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Sample records for adult human tissues

  1. Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokzijl, Francis; de Ligt, Joep; Jager, Myrthe; Sasselli, Valentina; Roerink, Sophie; Sasaki, Nobuo; Huch, Meritxell; Boymans, Sander; Kuijk, Ewart; Prins, Pjotr; Nijman, Isaac J.; Martincorena, Inigo; Mokry, Michal; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; Middendorp, Sabine; Sato, Toshiro; Schwank, Gerald; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Vries, Robert G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Stratton, Michael R.; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Ruben

    2016-10-01

    The gradual accumulation of genetic mutations in human adult stem cells (ASCs) during life is associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. Extreme variation in cancer risk across tissues was recently proposed to depend on the lifetime number of ASC divisions, owing to unavoidable random mutations that arise during DNA replication. However, the rates and patterns of mutations in normal ASCs remain unknown. Here we determine genome-wide mutation patterns in ASCs of the small intestine, colon and liver of human donors with ages ranging from 3 to 87 years by sequencing clonal organoid cultures derived from primary multipotent cells. Our results show that mutations accumulate steadily over time in all of the assessed tissue types, at a rate of approximately 40 novel mutations per year, despite the large variation in cancer incidence among these tissues. Liver ASCs, however, have different mutation spectra compared to those of the colon and small intestine. Mutational signature analysis reveals that this difference can be attributed to spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine residues in the colon and small intestine, probably reflecting their high ASC division rate. In liver, a signature with an as-yet-unknown underlying mechanism is predominant. Mutation spectra of driver genes in cancer show high similarity to the tissue-specific ASC mutation spectra, suggesting that intrinsic mutational processes in ASCs can initiate tumorigenesis. Notably, the inter-individual variation in mutation rate and spectra are low, suggesting tissue-specific activity of common mutational processes throughout life.

  2. Fourier analysis of human soft tissue facial shape: sex differences in normal adults.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Schmitz, J H; Miani, A; Taroni, G

    1995-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in human facial form involves both size and shape variations of the soft tissue structures. These variations are conventionally appreciated using linear and angular measurements, as well as ratios, taken from photographs or radiographs. Unfortunately this metric approach provides adequate quantitative information about size only, eluding the problems of shape definition. Mathematical methods such as the Fourier series allow a correct quantitative analysis of shape and of its changes. A method for the reconstruction of outlines starting from selected landmarks and for their Fourier analysis has been developed, and applied to analyse sex differences in shape of the soft tissue facial contour in a group of healthy young adults. When standardised for size, no sex differences were found between both cosine and sine coefficients of the Fourier series expansion. This shape similarity was largely overwhelmed by the very evident size differences and it could be measured only using the proper mathematical methods. PMID:8586558

  3. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  4. A mystery unraveled: nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells in human adult tissues

    PubMed Central

    Simerman, Ariel A; Perone, Marcelo J; Gimeno, María L; Dumesic, Daniel A; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have emerged as the gold standard of pluripotent stem cells and the class of stem cell with the highest potential for contribution to regenerative and therapeutic application; however, their translational use is often impeded by teratoma formation, commonly associated with pluripotency. We discuss a population of nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress Enduring (Muse) cells, which offer an innovative and exciting avenue of exploration for the potential treatment of various human diseases. Areas covered: This review discusses the origin of Muse cells, describes in detail their various unique characteristics, and considers future avenues of their application and investigation with respect to what is currently known of adult pluripotent stem cells in scientific literature. We begin by defining cell potency, then discuss both mesenchymal and various reported populations of pluripotent stem cells, and finally delve into Muse cells and the characteristics that set them apart from their contemporaries. Expert opinion: Muse cells derived from adipose tissue (Muse-AT) are efficiently, routinely and painlessly isolated from human lipoaspirate material, exhibit tripoblastic differentiation both spontaneously and under media-specific induction, and do not form teratomas. We describe qualities specific to Muse-AT cells and their potential impact on the field of regenerative medicine and cell therapy. PMID:24745973

  5. Isolation of pluripotent neural crest-derived stem cells from adult human tissues by connexin-43 enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Daniel; Huang, Chun-Yuh Charles; Cheung, Herman S

    2013-11-01

    Identification and isolation of pluripotent stem cells in adult tissues represent an important advancement in the fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. For several years, research has been performed on the identification of biomarkers that can isolate stem cells residing in neural crest (NC)-derived adult tissues. The NC is considered a good model in stem cell biology as cells from it migrate extensively and contribute to the formation of diverse tissues in the body during organogenesis. Migration of these cells is modulated, in part, by gap junction communication among the cell sheets. Here we present a study in which, selection of connexin 43 (Cx43) expressing cells from human adult periodontal ligament yields a novel pluripotent stem cell population. Cx43⁺ periodontal ligament stem cells express pluripotency-associated transcription factors OCT4, Nanog, and Sox2, as well as NC-specific markers Sox10, p75, and Nestin. When injected in vivo into an immunodeficient mouse model, these cells were capable of generating teratomas with tissues from the three embryological germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Furthermore, the cells formed mature structures of tissues normally arising from the NC during embryogenesis such as eccrine sweat glands of the human skin, muscle, neuronal tissues, cartilage, and bone. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the human origin of the neoplastic cells as well as the ectodermal and endodermal nature of some of the structures found in the tumors. These results suggest that Cx43 may be used as a biomarker to select and isolate the remnant NC pluripotent stem cells from adult human tissues arising from this embryological structure. The isolation of these cells through routine medical procedures such as wisdom teeth extraction further enhances their applicability to the regenerative medicine field.

  6. Ex-Vivo Tissues Engineering Modeling for Reconstructive Surgery Using Human Adult Adipose Stem Cells and Polymeric Nanostructured Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Morena, Francesco; Argentati, Chiara; Calzoni, Eleonora; Cordellini, Marino; Emiliani, Carla; D’Angelo, Francesco; Martino, Sabata

    2016-01-01

    The major challenge for stem cell translation regenerative medicine is the regeneration of damaged tissues by creating biological substitutes capable of recapitulating the missing function in the recipient host. Therefore, the current paradigm of tissue engineering strategies is the combination of a selected stem cell type, based on their capability to differentiate toward committed cell lineages, and a biomaterial, that, due to own characteristics (e.g., chemical, electric, mechanical property, nano-topography, and nanostructured molecular components), could serve as active scaffold to generate a bio-hybrid tissue/organ. Thus, effort has been made on the generation of in vitro tissue engineering modeling. Here, we present an in vitro model where human adipose stem cells isolated from lipoaspirate adipose tissue and breast adipose tissue, cultured on polymeric INTEGRA® Meshed Bilayer Wound Matrix (selected based on conventional clinical applications) are evaluated for their potential application for reconstructive surgery toward bone and adipose tissue. We demonstrated that human adipose stem cells isolated from lipoaspirate and breast tissue have similar stemness properties and are suitable for tissue engineering applications. Finally, the overall results highlighted lipoaspirate adipose tissue as a good source for the generation of adult adipose stem cells.

  7. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the (14)C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of (14)C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of (14)C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of (14)C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of (14)C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, (14)C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.

  8. Localisation of embryonic prealbumin in formalin-fixed human fetal and adult tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Gallon, M E; Reid, W A; McHardie, G A; Hardman, R; Smith, G D; Horne, C H; Kalashnikov, V V; Tatarinov, Y S

    1981-01-01

    The presence of embryonic prealbumin (EPA) has been confirmed in fetal fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and distal tubular epithelial cells by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. EPA has often been found also in the stromal cells of benign and malignant mesodermal tumours, but not in the epithelial cells of benign and malignant epithelial tumours. That EPA is not an exclusive product of neoplastic mesodermal cells is demonstrated by our finding of EPA in fibroblasts of granulation tissue, irradiated fibroblasts, and in distal tubular epithelial cells of miscellaneous adult kidneys. Images PMID:7021602

  9. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  10. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L F; Oomen, Pim J A; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Goumans, Marie-José T H; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  11. Effects of FGF-2 on human adipose tissue derived adult stem cells morphology and chondrogenesis enhancement in Transwell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiri, Azadeh; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Hashemibeni, Batool; Kazemi, Mohammad; Mardani, Mohammad; Esmaeili, Abolghasem

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated effects of FGF-2 on hADSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the level of gene expressions of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF-2 induces chondrogenesis in hADSCs, which Bullet Increasing information will decrease quality if hospital costs are very different. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result of this study may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering. -- Abstract: Injured cartilage is difficult to repair due to its poor vascularisation. Cell based therapies may serve as tools to more effectively regenerate defective cartilage. Both adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) are regarded as potential stem cell sources able to generate functional cartilage for cell transplantation. Growth factors, in particular the TGF-b superfamily, influence many processes during cartilage formation, including cell proliferation, extracellular matrix synthesis, maintenance of the differentiated phenotype, and induction of MSCs towards chondrogenesis. In the current study, we investigated the effects of FGF-2 on hADSC morphology and chondrogenesis in Transwell culture. hADSCs were obtained from patients undergoing elective surgery, and then cultured in expansion medium alone or in the presence of FGF-2 (10 ng/ml). mRNA expression levels of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The morphology, doubling time, trypsinization time and chondrogenesis of hADSCs were also studied. Expression levels of SOX-9, collagen type II, and aggrecan were all significantly increased in hADSCs expanded in presence of FGF-2. Furthermore FGF-2 induced a slender morphology, whereas doubling time and trypsinization time decreased. Our results suggest that FGF-2 induces hADSCs chondrogenesis in Transwell culture, which may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering.

  12. A method for high purity intestinal epithelial cell culture from adult human and murine tissues for the investigation of innate immune function.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christina L; Harden, Scott W; LaPato, Melissa; Nelson, Michael; Amador, Byron; Sorenson, Heather; Frazier, Charles J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serve as an important physiologic barrier between environmental antigens and the host intestinal immune system. Thus, IECs serve as a first line of defense and may act as sentinel cells during inflammatory insults. Despite recent renewed interest in IEC contributions to host immune function, the study of primary IEC has been hindered by lack of a robust culture technique, particularly for small intestinal and adult tissues. Here, a novel adaptation for culture of primary IEC is described for human duodenal organ donor tissue as well as duodenum and colon of adult mice. These epithelial cell cultures display characteristic phenotypes and are of high purity. In addition, the innate immune function of human primary IEC, specifically with regard to Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and microbial ligand responsiveness, is contrasted with a commonly used intestinal epithelial cell line (HT-29). Specifically, TLR expression at the mRNA level and production of cytokine (IFNγ and TNFα) in response to TLR agonist stimulation is assessed. Differential expression of TLRs as well as innate immune responses to ligand stimulation is observed in human-derived cultures compared to that of HT-29. Thus, use of this adapted method to culture primary epithelial cells from adult human donors and from adult mice will allow for more appropriate studies of IECs as innate immune effectors.

  13. Differences in compact bone tissue microscopic structure between adult humans (Homo sapiens) and Assam macaques (Macaca assamensis).

    PubMed

    Nganvongpanit, Korakot; Phatsara, Manussabhorn; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the osteon structure of adult humans and Assam macaques, which served as a nonhuman primate model, to find an adequate key for species identification. Samples of compact bone from humans (n=5) and Assam macaques (n=5) - including humerus (n=20), radius (n=20), ulna (n=20), femur (n=20), tibia (n=20) and fibula (n=20) - were processed using conventional histological techniques. 100 secondary osteons from each sample were evaluated under light microscopy. Parameter measurements included: diameter, perimeter and area of Haversian canal and osteon; distance between centers of Haversian canals; and ratio between diameter of Haversian canal and osteon. Four parameters, including diameters and areas of Haversian canal and osteon, demonstrated significantly higher (P<0.05) values in humans than in Assam macaques. Therefore, compact bone microstructure could thus be used as a potential tool to differentiate human and nonhuman primates.

  14. Tissue-resident Eomes(hi) T-bet(lo) CD56(bright) NK cells with reduced proinflammatory potential are enriched in the adult human liver.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Cathal; Robinson, Mark W; Fahey, Ronan; Whelan, Sarah; Houlihan, Diarmaid D; Geoghegan, Justin; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2016-09-01

    The adult human liver is enriched with natural killer (NK) cells, accounting for 30-50% of hepatic lymphocytes, which include tissue-resident hepatic NK-cell subpopulations, distinct from peripheral blood NK cells. In murine liver, a subset of liver-resident hepatic NK cells have altered expression of the two highly related T-box transcription factors, T-bet and eomesodermin (Eomes). Here, we investigate the heterogeneity of T-bet and Eomes expression in NK cells from healthy adult human liver with a view to identifying human liver-resident populations. Hepatic NK cells were isolated from donor liver perfusates and biopsies obtained during orthotopic liver transplantation (N = 28). Hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells were Eomes(hi) T-bet(lo) , a phenotype virtually absent from peripheral blood. These NK cells express the chemokine receptor CXCR6 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 6), a marker of tissue residency, which is absent from hepatic CD56(dim) and blood NK cells. Compared to blood populations, these hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells have increased expression of activatory receptors (NKp44, NKp46, and NKG2D). They show reduced ability to produce IFN-γ but enhanced degranulation in response to challenge with target cells. This functionally distinct population of hepatic NK cells constitutes 20-30% of the total hepatic lymphocyte repertoire and represents a tissue-resident immune cell population adapted to the tolerogenic liver microenvironment.

  15. Expressed sequence tag analysis of adult human optic nerve for NEIBank: Identification of cell type and tissue markers

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven L; Guo, Yan; Peterson, Katherine; Wistow, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Background The optic nerve is a pure white matter central nervous system (CNS) tract with an isolated blood supply, and is widely used in physiological studies of white matter response to various insults. We examined the gene expression profile of human optic nerve (ON) and, through the NEIBANK online resource, to provide a resource of sequenced verified cDNA clones. An un-normalized cDNA library was constructed from pooled human ON tissues and was used in expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis. Location of an abundant oligodendrocyte marker was examined by immunofluorescence. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western analysis were used to compare levels of expression for key calcium channel protein genes and protein product in primate and rodent ON. Results Our analyses revealed a profile similar in many respects to other white matter related tissues, but significantly different from previously available ON cDNA libraries. The previous libraries were found to include specific markers for other eye tissues, suggesting contamination. Immune/inflammatory markers were abundant in the new ON library. The oligodendrocyte marker QKI was abundant at the EST level. Immunofluorescence revealed that this protein is a useful oligodendrocyte cell-type marker in rodent and primate ONs. L-type calcium channel EST abundance was found to be particularly low. A qRT-PCR-based comparative mammalian species analysis reveals that L-type calcium channel expression levels are significantly lower in primate than in rodent ON, which may help account for the class-specific difference in responsiveness to calcium channel blocking agents. Several known eye disease genes are abundantly expressed in ON. Many genes associated with normal axonal function, mRNAs associated with axonal transport, inflammation and neuroprotection are observed. Conclusion We conclude that the new cDNA library is a faithful representation of human ON and EST data provide an initial overview

  16. The E3 ligase axotrophin/MARCH-7: protein expression profiling of human tissues reveals links to adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Szigyarto, Cristina A; Sibbons, Paul; Williams, Gill; Uhlen, Mathias; Metcalfe, Su M

    2010-04-01

    Axotrophin/MARCH-7 was first identified in mouse embryonic stem cells as a neural stem cell gene. Using the axotrophin/MARCH-7 null mouse, we discovered profound effects on T lymphocyte responses, including 8-fold hyperproliferation and 5-fold excess release of the stem cell cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Our further discovery that axotrophin/MARCH-7 is required for targeted degradation of the LIF receptor subunit gp190 implies a direct role in the regulation of LIF signaling. Bioinformatics studies revealed a highly conserved RING-CH domain in common with the MARCH family of E3-ubiquitin ligases, and accordingly, axotrophin was renamed "MARCH-7." To probe protein expression of human axotrophin/MARCH-7, we prepared antibodies against different domains of the protein. Each antibody bound its specific target epitope with high affinity, and immunohistochemistry cross-validated target specificity. Forty-eight human tissue types were screened. Epithelial cells stained strongly, with trophoblasts having the greatest staining. In certain tissues, specific cell types were selectively positive, including neurons and neuronal progenitor cells in the hippocampus and cerebellum, endothelial sinusoids of the spleen, megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, crypt stem cells of the small intestine, and alveolar macrophages in the lung. Approximately 20% of central nervous system neuropils were positive. Notably, axotrophin/MARCH-7 has an expression profile that is distinct from that of other MARCH family members. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials.

  17. Comparison of human adult stem cells from adipose tissue and bone marrow in the treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While administration of ex vivo culture-expanded stem cells has been used to study immunosuppressive mechanisms in multiple models of autoimmune diseases, less is known about the uncultured, nonexpanded stromal vascular fraction (SVF)-based therapy. The SVF is composed of a heterogeneous population of cells and has been used clinically to treat acute and chronic diseases, alleviating symptoms in a range of tissues and organs. Methods In this study, the ability of human SVF cells was compared with culture-expanded adipose stem cells (ASCs) and bone-derived marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as a treatment of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (35–55)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalitis in C57Bl/6J mice, a well-studied multiple sclerosis model (MS). A total of 1 × 106 BMSCs, ASCs, or SVF cells were administered intraperitoneally concomitantly with the induction of disease. Mice were monitored daily for clinical signs of disease by three independent, blinded investigators and rated on a scale of 0 to 5. Spinal cords were obtained after euthanasia at day 30 and processed for histological staining using luxol fast blue, toluidine blue, and hematoxylin and eosin to measure myelin and infiltrating immune cells. Blood was collected from mice at day 30 and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. Results The data indicate that intraperitoneal administration of all cell types significantly ameliorates the severity of disease. Furthermore, the data also demonstrate, for the first time, that the SVF was as effective as the more commonly cultured BMSCs and ASCs in an MS model. All cell therapies also demonstrated a similar reduction in tissue damage, inflammatory infiltrates, and sera levels of IFNγ and IL-12. While IFNγ levels were reduced to comparable levels between treatment groups, levels of IL-12 were significantly lower in SVF-treated than BMSC-treated or ASC-treated mice. Conclusions Based

  18. Enhanced propagation of adult human renal epithelial progenitor cells to improve cell sourcing for tissue-engineered therapeutic devices for renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Westover, Angela J; Buffington, Deborah A; Humes, H D

    2012-08-01

    Renal cell therapy employing cells derived from adult renal epithelial cell (REC) progenitors promises to reduce the morbidity of patients with renal insufficiency due to acute renal failure and end stage renal disease. To this end, tissue engineered devices addressing the neglected biologic component of renal replacement therapy are being developed. Because human donor tissue is limited, novel enhanced progenitor cell propagation (EP) techniques have been developed and applied to adult human kidney transplant discards from six donors. Changes include more efficient digestion and the amplification of progenitors prior to terminal epithelial differentiation promoted by contact inhibition and the addition of retinoic acid. Differentiated morphology in EP populations was demonstrated by the ability to form polarized epithelium with tight junctions, apical central cilia and expression of brush border membrane enzymes. Evaluation of lipopolysaccharide stimulated interleukin-8 secretion and γ-glutamyl transpeptisade activity in EP derived cells was used to confirm therapeutic equivalence to REC obtained using published techniques, which have previously shown efficacy in large animal models and clinical trials. Yield exceeded 10(16) cells/gram cortex from the only kidney obtained due to an anatomical defect, while the average yield from diseased kidneys ranged from 1.1 × 10(9) to 8.8 × 10(11) cells/gram cortex, representing an increase of more than 10 doublings over standard methods. Application of the EP protocol to REC expansion has solved the problem of cell sourcing as the limiting factor to the manufacture of cell based therapies targeting renal diseases and may provide a method for autologous device fabrication from core kidney biopsies.

  19. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  20. Human metapneumovirus in adults.

    PubMed

    Haas, Lenneke E M; Thijsen, Steven F T; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A

    2013-01-08

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination.

  1. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  2. The gene encoding the VP16-accessory protein HCF (HCFC1) resides in human Xq28 and is highly expressed in fetal tissues and the adult kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.C.; Herr, W.; Parrish, J.E.; Massa, H.F.

    1995-01-20

    After herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, the viral regulatory protein VP16 activates transcription of the HSV immediate-early promoters by directing complex formation with two cellular proteins, the POU-homeodomain transcription factor Oct-1 and the host cell factor HCF. The function of HCF in uninfected cells is unknown. Here we show by fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis that the gene encoding human HCF, HCFC1, maps to the q28 region of the X chromosome. Yeast artificial chromosome and cosmid mapping localizes the HCFC1 gene within 100 kb distal of the renal vasopressin type-2 receptor (V2R) gene and adjacent to the renin-binding protein gene (RENBP). The HCFC1 gene is apparently unique. HCF transcripts and protein are most abundant in fetal and placental tissues and cell lines, suggesting a role in cell proliferation. In adults, HCF protein is abundant in the kidney, but not in the brain, a site of latent HSV infection and where HCF levels may influence progression of HSV infection. 42 refs., 3 figs.

  3. How Somatic Adult Tissues Develop Organizer Activity.

    PubMed

    Vogg, Matthias C; Wenger, Yvan; Galliot, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The growth and patterning of anatomical structures from specific cellular fields in developing organisms relies on organizing centers that instruct surrounding cells to modify their behavior, namely migration, proliferation, and differentiation. We discuss here how organizers can form in adult organisms, a process of utmost interest for regenerative medicine. Animals like Hydra and planarians, which maintain their shape and fitness thanks to a highly dynamic homeostasis, offer a useful paradigm to study adult organizers in steady-state conditions. Beside the homeostatic context, these model systems also offer the possibility to study how organizers form de novo from somatic adult tissues. Both extracellular matrix remodeling and caspase activation play a key role in this transition, acting as promoters of organizer formation in the vicinity of the wound. Their respective roles and the crosstalk between them just start to be deciphered.

  4. Characterization of human tissue carnosinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lenney, J F; Peppers, S C; Kucera-Orallo, C M; George, R P

    1985-01-01

    Human tissue carnosinase (EC 3.4.13.3) had optimum activity at pH9.5 and was a cysteine peptidase, being activated by dithiothreitol and inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. By optimizing assay conditions, the activity per g of tissue was increased 10-fold compared with values in the literature. The enzyme was present in every human tissue assayed and was entirely different from serum carnosinase. Highly purified tissue carnosinase had a broader specificity than hog kidney carnosinase. Although tissue carnosinase was very strongly inhibited by bestatin, it did not hydrolyse tripeptides, and thus appears to be a dipeptidase rather than an aminopeptidase. It had a relative molecular mass of 90 000, an isoelectric point of 5.6, and a Km value of 10 mM-carnosine. Two forms of kidney and brain carnosinase were separated by high-resolution anion-exchange chromatography, although only one form was detected by various electrophoretic methods. Homocarnosinase and Mn2+-independent carnosinase were not detected in human tissues, although these enzymes are present in rat and hog kidney. PMID:4026801

  5. Angiogenic properties of adult human thymus fat.

    PubMed

    Salas, Julián; Montiel, Mercedes; Jiménez, Eugenio; Valenzuela, Miguel; Valderrama, José Francisco; Castillo, Rafael; González, Sergio; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2009-11-01

    The endogenous proangiogenic properties of adipose tissue are well recognized. Although the adult human thymus has long been known to degenerate into fat tissue, it has never been considered as a potential source of angiogenic factors. We have investigated the expression of diverse angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor A and B, angiopoietin 1, and tyrosine-protein kinase receptor-2 (an angiopoietin receptor), and then analyzed their physiological role on endothelial cell migration and proliferation, two relevant events in angiogenesis. The detection of the gene and protein expression of the various proteins has been performed by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We show, for the first time, that adult thymus fat produces a variety of angiogenic factors and induces the proliferation and migration of human umbilical cord endothelial cells. Based on these findings, we suggest that this fat has a potential angiogenic function that might affect thymic function and ongoing adipogenesis within the thymus.

  6. Tissue engineering a human phalanx.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J; Chubinskaya, S; Tokui, T; Wada, Y; Isogai, N; Jacquet, R

    2016-03-21

    A principal purpose of tissue engineering is the augmentation, repair or replacement of diseased or injured human tissue. This study was undertaken to determine whether human biopsies as a cell source could be utilized for successful engineering of human phalanges consisting of both bone and cartilage. This paper reports the use of cadaveric human chondrocytes and periosteum as a model for the development of phalanx constructs. Two factors, osteogenic protein-1 [OP-1/bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7)], alone or combined with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), were examined for their potential enhancement of chondrocytes and their secreted extracellular matrices. Design of the study included culture of chondrocytes and periosteum on biodegradable polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds and subsequent implantation in athymic nu/nu (nude) mice for 5, 20, 40 and 60 weeks. Engineered constructs retrieved from mice were characterized with regard to genotype and phenotype as a function of developmental (implantation) time. Assessments included gross observation, X-ray radiography or microcomputed tomography, histology and gene expression. The resulting data showed that human cell-scaffold constructs could be successfully developed over 60 weeks, despite variability in donor age. Cartilage formation of the distal phalanx models enhanced with both OP-1 and IGF-1 yielded more cells and extracellular matrix (collagen and proteoglycans) than control chondrocytes without added factors. Summary data demonstrated that human distal phalanx models utilizing cadaveric chondrocytes and periosteum were successfully fabricated and OP-1 and OP-1/IGF-1 accelerated construct development and mineralization. The results suggest that similar engineering and transplantation of human autologous tissues in patients are clinically feasible. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  9. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  10. General Information about Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  11. Stages of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  12. Ultrasonic assessment of facial soft tissue thicknesses in adult Egyptians.

    PubMed

    El-Mehallawi, I H; Soliman, E M

    2001-03-01

    The production of a three-dimensional plastic face on an unknown human skull has been practiced sporadically since the latter part of the last century. In recent years, the technique has been revived and applied to forensic science cases. The morphometric method of forensic facial reconstruction rests heavily on the use of facial soft tissue depth measurements. Moreover, it has been established that measurements made on the living are of more value than those made on the dead. In view of the well-known genetic complexities of the Egyptians, and the lack of knowledge of average facial soft tissue depths of the Egyptians that makes facial reconstruction questionable, it was decided to set up a table of norms for facial tissue thicknesses in 204 adult Egyptians aged 20-35 years. Tissue depths at 17 established landmarks (according to Aulsebrook et al. [Forensic Sci. Int. 79 (1996) 83]) were obtained using ultrasonic probing. The study revealed a unique spectrum of measurements for the Egyptians that might be useful for facial reconstruction purposes with obvious sexual dimorphism in facial soft tissue thickness. Additionally, the study provided evidence for the presence of interpopulation differences in average facial soft tissue thicknesses as evidenced from the comparison of the present data of Egyptians with those previously reported for some other populations.

  13. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  14. Microbiota of Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Urbaniak, Camilla; Cummins, Joanne; Brackstone, Muriel; Macklaim, Jean M.; Gloor, Gregory B.; Baban, Chwanrow K.; Scott, Leslie; O'Hanlon, Deidre M.; Burton, Jeremy P.; Francis, Kevin P.; Tangney, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a greater appreciation for the microbes inhabiting human body sites has emerged. In the female mammary gland, milk has been shown to contain bacterial species, ostensibly reaching the ducts from the skin. We decided to investigate whether there is a microbiome within the mammary tissue. Using 16S rRNA sequencing and culture, we analyzed breast tissue from 81 women with and without cancer in Canada and Ireland. A diverse population of bacteria was detected within tissue collected from sites all around the breast in women aged 18 to 90, not all of whom had a history of lactation. The principal phylum was Proteobacteria. The most abundant taxa in the Canadian samples were Bacillus (11.4%), Acinetobacter (10.0%), Enterobacteriaceae (8.3%), Pseudomonas (6.5%), Staphylococcus (6.5%), Propionibacterium (5.8%), Comamonadaceae (5.7%), Gammaproteobacteria (5.0%), and Prevotella (5.0%). In the Irish samples the most abundant taxa were Enterobacteriaceae (30.8%), Staphylococcus (12.7%), Listeria welshimeri (12.1%), Propionibacterium (10.1%), and Pseudomonas (5.3%). None of the subjects had signs or symptoms of infection, but the presence of viable bacteria was confirmed in some samples by culture. The extent to which these organisms play a role in health or disease remains to be determined. PMID:24610844

  15. Adult tissue sources for new β cells.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Robert J; New, Connie; Annes, Justin P

    2014-04-01

    The diabetes pandemic incurs extraordinary public health and financial costs that are projected to expand for the foreseeable future. Consequently, the development of definitive therapies for diabetes is a priority. Currently, a wide spectrum of therapeutic strategies-from implantable insulin delivery devices to transplantation-based cell replacement therapy, to β-cell regeneration-focus on replacing the lost insulin-producing capacity of individuals with diabetes. Among these, β-cell regeneration remains promising but heretofore unproved. Indeed, recent experimental work has uncovered surprising biology that underscores the potential therapeutic benefit of β-cell regeneration. These studies have elucidated a variety of sources for the endogenous production of new β cells from existing cells. First, β cells, long thought to be postmitotic, have demonstrated the potential for regenerative capacity. Second, the presence of pancreatic facultative endocrine progenitor cells has been established. Third, the malleability of cellular identity has availed the possibility of generating β cells from other differentiated cell types. Here, we review the exciting developments surrounding endogenous sources of β-cell production and consider the potential of realizing a regenerative therapy for diabetes from adult tissues.

  16. Brown adipose tissue as an anti-obesity tissue in humans.

    PubMed

    Chechi, K; Nedergaard, J; Richard, D

    2014-02-01

    During the 11th Stock Conference held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, world-leading experts came together to present and discuss recent developments made in the field of brown adipose tissue biology. Owing to the vast capacity of brown adipose tissue for burning food energy in the process of thermogenesis, and due to demonstrations of its presence in adult humans, there is tremendous interest in targeting brown adipose tissue as an anti-obesity tissue in humans. However, the future of such therapeutic approaches relies on our understanding of the origin, development, recruitment, activation and regulation of brown adipose tissue in humans. As reviewed here, the 11th Stock Conference was organized around these themes to discuss the recent progress made in each aspect, to identify gaps in our current understanding and to further provide a common groundwork that could support collaborative efforts aimed at a future therapy for obesity, based on brown adipose tissue thermogenesis.

  17. [Radiotherapy of adult soft tissue sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Moureau-Zabotto, L; Llacer, C; Ducassou, A; Sargos, P; Sunyach, M P; Thariat, J

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of soft tissue sarcoma is low and requires multidisciplinary treatment in specialized centers. The objective of this paper is to report the state of the art regarding indications and treatment techniques of main soft tissue sarcoma localisations.

  18. Adult human brain cell culture for neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Hannah M; Dragunow, Mike

    2010-06-01

    Studies of the brain have progressed enormously through the use of in vivo and in vitro non-human models. However, it is unlikely such studies alone will unravel the complexities of the human brain and so far no neuroprotective treatment developed in animals has worked in humans. In this review we discuss the use of adult human brain cell culture methods in brain research to unravel the biology of the normal and diseased human brain. The advantages of using adult human brain cells as tools to study human brain function from both historical and future perspectives are discussed. In particular, studies using dissociated cultures of adult human microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons are described and the applications of these types of study are evaluated. Alternative sources of human brain cells such as adult neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and slice cultures of adult human brain tissue are also reviewed. These adult human brain cell culture methods could benefit basic research and more importantly, facilitate the translation of basic neuroscience research to the clinic for the treatment of brain disorders.

  19. Uniquely hominid features of adult human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oberheim, Nancy Ann; Takano, Takahiro; Han, Xiaoning; He, Wei; Lin, Jane H C; Wang, Fushun; Xu, Qiwu; Wyatt, Jeffrey D; Pilcher, Webster; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Ransom, Bruce R; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2009-03-11

    Defining the microanatomic differences between the human brain and that of other mammals is key to understanding its unique computational power. Although much effort has been devoted to comparative studies of neurons, astrocytes have received far less attention. We report here that protoplasmic astrocytes in human neocortex are 2.6-fold larger in diameter and extend 10-fold more GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive primary processes than their rodent counterparts. In cortical slices prepared from acutely resected surgical tissue, protoplasmic astrocytes propagate Ca(2+) waves with a speed of 36 microm/s, approximately fourfold faster than rodent. Human astrocytes also transiently increase cystosolic Ca(2+) in response to glutamatergic and purinergic receptor agonists. The human neocortex also harbors several anatomically defined subclasses of astrocytes not represented in rodents. These include a population of astrocytes that reside in layers 5-6 and extend long fibers characterized by regularly spaced varicosities. Another specialized type of astrocyte, the interlaminar astrocyte, abundantly populates the superficial cortical layers and extends long processes without varicosities to cortical layers 3 and 4. Human fibrous astrocytes resemble their rodent counterpart but are larger in diameter. Thus, human cortical astrocytes are both larger, and structurally both more complex and more diverse, than those of rodents. On this basis, we posit that this astrocytic complexity has permitted the increased functional competence of the adult human brain.

  20. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  1. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  2. Human dignity and human tissue: a meaningful ethical relationship?

    PubMed

    Kirchhoffer, David G; Dierickx, Kris

    2011-09-01

    Human dignity has long been used as a foundational principle in policy documents and ethical guidelines intended to govern various forms of biomedical research. Despite the vast amount of literature concerning human dignity and embryonic tissues, the majority of biomedical research uses non-embryonic human tissue. Therefore, this contribution addresses a notable lacuna in the literature: the relationship, if any, between human dignity and human tissue. This paper first elaborates a multidimensional understanding of human dignity that overcomes many of the shortcomings associated with the use of human dignity in other ethical debates. Second, it discusses the relationship between such an understanding of human dignity and 'non-embryonic' human tissue. Finally, it considers the implications of this relationship for biomedical research and practice involving human tissue. The contribution demonstrates that while human tissue cannot be said to have human dignity, human dignity is nevertheless implicated by human tissue, making what is done with human tissue and how it is done worthy of moral consideration.

  3. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor...

  4. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  5. Adult human neurogenesis: from microscopy to magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nef quasispecies in pathological tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, B M; Epstein, L G; Saito, Y; Chen, D; Sharer, L R; Anand, R

    1992-01-01

    The role of the nef gene in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is poorly understood. To provide a basis for studies on the role of nef in AIDS, we used targeted polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA sequencing to determine the structure of nef genes in pathologic tissue from HIV-1-infected children and adults. We find that the nef reading frame is open in 92% of clones derived from both brain and lymphocytic tissue of children, suggesting that nef is expressed in these tissues. One HIV-1 clone, BRVA, obtained by coculture from the brain of an adult AIDS patient with progressive dementia, was previously shown to contain a duplicated region in nef. We show here that similar duplications are widespread in both adults and children with AIDS. However, coculture strongly selects against the broad spectrum of nef quasispecies found in tissue. These findings suggest functional selection for nef quasispecies in pathologic tissues during HIV-1 infection of the human host. Images PMID:1501274

  7. Humanized mice and tissue transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Laurie L; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular pathways that control immune responses, particularly immunomodulatory molecules that control the extent and duration of an immune response, have led to new approaches in the field of transplantation immunology to induce allograft survival. These molecular pathways are being defined precisely in murine models, and are now being translated into clinical practice. However, many of the newly available drugs are human-specific reagents and furthermore, there exist many species-specific differences between mouse and human immune systems. Recent advances in the development of humanized mice, i.e., immunodeficient mice engrafted with functional human immune systems, have led to the availability of a small animal model for the study of human immune responses. Humanized mice represent an important pre-clinical model system for evaluation of new drugs as well as identification of the mechanisms underlying human allograft rejection without putting patients at risk. This review highlights recent advances in the development of humanized mice and their use as pre-clinical models for the study of human allograft responses. PMID:26588186

  8. Tissue Specificity of Human Disease Module

    PubMed Central

    Kitsak, Maksim; Sharma, Amitabh; Menche, Jörg; Guney, Emre; Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    Genes carrying mutations associated with genetic diseases are present in all human cells; yet, clinical manifestations of genetic diseases are usually highly tissue-specific. Although some disease genes are expressed only in selected tissues, the expression patterns of disease genes alone cannot explain the observed tissue specificity of human diseases. Here we hypothesize that for a disease to manifest itself in a particular tissue, a whole functional subnetwork of genes (disease module) needs to be expressed in that tissue. Driven by this hypothesis, we conducted a systematic study of the expression patterns of disease genes within the human interactome. We find that genes expressed in a specific tissue tend to be localized in the same neighborhood of the interactome. By contrast, genes expressed in different tissues are segregated in distinct network neighborhoods. Most important, we show that it is the integrity and the completeness of the expression of the disease module that determines disease manifestation in selected tissues. This approach allows us to construct a disease-tissue network that confirms known and predicts unexpected disease-tissue associations. PMID:27748412

  9. Large-scale discovery of enhancers from human heart tissue.

    PubMed

    May, Dalit; Blow, Matthew J; Kaplan, Tommy; McCulley, David J; Jensen, Brian C; Akiyama, Jennifer A; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Afzal, Veena; Simpson, Paul C; Rubin, Edward M; Black, Brian L; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A; Visel, Axel

    2011-12-04

    Development and function of the human heart depend on the dynamic control of tissue-specific gene expression by distant-acting transcriptional enhancers. To generate an accurate genome-wide map of human heart enhancers, we used an epigenomic enhancer discovery approach and identified ∼6,200 candidate enhancer sequences directly from fetal and adult human heart tissue. Consistent with their predicted function, these elements were markedly enriched near genes implicated in heart development, function and disease. To further validate their in vivo enhancer activity, we tested 65 of these human sequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay and observed that 43 (66%) drove reproducible reporter gene expression in the heart. These results support the discovery of a genome-wide set of noncoding sequences highly enriched in human heart enhancers that is likely to facilitate downstream studies of the role of enhancers in development and pathological conditions of the heart.

  10. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  11. NCI’s Cooperative Human Tissue Network

    Cancer.gov

    Quality biospecimens are a foundational resource for cancer research. One of NCI’s longest running biospecimen programs is the Cooperative Human Tissue Network, a resource mainly for basic discovery and early translational research.

  12. Melanin content of hamster tissues, human tissues, and various melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.P.; Fairchild, R.G.; Slatkin, D.N.; Greenberg, D.; Packer, S.; Atkins, H.L.; Hannon, S.J.

    1981-02-01

    Melanin content (percentage by weight) was determined in both pigmented and nonpigmented tissues of Syrian golden hamsters bearing Greene melanoma. Melanin content was also measured in various other melanoma models (B-16 in C57 mice, Harding-Passey in BALB/c mice, and KHDD in C3H mice) and in nine human melanomas, as well as in selected normal tissues. The purpose was to evaluate the possible efficacy of chlorpromazine, which is known to bind to melanin, as a vehicle for boron transport in neutron capture therapy. Successful therapy would depend upon selective uptake and absolute concentration of borated compounds in tumors; these parameters will in turn depend upon melanin concentration in melanomas and nonpigmented ''background'' tissues. Hamster whole eyes, hamster melanomas, and other well-pigmented animal melanomas were found to contain 0.3 to 0.8% melanin by weight, whereas human melanomas varied from 0.1 to 0.9% (average, 0.35%). Other tissues, with the exception of skin, were lower in content by a factor of greater than or equal to30. Melanin pigment was extracted from tissues, and the melanin content was determined spectrophotometrically. Measurements were found to be sensitive to the presence of other proteins. Previous procedures for isolating and quantifying melanin often neglected the importance of removing proteins and other interfering nonmelanic substances.

  13. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  14. Hormone Receptor Expression in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; De Caro, R.

    2016-01-01

    Many epidemiologic, clinical, and experimental findings point to sex differences in myofascial pain in view of the fact that adult women tend to have more myofascial problems with respect to men. It is possible that one of the stimuli to sensitization of fascial nociceptors could come from hormonal factors such as estrogen and relaxin, that are involved in extracellular matrix and collagen remodeling and thus contribute to functions of myofascial tissue. Immunohistochemical and molecular investigations (real-time PCR analysis) of relaxin receptor 1 (RXFP1) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) localization were carried out on samples of human fascia collected from 8 volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery (all females, between 42 and 70 yrs, divided into pre- and post-menopausal groups), and in fibroblasts isolated from deep fascia, to examine both protein and RNA expression levels. We can assume that the two sex hormone receptors analyzed are expressed in all the human fascial districts examined and in fascial fibroblasts culture cells, to a lesser degree in the post-menopausal with respect to the pre-menopausal women. Hormone receptor expression was concentrated in the fibroblasts, and RXFP1 was also evident in blood vessels and nerves. Our results are the first demonstrating that the fibroblasts located within different districts of the muscular fasciae express sex hormone receptors and can help to explain the link between hormonal factors and myofascial pain. It is known, in fact, that estrogen and relaxin play a key role in extracellular matrix remodeling by inhibiting fibrosis and inflammatory activities, both important factors affecting fascial stiffness and sensitization of fascial nociceptors. PMID:28076930

  15. Tissue adaptations to gravitational stress - Newborn versus adult giraffes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R; Gershuni, David H.; Danzig, Larry A.; Millard, Ronald W.; Pettersson, Knut

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results on developmental alterations in load-bearing tissues of newborn and adult giraffes are presented. Attention is focused on vascular wall thickness in relation to local blood pressure, and on meniscal adaptations to increased load bearing in the developing giraffe. It is believed that the developing giraffe provides an excellent model for investigations of adaptive mechanisms of increased weight bearing.

  16. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  17. Human histocultures (tissue explants) in retrovirology

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses’ diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues and cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Human histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervico-vaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a pre-clinical platform for antivirals evaluation. PMID:24158827

  18. Brown adipose tissue in humans: therapeutic potential to combat obesity.

    PubMed

    Carey, Andrew L; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2013-10-01

    Harnessing the considerable capacity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to consume energy was first proposed as a potential target to control obesity nearly 40years ago. The plausibility of this approach was, however, questioned due to the prevailing view that BAT was either not present or not functional in adult humans. Recent definitive identification of functional BAT in adult humans as well as a number of important advances in the understanding of BAT biology has reignited interest in BAT as an anti-obesity target. Proof-of-concept evidence demonstrating drug-induced BAT activation provides an important foundation for development of targeted pharmacological approaches with clinical application. This review considers evidence from both human and relevant animal studies to determine whether harnessing BAT for the treatment of obesity via pharmacological intervention is a realistic goal.

  19. Accumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Francisca; Nadal, Martí; Navarro-Ortega, Alícia; Fàbrega, Francesc; Domingo, José L; Barceló, Damià; Farré, Marinella

    2013-09-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are environmental pollutants with an important bioaccumulation potential. However, their metabolism and distribution in humans are not well studied. In this study, the concentrations of 21 PFASs were analyzed in 99 samples of autopsy tissues (brain, liver, lung, bone, and kidney) from subjects who had been living in Tarragona (Catalonia, Spain). The samples were analyzed by solvent extraction and online purification by turbulent flow and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The occurrence of PFASs was confirmed in all human tissues. Although PFASs accumulation followed particular trends depending on the specific tissue, some similarities were found. In kidney and lung, perfluorobutanoic acid was the most frequent compound, and at highest concentrations (median values: 263 and 807ng/g in kidney and lung, respectively). In liver and brain, perfluorohexanoic acid showed the maximum levels (median: 68.3 and 141ng/g, respectively), while perfluorooctanoic acid was the most contributively in bone (median: 20.9ng/g). Lung tissues accumulated the highest concentration of PFASs. However, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and perfluorooctanoic acid were more prevalent in liver and bone, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the accumulation of different PFASs in samples of various human tissues from the same subjects is here reported for the very first time. The current results may be of high importance for the validation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, which are being developed for humans. However, further studies on the distribution of the same compounds in the human body are still required.

  20. A novel SCID mouse model for studying spontaneous metastasis of human lung cancer to human tissue.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Seyama, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-05-01

    We established a novel severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model for the study of human lung cancer metastasis to human lung. Implantation of both human fetal and adult lung tissue into mammary fat pads of SCID mice showed a 100% rate of engraftment, but only fetal lung implants revealed normal morphology of human lung tissue. Using these chimeric mice, we analyzed human lung cancer metastasis to both mouse and human lungs by subcutaneous inoculation of human squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cell lines into the mice. In 60 to 70% of SCID mice injected with human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma, RERF-LC-AI, cancer cells were found to have metastasized to both mouse lungs and human fetal lung implants but not to human adult lung implants 80 days after cancer inoculation. Furthermore, human-lung adenocarcinoma cells, RERF-LC-KJ, metastasized to the human lung implants within 90 days in about 40% of SCID mice, whereas there were no metastases to the lungs of the mice. These results demonstrate the potential of this model for the in vivo study of human lung cancer metastasis.

  1. Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice A; Thomas, David K; Ong, Luvena L; Schwartz, Robert E; Golub, Todd R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2011-07-19

    "Humanized" mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury but these methods have not gained widespread use due to the duration and variability of hepatocyte repopulation. In light of the significant progress that has been achieved in clinical cell transplantation through tissue engineering, we sought to develop a humanized mouse model based on the facile and ectopic implantation of a tissue-engineered human liver. These human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs) stabilize the function of cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes through juxtacrine and paracrine signals in polymeric scaffolds. In contrast to current methods, HEALs can be efficiently established in immunocompetent mice with normal liver function. Mice transplanted with HEALs exhibit humanized liver functions persistent for weeks, including synthesis of human proteins, human drug metabolism, drug-drug interaction, and drug-induced liver injury. Here, mice with HEALs are used to predict the disproportionate metabolism and toxicity of "major" human metabolites using multiple routes of administration and monitoring. These advances may enable manufacturing of reproducible in vivo models for diverse drug development and research applications.

  2. In Vitro Spermatogenesis in Explanted Adult Mouse Testis Tissues.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takuya; Katagiri, Kumiko; Kojima, Kazuaki; Komeya, Mitsuru; Yao, Masahiro; Ogawa, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Research on in vitro spermatogenesis is important for elucidating the spermatogenic mechanism. We previously developed an organ culture method which can support spermatogenesis from spermatogonial stem cells up to sperm formation using immature mouse testis tissues. In this study, we examined whether it is also applicable to mature testis tissues of adult mice. We used two lines of transgenic mice, Acrosin-GFP and Gsg2-GFP, which carry the marker GFP gene specific for meiotic and haploid cells, respectively. Testis tissue fragments of adult GFP mice, aged from 4 to 29 weeks old, which express GFP at full extension, were cultured in medium supplemented with 10% KSR or AlbuMAX. GFP expression decreased rapidly and became the lowest at 7 to 14 days of culture, but then slightly increased during the following culture period. This increase reflected de novo spermatogenesis, confirmed by BrdU labeling in spermatocytes and spermatids. We also used vitamin A-deficient mice, whose testes contain only spermatogonia. The testes of those mice at 13-21 weeks old, showing no GFP expression at explantation, gained GFP expression during culturing, and spermatogenesis was confirmed histologically. In addition, the adult testis tissues of Sl/Sld mutant mice, which lack spermatogenesis due to Kit ligand mutation, were cultured with recombinant Kit ligand to induce spermatogenesis up to haploid formation. Although the efficiency of spermatogenesis was lower than that of pup, present results showed that the organ culture method is effective for the culturing of mature adult mouse testis tissue, demonstrated by the induction of spermatogenesis from spermatogonia to haploid cells.

  3. Asymptomatic and isolated accessory mitral valve tissue in an adult.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Kazuki; Hashizume, Koji; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Miura, Takashi; Matsukuma, Seiji; Yokose, Shogo; Sumi, Mizuki; Eishi, Kiyoyuki

    2016-02-01

    Accessory mitral valve (AMV) tissue is a congenital anomaly that occurs in association with other congenital anomalies, and is an uncommon cause of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. It is usually detected in early childhood when accompanied by symptoms of obstruction of the left ventricular outflow tract, and is rarely diagnosed in adults. We present a case of a 53-year-old man who was referred to our institution for evaluation of a systolic heart murmur. Echocardiography disclosed a diagnosis of AMV tissue. This case was uncommon because of the lack of severe obstruction of left ventricular outflow, cardiac symptoms, or other cardiac anomalies. We were able to carry out surgical resection of AMV tissue to avert possible progression of aortic insufficiency and the risk of a cerebrovascular embolization. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative echocardiography showed no residual accessory mitral tissue.

  4. Wound healing in a fetal, adult, and scar tissue model: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Neeltje A; Schouten, Kelly C W M; Boekema, Bouke K H L; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M W

    2010-01-01

    Early gestation fetal wounds heal without scar formation. Understanding the mechanism of this scarless healing may lead to new therapeutic strategies for improving adult wound healing. The aims of this study were to develop a human fetal wound model in which fetal healing can be studied and to compare this model with a human adult and scar tissue model. A burn wound (10 x 2 mm) was made in human ex vivo fetal, adult, and scar tissue under controlled and standardized conditions. Subsequently, the skin samples were cultured for 7, 14, and 21 days. Cells in the skin samples maintained their viability during the 21-day culture period. Already after 7 days, a significantly higher median percentage of wound closure was achieved in the fetal skin model vs. the adult and scar tissue model (74% vs. 28 and 29%, respectively, p<0.05). After 21 days of culture, only fetal wounds were completely reepithelialized. Fibroblasts migrated into the wounded dermis of all three wound models during culture, but more fibroblasts were present earlier in the wound area of the fetal skin model. The fast reepithelialization and prompt presence of many fibroblasts in the fetal model suggest that rapid healing might play a role in scarless healing.

  5. Tissue migration capability of larval and adult Brugia pahangi.

    PubMed

    Chirgwin, Sharon R; Coleman, Sharon U; Porthouse, Kristina H; Klei, Thomas R

    2006-02-01

    Infection with mosquito-born filarial nematodes occurs when hosts are bitten by a vector carrying the infective third stage larvae (L3) of the parasites. These larvae, deposited on the skin by the feeding mosquito, are presumed to enter the skin via the vector-induced puncture wound. Larvae of Brugia spp. must then migrate from the entry site, penetrate various skin layers, and locate a lymphatic vessel that leads to their lymphatic predilection site. We have recently established an intradermal (ID) infection model using B. pahangi and the Mongolian gerbil, allowing us to investigate the migratory capability ofB. pahangi. Larval and adult parasites recovered from the peritoneal cavities of gerbils were capable of establishing an infection following ID (larvae) or subcutaneous (adult) injection. Third and fourth stage larvae both migrated away from the injection site within hours, although data suggest they localize to different lymphatic tissues at 3 days postinfection (DPI). Immature adult (28 day) B. pahangi also migrated away from their SC inoculation site within 7 DPI. Mature (45 day) adult B. pahangi displayed little migration away from the SC infection site, suggesting tissue migration may be limited to developing stages of the parasite.

  6. Great promise of tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells in transplantation and cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cell research has inspired great interest because these immature cells from your own body can act as potential, easily accessible cell sources for cell transplantation in regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. The use of adult stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal ability and multilineage differentiation potential, which are able to regenerate all the mature cells in the tissues from their origin, offers great promise in replacing non-functioning or lost cells and regenerating diseased and damaged tissues. The presence of a small subpopulation of adult stem/progenitor cells in most tissues and organs provides the possibility of stimulating their in vivo differentiation, or of using their ex vivo expanded progenies for cell-replacement and gene therapies with multiple applications in humans without a high-risk of graft rejection and major side effects. Among the diseases that could be treated by adult stem cell-based therapies are hematopoietic and immune disorders, multiple degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, Types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus as well as skin, eye, liver, lung, tooth and cardiovascular disorders. In addition, a combination of the current cancer treatments with an adjuvant treatment consisting of an autologous or allogeneic adult stem/progenitor cell transplantation also represents a promising strategy for treating and even curing diverse aggressive, metastatic, recurrent and lethal cancers. In this chapter, we reviewed the most recent advancements on the characterization of phenotypic and functional properties of adult stem/progenitor cell types found in bone marrow, heart, brain and other tissues and discussed their therapeutic implications in the stem cell-based transplantation therapy.

  7. Frequency domain optical tomography in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuqi; Wang, Yao; Pei, Yaling; Zhu, Wenwu; Hu, Jenhun; Barbour, Randall L.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, a reconstruction algorithm for frequency-domain optical tomography in human tissue is presented. A fast and efficient multigrid finite difference (MGFD) method is adopted as a forward solver to obtain the simulated detector responses and the required imaging operator. The solutions obtained form MGFD method for 3D problems with weakly discontinuous cocoefficients are compared with analyzed solutions to determine the accuracy of the numerical method. Simultaneous reconstruction of both absorption and scattering coefficients for tissue-like media is accomplished by solving a perturbation equation using the Born approximation. This solution is obtained by a conjugate gradient descent method with Tikhonov regularization. Two examples are given to show the quality of the reconstruction results. Both involve the examination of anatomically accurate optical models of tissue derived from segmented 3D magnetic resonance images to which have been assigned optical coefficients to the designated tissue types. One is a map of a female breast containing two small 'added pathologies', such as tumors. The other is a map of the brain containing a 'local bleeding' area, representing a hemorrhage. The reconstruction results show that the algorithm is computationally practical and can yield qualitatively correct geometry of the objects embedded in the simulated human tissue. Acceptable results are obtaiend even when 10% noise is present in the data.

  8. Injury Response of Resected Human Brain Tissue In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Verwer, Ronald W H; Sluiter, Arja A; Balesar, Rawien A; Baaijen, Johannes C; de Witt Hamer, Philip C; Speijer, Dave; Li, Yichen; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury affects a significant number of people each year. Organotypic cultures from resected normal neocortical tissue provide unique opportunities to study the cellular and neuropathological consequences of severe injury of adult human brain tissue in vitro. The in vitro injuries caused by resection (interruption of the circulation) and aggravated by the preparation of slices (severed neuronal and glial processes and blood vessels) reflect the reaction of human brain tissue to severe injury. We investigated this process using immunocytochemical markers, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Essential features were rapid shrinkage of neurons, loss of neuronal marker expression and proliferation of reactive cells that expressed Nestin and Vimentin. Also, microglia generally responded strongly, whereas the response of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes appeared to be more variable. Importantly, some reactive cells also expressed both microglia and astrocytic markers, thus confounding their origin. Comparison with post-mortem human brain tissue obtained at rapid autopsies suggested that the reactive process is not a consequence of epilepsy.

  9. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vineet; Johnson, Scott A; Reing, Janet; Zhang, Li; Tottey, Stephen; Wang, Gang; Hirschi, Karen K; Braunhut, Susan; Gudas, Lorraine J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2010-02-23

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor and stem cells to a site of injury. Bioactive molecules resulting from degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor and stem cells in vitro in adult mammals. The ability to recruit multipotential cells to the site of injury by in vivo administration of chemotactic ECM degradation products in a mammalian model of digit amputation was investigated in the present study. Adult, 6- to 8-week-old C57/BL6 mice were subjected to midsecond phalanx amputation of the third digit of the right hind foot and either treated with chemotactic ECM degradation products or left untreated. At 14 days after amputation, mice treated with ECM degradation products showed an accumulation of heterogeneous cells that expressed markers of multipotency, including Sox2, Sca1, and Rex1 (Zfp42). Cells isolated from the site of amputation were capable of differentiation along neuroectodermal and mesodermal lineages, whereas cells isolated from control mice were capable of differentiation along only mesodermal lineages. The present findings demonstrate the recruitment of endogenous stem cells to a site of injury, and/or their generation/proliferation therein, in response to ECM degradation products.

  10. KeyGenes, a Tool to Probe Tissue Differentiation Using a Human Fetal Transcriptional Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Roost, Matthias S.; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Buermans, Henk P.; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Devalla, Harsha D.; Passier, Robert; Mummery, Christine L.; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J.P.; van Zwet, Erik W.; Goeman, Jelle J.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Differentiated derivatives of human pluripotent stem cells in culture are generally phenotypically immature compared to their adult counterparts. Their identity is often difficult to determine with certainty because little is known about their human fetal equivalents in vivo. Cellular identity and signaling pathways directing differentiation are usually determined by extrapolating information from either human adult tissue or model organisms, assuming conservation with humans. To resolve this, we generated a collection of human fetal transcriptional profiles at different developmental stages. Moreover, we developed an algorithm, KeyGenes, which uses this dataset to quantify the extent to which next-generation sequencing or microarray data resemble specific cell or tissue types in the human fetus. Using KeyGenes combined with the human fetal atlas, we identified multiple cell and tissue samples unambiguously on a limited set of features. We thus provide a flexible and expandable platform to monitor and evaluate the efficiency of differentiation in vitro. PMID:26028532

  11. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-21

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  12. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  13. Brown adipose tissue as a therapeutic target for human obesity.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masayuki

    2013-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the major site of sympathetically activated adaptive thermogenesis during cold exposure and after spontaneous hyperphagia, thereby controlling whole-body energy expenditure and body fat. Recent radionuclide studies have demonstrated the existence of metabolically active BAT in healthy adult humans. Human BAT is activated by acute cold exposure, being positively correlated to cold-induced increases in energy expenditure. The metabolic activity of BAT is lower in older and obese individuals. The inverse relationship between the BAT activity and body fatness suggests that BAT, because of its energy dissipating activity, is protective against body fat accumulation. In fact, either repeated cold exposure or daily ingestion of some food ingredients acting on transient receptor potential channels recruited BAT in association with increased energy expenditure and decreased body fat even in individuals with low BAT activities before the treatment. Thus, BAT is a promising therapeutic target for combating human obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  14. Human brown adipose tissue: regulation and anti-obesity potential.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the site of sympathetically activated adaptive thermognenesis during cold exposure and after hyperphagia, thereby controlling whole-body energy expenditure (EE) and body fat. Radionuclide imaging studies have demonstrated that adult humans have metabolically active BAT composed of mainly beige/brite adipocytes, recently identified brown-like adipocytes. The inverse relationship between the BAT activity and body fatness suggests that BAT is, because of its energy dissipating activity, protective against body fat accumulation in humans as it is in small rodents. In fact, either repeated cold exposure or daily ingestion of some food ingredients acting on transient receptor potential channels recruits BAT in parallel with increased EE and decreased body fat. In addition to the sympathetic nervous system, several endocrine factors are also shown to recruit BAT. Thus, BAT is a promising therapeutic target for combating human obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  15. mRNA Quantification of NIPBL Isoforms A and B in Adult and Fetal Human Tissues, and a Potentially Pathological Variant Affecting Only Isoform A in Two Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Puisac, Beatriz; Teresa-Rodrigo, María-Esperanza; Hernández-Marcos, María; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Gil-Rodríguez, María-Concepción; Visnes, Torkild; Bot, Christopher; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Kaiser, Frank J.; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Ström, Lena; Pié, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by craniofacial dysmorphia, growth retardation, limb malformations, and intellectual disability. Approximately 60% of patients with CdLS carry a recognizable pathological variant in the NIPBL gene, of which two isoforms, A and B, have been identified, and which only differ in the C-terminal segment. In this work, we describe the distribution pattern of the isoforms A and B mRNAs in tissues of adult and fetal origin, by qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction). Our results show a higher gene expression of the isoform A, even though both seem to have the same tissue distribution. Interestingly, the expression in fetal tissues is higher than that of adults, especially in brain and skeletal muscle. Curiously, the study of fibroblasts of two siblings with a mild CdLS phenotype and a pathological variant specific of the isoform A of NIPBL (c.8387A > G; P.Tyr2796Cys), showed a similar reduction in both isoforms, and a normal sensitivity to DNA damage. Overall, these results suggest that the position of the pathological variant at the 3´ end of the NIPBL gene affecting only isoform A, is likely to be the cause of the atypical mild phenotype of the two brothers. PMID:28241484

  16. mRNA Quantification of NIPBL Isoforms A and B in Adult and Fetal Human Tissues, and a Potentially Pathological Variant Affecting Only Isoform A in Two Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Puisac, Beatriz; Teresa-Rodrigo, María-Esperanza; Hernández-Marcos, María; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Gil-Rodríguez, María-Concepción; Visnes, Torkild; Bot, Christopher; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Kaiser, Frank J; Ramos, Feliciano J; Ström, Lena; Pié, Juan

    2017-02-23

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by craniofacial dysmorphia, growth retardation, limb malformations, and intellectual disability. Approximately 60% of patients with CdLS carry a recognizable pathological variant in the NIPBL gene, of which two isoforms, A and B, have been identified, and which only differ in the C-terminal segment. In this work, we describe the distribution pattern of the isoforms A and B mRNAs in tissues of adult and fetal origin, by qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction). Our results show a higher gene expression of the isoform A, even though both seem to have the same tissue distribution. Interestingly, the expression in fetal tissues is higher than that of adults, especially in brain and skeletal muscle. Curiously, the study of fibroblasts of two siblings with a mild CdLS phenotype and a pathological variant specific of the isoform A of NIPBL (c.8387A > G; P.Tyr2796Cys), showed a similar reduction in both isoforms, and a normal sensitivity to DNA damage. Overall, these results suggest that the position of the pathological variant at the 3´ end of the NIPBL gene affecting only isoform A, is likely to be the cause of the atypical mild phenotype of the two brothers.

  17. Two types of brown adipose tissue in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Enerbäck, Sven

    2014-01-01

    During the last years the existence of metabolically active brown adipose tissue in adult humans has been widely accepted by the research community. Its unique ability to dissipate chemical energy stored in triglycerides as heat makes it an attractive target for new drugs against obesity and its related diseases. Hence the tissue is now subject to intense research, the hypothesis being that an expansion and/or activation of the tissue is associated with a healthy metabolic phenotype. Animal studies provide evidence for the existence of at least two types of brown adipocytes. Apart from the classical brown adipocyte that is found primarily in the interscapular region where it constitutes a thermogenic organ, a second type of brown adipocyte, the so-called beige adipocyte, can appear within white adipose tissue depots. The fact that the two cell types develop from different precursors suggests that they might be recruited and stimulated by different cues and therefore represent two distinct targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this commentary is to discuss recent work addressing the question whether also humans possess two types of brown adipocytes and to highlight some issues when looking for molecular markers for such cells. PMID:24575372

  18. Soft tissues store and return mechanical energy in human running.

    PubMed

    Riddick, R C; Kuo, A D

    2016-02-08

    During human running, softer parts of the body may deform under load and dissipate mechanical energy. Although tissues such as the heel pad have been characterized individually, the aggregate work performed by all soft tissues during running is unknown. We therefore estimated the work performed by soft tissues (N=8 healthy adults) at running speeds ranging 2-5 m s(-1), computed as the difference between joint work performed on rigid segments, and whole-body estimates of work performed on the (non-rigid) body center of mass (COM) and peripheral to the COM. Soft tissues performed aggregate negative work, with magnitude increasing linearly with speed. The amount was about -19 J per stance phase at a nominal 3 m s(-1), accounting for more than 25% of stance phase negative work performed by the entire body. Fluctuations in soft tissue mechanical power over time resembled a damped oscillation starting at ground contact, with peak negative power comparable to that for the knee joint (about -500 W). Even the positive work from soft tissue rebound was significant, about 13 J per stance phase (about 17% of the positive work of the entire body). Assuming that the net dissipative work is offset by an equal amount of active, positive muscle work performed at 25% efficiency, soft tissue dissipation could account for about 29% of the net metabolic expenditure for running at 5 m s(-1). During running, soft tissue deformations dissipate mechanical energy that must be offset by active muscle work at non-negligible metabolic cost.

  19. UWB pulse propagation into human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, Marta; Pittella, Erika; Pisa, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    In this paper the propagation of a UWB pulse into a layered model of the human body is studied to characterize absorption and reflection of the UWB signal due to the different body tissues. Several time behaviours for the incident UWB pulse are considered and compared with reference to the feasibility of breath and heartbeat activity monitoring. Results show that if the UWB source is placed far from the human body, the reflection coming from the interface between air and skin can be used to detect the respiratory activity. On the contrary, if the UWB source is placed close to the human body, a small reflection due to the interface between the posterior lung wall and the bone, which is well distanced in time from the reflections due to the first layers of the body model, can be used to detect lung and heart changes associated with the cardio-respiratory activity.

  20. Sorption studies of human keratinized tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, G. K.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, Sverre

    2010-04-01

    Water content is known to be the most important single parameter for keratinized tissue to remain its vital functions. In that sense, a general knowledge of the water binding properties is of great interest, and a reliable measurement setup must be found. Also, revealing the sorption properties of human keratinized tissues is vital towards a calibration of susceptance based skin hydration measurements that already is an important diagnostic tool in clinical dermatology, and we will see that any hysteresis will complicate such a calibration further. In this study we investigated the sorption properties of keratinized tissues such as human epidermal stratum corneum (SC), hair and nail. The study was performed under controlled environmental conditions with a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) instrument, and the water uptake of the keratinized test samples was measured as the relative humidity in the ambient air was altered step-wisely. In this study, vital and characteristic water sorption properties such as the isotherm, relative water uptake, and hysteresis were investigated and will be discussed.

  1. Cardiomyocyte clusters derived from human embryonic stem cells share similarities with human heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Asp, Julia; Steel, Daniella; Jonsson, Marianne; Améen, Caroline; Dahlenborg, Kerstin; Jeppsson, Anders; Lindahl, Anders; Sartipy, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Cardiotoxicity testing is a key activity in the pharmaceutical industry in order to detect detrimental effects of new drugs. A reliable human in vitro model would both be beneficial in selection of lead compounds and be important for reducing animal experimentation. However, the human heart is a complex organ composed of many distinct types of cardiomyocytes, but cardiomyocyte clusters (CMCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells could be an option for a cellular model. Data on functional properties of CMCs demonstrate similarities to their in vivo analogues in human. However, development of an in vitro model requires a more thorough comparison of CMCs to human heart tissue. Therefore, we directly compared individually isolated CMCs to human fetal, neonatal, adult atrial and ventricular heart tissues. Real-time qPCR analysis of mRNA levels and protein staining of ion channels and cardiac markers showed in general a similar expression pattern in CMCs and human heart. Moreover, a significant decrease in beat frequency was noted after addition of Zatebradine, a blocker to I(f) involved in regulation of spontaneous contraction in CMCs. The results underscore the similarities of CMCs to human cardiac tissue, and further support establishment of novel cardiotoxicity assays based on the CMCs in drug discovery.

  2. An Overview of Notch Signaling in Adult Tissue Renewal and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Chihiro; Zhao, Guojun; Ilagan, Ma. Xenia G.

    2015-01-01

    The Notch pathway is a critical mediator of short-range cell-cell communication that is reiteratively used to regulate a diverse array of cellular processes during embryonic development and the renewal and maintenance of adult tissues. Most Notch-dependent processes utilize a core signaling mechanism that is dependent on regulated intramembrane proteolysis: Upon ligand binding, Notch receptors undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAM metalloproteases, followed by γ-secretase-mediated intramembrane proteolysis. This releases the Notch intracellular domain, which translocates to the nucleus to activate transcription. In this review, we highlight the roles of Notch signaling particularly in self-renewing tissues in adults and several human diseases and raise some key considerations when targeting ADAMs and γ-secretase as disease-modifying strategies for Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:21605032

  3. Osseous differentiation of human fat tissue grafts: From tissue engineering to tissue differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bondarava, Maryna; Cattaneo, Chiara; Ren, Bin; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E.; Betz, Oliver B.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional bone tissue engineering approaches require isolation and in vitro propagation of autologous cells, followed by seeding on a variety of scaffolds. Those protracted procedures impede the clinical applications. Here we report the transdifferentiation of human fat tissue fragments retrieved from subcutaneous fat into tissue with bone characteristics in vitro without prior cell isolation and propagation. 3D collagen-I cultures of human fat tissue were cultivated either in growth medium or in osteogenic medium (OM) with or without addition of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) BMP-2, BMP-7 or BMP-9. Ca2+ depositions were observed after two weeks of osteogenic induction which visibly increased when either type of BMP was added. mRNA levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) increased when cultured in OM alone but addition of BMP-2, BMP-7 or BMP-9 caused significantly higher expression levels of ALP and OCN. Immunofluorescent staining for OCN, osteopontin and sclerostin supported the observed real-time-PCR data. BMP-9 was the most effective osteogenic inducer in this system. Our findings reveal that tissue regeneration can be remarkably simplified by omitting prior cell isolation and propagation, therefore removing significant obstacles on the way to clinical applications of much needed regeneration treatments. PMID:28054585

  4. Hippocampus and epilepsy: findings from human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huberfeld, Gilles; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Miles, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Surgical removal of the epileptogenic zone provides an effective therapy for several epileptic syndromes. This surgery offers the opportunity to study pathological activity in living human tissue for pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy syndromes including (1) temporal lobe epilepsies with hippocampal sclerosis, (2) cortical dysplasias, (3) epilepsies associated with tumors and (4) developmental malformations. Slices of tissue from patient with these syndromes retain functional neuronal networks and may generate epileptic activities. The properties of cells in this tissue may not be greatly changed, but excitatory synaptic transmission is often enhanced and GABAergic inhibition is preserved. Typically epileptic activity is not generated spontaneously by the neocortex, whether dysplastic or not, but can be induced by convulsants. The initiation of ictal discharges in neocortex depends on both GABAergic signaling and increased extracellular potassium. In contrast, a spontaneous interictal-like activity is generated by tissues from patients with temporal lobe epilepsies associated with hippocampal sclerosis. This activity is initiated, not in the hippocampus but in the subiculum an output region which projects to the entorhinal cortex. Interictal events seem to be triggered by GABAergic cells which paradoxically excite about 20% of subicular pyramidal cells while simultaneously inhibiting the majority. Interictal discharges thus depend on both GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. The depolarizing effects of GABA depend on a pathological elevation in levels of chloride in some subicular cells, similar to those of developmentally immature cells. Such defect is caused by a perturbed expression of the cotransporters regulating intracellular chloride concentration, the importer NKCC1 and the extruder KCC2. Blockade of NKCC1 actions by the diuretic bumetanide, restores intracellular chloride and thus hyperpolarizing GABAergic actions so suppressing interictal activity. PMID

  5. The reconstruction and analysis of tissue specific human metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tong; Ma, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Human tissues have distinct biological functions. Many proteins/enzymes are known to be expressed only in specific tissues and therefore the metabolic networks in various tissues are different. Though high quality global human metabolic networks and metabolic networks for certain tissues such as liver have already been studied, a systematic study of tissue specific metabolic networks for all main tissues is still missing. In this work, we reconstruct the tissue specific metabolic networks for 15 main tissues in human based on the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN). The tissue information is firstly obtained for enzymes from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and UniprotKB databases and transfers to reactions through the enzyme-reaction relationships in EHMN. As our knowledge of tissue distribution of proteins is still very limited, we replenish the tissue information of the metabolic network based on network connectivity analysis and thorough examination of the literature. Finally, about 80% of proteins and reactions in EHMN are determined to be in at least one of the 15 tissues. To validate the quality of the tissue specific network, the brain specific metabolic network is taken as an example for functional module analysis and the results reveal that the function of the brain metabolic network is closely related with its function as the centre of the human nervous system. The tissue specific human metabolic networks are available at .

  6. 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study Fish Tissue Data Dictionary

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Office of Science and Technology (OST) is providing the fish tissue results from the 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study (GLHHFTS). This document includes the “data dictionary” for Mercury, PFC, PBDE and PCBs.

  7. Lymphatic Stomata in the Adult Human Pulmonary Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Masahiro; Iobe, Hiroaki; Kudo, Tomoo; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Okudela, Koji; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yoshida, Maki; Nagao, Toshitaka; Nakaya, Takeo; Kurata, Atsushi; Ohtani, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymphatic stomata are small lymphatic openings in the serosal membrane that communicate with the serosal cavity. Although these stomata have primarily been studied in experimental mammals, little is known concerning the presence and properties of lymphatic stomata in the adult human pleura. Thus, adult human pleurae were examined for the presence or absence of lymphatic stomata. Methods and Results: A total of 26 pulmonary ligaments (13 left and 13 right) were obtained from 15 adult human autopsy cases and examined using electron and light microscopy. The microscopic studies revealed the presence of apertures fringed with D2-40-positive, CD31-positive, and cytokeratin-negative endothelial cells directly communicating with submesothelial lymphatics in all of the pulmonary ligaments. The apertures' sizes and densities varied from case to case according to the serial tissue section. The medians of these aperture sizes ranged from 2.25 to 8.75 μm in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2.50 to 12.50 μm in the right pulmonary ligaments. The densities of the apertures ranged from 2 to 9 per mm2 in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2 to 18 per mm2 in the right pulmonary ligaments. However, no significant differences were found regarding the aperture size (p=0.359) and density (p=0.438) between the left and the right pulmonary ligaments. Conclusions: Our study revealed that apertures exhibit structural adequacy as lymphatic stomata on the surface of the pulmonary ligament, thereby providing evidence that lymphatic stomata are present in the adult human pleura. PMID:25526320

  8. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  9. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  10. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  11. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  12. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  13. Adult Tissue Sources for New β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Robert J.; New, Connie; Annes, Justin P.

    2014-01-01

    The diabetes pandemic incurs extraordinary public health and financial costs that are projected to expand for the foreseeable future. Consequently, the development of definitive therapies for diabetes is a priority. Currently, a wide spectrum of therapeutic strategies, from implantable insulin-delivery devices to transplantation-based cell replacement therapy, to β-cell regeneration, focus on replacing the lost insulin-production capacity of diabetics. Among these, β-cell regeneration remains promising but heretofore unproven. Indeed, recent experimental work has uncovered surprising biology that underscores the potential therapeutic benefit of β-cell regeneration. These studies have elucidated a variety of sources for the endogenous production of new β-cells from existing cells. First, β-cells, long thought to be post-mitotic, have demonstrate potential for regenerative capacity. Second, the presence of pancreatic facultative endocrine progenitor cells has been established. Third, the malleability of cellular identity has availed the possibility of generating β-cells from other differentiated cell types. Here, we will review the exciting developments surrounding endogenous sources of β-cell production and consider the potential of realizing a regenerative therapy for diabetes from adult tissues. PMID:24345765

  14. Transcriptional profiling of adult neural stem-like cells from the human brain.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33-60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate.

  15. Distribution of Tight Junction Proteins in Adult Human Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Ola M.; Kim, Jung-Wan Martin; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A.; Baum, Bruce J.; Tran, Simon D.

    2008-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are an essential structure of fluid-secreting cells, such as those in salivary glands. Three major families of integral membrane proteins have been identified as components of the TJ: claudins, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs), plus the cytosolic protein zonula occludens (ZO). We have been working to develop an orally implantable artificial salivary gland that would be suitable for treating patients lacking salivary parenchymal tissue. To date, little is known about the distribution of TJ proteins in adult human salivary cells and thus what key molecular components might be desirable for the cellular component of an artificial salivary gland device. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of TJ proteins in human salivary glands. Salivary gland samples were obtained from 10 patients. Frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained using IHC methods. Claudin-1 was expressed in ductal, endothelial, and ∼25% of serous cells. Claudins-2, -3, and -4 and JAM-A were expressed in both ductal and acinar cells, whereas claudin-5 was expressed only in endothelial cells. Occludin and ZO-1 were expressed in acinar, ductal, and endothelial cells. These results provide new information on TJ proteins in two major human salivary glands and should serve as a reference for future studies to assess the presence of appropriate TJ proteins in a tissue-engineered human salivary gland. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:1093–1098, 2008) PMID:18765838

  16. Characterization of proopiomelanocortin transcripts in human nonpituitary tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, T.; De Keyzer, Y.; Luton, J.P.; Kahn, A.; Bertagna, X.

    1987-10-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor to adrenocorticotropic hormone and other related peptides, was originally identified in the corticotropic cell. Recent evidence shows that POMC products are also normally present in a variety of nonpituitary tissues. To investigate this phenomenon in humans the authors looked for the presence and characteristics of POMC transcripts in various adult tissues. Blot hybridization analysis of normal adrenal, thymus, and testis RNAs revealed a small RNA species approximately 400 nucleotides shorter than the 1200-nucleotide pituitary species. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping studies showed that this small RNA lacked exon 1 and exon 2 of the gene, and it corresponded to a set of at least six molecules starting 41 to 162 nucleotides downstream from the 5' end of exon 3. These RNAs appear to result from heterogeneous transcription initiation sites presumably under the control of GC box promoter sequences located in the 3' end of intron 2. They cannot encode a complete POMC molecule, and the only truncated POMC molecules that could be translated would lack a signal peptide necessary for membrane translocation and precursor processing. The use of highly sensitive S1 nuclease mapping techniques with uniformly labeled single-stranded DNA probes allowed the detection of a small but definite amount of the normal, 1200-nucleotide, mRNA species. It is suggested that it is this POMC mRNA that is responsible for the local production of all the POMC peptides.

  17. A comparison of concentrations of lead in human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, P S

    1975-01-01

    This postmortem study of lead concentrations in the tissues of 129 subjects is an extension to a report by Barry and Mossman (1970). Lead concentrations in bone greatly exceeded the concentrations in soft tissues and were highest in the dense bones. Bone lead concentrations increased with age in both sexes, more especially in male subjects and in dense bone, varying between mean values of 2-16 ppm in the ribs of children to over 50 ppm in the dense petrous temporal bones of elderly male adults. Male adults contained over 30% more lead in their bones than females. Mean concentrations of lead in the soft tissues varied from less than 0-1 ppm in organs such as muscle and heart to over 2 ppm in the aorta. In most tissues with lead values in excess of 0-2 ppm the male concentrations exceeded female values by about 30%. With the exception of the aorta, spleen, lung, and prostate, lead concentrations did not increase with age in the soft tissues of either sex after about the second decade of life. Children showed concentrations of lead in their soft tissues comparable to female adults, but the concentrations in bone were much lower. It is suggested that children do not possess the same capacity as adults to retain lead in bone. In male adults occupationally exposed to lead the concentrations of lead in bone exceeded the concentrations in unexposed male adults within the same age group by two-to three-fold. Soft tissue lead concentrations between the two groups were less divergent. An assessment of the total body burden of lead revealed higher levels in adult male subjects than in females at mean values of 164-8 mg compared to 103-6 mg, respectively. Over 90% of the total body burden of lead in adults was in bone, of which over 70% was in dense bone. Male adults occupationally exposed to lead had mean total body burdens of 566-4 mg Pb, of which 97% was in bone. The release of lead from bone in conjunction with calcium was not considered to be of physiological significance

  18. The use of animal tissues alongside human tissue: Cultural and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kaw, Anu; Jones, D Gareth; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives. The use of animal organs and tissues is carried out within the context of understanding human anatomy and function. Consequently, the interests of human donors are to be pre-eminent in any policies that are enunciated, so that if any donors find the presence of animal remains unacceptable, the latter should not be employed. The major differences appear to lie in differences in our perceptions of their respective intrinsic and instrumental values. Animals are considered to have lesser intrinsic value and greater instrumental value than humans. These differences stem from the role played by culture and ethical considerations, and are manifested in the resulting legal frameworks. In light of this discussion, six policy recommendations are proposed, encompassing the nature of consent, respect for animal tissues as well as human remains, and appropriate separation of both sets of tissues in preparation and display.

  19. Successful cryopreservation of human ovarian cortex tissues using supercooling.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Hisashi; Zhang, Yue; Mihara, Makoto; Sato, Chifumi

    2012-01-01

    The development of new method to cryopreserve human ovarian cortex tissues without damage is needed for the improvement of quality of life (QOL) of female cancer patients. Here we show novel cryopreservation method of human ovarian cortex tissues by using supercooling (S.C.) procedure. Our method will be helpful in order to preserve fertility of female cancer patients.

  20. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from adult human testis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Sabine; Renninger, Markus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Wiesner, Tina; Just, Lothar; Bonin, Michael; Aicher, Wilhelm; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Mattheus, Ulrich; Mack, Andreas; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Minger, Stephen; Matzkies, Matthias; Reppel, Michael; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Stenzl, Arnulf; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-11-20

    Human primordial germ cells and mouse neonatal and adult germline stem cells are pluripotent and show similar properties to embryonic stem cells. Here we report the successful establishment of human adult germline stem cells derived from spermatogonial cells of adult human testis. Cellular and molecular characterization of these cells revealed many similarities to human embryonic stem cells, and the germline stem cells produced teratomas after transplantation into immunodeficient mice. The human adult germline stem cells differentiated into various types of somatic cells of all three germ layers when grown under conditions used to induce the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. We conclude that the generation of human adult germline stem cells from testicular biopsies may provide simple and non-controversial access to individual cell-based therapy without the ethical and immunological problems associated with human embryonic stem cells.

  1. Fundamentals of gas phase plasmas for treatment of human tissue.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Mark J; Babaeva, Natalia Yu

    2011-01-01

    The use of gas phase plasmas for treating human tissue is at the intersection of two disciplines - plasma physics and engineering, and medicine. In this paper, a primer will be provided for the medical practitioner on the fundamentals of generating gas phase plasmas at atmospheric pressure in air for the treatment of human tissue. The mechanisms for gas phase plasmas interacting with tissue and biological fluids will also be discussed using results from computer modeling.

  2. Latent inhibition in human adults without masking.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Martha; Arcediano, Francisco; Miller, Ralph R

    2003-09-01

    Latent inhibition refers to attenuated responding to Cue X observed when the X-outcome pairings are preceded by X-alone presentations. It has proven difficult to obtain in human adults unless the preexposure (X-alone) presentations are embedded within a masking (i.e., distracting) task. The authors hypothesized that the difficulty in obtaining latent inhibition with unmasked tasks is related to the usual training procedures, in which the preexposure and conditioning experiences are separated by a set of instructions. Experiment 1 reports latent inhibition without masking in a task in which preexposure and conditioning occur without interruption. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrate that this attenuation in responding to target Cue X does not pass a summation test for conditioned inhibition and is context specific, thereby confirming that it is latent inhibition. Experiments 3 and 4 confirm that introducing instructions between preexposure and conditioning disrupts latent inhibition.

  3. Decellularized extracellular matrix derived from human adipose tissue as a potential scaffold for allograft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Beob Soo; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Jae Dong; Choi, Young Chan; Yang, Hyun-Jin; Park, Kinam; Lee, Hee Young; Cho, Yong Woo

    2011-06-01

    Decellularized tissues composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been clinically used to support the regeneration of various human tissues and organs. Most decellularized tissues so far have been derived from animals or cadavers. Therefore, despite the many advantages of decellularized tissue, there are concerns about the potential for immunogenicity and the possible presence of infectious agents. Herein, we present a biomaterial composed of ECM derived from human adipose tissue, the most prevalent, expendable, and safely harvested tissue in the human body. The ECM was extracted by successive physical, chemical, and enzymatic treatments of human adipose tissue isolated by liposuction. Cellular components including nucleic acids were effectively removed without significant disruption of the morphology or structure of the ECM. Major ECM components were quantified, including acid/pepsin-soluble collagen, sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and soluble elastin. In an in vivo experiment using mice, the decellularized ECM graft exhibited good compatibility to surrounding tissues. Overall results suggest that the decellularized ECM containing biological and chemical cues of native human ECM could be an ideal scaffold material not only for autologous but also for allograft tissue engineering.

  4. Macrophages modulate engineered human tissues for enhanced vascularization and healing

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Kara L.; Freytes, Donald O.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering is increasingly based on recapitulating human physiology, through integration of biological principles into engineering designs. In spite of all progress in engineering functional human tissues, we are just beginning to develop effective methods for establishing blood perfusion and controlling the inflammatory factors following implantation into the host. Functional vasculature largely determines tissue survival and function in vivo. The inflammatory response is a major regulator of vascularization and overall functionality of engineered tissues, through the activity of different types of macrophages and the cytokines they secrete. We discuss cell-scaffold-bioreactor systems for harnessing the inflammatory response for enhanced tissue vascularization and healing. To this end, inert scaffolds that have been considered for many decades a “gold standard” in regenerative medicine are beginning to be replaced by a new generation of “smart” tissue engineering systems designed to actively mediate tissue survival and function. PMID:25331098

  5. Diagnose human colonic tissues by terahertz near-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Ma, Shihua; Wu, Xiumei; Yang, Wenxing; Zhao, Tian

    2015-03-01

    Based on a terahertz (THz) pipe-based near-field imaging system, we demonstrate the capability of THz imaging to diagnose freshly surgically excised human colonic tissues. Through THz near-field scanning the absorbance of the colonic tissues, the acquired images can clearly distinguish cancerous tissues from healthy tissues fast and automatically without pathological hematoxylin and eosin stain diagnosis. A statistical study on 58 specimens (20 healthy tissues and 38 tissues with tumor) from 31 patients (mean age: 59 years; range: 46 to 79 years) shows that the corresponding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity on colonic tissues are both 100%. Due to its capability to perform quantitative analysis, our study indicates the potential of the THz pipe-based near-field imaging for future automation on human tumor pathological examinations.

  6. Neural-competent cells of adult human dermis belong to the Schwann lineage.

    PubMed

    Etxaniz, Usue; Pérez-San Vicente, Adrián; Gago-López, Nuria; García-Dominguez, Mario; Iribar, Haizea; Aduriz, Ariane; Pérez-López, Virginia; Burgoa, Izaskun; Irizar, Haritz; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Leis, Olatz; Matheu, Ander; Martín, Angel G; Otaegui, David; López-Mato, María Paz; Gutiérrez-Rivera, Araika; MacLellan, Robb; Izeta, Ander

    2014-11-11

    Resident neural precursor cells (NPCs) have been reported for a number of adult tissues. Understanding their physiological function or, alternatively, their activation after tissue damage or in vitro manipulation remains an unsolved issue. Here, we investigated the source of human dermal NPCs in adult tissue. By following an unbiased, comprehensive approach employing cell-surface marker screening, cell separation, transcriptomic characterization, and in vivo fate analyses, we found that p75NTR(+) precursors of human foreskin can be ascribed to the Schwann (CD56(+)) and perivascular (CD56(-)) cell lineages. Moreover, neural differentiation potential was restricted to the p75NTR(+)CD56(+) Schwann cells and mediated by SOX2 expression levels. Double-positive NPCs were similarly obtained from human cardiospheres, indicating that this phenomenon might be widespread.

  7. Neural-Competent Cells of Adult Human Dermis Belong to the Schwann Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Etxaniz, Usue; Pérez-San Vicente, Adrián; Gago-López, Nuria; García-Dominguez, Mario; Iribar, Haizea; Aduriz, Ariane; Pérez-López, Virginia; Burgoa, Izaskun; Irizar, Haritz; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Leis, Olatz; Matheu, Ander; Martín, Angel G.; Otaegui, David; López-Mato, María Paz; Gutiérrez-Rivera, Araika; MacLellan, Robb; Izeta, Ander

    2014-01-01

    Summary Resident neural precursor cells (NPCs) have been reported for a number of adult tissues. Understanding their physiological function or, alternatively, their activation after tissue damage or in vitro manipulation remains an unsolved issue. Here, we investigated the source of human dermal NPCs in adult tissue. By following an unbiased, comprehensive approach employing cell-surface marker screening, cell separation, transcriptomic characterization, and in vivo fate analyses, we found that p75NTR+ precursors of human foreskin can be ascribed to the Schwann (CD56+) and perivascular (CD56−) cell lineages. Moreover, neural differentiation potential was restricted to the p75NTR+CD56+ Schwann cells and mediated by SOX2 expression levels. Double-positive NPCs were similarly obtained from human cardiospheres, indicating that this phenomenon might be widespread. PMID:25418723

  8. Astrocitary niches in human adult medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Dermengiu, Dan; Loreto, Carla; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Pop, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Astrocytes are considered as neuromodulators of the CNS. Whereas experimental studies on astrocitary functions are gaining importance, the anatomy of the astrocitary niches in the human CNS has been overlooked. The study was performed on the brainstem of 10 adult cadavers. We aimed to determine astrocitary niches in the human medulla oblongata using immunohistochemical labeling with vimentin and also CD34 immunostaining to accurately diagnose associated microvessels. Niches rich in astrocytes were identified as follows: (a) the superficial layer of astrocytes, ventral and ventrolateral, in the rostral medulla oblongata; (b) the median raphe; (c) medullary nuclei: arcuate nucleus, area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract; (d) the subependymal zone (SEZ, caudal medulla) and subventricular zone (SVZ, rostral medulla). Astrocytes were scarce in the ventrolateral medulla, and mostly present within the pyramidal tract and the olivary nucleus. Apart from the SEZ and SVZ, the brainstem niches of astrocytes mostly overlap those regions known to perform roles as central respiratory chemoreceptors. The astrocytes of the SEZ and SVZ, which are known as stem cell niches, are related to an increased microvascular density.

  9. The patterns and expression of KDR in normal tissues of human internal organs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianfei; Zhu, Huijun; Wang, Xudong; Tang, Qi; Huang, Hua; Wu, Kerong; Zhu, Jin; Feng, Zhenqing; Shi, Gongshen

    2011-12-01

    KDR has been implicated for playing an important role in the formation of new blood vessels and in solid tumor growth. It was considered as one of the most important regulators of angiogenesis and a key target in anticancer treatment. In the present study, we characterized KDR mRNA and protein expression in normal tissues of perinatal and adult tissues using One-step Real-Time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry with a self-made anti-KDR antibody. The expression of KDR mRNA and protein in perinatal internal organs were all higher than in adult organs including brain, kidney, liver, lung and heart, respectively. KDR protein was presented in the cell plasma membrane of human internal tissues. The expression of KDR protein was raised in macrophage of spleen, and decreased in neurons of brain, myocardium, bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar epithelial cell, proximal and distal tubules cells, and hepatic cells with the maturity process of human organs. Notably, the order of KDR protein expression from highest to lowest is as follows: brain, liver, heart, kidney, and lung in adult tissues with statistically significant. It follows that how to balance the potential therapeutic side effect with human internal organs in targeted therapy of over-expressing KDR tumor.

  10. Depth-resolved fluorescence of human ectocervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-04-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence of normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within 120um depth were investigated utilizing a portable confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of all ectocervical tissue samples, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed, which created serious interference in seeking the correlation between tissue fluorescence and tissue pathology. While from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer, the measured NADH fluorescence induced by 355nm excitation and FAD fluorescence induced by 457nm excitation were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. The ratios between NADH over FAD fluorescence increased statistically in the CIN epithelial relative to the normal and HPV epithelia, which indicated increased metabolic activity in precancerous tissue. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  11. Brown Adipose Tissue and Seasonal Variation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yong, Iain T.H.; Thorn, Natasha; Ganatra, Rakesh; Perkins, Alan C.; Symonds, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is present in adult humans where it may be important in the prevention of obesity, although the main factors regulating its abundance are not well established. BAT demonstrates seasonal variation relating to ambient temperature and photoperiod in mammals. The objective of our study was therefore to determine whether seasonal variation in BAT activity in humans was more closely related to the prevailing photoperiod or temperature. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 3,614 consecutive patients who underwent positron emission tomography followed by computed tomography scans. The presence and location of BAT depots were documented and correlated with monthly changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature. RESULTS BAT activity was demonstrated in 167 (4.6%) scans. BAT was demonstrated in 52/724 scans (7.2%) in winter compared with 27/1,067 (2.5%) in summer months (P < 0.00001, χ2 test). Monthly changes in the occurrence of BAT were more closely related to differences in photoperiod (r2 = 0.876) rather than ambient temperature (r2 = 0.696). Individuals with serial scans also demonstrated strong seasonal variation in BAT activity (average standardized uptake value [SUVmax] 1.5 in July and 9.4 in January). BAT was also more common in female patients (female: n = 107, 7.2%; male: n = 60, 2.8%; P < 0.00001, χ2 test). CONCLUSIONS Our study demonstrates a very strong seasonal variation in the presence of BAT. This effect is more closely associated with photoperiod than ambient temperature, suggesting a previously undescribed mechanism for mediating BAT function in humans that could now potentially be recruited for the prevention or reversal of obesity. PMID:19696186

  12. Transcriptomics resources of human tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Uhlén, Mathias; Hallström, Björn M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Mardinoglu, Adil; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-04-04

    Quantifying the differential expression of genes in various human organs, tissues, and cell types is vital to understand human physiology and disease. Recently, several large-scale transcriptomics studies have analyzed the expression of protein-coding genes across tissues. These datasets provide a framework for defining the molecular constituents of the human body as well as for generating comprehensive lists of proteins expressed across tissues or in a tissue-restricted manner. Here, we review publicly available human transcriptome resources and discuss body-wide data from independent genome-wide transcriptome analyses of different tissues. Gene expression measurements from these independent datasets, generated using samples from fresh frozen surgical specimens and postmortem tissues, are consistent. Overall, the different genome-wide analyses support a distribution in which many proteins are found in all tissues and relatively few in a tissue-restricted manner. Moreover, we discuss the applications of publicly available omics data for building genome-scale metabolic models, used for analyzing cell and tissue functions both in physiological and in disease contexts.

  13. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  14. Differences in tissue distribution of HBCD alpha and gamma between adult and developing mice.

    PubMed

    Szabo, David T; Diliberto, Janet J; Huwe, Janice K; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2011-09-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a mixture of three stereoisomers alpha (α), beta (β), and gamma (γ). γ-HBCD dominates the mixture (∼70%), and despite α-HBCD's minor contribution to global HBCD production and usage (∼10%), it is the dominant congener found in most biotic samples worldwide. Evidence of toxicity and lack of stereoisomer studies drives the importance of understanding HBCD toxicokinetics in potentially susceptible populations. The majority of public health concern has focused on hazardous effects resulting from exposure of infants and young children to HBCD due to reports on adverse developmental effects in rodent studies, in combination with human exposure estimates suggesting that nursing infants and young children have the highest exposure to HBCD. This study was designed to investigate differences in the disposition of both γ-HBCD and α-HBCD in infantile mice reported to be susceptible to the HBCD commercial mixture. The tissue distribution of α-[(14)C]HBCD- and γ-[(14)C]HBCD-derived radioactivity was monitored in C57BL/6 mice following a single oral dose of either compound (3 mg/kg) after direct gavage at postnatal day 10. Mice were held up to 7 days in shoebox cages after which pups were sacrificed, tissue collected, and internal dosimetry was measured. Developing mice exposed to α-HBCD had an overall higher body burden than γ-HBCD at every time point measured; at 4 days postexposure, they retained 22% of the α-HBCD administered dose, whereas pups exposed to γ-HBCD retained 10%. Total body burden in infantile mice after exposure to γ-HBCD was increased 10-fold as compared with adults. Similarly, after exposure to α-HBCD, infantile mice contained 2.5-fold higher levels than adult. These differences lead to higher concentrations of the HBCD diastereomers at target tissues during critical windows of development. The results indicate that the toxicokinetics of the two HBCD diastereomers differ between developing and adult mice

  15. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V; Chong, Victor H T

    2015-11-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection.

  16. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  17. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-05

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas).

  18. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  19. Tissue-Based Imaging Model of Human Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Edward R.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a tissue-based model of the human trabecular meshwork (TM) using viable postmortem corneoscleral donor tissue. Two-photon microscopy is used to optically section and image deep in the tissue to analyze cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) within the original three-dimensional (3D) environment of the TM. Multimodal techniques, including autofluorescence (AF), second harmonic generation (SHG), intravital dye fluorescence, and epifluorescence, are combined to provide unique views of the tissue at the cellular and subcellular level. SHG and AF imaging are non-invasive tissue imaging techniques with potential for clinical application, which can be modeled in the system. We describe the following in the tissue-based model: analysis of live cellularity to determine tissue viability; characteristics of live cells based on intravital labeling; features and composition of the TM's structural ECM; localization of specific ECM proteins to regions such as basement membrane; in situ induction and expression of tissue markers characteristic of cultured TM cells relevant to glaucoma; analysis of TM actin and pharmacological effects; in situ visualization of TM, inner wall endothelium, and Schlemm's canal; and application of 3D reconstruction, modeling, and quantitative analysis to the TM. The human model represents a cost-effective use of valuable and scarce yet available human tissue that allows unique cell biology, pharmacology, and translational studies of the TM. PMID:24517246

  20. Facial soft-tissue thicknesses in the adult male Zulu.

    PubMed

    Aulsebrook, W A; Becker, P J; Işcan, M Y

    1996-05-31

    The morphometric method of forensic facial reconstruction rests heavily on the use of facial soft tissue depth measurements. In reconstructing the Negroid face, much use has been made of the tables of soft tissue thickness of American Negroid cadavers. However, the genetic complexities of American blacks are well known. In addition it is felt that measurements made on the living are of more value than those made on the dead. In view of this it was decided to set up a table of norms for facial soft tissue depths of the living Zulu, an African Negroid who has remained relatively free from genetic admixture with other populations. The tightly controlled sample consisted of 55 healthy male Zulus, aged 20 to 35. Tissue depths at established landmarks were measured from lateral and oblique cephalometric radiographs. These were then combined with ultrasonic readings at other landmarks on the subject's face to yield a comprehensive set of tissue depth data. This paper presents a set of average facial soft tissue depth measurements from the Zulu face that results in the development of a new profile. It also provides a method for linking two systems of measurement.

  1. Transplanted human embryonic stem cells as biological 'catalysts' for tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Liu, Hua; Cao, Tong

    2005-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have tremendous potential in the newly emerging field of regenerative medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the rescue of lethal cardiac defects in Id knockout mutant mouse embryos was not due to the transplanted cells giving rise to functional new tissues within the defective embryonic heart. Instead, there is indirect evidence that the observed therapeutic effect was due to various secreted factors emanating from the transplanted cells. This therefore, introduces the exciting prospect of utilizing human embryonic stem cells as biological 'catalysts' to promote tissue repair and regeneration in transplantation therapy. However, the immunological barrier against allogenic transplantation, as well as the teratogenic potential of human embryonic stem cells poses major technical challenges. A possible strategy to overcome the immunological barrier may be to impose a temporary regimen of immunosuppressive drugs followed by their gradual withdrawal, once adequate tissue regeneration has been achieved. Other more novel alternatives include the use of microencapsulation to block interaction with the transplant recipient's immune system, and co-transplantation with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have been demonstrated to possess immuno-suppressive properties. The teratogenic potential of human embryonic stem cells could possibly be alleviated by directing the differentiation of these cells to specific lineages prior to transplantation, or through mitotic inactivation (gamma irradiation or mitomycin C exposure). Co-transplantation with autologous adult stem cells may represent a novel strategy to further enhance the 'catalytic' effects of human embryonic stem cells. The various factors secreted by human embryonic stem cells could then have a concentrated localized effect on relatively large numbers of co-transplanted autologous adult stem cells, which may in turn lead to enhanced repair and regeneration of the damaged

  2. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  3. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated.

  4. The dynamics of adult neurogenesis in human hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ihunwo, Amadi O.; Tembo, Lackson H.; Dzamalala, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of adult neurogenesis is now an accepted occurrence in mammals and also in humans. At least two discrete places house stem cells for generation of neurons in adult brain. These are olfactory system and the hippocampus. In animals, newly generated neurons have been directly or indirectly demonstrated to generate a significant amount of new neurons to have a functional role. However, the data in humans on the extent of this process is still scanty and such as difficult to comprehend its functional role in humans. This paper explores the available data on as extent of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in humans and makes comparison to animal data. PMID:28197172

  5. Debra-mediated Ci degradation controls tissue homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-02-11

    Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control.

  6. Concise Review: Quiescence in Adult Stem Cells: Biological Significance and Relevance to Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rumman, Mohammad; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-10-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) are tissue resident stem cells responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration following injury. In uninjured tissues, ASCs exist in a nonproliferating, reversibly cell cycle-arrested state known as quiescence or G0. A key function of the quiescent state is to preserve stemness in ASCs by preventing precocious differentiation, and thus maintaining a pool of undifferentiated ASCs. Recent evidences suggest that quiescence is an actively maintained state and that excessive or defective quiescence may lead to compromised tissue regeneration or tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to provide an update regarding the biological mechanisms of ASC quiescence and their role in tissue regeneration.

  7. Constitutive gene expression and specification of tissue identity in adult planarian biology

    PubMed Central

    Reddien, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms that constitutively maintain adult tissues through cell turnover and can regenerate entire organisms from tiny body fragments. In addition to requiring new cells (from neoblasts), these feats require mechanisms that specify tissue identity in the adult. Critical roles for Wnt and BMP signaling in regeneration and maintenance of the body axes have been uncovered, among other regulatory factors. Available data indicate that genes involved in positional identity regulation at key embryonic stages in other animals display persisting regionalized expression in adult planarians. These expression patterns suggest that a constitutively active gene expression map exists for maintenance of the planarian body. Planarians therefore present a fertile ground for identification of factors regulating regionalization of the metazoan body plan and for study of the attributes of these factors that can lead to maintenance and regeneration of adult tissues. PMID:21680047

  8. Total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, N.; Harsas, W.; Marolt, R.S.; Morton, M.; Pollack, J.K.

    1988-12-01

    As far as the authors could ascertain only 4 well-documented analytical studies have been carried out in Australia determining the total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue. The latest of these studies was published over 16 years ago. Therefore it is timely and important to re-examine the total DDT and dieldrin concentration within the adipose tissue of the Australian population. The present investigation has analyzed 290 samples of human adipose tissue obtained from Westmead Hospital situated in an outer suburb of Sydney, New South Wales for their content of total DDT and dieldrin.

  9. Characterization of a simplified method of cryopreserving human parathyroid tissue.

    PubMed

    Saxe, A W; Gibson, G W; Kay, S

    1990-12-01

    Cryopreservation of human parathyroid tissue plays an important role in managing difficult parathyroid disease. It also can permit investigators to conduct experiments without dependence on the operating room schedule. Availability of cryopreservation has been limited by the perceived need for expensive, complex equipment. We adapted a simple method of freezing cell suspensions to freezing human parathyroid tissue. Vials containing human parathyroid in culture media, dimethylsulfoxide, and patient serum were placed in a plastic rack in a metal pan containing prechilled (4 degrees C) ethanol and placed in a -70 degrees C freezer. We compared viability (trypan blue dye exclusion by collagenase dispersed cells) of tissue frozen in this manner to that of tissue frozen in a programmable liquid nitrogen freezer at 1 degrees C per minute, a cooling rate recommended for human parathyroid tissue. The viability of 30 patients' samples cooled in liquid nitrogen (average length of storage 5 months) was 74% +/- 15% and that of 64 patients' samples cooled in ethanol (average length of storage 26 months) was 71% +/- 15%. Viability of 19 samples of fresh tissue was 79% +/- 10%. Neither method had a statistically significant correlation between length of storage and viability. Successful cryopreservation with simplified technology may expand the availability of parathyroid tissue to meet both clinical and investigative requirements.

  10. Efficient In Vitro Electropermeabilization of Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2015-10-01

    DNA electrotransfer is a successful technic for gene delivery. However, its use in clinical applications is limited since little is known about the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer in the complex environment occurring in a tissue. The objectives of this work were to investigate the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in that process. Tumor ECM composition was shown to modulate in vivo gene electrotransfer efficiency. In order to assess the effects of ECM composition and organization, as well as intercellular junctions and communication, in normal tissue response to electric pulses, we developed an innovative three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed human connective tissue model. 3D human dermal tissue was reconstructed in vitro by a tissue engineering approach and was representative of in vivo cell organization since cell-cell contacts were present as well as complex ECM. This human cell model presented multiple layers of primary dermal fibroblasts embedded in a native, collagen-rich ECM. This dermal tissue could become a useful tool to study skin DNA electrotransfer mechanisms. As proof of the concept, we show here that the cells within this standardized 3D tissue can be efficiently electropermeabilized by milliseconds electric pulses. We believe that a better comprehension of gene electrotransfer in such a model tissue would help improve electrogene therapy approaches such as the systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccination.

  11. Nutritional regulation of lipid metabolism in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Coppack, S W; Patel, J N; Lawrence, V J

    2001-01-01

    Pfeiffer and colleagues years ago pointed out that different distributions and amounts of adipose tissue are associated with abnormalities of lipolysis and lipoprotein metabolism. Adipose tissue has several crucial roles including (i) mobilization from stores of fatty acids as an energy source, (ii) catabolism of lipoproteins such as very-low-density lipoprotein and (iii) synthesis and release of hormonal signals such as leptin and interleukin-6. These adipose tissue actions are crucially regulated by nutrition. The review considers the existence of metabolic pathways and modes of regulation within adipose tissue, and how such metabolic activity can be quantitated in humans. Nutrition can influence adipose tissue at several 'levels'. Firstly the level of obesity or malnutrition has important effects on many aspects of adipose tissue metabolism. Secondly short-term overfeeding, underfeeding and exercise have major impacts on adipose tissue behaviour. Lastly, specific nutrients are capable of regulating adipose tissue metabolism. Recently there have been considerable advances in understanding adipose tissue metabolism and in particular its regulation. This review discusses the behaviour of adipose tissue under various nutritional conditions. There is then a review of recent work examining the ways in which nutritional influences act via intra-cellular mechanisms, insulin and the sympathetic innervation of adipose tissue.

  12. Meeting report: human fetal tissue transplantation research panel.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D W; Stevenson, R E

    1989-01-01

    On September 14 through 16, 1988, a meeting on the use of human fetal tissue in transplantation was held at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda Maryland, USA. The meeting sponsored by NIH for the Human Fetal Tissue Transplantation Research Panel, a consultant group to the Advisory Committee to the Director. The consultant group was convened to deal with the scientific, judicial and moral questions associated with research involving transplantation of human fetal tissue obtained after induced abortions. The first day of the meeting was devoted to presentations addressing scientific issues. Included among the speakers was Dr. Lars Olson, Professor of Neurobiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, who described the use of transplanted human fetal tissue in the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease and Dr. Eugene Redmond, Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, who showed results of work with transplantation of tissue to correct induced Parkinson-like disease in monkeys. Other speakers addressed the present, past or potential use of fetal tissue in the treatment of diabetes, immune disorders, and other diseases, as well as the use of fetal cells in the production of biologicals. At the conclusion of the meeting the panel did not recommend that research be halted on fetal tissue within the context discussed, although the recommendation of the committee is not binding, and an additional assembly of the panel will probably occur before the final recommendation to an NIH advisory committee is made in November. Other meetings on this subject include a meeting on the use of fetal tissue sponsored by the American Association of Tissue Banks, March 6-7, 1989, in Washington D. C. (Crystal City) and a meeting June 10, 1989, the day before the annual meeting of the Tissue Culture Association, USA, in Orlando, Florida, on fetal cells and ownership of cultured cells and products derived from clinical specimens. Following are statements to the

  13. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  16. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  17. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  18. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche1

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zach S.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Tamaresis, John S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. PMID:26696367

  19. Association between subcutaneous white adipose tissue and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cholecalciferol is known to be deposited in human adipose tissue, but the distribution of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in adipose tissue is not known. Objectives: To determine whether 25(OH)D is detectable in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (SWAT) in overweight and obese persons an...

  20. The adult human pubic symphysis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Ines; Woodley, Stephanie J; Stringer, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    The pubic symphysis is a unique joint consisting of a fibrocartilaginous disc sandwiched between the articular surfaces of the pubic bones. It resists tensile, shearing and compressive forces and is capable of a small amount of movement under physiological conditions in most adults (up to 2 mm shift and 1° rotation). During pregnancy, circulating hormones such as relaxin induce resorption of the symphyseal margins and structural changes in the fibrocartilaginous disc, increasing symphyseal width and mobility. This systematic review of the English, German and French literature focuses on the normal anatomy of the adult human pubic symphysis. Although scientific studies of the joint have yielded useful descriptive data, comparison of results is hampered by imprecise methodology and/or poorly controlled studies. Several aspects of the anatomy of the pubic symphysis remain unknown or unclear: the precise attachments of surrounding ligaments and muscles; the arrangement of connective tissue fibres within the interpubic disc and the origin, structure and function of its associated interpubic cleft; the biomechanical consequences of sexual dimorphism; potential ethnic variations in morphology; and its precise innervation and blood supply. These deficiencies hinder our understanding of the normal form and function of the joint, which is particularly relevant when attempting to understand the mechanisms underlying pregnancy-related pubic symphyseal pain, a neglected and relatively common cause of pubic pain. A better understanding of the normal anatomy of the human pubic symphysis should improve our understanding of such problems and contribute to better treatments for patients suffering from symphyseal pain and dysfunction. PMID:20840351

  1. Muscle regeneration by adipose tissue-derived adult stem cells attached to injectable PLGA spheres.

    PubMed

    Kim, MiJung; Choi, Yu Suk; Yang, Seung Hye; Hong, Hea-Nam; Cho, Sung-Woo; Cha, Sang Myun; Pak, Jhang Ho; Kim, Chan Wha; Kwon, Seog Woon; Park, Chan Jeoung

    2006-09-22

    The [corrected] use of adult stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering and regeneration strategies represents a promising approach for skeletal muscle repair. We have evaluated the combination of adipose tissue-derived adult stem cells (ADSCs) obtained from autologous liposuction and injectable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) spheres for muscle regeneration. ADSCs attached to PLGA spheres and PLGA spheres alone were cultured in myogenic medium for 21 days and injected subcutaneously into the necks of nude mice. After 30 and 60 days, the mice were sacrificed, and newly formed tissues were analyzed by immunostaining, H and E staining, and RT-PCR. We found that ADSCs attached to PLGA spheres, but not PLGA spheres alone, were able to generate muscle tissue. These findings suggest that ADSCs and PLGA spheres are useful materials for muscle tissue engineering and that their combination can be used in clinical settings for muscle regeneration.

  2. A New Antigen Retrieval Technique for Human Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Byne, William; Haroutunian, Vahram; García-Villanueva, Mercedes; Rábano, Alberto; García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of tissues is a powerful tool used to delineate the presence or absence of an antigen. During the last 30 years, antigen visualization in human brain tissue has been significantly limited by the masking effect of fixatives. In the present study, we have used a new method for antigen retrieval in formalin-fixed human brain tissue and examined the effectiveness of this protocol to reveal masked antigens in tissues with both short and long formalin fixation times. This new method, which is based on the use of citraconic acid, has not been previously utilized in brain tissue although it has been employed in various other tissues such as tonsil, ovary, skin, lymph node, stomach, breast, colon, lung and thymus. Thus, we reported here a novel method to carry out immunohistochemical studies in free-floating human brain sections. Since fixation of brain tissue specimens in formaldehyde is a commonly method used in brain banks, this new antigen retrieval method could facilitate immunohistochemical studies of brains with prolonged formalin fixation times. PMID:18852880

  3. Mechanized syringe homogenization of human and animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Porter, Andrew C; Patel, Nisha C; Kurono, Sadamu; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Scofield, R Hal

    2004-06-01

    Tissue homogenization is a prerequisite to any fractionation schedule. A plethora of hands-on methods are available to homogenize tissues. Here we report a mechanized method for homogenizing animal and human tissues rapidly and easily. The Bio-Mixer 1200 (manufactured by Innovative Products, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK) utilizes the back-and-forth movement of two motor-driven disposable syringes, connected to each other through a three-way stopcock, to homogenize animal or human tissue. Using this method, we were able to homogenize human or mouse tissues (brain, liver, heart, and salivary glands) in 5 min. From sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric enzyme assay for prolidase, we have found that the homogenates obtained were as good or even better than that obtained used a manual glass-on-Teflon (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) homogenization protocol (all-glass tube and Teflon pestle). Use of the Bio-Mixer 1200 to homogenize animal or human tissue precludes the need to stay in the cold room as is the case with the other hands-on homogenization methods available, in addition to freeing up time for other experiments.

  4. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues

    PubMed Central

    Freud, Aharon G.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34+CD45RA+ hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field. PMID:24661538

  5. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34(+)CD45RA(+) hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field.

  6. Ossified Ligamentum Longitudinale Anterius in Adult Human Dry Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Venumadhav, Nelluri; KS, Siddaraju

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ligamentum longitudinale anterius is a broad and strong band of fibrous tissue that runs along the anterior surfaces of the bodies of the vertebrae. Aim: The study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult dry human vertebra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 95 sets of dry human vertebral columns irrespective of age and sex at Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences- Barabanki,-UP, Melaka Manipal Medical College-Manipal University and Department of Anatomy, KMCT Medical College, Manassery- Calicut, India. All the sets of vertebral columns were macroscopically inspected for the ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius. Results: It was observed that out of 95 sets of vertebral columns, 27 (28.42%) vertebral columns showed ossification. Out of 27 vertebral columns, 17 (17.89%) vertebral columns showed segmental type of ossification, 2 (2.11%) vertebral columns showed continuous type of ossification and 8 (8.42%) vertebral columns showed mixed type of ossification at different vertebral level. Conclusion: Such type of ossification will affect the biomechanics of the spine and may result in stiff neck, low back pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, compression of the brachial plexus, aphonia, immobility or mucosal thickening of larynx. Hence, knowledge of such abnormalities should be kept in mind to minimise serious complications in any surgical intervention or investigative procedures in the region. PMID:25302180

  7. 78 FR 44134 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: Financial Sustainability of Human Tissue...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ...: Financial Sustainability of Human Tissue Biobanking (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1... Collection: Financial Sustainability of Human Tissue Biobanking, 0925-NEW, National Cancer Institute...

  8. The TissueNet v.2 database: A quantitative view of protein-protein interactions across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Omer; Barshir, Ruth; Sharon, Moran; Lerman, Eugene; Kirson, Binyamin F.; Hekselman, Idan; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular interactions of human proteins within tissues is important for identifying their tissue-specific roles and for shedding light on tissue phenotypes. However, many protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have no tissue-contexts. The TissueNet database bridges this gap by associating experimentally-identified PPIs with human tissues that were shown to express both pair-mates. Users can select a protein and a tissue, and obtain a network view of the query protein and its tissue-associated PPIs. TissueNet v.2 is an updated version of the TissueNet database previously featured in NAR. It includes over 40 human tissues profiled via RNA-sequencing or protein-based assays. Users can select their preferred expression data source and interactively set the expression threshold for determining tissue-association. The output of TissueNet v.2 emphasizes qualitative and quantitative features of query proteins and their PPIs. The tissue-specificity view highlights tissue-specific and globally-expressed proteins, and the quantitative view highlights proteins that were differentially expressed in the selected tissue relative to all other tissues. Together, these views allow users to quickly assess the unique versus global functionality of query proteins. Thus, TissueNet v.2 offers an extensive, quantitative and user-friendly interface to study the roles of human proteins across tissues. TissueNet v.2 is available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/tissuenet. PMID:27899616

  9. Investigation of genes important in neurodevelopment disorders in adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Maussion, Gilles; Diallo, Alpha B; Gigek, Carolina O; Chen, Elizabeth S; Crapper, Liam; Théroux, Jean-Francois; Chen, Gary G; Vasuta, Cristina; Ernst, Carl

    2015-10-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are caused by mutations in genes expressed in fetal brain, but little is known about these same genes in adult human brain. Here, we test the hypothesis that genes associated with NDDs continue to have a role in adult human brain to explore the idea that NDD symptoms may be partially a result of their adult function rather than just their neurodevelopmental function. To demonstrate adult brain function, we performed expression analyses and ChIPseq in human neural stem cell(NSC) lines at different developmental stages and adult human brain, targeting two genes associated with NDDs, SATB2 and EHMT1, and the WNT signaling gene TCF7L2, which has not been associated with NDDs. Analysis of DNA interaction sites in neural stem cells reveals high (40-50 %) overlap between proliferating and differentiating cells for each gene in temporal space. Studies in adult brain demonstrate that consensus sites are similar to NSCs but occur at different genomic locations. We also performed expression analyses using BrainSpan data for NDD-associated genes SATB2, EHMT1, FMR1, MECP2, MBD5, CTNND2, RAI1, CHD8, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, TCF4, SCN2A, and DYRK1A and find high expression of these genes in adult brain, at least comparable to developing human brain, confirming that genes associated with NDDs likely have a role in adult tissue. Adult function of genes associated with NDDs might be important in clinical disease presentation and may be suitable targets for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Developing Resourceful Humans. Adult Education within the Economic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynn Elen, Ed.

    This book, which explores the shifting paradigm from human resource development to developing resourceful humans, establishes the historical position of adult education within the economic context, discusses human capital propositions, and examines the learning dimensions of economic and educational change. The following chapters are included:…

  11. Quantitation of two endogenous lactose-inhibitable lectins in embryonic and adult chicken tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, E.C.; Barondes, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two lactose-binding lectins from chicken tissues, chicken-lactose-lectin-I (CLL-I) and chicken-lactose-lectin-II (CLL-II) were quantified with a radioimmunoassay in extracts of a number of developing and adult chicken tissues. Both lectins could be measured in the same extract without separation, because they showed no significant immunological cross- reactivity. Many embryonic and adult tissues, including brain, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, pancreas, and spleen, contained one or both lectins, although their concentrations differed markedly. For example, embryonic muscle, the richest source of CLL-I contained only traces of CLL-II whereas embryonic kidney, a very rich source of CLL-II contained substantial CLL-I. In both muscle and kidney, lectin levels in adulthood were much lower than in the embryonic state. In contrast, CLL-I in liver and CLL-II in intestine were 10-fold to 30-fold more concentrated in the adult than in the 15-d embryo. CLL-I and CLL-II from several tissues were purified by affinity chromatography and their identity in the various tissues was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and peptide mapping. The results suggest that these lectins might have different functions in the many developing and adult tissues in which they are found.

  12. Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

  13. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  14. Comparative gene expression profiling in human-induced pluripotent stem cell--derived cardiocytes and human and cynomolgus heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Dinesh; Collis, Leon P; Sun, Sunny Z; Bonato, Vinicius; Chen, Xian; Anson, Blake; Pletcher, Mathew; Fermini, Bernard; Engle, Sandra J

    2013-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is one of the leading causes of drug attrition. Current in vitro models insufficiently predict cardiotoxicity, and there is a need for alternative physiologically relevant models. Here we describe the gene expression profile of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiocytes (iCC) postthaw over a period of 42 days in culture and compare this profile to human fetal and adult as well as adult cynomolgus nonhuman primate (NHP, Macaca fascicularis) heart tissue. Our results indicate that iCC express relevant cardiac markers such as ion channels (SCN5A, KCNJ2, CACNA1C, KCNQ1, and KCNH2), tissue-specific structural markers (MYH6, MYLPF, MYBPC3, DES, TNNT2, and TNNI3), and transcription factors (NKX2.5, GATA4, and GATA6) and lack the expression of stem cell markers (FOXD3, GBX2, NANOG, POU5F1, SOX2, and ZFP42). Furthermore, we performed a functional evaluation of contractility of the iCC and showed functional and pharmacological correlations with myocytes isolated from adult NHP hearts. These results suggest that stem cell-derived cardiocytes may represent a novel in vitro model to study human cardiac toxicity with potential ex vivo and in vivo translation.

  15. High and low mammographic density human breast tissues maintain histological differential in murine tissue engineering chambers.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huang, D; Lin, S J; Huo, C; Blick, T; Henderson, M A; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Morrison, W A; Campbell, I G; Hopper, J L; Southey, M C; Haviv, I; Thompson, E W

    2012-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is the area of breast tissue that appears radiologically white on mammography. Although high MD is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, independent of BRCA1/2 mutation status, the molecular basis of high MD and its associated breast cancer risk is poorly understood. MD studies will benefit from an animal model, where hormonal, gene and drug perturbations on MD can be measured in a preclinical context. High and low MD tissues were selectively sampled by stereotactic biopsy from operative specimens of high-risk women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. The high and low MD tissues were transferred into separate vascularised biochambers in the groins of SCID mice. Chamber material was harvested after 6 weeks for histological analyses and immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins, vimentin and a human-specific mitochondrial antigen. Within-individual analysis was performed in replicate mice, eliminating confounding by age, body mass index and process-related factors, and comparisons were made to the parental human tissue. Maintenance of differential MD post-propagation was assessed radiographically. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the preservation of human glandular and stromal components in the murine biochambers, with maintenance of radiographic MD differential. Propagated high MD regions had higher stromal (p = 0.0002) and lower adipose (p = 0.0006) composition, reflecting the findings in the original human breast tissue, although glands appeared small and non-complex in both high and low MD groups. No significant differences were observed in glandular area (p = 0.4) or count (p = 0.4) between high and low MD biochamber tissues. Human mammary glandular and stromal tissues were viably maintained in murine biochambers, with preservation of differential radiographic density and histological features. Our study provides a murine model for future studies into the biomolecular basis of MD as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  16. Ethics, public policy, and human fetal tissue transplantation research.

    PubMed

    Childress, James F

    1991-06-01

    This article focuses on the deliberations of the National Institutes of Health Human Fetal Tissue Transplantation Research Panel in 1988. It explores various arguments for and against the use of fetal tissue for transplantation research, following elective abortion, and for and against the use of federal funds for such research. After examining the relevance of various positions on the moral status of the fetus and the morality of abortion, the article critically examines charges that such research, especially with federal funds, would involve complicity in the moral evil of abortion, would legitimate abortion practices, and would provide incentives for abortions. Finally, it considers whether the donation model is appropriate for the transfer of human fetal tissue and whether the woman who chooses to have an abortion is the apppropriate donor of the tissue.

  17. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with (/sup 3/H)Pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M/sub 1/ neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M/sub 1/, the cardiac M/sub 2/ and the glandular M/sub 3/.

  18. Hemodynamic measurements in deep brain tissues of humans by near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Oda, Motoki; Yamaki, Etsuko; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Daisuke; Yoshimoto, Kenji; Homma, Shu; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    Using near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS), we measured the human head in transmittance mode to obtain the optical properties, tissue oxygenation, and hemodynamics of deep brain tissues in 50 healthy adult volunteers. The right ear canal was irradiated with 3-wavelengths of pulsed light (760, 795, and 835nm), and the photons passing through the human head were collected at the left ear canal. Optical signals with sufficient intensity could be obtained from 46 of the 50 volunteers. By analyzing the temporal profiles based on the photon diffusion theory, we successfully obtained absorption coefficients for each wavelength. The levels of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2), deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb), total hemoglobin (tHb), and tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) were then determined by referring to the hemoglobin spectroscopic data. Compared with the SO2 values for the forehead measurements in reflectance mode, the SO2 values of the transmittance measurements of the human head were approximately 10% lower, and tHb values of the transmittance measurements were always lower than those of the forehead reflectance measurements. Moreover, the level of hemoglobin and the SO2 were strongly correlated between the human head measurements in transmittance mode and the forehead measurements in the reflectance mode, respectively. These results demonstrated a potential application of this TRS system in examining deep brain tissues of humans.

  19. Engineered human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) are produced in a rotating wall vessel (RWV) with microcarriers by coculturing mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (BTC) and bronchial epithelium cells (BEC). These TLAs display structural characteristics and express markers of in vivo respiratory epithelia. TLAs are useful for screening compounds active in lung tissues such as antiviral compounds, cystic fibrosis treatments, allergens, and cytotoxic compounds.

  20. An improved cryopreservation procedure for human fetal pancreas tissues.

    PubMed

    Shiogama, T; Mullen, Y; Klandorf, H; Terada, M; Clark, W R

    1987-11-01

    Improved viability and function of insulin-producing beta (B) cells of frozen-stored human fetal pancreatic tissue was obtained by a two-step method utilizing high concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Human fetal pancreata (14-23-week gestation) obtained from pathologic abortions were teased and cultured overnight. Prior to freezing the tissues were immersed in 0.9% saline containing 0.5 M DMSO for 30 min (room temperature) and then placed in 2.1 M DMSO on ice for 5 min. The tissues were frozen by the method previously developed in our laboratory and stored at -196 degrees C. The frozen-stored tissues were subsequently thawed at 24 degrees C and cultured overnight before viability testing. Viability and function of the B cells were assessed by several specific assay methods; glucose plus theophylline-induced insulin release during static incubation and perifusion, 3H-leucine incorporation into insulin, and insulin content of the tissue grown in athymic mice for 7 days. The response to glucose plus theophylline stimulation, measured on the frozen-thawed tissue one day after thawing, was 80% of the level measured in control tissue maintained in organ culture. Frozen-thawed tissues maintained in organ culture for 1 week responded comparably in the in vitro assay systems. The insulin content of frozen-thawed pancreatic tissue removed from athymic mice 1 week after transplantation was approximately 60% of the amount measured in the control grafts. These results demonstrate the utility of our procedure in the maintenance of the viability and function of frozen-stored human B cells both in culture and after transplantation.

  1. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  2. Advancing biomaterials of human origin for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterials have played an increasingly prominent role in the success of biomedical devices and in the development of tissue engineering, which seeks to unlock the regenerative potential innate to human tissues/organs in a state of deterioration and to restore or reestablish normal bodily function. Advances in our understanding of regenerative biomaterials and their roles in new tissue formation can potentially open a new frontier in the fast-growing field of regenerative medicine. Taking inspiration from the role and multi-component construction of native extracellular matrices (ECMs) for cell accommodation, the synthetic biomaterials produced today routinely incorporate biologically active components to define an artificial in vivo milieu with complex and dynamic interactions that foster and regulate stem cells, similar to the events occurring in a natural cellular microenvironment. The range and degree of biomaterial sophistication have also dramatically increased as more knowledge has accumulated through materials science, matrix biology and tissue engineering. However, achieving clinical translation and commercial success requires regenerative biomaterials to be not only efficacious and safe but also cost-effective and convenient for use and production. Utilizing biomaterials of human origin as building blocks for therapeutic purposes has provided a facilitated approach that closely mimics the critical aspects of natural tissue with regard to its physical and chemical properties for the orchestration of wound healing and tissue regeneration. In addition to directly using tissue transfers and transplants for repair, new applications of human-derived biomaterials are now focusing on the use of naturally occurring biomacromolecules, decellularized ECM scaffolds and autologous preparations rich in growth factors/non-expanded stem cells to either target acceleration/magnification of the body's own repair capacity or use nature's paradigms to create new tissues for

  3. Glomus tissue in the vicinity of the human carotid sinus.

    PubMed Central

    Garfia, A

    1980-01-01

    Three of 60 cadavers have shown, in the adventitia or in the adipose tissue from the human carotid sinus region, small islands of tissue richly and typically vascularized and with nerve endings contacting cells like the tissue of the principal carotid body. In two of the cases such 'miniglomera' were single but in the third there were several all on the same side. A modified en bloc silver nitrate reduction stain was used to demonstrate the microvascular arrangements and the nerve endings by light microscopy of serial tangential sections of the carotid bifurcation. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7364653

  4. Immunohistochemical characterization of FHIT expression in normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kujan, Omar; Abuderman, Abdulwahab; Al-Shawaf, Ahmad Zahi

    2016-01-01

    Background Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) is a tumor suppressor gene that is commonly inactivated in human tumors. Interestingly, the normal pattern of FHIT expression is largely unknown. Aim This study is aimed to characterize the expression of FHIT protein in normal human tissues. Materials and methods A total of 119 normal human tissue specimens were analyzed for the FHIT expression using immunohistochemistry technique. The inclusion criteria included: normal/inflammatory tissue with no evidence of cellular atypia. Results All studied specimens were stained positively with FHIT and showed either nuclear or cytoplasmic expression. Interestingly, the pattern of FHIT staining was similar among different specimens from each organ. FHIT is located predominantly in the nucleus, although cytoplasmic staining is also present in some cell types. Oral squamous epithelium, breast ductal epithelium, squamous and tubal metaplastic epithelium of the uterine cervix, esophageal squamous epithelium, salivary glands, and bronchial epithelia all strongly expressed the nuclear protein. In connective tissue, FHIT has shown strong cytoplasmic expression in histocytes including macrophages and dendritic cells, fibroblasts, and myofibroblasts. Conclusion Documentation of the pattern of FHIT expression in normal tissues will contribute to our understanding of the normal function of this protein and to interpretation of potentially altered FHIT expression in human tumors. PMID:28250975

  5. Biomechanical behavior of pericardial human tissue: a constitutive formulation.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Piero G; Pachera, Paola; Tiengo, Cesare; Natali, Arturo N

    2014-09-01

    This work aims to present a constitutive model suitable to interpret the biomechanical response of human pericardial tissues. The model is consistent with the need of describing large strains, anisotropy, almost incompressibility, and time-dependent effects. Attention is given to human pericardial tissue because of the increased interest in its application as a substitute in reconstructive surgery. Specific, even limited, experimental investigation has been performed on human samples taken from surgical grafts in order to verify the capability of the constitutive model in supplying a correct description of tissue mechanical response. Experimental data include uni-axial tensile tests and stress relaxation tests up to 300 s, developed along different directions of the tissue. The grafts tested show different mechanical characteristics for what concern the level of anisotropy of the tissue. The constitutive model proposed shows to adapt to the different configurations of the human pericardium grafts, as emerged by experimental data considered, and it is capable to describe the variability of the mechanical characteristics.

  6. Genetic and functional characterization of clonally derived adult human brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Kosaku; Luijten, Ineke H N; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Hong, Haemin; Sonne, Si B; Kim, Miae; Xue, Ruidan; Chondronikola, Maria; Cypess, Aaron M; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Nedergaard, Jan; Sidossis, Labros S; Kajimura, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) acts in mammals as a natural defense system against hypothermia, and its activation to a state of increased energy expenditure is believed to protect against the development of obesity. Even though the existence of BAT in adult humans has been widely appreciated1–8, its cellular origin and molecular identity remain elusive largely because of high cellular heterogeneity within various adipose tissue depots. To understand the nature of adult human brown adipocytes at single cell resolution, we isolated clonally derived adipocytes from stromal vascular fractions of adult human BAT from two individuals and globally analyzed their molecular signatures. We used RNA sequencing followed by unbiased genome-wide expression analyses and found that a population of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-positive human adipocytes possessed molecular signatures resembling those of a recruitable form of thermogenic adipocytes (that is, beige adipocytes). In addition, we identified molecular markers that were highly enriched in UCP1-positive human adipocytes, a set that included potassium channel K3 (KCNK3) and mitochondrial tumor suppressor 1 (MTUS1). Further, we functionally characterized these two markers using a loss-of-function approach and found that KCNK3 and MTUS1 were required for beige adipocyte differentiation and thermogenic function. The results of this study present new opportunities for human BAT research, such as facilitating cell-based disease modeling and unbiased screens for thermogenic regulators. PMID:25774848

  7. Adipose tissue gene expression and metabolic health of obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swapan Kumar; Ma, Lijun; Sharma, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Obese subjects with a similar body mass index (BMI) exhibit substantial heterogeneity in gluco- and cardio-metabolic heath phenotypes. However, defining genes that underlie the heterogeneity of metabolic features among obese individuals and determining metabolically healthy and unhealthy phenotypes remain challenging. We conducted unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue transcripts from 30 obese men and women ≥40 years old. Despite similar BMIs in all subjects, we found two distinct subgroups, one metabolically healthy (Group 1) and one metabolically unhealthy (Group 2). Subjects in Group 2 showed significantly higher total cholesterol (p=0.005), LDL cholesterol (p=0.006), 2h-Insulin during OGTT (p=0.015) and lower insulin sensitivity (SI, p=0.029) compared to Group 1. We identified significant up-regulation of 141 genes (e.g. MMP9 and SPP1) and down-regulation of 17 genes (e.g. NDRG4 and GINS3) in group 2 subjects. Intriguingly, these differentially expressed transcripts were enriched for genes involved in cardiovascular disease-related processes (p=2.81×10−11–3.74×10−02) and pathways involved in immune and inflammatory response (p=8.32×10−5–0.04). Two down-regulated genes, NDRG4 and GINS3, have been located in a genomic interval associated with cardiac repolarization in published GWASs and zebra fish knockout models. Our study provides evidence that perturbations in the adipose tissue gene expression network are important in defining metabolic health in obese subjects. PMID:25520251

  8. Near Infrared Spectral Determination of Human Tissue pH.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    Continuous Tissue pH Monitory in the Human Fetus During Labor", Obstet . Gynecol ., 55:523, 1980. 23. [Lemer 82] Lemer, H., et al., "Measurement of Glucose...Umbilical Blood pH", Am. J. Obstet . Gynecol ., 128: 901-903, 1977. 38. [Weyer 85] Weyer, L G., "Near Infrared Spectroscopy of Organic Substances," Applied...Patterns and Tissue pH in the Human Fetus", Am. J. Obstet . Gynecol ., 134:685-690, 1979. 24 Appendix I An Estimation Extension of the FKNN Algorithm In

  9. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  10. Transepithelial Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Human Intestinal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Dallin; Enda, Michael; Bond, Tanner; Moghaddam, Seyyed Pouya Hadipour; Conarton, Josh; Scaife, Courtney; Volckmann, Eric; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-11-02

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown transepithelial transport across intestinal epithelial barrier in rats and across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Caco-2 models innately lack mucous barriers, and rat isolated intestinal tissue has been shown to overestimate human permeability. This study is the first report of transport of PAMAM dendrimers across isolated human intestinal epithelium. It was observed that FITC labeled G4-NH2 and G3.5-COOH PAMAM dendrimers at 1 mM concentration do not have a statistically higher permeability compared to free FITC controls in isolated human jejunum and colonic tissues. Mannitol permeability was increased at 10 mM concentrations of G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 dendrimers. Significant histological changes in human colonic and jejunal tissues were observed at G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 concentrations of 10 mM implying that dose limiting toxicity may occur at similar concentrations in vivo. The permeability through human isolated intestinal tissue in this study was compared to previous rat and Caco-2 permeability data. This study implicates that PAMAM dendrimer oral drug delivery may be feasible, but it may be limited to highly potent drugs.

  11. Discordance of DNA Methylation Variance Between two Accessible Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ruiwei; Jones, Meaghan J.; Chen, Edith; Neumann, Sarah M.; Fraser, Hunter B.; Miller, Gregory E.; Kobor, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Population epigenetic studies have been seeking to identify differences in DNA methylation between specific exposures, demographic factors, or diseases in accessible tissues, but relatively little is known about how inter-individual variability differs between these tissues. This study presents an analysis of DNA methylation differences between matched peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) and buccal epithelial cells (BECs), the two most accessible tissues for population studies, in 998 promoter-located CpG sites. Specifically we compared probe-wise DNA methylation variance, and how this variance related to demographic factors across the two tissues. PBMCs had overall higher DNA methylation than BECs, and the two tissues tended to differ most at genomic regions of low CpG density. Furthermore, although both tissues showed appreciable probe-wise variability, the specific regions and magnitude of variability differed strongly between tissues. Lastly, through exploratory association analysis, we found indication of differential association of BEC and PBMC with demographic variables. The work presented here offers insight into variability of DNA methylation between individuals and across tissues and helps guide decisions on the suitability of buccal epithelial or peripheral mononuclear cells for the biological questions explored by epigenetic studies in human populations. PMID:25660083

  12. Cortisol in human tissues at different stages of life.

    PubMed

    Costa, A; Benedetto, C; Fabris, C; Giraudi, G F; Testori, O; Bertino, E; Marozio, L; Varvello, G; Arisio, R; Ariano, M; Emanuel, A

    1996-01-01

    Aim of the work was to measure the cortisol level in human tissues at different stages of life, by means of radioimmunoassay and by chromatography. Viable samples of 13 different tissues were obtained during surgical intervention from 30 to 70 years old patients of either sex. Mean tissue cortisol concentration was 78 +/- 35 ng/g, ranging from 20 +/- 10 ng/g in the thyroid to 124 +/- 76 ng/g in the kidney. Similar values were measured in the corresponding tissues from not decayed corpses, so that paired values could be mediated. However the pancreas, and corrupted autopsy tissues, gave nil or exceedingly high cortisol concentration values; in some cases, opposite extreme values were measured in different organs of the same body. Cortisol concentration was also measured in 11 sound different tissues of spontaneously aborted or stillbirth fetuses, between 16 and 36 weeks of gestation. Mean value was 63 +/- 27 ng/g, ranging from 30 +/- 25 ng/g in the liver to 104 +/- 52 ng/g in the lungs. Also in fetuses nil or exceedingly high cortisol values occurred in altered tissues. One hundred and fourteen samples of limbs and carcasses of 7 to 12 gestational weeks embryos, obtained from voluntary abortions, were also examined: 20% gave nil result, in the remaining mean cortisol concentration was 32 ng/g. In 33 samples of embryos' mixed viscera, RIA and chromatography gave unreliable exceedingly high values. The nil and the exceedingly high values measured in the altered autoptic tissue specimens were inconsistent with the cortisol blood level measured in the patients, as were those measured in embryonic tissues with the acknowledged blood and adrenals cortisol levels at that stage of life. Thus cortisol may be measured by RIA and by chromatography in sound tissues, while the values obtained in the pancreas, in corrupted tissues, and in embryonal viscera do not represent the hormonal milieu, but are likely artifacts due to impeachment of the diagnostic system.

  13. Inhaled cellulosic and plastic fibers found in human lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Pauly, J L; Stegmeier, S J; Allaart, H A; Cheney, R T; Zhang, P J; Mayer, A G; Streck, R J

    1998-05-01

    We report the results of studies undertaken to determine whether inhaled plant (i.e., cellulosic; e.g., cotton) and plastic (e.g., polyester) fibers are present in human lungs and, if so, whether inhaled fibers are also present in human lung cancers. Specimens of lung cancer of different histological types and adjacent nonneoplastic lung tissue were obtained from patients undergoing a lung resection for removal of a tumor. With the protection of a laminar flow hood and safeguards to prevent contamination by extraneous fibers, fresh, nonfixed, and nonstained samples of lung tissue were compressed between two glass microscope slides. Specimens in these dual slide chambers were examined with a microscope configured to permit viewing with white light, fluorescent light, polarizing light, and phase-contrast illumination. Near-term fetal bovine lungs and nonlung human tumors were used as controls. In contrast to the observations of these control tissues, morphologically heterogeneous fibers were seen repetitively in freshly excised human lung tissue using polarized light. Inhaled fibers were present in 83% of nonneoplastic lung specimens (n = 67/81) and in 97% of malignant lung specimens (n = 32/33). Thus, of the 114 human lung specimens examined, fibers were observed in 99 (87%). Examination of histopathology slides of lung tissue with polarized light confirmed the presence of inhaled cellulosic and plastic fibers. Of 160 surgical histopathology lung tissue slides, 17 were selected for critical examination; of these, fibers were identified in 13 slides. The inhalation of mineral (e.g., asbestos) fibers has been described by many investigators; we believe, however, that this is the first report of inhaled nonmineral (e.g., plant and plastic) fibers. These bioresistant and biopersistent cellulosic and plastic fibers are candidate agents contributing to the risk of lung cancer.

  14. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W. )

    1990-11-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which {sup 125}I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity.

  15. Brain tissue pressure measurements in perinatal and adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hornig, G W; Lorenzo, A V; Zavala, L M; Welch, K

    1987-12-01

    Brain tissue pressure (BTP) in pre- and post-natal anesthetized rabbits, held in a stereotactic head holder, was measured with a fluid filled 23 gauge open-ended cannula connected distally to a pressure transducer. By advancing the cannula step wise through a hole in the cranium it was possible to sequentially measure pressure from the cranial subarachnoid space, cortex, ventricle and basal ganglia. Separate cannulas and transducers were used to measure CSFP from the cisterna magna and arterial and/or venous pressure. Pressure recordings obtained when the tip of the BTP cannula was located in the cranial subarachnoid space or ventricle exhibited respiratory and blood pressure pulsations equivalent to and in phase with CSF pulsations recorded from the cisterna magna. When the tip was advanced into brain parenchymal sites such pulsations were suppressed or non-detectable unless communication with a CSF compartment had been established inadvertently. Although CSF pressures in the three spinal fluid compartments were equivalent, in most animals BTP was higher than CSFP. However, after momentary venting of the system BTP equilibrated at a pressure below that of CSFP. We speculate that venting of the low compliance system (1.20 x 10(-5) ml/mmHg) relieves the isometric pressure build-up due to insertion of the cannula into brain parenchyma. Under these conditions, and at all ages examined, BTP in the rabbit is consistently lower than CSFP and, as with CSFP, it increases as the animal matures.

  16. Magnetic studies of iron-entities in human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślawska-Waniewska, A.; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, E.; Nedelko, N.; Gałązka-Friedman, J.; Friedman, A.

    2004-05-01

    Iron-entities in the human liver, brain and blood tissues have been investigated by means of EPR spectroscopy and magnetization measurements over the temperature range 4-300 K. The identification of the most typical forms of iron in the human body (i.e. isolated Fe-ions bonded in hemoglobin and transferrin as well as exchange coupled Fe-ions in nanosized ferritin cores) is presented.

  17. Translational neuropharmacology: the use of human isolated gastrointestinal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, GJ; Broad, J; Kung, V; Knowles, CH

    2013-01-01

    Translational sciences increasingly emphasize the measurement of functions in native human tissues. However, such studies must confront variations in patient age, gender, genetic background and disease. Here, these are discussed with reference to neuromuscular and neurosecretory functions of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tissues are obtained after informed consent, in collaboration with surgeons (surgical techniques help minimize variables) and pathologists. Given the difficulties of directly recording from human myenteric neurones (embedded between muscle layers), enteric motor nerve functions are studied by measuring muscle contractions/relaxations evoked by electrical stimulation of intrinsic nerves; responses are regionally dependent, often involving cholinergic and nitrergic phenotypes. Enteric sensory functions can be studied by evoking the peristaltic reflex, involving enteric sensory and motor nerves, but this has rarely been achieved. As submucosal neurones are more accessible (after removing the mucosa), direct neuronal recordings are possible. Neurosecretory functions are studied by measuring changes in short-circuit current across the mucosa. For all experiments, basic questions must be addressed. Because tissues are from patients, what are the controls and the influence of disease? How long does it take before function fully recovers? What is the impact of age- and gender-related differences? What is the optimal sample size? Addressing these and other questions minimizes variability and raises the scientific credibility of human tissue research. Such studies also reduce animal use. Further, the many differences between animal and human GI functions also means that human tissue research must question the ethical validity of using strains of animals with unproved translational significance. Linked Article BJP published a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology in 2011. To view the articles in this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  18. Microimaging FT-IR of oral cavity tumours. Part III: Cells, inoculated tissues and human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Ferraris, P.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Possati, L.; Rocchetti, R.; Rubini, C.; Sabbatini, S.; Tosi, G.; Mariggiò, M. A.; Lo Muzio, L.

    2007-05-01

    The biochemistry of healthy and tumour cell cultures, inoculated tissues and oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR Microscopy with the aim to relate spectral patterns with microbiological and histopathological findings. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and the other two techniques. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wave number or band ratio images, allowed an evaluation of the pathological changes. The spectroscopic patterns of inoculated tissues resulted quite similar to human tissues; differences of both types of sections with cellular lines could be explained by the influence of the environment.

  19. Collagen in Human Tissues: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications from a Tissue Engineering Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Preethi; Prabhakaran, Molamma P.; Sireesha, Merum; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    The extracellular matrix is a complex biological structure encoded with various proteins, among which the collagen family is the most significant and abundant of all, contributing 30-35% of the whole-body protein. "Collagen" is a generic term for proteins that forms a triple-helical structure with three polypeptide chains, and around 29 types of collagen have been identified up to now. Although most of the members of the collagen family form such supramolecular structures, extensive diversity exists between each type of collagen. The diversity is not only based on the molecular assembly and supramolecular structures of collagen types but is also observed within its tissue distribution, function, and pathology. Collagens possess complex hierarchical structures and are present in various forms such as collagen fibrils (1.5-3.5 nm wide), collagen fibers (50-70 nm wide), and collagen bundles (150-250 nm wide), with distinct properties characteristic of each tissue providing elasticity to skin, softness of the cartilage, stiffness of the bone and tendon, transparency of the cornea, opaqueness of the sclera, etc. There exists an exclusive relation between the structural features of collagen in human tissues (such as the collagen composition, collagen fibril length and diameter, collagen distribution, and collagen fiber orientation) and its tissue-specific mechanical properties. In bone, a transverse collagen fiber orientation prevails in regions of higher compressive stress whereas longitudinally oriented collagen fibers correlate to higher tensile stress. The immense versatility of collagen compels a thorough understanding of the collagen types and this review discusses the major types of collagen found in different human tissues, highlighting their tissue-specific uniqueness based on their structure and mechanical function. The changes in collagen during a specific tissue damage or injury are discussed further, focusing on the many tissue engineering applications for

  20. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  1. Arrhenius parameters for primary thermal injury in human tonsillar tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen; Radabaugh, Rebecca; Coad, James E.

    2011-03-01

    Clinical implementation of a thermal therapy requires the ability to predict tissue injury following exposures to specific thermal histories. As part of an effort to develop a nonexcisional alternative to tonsillectomy, the degree of primary hyperthermic tissue injury in human tonsil was characterized. Fifteen fresh pediatric hypertrophic tonsillectomy specimens were sectioned and treated in a NIST-calibrated saline bath at temperatures of 40 to 70°C with hold times of one to seven minutes. The treated tissues were subsequently nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) stained to assess for thermal respiratory enzyme inactivation as a marker of cellular injury/death. The NBT stains were quantitatively image analyzed and used to calculate Arrhenius parameters for primary thermal injury in human tonsils.

  2. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of…

  3. Engineering musculoskeletal tissues with human embryonic germ cell derivatives.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Shyni; Hwang, Nathaniel S; Ferran, Angela; Hillel, Alexander; Theprungsirikul, Parnduangjai; Canver, Adam C; Zhang, Zijun; Gearhart, John; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2010-04-01

    The cells derived from differentiating embryoid bodies of human embryonic germ (hEG) cells express a broad spectrum of gene markers and have been induced toward ecto- and endodermal lineages. We describe here in vitro and in vivo differentiation of hEG-derived cells (LVEC line) toward mesenchymal tissues. The LVEC cells express many surface marker proteins characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells and differentiated into cartilage, bone, and fat. Homogenous hyaline cartilage was generated from cells after 63 population doublings. In vivo results demonstrate cell survival, differentiation, and tissue formation. The high proliferative capacity of hEG-derived cells and their ability to differentiate and form three-dimensional mesenchymal tissues without teratoma formation underscores their significant potential for regenerative medicine. The adopted coculture system also provides new insights into how a microenvironment comprised of extracellular and cellular components may be harnessed to generate hierarchically complex tissues from pluripotent cells.

  4. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  5. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  6. Generation of a conditional mouse model to target Acvr1b disruption in adult tissues.

    PubMed

    Ripoche, Doriane; Gout, Johann; Pommier, Roxane M; Jaafar, Rami; Zhang, Chang X; Bartholin, Laurent; Bertolino, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Alk4 is a type I receptor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) family. It takes part in the signaling of TGF-β ligands such as Activins, Gdfs, and Nodal that had been demonstrated to participate in numerous mechanisms ranging from early embryonic development to adult-tissue homeostasis. Evidences indicate that Alk4 is a key regulator of many embryonic processes, but little is known about its signaling in adult tissues and in pathological conditions where Alk4 mutations had been reported. Conventional deletion of Alk4 gene (Acvr1b) results in early embryonic lethality prior gastrulation, which has precluded study of Alk4 functions in postnatal and adult mice. To circumvent this problem, we have generated a conditional Acvr1b floxed-allele by flanking the fifth and sixth exons of the Acvr1b gene with loxP sites. Cre-mediated deletion of the floxed allele generates a deleted allele, which behaves as an Acvr1b null allele leading to embryonic lethality in homozygous mutant animals. A tamoxifen-inducible approach to target disruption of Acvr1b specifically in adult tissues was used and proved to be efficient for studying Alk4 functions in various organs. We report, therefore, a novel conditional model allowing investigation of biological role played by Alk4 in a variety of tissue-specific contexts.

  7. JH Biosynthesis by Reproductive Tissues and Corpora Allata in Adult Longhorned Beetles, Apriona germari

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis from long-chain intermediates by specific reproductive system tissues and the corpora allata (CA) prepared from adult longhorned beetles, Apriona germari. Testes, male accessory glands (MAGs), ovaries and CA contain the long-chain intermediates in the ...

  8. Functional Tissue Analysis Reveals Successful Cryopreservation of Human Osteoarthritic Synovium

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Marieke; Bennink, Miranda B.; van Lent, Peter L. E. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.; Koenders, Marije I.; Thurlings, Rogier M.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting cartilage and is the most common form of arthritis worldwide. One third of OA patients have severe synovitis and less than 10% have no evidence of synovitis. Moreover, synovitis is predictive for more severe disease progression. This offers a target for therapy but more research on the pathophysiological processes in the synovial tissue of these patients is needed. Functional studies performed with synovial tissue will be more approachable when this material, that becomes available by joint replacement surgery, can be stored for later use. We set out to determine the consequences of slow-freezing of human OA synovial tissue. Therefore, we validated a method that can be applied in every routine laboratory and performed a comparative study of five cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions. To determine possible deleterious cryopreservation-thaw effects on viability, the synovial tissue architecture, metabolic activity, RNA quality, expression of cryopreservation associated stress genes, and expression of OA characteristic disease genes was studied. Furthermore, the biological activity of the cryopreserved tissue was determined by measuring cytokine secretion induced by the TLR ligands lipopolysaccharides and Pam3Cys. Compared to non frozen synovium, no difference in cell and tissue morphology could be identified in the conditions using the CS10, standard and CryoSFM CPA solution for cryopreservation. However, we observed significantly lower preservation of tissue morphology with the Biofreeze and CS2 media. The other viability assays showed trends in the same direction but were not sensitive enough to detect significant differences between conditions. In all assays tested a clearly lower viability was detected in the condition in which synovium was frozen without CPA solution. This detailed analysis showed that OA synovial tissue explants can be cryopreserved while maintaining the morphology, viability and

  9. Predictions of ozone absorption in human lungs from newborn to adult

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H.; Graham, R.C. )

    1989-01-01

    Although children are an important human population, dosimetry models for gases have been used to predict absorption mainly in laboratory animals and adult humans. To correct this omission, we have used several sources of data on age-dependent lower respiratory tract (LRT) volumes, age-dependent airway dimensions, a model of the adult tracheobronchial region, and a model of the adult acinus to construct theoretical LRT lung models for humans from birth to adulthood. An ozone (O3) dosimetry model was then used to estimate the regional and local uptake of O3 in the (theoretical) LRT of children and adults. For sedentary or quiet breathing, the LRT distribution of absorbed O3, the percent uptake (84 to 88%) and the centriacinar O3 tissue dose are not very sensitive to age. For maximal work during exercise, predicted LRT uptakes range from 87 to 93%, and the regional percent uptakes are more dependent on age than during quiet breathing. In general, the total quantity of O3 absorbed per minute increases with age. Regardless of age and state of breathing, the largest tissue dose of O3 is predicted to occur in the centriacinar region, where many animal studies show the maximal morphological damage from O3.

  10. Tissue-engineered human bioartificial muscles expressing a foreign recombinant protein for gene therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Forman, D. E.; Hennessey, J.; Sullivan, K.; Zielinski, B. A.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1999-01-01

    Murine skeletal muscle cells transduced with foreign genes and tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (BAMs) are capable of long-term delivery of soluble growth factors when implanted into syngeneic mice (Vandenburgh et al., 1996b). With the goal of developing a therapeutic cell-based protein delivery system for humans, similar genetic tissue-engineering techniques were designed for human skeletal muscle stem cells. Stem cell myoblasts were isolated, cloned, and expanded in vitro from biopsied healthy adult (mean age, 42 +/- 2 years), and elderly congestive heart failure patient (mean age, 76 +/- 1 years) skeletal muscle. Total cell yield varied widely between biopsies (50 to 672 per 100 mg of tissue, N = 10), but was not significantly different between the two patient groups. Percent myoblasts per biopsy (73 +/- 6%), number of myoblast doublings prior to senescence in vitro (37 +/- 2), and myoblast doubling time (27 +/- 1 hr) were also not significantly different between the two patient groups. Fusion kinetics of the myoblasts were similar for the two groups after 20-22 doublings (74 +/- 2% myoblast fusion) when the biopsy samples had been expanded to 1 to 2 billion muscle cells, a number acceptable for human gene therapy use. The myoblasts from the two groups could be equally transduced ex vivo with replication-deficient retroviral expression vectors to secrete 0.5 to 2 microg of a foreign protein (recombinant human growth hormone, rhGH)/10(6) cells/day, and tissue engineered into human BAMs containing parallel arrays of differentiated, postmitotic myofibers. This work suggests that autologous human skeletal myoblasts from a potential patient population can be isolated, genetically modified to secrete foreign proteins, and tissue engineered into implantable living protein secretory devices for therapeutic use.

  11. Enabling research with human embryonic and fetal tissue resources.

    PubMed

    Gerrelli, Dianne; Lisgo, Steven; Copp, Andrew J; Lindsay, Susan

    2015-09-15

    Congenital anomalies are a significant burden on human health. Understanding the developmental origins of such anomalies is key to developing potential therapies. The Human Developmental Biology Resource (HDBR), based in London and Newcastle, UK, was established to provide embryonic and fetal material for a variety of human studies ranging from single gene expression analysis to large-scale genomic/transcriptomic studies. Increasingly, HDBR material is enabling the derivation of stem cell lines and contributing towards developments in tissue engineering. Use of the HDBR and other fetal tissue resources discussed here will contribute to the long-term aims of understanding the causation and pathogenesis of congenital anomalies, and developing new methods for their treatment and prevention.

  12. Enabling research with human embryonic and fetal tissue resources

    PubMed Central

    Gerrelli, Dianne; Lisgo, Steven; Copp, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Congenital anomalies are a significant burden on human health. Understanding the developmental origins of such anomalies is key to developing potential therapies. The Human Developmental Biology Resource (HDBR), based in London and Newcastle UK, was established to provide embryonic and fetal material for a variety of human studies ranging from single gene expression analysis to large scale genomic/transcriptomic studies. Increasingly HDBR material is enabling the derivation of stem cell lines and contributing towards developments in tissue engineering. Use of the HDBR and other fetal tissue resources discussed here will contribute to the long term aims of understanding the causation and pathogenesis of congenital anomalies, and developing new methods for their treatment and prevention. PMID:26395135

  13. Microwave dielectric measurements and tissue characteristics of the human brain: potential in localizing intracranial tissues.

    PubMed

    Axer, Hubertus; Grässel, David; Steinhauer, Matthias; Stöhr, Peter; John, Andreas; Coenen, Volker A; Jansen, Rolf H; von Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf

    2002-05-21

    This study describes the measurements of dielectric properties in the microwave range to differentiate various human central nervous structures. Using a vector network analyser transmission and reflection coefficients were measured from 500 MHz to 18 GHz in four human formalin fixed human brains. The positions of the electrodes were marked, and the tissue was histologically stained to visualize the myelo- and the cytoarchitecture as well as the nerve fibre orientation at the electrodes. The profiles of the transmission coefficients showed a characteristic minimum peak. In order to describe this peak, a mathematical function was fitted. Parameters derived from digital image processing were used to characterize the myelo- and cytoarchitecure of the tissue at the electrodes. A multiple regression model, with the frequency at the transmission peak minimum as a dependent variable and two tissue characteristics at the two electrodes as independent variables, showed a multiple regression coefficient of 0.765. A neural network model was able to estimate the frequency at the transmission peak minimum from the tissue characteristics at the electrode. The measurements of dielectric properties are well suited to differentiate distinct intracerebral structures. The method could be used for online monitoring of the needle's position during a stereotactic intervention in neurosurgery.

  14. Preclinical humanized mouse model with ectopic ovarian tissues

    PubMed Central

    FU, SHILONG; WANG, JUE; SUN, WU; XU, YI; ZHOU, XIAOYU; CHENG, WENJUN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish human ovarian stroma within the mouse subcutaneously, in order for the resulting stroma to serve as a useful preclinical tool to study the progression of human ovarian cancer in a humanized ovarian microenvironment. Normal human ovarian tissues were subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and then the implants were identified by immunohistochemistry. The implants became vascularized and retained their original morphology for about 4 weeks following implantation. Immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratin-7 confirmed the ovarian origin of the epithelial cells. CD34 staining demonstrated human-derived vessels. Positive estrogen receptor and partially-positive progesterone receptor staining indicated the estrogen and progesterone dependence of the implants. Only vascular pericytes expressed α-smooth muscle actin, indicating the normal ovarian origin of the xenografts. Human ovarian tissue successfully survived in SCID mice and retained its original properties. This humanized mouse model may be used as preclinical tool to investigate ovarian cancer. PMID:25120592

  15. Elemental composition of some essential cations in human ocular tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.; Kraner, H.W.; Warren, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    To obtain data on the baseline elemental content in normal adult sensory retina, RPE and iris, normal non-diabetic eyes were analyzed and these results were used for comparison to similarly prepared samples from diabetic donor eyes. To determine if the concentrations of the cations, Ca, Ba and Zn were altered by the age, alimentation and exposure to light of the donor, tissue from children (from 25 weeks gestation to 8-1/2 years old) was also analyzed by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, proton induced x-ray emission spectroscopy, and light and electron (scanning and transmission) microscopy.

  16. Modeling of human artery tissue with probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Linfei; Chui, Chee-Kong; Fu, Yabo; Teo, Chee-Leong; Li, Yao

    2015-04-01

    Accurate modeling of biological soft tissue properties is vital for realistic medical simulation. Mechanical response of biological soft tissue always exhibits a strong variability due to the complex microstructure and different loading conditions. The inhomogeneity in human artery tissue is modeled with a computational probabilistic approach by assuming that the instantaneous stress at a specific strain varies according to normal distribution. Material parameters of the artery tissue which are modeled with a combined logarithmic and polynomial energy equation are represented by a statistical function with normal distribution. Mean and standard deviation of the material parameters are determined using genetic algorithm (GA) and inverse mean-value first-order second-moment (IMVFOSM) method, respectively. This nondeterministic approach was verified using computer simulation based on the Monte-Carlo (MC) method. Cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the MC simulation corresponds well with that of the experimental stress-strain data and the probabilistic approach is further validated using data from other studies. By taking into account the inhomogeneous mechanical properties of human biological tissue, the proposed method is suitable for realistic virtual simulation as well as an accurate computational approach for medical device validation.

  17. Identification of rheological properties of human body surface tissue.

    PubMed

    Benevicius, Vincas; Gaidys, Rimvydas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Marozas, Vaidotas

    2014-04-11

    According to World Health Organization obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century. It has tripled since the 1980s and the numbers of those affected continue to rise at an alarming rate, especially among children. There are number of devices that act as a prevention measure to boost person's motivation for physical activity and its levels. The placement of these devices is not restricted thus the measurement errors that appear because of the body rheology, clothes, etc. cannot be eliminated. The main objective of this work is to introduce a tool that can be applied directly to process measured accelerations so human body surface tissue induced errors can be reduced. Both the modeling and experimental techniques are proposed to identify body tissue rheological properties and prelate them to body mass index. Multi-level computational model composed from measurement device model and human body surface tissue rheological model is developed. Human body surface tissue induced inaccuracies can increase the magnitude of measured accelerations up to 34% when accelerations of the magnitude of up to 27 m/s(2) are measured. Although the timeframe of those disruptions are short - up to 0.2 s - they still result in increased overall measurement error.

  18. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  19. Spatial coherence in human tissue: implications for imaging and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco; Trahey, Gregg; Dahl, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The spatial coherence properties of the signal backscattered by human tissue and measured by an ultrasound transducer array are investigated. Fourier acoustics are used to describe the propagation of ultrasound through a model of tissue that includes reverberation and random scatterering in the imaging plane. The theoretical development describes how the near-field tissue layer, transducer aperture properties, and reflectivity function at the focus reduce the spatial coherence of the imaging wave measured at the transducer surface. Simulations are used to propagate the acoustic field through a histologically characterized sample of the human abdomen and to validate the theoretical predictions. In vivo measurements performed with a diagnostic ultrasound scanner demonstrate that simulations and theory closely match the measured spatial coherence characteristics in the human body across the transducer array’s entire spatial extent. The theoretical framework and simulations are then used to describe the physics of spatial coherence imaging, a type of ultrasound imaging that measures coherence properties instead of echo brightness. The same echo data from an F/2 transducer was used to generate B-mode and short lag spatial coherence images. For an anechoic lesion at the focus the contrast to noise ratio is 1.21 for conventional B-mode imaging and 1.95 for spatial coherence imaging. It is shown that the contrast in spatial coherence imaging depends on the properties of the near-field tissue layer and the backscattering function in the focal plane. PMID:25474774

  20. Occurrence of human bocaviruses and parvovirus 4 in solid tissues.

    PubMed

    Norja, Päivi; Hedman, Lea; Kantola, Kalle; Kemppainen, Kaisa; Suvilehto, Jari; Pitkäranta, Anne; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Seppänen, Mikko; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2012-08-01

    Human bocaviruses 1-4 (HBoV1-4) and parvovirus 4 (PARV4) are recently discovered human parvoviruses. HBoV1 is associated with respiratory infections of young children, while HBoV2-4 are enteric viruses. The clinical manifestations of PARV4 remain unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether the DNAs of HBoV1-4 and PARV4 persist in human tissues long after primary infection. Biopsies of tonsillar tissue, skin, and synovia were examined for HBoV1-4 DNA and PARV4 DNA by PCR. Serum samples from the tissue donors were assayed for HBoV1 and PARV4 IgG and IgM antibodies. To obtain species-specific seroprevalences for HBoV1 and for HBoV2/3 combined, the sera were analyzed after virus-like particle (VLP) competition. While HBoV1 DNA was detected exclusively in the tonsillar tissues of 16/438 individuals (3.7%), all of them ≤8 years of age. HBoV2-4 and PARV4 DNAs were absent from all tissue types. HBoV1 IgG seroprevalence was 94.9%. No subject had HBoV1 or PARV4 IgM, nor did they have PARV4 IgG. The results indicate that HBoV1 DNA occurred in a small proportion of tonsils of young children after recent primary HBoV1 infection, but did not persist long in the other tissue types studied, unlike parvovirus B19 DNA. The results obtained by the PARV4 assays are in line with previous results on PARV4 epidemiology.

  1. Structured illumination microscopy of autofluorescent aggregations in human tissue.

    PubMed

    Best, Gerrit; Amberger, Roman; Baddeley, David; Ach, Thomas; Dithmar, Stefan; Heintzmann, Rainer; Cremer, Christoph

    2011-06-01

    Sections from human eye tissue were analyzed with Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) using a specially designed microscope setup. In this microscope the structured illumination was generated with a Twyman-Green Interferometer. This SIM technique allowed us to acquire light-optical images of autofluorophore distributions in the tissue with previously unmatched optical resolution. In this work the unique setup of the microscope made possible the application of SIM with three different excitation wavelengths (488, 568 and 647 nm), thus enabling us to gather spectral information about the autofluorescence signal.

  2. Effects of laser interaction with living human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanova, O. E.; Protasov, E. A.; Protasov, D. E.; Smirnova, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    With the help of a highly sensitive laser device with the wavelength λ = 0.808 pm, which is optimal for deep penetration of the radiation into biological tissues, the effects associated with the appearance of uncontrolled human infrasonic vibrations of different frequencies were investigated. It was established that the observed fluctuations are associated with the vascular system which is characterized by its own respiratory movements, occurring synchronously with the movements of the respiratory muscles, the operation of the heart muscle, and the effect of compression ischemia. The effect of “enlightenment” of a tissue is observed with stopping of blood flow in vessels by applying a tourniquet on the wrist.

  3. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus strains augment NLRP3 expression in newborn and adult porcine gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Tohno, Masanori; Shimosato, Takeshi; Aso, Hisashi; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2011-12-15

    We isolated cDNA encoding porcine nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) from Peyer's patches. The complete nucleotide open reading frame of porcine NLRP3 contains 3108-bp encoding a deduced polypeptide of 1036-amino acid residues. The porcine NLRP3 amino acid sequence is more similar to the longest isoform of human than the mouse counterpart. The predicted amino acid sequence of porcine NLRP3 presented nine C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domains. In newborn swine, the expression of NLRP3 was detected at higher levels in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, while lower levels were observed in intestinal tissues. In adult swine, NLRP3 was strongly expressed in Peyer's patches and the mesenteric lymph nodes, and the expression level in the lower intestinal tissues was comparable to that in spleen. Toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding domain ligands, as well as Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus gasseri, enhanced NLRP3 expression in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) of newborn and adult swine. Our results should aid in understanding the intestinal immunoregulatory mechanisms underlying NLRP3 activation and the priming ability of immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria in porcine GALT.

  4. Progress toward automatic classification of human brown adipose tissue using biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Aliya; Towse, Theodore F.; Walker, Ronald C.; Avison, Malcom J.; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a small but significant tissue, which may play an important role in obesity and the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Interest in studying BAT in adult humans is increasing, but in order to quantify BAT volume in a single measurement or to detect changes in BAT over the time course of a longitudinal experiment, BAT needs to first be reliably differentiated from surrounding tissue. Although the uptake of the radiotracer 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in adipose tissue on positron emission tomography (PET) scans following cold exposure is accepted as an indication of BAT, it is not a definitive indicator, and to date there exists no standardized method for segmenting BAT. Consequently, there is a strong need for robust automatic classification of BAT based on properties measured with biomedical imaging. In this study we begin the process of developing an automated segmentation method based on properties obtained from fat-water MRI and PET-CT scans acquired on ten healthy adult subjects.

  5. Natural killer cell distribution and trafficking in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Few data are available regarding the recirculation of natural killer (NK) cells among human organs. Earlier studies have been often impaired by the use of markers then proved to be either not sufficiently specific for NK cells (e.g., CD57, CD56) or expressed only by subsets of NK cells (e.g., CD16). At the present, available data confirmed that human NK cells populate blood, lymphoid organs, lung, liver, uterus (during pregnancy), and gut. Several studies showed that NK cell homing appears to be subset-specific, as secondary lymphoid organs and probably several solid tissues are preferentially inhabited by CD56brightCD16neg/dull non-cytotoxic NK cells. Similar studies performed in the mouse model showed that lymph node and bone marrow are preferentially populated by CD11bdull NK cells while blood, spleen, and lung by CD27dull NK cells. Therefore, an important topic to be addressed in the human system is the contribution of factors that regulate NK cell tissue homing and egress, such as chemotactic receptors or homeostatic mechanisms. Here, we review the current knowledge on NK cell distribution in peripheral tissues and, based on recent acquisitions, we propose our view regarding the recirculation of NK cells in the human body. PMID:23230434

  6. Engineering of human hepatic tissue with functional vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Takanori; Koike, Naoto; Sekine, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Ryoji; Amiya, Takeru; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Although absolute organ shortage highlights the needs of alternative organ sources for regenerative medicine, the generation of a three-dimensional (3D) and complex vital organ, such as well-vascularized liver, remains a challenge. To this end, tissue engineering holds great promise; however, this approach is significantly limited by the failure of early vascularization in vivo after implantation. Here, we established a stable 3D in vitro pre-vascularization platform to generate human hepatic tissue after implantation in vivo. Human fetal liver cells (hFLCs) were mixed with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and were implanted into a collagen/fibronectin matrix composite that was used as a 3-D carrier. After a couple of days, the fluorescent HUVECs developed premature vascular networks in vitro, which were stabilized by hMSCs. The establishment of functional vessels inside the pre-vascularized constructs was proven using dextran infusion studies after implantation under a transparency cranial window. Furthermore, dynamic morphological changes during embryonic liver cell maturation were intravitaly quantified with high-resolution confocal microscope analysis. The engineered human hepatic tissue demonstrated multiple liver-specific features, both structural and functional. Our new techniques discussed here can be implemented in future clinical uses and industrial uses, such as drug testing.

  7. Maresin conjugates in tissue regeneration biosynthesis enzymes in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond; Vlasakov, Iliyan; Riley, Ian R.; Rodriguez, Ana R.; Spur, Bernd W.; Chiang, Nan; Serhan, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are central in coordinating immune responses, tissue repair, and regeneration, with different subtypes being associated with inflammation-initiating and proresolving actions. We recently identified a family of macrophage-derived proresolving and tissue regenerative molecules coined maresin conjugates in tissue regeneration (MCTR). Herein, using lipid mediator profiling we identified MCTR in human serum, lymph nodes, and plasma and investigated MCTR biosynthetic pathways in human macrophages. With human recombinant enzymes, primary cells, and enantiomerically pure compounds we found that the synthetic maresin epoxide intermediate 13S,14S-eMaR (13S,14S-epoxy- 4Z,7Z,9E,11E,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid) was converted to MCTR1 (13R-glutathionyl, 14S-hydroxy-4Z,7Z,9E,11E,13R,14S,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid) by LTC4S and GSTM4. Incubation of human macrophages with LTC4S inhibitors blocked LTC4 and increased resolvins and lipoxins. The conversion of MCTR1 to MCTR2 (13R-cysteinylglycinyl, 14S-hydroxy-4Z,7Z,9E,11E,13R,14S,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid) was catalyzed by γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in human macrophages. Biosynthesis of MCTR3 was mediated by dipeptidases that cleaved the cysteinyl-glycinyl bond of MCTR2 to give 13R-cysteinyl, 14S-hydroxy-4Z,7Z,9E,11E,13R,14S,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid. Of note, both GSTM4 and GGT enzymes displayed higher affinity to 13S,14S-eMaR and MCTR1 compared with their classic substrates in the cysteinyl leukotriene metabolome. Together these results establish the MCTR biosynthetic pathway and provide mechanisms in tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:27791009

  8. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, β cells.

    PubMed

    Hrvatin, Sinisa; O'Donnell, Charles W; Deng, Francis; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; DiIorio, Philip; Rezania, Alireza; Gifford, David K; Melton, Douglas A

    2014-02-25

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic β cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in vitro and their in vivo counterparts are essential to validate hPSC-derived cells. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of sorted insulin-expressing (INS(+)) cells derived from three independent hPSC lines, human fetal pancreata, and adult human islets points to two major conclusions: (i) Different hPSC lines produce highly similar INS(+) cells and (ii) hPSC-derived INS(+) (hPSC-INS(+)) cells more closely resemble human fetal β cells than adult β cells. This study provides a direct comparison of transcriptional programs between pure hPSC-INS(+) cells and true β cells and provides a catalog of genes whose manipulation may convert hPSC-INS(+) cells into functional β cells.

  9. Protein kinase C isoenzymes in rat and human cardiovascular tissues

    PubMed Central

    Erdbrügger, W; Keffel, J; Knocks, M; Otto, T; Philipp, T; Michel, M C

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) activity and immuno-detectable isoenzymes in cytosolic and membrane extracts of rat and human cardiovascular tissues (heart, kidney, aorta, saphenous vein). Experiments were performed in raw extracts and upon combined diethylaminoethylcellulose (DEAE) and phenylsepharose column chromatography. PKC activity that bound to DEAE mostly eluted with 200 mM NaCl. DEAE-purified PKC from all tissues except rat kidney bound almost quantitatively to phenylsepharose and eluted with 0.5–0 M NaCl. Immunoblots with an antibody against classical PKCs and the activator profile for phosphatidylserine, diolein and Ca2+ revealed that the PKC from rat kidney, which did not bind to phenylsepharose, was most probably due to a proteolytically-generated, constitutively active PKC which is not under the control of a regulatory subunit. Studies in the reference tissue, rat brain, demonstrated that all PKC isoenzymes investigated (classical PKCs α, β, γ, new PKCs δ, ε, ζ, θ, and atypial PKCs ζ, λ, ι) have similar DEAE and phenylsepharose chromatography elution profiles. In the functional assay an inhibitor of all known PKC isoenzymes, bisindolylmaleimide, and a specific inhibitor of classical PKCs, Gö 6976, both inhibited PKC from rat brain completely and with high potency indicating that the functional assay preferentially detects classical PKC isoenzymes. Each PKC isoenzyme had a tissue-specific expression profile which was similar in rat and man. The classical PKCα, the new PKCs δ and ε and all atypical PKCs were detectable in most tissues, whereas the PKCβ and PKCγ were not detected in any pheripheral tissue; PKCζ and PKCθ were found in some tissues. We conclude that combined DEAE and phenylsepharose chromatography is useful to enrich and detect PKC isoenzymes; no major species differences in tissues-specific expression patterns appear to exist between rat and man. PMID:9117107

  10. The significance of paired astrocyte nuclei in normal human nervous tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Pittella, J E; Brasileiro-Filho, G

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative study of astrocytes was carried out in 80 microscopic fields and the number of paired nuclei in 100 consecutive astrocytes of the temporo-occipital gyrus cortex was determined in 13 patients with no cerebral or liver disease. No significant correlation was found between astrocyte number and the percentage of paired nuclei. When studies on astrocytes in hepatic encephalopathy, liver cirrhosis and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis are taken into consideration it is suggested that these cells are in continuous variable renewal in normal adult human nervous tissue, as occurs in other animal species. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3654344

  11. An Introduction to The Royan Human Ovarian Tissue Bank

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Naeimeh Sadat; Ebrahimi, Bita; Fathi, Rouhollah; Khodaverdi, Sepideh; Mehdizadeh Kashi, Abolfazl; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh

    2016-01-01

    From December 2000 until 2010, the researchers at Royan Institute conducted a wide range of investigations on ovarian tissue cryopreservation with the intent to provide fertility pres- ervation to cancer patients that were considered to be candidates for these services. In 2010, Royan Institute established the Royan Human Ovarian Tissue Bank as a subgroup of the Embryology Department. Since its inception, approximately 180 patients between the ages of 747 years have undergone consultations. Ovarian samples were cryopreserved from 47 patients (age: 7-35 years) diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma (n=9); breast carcinoma (n=7), Ewing’s sarcoma (n=7), opposite side ovarian tumor (n=7), endometrial adenocarci- noma (n=4), malignant colon tumors (n=3), as well as Hodgkin’s lymphoma, major thalas- semia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=1-2 patients for each disease). Additionally, two patients requested ovarian tissue transplantation after completion of their treatments. PMID:27441061

  12. Spontaneous myogenic differentiation of Flk-1-positive cells from adult pancreas and other nonmuscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Tritarelli, Alessandra; Toietta, Gabriele; Gatto, Ilaria; Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Pagani, Francesca; Mangoni, Antonella; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2008-02-01

    At the embryonic or fetal stages, autonomously myogenic cells (AMCs), i.e., cells able to spontaneously differentiate into skeletal myotubes, have been identified from several different sites other than skeletal muscle, including the vascular compartment. However, in the adult animal, AMCs from skeletal muscle-devoid tissues have been described in only two cases. One is represented by thymic myoid cells, a restricted population of committed myogenic progenitors of unknown derivation present in the thymic medulla; the other is represented by a small subset of adipose tissue-associated cells, which we recently identified. In the present study we report, for the first time, the presence of spontaneously differentiating myogenic precursors in the pancreas and in other skeletal muscle-devoid organs such as spleen and stomach, as well as in the periaortic tissue of adult mice. Immunomagnetic selection procedures indicate that AMCs derive from Flk-1(+) progenitors. Individual clones of myogenic cells from nonmuscle organs are morphologically and functionally indistinguishable from skeletal muscle-derived primary myoblasts. Moreover, they can be induced to proliferate in vitro and are able to participate in muscle regeneration in vivo. Thus, we provide evidence that fully competent myogenic progenitors can be derived from the Flk-1(+) compartment of several adult tissues that are embryologically unrelated to skeletal muscle.

  13. Postprandial Responses to Lipid and Carbohydrate Ingestion in Repeated Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Biopsies in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Dordevic, Aimee L; Pendergast, Felicity J; Morgan, Han; Villas-Boas, Silas; Caldow, Marissa K; Larsen, Amy E; Sinclair, Andrew J; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-07-01

    Adipose tissue is a primary site of meta-inflammation. Diet composition influences adipose tissue metabolism and a single meal can drive an inflammatory response in postprandial period. This study aimed to examine the effect lipid and carbohydrate ingestion compared with a non-caloric placebo on adipose tissue response. Thirty-three healthy adults (age 24.5 ± 3.3 year (mean ± standard deviation (SD)); body mass index (BMI) 24.1 ± 3.2 kg/m2, were randomised into one of three parallel beverage groups; placebo (water), carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or lipid (dairy-cream). Subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue biopsies and serum samples were collected prior to (0 h), as well as 2 h and 4 h after consumption of the beverage. Adipose tissue gene expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) increased in all three groups, without an increase in circulating TNF-α. Serum leptin (0.6-fold, p = 0.03) and adipose tissue leptin gene expression levels (0.6-fold, p = 0.001) decreased in the hours following the placebo beverage, but not the nutrient beverages. Despite increased inflammatory cytokine gene expression in adipose tissue with all beverages, suggesting a confounding effect of the repeated biopsy method, differences in metabolic responses of adipose tissue and circulating adipokines to ingestion of lipid and carbohydrate beverages were observed.

  14. TRAF-4 expression in epithelial progenitor cells. Analysis in normal adult, fetal, and tumor tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, M.; Krajewski, S.; Zapata, J. M.; Van Arsdale, T.; Gascoyne, R. D.; Berern, K.; McFadden, D.; Shabaik, A.; Hugh, J.; Reynolds, A.; Clevenger, C. V.; Reed, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    TRAF-4 was discovered because of its expression in breast cancers and is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family of putative signal-transducing proteins. In vitro binding assays demonstrated that TRAF-4 interacts with the cytosolic domain of the lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LT beta R) and weakly with the p75 nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) but not with TNFR1, TNFR2, Fas, or CD40. Immunofluorescence analysis of TRAF-4 in transfected cells demonstrated localization to cytosol but not nucleus. Immunohistochemical assays of normal human adult tissues revealed prominent cytosolic immunostaining in thymic epithelial cells and lymph node dendritic cells but not in lymphocytes or thymocytes, paralleling the reported patterns of LT beta R expression. The basal cell layer of most epithelia in the body was very strongly TRAF-4 immunopositive, including epidermis, nasopharynx, respiratory tract, salivary gland, and esophagus. Similar findings were obtained in 12- to 18-week human fetal tissue, indicating a highly restricted pattern of expression even during development in the mammary gland, epithelial cells of the terminal ducts were strongly TRAF-4 immunopositive whereas myoepithelial cells and most of the mammary epithelial cells lining the extralobular ducts were TRAF-4 immunonegative. Of 84 primary breast cancers evaluated, only 7 expressed TRAF-4. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions were uniformly TRAF-4 immunonegative (n = 21). In the prostate, the basal cells were strongly immunostained for TRAF-4, whereas the secretory epithelial cells were TRAF-4 negative. Basal cells in prostate hypertrophy (n = 6) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN; n = 6) were strongly TRAF-4 positive, but none of the 32 primary and 16 metastatic prostate cancer specimens examined contained TRAF-4-positive malignant cells. Although also expressed in some types of mesenchymal cells, these findings suggest that TRAF-4 is a marker of normal

  15. A continuous fiber distribution material model for human cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kristin M; Hendon, Christine P; Gan, Yu; Yao, Wang; Yoshida, Kyoko; Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Wapner, Ronald J

    2015-06-25

    The uterine cervix during pregnancy is the vital mechanical barrier which resists compressive and tensile loads generated from a growing fetus. Premature cervical remodeling and softening is hypothesized to result in the shortening of the cervix, which is known to increase a woman׳s risk of preterm birth. To understand the role of cervical material properties in preventing preterm birth, we derive a cervical material model based on previous mechanical, biochemical and histological experiments conducted on nonpregnant and pregnant human hysterectomy cervical tissue samples. In this study we present a three-dimensional fiber composite model that captures the equilibrium material behavior of the tissue in tension and compression. Cervical tissue is modeled as a fibrous composite material, where a single family of preferentially aligned and continuously distributed collagen fibers are embedded in a compressible neo-Hookean ground substance. The total stress in the collagen solid network is calculated by integrating the fiber stresses. The shape of the fiber distribution is described by an ellipsoid where semi-principal axis lengths are fit to optical coherence tomography measurements. The composite material model is fit to averaged mechanical testing data from uni-axial compression and tension experiments, and averaged material parameters are reported for nonpregnant and term pregnant human cervical tissue. The model is then evaluated by investigating the stress and strain state of a uniform thick-walled cylinder under a compressive stress with collagen fibers preferentially aligned in the circumferential direction. This material modeling framework for the equilibrium behavior of human cervical tissue serves as a basis to determine the role of preferentially-aligned cervical collagen fibers in preventing cervical deformation during pregnancy.

  16. Adipose tissue macrophages impair preadipocyte differentiation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li Fen; Craig, Colleen M.; Tolentino, Lorna L.; Choi, Okmi; Morton, John; Rivas, Homero; Cushman, Samuel W.; Engleman, Edgar G.; McLaughlin, Tracey

    2017-01-01

    Aim The physiologic mechanisms underlying the relationship between obesity and insulin resistance are not fully understood. Impaired adipocyte differentiation and localized inflammation characterize adipose tissue from obese, insulin-resistant humans. The directionality of this relationship is not known, however. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether adipose tissue inflammation is causally-related to impaired adipocyte differentiation. Methods Abdominal subcutaneous(SAT) and visceral(VAT) adipose tissue was obtained from 20 human participants undergoing bariatric surgery. Preadipocytes were isolated, and cultured in the presence or absence of CD14+ macrophages obtained from the same adipose tissue sample. Adipocyte differentiation was quantified after 14 days via immunofluorescence, Oil-Red O, and adipogenic gene expression. Cytokine secretion by mature adipocytes cultured with or without CD14+macrophages was quantified. Results Adipocyte differentiation was significantly lower in VAT than SAT by all measures (p<0.001). With macrophage removal, SAT preadipocyte differentiation increased significantly as measured by immunofluorescence and gene expression, whereas VAT preadipocyte differentiation was unchanged. Adipocyte-secreted proinflammatory cytokines were higher and adiponectin lower in media from VAT vs SAT: macrophage removal reduced inflammatory cytokine and increased adiponectin secretion from both SAT and VAT adipocytes. Differentiation of preadipocytes from SAT but not VAT correlated inversely with systemic insulin resistance. Conclusions The current results reveal that proinflammatory immune cells in human SAT are causally-related to impaired preadipocyte differentiation, which in turn is associated with systemic insulin resistance. In VAT, preadipocyte differentiation is poor even in the absence of tissue macrophages, pointing to inherent differences in fat storage potential between the two depots. PMID:28151993

  17. Informing future cartilage repair strategies: a comparative study of three different human cell types for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin B

    2013-06-01

    A major clinical need exists for cartilage repair and regeneration. Despite many different strategies having been pursued, the identification of an optimised cell type and of pre-treatment conditions remains a challenge. This study compares the cartilage-like tissue generated by human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and human neonatal and adult chondrocytes cultured on three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds under various conditions in vitro and in vivo with the aim of informing future cartilage repair strategies based upon tissue-engineering approaches. After 3 weeks in vitro culture, all three cell types showed cartilage-like tissue formation on 3D poly (lactide-co-glycolide) acid scaffolds only when cultured in chondrogenic medium. After 6 weeks of chondro-induction, neonatal chondrocyte constructs revealed the most cartilage-like tissue formation with a prominent superficial zone-like layer, a middle zone-like structure and the thinnest fibrous capsule. HBMSC constructs had the thickest fibrous capsule formation. Under basal culture conditions, neonatal articular chondrocytes failed to form any tissue, whereas HBMSCs and adult chondrocytes showed thick fibrous capsule formation at 6 weeks. After in vivo implantation, all groups generated more compact tissues compared with in vitro constructs. Pre-culturing in chondrogenic media for 1 week before implantation reduced fibrous tissue formation in all cell constructs at week 3. After 6 weeks, only the adult chondrocyte group pre-cultured in chondrogenic media was able to maintain a more chondrogenic/less fibrocartilaginous phenotype. Thus, pre-culture under chondrogenic conditions is required to maintain a long-term chondrogenic phenotype, with adult chondrocytes being a more promising cell source than HBMSCs for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  18. Adult human gingival epithelial cells as a source for whole-tooth bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Angelova Volponi, A; Kawasaki, M; Sharpe, P T

    2013-04-01

    Teeth develop from interactions between embryonic oral epithelium and neural-crest-derived mesenchyme. These cells can be separated into single-cell populations and recombined to form normal teeth, providing a basis for bioengineering new teeth if suitable, non-embryonic cell sources can be identified. We show here that cells can be isolated from adult human gingival tissue that can be expanded in vitro and, when combined with mouse embryonic tooth mesenchyme cells, form teeth. Teeth with developing roots can be produced from this cell combination following transplantation into renal capsules. These bioengineered teeth contain dentin and enamel with ameloblast-like cells and rests of Malassez of human origin.

  19. Characterization of colony-forming cells in adult human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ozbey, Ozlem; Sahin, Zeliha; Acar, Nuray; Ozcelik, Filiz Tepekoy; Ozenci, Alpay Merter; Koksoy, Sadi; Ustunel, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that adult human articular cartilage contains stem-like cells within the native structure. In this study, we aimed to determine the localization of putative stem cell markers such as CD90, STRO-1, OCT-3/4, CD105 and CD166 in adult human articular cartilage tissue sections and demonstrate the expression of these markers within the expanded surface zone colony-forming (CF) cells and evaluate their differentiation potential. Biopsy samples were either fixed immediately for immunohistochemical analyses or processed for in vitro cell culture. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analyses were performed by using CD90, STRO-1, OCT-3/4, CD105 and CD166 antibodies. Isolated colony-forming (CF) cells were further stimulated, by using the appropriate growth factors in their pellet culture, to obtain cartilage, bone and adipose lineages. We observed that the expression of the stem cell markers were in various zones of the human adult cartilage. Flow cytometry results showed that in CF cells the expression of CD90 and CD166 was high, while OCT-3/4 was low. We also determined that CF cells could be stimulated towards cartilage, bone and adipose lineages. The results of this research support the idea that the resident stem-like cells in adult human articular cartilage express these putative stem cell markers, but further experimental investigations are needed to determine the precise localization of these cells.

  20. Ultra-trace analysis of platinum in human tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Elisabeth; Hann, Stephan; Stingeder, Gerhard; Reiter, Christian

    2005-08-01

    Background levels of platinum were determined in human autopsy tissues taken from five individuals. The investigated specimens were lung, liver and kidney. Sample preparation involved microwave digestion followed by an open vessel treatment. Inductively-coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) was applied in combination with an ultrasonic nebulization/membrane desolvation system for sample introduction. Isotope dilution analysis was employed for accurate quantification of platinum. Excellent procedural detection limits (3 s validation) of 20, 20 and 34 pg g(-1) dry weight were obtained for lung, liver and kidney tissue, respectively. Due to the lack of appropriate biological reference material, road dust (BCR-723) was used for method validation. Platinum levels ranging between 0.03 and 1.42 ng g(-1) were determined in the investigated samples. The platinum concentrations observed in human lung tissue may reflect the increasing atmospheric background levels of platinum originating from car catalysts. The presence of platinum in kidney and liver tissue samples clearly indicates the bioavailability of the element.

  1. Best Practice BioBanking of Human Heart Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lal, Sean; Li, Amy; Allen, David; Allen, Paul D; Bannon, Paul; Cartmill, Tim; Cooke, Roger; Farnsworth, Alan; Keogh, Anne; Dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2015-12-01

    This review provides a guide to researchers who wish to establish a biobank. It also gives practical advice to investigators seeking access to samples of healthy or diseased human hearts. We begin with a brief history of the Sydney Heart Bank (SHB) from when it began in 1989, including the pivotal role played by the late Victor Chang. We discuss our standard operating procedures for tissue collection which include cryopreservation and the quality assurance needed to maintain the long-term molecular and cellular integrity of the samples. The SHB now contains about 16,000 heart samples derived from over 450 patients who underwent isotopic heart transplant procedures and from over 100 healthy organ donors. These enable us to provide samples from a wide range of categories of heart failure. So far, we have delivered heart samples to more than 50 laboratories over two decades, and we answer their most frequently asked questions. Other SHB services include the development of tissue microarrays (TMA). These enable end users to perform preliminary examinations of the expression and localisation of target molecules in diseased or aging donor hearts, all in a single section of the TMA. Finally, the processes involved in managing tissue requests from external users and logistics considerations for the shipment of human tissue are discussed in detail.

  2. Human omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibit specific lipidomic signatures.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Pamplona, Reinald; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Despite their differential effects on human metabolic pathophysiology, the differences in omental and subcutaneous lipidomes are largely unknown. To explore this field, liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used for lipidome analyses of adipose tissue samples (visceral and subcutaneous) selected from a group of obese subjects (n=38). Transcriptomics and in vitro studies in adipocytes were used to confirm the pathways affected by location. The analyses revealed the existence of obesity-related specific lipidome signatures in each of these locations, attributed to selective enrichment of specific triglycerides, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids, because these were not observed in adipose tissues from nonobese individuals. The changes were compatible with subcutaneous enrichment in pathways involved in adipogenesis, triacylglyceride synthesis, and lipid droplet formation, as well as increased α-oxidation. Marked differences between omental and subcutaneous depots in obese individuals were seen in the association of lipid species with metabolic traits (body mass index and insulin sensitivity). Targeted studies also revealed increased cholesterol (Δ56%) and cholesterol epoxide (Δ34%) concentrations in omental adipose tissue. In view of the effects of cholesterol epoxide, which induced enhanced expression of adipocyte differentiation and α-oxidation genes in human omental adipocytes, a novel role for cholesterol epoxide as a signaling molecule for differentiation is proposed. In summary, in obesity, adipose tissue exhibits a location-specific differential lipid profile that may contribute to explaining part of its distinct pathogenic role.

  3. Expression of the Endocannabinoid Receptors in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; Caro, R. De; Stecco, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  4. Best Practice BioBanking of Human Heart Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Sean; Li, Amy; Allen, David; Allen, Paul D; Bannon, Paul; Cartmill, Tim; Cooke, Roger; Farnsworth, Alan; Keogh, Anne; dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a guide to researchers who wish to establish a biobank. It also gives practical advice to investigators seeking access to samples of healthy or diseased human hearts. We begin with a brief history of the Sydney Heart Bank (SHB) from when it began in 1989, including the pivotal role played by the late Victor Chang. We discuss our standard operating procedures for tissue collection which include cryopreservation and the quality assurance needed to maintain the long-term molecular and cellular integrity of the samples. The SHB now contains about 16,000 heart samples derived from over 450 patients who underwent isotopic heart transplant procedures and from over 100 healthy organ donors. These enable us to provide samples from a wide range of categories of heart failure. So far, we have delivered heart samples to more than 50 laboratories over two decades, and we answer their most frequently asked questions. Other SHB services include the development of tissue microarrays (TMA). These enable end users to perform preliminary examinations of the expression and localisation of target molecules in diseased or aging donor hearts, all in a single section of the TMA. Finally, the processes involved in managing tissue requests from external users and logistics considerations for the shipment of human tissue are discussed in detail. PMID:26998172

  5. Soft-tissue cephalometric norms in Chinese adults with esthetic facial profiles.

    PubMed

    Lew, K K; Ho, K K; Keng, S B; Ho, K H

    1992-11-01

    Using a double selection process comprised of professional and lay judges, the cephalometric tracings on a final sample of 48 Chinese adults with esthetically pleasing profiles were analyzed. The soft-tissue cephalometric norms and standard deviations of two widely accepted soft-tissue analyses, the Legan and Burstone analysis and the Holdaway analysis, were determined. In comparison with white norms, the Chinese nose was less prominent (P < .01), the nasolabial angle was less obtuse (P < .01), both the upper and lower lips were more protrusive (P < .05), the upper lip curvature was greater (P < .01), and the soft-tissue chin thickness was less (P < .05). This variance between racial types emphasizes the need to recognize that soft-tissue lateral cephalometric norms are specific for the racial group and cannot always be applied across different racial types.

  6. Olfactomedin-like 3 (OLFML3) gene expression in baboon and human ocular tissues: cornea, lens, uvea and retina

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iràm Pablo; Garza-Rodríguez, Maria Lourdes; Mohamed-Noriega, Karim; Voruganti, Venkata Saroja; Tejero, Maria Elizabeth; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Ibave, Diana Cristina Perez; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E.; Mohamed-Noriega, Jibran; Martinez-Fierro, Margarita L; Reséndez-Pérez, Diana; Cole, Shelley A; Cavazos-Adame, Humberto; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Mohamed-Hamsho, Jesús; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Background Olfactomedin-like is a polyfunctional polymeric glycoprotein. This family has at least four members. One member of this family is OLFML3, which is preferentially expressed in placenta but is also detected in other adult tissues including the liver and heart. However, the orthologous rat gene is expressed in the iris, sclera, trabecular meshwork, retina, and optic nerve. Methods OLFML3 amplification was performed by RT-PCR from human and baboon ocular tissues. The products were cloned and sequenced. Results We report OFML3 expression in human and baboon eye. The full CDS has 1221 bp, from which a OFR of 406 amino acid was obtained. The baboon OLFML3 gene nucleotidic sequence has 98%, and amino acidic 99% similarity with humans. Conclusions OLFML3 expression in human and baboon ocular tissues and its high similarity make the baboon a powerful model to deduce the physiological and/or metabolic function of this protein in the eye. PMID:23398349

  7. Atlas-based Segmentation of Developing Tissues in the Human Brain with Quantitative Validation in Young Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. James; Studholme, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Imaging of the human fetus using magnetic resonance (MR) is an essential tool for quantitative studies of normal as well as abnormal brain development in utero. However, because of fundamental differences in tissue types, tissue properties and tissue distribution between the fetal and adult brain, automated tissue segmentation techniques developed for adult brain anatomy are unsuitable for this data. In this paper, we describe methodology for automatic atlas-based segmentation of individual tissue types in motion-corrected 3D volumes reconstructed from clinical MR scans of the fetal brain. To generate anatomically correct automatic segmentations, we create a set of accurate manual delineations and build an in utero 3D statistical atlas of tissue distribution incorporating developing grey and white matter as well as transient tissue types such as the germinal matrix. The probabilistic atlas is associated with an unbiased average shape and intensity template for registration of new subject images to the space of the atlas. Quantitative whole brain 3D validation of tissue labeling performed on a set of 14 fetal MR scans (20.57–22.86 weeks gestational age) demonstrates that this atlas-based EM segmentation approach achieves consistently high DSC performance for the main tissue types in the fetal brain. This work indicates that reliable measures of brain development can be automatically derived from clinical MR imaging and opens up possibility of further 3D volumetric and morphometric studies with multiple fetal subjects. PMID:20108226

  8. Distribution of bisphenol A into tissues of adult, neonatal, and fetal Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Brown, Ronald P.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2011-09-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA metabolites in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 suggests ubiquitous and frequent exposure in the range of 0.02-0.2 {mu}g/kg bw/d (25th-95th percentiles). The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure placental transfer and concentrations of aglycone (receptor-active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in tissues from Sprague-Dawley rats administered deuterated BPA (100 {mu}g/kg bw) by oral and IV routes. In adult female rat tissues, the tissue/serum concentration ratios for aglycone BPA ranged from 0.7 in liver to 5 in adipose tissue, reflecting differences in tissue perfusion, composition, and metabolic capacity. Following IV administration to dams, placental transfer was observed for aglycone BPA into fetuses at several gestational days (GD), with fetal/maternal serum ratios of 2.7 at GD 12, 1.2 at GD 16, and 0.4 at GD 20; the corresponding ratios for conjugated BPA were 0.43, 0.65, and 3.7. These ratios were within the ranges observed in adult tissues and were not indicative of preferential accumulation of aglycone BPA or hydrolysis of conjugates in fetal tissue in vivo. Concentrations of aglycone BPA in GD 20 fetal brain were higher than in liver or serum. Oral administration of the same dose did not produce measurable levels of aglycone BPA in fetal tissues. Amniotic fluid consistently contained levels of BPA at or below those in maternal serum. Concentrations of aglycone BPA in tissues of neonatal rats decreased with age in a manner consistent with the corresponding circulating levels. Phase II metabolism of BPA increased with fetal age such that near-term fetus was similar to early post-natal rats. These results show that concentrations of aglycone BPA in fetal tissues are similar to those in other maternal and neonatal tissues and that maternal Phase II metabolism, especially following oral

  9. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  10. Terahertz spectroscopic investigation of human gastric normal and tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dibo; Li, Xian; Cai, Jinhui; Ma, Yehao; Kang, Xusheng; Huang, Pingjie; Zhang, Guangxin

    2014-09-01

    Human dehydrated normal and cancerous gastric tissues were measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy. Based on the obtained terahertz absorption spectra, the contrasts between the two kinds of tissue were investigated and techniques for automatic identification of cancerous tissue were studied. Distinctive differences were demonstrated in both the shape and amplitude of the absorption spectra between normal and tumor tissue. Additionally, some spectral features in the range of 0.2~0.5 THz and 1~1.5 THz were revealed for all cancerous gastric tissues. To systematically achieve the identification of gastric cancer, principal component analysis combined with t-test was used to extract valuable information indicating the best distinction between the two types. Two clustering approaches, K-means and support vector machine (SVM), were then performed to classify the processed terahertz data into normal and cancerous groups. SVM presented a satisfactory result with less false classification cases. The results of this study implicate the potential of the terahertz technique to detect gastric cancer. The applied data analysis methodology provides a suggestion for automatic discrimination of terahertz spectra in other applications.

  11. FTIR protein secondary structure analysis of human ascending aortic tissues.

    PubMed

    Bonnier, Franck; Rubin, Sylvain; Debelle, Laurent; Ventéo, Lydie; Pluot, Michel; Baehrel, Bernard; Manfait, Michel; Sockalingum, Ganesh D

    2008-08-01

    The advent of moderate dilatations in ascending aortas is often accompanied by structural modifications of the main components of the aortic tissue, elastin and collagen. In this study, we have undertaken an approach based on FTIR microscopy coupled to a curve-fitting procedure to analyze secondary structure modifications in these proteins in human normal and pathological aortic tissues. We found that the outcome of the aortic pathology is strongly influenced by these proteins, which are abundant in the media of the aortic wall, and that the advent of an aortic dilatation is generally accompanied by a decrease of parallel beta-sheet structures. Elastin, essentially composed of beta-sheet structures, seems to be directly related to these changes and therefore indicative of the elastic alteration of the aortic wall. Conventional microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy were used to compare FTIR microscopy results with the organization of the elastic fibers present in the tissues. This in-vitro study on 6 patients (three normal and three pathologic), suggests that such a spectroscopic marker, specific to aneurismal tissue characterization, could be important information for surgeons who face the dilemma of moderate aortic tissue dilatation of the ascending aortas.

  12. Composition of MRI phantom equivalent to human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Koichi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Shibuya, Koichi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2005-10-15

    We previously developed two new MRI phantoms (called the CAG phantom and the CAGN phantom), with T1 and T2 relaxation times equivalent to those of any human tissue at 1.5 T. The conductivity of the CAGN phantom is equivalent to that of most types of human tissue in the frequency range of 1 to 130 MHz. In this paper, the relaxation times of human tissues are summarized, and the composition of the corresponding phantoms are provided in table form. The ingredients of these phantoms are carrageenan as the gelling agent, GdCl{sub 3} as a T1 modifier, agarose as a T2 modifier, NaCl (CAGN phantom only) as a conductivity modifier, NaN{sub 3} as an antiseptic, and distilled water. The phantoms have T1 values of 202-1904 ms and T2 values of 38-423 ms when the concentrations of GdCl{sub 3} and agarose are varied from 0-140 {mu}mol/kg, and 0%-1.6%, respectively, and the CAGN phantom has a conductivity of 0.27-1.26 S/m when the NaCl concentration is varied from 0%-0.7%. These phantoms have sufficient strength to replicate a torso without the use of reinforcing agents, and can be cut by a knife into any shape. We anticipate the CAGN phantom to be highly useful and practical for MRI and hyperthermia-related research.

  13. Adipose tissue α-linolenic acid is inversely associated with insulin resistance in adults1

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is emerging evidence of the beneficial effects of n–3 (ω-3) fatty acids (FAs) on cardiometabolic risk factors. Nevertheless, not much is known about the association between adipose tissue α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and insulin resistance. Objective: We determined the association between adipose tissue n–3 FAs (total n–3 FAs, ALA, and EPA plus DHA) and insulin resistance in healthy adults. Design: In this cross-sectional study, multivariable analyses were used to assess the association between adipose tissue FAs (ALA, EPA plus DHA, and total n–3 FAs) and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in a subset of adult participants (n = 716; mean age: 58 y) from the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) cohort. Results: Compared with the lowest tertile, the third tertile (β = −0.13; 95% CI: −0.24, −0.01) of adipose tissue ALA was inversely associated with the HOMA-IR. When stratified by waist circumference, ALA continued to be inversely associated [third tertile: β = −0.17 (95% CI: −0.31, −0.02)] with the HOMA-IR in subjects with a waist circumference ≤88 cm in women or ≤102 cm in men but not in those with a larger waist circumference. No significant association was noted between adipose tissue EPA plus DHA and HOMA-IR. Conclusions: Higher adipose tissue ALA was inversely associated with insulin resistance in this cohort of healthy adult men and women. This finding appears to be more pronounced in individuals with a normal waist circumference. PMID:26912497

  14. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Freeman, Jennifer J.; Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Spence, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  15. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  16. The connective tissue of the adductor canal--a morphological study in fetal and adult specimens.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Flavia; de Vasconcellos Fontes, Ricardo Bragança; da Silva Baptista, Josemberg; Mayer, William Paganini; de Campos Boldrini, Silvia; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2009-03-01

    The adductor canal is a conical or pyramid-shaped pathway that contains the femoral vessels, saphenous nerve and a varying amount of fibrous tissue. It is involved in adductor canal syndrome, a claudication syndrome involving young individuals. Our objective was to study modifications induced by aging on the connective tissue and to correlate them to the proposed pathophysiological mechanism. The bilateral adductor canals and femoral vessels of four adult and five fetal specimens were removed en bloc and analyzed. Sections 12 microm thick were obtained and the connective tissue studied with Sirius Red, Verhoeff, Weigert and Azo stains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs of the surfaces of each adductor canal were also analyzed. Findings were homogeneous inside each group. The connective tissue of the canal was continuous with the outer layer of the vessels in both groups. The pattern of concentric, thick collagen type I bundles in fetal specimens was replaced by a diffuse network of compact collagen bundles with several transversal fibers and an impressive content of collagen III fibers. Elastic fibers in adults were not concentrated in the thick bundles but dispersed in line with the transversal fiber system. A dynamic compression mechanism with or without an evident constricting fibrous band has been proposed previously for adductor canal syndrome, possibly involving the connective tissue inside the canal. The vessels may not slide freely during movement. These age-related modifications in normal individuals may represent necessary conditions for this syndrome to develop.

  17. The connective tissue of the adductor canal – a morphological study in fetal and adult specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Flavia; de Vasconcellos Fontes, Ricardo Bragança; da Silva Baptista, Josemberg; Mayer, William Paganini; de Campos Boldrini, Silvia; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2009-01-01

    The adductor canal is a conical or pyramid-shaped pathway that contains the femoral vessels, saphenous nerve and a varying amount of fibrous tissue. It is involved in adductor canal syndrome, a claudication syndrome involving young individuals. Our objective was to study modifications induced by aging on the connective tissue and to correlate them to the proposed pathophysiological mechanism. The bilateral adductor canals and femoral vessels of four adult and five fetal specimens were removed en bloc and analyzed. Sections 12 µm thick were obtained and the connective tissue studied with Sirius Red, Verhoeff, Weigert and Azo stains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs of the surfaces of each adductor canal were also analyzed. Findings were homogeneous inside each group. The connective tissue of the canal was continuous with the outer layer of the vessels in both groups. The pattern of concentric, thick collagen type I bundles in fetal specimens was replaced by a diffuse network of compact collagen bundles with several transversal fibers and an impressive content of collagen III fibers. Elastic fibers in adults were not concentrated in the thick bundles but dispersed in line with the transversal fiber system. A dynamic compression mechanism with or without an evident constricting fibrous band has been proposed previously for adductor canal syndrome, possibly involving the connective tissue inside the canal. The vessels may not slide freely during movement. These age-related modifications in normal individuals may represent necessary conditions for this syndrome to develop. PMID:19245505

  18. Head, Neck, Trunk and Pelvis Tissue Mass Predictions for Young Adults using Anthropometric Measures and DXA.

    PubMed

    Gyemi, Danielle L; Kahelin, Charles; George, Nicole C; Andrews, David M

    2017-03-24

    Accurate prediction of wobbling mass (WM), fat mass (FM), lean mass (LM) and bone mineral content (BMC) of living people using regression equations developed from anthropometric measures (lengths, circumferences, breadths, skinfolds) has previously been reported, but only for the extremities. Multiple linear stepwise regression was used to generate comparable equations for the head, neck, trunk and pelvis of young adults (38 males, 38 females). Equations were validated using actual tissue masses from an independent sample of 13 males and 13 females by manually segmenting full body Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry scans. Prediction equations exhibited adjusted R(2) values ranging from .249 to .940, with more explained variance for LM and WM than BMC and FM, especially for the head and neck. Mean relative errors between predicted and actual tissue masses ranged from -11.07% (trunk FM) to 7.61% (neck FM). Actual and predicted tissue masses from all equations were significantly correlated (R(2) = .329 to .937), except head BMC (R(2) = .046). These results show promise for obtaining in-vivo head, neck, trunk and pelvis tissue mass estimates in young adults. Further research is needed to improve head and neck FM and BMC predictions and develop tissue mass prediction equations for older populations.

  19. Expression cartography of human tissues using self organizing maps

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Parallel high-throughput microarray and sequencing experiments produce vast quantities of multidimensional data which must be arranged and analyzed in a concerted way. One approach to addressing this challenge is the machine learning technique known as self organizing maps (SOMs). SOMs enable a parallel sample- and gene-centered view of genomic data combined with strong visualization and second-level analysis capabilities. The paper aims at bridging the gap between the potency of SOM-machine learning to reduce dimension of high-dimensional data on one hand and practical applications with special emphasis on gene expression analysis on the other hand. Results The method was applied to generate a SOM characterizing the whole genome expression profiles of 67 healthy human tissues selected from ten tissue categories (adipose, endocrine, homeostasis, digestion, exocrine, epithelium, sexual reproduction, muscle, immune system and nervous tissues). SOM mapping reduces the dimension of expression data from ten of thousands of genes to a few thousand metagenes, each representing a minicluster of co-regulated single genes. Tissue-specific and common properties shared between groups of tissues emerge as a handful of localized spots in the tissue maps collecting groups of co-regulated and co-expressed metagenes. The functional context of the spots was discovered using overrepresentation analysis with respect to pre-defined gene sets of known functional impact. We found that tissue related spots typically contain enriched populations of genes related to specific molecular processes in the respective tissue. Analysis techniques normally used at the gene-level such as two-way hierarchical clustering are better represented and provide better signal-to-noise ratios if applied to the metagenes. Metagene-based clustering analyses aggregate the tissues broadly into three clusters containing nervous, immune system and the remaining tissues. Conclusions The SOM technique

  20. Hereditary Connective Tissue Diseases in Young Adult Stroke: A Comprehensive Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vanakker, Olivier M.; Hemelsoet, Dimitri; De Paepe, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Though the genetic background of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke is often polygenetic or multifactorial, it can in some cases result from a monogenic disease, particularly in young adults. Besides arteriopathies and metabolic disorders, several connective tissue diseases can present with stroke. While some of these diseases have been recognized for decades as causes of stroke, such as the vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, others only recently came to attention as being involved in stroke pathogenesis, such as those related to Type IV collagen. This paper discusses each of these connective tissue disorders and their relation with stroke briefly, emphasizing the main clinical features which can lead to their diagnosis. PMID:21331163

  1. Isolation and culture of adult human microglia within mixed glial cultures for functional experimentation and high-content analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amy M; Gibbons, Hannah M; Lill, Claire; Faull, Richard L M; Dragunow, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are thought to be involved in diseases of the adult human brain as well as normal aging processes. While neonatal and rodent microglia are often used in studies investigating microglial function, there are important differences between rodent microglia and their adult human counterparts. Human brain tissue provides a unique and valuable tool for microglial cell and molecular biology. Routine protocols can now enable use of this culture method in many laboratories. Detailed protocols and advice for culture of human brain microglia are provided here. We demonstrate the protocol for culturing human adult microglia within a mixed glial culture and use a phagocytosis assay as an example of the functional studies possible with these cells as well as a high-content analysis method of quantification.

  2. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Alessandro R.; Amstalden, Eliane M. I.; Plepis, Ana Maria G.; Martins, Virginia C. A.; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S. S.; Luzo, Angela C. M.; Miranda, João B.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model. PMID:26569221

  4. Immune physiology and oogenesis in fetal and adult humans, ovarian infertility, and totipotency of adult ovarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Caudle, Michael R; Virant-Klun, Irma; Gupta, Satish K; Dominguez, Roberto; Svetlikova, Marta; Xu, Fei

    2009-03-01

    It is still widely believed that while oocytes in invertebrates and lower vertebrates are periodically renewed throughout life, oocytes in humans and higher vertebrates are formed only during the fetal/perinatal period. However, this dogma is questioned, and clashes with Darwinian evolutionary theory. Studies of oogenesis and follicular renewal from ovarian stem cells (OSCs) in adult human ovaries, and of the role of third-party bone marrow-derived cells (monocyte-derived tissue macrophages and T lymphocytes) could help provide a better understanding of the causes of ovarian infertility, its prevention, and potential treatment. We have reported differentiation of distinct cell types from OSC and the production of new eggs in cultures derived from premenopausal and postmenopausal human ovaries. OSCs are also capable of producing neural/neuronal cells in vitro after sequential stimulation with sex steroid combinations. Hence, OSC represent a unique type of totipotent adult stem cells, which could be utilized for autologous treatment of premature ovarian failure and also for autologous stem cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases without use of allogeneic embryonic stem cells or somatic cell nuclear transfer. The in vivo application of sex steroid combinations may augment the proliferation of existing neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neuronal cells (systemic regenerative therapy). Such treatment may also stimulate the transdifferentiation of autologous neural stem cell precursors into neural stem cells useful for topical or systemic regenerative treatment.

  5. Identifying proteins in zebrafish embryos using spectral libraries generated from dissected adult organs and tissues.

    PubMed

    van der Plas-Duivesteijn, Suzanne J; Mohammed, Yassene; Dalebout, Hans; Meijer, Annemarie; Botermans, Anouk; Hoogendijk, Jordy L; Henneman, Alex A; Deelder, André M; Spaink, Herman P; Palmblad, Magnus

    2014-03-07

    Spectral libraries provide a sensitive and accurate method for identifying peptides from tandem mass spectra, complementary to searching genome-derived databases or sequencing de novo. Their application requires comprehensive libraries including peptides from low-abundant proteins. Here we describe a method for constructing such libraries using biological differentiation to "fractionate" the proteome by harvesting adult organs and tissues and build comprehensive libraries for identifying proteins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and larvae (an important and widely used model system). Hierarchical clustering using direct comparison of spectra was used to prioritize organ selection. The resulting and publicly available library covers 14,164 proteins, significantly improved the number of peptide-spectrum matches in zebrafish developmental stages, and can be used on data from different instruments and laboratories. The library contains information on tissue and organ expression of these proteins and is also applicable for adult experiments. The approach itself is not limited to zebrafish but would work for any model system.

  6. Limited Accuracy of Colour Doppler Ultrasound Dynamic Tissue Perfusion Measurement in Diabetic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stoperka, Felix; Karger, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM) is a pre-described and available method in pediatric ultrasound to quantify tissue perfusion in renal Doppler ultrasound by particular video analysis software. This study evaluates DTPM during single and between repeated visits after 6 months, calibrates repeated DTPM within different region of interest (ROI) and compares DTPM with kidney function markers in adult patients with early diabetic nephropathy (n = 17). During repeated measurements, no association of readings at the same patients in the same (n = 3 readings) as well as repeated visit (n = 2 visits) could be retrieved. No association between DTPM, MDRD-GFR, albuminuria, age and duration of diabetes was observed. These negative results are presumably related to inconsistency of DTPM due to non-fixed ROI position as could be shown in calibrating series. Further development of the method should be performed to enable reproducible DTPM readings in adults. PMID:28033403

  7. Elastic, permeability and swelling properties of human intervertebral disc tissues: A benchmark for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Daniel H; Jacobs, Nathan T; DeLucca, John F; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-06-27

    The aim of functional tissue engineering is to repair and replace tissues that have a biomechanical function, i.e., connective orthopaedic tissues. To do this, it is necessary to have accurate benchmarks for the elastic, permeability, and swelling (i.e., biphasic-swelling) properties of native tissues. However, in the case of the intervertebral disc, the biphasic-swelling properties of individual tissues reported in the literature exhibit great variation and even span several orders of magnitude. This variation is probably caused by differences in the testing protocols and the constitutive models used to analyze the data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the human lumbar disc annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP), and cartilaginous endplates (CEP) biphasic-swelling properties using a consistent experimental protocol and analyses. The testing protocol was composed of a swelling period followed by multiple confined compression ramps. To analyze the confined compression data, the tissues were modeled using a biphasic-swelling model, which augments the standard biphasic model through the addition of a deformation-dependent osmotic pressure term. This model allows considering the swelling deformations and the contribution of osmotic pressure in the analysis of the experimental data. The swelling stretch was not different between the disc regions (AF: 1.28±0.16; NP: 1.73±0.74; CEP: 1.29±0.26), with a total average of 1.42. The aggregate modulus (Ha) of the extra-fibrillar matrix was higher in the CEP (390kPa) compared to the NP (100kPa) or AF (30kPa). The permeability was very different across tissue regions, with the AF permeability (64 E(-16)m(4)/Ns) higher than the NP and CEP (~5.5 E(-16)m(4)/Ns). Additionally, a normalized time-constant (3000s) for the stress relaxation was similar for all the disc tissues. The properties measured in this study are important as benchmarks for tissue engineering and for modeling the disc's mechanical

  8. Human pyridoxal phosphatase. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Won, Moo Ho; Baek, Nam-In; Moon, Byung Jo; Choi, Soo Young; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2003-12-12

    Pyridoxal phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate. A human brain cDNA clone was identified to the PLP phosphatase on the basis of peptide sequences obtained previously. The cDNA predicts a 296-amino acid protein with a calculated Mr of 31698. The open reading frame is encoded by two exons located on human chromosome 22q12.3, and the exon-intron junction contains the GT/AG consensus splice site. In addition, a full-length mouse PLP phosphatase cDNA of 1978 bp was also isolated. Mouse enzyme encodes a protein of 292 amino acids with Mr of 31512, and it is localized on chromosome 15.E1. Human and mouse PLP phosphatase share 93% identity in protein sequence. A BLAST search revealed the existence of putative proteins in organism ranging from bacteria to mammals. Catalytically active human PLP phosphatase was expressed in Escherichia coli, and characteristics of the recombinant enzyme were similar to those of erythrocyte enzyme. The recombinant enzyme displayed Km and kcat values for pyridoxal of 2.5 microM and 1.52 s(-1), respectively. Human PLP phosphatase mRNA is differentially expressed in a tissue-specific manner. A single mRNA transcript of 2.1 kb was detected in all human tissues examined and was highly abundant in the brain. Obtaining the molecular properties for the human PLP phosphatase may provide new direction for investigating metabolic pathway involving vitamin B6.

  9. Relevance and safety of telomerase for human tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Rebecca Y.; Blum, Juliana L.; Hearn, Bevin; Lebow, Benjamin; Niklason, Laura E.

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds the promise of replacing damaged or diseased tissues and organs. The use of autologous donor cells is often not feasible because of the limited replicative lifespan of cells, particularly those derived from elderly patients. Proliferative arrest can be overcome by the ectopic expression of telomerase via human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene transfection. To study the efficacy and safety of this potentially valuable technology, we used differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and vascular tissue engineering as a model system. Although we previously demonstrated that vessels engineered with telomerase-expressing SMC had improved mechanics over those grown with control cells, it is critical to assess the phenotypic impact of telomerase expression in donor cells, because telomerase up-regulation is observed in >95% of human malignancies. To study the impact of telomerase in tissue engineering, expression of hTERT was retrovirally induced in SMC from eight elderly patients and one young donor. In hTERT SMC, significant lifespan extension beyond that of control was achieved without population doubling time acceleration. Karyotype changes were seen in both control and hTERT SMC but were not clonal nor representative of cancerous change. hTERT cells also failed to show evidence of neoplastic transformation in functional assays of tumorigenicity. In addition, the impact of donor age on cellular behavior, particularly the synthetic capability of SMC, was not affected by hTERT expression. Hence, this tissue engineering model system highlights the impact of donor age on cellular synthetic function that appears to be independent of lifespan extension by hTERT. PMID:16477025

  10. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Kathleen M; Gutman, Jonathan A; Kohrt, Wendy M; Wei, Qi; Shea, Karen L; Miller, Heidi L; Sullivan, Timothy M; Erickson, Paul F; Helm, Karen M; Acosta, Alistaire S; Childs, Christine R; Musselwhite, Evelyn; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Kelly, Kimberly; Majka, Susan M; Klemm, Dwight J

    2016-03-01

    White adipocytes in adults are typically derived from tissue resident mesenchymal progenitors. The recent identification of de novo production of adipocytes from bone marrow progenitor-derived cells in mice challenges this paradigm and indicates an alternative lineage specification that adipocytes exist. We hypothesized that alternative lineage specification of white adipocytes is also present in human adipose tissue. Bone marrow from transgenic mice in which luciferase expression is governed by the adipocyte-restricted adiponectin gene promoter was adoptively transferred to wild-type recipient mice. Light emission was quantitated in recipients by in vivo imaging and direct enzyme assay. Adipocytes were also obtained from human recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. DNA was isolated, and microsatellite polymorphisms were exploited to quantify donor/recipient chimerism. Luciferase emission was detected from major fat depots of transplanted mice. No light emission was observed from intestines, liver, or lungs. Up to 35% of adipocytes in humans were generated from donor marrow cells in the absence of cell fusion. Nontransplanted mice and stromal-vascular fraction samples were used as negative and positive controls for the mouse and human experiments, respectively. This study provides evidence for a nontissue resident origin of an adipocyte subpopulation in both mice and humans.

  11. Maps of the adult human hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Nezzar, Hachemi; Sakka, Laurent; Boirie, Yves; Fontaine, Denys; Coste, Aurélien; Coll, Guillaume; Sontheimer, Anna; Sarret, Catherine; Gabrillargues, Jean; De Salles, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The human hypothalamus is a small deeply located region placed at the crossroad of neurovegetative, neuroendocrine, limbic, and optic systems. Although deep brain stimulation techniques have proven that it could be feasible to modulate these systems, targeting the hypothalamus and in particular specific nuclei and white bundles, is still challenging. Our goal was to make a synthesis of relevant topographical data of the human hypothalamus, under the form of magnetic resonance imaging maps useful for mastering its elaborated structure as well as its neighborhood. As from 1.5 Tesla, Inversion-Recovery sequence allows locating the hypothalamus and most of its components. Spotting hypothalamic compartments is possible according to specific landmarks: the anterior commissure, the mammillary bodies, the preoptic recess, the infundibular recess, the crest between the preoptic and the infundibular recesses, the optical tract, the fornix, and the mammillo-thalamic bundle. The identification of hypothalamus and most of its components could be useful to allow the quantification of local pathological processes and to target specific circuitry to alleviate severe symptoms, using physical or biological agents. PMID:23682342

  12. Soft Tissue Deformations Contribute to the Mechanics of Walking in Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiao-Yu; Zelik, Karl E.; Board, Wayne J.; Browning, Raymond C.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity not only adds to the mass that must be carried during walking, but also changes body composition. Although extra mass causes roughly proportional increases in musculoskeletal loading, less well understood is the effect of relatively soft and mechanically compliant adipose tissue. Purpose To estimate the work performed by soft tissue deformations during walking. The soft tissue would be expected to experience damped oscillations, particularly from high force transients following heel strike, and could potentially change the mechanical work demands for walking. Method We analyzed treadmill walking data at 1.25 m/s for 11 obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) and 9 non-obese (BMI < 30 kg/m2) adults. The soft tissue work was quantified with a method that compares the work performed by lower extremity joints as derived using assumptions of rigid body segments, with that estimated without rigid body assumptions. Results Relative to body mass, obese and non-obese individuals perform similar amounts of mechanical work. But negative work performed by soft tissues was significantly greater in obese individuals (p= 0.0102), equivalent to about 0.36 J/kg vs. 0.27 J/kg in non-obese individuals. The negative (dissipative) work by soft tissues occurred mainly after heel strike, and for obese individuals was comparable in magnitude to the total negative work from all of the joints combined (0.34 J/kg vs. 0.33 J/kg for obese and non-obese adults, respectively). Although the joints performed a relatively similar amount of work overall, obese individuals performed less negative work actively at the knee. Conclusion The greater proportion of soft tissues in obese individuals results in substantial changes in the amount, location, and timing of work, and may also impact metabolic energy expenditure during walking. PMID:25380475

  13. Local tissue growth patterns underlying normal fetal human brain gyrification quantified in utero

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Corbett-Detig, James; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Existing knowledge of growth patterns in the living fetal human brain is based upon in utero imaging studies by MRI and ultrasound, which describe overall growth and provided mainly qualitative findings. However, formation of the complex folded cortical structure of the adult brain requires, in part, differential rates of regional tissue growth. To better understand these local tissue growth patterns, we applied recent advances in fetal MRI motion correction and computational image analysis techniques to 40 normal fetal human brains covering a period of primary sulcal formation (20-28 gestational weeks). Growth patterns were mapped by quantifying tissue locations that were expanding more or less quickly than the overall cerebral growth rate, which reveal increasing structural complexity. We detected increased local relative growth rates in the formation of the pre- and post-central gyri, right superior temporal gyrus and opercula, which differentiated between the constant growth rate in underlying cerebral mantle and the accelerating rate in the cortical plate undergoing folding. Analysis focused on the cortical plate revealed greater volume increases in parietal and occipital regions compared to the frontal lobe. Cortical plate growth patterns constrained to narrower age ranges showed that gyrification, reflected by greater growth rates, was more pronounced after 24 gestational weeks. Local hemispheric volume asymmetry was located in the posterior peri-Sylvian area associated with structural lateralization in the mature brain. These maps of fetal brain growth patterns construct a spatially specific baseline of developmental biomarkers with which to correlate abnormal development in the human. PMID:21414909

  14. Osteogenic Differentiation Capacity of In Vitro Cultured Human Skeletal Muscle for Expedited Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Chunlei; Zhou, Lulu; Tian, Lufeng; Zhang, Yingjie; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Fanghong; Liu, Tianyi

    2017-01-01

    Expedited bone tissue engineering employs the biological stimuli to harness the intrinsic regenerative potential of skeletal muscle to trigger the reparative process in situ to improve or replace biological functions. When genetically modified with adenovirus mediated BMP2 gene transfer, muscle biopsies from animals have demonstrated success in regenerating bone within rat bony defects. However, it is uncertain whether the human adult skeletal muscle displays an osteogenic potential in vitro when a suitable biological trigger is applied. In present study, human skeletal muscle cultured in a standard osteogenic medium supplemented with dexamethasone demonstrated significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity approximately 24-fold over control at 2-week time point. More interestingly, measurement of mRNA levels revealed the dramatic results for osteoblast transcripts of alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoproteins, transcription factor CBFA1, collagen type I, and osteocalcin. Calcified mineral deposits were demonstrated on superficial layers of muscle discs after an extended 8-week osteogenic induction. Taken together, these are the first data supporting human skeletal muscle tissue as a promising potential target for expedited bone regeneration, which of the technologies is a valuable method for tissue repair, being not only effective but also inexpensive and clinically expeditious. PMID:28210626

  15. Electric fish: new insights into conserved processes of adult tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Unguez, Graciela A

    2013-07-01

    Biology is replete with examples of regeneration, the process that allows animals to replace or repair cells, tissues and organs. As on land, vertebrates in aquatic environments experience the occurrence of injury with varying frequency and to different degrees. Studies demonstrate that ray-finned fishes possess a very high capacity to regenerate different tissues and organs when they are adults. Among fishes that exhibit robust regenerative capacities are the neotropical electric fishes of South America (Teleostei: Gymnotiformes). Specifically, adult gymnotiform electric fishes can regenerate injured brain and spinal cord tissues and restore amputated body parts repeatedly. We have begun to identify some aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tail regeneration in the weakly electric fish Sternopygus macrurus (long-tailed knifefish) with a focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. Application of in vivo microinjection techniques and generation of myogenic stem cell markers are beginning to overcome some of the challenges owing to the limitations of working with non-genetic animal models with extensive regenerative capacity. This review highlights some aspects of tail regeneration in S. macrurus and discusses the advantages of using gymnotiform electric fishes to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that produce new cells during regeneration in adult vertebrates.

  16. Electric fish: new insights into conserved processes of adult tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Unguez, Graciela A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Biology is replete with examples of regeneration, the process that allows animals to replace or repair cells, tissues and organs. As on land, vertebrates in aquatic environments experience the occurrence of injury with varying frequency and to different degrees. Studies demonstrate that ray-finned fishes possess a very high capacity to regenerate different tissues and organs when they are adults. Among fishes that exhibit robust regenerative capacities are the neotropical electric fishes of South America (Teleostei: Gymnotiformes). Specifically, adult gymnotiform electric fishes can regenerate injured brain and spinal cord tissues and restore amputated body parts repeatedly. We have begun to identify some aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tail regeneration in the weakly electric fish Sternopygus macrurus (long-tailed knifefish) with a focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. Application of in vivo microinjection techniques and generation of myogenic stem cell markers are beginning to overcome some of the challenges owing to the limitations of working with non-genetic animal models with extensive regenerative capacity. This review highlights some aspects of tail regeneration in S. macrurus and discusses the advantages of using gymnotiform electric fishes to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that produce new cells during regeneration in adult vertebrates. PMID:23761473

  17. Establishment of novel prediction system of intestinal absorption in humans using human intestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Masateru; Toguchi, Hajime; Nishibayashi, Toru; Higaki, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Koganei, Kazutaka; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Kitazume, Mina T; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Sato, Toshiro; Okamoto, Susumu; Kanai, Takanori; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a novel prediction system of drug absorption in humans by utilizing human intestinal tissues. Based on the transport index (TI), a newly defined parameter, calculated by taking account of the change in drug concentrations because of precipitation on the apical side and the amounts accumulated in the tissue and transported to the basal side, the absorbability of drugs in rank order as well as the fraction of dose absorbed (Fa) in humans were estimated. Human intestinal tissues taken from ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease patients were mounted in a mini-Ussing chamber and transport studies were performed to evaluate the permeation of drugs, including FD-4, a very low permeable marker, atenolol, a low permeable marker, and metoprolol, a high permeable marker. Although apparent permeability coefficients calculated by the conventional equation did not reflect human Fa values for FD-4, atenolol, and metoprolol, TI values were well correlated with Fa values, which are described by 100 · [1 - e (- f · (TI - α)) ]. Based on this equation, Fa values in humans for other test drugs were predicted successfully, indicating that our new system utilizing human intestinal tissues would be valuable for predicting oral drug absorption in humans.

  18. Fucosyltransferase activities in human pancreatic tissue: comparative study between cancer tissues and established tumoral cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mas, E; Pasqualini, E; Caillol, N; El Battari, A; Crotte, C; Lombardo, D; Sadoulet, M O

    1998-06-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is characterized by an alteration in fucose-containing surface blood group antigens such as H antigen, Lewis b, Lewis y, and sialyl-Lewis. These carbohydrate determinants can be synthesized by sequential action of alpha(2,3) sialyltransferases or alpha(1,2) fucosyltransferases (Fuc-T) and alpha(1,3/1,4) fucosyltransferases on (poly)N-acetyllactosamine chains. Therefore, the expression and the function of seven fucosyltransferases were investigated in normal and cancer pancreatic tissues and in four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Transcripts of FUT1, FUT2, FUT3, FUT4, FUT5, and FUT7 were detected by RT-PCR in carcinoma cell lines as well as in normal and tumoral tissues. Interestingly, the FUT6 message was only detected in tumoral tissues. Analysis of the acceptor substrate specificity for fucosyltransferases indicated that alpha(1,2) Fuc-T, alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, and alpha(1,4) Fuc-T were expressed in microsome preparations of all tissues as demonstrated by fucose incorporation into phenyl beta-d-galactoside, 2'-fucosyllactose, N-acetyllactosamine, 3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, and lacto-N-biose. However, these fucosyltransferase activities varied between tissues. A substantial decrease of alpha(1,2) Fuc-T activity was observed in tumoral tissues and cell lines compared to normal tissues. Conversely, the activity of alpha(1,4) Fuc-T, which generates Lewis a and sialyl-Lewis a structures, and that of alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, able to generate a lactodifucotetraose structure, were very important in SOJ-6 and BxPC-3 cell lines. These increases correlated with an enhanced expression of Lewis a, sialyl-Lewis a, and Lewis y on the cell surface. The activity of alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, which participates in the synthesis of the sialyl-Lewis x structure, was not significantly modified in cell lines compared to normal tissues. However, the sialyl-Lewis x antigen was expressed preferentially on the surface of SOJ-6 and BxPC-3 cell lines but was not detected on Panc-1

  19. The evidence for increased L1 activity in the site of human adult brain neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kurnosov, Alexey A; Ustyugova, Svetlana V; Nazarov, Vadim I; Minervina, Anastasia A; Komkov, Alexander Yu; Shugay, Mikhail; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V; Khodosevich, Konstantin V; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Lebedev, Yuri B

    2015-01-01

    Retroelement activity is a common source of polymorphisms in human genome. The mechanism whereby retroelements contribute to the intraindividual genetic heterogeneity by inserting into the DNA of somatic cells is gaining increasing attention. Brain tissues are suspected to accumulate genetic heterogeneity as a result of the retroelements somatic activity. This study aims to expand our understanding of the role retroelements play in generating somatic mosaicism of neural tissues. Whole-genome Alu and L1 profiling of genomic DNA extracted from the cerebellum, frontal cortex, subventricular zone, dentate gyrus, and the myocardium revealed hundreds of somatic insertions in each of the analyzed tissues. Interestingly, the highest concentration of such insertions was detected in the dentate gyrus-the hotspot of adult neurogenesis. Insertions of retroelements and their activity could produce genetically diverse neuronal subsets, which can be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory.

  20. Aberrant Synaptic Integration in Adult Lamina I Projection Neurons Following Neonatal Tissue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Kritzer, Elizabeth; Craig, Paige E.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that neonatal tissue damage evokes alterations in spinal pain reflexes which persist into adulthood. However, less is known about potential concomitant effects on the transmission of nociceptive information to the brain, as the degree to which early injury modulates synaptic integration and membrane excitability in mature spinal projection neurons remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury leads to a significant shift in the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition onto identified lamina I projection neurons of the adult mouse spinal cord. The strength of direct primary afferent input to mature spino-parabrachial neurons was enhanced following neonatal tissue damage, whereas the efficacy of both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition onto the same population was compromised. This was accompanied by reorganization in the pattern of sensory input to adult projection neurons, which included a greater prevalence of monosynaptic input from low-threshold A-fibers when preceded by early tissue damage. In addition, neonatal incision resulted in greater primary afferent-evoked action potential discharge in mature projection neurons. Overall, these results demonstrate that tissue damage during early life causes a long-term increase in the gain of spinal nociceptive circuits, and suggest that the prolonged consequences of neonatal trauma may not be restricted to the spinal cord but rather include excessive ascending signaling to supraspinal pain centers. PMID:25673839

  1. Characterization of human myoblast cultures for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stern-Straeter, Jens; Bran, Gregor; Riedel, Frank; Sauter, Alexander; Hörmann, Karl; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering, a promising specialty, aims at the reconstruction of skeletal muscle loss. In vitro tissue engineering attempts to achieve this goal by creating differentiated, functional muscle tissue through a process in which stem cells are extracted from the patient, e.g. by muscle biopsies, expanded and differentiated in a controlled environment, and subsequently re-implanted. A prerequisite for this undertaking is the ability to cultivate and differentiate human skeletal muscle cell cultures. Evidently, optimal culture conditions must be investigated for later clinical utilization. We therefore analysed the proliferation of human cells in different environments and evaluated the differentiation potential of different culture media. It was shown that human myoblasts have a higher rate of proliferation in the alamarBlue assay when cultured on gelatin-coated culture flasks rather than polystyrene-coated flasks. We also demonstrated that myoblasts treated with a culture medium with a high concentration of growth factors [growth medium (GM)] showed a higher proliferation compared to cultures treated with a culture medium with lower amounts of growth factors [differentiation medium (DM)]. Differentiation of human myoblast cell cultures treated with GM and DM was analysed until day 16 and myogenesis was verified by expression of MyoD, myogenin, alpha-sarcomeric actin and myosin heavy chain by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining for desmin, Myf-5 and alpha-sarcomeric actin was performed to verify the myogenic phenotype of extracted satellite cells and to prove the maturation of cells. Cultures treated with DM showed positive staining for alpha-sarcomeric actin. Notably, markers of differentiation were also detected in cultures treated with GM, but there was no formation of myotubes. In the enzymatic assay of creatine phosphokinase, cultures treated with DM showed a higher activity, evidencing a higher degree of differentiation

  2. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Kathleen M.; Gutman, Jonathan A.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Wei, Qi; Shea, Karen L.; Miller, Heidi L.; Sullivan, Timothy M.; Erickson, Paul F.; Helm, Karen M.; Acosta, Alistaire S.; Childs, Christine R.; Musselwhite, Evelyn; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Kelly, Kimberly; Majka, Susan M.; Klemm, Dwight J.

    2016-01-01

    White adipocytes in adults are typically derived from tissue resident mesenchymal progenitors. The recent identification of de novo production of adipocytes from bone marrow progenitor-derived cells in mice challenges this paradigm and indicates an alternative lineage specification that adipocytes exist. We hypothesized that alternative lineage specification of white adipocytes is also present in human adipose tissue. Bone marrow from transgenic mice in which luciferase expression is governed by the adipocyte-restricted adiponectin gene promoter was adoptively transferred to wild-type recipient mice. Light emission was quantitated in recipients by in vivo imaging and direct enzyme assay. Adipocytes were also obtained from human recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. DNA was isolated, and microsatellite polymorphisms were exploited to quantify donor/recipient chimerism. Luciferase emission was detected from major fat depots of transplanted mice. No light emission was observed from intestines, liver, or lungs. Up to 35% of adipocytes in humans were generated from donor marrow cells in the absence of cell fusion. Nontransplanted mice and stromal-vascular fraction samples were used as negative and positive controls for the mouse and human experiments, respectively. This study provides evidence for a nontissue resident origin of an adipocyte subpopulation in both mice and humans.—Gavin, K. M., Gutman, J. A., Kohrt, W. M., Wei, Q., Shea, K. L., Miller, H. L., Sullivan, T. M., Erickson, P. F., Helm, K. M., Acosta, A. S., Childs, C. R., Musselwhite, E., Varella-Garcia, M., Kelly, K., Majka, S. M., Klemm, D. J. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue. PMID:26581599

  3. Tissue optical clearing, three-dimensional imaging, and computer morphometry in whole mouse lungs and human airways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gregory D; Blum, Emily D; Fryer, Allison D; Jacoby, David B

    2014-07-01

    In whole adult mouse lung, full identification of airway nerves (or other cellular/subcellular objects) has not been possible due to patchy distribution and micron-scale size. Here we describe a method using tissue clearing to acquire the first complete image of three-dimensional (3D) innervation in the lung. We then created a method to pair analysis of nerve (or any other colabeled epitope) images with identification of 3D tissue compartments and airway morphometry by using fluorescent casting and morphometry software (which we designed and are making available as open-source). We then tested our method to quantify a sparse heterogeneous nerve population by examining visceral pleural nerves. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our method in human tissue to image full thickness innervation in irregular 3D tissue compartments and to quantify sparse objects (intrinsic airway ganglia). Overall, this method can uniquely pair the advantages of whole tissue imaging and cellular/subcellular fluorescence microscopy.

  4. Computational model of soft tissues in the human upper airway.

    PubMed

    Pelteret, J-P V; Reddy, B D

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of the tongue and surrounding soft tissues with potential application to the study of sleep apnoea and of linguistics and speech therapy. The anatomical data was obtained from the Visible Human Project, and the underlying histological data was also extracted and incorporated into the model. Hyperelastic constitutive models were used to describe the material behaviour, and material incompressibility was accounted for. An active Hill three-element muscle model was used to represent the muscular tissue of the tongue. The neural stimulus for each muscle group was determined through the use of a genetic algorithm-based neural control model. The fundamental behaviour of the tongue under gravitational and breathing-induced loading is investigated. It is demonstrated that, when a time-dependent loading is applied to the tongue, the neural model is able to control the position of the tongue and produce a physiologically realistic response for the genioglossus.

  5. Pathology, physiologic parameters, tissue contaminants, and tissue thiamine in morbid and healthy central Florida adult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Ross, J.P.; Carbonneau, D.A.; Terrell, S.P.; Woodward, A.R.; Schoeb, T.R.; Perceval, H.F.; Hinterkopf, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of adult alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) mortalities in Lake Griffin, central Florida, was conducted from 1998-2004. Alligator mortality was highest in the months of April and May and annual death count peaked in 2000. Bacterial pathogens, heavy metals, and pesticides were not linked with the mortalities. Blood chemistry did not point to any clinical diagnosis, although differences between impaired and normal animals were noted. Captured alligators with signs of neurologic impairment displayed unresponsive and uncoordinated behavior. Three of 21 impaired Lake Griffin alligators were found to have neural lesions characteristic of thiamine deficiency in the telencephalon, particularly the dorsal ventricular ridge. In some cases, lesions were found in the thalamus, and parts of the midbrain. Liver and muscle tissue concentrations of thiamine (vitamin B"1) were lowest in impaired Lake Griffin alligators when compared to unimpaired alligators or to alligators from Lake Woodruff. The consumption of thiaminase-positive gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) is thought to have been the cause of the low tissue thiamine and resulting mortalities. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  6. Pathology, physiologic parameters, tissue contaminants, and tissue thiamine in morbid and healthy central Florida adult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Honeyfield, Dale C; Ross, J Perran; Carbonneau, Dwayne A; Terrell, Scott P; Woodward, Allan R; Schoeb, Trenton R; Perceval, H Franklin; Hinterkopf, Joy P

    2008-04-01

    An investigation of adult alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) mortalities in Lake Griffin, central Florida, was conducted from 1998-2004. Alligator mortality was highest in the months of April and May and annual death count peaked in 2000. Bacterial pathogens, heavy metals, and pesticides were not linked with the mortalities. Blood chemistry did not point to any clinical diagnosis, although differences between impaired and normal animals were noted. Captured alligators with signs of neurologic impairment displayed unresponsive and uncoordinated behavior. Three of 21 impaired Lake Griffin alligators were found to have neural lesions characteristic of thiamine deficiency in the telencephalon, particularly the dorsal ventricular ridge. In some cases, lesions were found in the thalamus, and parts of the midbrain. Liver and muscle tissue concentrations of thiamine (vitamin B(1)) were lowest in impaired Lake Griffin alligators when compared to unimpaired alligators or to alligators from Lake Woodruff. The consumption of thiaminase-positive gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) is thought to have been the cause of the low tissue thiamine and resulting mortalities.

  7. Neonatal Tissue Damage Promotes Spike Timing-Dependent Synaptic Long-Term Potentiation in Adult Spinal Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence from both humans and rodents suggests that tissue damage during the neonatal period can “prime” developing nociceptive pathways such that a subsequent injury during adulthood causes an exacerbated degree of pain hypersensitivity. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this priming effect remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury relaxes the timing rules governing long-term potentiation (LTP) at mouse primary afferent synapses onto mature lamina I projection neurons, which serve as a major output of the spinal nociceptive network and are essential for pain perception. In addition, whereas LTP in naive mice was only observed if the presynaptic input preceded postsynaptic firing, early tissue injury removed this temporal requirement and LTP was observed regardless of the order in which the inputs were activated. Neonatal tissue damage also reduced the dependence of spike-timing-dependent LTP on NMDAR activation and unmasked a novel contribution of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs. These results suggest for the first time that transient tissue damage during early life creates a more permissive environment for the production of LTP within adult spinal nociceptive circuits. This persistent metaplasticity may promote the excessive amplification of ascending nociceptive transmission to the mature brain and thereby facilitate the generation of chronic pain after injury, thus representing a novel potential mechanism by which early trauma can prime adult pain pathways in the CNS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tissue damage during early life can “prime” developing nociceptive pathways in the CNS, leading to greater pain severity after repeat injury via mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury widens the timing window during which correlated presynaptic and postsynaptic activity can evoke long-term potentiation (LTP) at sensory synapses onto adult lamina I

  8. Long-term culture and functional characterization of follicular cells from adult normal human thyroids.

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, F; Ambesi-Impiombato, F S; Perrella, G; Coon, H G

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained long-term cultures of differentiated proliferating follicular cells from normal adult human thyroid glands. In vitro growth of such human cells has been sustained by a modified F-12 medium, supplemented with bovine hypothalamus and pituitary extracts and no added thyrotropin. Cultures have been expanded, cloned, frozen, successfully retrieved, and characterized. Functional characterization of these cells shows constitutive thyroglobulin production and release and thyrotropin-dependent adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production, the latter apparently not associated with significant increases in DNA synthesis or cell proliferation. Genetic characterization of these cells by chromosome counting showed the normal diploid chromosome number. The ability to cultivate differentiated human thyroid follicular cells in long-term culture opens possibilities for investigating the transduction pathways of thyrotropin stimulation in normal and pathological human tissues, developing clinically relevant in vitro assays, and considering cellular and molecular therapies. Images PMID:8090760

  9. Polyethylene glycol enhanced refolding of the recombinant human tissue transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, A; Fésüs, L

    2001-02-01

    Tissue transglutaminase forms cross-links between lysine and glutamine side-chains of polypeptide chains in a Ca2+-dependent reaction; its structural basis is still not clarified. In this study, we demonstrate that the refolding of the human recombinant enzyme molecule to its catalytically active form from inclusion bodies needs the presence of a helper material with higher molecular mass, but only in the initiation phase. Ca2+ and nucleotides are ascribed as affector molecules also in the early phase of structural reconstitution. Two optimal concentrations of polyethylene glycol and a relatively long time scale for the evolution of the final structure were identified. The optimized refolding procedure is reported.

  10. The phenotype and tissue-specific nature of multipotent cells derived from human mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wu, Min-Ke; Wang, Hang; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Sato, Soh; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2014-02-21

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from mature adipocytes have been considered to be a homogeneous group of multipotent cells, which present to be an alternative source of adult stem cells for regenerative medicine. However, many aspects of the cellular nature about DFAT cells remained unclarified. This study aimed to elucidate the basic characteristics of DFAT cells underlying their functions and differentiation potentials. By modified ceiling culture technique, DFAT cells were converted from human mature adipocytes from the human buccal fat pads. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that those derived cells were a homogeneous population of CD13(+) CD29(+) CD105(+) CD44(+) CD31(-) CD34(-) CD309(-) α-SMA(-) cells. DFAT cells in this study demonstrated tissue-specific differentiation properties with strong adipogenic but much weaker osteogenic capacity. Neither did they express endothelial markers under angiogenic induction.

  11. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43...

  12. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43...

  13. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43...

  14. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43...

  15. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43...

  16. Tissue engineered humanized bone supports human hematopoiesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Boris M; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Nowlan, Bianca; Barbier, Valerie; Thibaudeau, Laure; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Hooper, John D; Loessner, Daniela; Clements, Judith A; Russell, Pamela J; Pettit, Allison R; Winkler, Ingrid G; Levesque, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Advances in tissue-engineering have resulted in a versatile tool-box to specifically design a tailored microenvironment for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in order to study diseases that develop within this setting. However, most current in vivo models fail to recapitulate the biological processes seen in humans. Here we describe a highly reproducible method to engineer humanized bone constructs that are able to recapitulate the morphological features and biological functions of the HSC niches. Ectopic implantation of biodegradable composite scaffolds cultured for 4 weeks with human mesenchymal progenitor cells and loaded with rhBMP-7 resulted in the development of a chimeric bone organ including a large number of human mesenchymal cells which were shown to be metabolically active and capable of establishing a humanized microenvironment supportive of the homing and maintenance of human HSCs. A syngeneic mouse-to-mouse transplantation assay was used to prove the functionality of the tissue-engineered ossicles. We predict that the ability to tissue engineer a morphologically intact and functional large-volume bone organ with a humanized bone marrow compartment will help to further elucidate physiological or pathological interactions between human HSCs and their native niches.

  17. A Protocol for Collecting Human Cardiac Tissue for Research

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Cheavar A.; Haynes, Premi; Campbell, Stuart G.; Chung, Charles; Mitov, Mihail I.; Dennis, Donna; Bonnell, Mark R.; Hoopes, Charles W.; Guglin, Maya; Campbell, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript describes a protocol at the University of Kentucky that allows a translational research team to collect human myocardium that can be used for biological research. We have gained a great deal of practical experience since we started this protocol in 2008, and we hope that other groups might be able to learn from our endeavors. To date, we have procured ~4000 samples from ~230 patients. The tissue that we collect comes from organ donors and from patients who are receiving a heart transplant or a ventricular assist device because they have heart failure. We begin our manuscript by describing the importance of human samples in cardiac research. Subsequently, we describe the process for obtaining consent from patients, the cost of running the protocol, and some of the issues and practical difficulties that we have encountered. We conclude with some suggestions for other researchers who may be considering starting a similar protocol. PMID:28042604

  18. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, Dimitrios. G.; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure. PMID:25763648

  19. Developmental changes in purine phosphoribosyltransferases in human and rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A; Harkness, R A

    1976-01-01

    1. The hypoxanthine/guanine and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activities in a wide variety of human tissues were studied during their growth and development from foetal life onward. A wide range of activities develop after birth, with especially high values in the central nervous system and testes. 2. Postnatal development of hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase was also defined in the rat. Although there were increases in the central nervous system and testes, there was also a rise in activity in the liver, which was less marked in man. 3. A sensitive radiochemical assay method, using dTTP to inhibit 5'-nucleotidase activity, suitable for tissue extracts, was developed. 4. No definite evidence of the existence of tissue-specific isoenzymes of hypoxanthine/guanine or adenine phosphoribosyltransferase was found. Hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in testes, however, had a significantly different thermal-denaturation rate constant. 5. The findings are discussed in an attempt to relate activity of hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase to biological function. Growth as well as some developmental changes appear to be related to increase in the activity of this enzyme. PMID:1016239

  20. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Powell, Courtney A; Smiley, Beth L; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H

    2002-11-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  1. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  2. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  3. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  4. Proteogenomic Analysis of Human Chromosome 9-Encoded Genes from Human Samples and Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jung-Mo; Kim, Min-Sik; Kim, Yong-In; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Lee, Sun Hee; Paik, Young-Ki; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2014-01-01

    The Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) was recently initiated as an international collaborative effort. Our team adopted chromosome 9 (Chr 9) and performed a bioinformatics and proteogenomic analysis to catalog Chr 9-encoded proteins from normal tissues, lung cancer cell lines and lung cancer tissues. Approximately 74.7% of the Chr 9 genes of the human genome were identified, which included approximately 28% of missing proteins (46 of 162) on Chr 9 compared with the list of missing proteins from the neXtProt master table (2013-09). In addition, we performed a comparative proteomics analysis between normal lung and lung cancer tissues. Based on the data analysis, 15 proteins from Chr 9 were detected only in lung cancer tissues. Finally, we conducted a proteogenomic analysis to discover Chr 9-residing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and mutations described in the COSMIC cancer mutation database. We identified 21 SNPs and 4 mutations containing peptides on Chr 9 from normal human cells/tissues and lung cancer cell lines, respectively. In summary, this study provides valuable information of the human proteome for the scientific community as part of C-HPP. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD. PMID:24274035

  5. Dedifferentiated fat cells: an alternative source of adult multipotent cells from the adipose tissues

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie-fei; Sugawara, Atsunori; Yamashita, Joe; Ogura, Hideo; Sato, Soh

    2011-01-01

    When adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are retrieved from the stromal vascular portion of adipose tissue, a large amount of mature adipocytes are often discarded. However, by modified ceiling culture technique based on their buoyancy, mature adipocytes can be easily isolated from the adipose cell suspension and dedifferentiated into lipid-free fibroblast-like cells, named dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. DFAT cells re-establish active proliferation ability and undertake multipotent capacities. Compared with ASCs and other adult stem cells, DFAT cells showed unique advantages in their abundance, isolation and homogeneity. In this concise review, the establishment and culture methods of DFAT cells are introduced and the current profiles of their cellular nature are summarized. Under proper induction culture in vitro or environment in vivo, DFAT cells could demonstrate adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic and myogenic potentials. In angiogenic conditions, DFAT cells could exhibit perivascular characteristics and elicit neovascularization. Our preliminary findings also suggested the pericyte phenotype underlying such cell lineage, which supported a novel interpretation about the common origin of mesenchymal stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells within blood vessel walls. Current research on DFAT cells indicated that this alternative source of adult multipotent cells has great potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:21789960

  6. Dedifferentiated fat cells: an alternative source of adult multipotent cells from the adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie-fei; Sugawara, Atsunori; Yamashita, Joe; Ogura, Hideo; Sato, Soh

    2011-07-01

    When adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are retrieved from the stromal vascular portion of adipose tissue, a large amount of mature adipocytes are often discarded. However, by modified ceiling culture technique based on their buoyancy, mature adipocytes can be easily isolated from the adipose cell suspension and dedifferentiated into lipid-free fibroblast-like cells, named dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. DFAT cells re-establish active proliferation ability and undertake multipotent capacities. Compared with ASCs and other adult stem cells, DFAT cells showed unique advantages in their abundance, isolation and homogeneity. In this concise review, the establishment and culture methods of DFAT cells are introduced and the current profiles of their cellular nature are summarized. Under proper induction culture in vitro or environment in vivo, DFAT cells could demonstrate adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic and myogenic potentials. In angiogenic conditions, DFAT cells could exhibit perivascular characteristics and elicit neovascularization. Our preliminary findings also suggested the pericyte phenotype underlying such cell lineage, which supported a novel interpretation about the common origin of mesenchymal stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells within blood vessel walls. Current research on DFAT cells indicated that this alternative source of adult multipotent cells has great potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  7. Methylation of DNA in mouse early embryos, teratocarcinoma cells and adult tissues of mouse and rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J; Roberts-Ems, J; Luthardt, F W; Riggs, A D

    1979-01-01

    The distribution and amount of 5-methylcytosine (5-MeCyt) in DNA was measured for early embryos of mouse strain CF1 (2 to 4 cell stage to blastocyst) and mouse teratocarcinoma cells. In each case, the pattern of methylation was examined by use of the restriction enzymes Hha I and HPA II HPA II, which cut DNA at the sites 5'GCGC and 5'CCGG respectively, when the cytosines at these sites are not methylated. Mouse embryo DNA was found to have the same level of methylation as adult mouse tissues, and no changes in methylation were seen during differentiation of the teratocarcinoma cells. The ratio of 5-MeCyt/Cyt in DNA was measured by high performance liquid chromatography for the differentiating teratocarcinoma cells and for several adult mouse and rabbit tissues. The variation between tissues or between teratocarcinoma cells at different stages of differentiation was less than 10 percent. These results are discussed in view of proposals that 5-MeCyt plays a role in differentiation. Images PMID:523320

  8. The mirror RNA expression pattern in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bythwood, Tameka N.; Xu, Wei; Li, Wenzhi; Rao, Weinian; Li, Qiling; Xue, Xue; Richards, Jendai; Ma, Li; Song, Qing

    2017-01-01

    It has been realized in recent years that non-coding RNAs are playing important roles in genome functions and human diseases. Here we developed a new technology and observed a new pattern of gene expression. We observed that over 72% of RNAs in human genome are expressed in forward-reverse pairs, just like mirror images of each other between forward expression and reverse expression; the overview showed that it cannot be simply described as transcript overlapping, so we designated it as mirror expression. Furthermore, we found that the mirror expression is gene-specific and tissue-specific, and less common in the proximal promoter regions. The size of the shadows varies between different genes, different tissues and different classes. The shadow expression is most significant in the Alu element, it was also observed among L1, Simple Repeats and LTR elements, but rare in other repeats such as low-complexity, LINE/L2, DNA and MIRs. Although there is no evidence yet about the relationship of this mirror pattern and double-strand RNA (dsRNA), this new striking pattern provides a new clue and a new direction to unveil the role of RNAs in the genome functions and diseases.

  9. Tissue engineered human tracheas for in vivo implantation.

    PubMed

    Baiguera, Silvia; Jungebluth, Phillip; Burns, Alan; Mavilia, Carmelo; Haag, Johannes; De Coppi, Paolo; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2010-12-01

    Two years ago we performed the first clinical successful transplantation of a fully tissue engineered trachea. Despite the clinically positive outcome, the graft production took almost 3 months, a not feasible period of time for patients with the need of an urgent transplantation. We have then improved decellularization process and herein, for the first time, we completely describe and characterize the obtainment of human tracheal bioactive supports. Histological and molecular biology analysis demonstrated that all cellular components and nuclear material were removed and quantitative PCR confirmed it. SEM analysis revealed that the decellularized matrices retained the hierarchical structures of native trachea, and biomechanical tests showed that decellularization approach did not led to any influence on tracheal morphological and mechanical properties. Moreover immunohistological staining showed the preservation of angiogenic factors and angiogenic assays demonstrated that acellular human tracheal scaffolds exert an in vitro chemo-active action and induce strong in vivo angiogenic response (CAM analysis). We are now able to obtained, in a short and clinically useful time (approximately 3 weeks), a bioengineered trachea that is structurally and mechanically similar to native trachea, which exert chemotactive and pro-angiogenic properties and which could be successfully used for clinical tissue engineered airway clinical replacements.

  10. Distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Dinjens, W N; ten Kate, J; van der Linden, E P; Wijnen, J T; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1989-12-01

    The normal distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human body was investigated quantitatively by ADCP-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and qualitatively by immunohistochemistry. In these studies we used a specific rabbit anti-human ADCP antiserum. In all 19 investigated tissues, except erythrocytes, ADCP was found by RIA in the soluble and membrane fractions. From all tissues the membrane fractions contained more ADCP (expressed per mg protein) than the soluble fractions. High membrane ADCP concentrations were found in skin, renal cortex, gastrointestinal tract, and prostate. Immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the predominant membrane-associated localization of the protein. In serous sweat glands, convoluted tubules of renal cortex, bile canaliculi, gastrointestinal tract, lung, pancreas, prostate gland, salivary gland, gallbladder, mammary gland, and uterus, ADCP immunoreactivity was found confined to the luminal membranes of the epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that ADCP is present predominantly in exocrine glands and absorptive epithelia. The localization of ADCP at the secretory or absorptive apex of the cells suggests that the function of ADCP is related to the secretory and/or absorptive process.

  11. Bacteriology of moderate (chronic) periodontitis in mature adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Cato, E P; Smibert, R M; Burmeister, J A; Ranney, R R

    1983-01-01

    A total of 171 taxa was represented among 1,900 bacterial isolates from 60 samples of sites affected with moderate periodontitis in 22 mature adult humans. The composition of the subgingival sulcus flora was statistically significantly different from that of the adjacent supragingival flora and the subgingival flora of 14 people with healthy gingiva, but was not significantly different from that of sulci affected with severe periodontitis in 21 young human adults. The sulcus floras of moderate periodontitis and severe periodontitis shared many of their predominant bacterial species, but there were differences in the relative proportions of some of these species. Similar relationships were found for seven taxa of treponemes that were cultured from the samples. PMID:6642641

  12. Loss of HtrA2/Omi activity in non-neuronal tissues of adult mice causes premature aging.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Louboutin, J-P; Datta, P; Landel, C P; Martinez, D; Zervos, A S; Strayer, D S; Fernandes-Alnemri, T; Alnemri, E S

    2013-02-01

    mnd2 mice die prematurely as a result of neurodegeneration 30-40 days after birth due to loss of the enzymatic activity of the mitochondrial quality control protease HtrA2/Omi. Here, we show that transgenic expression of human HtrA2/Omi in the central nervous system of mnd2 mice rescues them from neurodegeneration and prevents their premature death. Interestingly, adult transgenic mnd2 mice develop accelerated aging phenotypes, such as premature weight loss, hair loss, reduced fertility, curvature of the spine, heart enlargement, increased autophagy, and death by 12-17 months of age. These mice also have elevated levels of clonally expanded mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions in their tissues. Our results provide direct genetic evidence linking mitochondrial protein quality control to mtDNA deletions and aging in mammals.

  13. Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium, uranium and neptunium in fed and fasted adult baboons: Application to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Cohen, N.; Ralston, L.G.; Ayres, L.

    1992-03-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) absorption values of plutonium, uranium, and neptunium were determined in fed and fasted adult baboons. A dual isotope method of determining GI absorption, which does not require animal sacrifice, was validated and shown to compare well with the sacrifice method (summation of oral isotope in urine with that in tissues at sacrifice). For all three elements, mean GI absorption values were significantly high (5- to 50-fold) in 24-hour (h)-fasted animals than in fed animals, and GI absorption values for baboons agreed well with those for humans.

  14. Quantification of human body fat tissue percentage by MRI.

    PubMed

    Müller, Hans-Peter; Raudies, Florian; Unrath, Alexander; Neumann, Heiko; Ludolph, Albert C; Kassubek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The MRI-based evaluation of the quantity and regional distribution of adipose tissue is one objective measure in the investigation of obesity. The aim of this article was to report a comprehensive and automatic analytical method for the determination of the volumes of subcutaneous fat tissue (SFT) and visceral fat tissue (VFT) in either the whole human body or selected slices or regions of interest. Using an MRI protocol in an examination position that was convenient for volunteers and patients with severe diseases, 22 healthy subjects were examined. The software platform was able to merge MRI scans of several body regions acquired in separate acquisitions. Through a cascade of image processing steps, SFT and VFT volumes were calculated. Whole-body SFT and VFT distributions, as well as fat distributions of defined body slices, were analysed in detail. Complete three-dimensional datasets were analysed in a reproducible manner with as few operator-dependent interventions as possible. In order to determine the SFT volume, the ARTIS (Adapted Rendering for Tissue Intensity Segmentation) algorithm was introduced. The advantage of the ARTIS algorithm was the delineation of SFT volumes in regions in which standard region grow techniques fail. Using the ARTIS algorithm, an automatic SFT volume detection was feasible. MRI data analysis was able to determine SFT and VFT volume percentages using new analytical strategies. With the techniques described, it was possible to detect changes in SFT and VFT percentages of the whole body and selected regions. The techniques presented in this study are likely to be of use in obesity-related investigations, as well as in the examination of longitudinal changes in weight during various medical conditions.

  15. Mouse matriptase-2: identification, characterization and comparative mRNA expression analysis with mouse hepsin in adult and embryonic tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, John D; Campagnolo, Luisa; Goodarzi, Goodarz; Truong, Tony N; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Quigley, James P

    2003-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of mouse matriptase-2 (m-matriptase-2), an 811-amino-acid protein composed of an N-terminal cytoplasmic domain, a membrane-spanning domain, two CUB (complement protein subcomponents C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 1) domains, three LDLR (low-density-lipoprotein receptor class A) domains and a C-terminal serine-protease domain. All m-matriptase-2 protein domain boundaries corresponded with intron/exon junctions of the encoding gene, which spans approx. 29 kb and comprises 18 exons. Matriptase-2 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat, with the rat matriptase-2 gene ( r-maltriptase-2 ) predicted to encode transmembrane and soluble isoforms. Western-blot analysis indicated that m-matriptase-2 migrates close to its theoretical molecular mass of 91 kDa, and immunofluorescence analysis was consistent with the proposed surface membrane localization of this protein. Reverse-transcription PCR and in-situ -hybridization analysis indicated that m-matriptase-2 expression overlaps with the distribution of mouse hepsin (m-hepsin, a cell-surface serine protease identified in hepatoma cells) in adult tissues and during embryonic development. In adult tissues both are expressed at highest levels in liver, kidney and uterus. During embryogenesis m-matriptase-2 expression peaked between days 12.5 and 15.5. m-hepsin expression was biphasic, with peaks at day 7.5 to 8.5 and again between days 12.5 and 15.5. In situ hybridization of embryonic tissues indicated abundant expression of both m-matriptase-2 and m-hepsin in the developing liver and at lower levels in developing pharyngo-tympanic tubes. While m-hepsin was detected in the residual embryonic yolk sac and with lower intensity in lung, heart, gastrointestinal tract, developing kidney tubules and epithelium of the oral cavity, m-matriptase-2 was absent in these tissues, but strongly expressed within the nasal cavity by olfactory epithelial

  16. Doublecortin expression in the normal and epileptic adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y W J; Curtis, M A; Gibbons, H M; Mee, E W; Bergin, P S; Teoh, H H; Connor, B; Dragunow, M; Faull, R L M

    2008-12-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a neurological disorder associated with spontaneous recurrent complex partial seizures and hippocampal sclerosis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported in animal models of MTLE, increased neurogenesis has not been reported in the hippocampus of adult human MTLE cases. Here we showed that cells expressing doublecortin (Dcx), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in migrating neuroblasts, were present in the hippocampus and temporal cortex of the normal and MTLE adult human brain. In particular, increased numbers of Dcx-positive cells were observed in the epileptic compared with the normal temporal cortex. Importantly, 56% of Dcx-expressing cells in the epileptic temporal cortex coexpressed both the proliferative cell marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and early neuronal marker, TuJ1, suggesting that they may be newly generated neurons. A subpopulation of Dcx-positive cells in the epileptic temporal cortex also coexpressed the mature neuronal marker, NeuN, suggesting that epilepsy may promote the generation of new neurons in the temporal cortex. This study has identified, for the first time, a novel population of Dcx-positive cells in the adult human temporal cortex that can be upregulated by epilepsy and thus, raises the possibility that these cells may have functional significance in the pathophysiology of epilepsy.

  17. Alternative Sources of Adult Stem Cells: Human Amniotic Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbank, Susanne; van Griensven, Martijn; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Peterbauer-Scherb, Anja

    Human amniotic membrane is a highly promising cell source for tissue engineering. The cells thereof, human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) and human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSC), may be immunoprivileged, they represent an early developmental status, and their application is ethically uncontroversial. Cell banking strategies may use freshly isolated cells or involve in vitro expansion to increase cell numbers. Therefore, we have thoroughly characterized the effect of in vitro cultivation on both phenotype and differentiation potential of hAEC. Moreover, we present different strategies to improve expansion including replacement of animal-derived supplements by human platelet products or the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase to extend the in vitro lifespan of amniotic cells. Characterization of the resulting cultures includes phenotype, growth characteristics, and differentiation potential, as well as immunogenic and immunomodulatory properties.

  18. Embryonic origin of adult stem cells required for tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Davies, Erin L; Lei, Kai; Seidel, Christopher W; Kroesen, Amanda E; McKinney, Sean A; Guo, Longhua; Robb, Sofia Mc; Ross, Eric J; Gotting, Kirsten; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2017-01-10

    Planarian neoblasts are pluripotent, adult somatic stem cells and lineage-primed progenitors that are required for the production and maintenance of all differentiated cell types, including the germline. Neoblasts, originally defined as undifferentiated cells residing in the adult parenchyma, are frequently compared to embryonic stem cells yet their developmental origin remains obscure. We investigated the provenance of neoblasts during Schmidtea mediterranea embryogenesis, and report that neoblasts arise from an anarchic, cycling piwi-1+ population wholly responsible for production of all temporary and definitive organs during embryogenesis. Early embryonic piwi-1+ cells are molecularly and functionally distinct from neoblasts: they express unique cohorts of early embryo enriched transcripts and behave differently than neoblasts in cell transplantation assays. Neoblast lineages arise as organogenesis begins and are required for construction of all major organ systems during embryogenesis. These subpopulations are continuously generated during adulthood, where they act as agents of tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  19. Tissue-specific in vivo transcription start sites of the human and murine cystic fibrosis genes.

    PubMed

    White, N L; Higgins, C F; Trezise, A E

    1998-03-01

    The in vivo transcription start sites of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene ( CFTR ) and its murine homologue ( Cftr ) have been mapped in a range of tissues using the technique of 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5' RACE). These are the first in vivo transcription start sites for CFTR or Cftr to be reported. Distinct, tissue-specific patterns of CFTR start site usage were identified in both mouse and human. In particular, striking variation in the position of the murine Cftr transcription start site was seen along the length of the intestinal tract; different start sites being utilized in ileum and in duodenum. In humans, distinct transcription start sites are utilized in adult and foetal lungs. In addition, a novel 5'-untranslated exon of murine Cftr , denoted exon -1, was identified and shown to be expressed exclusively in mouse testis. Expression of exon -1-containing Cftr transcripts was shown by mRNA in situ hybridization to be confined to the germ cells and to be regulated during spermatogenesis.

  20. Immunodetection of Human LINE-1 Expression in Cultured Cells and Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reema; Rodić, Nemanja; Burns, Kathleen H; Taylor, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) is the only active protein-coding retrotransposon in humans. It is not expressed in somatic tissue but is aberrantly expressed in a wide variety of human cancers. ORF1p protein is the most robust indicator of LINE-1 expression; the protein accumulates in large quantities in cellular cytoplasm. Recently, monoclonal antibodies have allowed more complete characterizations of ORF1p expression and indicated potential for developing ORF1p as a clinical biomarker. Here, we describe a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for human LINE-1 ORF1p and its application in immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry of both cells and human tissues. We also describe detection of tagged LINE-1 ORF2p via immunofluorescence. These general methods may be readily adapted to use with many other proteins and antibodies.

  1. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Benso, Maria P; Rivero-Gutierrez, Belen; Lopez-Minguez, Jesus; Anzola, Andrea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A; Lujan, Juan A; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Scheer, Frank A J L; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In humans, insulin sensitivity varies according to time of day, with decreased values in the evening and at night. Mechanisms responsible for the diurnal variation in insulin sensitivity are unclear. We investigated whether human adipose tissue (AT) expresses intrinsic circadian rhythms in insulin sensitivity that could contribute to this phenomenon. Subcutaneous and visceral AT biopsies were obtained from extremely obese participants (body mass index, 41.8 ± 6.3 kg/m(2); 46 ± 11 y) during gastric-bypass surgery. To assess the rhythm in insulin signaling, AKT phosphorylation was determined every 4 h over 24 h in vitro in response to different insulin concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM). Data revealed that subcutaneous AT exhibited robust circadian rhythms in insulin signaling (P < 0.00001). Insulin sensitivity reached its maximum (acrophase) around noon, being 54% higher than during midnight (P = 0.009). The amplitude of the rhythm was positively correlated with in vivo sleep duration (r = 0.53; P = 0.023) and negatively correlated with in vivo bedtime (r = -0.54; P = 0.020). No circadian rhythms were detected in visceral AT (P = 0.643). Here, we demonstrate the relevance of the time of the day for how sensitive AT is to the effects of insulin. Subcutaneous AT shows an endogenous circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity that could provide an underlying mechanism for the daily rhythm in systemic insulin sensitivity.-Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Rivero-Gutierrez, B., Lopez-Minguez, J., Anzola, A., Diez-Noguera, A., Madrid, J. A., Lujan, J. A., Martínez-Augustin, O., Scheer, F. A. J. L., Garaulet, M. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

  2. FASH and MASH: female and male adult human phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces: I. Development of the anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassola, V. F.; de Melo Lima, V. J.; Kramer, R.; Khoury, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Among computational models, voxel phantoms based on computer tomographic (CT), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or colour photographic images of patients, volunteers or cadavers have become popular in recent years. Although being true to nature representations of scanned individuals, voxel phantoms have limitations, especially when walled organs have to be segmented or when volumes of organs or body tissues, like adipose, have to be changed. Additionally, the scanning of patients or volunteers is usually made in supine position, which causes a shift of internal organs towards the ribcage, a compression of the lungs and a reduction of the sagittal diameter especially in the abdominal region compared to the regular anatomy of a person in the upright position, which in turn can influence organ and tissue absorbed or equivalent dose estimates. This study applies tools developed recently in the areas of computer graphics and animated films to the creation and modelling of 3D human organs, tissues, skeletons and bodies based on polygon mesh surfaces. Female and male adult human phantoms, called FASH (Female Adult meSH) and MASH (Male Adult meSH), have been designed using software, such as MakeHuman, Blender, Binvox and ImageJ, based on anatomical atlases, observing at the same time organ masses recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the male and female reference adult in report no 89. 113 organs, bones and tissues have been modelled in the FASH and the MASH phantoms representing locations for adults in standing posture. Most organ and tissue masses of the voxelized versions agree with corresponding data from ICRP89 within a margin of 2.6%. Comparison with the mesh-based male RPI_AM and female RPI_AF phantoms shows differences with respect to the material used, to the software and concepts applied, and to the anatomies created.

  3. FASH and MASH: female and male adult human phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces: I. Development of the anatomy.

    PubMed

    Cassola, V F; Lima, V J de Melo; Kramer, R; Khoury, H J

    2010-01-07

    Among computational models, voxel phantoms based on computer tomographic (CT), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or colour photographic images of patients, volunteers or cadavers have become popular in recent years. Although being true to nature representations of scanned individuals, voxel phantoms have limitations, especially when walled organs have to be segmented or when volumes of organs or body tissues, like adipose, have to be changed. Additionally, the scanning of patients or volunteers is usually made in supine position, which causes a shift of internal organs towards the ribcage, a compression of the lungs and a reduction of the sagittal diameter especially in the abdominal region compared to the regular anatomy of a person in the upright position, which in turn can influence organ and tissue absorbed or equivalent dose estimates. This study applies tools developed recently in the areas of computer graphics and animated films to the creation and modelling of 3D human organs, tissues, skeletons and bodies based on polygon mesh surfaces. Female and male adult human phantoms, called FASH (Female Adult meSH) and MASH (Male Adult meSH), have been designed using software, such as MakeHuman, Blender, Binvox and ImageJ, based on anatomical atlases, observing at the same time organ masses recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the male and female reference adult in report no 89. 113 organs, bones and tissues have been modelled in the FASH and the MASH phantoms representing locations for adults in standing posture. Most organ and tissue masses of the voxelized versions agree with corresponding data from ICRP89 within a margin of 2.6%. Comparison with the mesh-based male RPI_AM and female RPI_AF phantoms shows differences with respect to the material used, to the software and concepts applied, and to the anatomies created.

  4. Investigation of normal human skin tissue and acupuncture points of human skin tissue using fiberoptical FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Angelique L.; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Kolyakov, Sergei F.; Butvina, Leonid N.; Ma, Lixing

    1998-06-01

    An innovative spectroscopic diagnostic method has been developed for investigation of different regions of normal human skin tissue. This new method is a combination of Fourier transform IR fiberoptic evanescent wave (FTIR-FEW) spectroscopy and fiber optic techniques for the middle IR (MIR) wavelength range. The fiber optical sensors we have used are characterized by low optical losses and high flexibility for remote analysis. Our fiber optical accessories and method allows for direct interaction of the skin tissue with the fiber probe and can be utilized with a diversity of standard commercial Fourier transform spectrometers. The FTIR-FEW technique, using nontoxic unclad fibers in the attenuated total reflection regime, is suitable for noninvasive, fast, sensitive investigations of normal skin in vivo for various medical diagnostics applications including studies of acupuncture points. Here we present the first data on IR spectra of skin tissue in vivo for normal skin and several acupuncture points in the range of 1300 to 1800 cm-1 and 2600 to 4000 cm-1.

  5. [Primitive neuroectodermal tumour of soft tissue of the index finger in an adult. A case report].

    PubMed

    Berrada, N; Bellarbi, S; El Mannouar, M; Errihani, H

    2012-12-01

    The primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNET) of soft tissues belong to the Ewing's tumors family and affects particularly the child. The localization of the disease at the extremities is very rare within the adult population and raises the problem of differential diagnosis with others tumors of the soft tissues. We report the case of a 48-year-old patient with a localized tumor, at the level of the second right finger, of six months evolution. The biopsy showed the infiltrating nature of the tumour; and the diagnosis of (PNET) was confirmed after the histological and immunohistochemical study. The extension assessment was negative and the patient had an amputation of the second and third rays of the right hand. Four years afterwards, the patient showed no recurrence or metastases.

  6. Sequence, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of mRNA encoding a human glucose transporter-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Hirofumi; Seino, Susumu; Imura, Hiroo; Seino, Yutaka; Eddy, R.L.; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Byers, M.G.; Shows, T.B.; Bell, G.I. )

    1988-08-01

    Recombinant DNA clones encoding a glucose transporter-like protein have been isolated from adult human liver and kidney cDNA libraries by cross-hybridization with the human HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter cDNA. Analysis of the sequence of this 524-amino acid glucose transporter-like protein indicates that is has 55.5% identity with the HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter as well as a similar structural organization. Studies of the tissue distribution of the mRNA coding for this glucose transporter-like protein in adult human tissues indicate that the highest amounts are present in liver with lower amounts in kidney and small intestine. The amounts of glucose transporter-like mRNA in other tissues, including colon, stomach, cerebrum, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, were below the level of sensitivity of our assay. The single-copy gene encoding this glucose transporter-like protein has been localized to the q26.1{yields}q26.3 region of chromosome 3.

  7. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kizil, Caghan; Iltzsche, Anne; Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two- polyR and Trans - that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael's addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues.

  8. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two– polyR and Trans – that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael’s addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues. PMID:25894337

  9. Development of A Three-Dimensional Tissue Construct from Dental Human Ectomesenchymal Stem Cells: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Uribe, Daniela; Estrada, Keila Neri Alvarado; Guillén, Amaury de Jesús Pozos; Pérez, Silvia Martín; Ibáñez, Raúl Rosales

    2012-01-01

    Application of regenerative medicine technology provides treatment for patients with several clinical problems, like loss of tissue and its function. The investigation of biological tooth replacement, dental tissue engineering and cell culture, scaffolds and growth factors are considered essential. Currently, studies reported on the making of threedimensional tissue constructs focused on the use of animal cells in the early stages of embryogenesis applied to young biomodels. The purpose of this study was the development and characterization of a three-dimensional tissue construct from human dental cells. The construct was detached, cultured and characterized in mesenchymal and epithelial cells of a human tooth germ of a 12 year old patient. The cells were characterized by specific membrane markers (STRO1, CD44), making a biocomplex using Pura Matrix as a scaffold, and it was incubated for four days and transplanted into 30 adult immunosuppressed male Wistar rats. They were evaluated at 6 days, 10 days and 2 months, obtaining histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Cell cultures were positive for specific membrane markers, showing evident deviations in morphology under phase contrast microscope. Differentiation and organization were noted at 10 days, while the constructs at 2 months showed a clear difference in morphology, organization and cell type. It was possible to obtain a three-dimensional tissue construct from human dental ectomesenchymal cells achieving a degree of tissue organization that corresponds to the presence of cellular stratification and extracellular matrix. PMID:23308086

  10. Facial soft tissue thickness in a sample of Sudanese adults with different occlusions.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sama; Abuaffan, Amal H

    2016-09-01

    Facial soft tissue thickness is essential to orthodontists and plastic surgeons for treatment planning, and to forensic anthropologists for facial reconstruction, a process combining science and art to recreate a recognizable face from an unidentified skull. The facial profile, together with the age and sex of a person, is related to facial soft tissue thickness, which is required for accurate facial reconstruction and recognition. Skeletal occlusions in orthodontics are classified according to the basic human facial profiles: straight, convex, and concave or skeletal class I, II, and III, respectively. In the present study, the facial soft tissue thickness of 233 Sudanese subjects (105 men and 128 women), ranging in age from 18 to 35 years, with different facial profiles at 20 landmarks was measured (10 soft tissue and 10 dentoskeletal). Sexual dimorphism was noted, with males having thicker facial soft tissue at all measured points. The facial soft tissue thickness varied among different occlusions. Individuals with skeletal class II occlusion had the thickest lower lip, and class III individuals had the thickest upper lip. In general, the Sudanese sample had a unique spectrum of measurements, with thick upper and lower lips, compared with African and Caucasoid subjects, pointing to the need for ethnic-specific data.

  11. Laser hard tissue interactions: energy transmission through human dental tissue using a holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1995-05-01

    Laser energy transmission through hard tissue was investigated using a pulsed Holmium:YAG laser (2.12 micrometers wavelength). The surface of extracted human dental tissue, 200 micrometers to 700 micrometers in thickness, was irradiated by a laser beam of various fluences between 3 J/cm2 to 28 J/cm2. The transmitted energy through different dentinal components of the tooth was measured. For the mature teeth, the region of the dentinoenamel junction showed the least transmission and the coronal the most; the difference between the two regions could be as large as 20%. The unerupted or young teeth revealed the opposite transmission characteristics. Repeated laser treatment revealed an enhanced transmissibility and the transmitted energy reached a plateau after certain irradiation exposure. Also studied were the effects of various media on the dental transmissibility. For example, surface application of a smear layer of unfilled resin did not change the transmissibility but appeared to slow down the temperature build-up. Visible surface damage -- a yellow or a white spot on the treatment site -- appeared when the fluence reached beyond 20 J/cm2. SEM samples revealed three different surface structural changes: melting with tubule closures, surface removal with tubule exposures, and surface cracking with crater formation, depending on the level of irradiation.

  12. New dimensions in tissue engineering: possible models for human physiology.

    PubMed

    Baar, Keith

    2005-11-01

    Tissue engineering is a discipline of great promise. In some areas, such as the cornea, tissues engineered in the laboratory are already in clinical use. In other areas, where the tissue architecture is more complex, there are a number of obstacles to manoeuvre before clinically relevant tissues can be produced. However, even in areas where clinically relevant tissues are decades away, the tissues being produced at the moment provide powerful new models to aid the understanding of complex physiological processes. This article provides a personal view of the role of tissue engineering in advancing our understanding of physiology, with specific attention being paid to musculoskeletal tissues.

  13. A hypothesis for an embryonic origin of pluripotent Oct-4(+) stem cells in adult bone marrow and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, M Z; Machalinski, B; Wojakowski, W; Ratajczak, J; Kucia, M

    2007-05-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that adult tissues contain a population of stem cells that express early developmental markers such as stage-specific embryonic antigen and transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog. These are the markers characteristic for embryonic stem cells, epiblast stem cells and primordial germ cells. The presence of these stem cells in adult tissues including bone marrow, epidermis, bronchial epithelium, myocardium, pancreas and testes supports the concept that adult tissues contain some population of pluripotent stem cells that is deposited in embryogenesis during early gastrulation. In this review we will discuss these data and present a hypothesis that these cells could be direct descendants of the germ lineage. The germ lineage in order to pass genes on to the next generations creates soma and thus becomes a 'mother lineage' for all somatic cell lineages present in the adult body.

  14. Photobiomodulation in human muscle tissue: an advantage in sports performance?

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-12-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) describes the use of red or near-infrared (NIR) light to stimulate, heal, and regenerate damaged tissue. Both preconditioning (light delivered to muscles before exercise) and PBM applied after exercise can increase sports performance in athletes. This review covers the effects of PBM on human muscle tissue in clinical trials in volunteers related to sports performance and in athletes. The parameters used were categorized into those with positive effects or no effects on muscle performance and recovery. Randomized controlled trials and case-control studies in both healthy trained and untrained participants, and elite athletes were retrieved from MEDLINE up to 2016. Performance metrics included fatigue, number of repetitions, torque, hypertrophy; measures of muscle damage and recovery such as creatine kinase and delayed onset muscle soreness. Searches retrieved 533 studies, of which 46 were included in the review (n = 1045 participants). Studies used single laser probes, cluster of laser diodes, LED clusters, mixed clusters (lasers and LEDs), and flexible LED arrays. Both red, NIR, and red/NIR mixtures were used. PBM can increase muscle mass gained after training, and decrease inflammation and oxidative stress in muscle biopsies. We raise the question of whether PBM should be permitted in athletic competition by international regulatory authorities.

  15. Organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in human adipose tissues in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwicki, J.K.; Goralczyk, K. )

    1994-03-01

    Most of the persistent organochlorine (OC) pesticides, excluding lindane, were banned in Poland in 1975/76. The first restrictions concerning the use and marketing of lindane (gamma-HCH) became effective in 1980 and were gradually extended until it's agricultural use was ultimately banned in 1989. Unfortunately, there are no detailed data on the use and release of PCBs to the environment in Poland. The former studies showed that in the late seventies the concentrations of OC pesticides and their metabolites in men reached considerable high levels. Despite of the restrictions or bans of these pesticides in most of the countries of the temperate climate, they still circulate in various food chains and eventually concentrate in man. Many authors claim an uneven distribution of the OC compounds in the population and report different levels in men and women and also some relations between OC compounds levels in fat tissues and age. Environmental contamination also plays an important role in the magnitude of OC compounds levels in man. The aim of this paper is to present the actual concentrations of HCB, p,p[prime]-DDT, p,p[prime]-DDE, isomers of HCH (alpha, beta, gamma), and PCBs in human adipose tissues particularly regarding age and sex as possible factors influencing the levels of these compounds and to contribute to the general discussion on the distribution patterns of the organochlorine compounds in the population. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Engineering bone tissue substitutes from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Marcos-Campos, Iván; Kahler, David John; Alsalman, Dana; Shang, Linshan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2013-05-21

    Congenital defects, trauma, and disease can compromise the integrity and functionality of the skeletal system to the extent requiring implantation of bone grafts. Engineering of viable bone substitutes that can be personalized to meet specific clinical needs represents a promising therapeutic alternative. The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for bone tissue engineering. We first induced three hiPSC lines with different tissue and reprogramming backgrounds into the mesenchymal lineages and used a combination of differentiation assays, surface antigen profiling, and global gene expression analysis to identify the lines exhibiting strong osteogenic differentiation potential. We then engineered functional bone substitutes by culturing hiPSC-derived mesenchymal progenitors on osteoconductive scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors and confirmed their phenotype stability in a subcutaneous implantation model for 12 wk. Molecular analysis confirmed that the maturation of bone substitutes in perfusion bioreactors results in global repression of cell proliferation and an increased expression of lineage-specific genes. These results pave the way for growing patient-specific bone substitutes for reconstructive treatments of the skeletal system and for constructing qualified experimental models of development and disease.

  17. Magnesium degradation products: effects on tissue and human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seitz, J-M; Eifler, R; Bach, Fr-W; Maier, H J

    2014-10-01

    Owing to their mechanical properties, metallic materials present a promising solution in the field of resorbable implants. The magnesium metabolism in humans differs depending on its introduction. The natural, oral administration of magnesium via, for example, food, essentially leads to an intracellular enrichment of Mg(2+) . In contrast, introducing magnesium-rich substances or implants into the tissue results in a different decomposition behavior. Here, exposing magnesium to artificial body electrolytes resulted in the formation of the following products: magnesium hydroxide, magnesium oxide, and magnesium chloride, as well as calcium and magnesium apatites. Moreover, it can be assumed that Mg(2+) , OH(-) ions, and gaseous hydrogen are also present and result from the reaction for magnesium in an aqueous environment. With the aid of physiological metabolic processes, the organism succeeds in either excreting the above mentioned products or integrating them into the natural metabolic process. Only a burst release of these products is to be considered a problem. A multitude of general tissue effects and responses from the Mg's degradation products is considered within this review, which is not targeting specific implant classes. Furthermore, common alloying elements of magnesium and their hazardous potential in vivo are taken into account.

  18. Normalizing the environment recapitulates adult human immune traits in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Hamilton, Sara E; Bi, Kevin; Schenkel, Jason M; Odumade, Oludare A; Casey, Kerry A; Thompson, Emily A; Fraser, Kathryn A; Rosato, Pamela C; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick P; Jenkins, Marc K; Vezys, Vaiva; Haining, W Nicholas; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David

    2016-04-28

    Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice, partly because they are inbred and genetically homogeneous, can be genetically manipulated, allow kinetic tissue analyses to be carried out from the onset of disease, and permit the use of tractable disease models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. However, there is growing concern that laboratory mice do not reflect relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic specific pathogen free (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that standard laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes produce mice with immune systems closer to those of adult humans. Laboratory mice--like newborn, but not adult, humans--lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice and pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting that the environment is involved in the induction of these cells. Altering the living conditions of mice profoundly affected the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune systems, resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression to patterns that more closely reflected the immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered resistance to infection, and influenced T-cell differentiation in response to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the effects of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modelling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans.

  19. Recapitulating adult human immune traits in laboratory mice by normalizing environment

    PubMed Central

    Beura, Lalit K.; Hamilton, Sara E.; Bi, Kevin; Schenkel, Jason M.; Odumade, Oludare A.; Casey, Kerry A.; Thompson, Emily A.; Fraser, Kathryn A.; Rosato, Pamela C.; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick P.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Vezys, Vaiva; Haining, W. Nicholas; Jameson, Stephen C.; Masopust, David

    2016-01-01

    Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice because of experimental advantages including inbred homogeneity, tools for genetic manipulation, the ability to perform kinetic tissue analyses starting with the onset of disease, and tractable models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. Despite revealing many fundamental principals of immunology, there is growing concern that mice fail to capture relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside1–8. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic “specific pathogen free” (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that the standard practice of laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes result in better recapitulation of features of adult humans. Laboratory mice lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells, which more closely resembles neonatal than adult humans. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice, pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting a role for environment. Consequences of altering mouse housing profoundly impacted the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune system and resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression patterns that more closely aligned with immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered the mouse’s resistance to infection, and impacted T cell differentiation to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the impact of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modeling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans. PMID

  20. Covert spatial attention is functionally intact in amblyopic human adults

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mariel; Cymerman, Rachel; Smith, R. Theodore; Kiorpes, Lynne; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Certain abnormalities in behavioral performance and neural signaling have been attributed to a deficit of visual attention in amblyopia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a diverse array of visual deficits following abnormal binocular childhood experience. Critically, most have inferred attention's role in their task without explicitly manipulating and measuring its effects against a baseline condition. Here, we directly investigate whether human amblyopic adults benefit from covert spatial attention—the selective processing of visual information in the absence of eye movements—to the same degree as neurotypical observers. We manipulated both involuntary (Experiment 1) and voluntary (Experiment 2) attention during an orientation discrimination task for which the effects of covert spatial attention have been well established in neurotypical and special populations. In both experiments, attention significantly improved accuracy and decreased reaction times to a similar extent (a) between the eyes of the amblyopic adults and (b) between the amblyopes and their age- and gender-matched controls. Moreover, deployment of voluntary attention away from the target location significantly impaired task performance (Experiment 2). The magnitudes of the involuntary and voluntary attention benefits did not correlate with amblyopic depth or severity. Both groups of observers showed canonical performance fields (better performance along the horizontal than vertical meridian and at the lower than upper vertical meridian) and similar effects of attention across locations. Despite their characteristic low-level vision impairments, covert spatial attention remains functionally intact in human amblyopic adults. PMID:28033433

  1. The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Melgar, Paul; Maluccio, John A; Stein, Aryeh D; Rivera, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews key findings about the long-term impact of a nutrition intervention carried out by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama from 1969 to 1977. Results from follow-up studies in 1988-89 and 2002-04 show substantial impact on adult human capital and economic productivity. The 1988-89 study showed that adult body size and work capacity increased for those provided improved nutrition through age 3 y, whereas the 2002-04 follow-up showed that schooling was increased for women and reading comprehension and intelligence increased in both men and women. Participants were 26-42 y of age at the time of the 2002-04 follow-up, facilitating the assessment of economic productivity. Wages of men increased by 46% in those provided with improved nutrition through age 2 y. Findings for cardiovascular disease risk factors were heterogeneous; however, they suggest that improved nutrition in early life is unlikely to increase cardiovascular disease risk later in life and may indeed lower risk. In conclusion, the substantial improvement in adult human capital and economic productivity resulting from the nutrition intervention provides a powerful argument for promoting improvements in nutrition in pregnant women and young children.

  2. Effect of Anti-Sclerostin Therapy and Osteogenesis Imperfecta on Tissue-level Properties in Growing and Adult Mice While Controlling for Tissue Age

    PubMed Central

    Sinder, Benjamin P.; Lloyd, William R.; Salemi, Joseph D.; Marini, Joan C.; Caird, Michelle S.; Morris, Michael D.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-01

    Bone composition and biomechanics at the tissue-level are important contributors to whole bone strength. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) is a candidate anabolic therapy for the treatment of osteoporosis that increases bone formation, bone mass, and bone strength in animal studies, but its effect on bone quality at the tissue-level has received little attention. Pre-clinical studies of Scl-Ab have recently expanded to include diseases with altered collagen and material properties such as Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Scl-Ab on bone quality by determining bone material composition and tissue-level mechanical properties in normal wild type (WT) tissue, as well as mice with a typical OI Gly→Cys mutation (Brtl/+) in type I collagen. Rapidly growing (3-week-old) and adult (6-month-old) WT and Brtl/+ mice were treated for 5 weeks with Scl-Ab. Fluorescent guided tissue-level bone composition analysis (Raman spectroscopy) and biomechanical testing (nanoindentation) were performed at multiple tissue ages. Scl-Ab increased mineral to matrix in adult WT and Brtl/+ at tissue ages of 2–4wks. However, no treatment related changes were observed in mineral to matrix levels at mid-cortex, and elastic modulus was not altered by Scl-Ab at any tissue age. Increased mineral-to-matrix was phenotypically observed in adult Brtl/+ OI mice (at tissue ages >3wk) and rapidly growing Brtl/+ (at tissue ages > 4wk) mice compared to WT. At identical tissue ages defined by fluorescent labels adult mice had generally lower mineral to matrix ratios and a greater elastic modulus than rapidly growing mice, demonstrating that bone matrix quality can be influenced by animal age and tissue age alike. In summary, these data suggest that Scl-Ab alters the matrix chemistry of newly formed bone while not affecting the elastic modulus, induces similar changes between Brtl/+ and WT mice, and provides new insight into the interaction between tissue age

  3. Effect of anti-sclerostin therapy and osteogenesis imperfecta on tissue-level properties in growing and adult mice while controlling for tissue age.

    PubMed

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Lloyd, William R; Salemi, Joseph D; Marini, Joan C; Caird, Michelle S; Morris, Michael D; Kozloff, Kenneth M

    2016-03-01

    Bone composition and biomechanics at the tissue-level are important contributors to whole bone strength. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) is a candidate anabolic therapy for the treatment of osteoporosis that increases bone formation, bone mass, and bone strength in animal studies, but its effect on bone quality at the tissue-level has received little attention. Pre-clinical studies of Scl-Ab have recently expanded to include diseases with altered collagen and material properties such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Scl-Ab on bone quality by determining bone material composition and tissue-level mechanical properties in normal wild type (WT) tissue, as well as mice with a typical OI Gly➔Cys mutation (Brtl/+) in type I collagen. Rapidly growing (3-week-old) and adult (6-month-old) WT and Brtl/+ mice were treated for 5weeks with Scl-Ab. Fluorescent guided tissue-level bone composition analysis (Raman spectroscopy) and biomechanical testing (nanoindentation) were performed at multiple tissue ages. Scl-Ab increased mineral to matrix in adult WT and Brtl/+ at tissue ages of 2-4wks. However, no treatment related changes were observed in mineral to matrix levels at mid-cortex, and elastic modulus was not altered by Scl-Ab at any tissue age. Increased mineral-to-matrix was phenotypically observed in adult Brtl/+ OI mice (at tissue ages>3wks) and rapidly growing Brtl/+ (at tissue ages>4wks) mice compared to WT. At identical tissue ages defined by fluorescent labels, adult mice had generally lower mineral to matrix ratios and a greater elastic modulus than rapidly growing mice, demonstrating that bone matrix quality can be influenced by animal age and tissue age alike. In summary, these data suggest that Scl-Ab alters the matrix chemistry of newly formed bone while not affecting the elastic modulus, induces similar changes between Brtl/+ and WT mice, and provides new insight into the interaction between tissue age and

  4. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  5. Volume Expansion of Tissue Engineered Human Nasal Septal Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Reuther, Marsha S; Briggs, Kristen K; Neuman, Monica K; Masuda, Koichi; Sah, Robert L; Watson, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Importance Cartilaginous craniofacial defects range in size and autologous cartilaginous tissue is preferred for repair of these defects. Therefore, it is important to have the ability to produce large size cartilaginous constructs for repair of cartilaginous abnormalities. Objectives To produce autologous human septal neocartilage constructs substantially larger in size than previously produced constructs To demonstrate that volume expanded neocartilage constructs possess comparable histological and biochemical properties to standard size constructs To show that volume expanded neocartilage constructs retain similar biomechanical properties to standard size constructs Design Prospective, basic science Setting Laboratory Participants The study used remnant human septal specimens removed during routine surgery at the University of California, San Diego Medical Center or San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Cartilage from a total of 8 donors was collected. Main Outcomes Measured Human septal chondrocytes from 8 donors were used to create 12mm and 24mm neocartilage constructs. These were cultured for a total of 10 weeks. Photo documentation, histological, biochemical, and biomechanical properties were measured and compared. Results The 24mm diameter constructs were qualitatively similar to the 12mm constructs. They possessed adequate strength and durability to be manually manipulated. Histological analysis of the constructs demonstrated similar staining patterns in standard and volume expanded constructs. Proliferation, as measured by DNA content, was similar in 24mm and 12mm constructs. Additionally, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and total collagen content did not significantly differ between the two construct sizes. Biomechanical analysis of the 24mm and 12mm constructs demonstrated comparable compressive and tensile properties. Conclusion and Relevance Volume expanded human septal neocartilage constructs are qualitatively and histologically similar to standard 12mm

  6. Variations of midline facial soft tissue thicknesses among three skeletal classes in Central Anatolian adults.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Kahraman; Bulut, Ozgur; Hizliol, Ismail; Hekimoglu, Baki; Gurcan, Safa

    2015-11-01

    Facial reconstruction is a technique employed in a forensic investigation as a last resort to recreate an individual's facial appearance from his/her skull. Forensic anthropologists or artists use facial soft tissue thickness (FSTT) measurements as a guide in facial reconstructions. The aim of this study was to develop FSTT values for Central Anatolian adults, taking into consideration sex and skeletal classes; first, to achieve better results obtaining the likenesses of deceased individuals in two or three-dimensional forensic facial reconstructions and, second, to compare these values to existing databases. Lateral cephalograms were used to determine FSTT values at 10 midline facial landmarks of 167 adults. Descriptive statistics were calculated for these facial soft tissue thickness values, and these values were compared to those reported in two other comparable databases. The majority of the landmarks showed sex-based differences. Males were found to have significantly larger landmark values than female subjects. These results point not only to the necessity to present data in accordance with sexual dimorphism, but also the need to consider that individuals from different geographical areas have unique facial features and that, as a result, geographical population-specific FSTT values are required.

  7. Full-field bulge test for planar anisotropic tissues: part I--experimental methods applied to human skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Tonge, Theresa K; Atlan, Lorre S; Voo, Liming M; Nguyen, Thao D

    2013-04-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic properties of human skin tissue were investigated using bulge testing. Full-field displacement data were obtained during testing of human skin tissues procured from the lower back of post-mortem human subjects using 3-D digital image correlation. To measure anisotropy, the dominant fiber direction of the tissue was determined from the deformed geometry of the specimen. Local strains and stress resultants were calculated along both the dominant fiber direction and the perpendicular direction. Variation in anisotropy and stiffness was observed between specimens. The use of stress resultants rather than the membrane stress approximation accounted for bending effects, which are significant for a thick nonlinear tissue. Of the six specimens tested, it was observed that specimens from older donors exhibited a stiffer and more isotropic response than those from younger donors. It was seen that the mechanical response of the tissue was negligibly impacted by preconditioning or the ambient humidity. The methods presented in this work for skin tissue are sufficiently general to be applied to other planar tissues, such as pericardium, gastrointestinal tissue, and fetal membranes. The stress resultant-stretch relations will be used in a companion paper to obtain material parameters for a nonlinear anisotropic hyperelastic model.

  8. Viral inactivation of human bone tissue using supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Fages, J; Poirier, B; Barbier, Y; Frayssinet, P; Joffret, M L; Majewski, W; Bonel, G; Larzul, D

    1998-01-01

    A new bone tissue process using supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction (SFE) has been evaluated for its ability to inactivate or eliminate viruses. Four viruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), Sindbis virus, polio Sabin type I virus, and pseudorabies virus (PRV), were exposed to four different processing steps. In addition to supercritical CO2, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hydroxide, and ethanol treatments were evaluated. The mean cumulated reduction factors (log10) for the four viruses exposed to these four steps were > 14.2 for HIV-1, > 18.2 for Sindbis virus, > 24.4 for poliovirus, and > 17.6 for PRV. The mean reduction factors obtained by the supercritical fluid extraction alone were > 4.0, > 4.3, > 6.6, and > 4.0, respectively. These results demonstrate that the SFE process is effective in inactivating viruses on human femoral heads, and provides a level of inactivation similar to that obtained by traditional cleaning methods. It is proposed that CO2 SFE be incorporated as a routine step in the processing of bone allografts for transplantation either to replace or supplement existing procedures.

  9. A multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized cardiac tissue constructs using adult stem sells, dynamic cell cultures, and porous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Pagliari, Stefania; Tirella, Annalisa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Duim, Sjoerd; Goumans, Marie-Josè; Aoyagi, Takao; Forte, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The vascularization of tissue engineered products represents a key issue in regenerative medicine which needs to be addressed before the translation of these protocols to the bedside can be foreseen. Here we propose a multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized three-dimensional (3D) cardiac bio-substitutes using dynamic cell cultures and highly porous biocompatible gelatin scaffolds. The strategy adopted exploits the peculiar differentiation potential of two distinct subsets of adult stem cells to obtain human vascularized 3D cardiac tissues. In the first step of the procedure, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are seeded onto gelatin scaffolds to provide interconnected vessel-like structures, while human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (hCMPCs) are stimulated in vitro to obtain their commitment toward the cardiac phenotype. The use of a modular bioreactor allows the perfusion of the whole scaffold, providing superior performance in terms of cardiac tissue maturation and cell survival. Both the cell culture on natural-derived polymers and the continuous medium perfusion of the scaffold led to the formation of a densely packaged proto-tissue composed of vascular-like and cardiac-like cells, which might complete maturation process and interconnect with native tissue upon in vivo implantation. In conclusion, the data obtained through the approach here proposed highlight the importance to provide stem cells with complementary signals in vitro able to resemble the complexity of cardiac microenvironment. PMID:24917827

  10. Circulating connective tissue precursors: extreme rarity in humans and chondrogenic potential in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Mankani, Mahesh H; Leet, Arabella I; Ziran, Navid; Gronthos, Stan; Robey, Pamela Gehron

    2007-07-01

    Using a variety of cell separation techniques and cultivation conditions, circulating, adherent, connective tissue, clonogenic cells were found in just 3 donors out of 66, demonstrating that these precursors are extremely rare in postnatal human blood. Contrary to humans, guinea pig blood shows much more reproducible connective tissue colony formation; it was therefore chosen to study the differentiation potential of adherent blood-derived clonogenic cells. Out of 22 single colony-derived strains of various morphologies, only 5 spindle-shaped strains showed extensive proliferative capacity in vitro. None of these strains formed bone upon in vivo transplantation, whereas two strains formed cartilage in high-density pellet cultures in vitro. Both chondrogenic strains included cells expressing aggrecan, whereas nonchondrogenic strains did not. Out of four polyclonal strains studied, one formed both cartilage and abundant bone accompanied by hematopoiesis-supporting stroma. Evidently, there are cells in adult guinea pig blood capable of both extensive proliferation and differentiation toward cartilage: circulating chondrogenic precursors. Although some of these cells lack osteogenic potential and therefore represent committed chondrogenic precursors, others may be multipotential and consequently belong to the family of skeletal stem cells. This is the first demonstration of postnatal circulating chondrogenic precursors, as well as of precursor cells with chondrogenic but not osteogenic potential. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  11. Chondrogenic induction of human mesenchymal stem cells using combined growth factors for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bosetti, Michela; Boccafoschi, Francesca; Leigheb, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Andrea E; Cannas, Mario

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether growth factors (FGF-2, FGF-4 and FGF-6) used alone or in combination with TGFβ2 are able to increase the proliferation and induce the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to chondrocytes, with a view to using them in cartilage tissue engineering. Cells cultured in monolayer, used to test the activity of the growth factors on cell proliferation, showed that a combination of FGFs with TGFβ2 increases cell proliferation compared to cells cultured in control medium or in the presence of growth factors alone. The chondrogenic potential, evaluated in three-dimensional (3D) cell aggregates, showed that FGF-2 and FGF-6, when used in combination with TGFβ2 increased the size and glycosaminoglycan content of the cell aggregates without increasing cell number. Extracellular matrix (ECM) also showed higher collagen type II immunoreactivity, which was particularly evident in an area similar to a germinative pole that was observed only in pellets cultured with FGF-2 and FGF-6 combined with TGFβ2, or in pellets cultured with FGF-2 alone. Moreover, the RT-PCR assay has highlighted an increased expression of collagen type II and Sox9, used as gene markers for chondrogenesis. We can conclude that combinations of FGF-2 or FGF-6 with TGFβ2 may provide a novel tool to induce the differentiation of adult human mesenchymal stem cells for applications in cartilage tissue engineering.

  12. CCM2 expression during prenatal development and adult human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, Gamze; Sozen, Berna; Gunel, Murat; Demir, Necdet

    2011-08-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is one of the most common types of vascular malformations of the central nervous system, affecting nearly one in 200 people. CCM lesions are characterized by grossly dilated vascular channels lined by a single layer of endothelium. Genetic linkage analyses have mapped three CCM loci to CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3. All three causative genes have now been identified allowing new insights into CCM pathophysiology. We focused on the CCM2 protein that might take place in blood vessel formation; we report here the expression patterns of CCM2 in prenatal development and adult human neocortex by means of immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. CCM2 was obviously detected in vascular endothelium and neuroglial precursor cells during development and also observed in arterial endothelium, neurons, some of the glial cells in adult neocortex. The expression patterns suggest that it could be one of the arterial markers whether this is a cause or a consequence of an altered vascular identity. CCM2 might play a role during vasculogenesis and angiogenesis during human brain development. Furthermore, with this study, CCM2 have been described for the first time in developing human neocortex.

  13. Activity, Inhibition, and Induction of Cytochrome P450 2J2 in Adult Human Primary Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Eric A.; Kaspera, Rüdiger; Mokadam, Nahush A.; Jones, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2J2 plays a significant role in the epoxidation of arachidonic acid to signaling molecules important in cardiovascular events. CYP2J2 also contributes to drug metabolism and is responsible for the intestinal clearance of ebastine. However, the interaction between arachidonic acid metabolism and drug metabolism in cardiac tissue, the main expression site of CYP2J2, has not been examined. Here we investigate an adult-derived human primary cardiac cell line as a suitable model to study metabolic drug interactions (inhibition and induction) of CYP2J2 in cardiac tissue. The primary human cardiomyocyte cell line demonstrated similar mRNA-expression profiles of P450 enzymes to adult human ventricular tissue. CYP2J2 was the dominant isozyme with minor contributions from CYP2D6 and CYP2E1. Both terfenadine and astemizole oxidation were observed in this cell line, whereas midazolam was not metabolized suggesting lack of CYP3A activity. Compared with recombinant CYP2J2, terfenadine was hydroxylated in cardiomyocytes at a similar Km value of 1.5 μM. The Vmax of terfenadine hydroxylation in recombinant enzyme was found to be 29.4 pmol/pmol P450 per minute and in the cells 6.0 pmol/pmol P450 per minute. CYP2J2 activity in the cell line was inhibited by danazol, astemizole, and ketoconazole in submicromolar range, but also by xenobiotics known to cause cardiac adverse effects. Of the 14 compounds tested for CYP2J2 induction, only rosiglitazone increased mRNA expression, by 1.8-fold. This cell model can be a useful in vitro model to investigate the role of CYP2J2-mediated drug metabolism, arachidonic acid metabolism, and their association to drug induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24021950

  14. High seeding density of human chondrocytes in agarose produces tissue-engineered cartilage approaching native mechanical and biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Cigan, Alexander D; Roach, Brendan L; Nims, Robert J; Tan, Andrea R; Albro, Michael B; Stoker, Aaron M; Cook, James L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-06-14

    Animal cells have served as highly controllable model systems for furthering cartilage tissue engineering practices in pursuit of treating osteoarthritis. Although successful strategies for animal cells must ultimately be adapted to human cells to be clinically relevant, human chondrocytes are rarely employed in such studies. In this study, we evaluated the applicability of culture techniques established for juvenile bovine and adult canine chondrocytes to human chondrocytes obtained from fresh or expired osteochondral allografts. Human chondrocytes were expanded and encapsulated in 2% agarose scaffolds measuring ∅3-4mm×2.3mm, with cell seeding densities ranging from 15 to 90×10(6)cells/mL. Subsets of constructs were subjected to transient or sustained TGF-β treatment, or provided channels to enhance nutrient transport. Human cartilaginous constructs physically resembled native human cartilage, and reached compressive Young's moduli of up to ~250kPa (corresponding to the low end of ranges reported for native knee cartilage), dynamic moduli of ~950kPa (0.01Hz), and contained 5.7% wet weight (%/ww) of glycosaminoglycans (≥ native levels) and 1.5%/ww collagen. We found that the initial seeding density had pronounced effects on tissue outcomes, with high cell seeding densities significantly increasing nearly all measured properties. Transient TGF-β treatment was ineffective for adult human cells, and tissue construct properties plateaued or declined beyond 28 days of culture. Finally, nutrient channels improved construct mechanical properties, presumably due to enhanced rates of mass transport. These results demonstrate that our previously established culture system can be successfully translated to human chondrocytes.

  15. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  16. Organ and tissue donation: a survey of nurse's knowledge and educational needs in an adult ITU.

    PubMed

    Collins, Timothy J

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey that was undertaken to assess nurses' knowledge and educational needs towards organ donation within one adult general intensive care unit. The survey consists of 31 registered nurses who completed a confidential questionnaire that aimed to assess their existing knowledge and deficits in organ and tissue donation. The survey highlights the sample lacked confidence in approaching relatives for donation consent, deficits in brain stem death testing and donor criteria. It was also apparent that a significant number of nurses could not identify which tissues can be donated and the contraindications for tissue donation. A majority of the sample stated their knowledge of donation issues would improve if an educational programme were developed on organ donation. This is further supported by previous work by [Bidigare S, Oermann M, 1991. Attitudes and knowledge of nurses regarding organ procurement. Heart & lung 1:20-3; Smith-Brew S, Yanai L, 1996. The organ donation process through a review of the literature. Part 1. Accident & emergency nursing 4:5-11; Roark D, 2000. Overhauling the organ donation system. Am J Nurs 6:44-9] who suggest that educational programmes covering donation issues should enhance nurses' knowledge and confidence in the organ donation process and ultimately increase the number of potential donors.

  17. SpSM30 gene family expression patterns in embryonic and adult biomineralized tissues of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Killian, Christopher E; Croker, Lindsay; Wilt, Fred H

    2010-01-01

    The SpSM30 gene family of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, is comprised of six members, designated SpSM30A through SpSM30F (Livingston et al., 2006). The SpSM30 proteins are found uniquely in embryonic and adult mineralized tissues of the sea urchin. Previous studies have revealed that SpSM30 proteins are occluded within the embryonic endoskeleton and adult mineralized tissues (Killian and Wilt, 1996; Mann et al., 2008a,b; Urry et al., 2000). Furthermore, some of the SpSM30 proteins are among the most abundant of the approximately four-dozen integral matrix proteins of the larval spicule (Killian and Wilt, 1996). The amino acid sequence, protein domain architecture, and contiguity within the genome strongly support the supposition that the six genes constitute a gene family. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is used in the present study to describe the time course of expression of the family members during embryonic development, and their expression in adult tissues. SpSM30A, B, C and E are expressed, albeit at different levels, during overt spicule deposition in the embryo with some differences in the precise timing of expression. SpSM30D is not expressed in the embryo, and SpSM30F is expressed transiently and at low levels just prior to overt spicule formation. Whole mount in situ hybridization studies show that SpSM30A, B, C, and E are expressed exclusively in primary mesenchyme (PMC) cells and their descendants. In addition, tissue fractionation studies indicate that SpSM30F expression is highly enriched in PMCs. Each adult tissue examined expresses a different cohort of the SpSM30 family members at varying levels: SpSM30A mRNA is not expressed in adult tissues. Its expression is limited to the embryo. Conversely, SpSM30D mRNA is not expressed in the embryo, but is expressed in adult spines and teeth. SpSM30B and SpSM30C are expressed at modest levels in all mineralized adult tissues; SpSM30E is expressed highly in tooth and

  18. 75 FR 34146 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request Resource for the Collection and Evaluation of Human Tissues...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request Resource for the Collection and Evaluation of Human Tissues and Cells From Donors With an Epidemiology Profile (NCI) SUMMARY... Collection: Title: Resource for the Collection and Evaluation of Human Tissues and Cells From Donors With...

  19. Androgen responsive adult human prostatic epithelial cell lines immortalized by human papillomavirus 18.

    PubMed

    Bello, D; Webber, M M; Kleinman, H K; Wartinger, D D; Rhim, J S

    1997-06-01

    Prostate cancer and benign tumors of the prostate are the two most common neoplastic diseases in men in the United States, however, research on their causes and treatment has been slow because of the difficulty in obtaining fresh samples of human tissue and a lack of well characterized cell lines which exhibit growth and differentiation characteristics of normal prostatic epithelium. Non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial cells from a white male donor were immortalized with human papillomavirus 18 which resulted in the establishment of the RWPE-1 cell line. Cells from the RWPE-1 cell line were further transformed by v-Ki-ras to establish the RWPE-2 cell line. The objectives of this study were to: (1) establish the prostatic epithelial origin and androgen responsiveness of RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 cell lines; (2) examine their response to growth factors; and (3) establish the malignant characteristics of the RWPE-2 cell line. Immunoperoxidase staining showed that both RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 cells express cytokeratins 8 and 18, which are characteristic of luminal prostatic epithelial cells, but they also coexpress basal cell cytokeratins. These cell lines show growth stimulation and prostate specific antigen (PSA) and androgen receptor (AR) expression in response to the synthetic androgen mibolerone, which establishes their prostatic epithelial origin. Both cell lines also show a dose-dependent growth stimulation by EGF and bFGF and growth inhibition when exposed to TGF-beta, however, the transformed RWPE-2 cells are less responsive. RWPE-1 cells neither grow in agar nor form tumors when injected into nude mice with or without Matrigel. However, RWPE-2 cells form colonies in agar and tumors in nude mice. In the in vitro invasion assay, RWPE-1 cells are not invasive whereas RWPE-2 cells are invasive. Nuclear expression of p53 and Rb proteins was heterogeneous but detectable by immunostaining in both cell lines. The RWPE-1 cells, which show many normal cell

  20. Hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and infectious virus in gut-associated lymphoid tissue of mice after oral inoculation with simian-human or bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Moser, C A; Dolfi, D V; Di Vietro, M L; Heaton, P A; Offit, P A; Clark, H F

    2001-04-01

    Oral inoculation of infants with a vaccine that contains simian-human reassortant rotaviruses has been found to be a rare cause of intussusception. Because intussusception can be associated with enlargement of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, we studied the capacity of simian-human and bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses to cause lymphoid hypertrophy and hyperplasia of Peyer's patches (PP) of adult BALB/c mice. Neither hypertrophy nor hyperplasia was detected in PP after oral inoculation with simian-human or bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses. However, infectious virus was detected in PP and mesenteric lymph nodes after oral inoculation with simian, but not bovine, reassortant rotaviruses. Implications of these findings on the pathogenesis of intussusception are discussed.

  1. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  2. Adult human heart slices are a multicellular system suitable for electrophysiological and pharmacological studies.

    PubMed

    Camelliti, Patrizia; Al-Saud, Sara Abou; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Al-Ayoubi, Samha; Bussek, Alexandra; Wettwer, Erich; Banner, Nicholas R; Bowles, Christopher T; Yacoub, Magdi H; Terracciano, Cesare M

    2011-09-01

    Electrophysiological and pharmacological data from the human heart are limited due to the absence of simple but representative experimental model systems of human myocardium. The aim of this study was to establish and characterise adult human myocardial slices from small patients' heart biopsies as a simple, reproducible and relevant preparation suitable for the study of human cardiac tissue at the multicellular level. Vibratome-cut myocardial slices were prepared from left ventricular biopsies obtained from end-stage heart failure patients undergoing heart transplant or ventricular assist device implantation, and from hearts of normal dogs. Multiple slices were prepared from each biopsy. Regular contractility was observed at a range of stimulation frequencies (0.1-2 Hz), and stable electrical activity, monitored using multi-electrode arrays (MEA), was maintained for at least 8 h from slice preparation. ATP/ADP and phosphocreatine/creatine ratios were comparable to intact organ values, and morphology and gap junction distribution were representative of native myocardium. MEA recordings showed that field potential duration (FPD) and conduction velocity (CV) in human and dog slices were similar to the values previously reported for papillary muscles, ventricular wedges and whole hearts. Longitudinal CV was significantly faster than transversal CV, with an anisotropic ratio of 3:1 for human and 2.3:1 for dog slices. Importantly, slices responded to the application of E-4031, chromanol and 4-aminopyridine, three potassium channel blockers known to affect action potential duration, with an increase in FPD. We conclude that viable myocardial slices with preserved structural, biochemical and electrophysiological properties can be prepared from adult human and canine heart biopsies and offer a novel preparation suitable for the study of heart failure and drug screening.

  3. Status quo of management of the human tissue banks in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ching-Pang; Chou, Szu-Cheng; Chen, Ying-Hua; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Ming-Shin

    2017-03-01

    As the technologies associated with transplantation and biological tissue engineering continue to advance, human cells and tissues form an integral part to the practice of regenerative medicine. The patient's use of tissues entails the risk of introducing, transmitting and spreading communicable diseases. To prevent such risk and to ensure that the human organs, tissues and cells remain intact and functional after being handled and processed, the transplanted tissues must be subject to good management standards through all stages of collection, screening, processing, storage and distribution as the safety of the users is of the utmost importance. On February 2009, the government of Taiwan promulgated the Regulations for Administration on Human Organ Bank that requires all human tissues banks to adhere to the Good Tissue Practice for Human Organ, Tissue and Cell in terms of establishment and operation in order to cope with the international management trend and the development and management need of the domestic industry. Six years have passed since the law became effective. This article seeks to introduce the current management mechanism and status quo of management of human tissue banks in Taiwan. We also conducted statistical analysis of the data relating to the tissue banks to identify potential risks and the room for improvement. The study concludes that human tissue banks in Taiwan are on the right track with their management practice, leading to a state of steady development and progress.

  4. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  5. Commodification of human tissue: implications for feminist and development ethics.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, Donna

    2002-05-01

    One effect of late capitalism--the commodification of practically everything--is to knock down the Chinese walls between the natural and productive realms, to use a Marxist framework. Women's labour in egg extraction and 'surrogate' motherhood might then be seen as what it is, labour which produces something of value. But this does not necessarily mean that women will benefit from the commodification of practically everything, in either North or South. In the newly developing biotechnologies involving stem cells, the reverse is more likely, particular given the the shortage in the North of the egg donors who will be increasingly necessary to therapeutic cloning. Although most of the ethical debate has focused on the status of the embryo, this is to define ethics with no reference to global or gender justice. There has been little or no debate about possible exploitation of women, particularly of ovum donors from the South. Countries of the South without national ethics committees or guidelines may be particularly vulnerable: although there is increasing awareness of the susceptibility of poorer countries to abuses in research ethics, very little has been written about how they might be affected by the enormously profitable new technologies exploiting human tissue. Even in the UK, although the new Medical Research Council guidelines make a good deal of the 'gift relationship', what they are actually about is commodification. If donors believe they are demonstrating altruism, but biotechnology firms and researchers use the discourse of commodity and profit, we have not 'incomplete commodification' but complete commodification with a plausibly human face.

  6. Adult stem cells, scaffolds for in vivo and in vitro myocardial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Di Felice, Valentina; De Luca, Angela; Serradifalco, Claudia; Di Marco, Patrizia; Verin, Lucia; Motta, Antonella; Guercio, Annalisa; Zummo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The main goal in the last few years in cardiac research has been to isolate cardiac potential stem cells from adult myocardium and to demonstrate their differentiation potential. We have previously demonstrated that c-Kit positive cardiac stem cells are able to organize themselves into a tissue-like cell mass. In this 3D mass, they can produce a high concentration of natural extracellular matrix, can create vessels, a capsule and, with the help of an Open-pore Polylactic Acid scaffold, many cells can organize an elementary myocardium. Drawing from this background, we decided to design and use poly-lactic scaffolds and the model of the athymic Nude-Foxn1(nu) mouse to evaluate the extent of the myogenic vs endothelial differentiation in vivo, and to evaluate the presence or the absence of a foreign body reaction.

  7. The sequential tissue distribution of duck Tembusu virus in adult ducks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Ding, Leilei; Lin, Yuan; Li, Qimeng; He, Xijun; Chen, Qiusheng; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a novel Tembusu virus (TMUV) that caused a severe decrease in the egg production of ducks was isolated in southeast China. Given the novelty of this duck pathogen, little information is available regarding its pathogenesis. Here, we systematically investigated the replication kinetics of TMUV PTD2010 in adult male and female ducks. We found that PTD2010 was detectable in most of the parenchymatous organs as well as the oviduct and intestinal tract from days 1 to 7 after inoculation. Viral titers were maintained at high levels for at least 9 days in the spleen, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, brain, and ovary. No virus was detected in any of these organs or tissues at 18 days after inoculation. PTD2010, thus, causes systemic infections in male and female ducks; its replication kinetics show similar patterns in most organs, with the exception of the ovaries and testes.

  8. Human bone marrow and adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells: a user's guide.

    PubMed

    Mosna, Federico; Sensebé, Luc; Krampera, Mauro

    2010-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells that hold great promise in the field of regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from almost any tissue of the body and display, after expansion, very similar properties and minor differences, probably due to their microenvironment of origin. Expansion in vitro can be obtained in cytokine-free, serum-enriched media, as well as in serum-free, basic fibroblast growth factor-enriched media. A detailed immunophenotypic analysis is required to test the purity of the preparation, but no unique distinguishing marker has been described as yet. Functional assays, that is, differentiation studies in vitro, are needed to prove multilineage differentiation of expanded cells, and demonstration of pluripotency is necessary to identify most immature precursors. MSCs show powerful immunomodulative properties toward most of the cells of the immune system: this strengthens the theoretical rationale for their use also in an allogeneic setting across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) immunological barriers. Systemic intravenous injection and local use have been tried: after systemic injection, MSCs show a high degree of chemotaxis based on pro-inflammatory cytokines, and localize at inflamed and neoplastic tissues; local regeneration has been improved using synthetic, as well as organic scaffolds. On the other hand, inadequate heterotopic in vivo differentiation and neoplastic transformation are potential risks of this form of cell therapy, even if evidence of this sort has been collected only from studies in mice, and generally after prolonged in vitro expansion. This review tries to provide a detailed technical overview of the methods used for human bone-marrow (BM)-derived and adipose-tissue (AT)-derived MSC isolation, in vitro expansion, and characterization for tissue repair. We chose to use BM-MSCs as a model to describe techniques that have been used for MSC isolation and expansion from very different sources, and

  9. Plasticity of Adult Human Pancreatic Duct Cells by Neurogenin3-Mediated Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Bonné, Stefan; Heremans, Yves; Borup, Rehannah; Van de Casteele, Mark; Ling, Zhidong; Pipeleers, Daniel; Ravassard, Philippe; Nielsen, Finn; Ferrer, Jorge; Heimberg, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Duct cells isolated from adult human pancreas can be reprogrammed to express islet beta cell genes by adenoviral transduction of the developmental transcription factor neurogenin3 (Ngn3). In this study we aimed to fully characterize the extent of this reprogramming and intended to improve it. Methods The extent of the Ngn3-mediated duct-to-endocrine cell reprogramming was measured employing genome wide mRNA profiling. By modulation of the Delta-Notch signaling or addition of pancreatic endocrine transcription factors Myt1, MafA and Pdx1 we intended to improve the reprogramming. Results Ngn3 stimulates duct cells to express a focused set of genes that are characteristic for islet endocrine cells and/or neural tissues. This neuro-endocrine shift however, is incomplete with less than 10% of full duct-to-endocrine reprogramming achieved. Transduction of exogenous Ngn3 activates endogenous Ngn3 suggesting auto-activation of this gene. Furthermore, pancreatic endocrine reprogramming of human duct cells can be moderately enhanced by inhibition of Delta-Notch signaling as well as by co-expressing the transcription factor Myt1, but not MafA and Pdx1. Conclusions/Interpretation The results provide further insight into the plasticity of adult human duct cells and suggest measurable routes to enhance Ngn3-mediated in vitro reprogramming protocols for regenerative beta cell therapy in diabetes. PMID:22606327

  10. Transcription levels of sirtuin family in neural stem cells and brain tissues of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, H F; Li, Q; Feng, R L; Wen, T Q

    2012-09-10

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) has been used as a well-known model to investigate apoptosis, differentiation, maintenance of stem cells status, and therapy of neurological disease. The C17.2 NSCs line was produced after v-myc transformation of neural progenitor from mouse cerebellar cortex. Sirtuin family plays important roles involved in neuronal differentiation, genomic stability, lifespan, cell survival. However, little is known about gene expression variation of sirtuin family in C17.2 NSCs, primary NSCs, and different brain tissues in adult mice. Here, we confirmed that the mRNA expression levels of sirt2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 in E14.5 NSCs were significantly higher than in C17.2 NSCs, whereas that sirt 6 displayed an opposing mode. Moreover, a higher mRNA level of sirtuin family was observed in the adult mouse brain compared to C17.2 NSCs. In addition, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors nicotinamide and Trichostatin A (TSA) were used to explore differential changes at the transcriptional level of sirtuins. Results indicated that the expression of sirt1, sirt5 and sirt6 was significant downregulated by nicotinamide treatment. Whereas, a significant downregulation in sirt1 and sirt3 and a significant upregulation in sirt2, sirt4, sirt6, and sirt7 were observed in the treatment of TSA. Thus our studies indicate different sirtuin mRNA expression profiles between C17.2 NSCs, E14.5 NSCs and brain tissues, suggesting the transcriptional regulation of sirtuin family could be mediated by different histone acetylation.

  11. Evaluation of immunohistochemical staining for glucagon in human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Gurlo, Tatyana; Butler, Peter C; Butler, Alexandra E

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) staining techniques are important diagnostic tools of anatomic pathology in the clinical setting and widely used analytical tools in research laboratories. In diabetes research, they are routinely used for the assessment of beta- and alpha-cell mass, for assessment of endocrine cell distribution within the pancreas, for evaluation of islet composition and islet morphology. Here, we present the evaluation of IHC techniques for the detection of alpha-cells in human pancreatic tissue. We compared the Horse Radish Peroxidase (HRP)-based method utilizing DAB Peroxidase Substrate to the Alkaline Phosphatase (AP)-based method utilizing Vector Red substrate. We conclude that HRP-DAB staining is a robust and reliable method for detection of alpha-cells using either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal anti-glucagon antibodies. However, AP-Vector Red staining should be used with caution, because it is affected by the dehydration with ethanol and toluene preceding the mounting of slides with Permount mounting medium. When AP-Vector Red is a preferable method for alpha-cell labeling, slides should be mounted using aqueous mounting medium or, alternatively, they could be air-dried before permanent mounting.

  12. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration.

  13. High-Resolution NMR Studies of Human Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzio, Kristin M.; Watt, Eric D.; Boettcher, John M.; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M.; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    In normal hemostasis, the blood clotting cascade is initiated when factor VIIa (fVIIa, other clotting factors are named similarly) binds to the integral membrane protein, human tissue factor (TF). The TF/fVIIa complex in turn activates fX and fIX, eventually concluding with clot formation. Several X-ray crystal structures of the soluble extracellular domain of TF (sTF) exist; however, these structures are missing electron density in functionally relevant regions of the protein. In this context, NMR can provide complementary structural information as well as dynamic insights into enzyme activity. The resolution and sensitivity for NMR studies are greatly enhanced by the ability to prepare multiple milligrams of protein with various isotopic labeling patterns. Here, we demonstrate high-yield production of several isotopically labeled forms of recombinant sTF, allowing for high-resolution NMR studies both in the solid and solution state. We also report solution NMR spectra at sub-mM concentrations of sTF, ensuring the presence of dispersed monomer, as well as the first solid-state NMR spectra of sTF. Our improved sample preparation and precipitation conditions have enabled the acquisition of multidimensional NMR data sets for TF chemical shift assignment and provide a benchmark for TF structure elucidation. PMID:27657719

  14. Measurement of elastic wave dispersion on human femur tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strantza, M.; Louis, O.; Polyzos, D.; Boulpaep, F.; Van Hemelrijck, D.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-03-01

    Cortical bone is one of the most complex heterogeneous media exhibiting strong wave dispersion. In such media when a burst of energy goes into the formation of elastic waves the different modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components as usually occurs in waveguides. In this study human femur specimens were subjected to elastic wave measurements. The main objective of the study is using broadband acoustic emission sensors to measure parameters like wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Additionally, waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, are also examined relatively to the propagation distance as a preparation for acoustic emission monitoring during fracture. To do so, four sensors were placed at adjacent positions on the surface of the cortical bone in order to record the transient response after pencil lead break excitation. The results are compared to similar measurements on a bulk metal piece which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the scale of the propagating wave lengths. It is shown that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals.

  15. Low Energy Defibrillation in Human Cardiac Tissue: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stuart W.; Plank, Gernot; Biktasheva, Irina V.; Biktashev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    We aim to assess the effectiveness of feedback-controlled resonant drift pacing as a method for low energy defibrillation. Antitachycardia pacing is the only low energy defibrillation approach to have gained clinical significance, but it is still suboptimal. Low energy defibrillation would avoid adverse side effects associated with high voltage shocks and allow the application of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, in cases where such therapy is not tolerated today. We present results of computer simulations of a bidomain model of cardiac tissue with human atrial ionic kinetics. Reentry was initiated and low energy shocks were applied with the same period as the reentry, using feedback to maintain resonance. We demonstrate that such stimulation can move the core of reentrant patterns, in the direction that depends on the location of the electrodes and the time delay in the feedback. Termination of reentry is achieved with shock strength one-order-of-magnitude weaker than in conventional single-shock defibrillation. We conclude that resonant drift pacing can terminate reentry at a fraction of the shock strength currently used for defibrillation and can potentially work where antitachycardia pacing fails, due to the feedback mechanisms. Success depends on a number of details that these numerical simulations have uncovered. PMID:19217854

  16. Comparison of Characteristics of Human Amniotic Membrane and Human Adipose Tissue Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dizaji Asl, Khadijeh; Shafaei, Hajar; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Nozad, Hojjat Ollah

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ideal candidates for treatment of diseases. Amniotic membranes are an inexpensive source of MSCs (AM-MSC) without any donor site morbidity in cell therapy. Adipose tissue derived stem cells (ASCs) are also suitable cells for cell therapy. There is discrepancy in CD271 expression among MSCs from different sources. In this study, the characteristics of AM-MSC and ASCs and CD271 expression were compared. METHODS Adult adipose tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing elective surgical procedure, and samples of amniotic membrane were collected immediately after caesarean operation. After isolation and expansion of MSCs, the proliferation rate and viability of cells were evaluated through calculating DT and MTT assay. Expression of routine mesenchymal specific surface antigens of MSCs and CD271 was evaluated by flow cytometry for both types of cells. RESULTS The growth rate and viability of the MSCs from the amniotic membrane was significantly higher compared with the ASCs. The low expression of CD14 and CD45 indicated that AM-MSC and ASCs are non hematopoietic cells, and both cell types expressed high percentages of CD44, CD105. The results revealed that AM-MSC and ASCs expressed no CD271 on their surfaces. CONCLUSION This study showed that amniotic membrane is a suitable cell source for cell therapy, and CD271 is a negative marker for MSCs identification from amniotic membrane and adipose tissue. PMID:28289611

  17. Embryonic origin of adult stem cells required for tissue homeostasis and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Erin L; Lei, Kai; Seidel, Christopher W; Kroesen, Amanda E; McKinney, Sean A; Guo, Longhua; Robb, Sofia MC; Ross, Eric J; Gotting, Kirsten; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Planarian neoblasts are pluripotent, adult somatic stem cells and lineage-primed progenitors that are required for the production and maintenance of all differentiated cell types, including the germline. Neoblasts, originally defined as undifferentiated cells residing in the adult parenchyma, are frequently compared to embryonic stem cells yet their developmental origin remains obscure. We investigated the provenance of neoblasts during Schmidtea mediterranea embryogenesis, and report that neoblasts arise from an anarchic, cycling piwi-1+ population wholly responsible for production of all temporary and definitive organs during embryogenesis. Early embryonic piwi-1+ cells are molecularly and functionally distinct from neoblasts: they express unique cohorts of early embryo enriched transcripts and behave differently than neoblasts in cell transplantation assays. Neoblast lineages arise as organogenesis begins and are required for construction of all major organ systems during embryogenesis. These subpopulations are continuously generated during adulthood, where they act as agents of tissue homeostasis and regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21052.001 PMID:28072387

  18. Targeted therapy for soft tissue sarcomas in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Diana A; Pratilas, Christine A; Loeb, David M

    2017-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors originating from the mesenchyme. Even though they affect individuals in all age groups, the prevalence of subtypes of STSs changes significantly from childhood through adolescence into adulthood. The mainstay of therapy is surgery, with or without the addition of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. These treatment modalities are associated, in many cases, with significant morbidity and, given the heterogeneity of tumor histologies encompassed by the term “STS”, have not uniformly improved outcomes. Moreover, some subgroups of STSs appear to be more, and others less, responsive to conventional chemotherapy agents. Over the last two decades, our understanding of the biology of STSs is slowly increasing, allowing for the development of more targeted therapies. We review the new treatment modalities that have been tested on patients with STSs, with a special focus on adolescents and young adults, a group of patients that is often underrepresented in clinical trials and has not received the dedicated attention it deserves, given the significant differences in biology and treatment response in comparison to children and adults.

  19. Characterization of RNA isolated from eighteen different human tissues: results from a rapid human autopsy program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Douglas G; Whetzel, Alexis M; Serrano, Geidy; Sue, Lucia I; Lue, Lih-Fen; Beach, Thomas G

    2016-09-01

    Many factors affect the integrity of messenger RNA from human autopsy tissues including postmortem interval (PMI) between death and tissue preservation and the pre-mortem agonal and disease states. In this communication, we describe RNA isolation and characterization of 389 samples from 18 different tissues from elderly donors who were participants in a rapid whole-body autopsy program located in Sun City, Arizona ( www.brainandbodydonationprogram.org ). Most tissues were collected within a PMI of 2-6 h (median 3.15 h; N = 455), but for this study, tissue from cases with longer PMIs (1.25-29.25 h) were included. RNA quality was assessed by RNA integrity number (RIN) and total yield (ng RNA/mg tissue). RIN correlated with PMI for heart (r = -0.531, p = 0.009) and liver (r = -558, p = 0.0017), while RNA yield correlated with PMI for colon (r = -485, p = 0.016) and skin (r = -0.460, p = 0.031). RNAs with the lowest integrity were from skin and cervix where 22.7 and 31.4 % of samples respectively failed to produce intact RNA; by contrast all samples from esophagus, lymph node, jejunum, lung, stomach, submandibular gland and kidney produced RNA with measurable RINs. Expression levels in heart RNA of 4 common housekeeping normalization genes showed significant correlations of Ct values with RIN, but only one gene, glyceraldehyde-3 phosphate dehydrogenase, showed a correlation of Ct with PMI. There were no correlations between RIN values obtained for liver, adrenal, cervix, esophagus and lymph node and those obtained from corresponding brain samples. We show that high quality RNA can be produced from most human autopsy tissues, though with significant differences between tissues and donors. The RNA stability and yield did not depend solely on PMI; other undetermined factors are involved, but these do not include the age of the donor.

  20. Oct4 expression in adult human stem cells: evidence in support of the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tai, Mei-Hui; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Kiupel, Matti; Webster, Joshua D; Olson, L Karl; Trosko, James E

    2005-02-01

    The Oct3/4 gene, a POU family transcription factor, has been noted as being specifically expressed in embryonic stem cells and in tumor cells but not in cells of differentiated tissues. With the ability to isolate adult human stem cells it became possible to test for the expression of Oct3/4 gene in adult stem cells and to test the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis. Using antibodies and PCR primers we tested human breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, mesenchyme and gastric stem cells, the cancer cell lines HeLa and MCF-7 and human, dog and rat tumors for Oct4 expression. The results indicate that adult human stem cells, immortalized non-tumorigenic cells and tumor cells and cell lines, but not differentiated cells, express Oct4. Oct4 is expressed in a few cells found in the basal layer of human skin epidermis. The data demonstrate that adult stem cells maintain expression of Oct4, consistent with the stem cell hypothesis of carcinogenesis.

  1. VEGF Gene Expression in Adult Human Thymus Fat: A Correlative Study with Hypoxic Induced Factor and Cyclooxigenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Tinahones, Francisco; Salas, Julian; Mayas, María Dolores; Ruiz-Villalba, Adrian; Macias-Gonzalez, Manuel; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; DeMora, Manuel; Moreno-Santos, Inmaculada; Bernal, Rosa; Cardona, Fernando; Bekay, Rajaa El

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that the adult human thymus degenerates into fat tissue; however, it has never been considered as a potential source of angiogenic factors. Recently, we have described that this fat (TAT) produces angiogenic factors and induces human endothelial cell proliferation and migration, indicating its potential angiogenic properties. Design Adult thymus fat and subcutaneous adipose tissue specimens were obtained from 28 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, making this tissue readily available as a prime source of adipose tissue. We focused our investigation on determining VEGF gene expression and characterizing the different genes, mediators of inflammation and adipogenesis, and which are known to play a relevant role in angiogenesis regulation. Results We found that VEGF-A was the isoform most expressed in TAT. This expression was accompanied by an upregulation of HIF-1α, COX-2 and HO-1 proteins, and by increased HIF-1 DNA binding activity, compared to SAT. Furthermore, we observed that TAT contains a high percentage of mature adipocytes, 0.25% of macrophage cells, 15% of endothelial cells and a very low percentage of thymocyte cells, suggesting the cellular variability of TAT, which could explain the differences in gene expression observed in TAT. Subsequently, we showed that the expression of genes known as adipogenic mediators, including PPARγ1/γ2, FABP-4 and adiponectin was similar in both TAT and SAT. Moreover the expression of these latter genes presented a significantly positive correlation with VEGF, suggesting the potential association between VEGF and the generation of adipose tissue in adult thymus. Conclusion Here we suggest that this fat has a potential angiogenic function related to ongoing adipogenesis, which substitutes immune functions within the adult thymus. The expression of VEGF seems to be associated with COX-2, HO-1 and adipogenesis related genes, suggesting the importance that this new fat has acquired in research in relation to

  2. Association between subcutaneous white adipose tissue and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in overweight and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Brian D; Dolnikowski, Gregory; Seyoum, Elias; Thomas, Anthony P; Gertz, Erik R; Souza, Elaine C; Woodhouse, Leslie R; Newman, John W; Keim, Nancy L; Adams, Sean H; Van Loan, Marta D

    2013-08-26

    Cholecalciferol is known to be deposited in human adipose tissue, but it is not known whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is found in detectable concentrations. Therefore, our objective was to determine whether 25(OH)D is detectable in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (SWAT) in overweight and obese persons enrolled in a twelve week energy restricted diet. Baseline and post-intervention gluteal SWAT biopsies were collected from 20 subjects participating in a larger clinical weight loss intervention. LC-MS/MS was utilized to determine SWAT 25(OH)D concentrations. Serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were measured by RIA. Body composition was assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. SWAT 25(OH)D concentrations were 5.8 ± 2.6 nmol/kg tissue and 6.2 ± 2.7 nmol/kg tissue pre- and post-intervention SWAT, respectively. There was a significant positive association between SWAT 25(OH)D concentration and serum 25(OH)D concentration (r = 0.52, P < 0.01). Both SWAT and serum 25(OH)D concentrations did not significantly change after a twelve-week period of energy restriction with approximately 5 kg of fat loss. In conclusion, we have demonstrated our LC-MS/MS method can detect 25(OH)D3 in human subcutaneous fat tissue from overweight and obese individuals and is consistent with previously reported concentrations in swine. Additionally, our findings of no significant changes in SWAT 25(OH)D3 or serum 25(OH)D after a 6% loss of total body weight and 13% reduction in total fat provides the first human evidence that adipose 25(OH)D does not likely contribute to serum 25(OH)D with moderate weight loss; whether this is also the case with larger amounts of weight loss is unknown. Weight loss alone is not sufficient to increase serum 25(OH)D and increases in dietary or dermal biosynthesis of vitamin D appear to be the most critical contributors to in vitamin D status.

  3. Intrastriatal transplantation of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells improves functional outcome in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Müller, Janine; Ossig, Christiana; Greiner, Johannes F W; Hauser, Stefan; Fauser, Mareike; Widera, Darius; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Storch, Alexander; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered the second most frequent and one of the most severe neurodegenerative diseases, with dysfunctions of the motor system and with nonmotor symptoms such as depression and dementia. Compensation for the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons during PD using current pharmacological treatment strategies is limited and remains challenging. Pluripotent stem cell-based regenerative medicine may offer a promising therapeutic alternative, although the medical application of human embryonic tissue and pluripotent stem cells is still a matter of ethical and practical debate. Addressing these challenges, the present study investigated the potential of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells derived from the inferior turbinate (ITSCs) transplanted into a parkinsonian rat model. Emphasizing their capability to give rise to nervous tissue, ITSCs isolated from the adult human nose efficiently differentiated into functional mature neurons in vitro. Additional successful dopaminergic differentiation of ITSCs was subsequently followed by their transplantation into a unilaterally lesioned 6-hydroxydopamine rat PD model. Transplantation of predifferentiated or undifferentiated ITSCs led to robust restoration of rotational behavior, accompanied by significant recovery of DA neurons within the substantia nigra. ITSCs were further shown to migrate extensively in loose streams primarily toward the posterior direction as far as to the midbrain region, at which point they were able to differentiate into DA neurons within the locus ceruleus. We demonstrate, for the first time, that adult human ITSCs are capable of functionally recovering a PD rat model.

  4. Obesity Determines the Immunophenotypic Profile and Functional Characteristics of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Pachón-Peña, Gisela; Serena, Carolina; Ejarque, Miriam; Petriz, Jordi; Duran, Xevi; Oliva-Olivera, W.; Simó, Rafael; Tinahones, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a major source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which possess a variety of properties that make them ideal candidates for regenerative and immunomodulatory therapies. Here, we compared the immunophenotypic profile of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) from lean and obese individuals, and explored its relationship with the apparent altered plasticity of hASCs. We also hypothesized that persistent hypoxia treatment of cultured hASCs may be necessary but not sufficient to drive significant changes in mature adipocytes. hASCs were obtained from subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy, adult, female donors undergoing abdominal plastic surgery: lean (n = 8; body mass index [BMI]: 23 ± 1 kg/m2) and obese (n = 8; BMI: 35 ± 5 kg/m2). Cell surface marker expression, proliferation and migration capacity, and adipogenic differentiation potential of cultured hASCs at two different oxygen conditions were studied. Compared with lean-derived hASCs, obese-derived hASCs demonstrated increased proliferation and migration capacity but decreased lipid droplet accumulation, correlating with a higher expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-II and cluster of differentiation (CD) 106 and lower expression of CD29. Of interest, adipogenic differentiation modified CD106, CD49b, HLA-ABC surface protein expression, which was dependent on the donor’s BMI. Additionally, low oxygen tension increased proliferation and migration of lean but not obese hASCs, which correlated with an altered CD36 and CD49b immunophenotypic profile. In summary, the differences observed in proliferation, migration, and differentiation capacity in obese hASCs occurred in parallel with changes in cell surface markers, both under basal conditions and during differentiation. Therefore, obesity is an important determinant of stem cell function independent of oxygen tension. Significance The obesity-related hypoxic environment may have latent effects on human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal

  5. Terahertz pulsed imaging of freshly excised human colonic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Caroline B.; Fitzgerald, Anthony; Reese, George; Goldin, Robert; Tekkis, Paris; O'Kelly, P. S.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma; Gibson, Adam P.; Wallace, Vincent P.

    2011-07-01

    We present the results from a feasibility study which measures properties in the terahertz frequency range of excised cancerous, dysplastic and healthy colonic tissues from 30 patients. We compare their absorption and refractive index spectra to identify trends which may enable different tissue types to be distinguished. In addition, we present statistical models based on variations between up to 17 parameters calculated from the reflected time and frequency domain signals of all the measured tissues. These models produce a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 77% in distinguishing between healthy and all diseased tissues and a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 71% in distinguishing between dysplastic and healthy tissues. The contrast between the tissue types was supported by histological staining studies which showed an increased vascularity in regions of increased terahertz absorption.

  6. The impact on histopathology practice of new human tissue legislation in the UK.

    PubMed

    Underwood, J C E

    2006-09-01

    The undisclosed or unauthorized retention of tissue from autopsies in the UK and elsewhere has caused considerable public concern and much distress to some families. Histopathologists involved in these cases have also been discomfited. These events have exposed deficiencies in prevailing legislation, principally in the Human Tissue Act 1961 and the Coroners Rules 1984. New human tissue legislation comes into force in the UK in September 2006. The Human Tissue Act 2004 and the Human Tissue (Scotland) Act 2006 make it unlawful to remove, store and use tissue from the dead without appropriate authority. The Human Tissue Act 2004, which does not apply in Scotland, also prohibits the removal, storage and use of tissue from living individuals for purposes specified in the Act unless appropriate consent has been obtained. The Coroners (Amendment) Rules 2005, which came into force in June 2005, introduced new arrangements for dealing with the retention of tissue from bodies undergoing coroner's autopsies. This new legislative regime is intended to create a climate in which pathologists, patients and the public can have confidence that tissue is used appropriately and, when necessary, with proper authority or valid consent. However, other than in Scotland, there may be unintended consequences arising from restrictions on archiving, for audit and diagnostic review, tissue samples from coronial autopsies.

  7. Tooth Tissue Engineering: The Importance of Blood Products as a Supplement in Tissue Culture Medium for Human Pulp Dental Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pisciolaro, Ricardo Luiz; Duailibi, Monica Talarico; Novo, Neil Ferreira; Juliano, Yara; Pallos, Debora; Yelick, Pamela Crotty; Vacanti, Joseph Phillip; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Duailibi, Silvio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    One of the goals in using cells for tissue engineering (TE) and cell therapy consists of optimizing the medium for cell culture. The present study compares three different blood product supplements for improved cell proliferation and protection against DNA damage in cultured human dental pulp stem cells for tooth TE applications. Human cells from dental pulp were first characterized as adult stem cells (ectomesenchymal mixed origin) by flow cytometry. Next, four different cell culture conditions were tested: I, supplement-free; II, supplemented with fetal bovine serum; III, allogeneic human serum; and IV, autologous human serum. Cultured cells were then characterized for cell proliferation, mineralized nodule formation, and colony-forming units (CFU) capability. After 28 days in culture, the comet assay was performed to assess possible damage in cellular DNA. Our results revealed that Protocol IV achieved higher cell proliferation than Protocol I (p = 0.0112). Protocols II and III resulted in higher cell proliferation than Protocol I, but no statistical differences were found relative to Protocol IV. The comet assay revealed less cell damage in cells cultured using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. The damage percentage observed on Protocol II was significantly higher than all other protocols. CFUs capability was highest using Protocol IV (p = 0.0018) and III, respectively, and the highest degree of mineralization was observed using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. Protocol IV resulted in significantly improved cell proliferation, and no cell damage was observed. These results demonstrate that human blood product supplements can be used as feasible supplements for culturing adult human dental stem cells.

  8. Human embryonic and fetal mesenchymal stem cells differentiate toward three different cardiac lineages in contrast to their adult counterparts.

    PubMed

    Ramkisoensing, Arti A; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Askar, Saïd F A; Passier, Robert; Swildens, Jim; Goumans, Marie José; Schutte, Cindy I; de Vries, Antoine A F; Scherjon, Sicco; Mummery, Christine L; Schalij, Martin J; Atsma, Douwe E

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show unexplained differences in differentiation potential. In this study, differentiation of human (h) MSCs derived from embryonic, fetal and adult sources toward cardiomyocytes, endothelial and smooth muscle cells was investigated. Labeled hMSCs derived from embryonic stem cells (hESC-MSCs), fetal umbilical cord, bone marrow, amniotic membrane and adult bone marrow and adipose tissue were co-cultured with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (nrCMCs) or cardiac fibroblasts (nrCFBs) for 10 days, and also cultured under angiogenic conditions. Cardiomyogenesis was assessed by human-specific immunocytological analysis, whole-cell current-clamp recordings, human-specific qRT-PCR and optical mapping. After co-culture with nrCMCs, significantly more hESC-MSCs than fetal hMSCs stained positive for α-actinin, whereas adult hMSCs stained negative. Furthermore, functional cardiomyogenic differentiation, based on action potential recordings, was shown to occur, but not in adult hMSCs. Of all sources, hESC-MSCs expressed most cardiac-specific genes. hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs contained significantly higher basal levels of connexin43 than adult hMSCs and co-culture with nrCMCs increased expression. After co-culture with nrCFBs, hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs did not express α-actinin and connexin43 expression was decreased. Conduction velocity (CV) in co-cultures of nrCMCs and hESC-MSCs was significantly higher than in co-cultures with fetal or adult hMSCs. In angiogenesis bioassays, only hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs were able to form capillary-like structures, which stained for smooth muscle and endothelial cell markers.Human embryonic and fetal MSCs differentiate toward three different cardiac lineages, in contrast to adult MSCs. Cardiomyogenesis is determined by stimuli from the cellular microenvironment, where connexin43 may play an important role.

  9. Porosity, Mineralization, Tissue Type and Morphology Interactions at the Human Tibial Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampson, Naomi A.

    Prior research has shown a relationship between tibia robustness (ratio of cross-sectional area to bone length) and stress fracture risk, with less robust bones having a higher risk, which may indicate a compensatory increase in elastic modulus to increase bending strength. Previous studies of human tibiae have shown higher ash content in slender bones. In this study, the relationships between variations in volumetric porosity, ash content, tissue mineral density, secondary bone tissue, and cross sectional geometry, were investigated in order to better understand the tissue level adaptations that may occur in the establishment of cross-sectional properties. In this research, significant differences were found between porosity, ash content, and tissue type around the cortex between robust and slender bones, suggesting that there was a level of co-adaption occurring. Variation in porosity correlated with robustness, and explained large parts of the variation in tissue mineral density. The nonlinear relationship between porosity and ash content may support that slender bones compensate for poor geometry by increasing ash content through reduced remodeling, while robust individuals increase porosity to decrease mass, but only to a point. These results suggest that tissue level organization plays a compensatory role in the establishment of adult bone mass, and may contribute to differences in bone aging between different bone phenotypes. The results suggest that slender individuals have significantly less remodeled bone, however the proportion of remodeled bone was not uniform around the tibia. In the complex results of the study of 38% vs. 66% sites the distal site was subject to higher strains than the 66% site, indicating both local and global regulators may be affecting overall remodeling rates and need to be teased apart in future studies. This research has broad clinical implications on the diagnosis and treatment of fragility fractures. The relationships that

  10. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  11. VEGF expression in human brain tissue after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mărgăritescu, Otilia; Pirici, D; Mărgăritescu, Cl

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third most common cause of death in humans, requiring further studies to elucidate its pathophysiological background. One potential mechanism to increase oxygen delivery to the affected tissue is induction of angiogenesis. The most potent proangiogenic factor is VEGF. For this reason, our study investigated immunohistochemically VEGF reactivity in different cellular brain compartments from 15 ischemic stroke patients, as well as from 2 age control cases. By enzymatic immunohistochemistry, we investigate VEGF expression in different brain cell compartments and then we quantified its signal intensity by assessing integrated optical densities (IOD). To establish the exact cellular brain topography of VEGF immunoreactivity we performed double fluorescent immunohistochemistry series (VEGF÷NeuN, GFAP, CD68, CD105). In control samples, VEGF reactivity was observed especially in neurons from the Brodmann cortical layers IV to VI and in protoplasmic astrocytes from the deeper layers of gray matter and in endothelial cells from normal blood vessels because of systemic hypoxia generated after death. In acute ischemic stroke samples, this reactivity was noticed in all brain cellular compartments but with different intensities. The most reactive compartment was the neurons, the intensity of VEGF reaction decreasing with the lesional age from the core infarct toward intact adjacent brain cortex. With a lower intensity, VEGF reaction was noticed in astrocytes compartments, especially in gemistocytic astrocytes adjacent to the liquefaction zone. We also noticed a weak reaction in activated non-phagocytic microglia from the periphery of liquefaction zones, and high VEGF-CD105 colocalization values at the level of microvessels that surround the infarcted brain area. In conclusion, this reactivity could suggest that VEGF might exhibit neuronal and glial protective effects and also a neoangiogenic property in acute ischemic stroke, facts that may have

  12. Distribution of type XV collagen transcripts in human tissue and their production by muscle cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Kivirikko, S.; Saarela, J.; Myers, J. C.; Autio-Harmainen, H.; Pihlajaniemi, T.

    1995-01-01

    Type XV collagen is a recently identified member of the diverse family of collagens, its structure being characterized by extensive interruptions in the collagenous sequences. A combination of Northern blot hybridization of fetal and adult human tissues and in situ hybridization analyses of a fetus with Down's syndrome, several placentas, and adult skin were used to localize expression of its mRNAs. Northern blot analysis revealed marked expression in heart, skeletal muscle, and placenta tissues and moderate levels in the kidney and pancreas. Clear in situ hybridization signals were detected in fibroblasts and endothelial cells in all tissues studied. Examination of fetal heart, skeletal muscle, and smooth muscle tissues showed that the high type XV collagen mRNA level in the muscle RNA was localized not only to fibroblasts residing in the endomysium but also to myoblasts. Interestingly, type XV collagen mRNAs were also synthesized by certain epithelial cells in kidney, lung, pancreas, and placenta. It was the morphologically immature glomeruli in the kidney and the lower parts of the nephron, especially the collecting ducts, that contained these mRNAs but not the mature glomeruli or proximal tubules, suggesting differences in expression during development. These findings indicate a wide distribution of type XV collagen transcripts, the main producers being mesenchymally derived cells, particularly muscle cells and fibroblasts. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7485412

  13. Human adipose CD34+ CD90+ stem cells and collagen scaffold constructs grafted in vivo fabricate loose connective and adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Giuseppe A; De Francesco, Francesco; Nicoletti, Gianfranco; Paino, Francesca; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Tirino, Virginia; D'Andrea, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    Stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues are of great interest for a high number of diseases. Adult stem cells, instead, are more available, abundant and harvested with minimally invasive procedures. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multi-potent progenitors, able to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and adipose tissues. Human adult adipose tissue seems to be the most abundant source of MSCs and, due to its easy accessibility; it is able to give a considerable amount of stem cells. In this study, we selected MSCs co-expressing CD34 and CD90 from adipose tissue. This stem cell population displayed higher proliferative capacity than CD34(-) CD90(-) cells and was able to differentiate in vitro into adipocytes (PPARγ(+) and adiponectin(+)) and endothelial cells (CD31(+) VEGF(+) Flk1(+)). In addition, in methylcellulose without VEGF, it formed a vascular network. The aim of this study was to investigate differentiation potential of human adipose CD34(+) /CD90(+) stem cells loaded onto commercial collagen sponges already used in clinical practice (Gingistat) both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that human adult adipose and loose connective tissues can be obtained in vivo, highlighting that CD34(+) /CD90 ASCs are extremely useful for regenerative medicine.

  14. Needle optical coherence elastography for the measurement of microscale mechanical contrast deep within human breast tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kelsey M.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Tien, Alan; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging imaging technique that probes microscale mechanical contrast in tissues with the potential to differentiate healthy and malignant tissues. However, conventional OCE techniques are limited to imaging the first 1 to 2 mm of tissue in depth. We demonstrate, for the first time, OCE measurements deep within human tissues using needle OCE, extending the potential of OCE as a surgical guidance tool. We use needle OCE to detect tissue interfaces based on mechanical contrast in both normal and malignant breast tissues in freshly excised human mastectomy samples, as validated against histopathology. Further, we demonstrate the feasibility of in situ measurements >4 cm from the tissue surface using ultrasound guidance of the OCE needle probe. With further refinement, our method may potentially aid in accurate detection of the boundary of the tumor to help ensure full removal of all malignant tissues, which is critical to the success of breast-conserving surgery.

  15. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano; Alves da Silva, Ricardo Henrique

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects.

  16. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Absract The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects. PMID:27847394

  17. Human stem cells and articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, J-F; Huselstein, C; Schiavi, J; Li, Y Y; Bensoussan, D; Decot, V; De Isla, N

    2012-12-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage are one of the most challenging issues of musculoskeletal medicine due to the poor intrinsic ability of this tissue for repair. Despite progress in orthopaedic surgery, cell-based surgical therapies such as autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) have been in clinical use for cartilage repair for over a decade but this approach has shown mixed results. Moreover, the lack of efficient modalities of treatment for large chondral defects has prompted research on cartilage tissue engineering combining cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. This paper focuses on the main parameters in tissue engineering and in particular, on the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative to cells derived from patient tissues in autologous transplantation and tissue engineering. We discussed the prospects of using autologous chondrocytes or MSCs in regenerative medicine and summarized the advantages and disadvantages of these cells in articular cartilage engineering.

  18. Evidence for Trypanosoma cruzi in adipose tissue in human chronic Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Adaliene Versiani Matos; Segatto, Marcela; Menezes, Zélia; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Gelape, Cláudio; de Oliveira Andrade, Luciana; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Scherer, Philipp E.; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi the cause of Chagas disease persists in tissues of infected experimental animals and humans. Here we demonstrate the persistence of the parasite in adipose tissue from of three of 10 elderly seropositive patients with chronic chagasic heart disease. Nine control patients had no parasites in the fat. We also demonstrate that T. cruzi parasitizes primary adipocytes in vitro. Thus, in humans as in mice the parasite may persist in adipose tissue for decades and become a reservoir of infection. PMID:21726660

  19. Evidence for Trypanosoma cruzi in adipose tissue in human chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adaliene Versiani Matos; Segatto, Marcela; Menezes, Zélia; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Gelape, Cláudio; de Oliveira Andrade, Luciana; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Scherer, Philipp E; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2011-11-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi the cause of Chagas disease persists in tissues of infected experimental animals and humans. Here we demonstrate the persistence of the parasite in adipose tissue from of three of 10 elderly seropositive patients with chronic chagasic heart disease. Nine control patients had no parasites in the fat. We also demonstrate that T. cruzi parasitizes primary adipocytes in vitro. Thus, in humans as in mice the parasite may persist in adipose tissue for decades and become a reservoir of infection.

  20. Characterization of human breast cancer tissues by infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, M; Denayer, A; Delvaux, B; Garaud, S; De Wind, R; Desmedt, C; Sotiriou, C; Willard-Gallo, K; Goormaghtigh, E

    2016-01-21

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to microscopy (IR imaging) has shown unique advantages in detecting morphological and molecular pathologic alterations in biological tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of IR imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify characteristics of breast epithelial cells and the stroma. In this study a total of 19 breast tissue samples were obtained from 13 patients. For 6 of the patients, we also obtained Non-Adjacent Non-Tumor tissue samples. Infrared images were recorded on the main cell/tissue types identified in all breast tissue samples. Unsupervised Principal Component Analyses and supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analyses (PLS-DA) were used to discriminate spectra. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of PLS-DA models. Our results show that IR imaging coupled with PLS-DA can efficiently identify the main cell types present in FFPE breast tissue sections, i.e. epithelial cells, lymphocytes, connective tissue, vascular tissue and erythrocytes. A second PLS-DA model could distinguish normal and tumor breast epithelial cells in the breast tissue sections. A patient-specific model reached particularly high sensitivity, specificity and MCC rates. Finally, we showed that the stroma located close or at distance from the tumor exhibits distinct spectral characteristics. In conclusion FTIR imaging combined with computational algorithms could be an accurate, rapid and objective tool to identify/quantify breast epithelial cells and differentiate tumor from normal breast tissue as well as normal from tumor-associated stroma, paving the way to the establishment of a potential complementary tool to ensure safe tumor margins.

  1. Fibronectin functional domains coupled to hyaluronan stimulate adult human dermal fibroblast responses critical for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kaustabh; Ren, Xiang-Dong; Shu, Xiao Zheng; Prestwich, Glenn D; Clark, Richard A F

    2006-03-01

    Fibronectin (FN) facilitates dermal fibroblast migration during normal wound healing. Proteolytic degradation of FN in chronic wounds hampers healing. Previously, three FN functional domains (FNfd) have been shown to be sufficient for optimal adult human dermal fibroblast migration. Here we report the development of an acellular hydrogel matrix comprised of the FNfds coupled to a hyaluronan (HA) backbone to stimulate wound repair. Employing Michael-type addition, the cysteine- tagged FNfds were first coupled to a homobifunctional PEG derivative. Thereafter, these PEG derivative FNfd solutions, containing bifunctional PEG-derivative crosslinker were coupled to thiol-modified HA (HA-DTPH) to obtain a crosslinked hydrogel matrix. When evaluated in vitro, these acellular hydrogels were completely cytocompatible. While spreading and proliferation of adult human dermal fibroblasts plateaued at higher FNfd bulk densities, their rapid and robust migration followed a typical bell-shaped response. When implanted in porcine cutaneous wounds, these acellular matrices, besides being completely biocompatible, induced rapid and en masse recruitment of stromal fibroblasts that was not observed with RGD-tethered or unmodified hydrogels. Such constructs might be of great benefit in clinical settings where rapid formation of new tissue is needed.

  2. Essential Microenvironment for Thymopoiesis is Preserved in Human Adult and Aged Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, J.; Utsuyama, M.; Seki, S.; Akamatsu, H.; Sunamori, M.; Kasai, M.; Hirokawa, K.

    2003-01-01

    Normal human thymuses at various ages were immunohistologically examined in order to determine whether adult or aged thymus maintained the microenvironment for the T cell development and thymopoiesis was really ongoing. To analyze the thymic microenvironment, two monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) were employed. One is MoAb to IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) recognizing medullary and subcapsular cortical epithelial cells of normal infant human thymus. The other is UH-1 MoAb recognizing thymic epithelial cells within the cortex, which are negative with IL-1R-MoAb. Thymus of subjects over 20 years of age was split into many fragments and dispersed in the fatty tissue. However, the microenvironment of each fragment was composed of both IL-1R positive and UH-1 positive epithelial cells, and the UH-1 positive portion was populated with lymphocytes showing a follicle-like appearance. Lymphocytes in these follicle-like portions were mostly CD4+CD8+ double positive cells and contained many proliferating cells as well as apoptotic cells. Thus these follicle-like portions in adult and aged thymus were considered to be functioning as cortex as in infant thymus. Proliferative activity of thymocytes in the thymic cortex and the follicle-like portions definitely declined with advance of age, while incidence of apoptotic thymocytes increased with aging. PMID:14575158

  3. A Digital Gene Expression-Based Bovine Gene Atlas Evaluating 92 Adult, Juvenile and Fetal Cattle Tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive transcriptome survey, or “Gene Atlas,” provides information essential for a complete understanding of the genomic biology of an organism. Using a digital gene expression approach, we developed a Gene Atlas of RNA abundance in 92 adult, juvenile and fetal cattle tissues. The samples...

  4. Raman spectrosopic characterization of human malignant tissues: implications for a percutaneous optical biopsy technique for in-situ tissue diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, Douglas C. B.; Frank, Christopher J.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Gansler, Ted S.; McCreery, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in the technique of Raman spectroscopy now make it possible to achieve rapid, minimally invasive and non-destructive characterization of tissues. In order to evaluate the efficacy of this technique for diagnosis, the Raman spectra of normal and neoplastic human tissues (e.g., breast, kidney, liver and colon) were obtained utilizing visible and near-IR excitation. Normal breast tissue and colon adenocarcinoma showed major Raman features due to the presence of carotenoids and lipids. In breast carcinoma, the features due to lipids were attenuated and as fibrosis (desmoplasia) increased, new spectral features attributable to collagen were observed. Samples of normal and neoplastic liver and kidney show unique spectral differences sufficient to permit tissue differentiation.

  5. Facial soft tissue thickness among various vertical facial patterns in adult Pakistani subjects.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, Waqar; Fida, Mubassar; Shaikh, Attiya

    2015-12-01

    Facial reconstruction techniques are used to obtain an approximation of an individual's appearance thus helping identification of unidentified decedents from their dried skeletal remains. Many of these techniques rely on the sets of average facial soft tissue thickness (FST) values at different anatomical landmarks provided by the previous studies. FST is influenced by the age, sex, ethnicity and the body mass index of the individual. Recent literature has shown that the anthropological variations of the skull may also affect FST at certain points. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of such variations in vertical skull morphology on FST as around one third of different population groups have either a long or short facial pattern as compared to the average facial pattern. Moreover, this study also provides a FST database for the adult Pakistani subjects that may have potential implications in the facial reconstruction of the local subjects. A retrospective analysis of 276 lateral cephalograms of adult subjects having normal sagittal facial pattern was performed. Subjects were categorized into three vertical facial patterns (long face=95, average face=102, short face=79) according to the vertical dimensions of the skull and the FST was measured at 11 midline points. To compare the FST between males and females Mann-Whitney U test was used. Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to compare FST among three vertical facial patterns. The results of our study revealed significant differences in FST at nine landmarks between males and females. These sex-based differences were more pronounced in the long and short facial patterns as compared to the average facial pattern. FST at stomion, pogonion, gnathion and menton was significantly greater in the short facial pattern as compared to the long facial pattern in both the sexes. The results of the present study highlight the importance of anthropological analysis of the skull and taking the vertical skeletal dimension

  6. A new method of infrared thermography for quantification of brown adipose tissue activation in healthy adults (TACTICAL): a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ang, Qi Yan; Goh, Hui Jen; Cao, Yanpeng; Li, Yiqun; Chan, Siew-Pang; Swain, Judith L; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar; Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing

    2017-05-01

    The ability to alter the amount and activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in human adults is a potential strategy to manage obesity and related metabolic disorders associated with food, drug, and environmental stimuli with BAT activating/recruiting capacity. Infrared thermography (IRT) provides a non-invasive and inexpensive alternative to the current methods (e.g. (18)F-FDG PET) used to assess BAT. We have quantified BAT activation in the cervical-supraclavicular (C-SCV) region using IRT video imaging and a novel image computational algorithm by studying C-SCV heat production in healthy young men after cold stimulation and the ingestion of capsinoids in a prospective double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial. Subjects were divided into low-BAT and high-BAT groups based on changes in IR emissions in the C-SCV region induced by cold. The high-BAT group showed significant increases in energy expenditure, fat oxidation, and heat output in the C-SCV region post-capsinoid ingestion compared to post-placebo ingestion, but the low-BAT group did not. Based on these results, we conclude that IRT is a promising tool for quantifying BAT activity.

  7. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Pediatric and Young Adult Nonrhabdomyosarcoma Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kristy B.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Knapik, Jacquelyn A.; Lagmay, Joanne P.; Morris, Christopher; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors, outcomes, and complications in patients aged {<=}30 years with resectable nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma treated at the University of Florida with radiotherapy (RT) during a 34-year period. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 pediatric or young adult patients with nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma were treated with curative intent with surgery and RT at the University of Florida between 1973 and 2007. The most common histologic tumor subtypes were synovial sarcoma in 22 patients, malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 19, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 11 patients. The mean age at RT was 22 years (range, 6-30). Of the 95 patients, 73 had high-grade tumors; 45 had undergone preoperative RT and 50 postoperative RT. The prognostic factors for survival, local recurrence, and distant recurrence were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 0.4-30.5). The actuarial 5-year local control rate was 88%. A microscopically negative margin was associated with superior local control. Although 83% of local recurrence cases initially developed in the absence of metastases, all patients with local failure ultimately died of their disease. The actuarial estimate of 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival was 65% and 63%, respectively. Of all the deaths, 92% were disease related. An early American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, tumor <8 cm, and the absence of neurovascular invasion were associated with superior disease-free survival. The National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, Grade 3-4 treatment complication rate was 9%. No secondary malignancies were observed. Conclusion: In the present large single-institution study, we found positive margins and locally advanced features to be poor prognostic factors for both local progression and survival. The results from the present study have helped to characterize the therapeutic ratio of RT in pediatric and young

  8. X-ray microscopy of soft and hard human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Bert Schulz, Georg Deyhle, Hans Stalder, Anja K. Ilgenstein, Bernd Holme, Margaret N. Hieber, Simone E.; Beckmann, Felix

    2016-01-28

    The simultaneous post mortem visualization of soft and hard tissues using absorption-based CT remains a challenge. If the photon energy is optimized for the visualization of hard tissue, the surrounding soft tissue components are almost X-ray transparent. Therefore, the combination with other modalities such as phase-contrast CT, magnetic resonance microscopy, and histology is essential to detect the anatomical features. The combination of the 2D and 3D data sets using sophisticated segmentation and registration tools allows for conclusions about otherwise inaccessible anatomical features essential for improved patient treatments.

  9. X-ray microscopy of soft and hard human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Stalder, Anja K.; Ilgenstein, Bernd; Holme, Margaret N.; Weitkamp, Timm; Beckmann, Felix; Hieber, Simone E.

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous post mortem visualization of soft and hard tissues using absorption-based CT remains a challenge. If the photon energy is optimized for the visualization of hard tissue, the surrounding soft tissue components are almost X-ray transparent. Therefore, the combination with other modalities such as phase-contrast CT, magnetic resonance microscopy, and histology is essential to detect the anatomical features. The combination of the 2D and 3D data sets using sophisticated segmentation and registration tools allows for conclusions about otherwise inaccessible anatomical features essential for improved patient treatments.

  10. Functional improvement and maturation of rat and human engineered heart tissue by chronic electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hirt, Marc N; Boeddinghaus, Jasper; Mitchell, Alice; Schaaf, Sebastian; Börnchen, Christian; Müller, Christian; Schulz, Herbert; Hubner, Norbert; Stenzig, Justus; Stoehr, Andrea; Neuber, Christiane; Eder, Alexandra; Luther, Pradeep K; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Spontaneously beating engineered heart tissue (EHT) represents an advanced in vitro model for drug testing and disease modeling, but cardiomyocytes in EHTs are less mature and generate lower forces than in the adult heart. We devised a novel pacing system integrated in a setup for videooptical recording of EHT contractile function over time and investigated whether sustained electrical field stimulation improved EHT properties. EHTs were generated from neonatal rat heart cells (rEHT, n=96) or human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (hEHT, n=19). Pacing with biphasic pulses was initiated on day 4 of culture. REHT continuously paced for 16-18 days at 0.5Hz developed 2.2× higher forces than nonstimulated rEHT. This was reflected by higher cardiomyocyte density in the center of EHTs, increased connexin-43 abundance as investigated by two-photon microscopy and remarkably improved sarcomere ultrastructure including regular M-bands. Further signs of tissue maturation include a rightward shift (to more physiological values) of the Ca(2+)-response curve, increased force response to isoprenaline and decreased spontaneous beating activity. Human EHTs stimulated at 2Hz in the first week and 1.5Hz thereafter developed 1.5× higher forces than nonstimulated hEHT on day 14, an ameliorated muscular network of longitudinally oriented cardiomyocytes and a higher cytoplasm-to-nucleus ratio. Taken together, continuous pacing improved structural and functional properties of rEHTs and hEHTs to an unprecedented level. Electrical stimulation appears to be an important step toward the generation of fully mature EHT.

  11. Bacteriology of severe periodontitis in young adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Smibert, R M; Hash, D E; Burmeister, J A; Ranney, R R

    1982-01-01

    A total of 78 bacteriological samples were taken from the supragingival tooth surface after superficial cleaning with toothpicks or from the periodontal sulci of 42 affected sites in 21 adolescents or young adults with severe generalized periodontitis. Of 190 bacterial species, subspecies, or serotypes detected among 2,723 isolates, 11 species exceeded 1% of the subgingival flora and were most closely associated with the diseased sulci. Eleven others were also sufficiently frequent to be suspect agents of tissue destruction. Many of these species are known pathogens of other body sites. In addition, 10 species of Treponema were isolated. One of these and the "large treponeme" were also more closely associated with severe periodontitis than they were with healthy sites or gingivitis. There were highly significant differences between the composition of the flora of the affected sulci and the flora of (i) the adjacent supragingival tooth surface, (ii) the gingival crevice of periodontally healthy people, and (iii) sites with a gingival index score of 0 or 2 in experimental gingivitis studies. The floras of different individuals were also significantly different. There was no statistically detectable effect of sampling per se upon the composition of the flora of subsequent samples from the same sites. The composition of the supragingival flora of the patients with severe generalized periodontitis that had serum antibody to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was significantly different from the supragingival flora of patients without this serum antibody. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the composition of their subgingival floras. PMID:7152665

  12. Histological study of the extratympanic portion of the discomallear ligament in adult humans: a functional hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Mérida-Velasco, J R; de la Cuadra-Blanco, C; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Mérida-Velasco, J A

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out on histological aspects of the extratympanic portion of the discomallear ligament (DL) in adult humans. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was dissected bilaterally in 20 cadavers; in 15 cases the articular disc (AD) and the retroarticular tissue were extirpated. The extratympanic portion of the DL had the shape of a base-down triangle, in relation to the AD, and an upper vertex, in relation to the petrotympanic fissure. In five cases, the base, measured bilaterally, had an average length of 6.4 mm, while the distance from the base to the upper vertex averaged 9.3 mm in length. The extratypanic portion of the DL is an intrinsic ligament of the TMJ, composed of collagen fibres and abundant elastic fibres. We propose that this ligament could act as a tensor of the synovial membrane in movements of the TMJ. PMID:22050648

  13. Histological study of the extratympanic portion of the discomallear ligament in adult humans: a functional hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Mérida-Velasco, J R; de la Cuadra-Blanco, C; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Mérida-Velasco, J A

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out on histological aspects of the extratympanic portion of the discomallear ligament (DL) in adult humans. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was dissected bilaterally in 20 cadavers; in 15 cases the articular disc (AD) and the retroarticular tissue were extirpated. The extratympanic portion of the DL had the shape of a base-down triangle, in relation to the AD, and an upper vertex, in relation to the petrotympanic fissure. In five cases, the base, measured bilaterally, had an average length of 6.4 mm, while the distance from the base to the upper vertex averaged 9.3 mm in length. The extratypanic portion of the DL is an intrinsic ligament of the TMJ, composed of collagen fibres and abundant elastic fibres. We propose that this ligament could act as a tensor of the synovial membrane in movements of the TMJ.

  14. Myelogenous Leukemia in Adult Inbred MHC Defined Miniature Swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Patricia S.; Teague, Alexander G.S.; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S.; Hanekamp, John S.; Moran, Shannon G.; Wikiel, Krzysztof J.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Lo, Diana P.; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J. Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; McMorrow, Isabel M.; Sachs, David H.; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. PMID:20079939

  15. New aspects in fenestrated capillary and tissue dynamics in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult brains.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) generally consists of endothelial tight junction barriers that prevent the free entry of blood-derived substances, thereby maintaining the extracellular environment of the brain. However, the circumventricular organs (CVOs), which are located along the midlines of the brain ventricles, lack these endothelial barriers and have fenestrated capillaries; therefore, they have a number of essential functions, including the transduction of information between the blood circulation and brain. Previous studies have demonstrated the extensive contribution of the CVOs to body fluid and thermal homeostasis, energy balance, the chemoreception of blood-derived substances, and neuroinflammation. In this review, recent advances have been discussed in fenestrated capillary characterization and dynamic tissue reconstruction accompanied by angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis in the sensory CVOs of adult brains. The sensory CVOs, including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), subfornical organ (SFO), and area postrema (AP), have size-selective and heterogeneous vascular permeabilities. Astrocyte-/tanycyte-like neural stem cells (NSCs) sense blood- and cerebrospinal fluid-derived information through the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a mechanical/osmotic receptor, Toll-like receptor 4, a lipopolysaccharide receptor, and Nax, a Na-sensing Na channel. They also express tight junction proteins and densely and tightly surround mature neurons to protect them from blood-derived neurotoxic substances, indicating that the NSCs of the CVOs perform BBB functions while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into new neurons and glial cells. In addition to neurogliogenesis, the density of fenestrated capillaries is regulated by angiogenesis, which is accompanied by the active proliferation and sprouting of endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling may be involved in angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis, both of

  16. Association between vitamin D metabolites in fat tissue and serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D in overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cholecalciferol has been measured in human white adipose tissue (WAT), but little is known about the relationship between the other circulating vitamin D metabolites and WAT. We measured concentrations of 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D in subcutaneous fat tissue from 20 overweight and obese subjects partic...

  17. The Effect of Body Mass on Outdoor Adult Human Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Spencer, Jessica R; Dabbs, Gretchen R

    2017-02-23

    Forensic taphonomy explores factors impacting human decomposition. This study investigated the effect of body mass on the rate and pattern of adult human decomposition. Nine males and three females aged 49-95 years ranging in mass from 73 to 159 kg who were donated to the Complex for Forensic Anthropology Research between December 2012 and September 2015 were included in this study. Kelvin accumulated degree days (KADD) were used to assess the thermal energy required for subjects to reach several total body score (TBS) thresholds: early decomposition (TBS ≥6.0), TBS ≥12.5, advanced decomposition (TBS ≥19.0), TBS ≥23.0, and skeletonization (TBS ≥27.0). Results indicate no significant correlation between body mass and KADD at any TBS threshold. Body mass accounted for up to 24.0% of variation in decomposition rate depending on stage, and minor differences in decomposition pattern were observed. Body mass likely has a minimal impact on postmortem interval estimation.

  18. Adult human liver mesenchymal progenitor cells express phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Baruteau, Julien; Nyabi, Omar; Najimi, Mustapha; Fauvart, Maarten; Sokal, Etienne

    2014-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases and is accountable for a severe encephalopathy by progressive intoxication of the brain by phenylalanine. This results from an ineffective L-phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme (PAH) due to a mutated phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Neonatal screening programs allow an early dietetic treatment with restrictive phenylalanine intake. This diet prevents most of the neuropsychological disabilities but remains challenging for lifelong compliance. Adult-derived human liver progenitor cells (ADHLPC) are a pool of precursors that can differentiate into hepatocytes. We aim to study PAH expression and PAH activity in a differenciated ADHLPC. ADHLPC were isolated from human hepatocyte primary culture of two different donors and differenciated under specific culture conditions. We demonstrated the high expression of PAH and a large increase of PAH activity in differenciated LPC. The age of the donor, the cellular viability after liver digestion and cryopreservation affects PAH activity. ADHLPC might therefore be considered as a suitable source for cell therapy in PKU.

  19. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.

  20. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    DOE PAGES

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection.more » Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.« less

  1. Comprehensive cellular‐resolution atlas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Joshua J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A.C.; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet‐Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A.; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L.; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A.; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W.; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H. Ronald; Hohmann, John G.; Jones, Allan R.; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole‐brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high‐resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large‐format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto‐ and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127–3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27418273

  2. Creation of a Large Adipose Tissue Construct in Humans Using a Tissue-engineering Chamber: A Step Forward in the Clinical Application of Soft Tissue Engineering☆

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Wayne A.; Marre, Diego; Grinsell, Damien; Batty, Andrew; Trost, Nicholas; O'Connor, Andrea J.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering is currently exploring new and exciting avenues for the repair of soft tissue and organ defects. Adipose tissue engineering using the tissue engineering chamber (TEC) model has yielded promising results in animals; however, to date, there have been no reports on the use of this device in humans. Five female post mastectomy patients ranging from 35 to 49 years old were recruited and a pedicled thoracodorsal artery perforator fat flap ranging from 6 to 50 ml was harvested, transposed onto the chest wall and covered by an acrylic perforated dome-shaped chamber ranging from 140 to 350 cm3. Magnetic resonance evaluation was performed at three and six months after chamber implantation. Chambers were removed at six months and samples were obtained for histological analysis. In one patient, newly formed tissue to a volume of 210 ml was generated inside the chamber. One patient was unable to complete the trial and the other three failed to develop significant enlargement of the original fat flap, which, at the time of chamber explantation, was encased in a thick fibrous capsule. Our study provides evidence that generation of large well-vascularized tissue engineered constructs using the TEC is feasible in humans. PMID:27211566

  3. Creation of a Large Adipose Tissue Construct in Humans Using a Tissue-engineering Chamber: A Step Forward in the Clinical Application of Soft Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Wayne A; Marre, Diego; Grinsell, Damien; Batty, Andrew; Trost, Nicholas; O'Connor, Andrea J

    2016-04-01

    Tissue engineering is currently exploring new and exciting avenues for the repair of soft tissue and organ defects. Adipose tissue engineering using the tissue engineering chamber (TEC) model has yielded promising results in animals; however, to date, there have been no reports on the use of this device in humans. Five female post mastectomy patients ranging from 35 to 49years old were recruited and a pedicled thoracodorsal artery perforator fat flap ranging from 6 to 50ml was harvested, transposed onto the chest wall and covered by an acrylic perforated dome-shaped chamber ranging from 140 to 350cm(3). Magnetic resonance evaluation was performed at three and six months after chamber implantation. Chambers were removed at six months and samples were obtained for histological analysis. In one patient, newly formed tissue to a volume of 210ml was generated inside the chamber. One patient was unable to complete the trial and the other three failed to develop significant enlargement of the original fat flap, which, at the time of chamber explantation, was encased in a thick fibrous capsule. Our study provides evidence that generation of large well-vascularized tissue engineered constructs using the TEC is feasible in humans.

  4. Three-Dimensional Engineered High Fidelity Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLA) as Targets for Human Respiratory Virus Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Deatly, A. M.; Suderman, M. T.; Lin, Y.-H.; Chen, W.; Gupta, C. K.; Randolph, V. B.; Udem, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    Unlike traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like assemblies (TLA) (Goodwin et aI, 1992, 1993, 2000 and Nickerson et aI. , 2001,2002) offer high organ fidelity with the potential to emulate the infective dynamics of viruses and bacteria in vivo. Thus, utilizing NASA micro gravity Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology, in vitro human broncho-epithelial (HBE) TLAs were engineered to mimic in vivo tissue for study of human respiratory viruses. These 3D HBE TLAs were propagated from a human broncho-tracheal cell line with a mesenchymal component (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and either an adult human broncho-epithelial cell (BEAS-2B) or human neonatal epithelial cell (16HBE140-) as the overlying element. Resulting TLAs share several characteristic features with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including tight junctions, desmosomes and cilia (SEM, TEM). The presence of epithelium and specific lung epithelium markers furthers the contention that these HBE cells differentiate into TLAs paralleling in vivo tissues. A time course of infection of these 3D HBE TLAs with human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) wild type A2 strain, indicates that virus replication and virus budding are supported and manifested by increasing virus titer and detection of membrane-bound F and G glycoproteins. Infected 3D HBE TLAs remain intact for up to 12 days compared to infected 2D cultures that are destroyed in 2-3 days. Infected cells show an increased vacuolation and cellular destruction (by transmission electron microscopy) by day 9; whereas, uninfected cells remain robust and morphologically intact. Therefore, the 3D HBE TLAs mimic aspects of human respiratory epithelium providing a unique opportunity to analyze, for the first time, simulated in vivo viral infection independent of host immune response.

  5. Human adipose tissue-resident monocytes exhibit an endothelial-like phenotype and display angiogenic properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adipose tissue has the unique property of expanding throughout adult life, and angiogenesis is required for its growth. However, endothelial progenitor cells contribute minimally to neovascularization. Because myeloid cells have proven to be angiogenic, and monocytes accumulate in expanding adipose tissue, they might contribute to vascularization. Methods The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells from human adipose tissue were magnetically separated according to CD45 or CD14 expression. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were obtained from SVF CD45- cells. CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells and then cultured with SVF-derived MSCs. Freshly isolated or cultured cells were characterized with flow cytometry; the conditioned media were analyzed for the angiogenic growth factors, angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with Luminex Technology; their angiogenic capacity was determined in an in vivo gelatinous protein mixture (Matrigel) plug angiogenesis assay. Results CD45+ hematopoietic cells within the SVF contain CD14+ cells that co-express the CD34 progenitor marker and the endothelial cell antigens VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2/KDR), VEGFR1/Flt1, and Tie2. Co-culture experiments showed that SVF-derived MSCs promoted the acquisition of KDR and Tie-2 in PB monocytes. MSCs secreted significant amounts of Ang-2 and HGF, but minimal amounts of bFGF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF, whereas the opposite was observed for SVF CD14+ cells. Additionally, SVF CD14+ cells secreted significantly higher levels of VEGF and bFGF than did MSCs. Culture supernatants of PB monocytes cultured with MSCs contained significantly higher concentrations of VEGF, HGF, G-CSF, and GM-CSF than did the supernatants from cultures without MSCs

  6. Online quantitative analysis of multispectral images of human body tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenko, S A

    2013-08-31

    A method is developed for online monitoring of structural and morphological parameters of biological tissues (haemoglobin concentration, degree of blood oxygenation, average diameter of capillaries and the parameter characterising the average size of tissue scatterers), which involves multispectral tissue imaging, image normalisation to one of its spectral layers and determination of unknown parameters based on their stable regression relation with the spectral characteristics of the normalised image. Regression is obtained by simulating numerically the diffuse reflectance spectrum of the tissue by the Monte Carlo method at a wide variation of model parameters. The correctness of the model calculations is confirmed by the good agreement with the experimental data. The error of the method is estimated under conditions of general variability of structural and morphological parameters of the tissue. The method developed is compared with the traditional methods of interpretation of multispectral images of biological tissues, based on the solution of the inverse problem for each pixel of the image in the approximation of different analytical models. (biomedical optics)

  7. Contribution of transplanted bone marrow cells to Purkinje neurons in human adult brains

    PubMed Central

    Weimann, James M.; Charlton, Carol A.; Brazelton, Timothy R.; Hackman, Robert C.; Blau, Helen M.

    2003-01-01

    We show here that cells within human adult bone marrow can contribute to cells in the adult human brain. Cerebellar tissues from female patients with hematologic malignancies, who had received chemotherapy, radiation, and a bone marrow transplant, were analyzed. Brain samples were obtained at autopsy from female patients who received male (sex-mismatched) or female (sex-matched, control) bone marrow transplants. Cerebella were evaluated in 10-μm-thick, formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections that encompassed up to ≈50% of a human Purkinje nucleus. A total of 5,860 Purkinje cells from sex-mismatched females and 3,202 Purkinje cells from sex-matched females were screened for Y chromosomes by epifluorescence. Confocal laser scanning microscopy allowed definitive identification of the sex chromosomes within the morphologically distinct Purkinje cells. In the brains of females who received male bone marrow, four Purkinje neurons were found that contained an X and a Y chromosome and two other Purkinje neurons contained more than a diploid number of sex chromosomes. No Y chromosomes were detected in the brains of sex-matched controls. The total frequency of male bone marrow contribution to female Purkinje cells approximated 0.1%. This study demonstrates that although during human development Purkinje neurons are no longer generated after birth, cells within the bone marrow can contribute to these CNS neurons even in adulthood. The underlying mechanism may be caused either by generation de novo of Purkinje neurons from bone marrow-derived cells or by fusion of marrow-derived cells with existing recipient Purkinje neurons. PMID:12576546

  8. Automated classification of optical coherence tomography images of human atrial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yu; Tsay, David; Amir, Syed B.; Marboe, Charles C.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2016-10-01

    Tissue composition of the atria plays a critical role in the pathology of cardiovascular disease, tissue remodeling, and arrhythmogenic substrates. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the ability to capture the tissue composition information of the human atria. In this study, we developed a region-based automated method to classify tissue compositions within human atria samples within OCT images. We segmented regional information without prior information about the tissue architecture and subsequently extracted features within each segmented region. A relevance vector machine model was used to perform automated classification. Segmentation of human atrial ex vivo datasets was correlated with trichrome histology and our classification algorithm had an average accuracy of 80.41% for identifying adipose, myocardium, fibrotic myocardium, and collagen tissue compositions.

  9. The effects of corrosive substances on human bone, teeth, hair, nails, and soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Kristen M; Fulginiti, Laura C; Di Modica, Frank

    2011-07-01

    This research investigates the effects of household chemicals on human tissues. Five different human tissues (bone, tooth, hair, fingernails, and skin/muscle/fat) were immersed into six different corrosive agents. These agents consisted of hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, lye, bleach, organic septic cleaner, and Coca-Cola(®) soda. Tap water was used as a control. Tissue samples were cut to consistent sizes and submerged in the corrosive liquids. Over time, the appearance, consistency, and weight were documented. Hydrochloric acid was the most destructive agent in this study, consuming most tissues within 24 h. Sulfuric acid was the second most destructive agent in this study. Bleach, lye, and cola had no structural effects on the hard tissues of the body, but did alter the appearance or integrity of the hair, nails, or flesh in some way. The organic septic cleaner and tap water had no effect on any of the human tissue tested during the timeframe of the study.

  10. Determination of optical parameters of human breast tissue from spatially resolved fluorescence: a diffusion theory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Maya S.; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Raju, Narisetti Sundar; Pradhan, Asima

    2002-07-01

    We report the measurement of optical transport parameters of pathologically characterized malignant tissues, normal tissues, and different types of benign tumors of the human breast in the visible wavelength region. A spatially resolved steady-state diffuse fluorescence reflectance technique was used to estimate the values for the reduced-scattering coefficient (mu's) and the absorption coefficient (mua) of human breast tissues at three wavelengths (530, 550, and 590 nm). Different breast tissues could be well differentiated from one another, and different benign tumors could also be distinguished by their measured transport parameters. A diffusion theory model was developed to describe fluorescence light energy distribution, especially its spatial variation in a turbid and multiply scattering medium such as human tissue. The validity of the model was checked with a Monte Carlo simulation and also with different tissue phantoms prepared with polystyrene microspheres as scatterers, riboflavin as fluorophores, and methylene blue as absorbers.

  11. Ethical issues surrounding the transplantation of human fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Hurd, R E

    1992-12-01

    Organ transplants have been one of the greatest advances in medicine. However, organs from living relatives or cadavers are in short supply, and many people die awaiting a donor organ. Increasing the donor pool by using organs from aborted fetuses has been proposed to increase the supply. In addition, there are benefits of using fetal tissue including its particular usefulness in children, the fact that it is not readily rejected, and its potential for growth. Guidelines for fetal research were issued in 1975, but a research moratorium was imposed in 1988 to allow study of ethical and legal issues. While the federal government delays in lifting the ban, several states have written laws governing experimentation with fetuses. Ethical arguments against using fetal tissue for organ transplant include a concern that this would create a branch of biomedicine which depends on the continuation of induced abortions. This could lead to neglect of research for other therapies. The timing and type of abortion should continue to benefit the mother, rather than the organ recipient. Ethicists debate whether or not use of aborted tissue implies complicity in the abortion process beyond that which exists for all members of a society which permits abortion. They also wonder whether knowing that some good could come of an abortion would influence a woman's decision to have one. Proposals to keep the use of fetal tissue ethical include banning the commercial use of sale of tissues, forbidding designation of the tissue recipient (to prevent harvesting fetal tissue for a relative), separating abortion counseling and management from harvesting of the tissue, and obtaining informed consent (perhaps from a proxy surrogate rather than from the mother) for the use of fetal tissue. When the medical and ethical communities have reached some consensus on these issues, crafted safeguards, and precluded conflicts of interest, then restrictions on government funding should be lifted. Whereas it

  12. Human periprostatic adipose tissue promotes prostate cancer aggressiveness in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and mortality. The contribution of periprostatic adipose tissue, which is often infiltrated by malignant cells, to cancer progression is largely unknown. Thus, this study aimed to determine if periprostatic adipose tissue is linked with aggressive tumor biology in prostate cancer. Methods Supernatants of whole adipose tissue (explants) or stromal vascular fraction (SVF) from paired fat samples of periprostatic (PP) and pre-peritoneal visceral (VIS) anatomic origin from different donors were prepared and analyzed for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activity. The effects of those conditioned media (CM) on growth and migration of hormone-refractory (PC-3) and hormone-sensitive (LNCaP) prostate cancer cells were measured. Results We show here that PP adipose tissue of overweight men has higher MMP9 activity in comparison with normal subjects. The observed increased activities of both MMP2 and MMP9 in PP whole adipose tissue explants, likely reveal the contribution of adipocytes plus stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) as opposed to SVF alone. MMP2 activity was higher for PP when compared to VIS adipose tissue. When PC-3 cells were stimulated with CM from PP adipose tissue explants, increased proliferative and migratory capacities were observed, but not in the presence of SVF. Conversely, when LNCaP cells were stimulated with PP explants CM, we found enhanced motility despite the inhibition of proliferation, whereas CM derived from SVF increased both cell proliferation and motility. Explants culture and using adipose tissue of PP origin are most effective in promoting proliferation and migration of PC-3 cells, as respectively compared with SVF culture and using adipose tissue of VIS origin. In LNCaP cells, while explants CM cause increased migration compared to SVF, the use of PP adipose tissue to generate CM result in the increase of both cellular proliferation and migration. Conclusions Our

  13. Scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach based on phase-contrast microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In order to study scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach, we collect images for human gastric specimens by using phase-contrast microscope. The images were processed by the way of mathematics morphology. The equivalent particle size distribution of tissues can be obtained. Combining with Mie scattering theory, the scattering properties of tissues can be calculated. Assume scattering of light in biological tissue can be seen as separate scattering events by different particles, total scattering properties can be equivalent to as scattering sum of particles with different diameters. The results suggest that scattering coefficient of the cancerous tissue is significantly higher than that of normal tissue. The scattering phase function is different especially in the backscattering area. Those are significant clinical benefits to diagnosis cancerous tissue

  14. A case of adult Langerhans cell histiocytosis showing successfully regenerated osseous tissue of the skull after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Izutsu, Koji; Kako, Shinichi; Ohta, Satoshi; Hangaishi, Akira; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells and extremely rare in adults. Adult LCH is often associated with osteolytic bone lesions, but large bone-defective lesions have been rarely reported. We report an adult case of LCH accompanied by large osteolytic lesions in the skull that successfully responded to chemotherapy. A 47-year-old woman with LCH who had multiple, large osteolytic areas of more than 3 cm in diameter in the skull was admitted to our hospital. She was treated with systemic chemotherapy consisting of prednisolone, vinblastine, and 6-mercaptopurine. Twelve months later, when she completed the treatment, osteolytic areas were covered with hard osseous tissue, and X-ray examination confirmed regeneration of the bone. This case indicates that chemotherapy can be effective even for the treatment of large osteolytic lesions in adult LCH patients.

  15. Cloning and study of adult-tissue-specific expression of Sox9 in Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Yan; Wang, Feng-Yu; Hua, Hui-Ying; Chang, Zhong-Jie

    2007-08-01

    The Sox9 gene is one of the important transcription factors in the development of many tissues and organs, particularly in sex determination and chondrogenesis. We amplified the genomic DNA of Cyprinus carpio using degenerate primers, and found that there were two versions of Sox9 in this species: Sox9a and Sox9b, that differ in having an intron of different length (704 bp and 616 bp, respectively) in the conserved HMG box region that codes for identical amino acid sequences. We used a two-phase rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) for the isolation of full-length cDNA of Sox9b. Sequence analyses revealed a 2447-bp cDNA containing 233-bp 5' untranslated region, a 927-bp 3' untranslated region, including poly(A), and a 1287 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 428 amino acids. The HMG box of 79 amino acid motif was confirmed from positions 96-174. Sequence alignment showed that the identity of amino acids of Sox9 among ten animal species, including C. carpio, is 75%, indicating that the Sox9 gene is evolutionarily quite conserved. The expression level of Sox9b gene varied among several organs of adult C. carpio, with the level of expression being highest in the brain and testis.

  16. In-Vivo Time Domain Measurement of Dielectric Properties of Human Body Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazunori; Hirata, Akimasa; Wang, Jianquing; Fujiwara, Osamu

    It is essential to measure dielectric properties of human tissues for the safety evaluation of electromagnetic field exposures. In this paper, towards developing an in-vivo measurement method for living human tissues, we employed an open-ended coaxial probe together with a time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique, which probably enables us to extract a reflected waveform from some specified tissues in the time domain. We compared the TDR-measured dielectric properties for human surface tissues with those derived from a conventional frequency-domain technique. As a result, we found a fair agreement between them in the frequency range from 300 MHz to 6 GHz. This result suggests the possibility of in-vivo dielectric property measurement for superficial human tissues by using the proposed TDR technique.

  17. A comparative study of the spatial distribution of mast cells and microvessels in the foetal, adult human thymus and thymoma.

    PubMed

    Raica, Marius; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nico, Beatrice; Guidolin, Diego; Ribatti, Domenico

    2010-02-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are widely distributed in human and animal tissues and have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis in normal and pathological conditions. Few data are available about the relationship between MCs and blood vessels in the normal human thymus, and there are virtually no data about their distribution and significance in thymoma. The aim of this study was to analyse the spatial distribution of MCs and microvessels in the normal foetal and adult thymus and thymoma. Twenty biopsy specimens of human thymus, including foetal and adult normal thymus and thymoma were analysed. Double staining with CD34 and mast cell tryptase was used to count both mast cells and microvessels in the same fields. Computer-assisted image analysis was performed to characterize the spatial distribution of MCs and blood vessels in selected specimens. Results demonstrated that MCs were localized exclusively to the medulla. Their number was significantly higher in thymoma specimens as compared with adult and foetal normal specimens respectively. In contrast the microvessel area was unchanged. The analysis of the spatial distribution and relationship between MCs and microvessels revealed that only in the thymoma specimens was there a significant spatial association between MCs and microvessels. Overall, these data suggest that MCs do not contribute significantly to the development of the vascular network in foetal and adult thymus, whereas in thymoma they show a close relationship to blood vessels. This could be an expression of their involvement not only in endothelial cells but also in tumour cell proliferation.

  18. A comparison of epithelial and neural properties in progenitor cells derived from the adult human ciliary body and brain.

    PubMed

    Moe, Morten C; Kolberg, Rebecca S; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Olstorn, Havard; Varghese, Mercy; Langmoen, Iver A; Nicolaissen, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Cells isolated from the ciliary body (CB) of the adult human eye possess properties of retinal stem/progenitor cells and can be propagated as spheres in culture. As these cells are isolated from a non-neural epithelium which has neuroepithelial origin, they may have both epithelial and neural lineages. Since it is the properties of neural progenitor cells that are sought after in a future scenario of autotransplantation, we wanted to directly compare human CB spheres with neurospheres derived from the human subventricular zone (SVZ), which is the best characterized neural stem cell niche in the CNS of adults. The CB epithelium was dissected from donor eyes (n = 8). Biopsies from the ventricular wall were harvested during neurosurgery due to epilepsy (n = 7). CB and SVZ tissue were also isolated from Brown Norwegian rats. Dissociated single cells were cultivated in a sphere-promoting medium and passaged every 10-30 days. Fixed spheres were studied by immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and scanning/transmission electron microscopy. We found that both CB and SVZ spheres contained a mixed population of cells embedded in extracellular matrix. CB spheres, in contrast to SVZ neurospheres, contained pigmented cells with epithelial morphology that stained for cytokeratins (3/12 + 19), were connected through desmosomes and tight-junctions and produced PEDF. Markers of neural progenitors (nestin, Sox-2, GFAP) were significantly lower expressed in human CB compared to SVZ spheres, and nestin positive cells in the CB spheres also contained pigment. There was higher expression of EGF and TGF-beta receptors in human CB spheres, and a comparative greater activation of the canonical Wnt pathway. These results indicate that adult human CB spheres contain progenitor cells with epithelial properties and limited expression of neural progenitor markers compared to CNS neurospheres. Further studies mapping the regulation between epithelial and neural properties in the adult human

  19. Evidence of progenitor cells of glandular and myoepithelial cell lineages in the human adult female breast epithelium: a new progenitor (adult stem) cell concept.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Werner; Buerger, Horst

    2003-10-01

    Although experimental data clearly confirm the existence of self-renewing mammary stem cells, the characteristics of such progenitor cells have never been satisfactorily defined. Using a double immunofluorescence technique for simultaneous detection of the basal cytokeratin 5, the glandular cytokeratins 8/18 and the myoepithelial differentiation marker smooth muscle actin (SMA), we were able to demonstrate the presence of CK5+ cells in human adult breast epithelium. These cells have the potential to differentiate to either glandular (CK8/18+) or myoepithelial cells (SMA+) through intermediary cells (CK5+ and CK8/18+ or SMA+). We therefore proceeded on the assumption that the CK5+ cells are phenotypically and behaviourally progenitor (committed adult stem) cells of human breast epithelium. Furthermore, we furnish evidence that most of these progenitor cells are located in the luminal epithelium of the ductal lobular tree. Based on data obtained in extensive analyses of proliferative breast disease lesions, we have come to regard usual ductal hyperplasia as a progenitor cell-derived lesion, whereas most breast cancers seem to evolve from differentiated glandular cells. Double immunofluorescence experiments provide a new tool to characterize phenotypically progenitor (adult stem) cells and their progenies. This model has been shown to be of great value for a better understanding not only of normal tissue regeneration but also of proliferative breast disease. Furthermore, this model provides a new tool for unravelling further the regulatory mechanisms that govern normal and pathological cell growth.

  20. hPSC-derived lung and intestinal organoids as models of human fetal tissue.

    PubMed

    Aurora, Megan; Spence, Jason R

    2016-12-15

    In vitro human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) derived tissues are excellent models to study certain aspects of normal human development. Current research in the field of hPSC derived tissues reveals these models to be inherently fetal-like on both a morphological and gene expression level. In this review we briefly discuss current methods for differentiating lung and intestinal tissue from hPSCs into individual 3-dimensional units called organoids. We discuss how these methods mirror what is known about in vivo signaling pathways of the developing embryo. Additionally, we will review how the inherent immaturity of these models lends them to be particularly valuable in the study of immature human tissues in the clinical setting of premature birth. Human lung organoids (HLOs) and human intestinal organoids (HIOs) not only model normal development, but can also be utilized to study several important diseases of prematurity such as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

  1. Measuring the local electrical conductivity of human brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtari, M.; Emin, D.; Ellingson, B. M.; Woodworth, D.; Frew, A.; Mathern, G. W.

    2016-02-01

    The electrical conductivities of freshly excised brain tissues from 24 patients were measured. The diffusion-MRI of the hydrogen nuclei of water molecules from regions that were subsequently excised was also measured. Analysis of these measurements indicates that differences between samples' conductivities are primarily due to differences of their densities of solvated sodium cations. Concomitantly, the sample-to-sample variations of their diffusion constants are relatively small. This finding suggests that non-invasive in-vivo measurements of brain tissues' local sodium-cation density can be utilized to estimate its local electrical conductivity.

  2. Integrin α1β1 is involved in the differentiation into myofibroblasts in adult reactive tissues in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alejandro; Karen, Jakob; Gardner, Humphrey; Gerdin, Bengt; Rubin, Kristofer; Sundberg, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Connective tissue cell activation is of importance during reactive conditions such as solid tumour growth, wound healing and pannus formation in rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we have compared connective tissue cells of mesenchymal origin in human tissues from these conditions and their normal counterparts using a panel of cell-type-specific markers. In particular, we investigated variations of integrin expression among connective tissue cell phenotypes. Connective tissue cell populations were defined based on their association with the microvasculature and their expression of activation markers. The phenotype of these cells varied according to the type of pathological connective tissue examined. Our morphological data from human tissues suggested that the α1β1 integrin, a collagen/laminin receptor, is involved in the differentiation of precursor cells into myofibroblasts. To mechanistically investigate this hypothesis, we employed experimental models for carcinoma growth and wound healing utilizing α1 integrin-deficient mice. The data confirmed that the α1β1 integrin is of importance not only for the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into myofibroblasts but also for the neovascularization and connective tissue organization and emphasize the importance of myofibroblasts in the pathophysiology of tissue repair, inflammation and tumour growth. PMID:19397781

  3. 21 CFR 1270.21 - Determination of donor suitability for human tissue intended for transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of donor suitability for human..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Donor Screening and...

  4. 21 CFR 1270.21 - Determination of donor suitability for human tissue intended for transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of donor suitability for human..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Donor Screening and...

  5. Immunohistochemical localization of collagen type XI alpha1 and alpha2 chains in human colon tissue.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Kara B; Reimers, Aaron P; Luman, Sarah; Kronz, Joseph D; Fyffe, William E; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2008-03-01

    In previous studies, collagen XI mRNA has been detected in colon cancer, but its location in human colon tissue has not been determined. The heterotrimeric collagen XI consists of three alpha chains. While it is known that collagen XI plays a regulatory role in collagen fibril formation, its function in the colon is unknown. The characterization of normal human colon tissue will allow a better understanding of the variance of collagen XI in abnormal tissues. Grossly normal and malignant human colon tissue was obtained from pathology archives. Immunohistochemical staining with a 58K Golgi marker and alpha1(XI) and alpha2(XI) antisera was used to specifically locate their presence in normal colon tissue. A comparative bright field microscopic analysis showed the presence of collagen XI in human colon. The juxtanuclear, dot-like collagen XI staining in the Golgi apparatus of goblet cells in normal tissue paralleled the staining of the 58K Golgi marker. Ultra light microscopy verified these results. Staining was also confirmed in malignant colon tissue. This study is the first to show that collagen XI is present in the Golgi apparatus of normal human colon goblet cells and localizes collagen XI in both normal and malignant tissue. Although the function of collagen XI in the colon is unknown, our immunohistochemical characterization provides the foundation for future immunohistopathology studies of the colon.

  6. Environmental carcinogens in human target tissues in culture. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, I.C.

    1986-02-19

    Cells from different organ or animal species have shown diverse activities in activation and detoxification of chemical carcinogens. Based on the mutation assays, human hepatocytes were more effective than animal hepatocytes in detoxification of aromatic nitrogen compounds. The adduct formation was also different in human and rodent hepatocytes exposed to aminofluorene (AF) or acetylaminofluorene (AAF). Both AF and AAF adduct DNA were observed in rat liver cells exposed to AF or AAF. However, very little acetylation or deacetyl of the DNA adducts occurred in the human hepatocytes. Human hepatocytes treated with AF in primary culture produced mainly AF adducted DNA while AAF treated cells formed AAF adduct DNA. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in CT Examinations of Human Mummies

    PubMed Central

    Panzer, Stephanie; Mc Coy, Mark R.; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Piombino-Mascali, Dario; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Zink, Albert R.; Augat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a checklist for standardized assessment of soft tissue preservation in human mummies based on whole-body computed tomography examinations, and to add a scoring system to facilitate quantitative comparison of mummies. Computed tomography examinations of 23 mummies from the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Sicily (17 adults, 6 children; 17 anthropogenically and 6 naturally mummified) and 7 mummies from the crypt of the Dominican Church of the Holy Spirit of Vilnius, Lithuania (5 adults, 2 children; all naturally mummified) were used to develop the checklist following previously published guidelines. The scoring system was developed by assigning equal scores for checkpoints with equivalent quality. The checklist was evaluated by intra- and inter-observer reliability. The finalized checklist was applied to compare the groups of anthropogenically and naturally mummified bodies. The finalized checklist contains 97 checkpoints and was divided into two main categories, “A. Soft Tissues of Head and Musculoskeletal System” and “B. Organs and Organ Systems”, each including various subcategories. The complete checklist had an intra-observer reliability of 98% and an inter-observer reliability of 93%. Statistical comparison revealed significantly higher values in anthropogenically compared to naturally mummified bodies for the total score and for three subcategories. In conclusion, the developed checklist allows for a standardized assessment and documentation of soft tissue preservation in whole-body computed tomography examinations of human mummies. The scoring system facilitates a quantitative comparison of the soft tissue preservation status between single mummies or mummy collections. PMID:26244862

  8. Computer-aided tissue engineering of a human vertebral body.

    PubMed

    Wettergreen, M A; Bucklen, B S; Sun, W; Liebschner, M A K

    2005-10-01

    Tissue engineering is developing into a less speculative science involving the careful interplay of numerous design parameters and multidisciplinary professionals. Problem solving abilities and state of the art research tools are required to develop solutions for a wide variety of clinical issues. One area of particular interest is orthopedic biomechanics, a field that is responsible for the treatment of over 700,000 vertebral fractures in the United States alone last year. Engineers are currently lacking the technology and knowledge required to govern the subsistence of cells in vivo, let alone the knowledge to create a functional tissue replacement for a whole organ. Despite this, advances in computer-aided tissue engineering are continually growing. Using a combinatory approach to scaffold design, patient-specific implants may be constructed. Computer-aided design, optimization of geometry using voxel finite element models or other optimization routines, creation of a library of architectures with specific material properties, rapid prototyping, and determination of a defect site using imaging modalities highlight the current availability of design resources. This study proposes a novel methodology from start to finish which could, in the future, be used to design a tissue-engineered construct for the replacement of an entire vertebral body.

  9. Multiple-Image Radiography for Human Soft Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Muehleman,C.; Li, J.; Zhong, Z.; Brankov, J.; Wernick, M.

    2006-01-01

    Conventional radiography only provides a measure of the X-ray attenuation caused by an object; thus, it is insensitive to other inherent informative effects, such as refraction. Furthermore, conventional radiographs are degraded by X-ray scatter that can obscure important details of the object being imaged. The novel X-ray technology diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) has recently allowed the visualization of nearly scatter-free images displaying both attenuation and refraction properties. A new method termed multiple-image radiography (MIR) is a significant improvement over DEI, corrects errors in DEI, is more robust to noise and produces an additional image that is entirely new to medical imaging. This new image, which portrays ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) conveys the presence of microstructure in the object, thus differentiating homogeneous tissues from tissues that are irregular on a scale of micrometers. The aim of this study was to examine the use of MIR for evaluation of soft tissue, and in particular to conduct a preliminary investigation of the USAXS image, which has not previously been used in tissue imaging.

  10. Features of hand-foot crawling behavior in human adults.

    PubMed

    Maclellan, M J; Ivanenko, Y P; Cappellini, G; Sylos Labini, F; Lacquaniti, F

    2012-01-01

    Interlimb coordination of crawling kinematics in humans shares features with other primates and nonprimate quadrupeds, and it has been suggested that this is due to a similar organization of the locomotor pattern generators (CPGs). To extend the previous findings and to further explore the neural control of bipedal vs. quadrupedal locomotion, we used a crawling paradigm in which healthy adults crawled on their hands and feet at different speeds and at different surface inclinations (13°, 27°, and 35°). Ground reaction forces, limb kinematics, and electromyographic (EMG) activity from 26 upper and lower limb muscles on the right side of the body were collected. The EMG activity was mapped onto the spinal cord in approximate rostrocaudal locations of the motoneuron pools to characterize the general features of cervical and lumbosacral spinal cord activation. The spatiotemporal pattern of spinal cord activity significantly differed between quadrupedal and bipedal gaits. In addition, participants exhibited a large range of kinematic coordination styles (diagonal vs. lateral patterns), which is in contrast to the stereotypical kinematics of upright bipedal walking, suggesting flexible coupling of cervical and lumbosacral pattern generators. Results showed strikingly dissimilar directional horizontal forces for the arms and legs, considerably retracted average leg orientation, and substantially smaller sacral vs. lumbar motoneuron activity compared with quadrupedal gait in animals. A gradual transition to a more vertical body orientation (increasing the inclination of the treadmill) led to the appearance of more prominent sacral activity (related to activation of ankle plantar flexors), typical of bipedal walking. The findings highlight the reorganization and adaptation of CPG networks involved in the control of quadrupedal human locomotion and a high specialization of the musculoskeletal apparatus to specific gaits.

  11. Concise Review: Human Dermis as an Autologous Source of Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Vapniarsky, Natalia; Arzi, Boaz; Hu, Jerry C.; Nolta, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    The exciting potential for regenerating organs from autologous stem cells is on the near horizon, and adult dermis stem cells (DSCs) are particularly appealing because of the ease and relative minimal invasiveness of skin collection. A substantial number of reports have described DSCs and their potential for regenerating tissues from mesenchymal, ectodermal, and endodermal lineages; however, the exact niches of these stem cells in various skin types and their antigenic surface makeup are not yet clearly defined. The multilineage potential of DSCs appears to be similar, despite great variability in isolation and in vitro propagation methods. Despite this great potential, only limited amounts of tissues and clinical applications for organ regeneration have been developed from DSCs. This review summarizes the literature on DSCs regarding their niches and the specific markers they express. The concept of the niches and the differentiation capacity of cells residing in them along particular lineages is discussed. Furthermore, the advantages and disadvantages of widely used methods to demonstrate lineage differentiation are considered. In addition, safety considerations and the most recent advancements in the field of tissue engineering and regeneration using DSCs are discussed. This review concludes with thoughts on how to prospectively approach engineering of tissues and organ regeneration using DSCs. Our expectation is that implementation of the major points highlighted in this review will lead to major advancements in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Significance Autologous dermis-derived stem cells are generating great excitement and efforts in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. The substantial impact of this review lies in its critical coverage of the available literature and in providing insight regarding niches, characteristics, and isolation methods of stem cells derived from the human dermis. Furthermore, it

  12. Improved adipose tissue metabolism after 5-year growth hormone replacement therapy in growth hormone deficient adults: The role of zinc-α2-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Balaž, Miroslav; Ukropcova, Barbara; Kurdiova, Timea; Vlcek, Miroslav; Surova, Martina; Krumpolec, Patrik; Vanuga, Peter; Gašperíková, Daniela; Klimeš, Iwar; Payer, Juraj; Wolfrum, Christian; Ukropec, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) supplementation therapy to adults with GH deficiency has beneficial effects on adipose tissue lipid metabolism, improving thus adipocyte functional morphology and insulin sensitivity. However, molecular nature of these effects remains unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that lipid-mobilizing adipokine zinc-α2-glycoprotein is causally linked to GH effects on adipose tissue lipid metabolism. Seventeen patients with severe GH deficiency examined before and after the 5-year GH replacement therapy were compared with age-, gender- and BMI-matched healthy controls. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was used to assess whole-body and adipose tissue-specific insulin sensitivity. Glucose tolerance was determined by oGTT, visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adiposity by MRI, adipocyte size morphometrically after collagenase digestion, lipid accumulation and release was studied in differentiated human primary adipocytes in association with GH treatment and zinc-α2-glycoprotein gene silencing. Five-year GH replacement therapy improved glucose tolerance, adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and reduced adipocyte size without affecting adiposity and whole-body insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression was positively associated with whole-body and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and negatively with adipocyte size. GH treatment to adipocytes in vitro increased zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression (>50%) and was paralleled by enhanced lipolysis and decreased triglyceride accumulation (>35%). Moreover, GH treatment improved antilipolytic action of insulin in cultured adipocytes. Most importantly, silencing zinc-α2-glycoprotein eliminated all of the GH effects on adipocyte lipid metabolism. Effects of 5-year GH supplementation therapy on adipose tissue lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity are associated with zinc-α2-glycoprotein. Presence of this adipokine is required for the GH action on adipocyte lipid metabolism in vitro

  13. Caspase Induction and BCL2 Inhibition in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tinahones, Francisco José; Coín Aragüez, Leticia; Murri, Mora; Oliva Olivera, Wilfredo; Mayas Torres, María Dolores; Barbarroja, Nuria; Gomez Huelgas, Ricardo; Malagón, Maria M.; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cell death determines the onset of obesity and associated insulin resistance. Here, we analyze the relationship among obesity, adipose tissue apoptosis, and insulin signaling. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The expression levels of initiator (CASP8/9) and effector (CASP3/7) caspases as well as antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma (BCL)2 and inflammatory markers were assessed in visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue from patients with different degrees of obesity and without insulin resistance or diabetes. Adipose tissue explants from lean subjects were cultured with TNF-α or IL-6, and the expression of apoptotic and insulin signaling components was analyzed and compared with basal expression levels in morbidly obese subjects. RESULTS SAT and VAT exhibited increased CASP3/7 and CASP8/9 expression levels and decreased BCL2 expression with BMI increase. These changes were accompanied by increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels and macrophage infiltration markers. In obese subjects, CASP3/7 activation and BCL2 downregulation correlated with the IRS-1/2–expression levels. Expression levels of caspases, BCL2, p21, p53, IRS-1/2, GLUT4, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, and leukocyte antigen-related phosphatase in TNF-α– or IL-6–treated explants from lean subjects were comparable with those found in adipose tissue samples from morbidly obese subjects. These insulin component expression levels were reverted with CASP3/7 inhibition in these TNF-α– or IL-6–treated explants. CONCLUSIONS Body fat mass increase is associated with CASP3/7 and BCL2 expression in adipose tissue. Moreover, this proapoptotic state correlated with insulin signaling, suggesting its potential contribution to the development of insulin resistance. PMID:23193206

  14. Assessment of bioburden on human and animal tissues: part 2--results of testing of human tissue and qualification of a composite sample for routine bioburden determination.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, John B; Merritt, Karen; Gocke, David; Osborne, Joel

    2012-08-01

    A quantitative method was developed and validated to assess bioburden on tissue from human donors and to compare bioburden determination results to swab culture results from the same donor. An initial study with allograft tissue from 101 donors showed a wide range of bioburden levels; values from no colony-forming units (CFU) detected to >28,000 CFU were observed. Tissues from donors that had swab cultures negative for objectionable microorganisms generally had lower bioburden than tissues from donors where objectionable microorganisms were recovered by swab culturing. In a follow-up study with 1,445 donors, a wide range of bioburden levels was again observed on tissues from donors that were swab culture negative for objectionable microorganisms. Tissues from 885 (61%) of these donors had no recoverable bioburden (<2 CFU). Importantly, tissues from 560 (39%) of the donors had recoverable bioburden which ranged from 1 to >24,000 CFU. Identification of bioburden isolates showed a diversity of genera and species. In compliance with the recent revision of the American Association of Tissue Banks K2.210 Standard, the quantitative bioburden determination method was validated with a composite tissue sample that contains bone and soft tissue sections tested together in one extraction vessel. A recovery efficiency of 68% was validated and the composite sample was shown to be representative of all of the tissues recovered from a donor. The use of the composite sample in conjunction with the quantitative bioburden determination method will facilitate an accurate assessment of the numbers and types of contaminating microorganisms on allografts prior to disinfection/sterilization. This information will ensure that disinfection/sterilization processes are properly validated and the capability of the overall allograft process is understood on a donor by donor basis.

  15. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  16. Genes overexpressed in different human solid cancers exhibit different tissue-specific expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Bock Axelsen, Jacob; Lotem, Joseph; Sachs, Leo; Domany, Eytan

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression in different normal human tissues and different types of solid cancers derived from these tissues. The cancers analyzed include brain (astrocytoma and glioblastoma), breast, colon, endometrium, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, prostate, skin, and thyroid cancers. Comparing gene expression in each normal tissue to 12 other normal tissues, we identified 4,917 tissue-selective genes that were selectively expressed in different normal tissues. We also identified 2,929 genes that are overexpressed at least 4-fold in the cancers compared with the normal tissue from which these cancers were derived. The overlap between these two gene groups identified 1,340 tissue-selective genes that are overexpressed in cancers. Different types of cancers, including different brain cancers arising from the same lineage, showed differences in the tissue-selective genes they overexpressed. Melanomas overexpressed the highest number of brain-selective genes and this may contribute to melanoma metastasis to the brain. Of all of the genes with tissue-selective expression, those selectively expressed in testis showed the highest frequency of genes that are overexpressed in at least two types of cancer. However, colon and prostate cancers did not overexpress any testis-selective gene. Nearly all of the genes with tissue-selective expression that are overexpressed in cancers showed selective expression in tissues different from the cancers' tissue of origin. Cancers aberrantly expressing such genes may acquire phenotypic alterations that contribute to cancer cell viability, growth, and metastasis. PMID:17664417

  17. Design Principles for Engineering of Tissues from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matthys, Oriane B.; Hookway, Tracy A.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) technologies have enabled the engineering of human tissue constructs for developmental studies, disease modeling, and drug screening platforms. In vitro tissue formation can be generally described at three levels of cellular organization. Multicellular hPSC constructs are initially formed either with polymeric scaffold materials or simply via self-assembly, adhesive mechanisms. Heterotypic interactions within hPSC tissue constructs can be achieved by physically mixing independently differentiated cell populations or coaxed to simultaneously co-emerge from a common population of undifferentiated cells. Higher order tissue architecture can be engineered by imposing external spatial constraints, such as molds and scaffolds, or depend upon cell-driven organization that exploits endogenous innate developmental mechanisms. The multicellular, heterogeneous, and highly organized structure of hPSC constructs ultimately dictates the resulting form and function of in vitro engineered human tissue models. PMID:27330934

  18. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) pilot analysis: Multitissue gene regulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the functional consequences of genetic variation, and how it affects complex human disease and quantitative traits, remains a critical challenge for biomedicine. We present an analysis of RNA sequencing data from 1641 samples across 43 tissues from 175 individuals, generated as part of the pilot phase of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We describe the landscape of gene expression across tissues, catalog thousands of tissue-specific and shared regulatory expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) variants, describe complex network relationships, and identify signals from genome-wide association studies explained by eQTLs. These findings provide a systematic understanding of the cellular and biological consequences of human genetic variation and of the heterogeneity of such effects among a diverse set of human tissues. PMID:25954001

  19. Epithelial-connective tissue boundary in the oral part of the human soft palate

    PubMed Central

    PAULSEN, FRIEDRICH; THALE, ANDREAS

    1998-01-01

    The papillary layer of the oral part of the human soft palate was studied in 31 subjects of different age by means of histological, immunohistochemical and scanning electron microscopical methods. For scanning electron microscopy a new maceration method was introduced. Results determine epithelial thickness, height and density of connective tissue papillae and their 3-dimensional architecture inside the lining epithelium as well as the collagenous arrangement of the openings of the glandular ducts. The individual connective tissue papillae of the soft palate are compared with the connective tissue boundary on the other side of the oral cavity. The connective tissue plateaux carrying a variable number of connective tissue papillae were found to be the basic structural units of the papillary body. The function of the epithelial-connective tissue interface and the extracellular matrix arrangement in the lamina propria are discussed in order to promote the comparability of normal with pathologically altered human soft palates. PMID:9877301

  20. The adult brain tissue response to hollow fiber membranes of varying surface architecture with or without cotransplanted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning

    A variety of biomaterials have been chronically implanted into the central nervous system (CNS) for repair or therapeutic purposes. Regardless of the application, chronic implantation of materials into the CNS induces injury and elicits a wound healing response, eventually leading to the formation of a dense extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich scar tissue that is associated with the segregation of implanted materials from the surrounding normal tissue. Often this reaction results in impaired performance of indwelling CNS devices. In order to enhance the performance of biomaterial-based implantable devices in the CNS, this thesis investigated whether adult brain tissue response to implanted biomaterials could be manipulated by changing biomaterial surface properties or further by utilizing the biology of co-transplanted cells. Specifically, the adult rat brain tissue response to chronically implanted poly(acrylonitrile-vinylchloride) (PAN-PVC) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) of varying surface architecture were examined temporally at 2, 4, and 12 weeks postimplantation. Significant differences were discovered in the brain tissue response to the PAN-PVC HFMs of varying surface architecture at 4 and 12 weeks. To extend this work, whether the soluble factors derived from a co-transplanted cellular component further affect the brain tissue response to an implanted HFM in a significant way was critically exploited. The cells used were astrocytes, whose ability to influence scar formation process following CNS injury by physical contact with the host tissue had been documented in the literature. Data indicated for the first time that astrocyte-derived soluble factors ameliorate the adult brain tissue reactivity toward HFM implants in an age-dependent manner. While immature astrocytes secreted soluble factors that suppressed the brain tissue reactivity around the implants, mature astrocytes secreted factors that enhanced the gliotic response. These findings prove the feasibility

  1. Cryopreservation, Culture, and Transplantation of Human Fetal Mesencephalic Tissue into Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, D. E.; Naftolin, F.; Collier, T. J.; Leranth, C.; Robbins, R. J.; Sladek, C. D.; Roth, R. H.; Sladek, J. R.

    1988-11-01

    Studies in animals suggest that fetal neural grafts might restore lost neurological function in Parkinson's disease. In monkeys, such grafts survive for many months and reverse signs of parkinsonism, without attendant graft rejection. The successful and reliable application of a similar transplantation procedure to human patients, however, will require neural tissue obtained from human fetal cadavers, with demonstrated cellular identity, viability, and biological safety. In this report, human fetal neural tissue was successfully grafted into the brains of monkeys. Neural tissue was collected from human fetal cadavers after 9 to 12 weeks of gestation and cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. Viability after up to 2 months of storage was demonstrated by cell culture and by transplantation into monkeys. Cryopreservation and storage of human fetal neural tissue would allow formation of a tissue bank. The stored cells could then be specifically tested to assure their cellular identity, viability, and bacteriological and virological safety before clinical use. The capacity to collect and maintain viable human fetal neural tissue would also facilitate research efforts to understand the development and function of the human brain and provide opportunities to study neurological diseases.

  2. Linking microstructure and nanochemistry in human dental tissues.

    PubMed

    Srot, Vesna; Bussmann, Birgit; Salzberger, Ute; Koch, Christoph T; van Aken, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    Mineralized dental tissues and dental pulp were characterized using advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. Quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy was employed to determine the Ca/P and Mg/P concentration ratios. Significantly lower Ca/P concentration ratios were measured in peritubular dentine compared to intertubular dentine, which is accompanied by higher and variable Mg/P concentration ratios. There is strong evidence that magnesium is partially substituting calcium in the hydroxyapatite structure. Electron energy-loss near-edge structures (ELNES) of C-K and O-K from enamel and dentine are noticeably different. We observe a strong influence of beam damage on mineralized dental tissues and dental pulp, causing changes of the composition and consequently also differences in the ELNES. In this article, the importance of TEM sample preparation and specimen damage through electron irradiation is demonstrated.

  3. Analysis of variance in spectroscopic imaging data from human tissues.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Reddy, Rohith; Sinha, Saurabh; Bhargava, Rohit

    2012-01-17

    The analysis of cell types and disease using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is promising. The approach lacks an appreciation of the limits of performance for the technology, however, which limits both researcher efforts in improving the approach and acceptance by practitioners. One factor limiting performance is the variance in data arising from biological diversity, measurement noise or from other sources. Here we identify the sources of variation by first employing a high throughout sampling platform of tissue microarrays (TMAs) to record a sufficiently large and diverse set data. Next, a comprehensive set of analysis of variance (ANOVA) models is employed to analyze the data. Estimating the portions of explained variation, we quantify the primary sources of variation, find the most discriminating spectral metrics, and recognize the aspects of the technology to improve. The study provides a framework for the development of protocols for clinical translation and provides guidelines to design statistically valid studies in the spectroscopic analysis of tissue.

  4. Legal requirements for donating and retaining organs: the Human Tissue Act.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2006-10-01

    The Human Tissue Act 2004 came into force on 1 September 2006 and introduced significant changes in the way human body parts, tissue and organs are removed, stored and used. The Act seeks to remedy the poor availability of organs for transplant caused in part by laws that date back to the 17th Century and to right the concerns raised by the Liverpool Children's Inquiry that revealed widespread retention of organs by hospitals without permission. In this article Richard Griffith describes how consent is now the driving force underpinning such activity and how the wishes of the patient remain paramount even after death. He also outlines how the Human Tissue Authority will licence and inspect activities involving human tissue under the Act and discuss how the new law will affect district nurse practice.

  5. Production of tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry staining and digitalization within the human protein atlas.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Olsson, Ingmarie; Ryberg, Urban; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Pontén, Fredrik

    2012-05-31

    The tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides the means for high-throughput analysis of multiple tissues and cells. The technique is used within the Human Protein Atlas project for global analysis of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, cancer and cell lines. Here we present the assembly of 1 mm cores, retrieved from microscopically selected representative tissues, into a single recipient TMA block. The number and size of cores in a TMA block can be varied from approximately forty 2 mm cores to hundreds of 0.6 mm cores. The advantage of using TMA technology is that large amount of data can rapidly be obtained using a single immunostaining protocol to avoid experimental variability. Importantly, only limited amount of scarce tissue is needed, which allows for the analysis of large patient cohorts (1 2). Approximately 250 consecutive sections (4 μm thick) can be cut from a TMA block and used for immunohistochemical staining to determine specific protein expression patterns for 250 different antibodies. In the Human Protein Atlas project, antibodies are generated towards all human proteins and used to acquire corresponding protein profiles in both normal human tissues from 144 individuals and cancer tissues from 216 different patients, representing the 20 most common forms of human cancer. Immunohistochemically stained TMA sections on glass slides are scanned to create high-resolution images from which pathologists can interpret and annotate the outcome of immunohistochemistry. Images together with corresponding pathology-based annotation data are made publically available for the research community through the Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org) (Figure 1) (3 4). The Human Protein Atlas provides a map showing the distribution and relative abundance of proteins in the human body. The current version contains over 11 million images with protein expression data for 12.238 unique proteins, corresponding to more than 61% of all proteins

  6. Production of Tissue Microarrays, Immunohistochemistry Staining and Digitalization Within the Human Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Caroline; Olsson, IngMarie; Ryberg, Urban; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Pontén, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides the means for high-throughput analysis of multiple tissues and cells. The technique is used within the Human Protein Atlas project for global analysis of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, cancer and cell lines. Here we present the assembly of 1 mm cores, retrieved from microscopically selected representative tissues, into a single recipient TMA block. The number and size of cores in a TMA block can be varied from approximately forty 2 mm cores to hundreds of 0.6 mm cores. The advantage of using TMA technology is that large amount of data can rapidly be obtained using a single immunostaining protocol to avoid experimental variability. Importantly, only limited amount of scarce tissue is needed, which allows for the analysis of large patient cohorts 1 2. Approximately 250 consecutive sections (4 μm thick) can be cut from a TMA block and used for immunohistochemical staining to determine specific protein expression patterns for 250 different antibodies. In the Human Protein Atlas project, antibodies are generated towards all human proteins and used to acquire corresponding protein profiles in both normal human tissues from 144 individuals and cancer tissues from 216 different patients, representing the 20 most common forms of human cancer. Immunohistochemically stained TMA sections on glass slides are scanned to create high-resolution images from which pathologists can interpret and annotate the outcome of immunohistochemistry. Images together with corresponding pathology-based annotation data are made publically available for the research community through the Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org) (Figure 1) 3 4. The Human Protein Atlas provides a map showing the distribution and relative abundance of proteins in the human body. The current version contains over 11 million images with protein expression data for 12.238 unique proteins, corresponding to more than 61% of all proteins

  7. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-μm-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation.

  8. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining.

  9. Biomechanical Characterization of Human Soft Tissues Using Indentation and Tensile Testing

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michelle; Premakumar, Yaami; Seifalian, Alexander; Butler, Peter Edward; Szarko, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine aims to engineer materials to replace or restore damaged or diseased organs. The mechanical properties of such materials should mimic the human tissues they are aiming to replace; to provide the required anatomical shape, the materials must be able to sustain the mechanical forces they will experience when implanted at the defect site. Although the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered scaffolds are of great importance, many human tissues that undergo restoration with engineered materials have not been fully biomechanically characterized. Several compressive and tensile protocols are reported for evaluating materials, but with large variability it is difficult to compare results between studies. Further complicating the studies is the often destructive nature of mechanical testing. Whilst an understanding of tissue failure is important, it is also important to have knowledge of the elastic and viscoelastic properties under more physiological loading conditions. This report aims to provide a minimally destructive protocol to evaluate the compressive and tensile properties of human soft tissues. As examples of this technique, the tensile testing of skin and the compressive testing of cartilage are described. These protocols can also be directly applied to synthetic materials to ensure that the mechanical properties are similar to the native tissue. Protocols to assess the mechanical properties of human native tissue will allow a benchmark by which to create suitable tissue-engineered substitutes. PMID:28060331

  10. The effect of postmortem time on the RNA quality of human ocular tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Jin; Sprehe, Nicholas; Morganti, Ashley; Wordinger, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Profiling gene expression in human ocular tissues provides invaluable information for understanding ocular biology and investigating numerous ocular diseases. Accurate measurement of gene expression requires high-quality RNA, which often is a challenge with postmortem ocular tissues. Methods We examined the effect of various death to preservation (DP) times on the RNA quality of ten different ocular tissues. We used 16 eyes from eight different human donors. The eyes were preserved immediately in RNAlater or preserved after initial storage at 4 °C to create a range of DP times from 2 to 48 h. Ten ocular tissues were dissected from each eye. After total RNA was extracted from each dissected ocular tissue, the RNA integrity number (RIN) was determined using an Agilent Bioanalyzer. Results The RIN values from corneal and trabecular meshwork tissues were significantly (p<0.05) higher than those from the ciliary body at an earlier DP time (<6 h), but were not different among all tissues after 8 h. Interestingly, the RIN values from non-vascularized tissues were significantly (p=0.0002) higher than those from vascularized ocular tissues at early DP times (<6 h). The RIN value from the cornea was significantly (p<0.05) higher at short DP times compared to longer DP times. The RIN values from corneal tissues were significantly correlated to DP time according to regression analysis (p<0.05). Conclusions In this study, we determined RNA quality from postmortem ocular tissues with various DP times. Our results emphasize the need for rapid preservation and processing of postmortem human donor eye tissues, especially for vascularized ocular tissues. PMID:23805035

  11. Three-dimensional tissues using human pluripotent stem cell spheroids as biofabrication building blocks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haishuang; Li, Qiang; Lei, Yuguo

    2017-03-13

    A recently emerged approach for tissue engineering is to biofabricate tissues using cellular spheroids as building blocks. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), can be cultured to generate large numbers of cells and presumably be differentiated into all the cell types of human body in vitro, thus are ideal cell source for biofabrication. We previously developed a hydrogel-based cell culture system that can economically produce large numbers of hPSC spheroids. With hPSCs and this culture system, there are two potential methods to biofabricate a desired tissue. In Method 1, hPSC spheroids are first utilized to biofabricate a hPSC tissue that is subsequently differentiated into the desired tissue. In Method 2, hPSC spheroids are first converted into tissue spheroids in the hydrogel-based culture system and the tissue spheroids are then utilized to biofabricate the desired tissue. In this paper, we systematically measured the fusion rates of hPSC spheroids without and with differentiation toward cortical and midbrain dopaminergic neurons and found spheroids' fusion rates dropped sharply as differentiation progressed. We found Method 1 was appropriated for biofabricating neural tissues.

  12. Current good tissue practice for human cell, tissue, and cellular and tissue-based product establishments; inspection and enforcement. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2004-11-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring human cell, tissue, and cellular and tissue-based product (HCT/P) establishments to follow current good tissue practice (CGTP), which governs the methods used in, and the facilities and controls used for, the manufacture of HCT/Ps; recordkeeping; and the establishment of a quality program. The agency is also issuing new regulations pertaining to labeling, reporting, inspections, and enforcement that will apply to manufacturers of those HCT/Ps regulated solely under the authority of the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act), and not as drugs, devices, and/or biological products. The agency's actions are intended to improve protection of the public health while keeping regulatory burden to a minimum, which in turn would encourage significant innovation.

  13. Immunomodulatory properties of human adult and fetal multipotent mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Min; Yen, Men-Luh; Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Yen, B-Linju

    2011-07-18

    In recent years, a large number of studies have contributed to our understanding of the immunomodulatory mechanisms used by multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Initially isolated from the bone marrow (BM), MSCs have been found in many tissues but the strong immunomodulatory properties are best studied in BM MSCs. The immunomodulatory effects of BM MSCs are wide, extending to T lymphocytes and dendritic cells, and are therapeutically useful for treatment of immune-related diseases including graft-versus-host disease as well as possibly autoimmune diseases. However, BM MSCs are very rare cells and require an invasive procedure for procurement. Recently, MSCs have also been found in fetal-stage embryo-proper and extra-embryonic tissues, and these human fetal MSCs (F-MSCs) have a higher proliferative profile, and are capable of multilineage differentiation as well as exert strong immunomodulatory effects. As such, these F-MSCs can be viewed as alternative sources of MSCs. We review here the current understanding of the mechanisms behind the immunomodulatory properties of BM MSCs and F-MSCs. An increase in our understanding of MSC suppressor mechanisms will offer insights for prevalent clinical use of these versatile adult stem cells in the near future.

  14. Differential HMG-CoA lyase expression in human tissues provides clues about 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Puisac, Beatriz; Arnedo, María; Casale, Cesar H.; Ribate, María Pilar; Castiella, Tomás; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Ribes, Antonia; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Casals, Nuria; Hegardt, Fausto G.

    2010-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria is a rare human autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL). This mitochondrial enzyme catalyzes the common final step of leucine degradation and ketogenesis. Acute symptoms include vomiting, seizures and lethargy, accompanied by metabolic acidosis and hypoketotic hypoglycaemia. Such organs as the liver, brain, pancreas, and heart can also be involved. However, the pathophysiology of this disease is only partially understood. We measured mRNA levels, protein expression and enzyme activity of human HMG-CoA lyase from liver, kidney, pancreas, testis, heart, skeletal muscle, and brain. Surprisingly, the pancreas is, after the liver, the tissue with most HL activity. However, in heart and adult brain, HL activity was not detected in the mitochondrial fraction. These findings contribute to our understanding of the enzyme function and the consequences of its deficiency and suggest the need for assessment of pancreatic damage in these patients. PMID:20532825

  15. FTIR microscopic comparative study on normal, premalignant, and malignant tissues of human intenstine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordechai, Shaul; Argov, Shmuel; Salman, Ahmad O.; Cohen, Beny; Ramesh, Jagannathan; Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Goldstein, Jed; Sinelnikov, Igor

    2000-07-01

    Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) employs a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathology based on the characteristic molecular vibrational spectra of the tissue. The architectural changes in the cellular and sub-cellular levels developing in abnormal tissue, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest themselves in different optical signatures, which can be detected in infrared spectroscopy. The biological systems we have studied include normal, premalignant (polyp) and malignant human colonic tissues from three patients. Our method is based on microscopic infrared study (FTIR-microscopy) of thin tissue specimens and a direct comparison with normal histopathological analysis, which serves as a `gold' reference. The normal intestine tissue has a stronger absorption than polyp and cancerous types over a wide region in all three cases. The detailed analysis showed that there is a significant decrease in total phosphate and creatine contents for polyp and cancerous tissue types in comparison to the controls.

  16. Assumed non-persistent environmental chemicals in human adipose tissue; matrix stability and correlation with levels measured in urine and serum.

    PubMed

    Artacho-Cordón, F; Arrebola, J P; Nielsen, O; Hernández, P; Skakkebaek, N E; Fernández, M F; Andersson, A M; Olea, N; Frederiksen, H

    2017-03-22

    The aim of this study was to (1) optimize a method for the measurement of parabens and phenols in adipose tissue, (2) evaluate the stability of chemical residues in adipose tissue samples, and (3) study correlations of these compounds in urine, serum, and adipose tissue. Samples were obtained from adults undergoing trauma surgery. Nine phenols and seven parabens were determined by isotope diluted TurboFlow-LC-MS/MS. The analytical method showed good accuracy and precision. Limits of detection (LOD) for parabens and phenols ranged from 0.05 to 1.83ng/g tissue. Good recovery rates were found, even when biological samples remained defrosted up to 24h. Benzophenone-3 (BP-3; range of values: tissue) and methylparaben (MeP; tissue) were detected in >70% of adipose tissue samples, while bisphenol-A (BPA; tissue) and 2-phenylphenol (2-PP; tissue) were detected in >40% of adipose tissue samples. In general, levels were similar between adipose tissue and serum, while a correlation between adipose tissue and urine was only found for BP-3. In conclusion, adipose tissue samples in this study were found to contain environmental chemicals considered to be non-persistent, whose levels were weakly or not at all correlated with the urine burden. Therefore, adipose tissue may potentially provide additional information to that obtained from other biological matrices. Further investigations are warranted to explore whether adipose tissue might be a suitable matrix for assessment of the consequences for human health of mid/long-term exposure to these chemicals.

  17. Immunoreactivity of thymosin beta 4 in human foetal and adult genitourinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Nemolato, S.; Cabras, T.; Fanari, M.U.; Cau, F.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Manconi, B.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2010-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) is a member of the beta-thymosins family, a family of peptides playing essential roles in many cellular functions. Our recent studies suggested Tβ4 plays a key role in the development of human salivary glands and the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to analy