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Sample records for adult internet users

  1. Associations of eHealth Literacy With Health Behavior Among Adult Internet Users

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Ai; Ishii, Kaori; Oka, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background In the rapidly developing use of the Internet in society, eHealth literacy—having the skills to utilize health information on the Internet—has become an important prerequisite for promoting healthy behavior. However, little is known about whether eHealth literacy is associated with health behavior in a representative sample of adult Internet users. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the association between eHealth literacy and general health behavior (cigarette smoking, physical exercise, alcohol consumption, sleeping hours, eating breakfast, eating between meals, and balanced nutrition) among adult Internet users in Japan. Methods The participants were recruited among registrants of a Japanese Internet research service company and asked to answer a cross-sectional Internet-based survey in 2012. The potential respondents (N=10,178) were randomly and blindly invited via email from the registrants in accordance with the set sample size and other attributes. eHealth literacy was assessed using the Japanese version of the eHealth Literacy Scale. The self-reported health behaviors investigated included never smoking cigarettes, physical exercise, alcohol consumption, sleeping hours, eating breakfast, not eating between meals, and balanced nutrition. We obtained details of sociodemographic attributes (sex, age, marital status, educational attainment, and household income level) and frequency of conducting Internet searches. To determine the association of each health behavior with eHealth literacy, we performed a logistic regression analysis; we adjusted for sociodemographic attributes and frequency of Internet searching as well as for other health behaviors that were statistically significant with respect to eHealth literacy in univariate analyses. Results We analyzed the data of 2115 adults (response rate: 24.04%, 2142/10,178; male: 49.74%, 1052/2115; age: mean 39.7, SD 10.9 years) who responded to the survey. Logistic regression analysis

  2. Older Adults' Knowledge of Internet Hazards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Galen A.; Hough, Michelle G.; Mazur, Elizabeth; Signorella, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Older adults are less likely to be using computers and less knowledgeable about Internet security than are younger users. The two groups do not differ on trust of Internet information. The younger group shows no age or gender differences. Within the older group, computer users are more trusting of Internet information, and along with those with…

  3. The Internet Guide for New Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dern, Daniel P.

    This guide will help the new user get started on the Internet. It explains what the Internet is, how to use it, and how to think like an Internet user. Part 1, "Ramping Up, Getting Started," covers the basics of getting access to the Internet and general information about it. It includes a review of the history and technology of the Internet, some…

  4. Distance Learning for Mobile Internet Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Necat, Beran

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on the current state of art in the field of Distance learning for mobile users. It mentions a large range of technologies, services and approaches that may be used to bring distance learning to mobile internet users. These technologies are supposed to considerably increase innovative e-learning solutions for the…

  5. Emotional Maturity of Internet Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dangwal, Kiran Lata; Srivastava, Shipra

    2016-01-01

    Internet has been emerged as a most powerful tool for communication and exchange of information all over the world. More recently the web 2.0 tools has provoked a revolution and unlocked a new dimension in the field of communication and technology; this ongoing digital revolution has touched and turned almost every sphere of life of its users…

  6. Chinese older adults' Internet use for health information.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen K M; Yeung, Dannii Y; Ho, Henry C Y; Tse, Kin-Po; Lam, Chun-Yiu

    2014-04-01

    Technological advancement benefits Internet users with the convenience of social connection and information search. This study aimed at investigating the predictors of Internet use to search for online health information among Chinese older adults. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was applied to examine the predictiveness of perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and attitudes toward Internet use on behavioral intention to search for health information online. Ninety-eight Chinese older adults were recruited from an academic institute for older people and community centers. Frequency of Internet use and physical and psychological health were also assessed. Results showed that perceived ease of use and attitudes significantly predicted behavioral intention of Internet use. The potential influences of traditional Chinese values and beliefs in health were also discussed. PMID:24717738

  7. Chinese older adults' Internet use for health information.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen K M; Yeung, Dannii Y; Ho, Henry C Y; Tse, Kin-Po; Lam, Chun-Yiu

    2014-04-01

    Technological advancement benefits Internet users with the convenience of social connection and information search. This study aimed at investigating the predictors of Internet use to search for online health information among Chinese older adults. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was applied to examine the predictiveness of perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and attitudes toward Internet use on behavioral intention to search for health information online. Ninety-eight Chinese older adults were recruited from an academic institute for older people and community centers. Frequency of Internet use and physical and psychological health were also assessed. Results showed that perceived ease of use and attitudes significantly predicted behavioral intention of Internet use. The potential influences of traditional Chinese values and beliefs in health were also discussed.

  8. The Association between Internet User Characteristics and Dimensions of Internet Addiction among Greek Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreou, Eleni; Svoli, Hionia

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how internet users' psychological characteristics, amount of internet use and demographic factors contribute to particular dimensions of internet addiction. The sample consisted of 384 adolescents, ranging in age from 15 to 18 years. Participants were asked to complete the Internet Addiction Test (IAT), measures of Locus of…

  9. IDnet Mesh: Towards User Accountability for the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Leiwen

    2010-01-01

    The current Internet architecture hides a user's real identity by design, which is an important factor contributing to the Internet's great success. However, as the Internet is quickly moving towards the mainstream of the societies nowadays, it is also raising tremendous problems on a daily basis, simply because there are no effective means to…

  10. Investigating internet use by mental health service users: interview study.

    PubMed

    Powell, John; Clarke, Aileen

    2007-01-01

    The internet is an increasingly important source of mental health-related information, and has the potential to be harnessed as a tool to support self-care and informed decision-making. Yet little is known about the motivations and attitudes of users. We therefore undertook a qualitative interview study with a purposive sample of mental health service users with internet experience, to explore issues with respect to mental health-related internet use. One of the prime motivations for online mental health seekers was to find experiential information from other people with similar problems. This information allowed users to know they were not alone, and to instill hope that others in the same situation had recovered. Benefits of the internet as an information source included convenience, privacy and anonymity. Problems related more to misuse of the internet rather than concerns over inaccuracy. Such qualitative work is important in an emerging research area to understand internet use better.

  11. Classifying Internet Pathological Users: Their Usage, Internet Sensation Seeking, and Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Sunny S. J.

    A study was conducted to identify pathological Internet users and to reveal their psychological features and problematic usage patterns. One thousand and fifty Taiwanese undergraduates were selected. An Internet Addiction Scale was adopted to classify 648 students into 4 clusters. The 146 users in the 4th cluster, who reported significantly higher…

  12. Cross-sectional survey of users of Internet depression communities

    PubMed Central

    Powell, John; McCarthy, Noel; Eysenbach, Gunther

    2003-01-01

    Background Internet-based depression communities provide a forum for individuals to communicate and share information and ideas. There has been little research into the health status and other characteristics of users of these communities. Methods Online cross-sectional survey of Internet depression communities to identify depressive morbidity among users of Internet depression communities in six European countries; to investigate whether users were in contact with health services and receiving treatment; and to identify user perceived effects of the communities. Results Major depression was highly prevalent among respondents (varying by country from 40% to 64%). Forty-nine percent of users meeting criteria for major depression were not receiving treatment, and 35% had no consultation with health services in the previous year. Thirty-six percent of repeat community users who had consulted a health professional in the previous year felt that the Internet community had been an important factor in deciding to seek professional help. Conclusions There are high levels of untreated and undiagnosed depression in users of Internet depression communities. This group represents a target for intervention. Internet communities can provide information and support for stigmatizing conditions that inhibit more traditional modes of information seeking. PMID:14664725

  13. The Internet for Educators: A User's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Brian D.; Dharm, Matthew

    1995-01-01

    Presents a practical guide to use of the Internet. Topics discussed include getting connected; the UNIX operating system; electronic mail; FTP (File Transfer Protocol); Finger; Telnet; Archie; Veronica; Gopher; teacher education; the Yanoff List; and expansion of the Internet. (three references) (LRW)

  14. From Internet User to Cyberspace Citizen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Ippei

    1997-01-01

    Discusses social and cultural challenges that Internet technology raises. Highlights include preserving the freedom in cyberspace, the information distribution scheme of the Internet, two-way interactivity, search engines as marketing tools, the insecurity of cyberspace, online safety rules for children, educating children to "walk alone" in…

  15. User Perspectives of the Future of the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Trevor

    This paper presents user perspectives on the future of the Internet. The first section discusses understanding users, including the difference between technology service offerings and potential uses, the need for investigation into the relationship between new communications technology and social behavior, and the shift from supply-led development…

  16. The Third Annual NASA Science Internet User Working Group Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lev, Brian S. (Editor); Gary, J. Patrick (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) User Support Office (USO) sponsored the Third Annual NSI User Working Group (NSIUWG) Conference March 30 through April 3, 1992, in Greenbelt, MD. Approximately 130 NSI users attended to learn more about the NSI, hear from projects which use NSI, and receive updates about new networking technologies and services. This report contains material relevant to the conference; copies of the agenda, meeting summaries, presentations, and descriptions of exhibitors. Plenary sessions featured a variety of speakers, including NSI project management, scientists, and NSI user project managers whose projects and applications effectively use NSI, and notable citizens of the larger Internet community. The conference also included exhibits of advanced networking applications; tutorials on internetworking, computer security, and networking technologies; and user subgroup meetings on the future direction of the conference, networking, and user services and applications.

  17. Physiological markers of biased decision-making in problematic Internet users.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidou, Maria; Fraser, Danaë Stanton; Hinvest, Neal

    2016-09-01

    Background and aims Addiction has been reliably associated with biased emotional reactions to risky choices. Problematic Internet use (PIU) is a relatively new concept and its classification as an addiction is debated. Implicit emotional responses were measured in individuals expressing nonproblematic and problematic Internet behaviors while they made risky/ambiguous decisions to explore whether they showed similar responses to those found in agreed-upon addictions. Methods The design of the study was cross sectional. Participants were adult Internet users (N = 72). All testing took place in the Psychophysics Laboratory at the University of Bath, UK. Participants were given the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) which provides an index of an individual's ability to process and learn probabilities of reward and loss. Integration of emotions into current decision-making frameworks is vital for optimal performance on the IGT and thus, skin conductance responses (SCRs) to reward, punishment, and in anticipation of both were measured to assess emotional function. Results Performance on the IGT did not differ between the groups of Internet users. However, problematic Internet users expressed increased sensitivity to punishment as revealed by stronger SCRs to trials with higher punishment magnitude. Discussion and conclusions PIU seems to differ on behavioral and physiological levels with other addictions. However, our data imply that problematic Internet users were more risk-sensitive, which is a suggestion that needs to be incorporated into in any measure and, potentially, any intervention for PIU. PMID:27554505

  18. Dynamics of hate based Internet user networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobkowicz, P.; Sobkowicz, A.

    2010-02-01

    We present a study of the properties of network of political discussions on one of the most popular Polish Internet forums. This provides the opportunity to study the computer mediated human interactions in strongly bipolar environment. The comments of the participants are found to be mostly disagreements, with strong percentage of invective and provocative ones. Binary exchanges (quarrels) play significant role in the network growth and topology. Statistical analysis shows that the growth of the discussions depends on the degree of controversy of the subject and the intensity of personal conflict between the participants. This is in contrast to most previously studied social networks, for example networks of scientific citations, where the nature of the links is much more positive and based on similarity and collaboration rather than opposition and abuse. The work discusses also the implications of the findings for more general studies of consensus formation, where our observations of increased conflict contradict the usual assumptions that interactions between people lead to averaging of opinions and agreement.

  19. Internet user profile in the field of parasitology.

    PubMed

    Vorbeck-Meister, I; Hassl, A; Vorbeck, F; Rotter, M

    2001-01-01

    This study determined a profile of current Internet users in parasitology, their use patterns on the Internet for parasitologic purposes, and the Web sites they would recommend. In a European survey, 689 parasitologically engaged scientists were asked to fill out a questionnaire about Internet access, current problems, current and future use, and which Web sites they would recommend as well as about the use of e-mail. In all, 153 (22.2%) of the interviewees returned the questionnaire. Only one participant had no access to the Internet. Time expenditure was considered the main problem involved in use of the Internet. The Internet was mainly used for e-mail (96.1%); for literature research (93.5%); for reading of electronic journals (51.6%); and for gathering of information, e.g., about institutes and colleagues (58.2%) and about congresses (49.7%). In the future, 71.9% of the respondents would like to read electronic journals more often and 49.7% would like to use the web more intensively for acquisition of information about congresses, universities, and institutions. Requests for the future included an easier application of the browser software (33%) and a shorter response time (47.7%). The survey demonstrates that the Internet has assumed a definite place in the lives of researchers in the field of parasitology. Survey responses indicate a need for electronic journals. In our opinion, universities and parasitology societies should be urged to publish journals electronically on the Web. To diminish current problems involved in the finding of relevant information on the Internet, we strongly recommend careful reading of the instructions regarding the search engines used. Web pages with clear structures, small file sizes, precise HTML (hypertext markup language) key-word editing, and page titles would facilitate more accurate discovery of specific sites. In addition, there seems to be a need for regular publication of reviewed parasitology-link collections.

  20. User Acceptance of Internet Banking Service in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenyuen, Yee; Yeow, P. H. P.

    The study is the first research in Malaysia that investigates user acceptance of Internet banking service (IBS) based on Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology model (Venkatesh, Morris, Davis and Davis, 2003). Two hundred and eighty questionnaires were distributed and collected from two major cities, Kuala Lumpur and Melaka. Descriptive statistics was used to analyse the data. The results show that Malaysians have intentions of using IBS (mean rating of close to 4.00). Moreover, Malaysians recognize the benefits of IBS by giving a high mean rating (close to 4.00) to performance expectancy. However, they give relative low mean ratings (close to 3.00) on other indicators of Behavioural Intention to Use IBS such as effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions and perceived credibility. Recommendations were given to promote a safe, efficient and conducive environment for user adoption of Internet banking.

  1. Risk Factors of Internet Addiction among Internet Users: An Online Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Yi; Lee, Ming-Been; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chang, Li-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds Internet addiction (IA) has become a major public health issue worldwide and is closely linked to psychiatric disorders and suicide. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of IA and its associated psychosocial and psychopathological determinants among internet users across different age groups. Methods The study was a cross-sectional survey initiated by the Taiwan Suicide Prevention Center. The participants were recruited from the general public who responded to the online questionnaire. They completed a series of self-reported measures, including Chen Internet Addiction Scale-revised (CIAS-R), Five-item Brief Symptom Rating Scale (BSRS-5), Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI), and questions about suicide and internet use habits. Results We enrolled 1100 respondents with a preponderance of female subjects (85.8%). Based on an optimal cutoff for CIAS-R (67/68), the prevalence rate of IA was 10.6%. People with higher scores of CIAS-R were characterized as: male, single, students, high neuroticism, life impairment due to internet use, time for internet use, online gaming, presence of psychiatric morbidity, recent suicide ideation and past suicide attempts. Multiple regression on IA showed that age, gender, neuroticism, life impairment, internet use time, and BSRS-5 score accounted for 31% of variance for CIAS-R score. Further, logistic regression showed that neuroticism, life impairment and internet use time were three main predictors for IA. Compared to those without IA, the internet addicts had higher rates of psychiatric morbidity (65.0%), suicide ideation in a week (47.0%), lifetime suicide attempts (23.1%), and suicide attempt in a year (5.1%). Conclusion Neurotic personality traits, psychopathology, time for internet use and its subsequent life impairment were important predictors for IA. Individuals with IA may have higher rates of psychiatric morbidity and suicide risks. The findings provide important information for further

  2. Comparison of national and personal identity between person with internet addiction disorder and normal internet users

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Jannatifard, Fereshte; Maracy, Mohammad R.; Alaghemandan, Hamed; Setare, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds: The present study was carried out in order to compare national and personal identity and their subscales in internet addicts and nonaddicts. Materials and Methods: This study was a descriptive-analytical research, and was carried out on 384 student internet users in different universities in the city of Isfahan who were selected using quota sampling. Subjects completed the questionnaires, then, subscales of personal and national identity questionnaires in internet addict and nonaddict were analyzed via SPSS16 software. Results: Results indicated a significant difference between the scores of national identity and personal identity as well as all subscales in internet addicts and nonaddicts, except for national heritage and homeland defence factors. In addition, there was a negative and significant relationship between addiction to internet and personal and national identity, except for the fourth and fifth factors of national identity (viewpoints of others considering the national group and homeland defence). Moreover, after controlling for the sex variable, internet addiction had an effect on personal and national identity. Conclusion: The findings of this research indicate that an excess of internet use and overinvolvement in cyberspace and the addiction to them, could be associated with defects in some aspects of national and personal identity. PMID:25013835

  3. Correlates of, and barriers to, Internet use among older adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, Janet; McAllister, Carolyn; McCaslin, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Older adults constitute the group with the greatest increase in Internet usage in the past decade; however, usage varies greatly within this population. Services to older adults require a current understanding of Internet-use trends. This study utilized a quantitative survey method to examine correlates of, and barriers to, current Internet use in a demographically diverse county in Southern California. Findings indicate that the presence of a computer at home, a job requiring computer use, age, education, and ethnicity are important factors in predicting Internet use in older adults. Implications for social work practice with older adults is discussed.

  4. Evaluating Websites for Older Adults: Adherence to "Senior-Friendly" Guidelines and End-User Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, T. A.; Chaparro, B. S.; Halcomb, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Older adults in the US are the fastest-growing demographic, and also the largest-growing group of internet users. The aim of this research was to evaluate websites designed for older adults in terms of (1) how well they adhere to "senior-friendly" guidelines and (2) overall ease of use and satisfaction. In Experiment I, 40 websites designed for…

  5. Identification and Characterization of Adolescent Internet User's Profiles.

    PubMed

    Rial, Antonio; Gómez, Patricia; Picón, Eduardo; Braña, Teresa; Varela, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The percentages of adolescent Internet use in general terms have been measured for nearly two decades now; however, it might be thought that not every teenager behaves online in the same way. This study aims to identify the different types or profiles of adolescents and to characterize them from an attitudinal, behavioral and socio-demographic viewpoint. A questionnaire was applied to a representative sample of 2,339 Compulsory Secondary School students (M = 13.77 years old) from Galicia (a North-Western region of Spain) for this purpose. A two-stage cluster analysis, based on the response pattern in relation to their attitudes toward Internet, was carried out. Four different segments with specific characteristics were identified: the first steppers, the trainees, the sensible users, and the heavy users. Besides the relevance of descriptive data, these results are of particular interest at an applied level, because they could lead to a better fit of programs to prevent risky behaviors and problematic Internet use in adolescents.

  6. HEALTH INSURANCE INFORMATION-SEEKING BEHAVIORS AMONG INTERNET USERS: AN EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS TO INFORM POLICIES.

    PubMed

    Erlyana, Erlyana; Acosta-Deprez, Veronica; O'Lawrence, Henry; Sinay, Tony; Ramirez, Jeremy; Jacot, Emmanuel C; Shim, Kyuyoung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore characteristics of Internet users who seek health insurance information online, as well as factors affecting their behaviors in seeking health insurance information. Secondary data analysis was conducted using data from the 2012 Pew Internet Health Tracking Survey. Of 2,305 Internet user adults, only 29% were seeking health insurance information online. Bivariate analyses were conducted to test differences in characteristics of those who seek health insurance information online and those who do not. A logistic regression model was used to determine significant predictors of health insurance information-seeking behavior online. Findings suggested that factors such as being a single parent, having a high school education or less, and being uninsured were significant and those individuals were less likely to seek health insurance information online. Being a family caregiver of an adult and those who bought private health insurance or were entitled to Medicare were more likely to seek health insurance information online than non-caregivers and the uninsured. The findings suggested the need to provide quality health insurance information online is critical for both the insured and uninsured population.

  7. Energy utilities in the Internet and NII: Users or providers?

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, R.J.; Cavallini, J.S.; Scott, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    In its bid to respond to evolving business requirements, the energy utility industry is exploring new ways to provide cost effective quality energy to its constituency while concurrently reducing the need for additional generation plants, consumption of non-renewable fuel resources, and generation of emissions. Their options cover a full spectrum that includes the utilities providing the ``last mile`` access to its customers for both generic internet access required for empowering the users as well as supporting the necessary utility applications. In one scenario the Energy utilities provide high speed NII access to both residences and industry over utility owned infrastructure in order to obtain the level off reliability they need as well as providing the infrastructure necessary to support real time energy supply and consumption management. In a second scenario, the energy utilities make use of a combination of their own infrastructure and that of existing service providers, such as cable and telecommunications companies to satisfy the same set of requirements. Either scenario can greatly increase the number of active nodes on the National Information Infrastructure (NII) and the Global Information Infrastructure (GII); and therefore have a large impact on the network. This paper will outline the major areas and issues with respect to (1) the energy utilities use and possible provision of network services, (2) the current major business and regulatory issues, (3) the technical challenges facing an utility company wishing to use the Internet, NII, and GII to support both its internal and customer based communications needs; and (4) explore what models and technologies are required by both the utilities and their customers (e.g. premises LAN, the gateway to the premises, and the utility infrastructure) to support both energy demand management and possibly generic Internet/NII/GII access to the end user.

  8. Alexithymia components in excessive internet users: a multi-factorial analysis.

    PubMed

    Kandri, Theodora A; Bonotis, Konstantinos S; Floros, Georgios D; Zafiropoulou, Maria M

    2014-12-15

    The increasing use of computers and the internet - especially among young people - apart from its positive effects, sometimes leads to excessive and pathological use. The present study examined the relationship among the excessive use of the internet by university students, the alexithymia components and sociodemographic factors associated with internet users and their online activities. 515 university students from the University of Thessaly participated in the study. Participants anonymously completed: a) the Internet Addiction Test (IAT), b) the Toronto Alexithymia Test (TAS 20) and c) a questionnaire covering various aspects of internet use and demographic characteristics of internet users. Excessive use of the internet among Greek university students was studied within a multi-factorial context and was associated with the alexithymia and demographic factors in nonlinear correlations, forming thus a personalized emotional and demographic profile of the excessive internet users.

  9. Prevalence of internet addiction and its association with stressful life events and psychological symptoms among adolescent internet users.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Yu, Yizhen; Du, Yukai; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Dongying; Wang, Jiaji

    2014-03-01

    Internet addiction (IA) among adolescents is a serious public health problem around the world. However, there have been few studies that examine the association between IA and stressful life events and psychological symptoms among Chinese adolescent internet users. We examined the association between IA and stressful life events and psychological symptoms among a random sample of school students who were internet users (N=755) in Wuhan, China. Internet addiction, stressful life events, coping style and psychological symptoms were measured by self-rated scales. The prevalence rate of internet addiction was 6.0% among adolescent internet users. Logistic regression analyses indicated that stressors from interpersonal problem and school related problem and anxiety symptoms were significantly associated with IA after controlling for demographic characteristics. Analyses examining the coping style with the IA revealed that negative coping style may mediate the effects of stressful life events to increase the risk of IA. However, no significant interaction of stressful life events and psychological symptoms was found. These findings of the current study indicate a high prevalence of internet addiction among Chinese adolescent internet users and highlight the importance of stressors from interpersonal problem and school related problem as a risk factor for IA which mainly mediated through negative coping style.

  10. Adult Literacy, the Internet, and NCAL: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rethemeyer, R. Karl

    This document provides information on two services established on the Internet by the National Center on Adult Literacy (NCAL): electronic mail (e-mail) communication with NCAL and a Gopher server that makes it possible to access and download information, documents, and software relevant to adult literacy. A recent "NCAL Connections" article,…

  11. The Effect of Limited Health Literacy on How Internet Users Learn About Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yom-Tov, Elad; Marino, Barbara; Pai, Jennifer; Harris, Dawn; Wolf, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The Internet continues to be an important supplemental health information resource for an increasing number of U.S. adults, especially for those with a new or existing chronic condition. Here we examine how people use the Internet to learn about Type 2 diabetes and how health literacy (HL) influences this information-seeking behavior. We analyzed the searches of approximately 2 million people who queried for diabetes-related information on Microsoft's Bing search engine. The HL of searchers was imputed through a community-based HL score. Topics searched were categorized and subsequent websites were assessed for readability. Overall, diabetes information-seeking strategies via the Internet are similar among adults with limited and adequate HL skills. However, people with limited HL take a longer time to read pages that are quickly read by people with adequate HL and vice versa. Information seeking among the former is terminated prematurely, as is evident from a Hidden Markov Model of the search process. Our findings indicate that the reading level required to understand the majority of diabetes-related information is high. Especially on government websites, more than 80% of information requires a reading level corresponding to 7th grade or higher. Our results indicate that individuals with lower HL may disproportionately struggle with Internet searches and fail to get an equivalent benefit from this information resource compared to users with greater HL. Future interventions should target the quality and ease of navigation of health care websites and find ways to leverage other relevant professionals to encourage and promote successful information access on the Web. PMID:27684112

  12. The Effect of Limited Health Literacy on How Internet Users Learn About Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yom-Tov, Elad; Marino, Barbara; Pai, Jennifer; Harris, Dawn; Wolf, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The Internet continues to be an important supplemental health information resource for an increasing number of U.S. adults, especially for those with a new or existing chronic condition. Here we examine how people use the Internet to learn about Type 2 diabetes and how health literacy (HL) influences this information-seeking behavior. We analyzed the searches of approximately 2 million people who queried for diabetes-related information on Microsoft's Bing search engine. The HL of searchers was imputed through a community-based HL score. Topics searched were categorized and subsequent websites were assessed for readability. Overall, diabetes information-seeking strategies via the Internet are similar among adults with limited and adequate HL skills. However, people with limited HL take a longer time to read pages that are quickly read by people with adequate HL and vice versa. Information seeking among the former is terminated prematurely, as is evident from a Hidden Markov Model of the search process. Our findings indicate that the reading level required to understand the majority of diabetes-related information is high. Especially on government websites, more than 80% of information requires a reading level corresponding to 7th grade or higher. Our results indicate that individuals with lower HL may disproportionately struggle with Internet searches and fail to get an equivalent benefit from this information resource compared to users with greater HL. Future interventions should target the quality and ease of navigation of health care websites and find ways to leverage other relevant professionals to encourage and promote successful information access on the Web.

  13. Identifying Problematic Internet Users: Development and Validation of the Internet Motive Questionnaire for Adolescents (IMQ-A)

    PubMed Central

    Bischof-Kastner, Christina; Kuntsche, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Internationally, up to 15.1% of intensive Internet use among adolescents is dysfunctional. To provide a basis for early intervention and preventive measures, understanding the motives behind intensive Internet use is important. Objective This study aims to develop a questionnaire, the Internet Motive Questionnaire for Adolescents (IMQ-A), as a theory-based measurement for identifying the underlying motives for high-risk Internet use. More precisely, the aim was to confirm the 4-factor structure (ie, social, enhancement, coping, and conformity motives) as well as its construct and concurrent validity. Another aim was to identify the motivational differences between high-risk and low-risk Internet users. Methods A sample of 101 German adolescents (female: 52.5%, 53/101; age: mean 15.9, SD 1.3 years) was recruited. High-risk users (n=47) and low-risk users (n=54) were identified based on a screening measure for online addiction behavior in children and adolescents (Online-Suchtverhalten-Skala, OSVK-S). Here, “high-risk” Internet use means use that exceeds the level of intensive Internet use (OSVK-S sum score ≥7). Results The confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the IMQ-A’s 4-factor structure. A reliability analysis revealed good internal consistencies of the subscales (.71 up to .86). Moreover, regression analyses confirmed that the enhancement and coping motive groups significantly predicted high-risk Internet consumption and the OSVK-S sum score. A mixed-model ANOVA confirmed that adolescents mainly access the Internet for social motives, followed by enhancement and coping motives, and that high-risk users access the Internet more frequently for coping and enhancement motives than low-risk users. Low-risk users were primarily motivated socially. Conclusions The IMQ-A enables the assessment of motives related to adolescent Internet use and thus the identification of populations at risk. The questionnaire enables the development of preventive

  14. Internet use and looking up information online in adults with epilepsy varies by epilepsy status--2013 National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Us Centers For Disease Control And Prevention Epilepsy Program

    2016-01-01

    We estimated US national prevalences of Internet use and looking up health information online among adults with epilepsy and those without, overall (age-standardized) and by three age groups (18-44, 45-59, and ≥60years) using the 2013 National Health Interview Survey. Results showed that both overall and across all age groups, a significantly lower percentage of adults with active epilepsy reported using the Internet compared with that of adults without epilepsy. However, among Internet users, the percentage of looking up health information online did not differ by epilepsy status or age. Ensuring access to the Internet and encouraging use of quality, secure, and easy-to-access resources and e-tools might help adults with epilepsy to optimize their self-management and improve their quality of life.

  15. Older adults and political participation on the Internet: a cross-cultural comparison of the USA and China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Jaeger, Paul T

    2008-03-01

    Older adults are not only lagging behind in terms of physical access to the Internet but also in engaging in political activities in the online environment. The findings from two independent studies bridging the USA and China suggest that older adults, even when they have access to the Internet, have ambivalent or negative attitudes toward political activities online. As political participation is seen as one of the key social benefits of the Internet and many governments are moving interactions with citizens into the online environment through e-government, the hesitance of older adults to engage in political participation via the Internet is a significant social and political issue that deserves further study and discussion internationally. This paper reviews the social impact of the Internet on political participation and the possible forms of political participation among older Internet users, examining the data from the two studies in terms of the parallel issues of older adults' attitudes toward political participation online and different cultural understandings of political participation. The findings from the comparison of the data are examined and the growing importance of this area of study is detailed. Ultimately, this paper offers suggestions for future research in the area of older adults, political participation, and the Internet.

  16. Teaching internet use to adult learners: The LANL experience

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Comstock, D.

    1995-12-01

    The Research library at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been teaching an Internet class to adult learners since May 1994. The class is a team effort, combining lecture/demo with hands-on practice using Gopher and the World Wide Web. What started out as a small short-term project has become a weekly class available to any Lab employee or associate. More than 250 people have been taught to find basic reference materials and to navigate the Internet on the Gopher and World Wide Web. The class is one of the first classes offered by the Research Library to be filled every month, and one Laboratory group has recommended that their staff attend this class in preparation for more advanced Internet and HTML classes as part of their group training. The success of this class spurred development by the Research Library of more specific subject classes using Internet resources, specifically business and general science resources.

  17. 47 CFR 64.613 - Numbering directory for Internet-based TRS users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CFR 64.604(a)(5)(iii), may compensate the TRS Numbering Administrator for the reasonable costs of... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Numbering directory for Internet-based TRS... for Internet-based TRS users. (a) TRS Numbering Directory. (1) The TRS Numbering Directory...

  18. 47 CFR 64.613 - Numbering directory for internet-based TRS users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR 64.604(a)(5)(iii), may compensate the TRS Numbering Administrator for the reasonable costs of... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Numbering directory for internet-based TRS... for internet-based TRS users. (a) TRS Numbering Directory. (1) The TRS Numbering Directory...

  19. 47 CFR 64.613 - Numbering directory for Internet-based TRS users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CFR 64.604(a)(5)(iii), may compensate the TRS Numbering Administrator for the reasonable costs of... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Numbering directory for Internet-based TRS... for Internet-based TRS users. (a) TRS Numbering Directory. (1) The TRS Numbering Directory...

  20. 47 CFR 64.613 - Numbering directory for Internet-based TRS users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CFR 64.604(a)(5)(iii), may compensate the TRS Numbering Administrator for the reasonable costs of... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Numbering directory for Internet-based TRS... for Internet-based TRS users. (a) TRS Numbering Directory. (1) The TRS Numbering Directory...

  1. 47 CFR 64.613 - Numbering directory for Internet-based TRS users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CFR 64.604(a)(5)(iii), may compensate the TRS Numbering Administrator for the reasonable costs of... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Numbering directory for Internet-based TRS... for Internet-based TRS users. (a) TRS Numbering Directory. (1) The TRS Numbering Directory...

  2. A Comparative Analysis of User Preferences for for Major Internet Based Education Media in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Chunyang; Jiang, Yanqing

    2014-01-01

    Internet based education media are developing at an amazing rate and being seen as an upstart that will likely take the place of traditional education means worldwide in the future. This paper presents the results of a comparative analysis on user preferences for four major categories of internet-based media used in China. In this paper, we first…

  3. Teaching Internet Use to Adult Learners: The LANL Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sharon; Comstock, Dan

    The Research Library at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been teaching an Internet class to adult learners since May 1994. The weekly class combines lecture, personal anecdote, and teacher demonstration with hands-on practice using Gopher and the World Wide Web. The class, open to any Lab employee or associate, has provided 250 people…

  4. Internet Gambling Among Community Adults and University Students in Macao.

    PubMed

    Wu, Anise M S; Lai, Mark H C; Tong, Kwok-Kit

    2015-09-01

    Despite the high availability of offline gambling in Macao, China, Internet gambling may remain attractive to many gamblers due to its anonymity and convenience. Given the scarcity of relevant research, this study aims to not only investigate the public attitude and prevalence of Internet gambling but also identify the demographic and psychological characteristics of Internet gamblers in Macao. We recruited 952 community adults with the random residential number dialing method and 427 university students through convenience sampling. Only 5.4% of the community adult respondents preferred online gambling compared to offline gambling, and the past-year prevalence of online gambling was about 1%. As hypothesized, Internet gambling was found to be positively associated with pathological gambling in both community and student samples. It was also associated with casino employment across samples. Moreover, we found that male gender, casino employment, materialism, and life dissatisfaction were significant risk factors of pathological gambling among Chinese gamblers. The findings provide insights on future designs of preventive measures and research direction for Internet gambling and pathological gambling in Chinese communities.

  5. Digital Divides and Socio-Demographic Factors: A Longitudinal Quantitative Study of Internet Users in U.S. from 2000 to 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    This research attempted to reveal the existence of digital divides, their relationships to users' socio-demographics, and the Internet adoption and usage patterns. It was a longitudinal investigation targeted to the adults eighteen years or older in the household setting from the nation-wide surveys conducted in the United States between 2000…

  6. A Comparative Study of Library Surveys of Internet Users at Seton Hall University in 1998 and 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bao, Xue-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Compares data collected in library surveys of Internet users at Seton Hall University in 1998 and 2001 to provide information on changes in library users' Internet use behavior, satisfaction levels, and problems in using the Internet. Discusses use of the university library home page; search strategies; and search training. (Author/LRW)

  7. Coping with Loneliness: Young Adult Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokach, Ami; Orzeck, Tricia

    Since there appears to be a connection between substance use (and abuse) and loneliness it is of theoretical and clinical interest to explore the differences of coping with loneliness which drug users employ. The present study examined the manner in which MDMA (Ecstasy) users in comparison with non-MDMA (Non-Ecstasy) users and the general…

  8. Proceedings of the Second Annual NASA Science Internet User Working Group Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Lenore A. (Editor); Gary, J. Patrick (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Copies of the agenda, list of attendees, meeting summaries, and all presentations and exhibit material are contained. Included are plenary sessions, exhibits of advanced networking applications, and user subgroup meetings on NASA Science Internet policy, networking, security, and user services and applications topics.

  9. Use of and Satisfaction with Sources of Health Information among Older Internet Users and Nonusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taha, Jessica; Sharit, Joseph; Czaja, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Older adults generally have an increased need for health care information. Whereas some use the Internet to look for this information, others use more traditional sources. This study gathered data from older adults to determine their health information needs, the perceived usefulness of sources of health information, and if there are…

  10. The Effectiveness of Commercial Internet Web Sites: A User's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Hudson; Tang, Nelson K. H.

    1998-01-01

    A user survey of 60 company Web sites (electronic commerce, entertainment and leisure, financial and banking services, information services, retailing and travel, and tourism) determined that 30% had facilities for conducting online transactions and only 7% charged for site access. Overall, Web sites were rated high in ease of access, content, and…

  11. Adult heavy and low users of dental services: treatment provided.

    PubMed

    Nihtilä, Annamari; Widström, Eeva; Elonheimo, Outi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare treatment provided to adult heavy and low users of dental services in the Finnish Public Dental Service (PDS) and to analyse changes in patients' oral health status. We assigned all adults who attended the PDS in Espoo in 2004 to a group of heavy users (n = 3,173) if they had made six or more dental visits and to a comparison group of low users (n = 22,820), if they had made three or fewer dental visits. Data were obtained from the patient register of the PDS. A sample of 320 patients was randomly selected from each group. Baseline information (year 2004) on age, sex, number and types of visits, oral health status and treatment provided was collected from treatment records. Both groups were followed-up for five years. Restorative treatment measures dominated the heavy and low users'treatments; 88.8% of heavy users and 79.6% low users had received restorations during the five-year period. Fixed prosthetic treatments were provided to just 2% of the heavy users and 0.8% of the low users. Emergency visits were more common for heavy users (74.8%) than for low users (21.6%) (p < 0.001). Fewer than half of the heavy (46.1%) or low (46.5%) users were examined twice. Typical for heavy use of oral health services was a cycle of repetitive repair or replacement of restorations, often as emergency treatment, a lack of proper examinations and preventive care; crown therapy was seldom used. Immediately after the major dental care reform in Finland, the PDS in Espoo had problems providing good quality dental care for the new adult patients. Older patients with lower social class background were not accustomed to regular dental care and the PDS did not actively propose proper comprehensive regular care for adults.

  12. Adult heavy and low users of dental services: treatment provided.

    PubMed

    Nihtilä, Annamari; Widström, Eeva; Elonheimo, Outi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare treatment provided to adult heavy and low users of dental services in the Finnish Public Dental Service (PDS) and to analyse changes in patients' oral health status. We assigned all adults who attended the PDS in Espoo in 2004 to a group of heavy users (n = 3,173) if they had made six or more dental visits and to a comparison group of low users (n = 22,820), if they had made three or fewer dental visits. Data were obtained from the patient register of the PDS. A sample of 320 patients was randomly selected from each group. Baseline information (year 2004) on age, sex, number and types of visits, oral health status and treatment provided was collected from treatment records. Both groups were followed-up for five years. Restorative treatment measures dominated the heavy and low users'treatments; 88.8% of heavy users and 79.6% low users had received restorations during the five-year period. Fixed prosthetic treatments were provided to just 2% of the heavy users and 0.8% of the low users. Emergency visits were more common for heavy users (74.8%) than for low users (21.6%) (p < 0.001). Fewer than half of the heavy (46.1%) or low (46.5%) users were examined twice. Typical for heavy use of oral health services was a cycle of repetitive repair or replacement of restorations, often as emergency treatment, a lack of proper examinations and preventive care; crown therapy was seldom used. Immediately after the major dental care reform in Finland, the PDS in Espoo had problems providing good quality dental care for the new adult patients. Older patients with lower social class background were not accustomed to regular dental care and the PDS did not actively propose proper comprehensive regular care for adults. PMID:27464379

  13. User information seeking behaviour: perceptions and reality. An evaluation of the WHO Labresources Internet portal.

    PubMed

    Madle, Gemma; Berger, Anouk; Cognat, Sebastien; Menna, Sylvio; Kostkova, Patty

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation on Internet portals is a key component of any online resource development. Understanding user information seeking behaviour and user perceived behaviour is essential to obtain the full picture of user needs, online activities and draw lessons to improve the design of Internet portals to better meet user expectations. This article discusses the evaluation of a WHO Internet portal: the Labresources website. The evaluation investigates user satisfaction with the resource, usability, demographic information about users and how well they could complete specific tasks using the website and compared this with the actual online behaviour revealing a number of discrepancies. An online questionnaire was advertised on the Labresources website during the period 25 November 2005 to 20 February 2006. As the site caters to English and French speakers, the questionnaire was made available in both languages. It consisted of two sections - the first section required the participant to complete three tasks using the website whereas the second section tested user satisfaction, information needs and appropriateness of the content. Weblogs data were compared with the questionnaire results to compare user perceived and actual online behaviour. Twenty one respondents completed the online questionnaire from a total of 18 countries. This was out of a potential 60 website users among whom the questionnaire was promoted. In general, respondents were satisfied with the website layout and navigation. 61.9% of respondents listed WHO among their top 5 and a third listed the Labresources website. The number of sessions where users browse (146) the information resources is almost three times more than the number of users who search (52) the resources. Weblogs revealed most interesting results with differences between what users reported doing when completing tasks and how easy they perceived the tasks and what they actually did. Twelve respondents completed at least one task. Of the

  14. Understanding Older Adults' Perceptions of Internet Use: An Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Robert; Spears, Jeffrey; Luptak, Marilyn; Wilby, Frances

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined factors related to older adults' perceptions of Internet use. Three hundred ninety five older adults participated in the study. The factor analysis revealed four factors perceived by older adults as critical to their Internet use: social connection, self-efficacy, the need to seek financial information, and the need to…

  15. Crafting Self Identity in a Virtual Community: Chinese Internet Users and Their Political Sense Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Robert G.; Wu, Yan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the construction of virtual community identities among Chinese internet users and their motivation for lurking, posting or flaming. Design/methodology/approach: Taking Qiangguo Luntan as an online study site the authors apply an ethnographic approach for the research, a method that is becoming more…

  16. Impact of Internet Search Engines on OPAC Users: A Study of Punjabi University, Patiala (India)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Shiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to study the impact of internet search engine usage with special reference to OPAC searches in the Punjabi University Library, Patiala, Punjab (India). Design/methodology/approach: The primary data were collected from 352 users comprising faculty, research scholars and postgraduate students of the university. A…

  17. Designing User Interfaces for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Douglas; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Of 45 adults over 50 who had computer experience, 44% reported difficulty reading screens, 53% were frustrated by complex software, and 27% had difficulty with the mouse. The physical characteristics of aging should be considered in designing special software features such as dynamic text resizing and menu buttons instead of pull-down menus. (SK)

  18. Are Internet use and video-game-playing addictive behaviors? Biological, clinical and public health implications for youths and adults

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Yvonne H. C.; Crowley, Michael J.; Mayes, Linda C.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Internet use and video-game playing are experiencing rapid growth among both youth and adult populations. Research suggests that a minority of users experience symptoms traditionally associated with substance-related addictions. Mental health professionals, policy makers and the general public continue to debate the issue of Internet addiction (IA) and problematic video-game playing (PVG). This review identifies existing studies into the clinical and biological characteristics of these disorders that may help guide decisions as to whether or not IA and PVG should be grouped together with substance use disorders (SUDs). PMID:24288435

  19. Are Internet use and video-game-playing addictive behaviors? Biological, clinical and public health implications for youths and adults.

    PubMed

    Yau, Yvonne H C; Crowley, Michael J; Mayes, Linda C; Potenza, Marc N

    2012-09-01

    Internet use and video-game playing are experiencing rapid growth among both youth and adult populations. Research suggests that a minority of users experience symptoms traditionally associated with substance-related addictions. Mental health professionals, policy makers and the general public continue to debate the issue of Internet addiction (IA) and problematic video-game playing (PVG). This review identifies existing studies into the clinical and biological characteristics of these disorders that may help guide decisions as to whether or not IA and PVG should be grouped together with substance use disorders (SUDs).

  20. Systematic review and meta-analysis of Internet interventions for smoking cessation among adults

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Amanda L; Carpenter, Kelly M; Cha, Sarah; Cole, Sam; Jacobs, Megan A; Raskob, Margaret; Cole-Lewis, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of Internet interventions in promoting smoking cessation among adult tobacco users relative to other forms of intervention recommended in treatment guidelines. Methods This review followed Cochrane Collaboration guidelines for systematic reviews. Combinations of “Internet,” “web-based,” and “smoking cessation intervention” and related keywords were used in both automated and manual searches. We included randomized trials published from January 1990 through to April 2015. A modified version of the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool was used. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) for each study. Meta-analysis was conducted using random-effects method to pool RRs. Presentation of results follows the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Results Forty randomized trials involving 98,530 participants were included. Most trials had a low risk of bias in most domains. Pooled results comparing Internet interventions to assessment-only/waitlist control were significant (RR 1.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–2.21, I2=51.7%; four studies). Pooled results of largely static Internet interventions compared to print materials were not significant (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.63–1.10, I2=0%; two studies), whereas comparisons of interactive Internet interventions to print materials were significant (RR 2.10, 95% CI 1.25–3.52, I2=41.6%; two studies). No significant effects were observed in pooled results of Internet interventions compared to face-to-face counseling (RR 1.35, 95% CI 0.97–1.87, I2=0%; four studies) or to telephone counseling (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.79–1.13, I2=0%; two studies). The majority of trials compared different Internet interventions; pooled results from 15 such trials (24 comparisons) found a significant effect in favor of experimental Internet interventions (RR 1.16, 95% CI 1.03–1.31, I2=76.7%). Conclusion Internet

  1. Community Structure of a Mental Health Internet Support Group: Modularity in User Thread Participation

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Julia; Bennett, Kylie; Bennett, Anthony; Cunningham, John Alastair; Griffiths, Kathleen Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the community structure of mental health Internet support groups, quantitatively. A greater understanding of the factors, which lead to user interaction, is needed to explain the design information of these services and future research concerning their utility. Objective A study was conducted to determine the characteristics of users associated with the subgroup community structure of an Internet support group for mental health issues. Methods A social network analysis of the Internet support group BlueBoard (blueboard.anu.edu.au) was performed to determine the modularity of the community using the Louvain method. Demographic characteristics age, gender, residential location, type of user (consumer, carer, or other), registration date, and posting frequency in subforums (depression, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, panic disorder, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, borderline personality disorder, eating disorders, carers, general (eg, “chit chat”), and suggestions box) of the BlueBoard users were assessed as potential predictors of the resulting subgroup structure. Results The analysis of modularity identified five main subgroups in the BlueBoard community. Registration date was found to be the largest contributor to the modularity outcome as observed by multinomial logistic regression. The addition of this variable to the final model containing all other factors improved its classification accuracy by 46.3%, that is, from 37.9% to 84.2%. Further investigation of this variable revealed that the most active and central users registered significantly earlier than the median registration time in each group. Conclusions The five subgroups resembled five generations of BlueBoard in distinct eras that transcended discussion about different mental health issues. This finding may be due to the activity of highly engaged and central users who communicate with many other users. Future research should seek to determine

  2. Musical FAVORS: Reintroducing music to adult cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Plant, Geoff

    2015-09-01

    Music represents a considerable challenge for many adult users of cochlear implants (CIs). Around half of adult CI users report that they do not find music enjoyable, and, in some cases, despite enhanced speech perception skills, this leads to considerable frustration and disappointment for the CI user. This paper presents suggestions to improve the musical experiences of deafened adults with CIs. Interviews with a number of adult CI users revealed that there were a number of factors which could lead to enhanced music experiences. The acronym FAVORS (familiar music, auditory-visual access, open-mindedness, and simple arrangements) summarizes the factors that have been identified, which can help CI users in their early music listening experiences. Each of these factors is discussed in detail, along with suggestions for how they can be used in therapy sessions. The use of a group approach (music focus groups) is also discussed and an overview of the approach and exercises used is presented. The importance of live music experiences is also discussed.

  3. Musical FAVORS: Reintroducing music to adult cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Plant, Geoff

    2015-09-01

    Music represents a considerable challenge for many adult users of cochlear implants (CIs). Around half of adult CI users report that they do not find music enjoyable, and, in some cases, despite enhanced speech perception skills, this leads to considerable frustration and disappointment for the CI user. This paper presents suggestions to improve the musical experiences of deafened adults with CIs. Interviews with a number of adult CI users revealed that there were a number of factors which could lead to enhanced music experiences. The acronym FAVORS (familiar music, auditory-visual access, open-mindedness, and simple arrangements) summarizes the factors that have been identified, which can help CI users in their early music listening experiences. Each of these factors is discussed in detail, along with suggestions for how they can be used in therapy sessions. The use of a group approach (music focus groups) is also discussed and an overview of the approach and exercises used is presented. The importance of live music experiences is also discussed. PMID:26561887

  4. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of internet addiction in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Sepede, Gianna; Tavino, Margherita; Santacroce, Rita; Fiori, Federica; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies pertaining internet addiction disorder (IAD) in young adults. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review on PubMed, focusing our attention on fMRI studies involving adult IAD patients, free from any comorbid psychiatric condition. The following search words were used, both alone and in combination: fMRI, internet addiction, internet dependence, functional neuroimaging. The search was conducted on April 20th, 2015 and yielded 58 records. Inclusion criteria were the following: Articles written in English, patients’ age ≥ 18 years, patients affected by IAD, studies providing fMRI results during resting state or cognitive/emotional paradigms. Structural MRI studies, functional imaging techniques other than fMRI, studies involving adolescents, patients with comorbid psychiatric, neurological or medical conditions were excluded. By reading titles and abstracts, we excluded 30 records. By reading the full texts of the 28 remaining articles, we identified 18 papers meeting our inclusion criteria and therefore included in the qualitative synthesis. RESULTS: We found 18 studies fulfilling our inclusion criteria, 17 of them conducted in Asia, and including a total number of 666 tested subjects. The included studies reported data acquired during resting state or different paradigms, such as cue-reactivity, guessing or cognitive control tasks. The enrolled patients were usually males (95.4%) and very young (21-25 years). The most represented IAD subtype, reported in more than 85% of patients, was the internet gaming disorder, or videogame addiction. In the resting state studies, the more relevant abnormalities were localized in the superior temporal gyrus, limbic, medial frontal and parietal regions. When analyzing the task related fmri studies, we found that less than half of the papers reported behavioral differences between patients and normal controls, but all of them found significant

  5. Cybersex addiction in heterosexual female users of internet pornography can be explained by gratification hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Laier, Christian; Pekal, Jaro; Brand, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    In the context of Internet addiction, cybersex is considered to be an Internet application in which users are at risk for developing addictive usage behavior. Regarding males, experimental research has shown that indicators of sexual arousal and craving in response to Internet pornographic cues are related to severity of cybersex addiction in Internet pornography users (IPU). Since comparable investigations on females do not exist, the aim of this study is to investigate predictors of cybersex addiction in heterosexual women. We examined 51 female IPU and 51 female non-Internet pornography users (NIPU). Using questionnaires, we assessed the severity of cybersex addiction in general, as well as propensity for sexual excitation, general problematic sexual behavior, and severity of psychological symptoms. Additionally, an experimental paradigm, including a subjective arousal rating of 100 pornographic pictures, as well as indicators of craving, was conducted. Results indicated that IPU rated pornographic pictures as more arousing and reported greater craving due to pornographic picture presentation compared with NIPU. Moreover, craving, sexual arousal rating of pictures, sensitivity to sexual excitation, problematic sexual behavior, and severity of psychological symptoms predicted tendencies toward cybersex addiction in IPU. Being in a relationship, number of sexual contacts, satisfaction with sexual contacts, and use of interactive cybersex were not associated with cybersex addiction. These results are in line with those reported for heterosexual males in previous studies. Findings regarding the reinforcing nature of sexual arousal, the mechanisms of learning, and the role of cue reactivity and craving in the development of cybersex addiction in IPU need to be discussed. PMID:25080011

  6. Cybersex addiction in heterosexual female users of internet pornography can be explained by gratification hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Laier, Christian; Pekal, Jaro; Brand, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    In the context of Internet addiction, cybersex is considered to be an Internet application in which users are at risk for developing addictive usage behavior. Regarding males, experimental research has shown that indicators of sexual arousal and craving in response to Internet pornographic cues are related to severity of cybersex addiction in Internet pornography users (IPU). Since comparable investigations on females do not exist, the aim of this study is to investigate predictors of cybersex addiction in heterosexual women. We examined 51 female IPU and 51 female non-Internet pornography users (NIPU). Using questionnaires, we assessed the severity of cybersex addiction in general, as well as propensity for sexual excitation, general problematic sexual behavior, and severity of psychological symptoms. Additionally, an experimental paradigm, including a subjective arousal rating of 100 pornographic pictures, as well as indicators of craving, was conducted. Results indicated that IPU rated pornographic pictures as more arousing and reported greater craving due to pornographic picture presentation compared with NIPU. Moreover, craving, sexual arousal rating of pictures, sensitivity to sexual excitation, problematic sexual behavior, and severity of psychological symptoms predicted tendencies toward cybersex addiction in IPU. Being in a relationship, number of sexual contacts, satisfaction with sexual contacts, and use of interactive cybersex were not associated with cybersex addiction. These results are in line with those reported for heterosexual males in previous studies. Findings regarding the reinforcing nature of sexual arousal, the mechanisms of learning, and the role of cue reactivity and craving in the development of cybersex addiction in IPU need to be discussed.

  7. An Investigation of the Integrated Model of User Technology Acceptance: Internet User Samples in Four Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusilier, Marcelline; Durlabhji, Subhash; Cucchi, Alain

    2008-01-01

    National background of users may influence the process of technology acceptance. The present study explored this issue with the new, integrated technology use model proposed by Sun and Zhang (2006). Data were collected from samples of college students in India, Mauritius, Reunion Island, and United States. Questionnaire methodology and…

  8. Secure Web-based Ground System User Interfaces over the Open Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, James H.; Murray, Henry L.; Hunt, Gary R.

    1998-01-01

    A prototype has been developed which makes use of commercially available products in conjunction with the Java programming language to provide a secure user interface for command and control over the open Internet. This paper reports successful demonstration of: (1) Security over the Internet, including encryption and certification; (2) Integration of Java applets with a COTS command and control product; (3) Remote spacecraft commanding using the Internet. The Java-based Spacecraft Web Interface to Telemetry and Command Handling (Jswitch) ground system prototype provides these capabilities. This activity demonstrates the use and integration of current technologies to enable a spacecraft engineer or flight operator to monitor and control a spacecraft from a user interface communicating over the open Internet using standard World Wide Web (WWW) protocols and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products. The core command and control functions are provided by the COTS Epoch 2000 product. The standard WWW tools and browsers are used in conjunction with the Java programming technology. Security is provided with the current encryption and certification technology. This system prototype is a step in the direction of giving scientist and flight operators Web-based access to instrument, payload, and spacecraft data.

  9. Visual illusions on the Internet: 15 years of change in technology and user behavior.

    PubMed

    Bach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Looking back over 15 years of demonstrating visual phenomena and optical illusions on the Internet, I will discuss two major topics. The first concerns the methodology used to present interactive visual experiments on the web, with respect to (a) wide accessibility, ie independent of browser and platform, (b) capable and elegant graphic user interface, (c) sufficient computational power, (d) ease of development and, finally, (e) future-proofing in an ever-changing online environment. The second major topic addresses some aspects of user behaviour, mainly temporal patterns (eg changes over weeks. years, long-term), which reveal that there are more visitors during office hours.

  10. The Mystery of the European Smile: A Comparison Based on Individual Photographs Provided by Internet Users

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze cross-cultural differences in preference for smiling among the users of one of the most popular instant messaging sites called Windows Live Messenger in terms of facial expression (smiling vs. non-smiling) on the photographs accompanying their profiles. 2,000 photos from 10 countries were rated by two independent judges. Despite the fact that 20 years have passed since the fall of the Berlin Wall, Internet users from a former Soviet bloc appear to smile less often than those from Western Europe. Also, replicating past research, women irrespective of their nationality smiled more than men. PMID:21057574

  11. The Systematic Development of an Internet-Based Smoking Cessation Intervention for Adults.

    PubMed

    Dalum, Peter; Brandt, Caroline Lyng; Skov-Ettrup, Lise; Tolstrup, Janne; Kok, Gerjo

    2016-07-01

    Objectives The objective of this project was to determine whether intervention mapping is a suitable strategy for developing an Internet- and text message-based smoking cessation intervention. Method We used the Intervention Mapping framework for planning health promotion programs. After a needs assessment, we identified important changeable determinants of cessation behavior, specified objectives for the intervention, selected theoretical methods for meeting our objectives, and operationalized change methods into practical intervention strategies. Results We found that "social cognitive theory," the "transtheoretical model/stages of change," "self-regulation theory," and "appreciative inquiry" were relevant theories for smoking cessation interventions. From these theories, we selected modeling/behavioral journalism, feedback, planning coping responses/if-then statements, gain frame/positive imaging, consciousness-raising, helping relationships, stimulus control, and goal-setting as suitable methods for an Internet- and text-based adult smoking cessation program. Furthermore, we identified computer tailoring as a useful strategy for adapting the intervention to individual users. Conclusion The Intervention Mapping method, with a clear link between behavioral goals, theoretical methods, and practical strategies and materials, proved useful for systematic development of a digital smoking cessation intervention for adults. PMID:27101996

  12. Chronic health conditions and internet behavioral interventions: a review of factors to enhance user engagement.

    PubMed

    Schubart, Jane R; Stuckey, Heather L; Ganeshamoorthy, Ambika; Sciamanna, Christopher N

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to review the evidence about what factors influence user engagement in Internet-based behavioral interventions for chronic illness. We conducted a systematic review of the recent published literature. Searches of MEDLINE (using Ovid and PubMed), The Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO, from January 2000 to December 2008, were completed. Additional articles were identified from searching the bibliographies of retrieved articles. We identified studies of interactive health communication interventions delivered via the Internet that, apart from delivering health information, had another component such as interactive tools to manage illness, decision support for treatment, or social support. We restricted the age range to adulthood. The search identified 186 abstracts; 46 articles were reviewed. We used a qualitative approach called "positive deviance" to study those interventions that have succeeded in engaging users where most have failed. Some ways to improve user engagement in Internet interventions suggested by our review include addressing health concerns that are important and relevant to an individual patient or consumer and an individualized approach, such as personally tailored advice and feedback. Interventions that are part of larger health management programs that include clinicians appear to be especially promising.

  13. Implementation of Internet Training on Posture Reform of Computer Users in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Keykhaie, Zohreh; Zareban, Iraj; Shahrakipoor, Mahnaz; Hormozi, Maryam; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Masoudi, Gholamreza; Rahimi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Musculoskeletal disorders are of common problems among computer (PC) users. Training of posture reform plays a significant role in the prevention of the emergence, progression and complications of these diseases. The present research was performed to study the effect of the Internet training on the posture reform of the Internet users working in two Iranian universities including Sistan and Baluchestan University and Islamic Azad University of Zahedan in 2014. Materials and Method: This study was a quasi-experimental intervention with control group and conducted in two Iranian universities including Sistan and Baluchestan University and Islamic Azad University of Zahedan. The study was done on 160 PC users in the two groups of intervention (80 people) and control (80 people). Training PowerPoint was sent to the intervention group through the Internet and a post test was given to them after 45 days. Statistical software of SPSS 19 and statistical tests of Kolmogrov, t-test, Fisher Exact test, and correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. Results: After the training, the mean scores of knowledge, attitude, performance and self-efficacy in the intervention group were 24.21 ± 1.34, 38.36 ± 2.89, 7.59 ± 1.16, and 45.06 ± 4.11, respectively (P <0.001). The mean scores of knowledge in the intervention group 5.45±2.81 and in the control group 1.20 ± 1.07 showed a significant change. Mean scores of attitude in the intervention group 3.60 ± 3.59 and in the control group 0.48± 1.03 showed a significant change as well. Mean scores of self-efficacy in the intervention group 14.83 ± 4.67 and in the control group 0.88 ± 1.93 indicated a significant change and mean scores of performance in the intervention group 5.28 ± 1.24 and in the control group 0.62 ± 0.73 indicated a significant change (P <0.001). Discussion: The results of the study showed that training through the Internet had a significant impact on the posture reform of the

  14. Within a Stone's Throw: Proximal Geolocation of Internet Users via Covert Wireless Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Nathanael R; Shue, Craig; Taylor, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    While Internet users may often believe they have anonymity online, a culmination of technologies and recent research may allow an adversary to precisely locate an online user s geophysical location. In many cases, such as peer-to-peer applications, an adversary can easily use a target s IP address to quickly obtain the general geographical location of the target. Recent research has scoped this general area to a 690m (0.43 mile) radius circle. In this work, we show how an adversary can exploit Internet communication for geophysical location by embedding covert signals in communication with a target on a remote wireless local area network. We evaluated the approach in two common real-world settings: a residential neighborhood and an apartment building. In the neighborhood case, we used a single-blind trial in which an observer located a target network to within three houses in less than 40 minutes. Directional antennas may have allowed even more precise geolocation. This approach had only a 0.38% false positive rate, despite 24,000 observed unrelated packets and many unrelated networks. This low rate allowed the observer to exclude false locations and continue searching for the target. Our results enable law enforcement or copyright holders to quickly locate online Internet users without requiring time-consuming subpoenas to Internet Service Providers. Other privacy use cases include rapidly locating individuals based on their online speech or interests. We hope to raise awareness of these issues and to spur discussion on privacy and geolocating techniques.

  15. Young adults as users of adult healthcare: experiences of young adults with complex or life-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Beresford, B; Stuttard, L

    2014-08-01

    Awareness is growing that young adults may have distinctive experiences of adult healthcare and that their needs may differ from those of other adult users. In addition, the role of adult health teams in supporting positive transitions from paediatrics is increasingly under discussion. This paper contributes to these debates. It reports a qualitative study of the experiences of young adults - all with complex chronic health conditions - as users of adult health services. Key findings from the study are reported, including an exploration of factors that help to explain interviewees' experiences. Study findings are discussed in the context of existing evidence from young adults in adult healthcare settings and theories of 'young adulthood'. Implications for training and practice are considered, and priorities for future research are identified.

  16. Intake of micronutrients among Danish adult users and non-users of dietary supplements

    PubMed Central

    Tetens, Inge; Biltoft-Jensen, Anja; Spagner, Camilla; Christensen, Tue; Gille, Maj-Britt; Bügel, Susanne; Banke Rasmussen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the intake of micronutrients from the diet and from supplements in users and non-users of dietary supplements, respectively, in a representative sample of the Danish adult population. A specific objective was to identify the determinants of supplement use. Design A cross-sectional representative national study of the intake of vitamins and minerals from the diet and from dietary supplements. Method The Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity, 2000–2004. Participants (n=4,479; 53% females) aged 18–75 years gave information about the use of dietary supplements in a personal interview. The quantification of the micronutrient contribution from supplements was estimated from a generic supplement constructed from data on household purchases. Nutrient intakes from the diet were obtained from a self-administered 7-day pre-coded dietary record. Median intakes of total nutrients from the diets of users and non-users of supplements were analysed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results Sixty percent of females and 51% of males were users of supplements. With the exception of vitamin D, the intake of micronutrients from the diet was adequate at the group level for all age and gender groups. Among females in the age group 18–49 years, the micronutrient intake from the diet was significantly higher compared with the non-users of dietary supplements. The use of dietary supplements increased with age and with ‘intention to eat healthy.’ Conclusion Intake of micronutrients from the diet alone was considered adequate for both users and non-users of dietary supplements. Younger females who were supplement users had a more micronutrient-dense diet compared to non-users. PMID:21909288

  17. The differing privacy concerns regarding exchanging electronic medical records of internet users in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hsin-Ginn; Han, Hwai-En; Kuo, Kuang-Ming; Liu, Chung-Feng

    2012-12-01

    This study explores whether Internet users have different privacy concerns regarding the information contained in electronic medical records (EMRs) according to gender, age, occupation, education, and EMR awareness. Based on the Concern for Information Privacy (CFIP) scale developed by Smith and colleagues in 1996, we conducted an online survey using 15 items in four dimensions, namely, collection, unauthorized access, secondary use, and errors, to investigate Internet users' concerns regarding the privacy of EMRs under health information exchanges (HIE). We retrieved 213 valid questionnaires. The results indicate that the respondents had substantial privacy concerns regarding EMRs and their educational level and EMR awareness significantly influenced their privacy concerns regarding unauthorized access and secondary use of EMRs. This study recommends that the Taiwanese government organizes a comprehensive EMR awareness campaign, emphasizing unauthorized access and secondary use of EMRs. Additionally, to cultivate the public's understanding of EMRs, the government should employ various media, especially Internet channels, to promote EMR awareness, thereby enabling the public to accept the concept and use of EMRs. People who are highly educated and have superior EMR awareness should be given a comprehensive explanation of how hospitals protect patients' EMRs from unauthorized access and secondary use to address their concerns. Thus, the public can comprehend, trust, and accept the use of EMRs, reducing their privacy concerns, which should facilitate the future implementation of HIE.

  18. Prescription drugs purchased through the internet: Who are the end users?

    PubMed Central

    Inciardi, James A.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Cicero, Theodore J.; Rosenblum, Andrew; Ahwah, Candice; Bailey, J. Elise; Dart, Richard C.; Burke, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Although prescription drugs are readily available on the Internet, little is known about the prevalence of Internet use for the purchase of medications without a legitimate prescription, and the characteristics of those that obtain non-prescribed drugs through online sources. The scientific literature on this topic is limited to anecdotal reports or studies plagued by small sample sizes. Within this context, the focus of this paper is an examination of five national data sets from the U.S. with the purpose of estimating: (1) how common obtaining prescription medications from the Internet actually is, (2) who are the typical populations of “end users” of these non-prescribed medications, and (3) which drugs are being purchased without a prescription. Three of the data sets are drawn from the RADARS® (Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance) System, a comprehensive series of studies designed to collect timely and geographically specific data on the abuse and diversion of a number of prescription stimulants and opioid analgesics. The remaining data sets include the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) and the Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey. Our analysis yielded uniformly low rates of prescription drug acquisition from online sources across all five data systems we examined. The consistency of this finding across very diverse populations suggests that the Internet is a relatively minor source for illicit purchases of prescription medications by the individual end-users of these drugs. PMID:20227199

  19. Lessons on Using Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemme, Bobbi; Donovan, Terri

    Intended for beginning Internet users and adult basic education instructors, this manual presents a very basic, instructional approach to exploring the Internet, with explicit instructions on what to do, places to go, and interesting things to try. An introduction on getting started is followed by sections on electronic mail, including using the…

  20. College female and male heavy internet users' profiles of practices and their academic grades and psychosocial adjustment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Yen; Tzeng, Jeng-Yi

    2010-06-01

    This study presents the profiles of heavy Internet users and provides empirical evidence that it is not how much time university students spend online but what they do online that is associated with academic grades and psychological adjustment. Using a nationally representative sample from Taiwan, we employed K-mean cluster analysis and identified profiles based on nine Internet practices in which users engaged. Female heavy users favoring information seeking and chatting had better academic performance but tended to feel more depressed than nonheavy users, while those favoring information seeking, chatting, and online games had lower academic grades and greater loneliness, physical illness, and depression scores than nonheavy users. In contrast, only male heavy users favoring online games had lower academic grades, whereas those who favored information seeking, chatting, and online games were more likely than nonheavy users to feel physically ill and depressed. PMID:20557244

  1. IntentSearch: Capturing User Intention for One-Click Internet Image Search.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoou; Liu, Ke; Cui, Jingyu; Wen, Fang; Wang, Xiaogang

    2012-07-01

    Web-scale image search engines (e.g., Google image search, Bing image search) mostly rely on surrounding text features. It is difficult for them to interpret users' search intention only by query keywords and this leads to ambiguous and noisy search results which are far from satisfactory. It is important to use visual information in order to solve the ambiguity in text-based image retrieval. In this paper, we propose a novel Internet image search approach. It only requires the user to click on one query image with minimum effort and images from a pool retrieved by text-based search are reranked based on both visual and textual content. Our key contribution is to capture the users' search intention from this one-click query image in four steps. 1) The query image is categorized into one of the predefined adaptive weight categories which reflect users' search intention at a coarse level. Inside each category, a specific weight schema is used to combine visual features adaptive to this kind of image to better rerank the text-based search result. 2) Based on the visual content of the query image selected by the user and through image clustering, query keywords are expanded to capture user intention. 3) Expanded keywords are used to enlarge the image pool to contain more relevant images. 4) Expanded keywords are also used to expand the query image to multiple positive visual examples from which new query specific visual and textual similarity metrics are learned to further improve content-based image reranking. All these steps are automatic, without extra effort from the user. This is critically important for any commercial web-based image search engine, where the user interface has to be extremely simple. Besides this key contribution, a set of visual features which are both effective and efficient in Internet image search are designed. Experimental evaluation shows that our approach significantly improves the precision of top-ranked images and also the user

  2. Impaired anterior insular activation during risky decision making in young adults with internet gaming disorder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Deokjong; Lee, Junghan; Yoon, Kang Joon; Kee, Namkoong; Jung, Young-Chul

    2016-05-25

    Internet gaming disorder is defined as excessive and compulsive use of the internet to engage in games that leads to clinically significant psychosocial impairment. We tested the hypothesis that individuals with internet gaming disorder would be less sensitive to high-risk situations and show aberrant brain activation related to risk prediction processing. Young adults with internet gaming disorder underwent functional MRI while performing a risky decision-making task. The healthy control group showed stronger activations within the dorsal attention network and the anterior insular cortex, which were not found in the internet gaming disorder group. Our findings imply that young adults with internet gaming disorder show impaired anterior insular activation during risky decision making, which might make them vulnerable when they need to adapt new behavioral strategies in high-risk situations. PMID:27092470

  3. Associations between Online Friendship and Internet Addiction among Adolescents and Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smahel, David; Brown, B. Bradford; Blinka, Lukas

    2012-01-01

    The past decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of youths using the Internet, especially for communicating with peers. Online activity can widen and strengthen the social networks of adolescents and emerging adults (Subrahmanyam & Smahel, 2011), but it also increases the risk of Internet addiction. Using a framework derived from…

  4. Development of an Internet Intervention to Address Behaviors Associated with Skin Cancer Risk among Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, Carolyn; Darlow, Susan; Munshi, Teja; Caruso, Carolyn; Ritterband, Lee; Raivitch, Stephanie; Fleisher, Linda; Manne, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the US, and its incidence is increasing. The major risk factor for skin cancer is exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV). Young adults tend to expose themselves to large amounts of UV and engage in minimal skin protection, which increases their skin cancer risk. Interventions are needed to address risk behaviors among young adults that may lead to skin cancer. The nternet offers a cost-effective way to widely disseminate efficacious interventions. The current paper describes the development of an online skin cancer risk reduction intervention (UV4.me) for young adults. Procedures The iterative development process for UV4.me followed best-practice guidelines and included the following activities: individual interviews, focus groups, content development by the expert team, acceptability testing, cognitive interviewing for questionnaires, quality control testing, usability testing, and a pilot randomized controlled trial. Participant acceptability and usability feedback was assessed. Principal Results The development process produced an evidence-informed intervention that is individually-tailored, interactive, and multimedia in nature based on the Integrative Model of Behavior Prediction, a model for internet interventions, and other best-practice recommendations, expert input, as well as user acceptability and usability feedback gathered before, during, and after development. Major Conclusions Development of an acceptable intervention intended to have a significant public health impact requires a relatively large investment in time, money, expertise, and ongoing user input. Lessons learned and recommendations are discussed. The comprehensive process used may help prepare others interested in creating similar behavioral health interventions. PMID:26640776

  5. Quantitative agent based model of user behavior in an Internet discussion forum.

    PubMed

    Sobkowicz, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents an agent based simulation of opinion evolution, based on a nonlinear emotion/information/opinion (E/I/O) individual dynamics, to an actual Internet discussion forum. The goal is to reproduce the results of two-year long observations and analyses of the user communication behavior and of the expressed opinions and emotions, via simulations using an agent based model. The model allowed to derive various characteristics of the forum, including the distribution of user activity and popularity (outdegree and indegree), the distribution of length of dialogs between the participants, their political sympathies and the emotional content and purpose of the comments. The parameters used in the model have intuitive meanings, and can be translated into psychological observables.

  6. NSI customer service representatives and user support office: NASA Science Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet, (NSI) was established in 1987 to provide NASA's Offices of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) missions with transparent wide-area data connectivity to NASA's researchers, computational resources, and databases. The NSI Office at NASA/Ames Research Center has the lead responsibility for implementing a total, open networking program to serve the OSSA community. NSI is a full-service communications provider whose services include science network planning, network engineering, applications development, network operations, and network information center/user support services. NSI's mission is to provide reliable high-speed communications to the NASA science community. To this end, the NSI Office manages and operates the NASA Science Internet, a multiprotocol network currently supporting both DECnet and TCP/IP protocols. NSI utilizes state-of-the-art network technology to meet its customers' requirements. THe NASA Science Internet interconnects with other national networks including the National Science Foundation's NSFNET, the Department of Energy's ESnet, and the Department of Defense's MILNET. NSI also has international connections to Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, and several European countries. NSI cooperates with other government agencies as well as academic and commercial organizations to implement networking technologies which foster interoperability, improve reliability and performance, increase security and control, and expedite migration to the OSI protocols.

  7. Audio-vocal responses elicited in adult cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Torrey M.; Suneel, Deepa; Aronoff, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory deprivation experienced prior to receiving a cochlear implant could compromise neural connections that allow for modulation of vocalization using auditory feedback. In this report, pitch-shift stimuli were presented to adult cochlear implant users to test whether compensatory motor changes in vocal F0 could be elicited. In five of six participants, rapid adjustments in vocal F0 were detected following the stimuli, which resemble the cortically mediated pitch-shift responses observed in typical hearing individuals. These findings suggest that cochlear implants can convey vocal F0 shifts to the auditory pathway that might benefit audio-vocal monitoring. PMID:26520350

  8. Contextual profiles of young adult Ecstasy users: a multisite study

    PubMed Central

    Ramtekkar, Ujjwal P.; Striley, Catherine W; Cottler, Linda B

    2010-01-01

    These analyses assess contextual profiles of 612 young adult Ecstasy users, 18–30 years of age, from St. Louis (USA), Miami (USA) and Sydney (Australia). Bivariate analyses revealed different contextual factors influencing Ecstasy use. Friends were the most common sources of Ecstasy at all sites and most used with friends. St. Louis and Miami use mostly occurred in residences, whereas in Sydney use was mostly at clubs, bars or restaurants. Ecstasy consumption at public places and in cars, trains or ferries was significantly higher in Miami (89% and 77%) than in St. Louis (67% and 65%) and Sydney (67% and 61%). At all sites, simultaneous use of LSD/mushroom and nitrous oxide with Ecstasy was common; concurrent amphetamines predominated in Sydney and heroin/opiates in St. Louis Contextual factors influencing Ecstasy use among young adults vary by geographic region. Their inclusion may help tailor effective prevention programs to reduce or ameliorate Ecstasy use. PMID:21094585

  9. Internet Use for Searching Information on Medicines and Disease: A Community Pharmacy–Based Survey Among Adult Pharmacy Customers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The Internet is increasingly used as a source of health-related information, and a vast majority of Internet users are performing health-related searches in the United States and Europe, with wide differences among countries. Health information searching behavior on the Internet is affected by multiple factors, including demographics, socioeconomic factors, education, employment, attitudes toward the Internet, and health conditions, and their knowledge may help to promote a safer use of the Internet. Limited information however exists so far about Internet use to search for medical information in Italy. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the use of the Internet for searching for information on medicines and disease in adult subjects in Northern Italy. Methods Survey in randomly selected community pharmacies, using a self-administered questionnaire, with open and multiple choices questions, was conducted. Results A total of 1008 participants were enrolled (59.5% women; median age: 43 years; range: 14-88 years). Previous use of the Internet to search for information about medicines or dietary supplements was reported by 26.0% of respondents, more commonly by women (30.00% vs 20.10% men, P<.001), unmarried subjects (32.9% vs 17.4% widowed subjects, P=.022), and employed people (29.1% vs 10.4% retired people, P=.002). Use was highest in the age range of 26 to 35 (40.0% users vs 19.6% and 12.3% in the age range ≤25 and ≥56, respectively, P<.001) and increased with years of education (from 5.3% with 5 years, up to 41.0% with a university degree, P<.001). Previous use of the Internet to search for information about disease was reported by 59.1% of respondents, more commonly by women (64.5% vs 51.0% males, P<.001), unmarried subjects (64.2% vs 58.5% married or divorced subjects and 30.4% widowed subjects, P=.012), unemployed people (66.7% vs 64.0% workers and 29.9% retired people, P<.001). Use was highest in the age range of 26 to 35

  10. Effects of an Internet physical activity intervention in adults with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bosak, Kelly A; Yates, Bernice; Pozehl, Bunny

    2010-02-01

    The Internet is a relatively new method of delivering strategies for health behavior change. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of delivering a physical activity intervention by the Internet to improve outcomes in adults with the metabolic syndrome. Twenty-two participants (16 males; 6 females) were recruited from a cardiology clinic database, age range 32-66 years. Participants were randomly assigned to the Internet intervention (n = 12) or the usual care ( n = 10) group. The mean total dose, in terms of the time the intervention Web site was accessed was 2 hours over 6 weeks, which was greater than the time spent delivering usual care. Overall, participants' evaluations of the Internet intervention were positive. The costs of development and delivery of the Internet intervention were less than that of a consultation and follow-up in the cardiology clinic for this sample. The Internet intervention appears feasible for testing in a larger study.

  11. Use of the Internet as a Health Information Resource Among French Young Adults: Results From a Nationally Representative Survey

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jean-Baptiste; Nguyen-Thanh, Viet; Montagni, Ilaria; Parizot, Isabelle; Renahy, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Background The Internet is one of the main resources of health information especially for young adults, but website content is not always trustworthy or validated. Little is known about this specific population and the importance of online health searches for use and impact. It is fundamental to assess behaviors and attitudes of young people looking for online health-related information and their level of trust in such information. Objective The objective is to describe the characteristics of Internet users aged 15-30 years who use the Web as a health information resource and their trust in it, and to define the context and the effect of such use on French young adults’ behavior in relation to their medical consultations. Methods We used the French Health Barometer 2010, a nationally representative survey of 27,653 individuals that investigates population health behaviors and concerns. Multivariate logistic regressions were performed using a subsample of 1052 young adults aged 15-30 years to estimate associations between demographics, socioeconomic, and health status and (1) the use of the Internet to search for health information, and (2) its impact on health behaviors and the physician-patient relationship. Results In 2010, 48.5% (474/977) of Web users aged 15-30 years used the Internet for health purposes. Those who did not use the Internet for health purposes reported being informed enough by other sources (75.0%, 377/503), stated they preferred seeing a doctor (74.1%, 373/503) or did not trust the information on the Internet (67.2%, 338/503). However, approximately 80% (371/474) of young online health seekers considered the information found online reliable. Women (P<.001) and people with higher sociocultural positions (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.9 and OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.7 for employees and manual workers, respectively, vs individuals with executive or manager positions) were more likely to use the Internet for health purposes. For a subsample of women only

  12. Convenient intelligent cursor control web systems for Internet users with severe motor-impairments.

    PubMed

    Surdilovic, Tihomir; Zhang, Yan-Qing

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research work is to simplify and improve the efficiency of cursor control and its interactions on the computer screen by applying fuzzy logic in its decision-making to make Internet users with disabilities use the networked computers conveniently and easily. "Point and click" interactions are one of the key features of operating systems based of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) [C.E. Steriadis, P. Constantinou, Designing human-computer interfaces for quadriplegic people, ACM Trans. Comput.-Hum.-Interact. (TOCHI) 10 (2) (2003) 87-118.]. People with severe motor-impairments due to spinal cord injury (SCI) or spinal cord dysfunction (SCD), however, often have difficulty with accurate and efficient control of pointing devices, limiting their integration to society and unassisted control over their environment through the use of such operating systems [S. Keates, F. Hwang, P. Langdon, P.J. Clarkson, P. Robinson, Cursor measures for motion-impaired computer users, in: Proceedings of ACM SIGCAPH Conference of Assistive Technologies - ASSETS 2002, pp. 135-142.]. The questions "How can someone with severe motor-impairments perform 'point and click' interactions as accurately and efficiently as an able-bodied person?" and "How can these interactions be advanced through use of Computational Intelligence (CI)?" are the driving forces behind the research described in this paper. Through this research, a novel fuzzy mouse cursor control system (FMCCS) is described. The FMCCS core consists of several fuzzy control functions, which define different user interactions with the system. Design and descriptions of these functions, as well first prototype implementation and testing with real users sustaining severe disabilities are presented.

  13. The Role of the Adult Educator in Helping Learners Access and Select Quality Health Information on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Melissa; Grabowsky, Adelia

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, 45 percent of American adults had used the Internet to search for health information. However, according to a 2009 report, the number had increased to 71 percent of adults ages thirty to forty-nine and 46 percent of those 50 and older who had sought health information online. While the number of adults using the Internet to search for…

  14. Reaching young adult smokers through the Internet: Comparison of three recruitment mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sharon M.; Prochaska, Judith J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: While young adults have the highest prevalence of cigarette smoking of any adult age group, studies of tobacco and other substance use have reported challenges in recruiting this age group. The Internet may be a useful tool for reaching young adult smokers. The present study compared three Internet-based recruitment methods for young adult smokers to complete a survey about tobacco and other substance use: Craigslist advertisements, other Internet advertisements, and E-mail invitations through a survey sampling service. Methods: Recruitment campaigns invited young adults aged 18–25 years who had smoked at least one cigarette in the past 30 days to complete an online survey. Recruitment methods were compared across recruitment numbers, costeffectiveness, and demographic and smoking characteristics of recruited participants. Results: In 6 months, 920 people gave online consent to determine eligibility to complete the survey, of which 336 (36.5%) were eligible, and 201 (59.8%) completed the survey. While Internet advertisements yielded the largest proportion of recruited participants and completed surveys overall, Craigslist and sampling strategies were more successful at targeting young adult smokers who went on to complete the survey and were more costeffective. Participants differed in demographic and substance use characteristics across the three recruitment mechanisms. Discussion: We identified success at reaching young adults who have smoked cigarettes recently through the Internet, though costs, participant eligibility, proportion of completed surveys, and respondent characteristics differed among the three methods. A multipronged approach to Internet recruitment is most likely to generate a broad diverse sample of young adult smokers. PMID:20530194

  15. Web applications meet astronomical archives . Because astronomers are experienced internet users too

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, L.; Ricci, D.; Sprimont, P. G.

    We present here the most modern internet and web technologies which we have tested and verified to be very suitable for the development of innovative, web-based tools for observational astronomy and archival data exploitation. Nothing but an updated browser is required to the user. This approach can boost the exploitation of huge data archives such as those that will be produced by projects like GAIA and TAOS-II, and will allow to easily manage heterogeneous data, like those of the IPERCOOL project. In spite these technologies are still not fully mature, they are already accepted standards in the browsers of our laptops, tablets and cellphones. We discuss the impact of these new technologies in astronomy and present test examples to show their capabilities.

  16. An evolving user-oriented model of Internet health information seeking.

    PubMed

    Gaie, Martha J

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an evolving user-oriented model of Internet health information seeking (IS) based on qualitative data collected from 22 lung cancer (LC) patients and caregivers. This evolving model represents information search behavior as more highly individualized, complex, and dynamic than previous models, including pre-search psychological activity, use of multiple heuristics throughout the process, and cost-benefit evaluation of search results. This study's findings suggest that IS occurs in four distinct phases: search initiation/continuation, selective exposure, message processing, and message evaluation. The identification of these phases and the heuristics used within them suggests a higher order of complexity in the decision-making processes that underlie IS, which could lead to the development of a conceptual framework that more closely reflects the complex nature of contextualized IS. It also illustrates the advantages of using qualitative methods to extract more subtle details of the IS process and fill in the gaps in existing models.

  17. Who commits virtual identity suicide? Differences in privacy concerns, Internet addiction, and personality between Facebook users and quitters.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Stefan; Burger, Christoph; Bohn, Manuel; Voracek, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Social networking sites such as Facebook attract millions of users by offering highly interactive social communications. Recently, a counter movement of users has formed, deciding to leave social networks by quitting their accounts (i.e., virtual identity suicide). To investigate whether Facebook quitters (n=310) differ from Facebook users (n=321), we examined privacy concerns, Internet addiction scores, and personality. We found Facebook quitters to be significantly more cautious about their privacy, having higher Internet addiction scores, and being more conscientious than Facebook users. The main self-stated reason for committing virtual identity suicide was privacy concerns (48 percent). Although the adequacy of privacy in online communication has been questioned, privacy is still an important issue in online social communications.

  18. Adult Learning Disabilities Screening Using an Internet-Administered Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Sean; Mellard, Daryl

    2005-01-01

    Identifying individuals with specific learning disabilities (SLD) is a complex task, particularly for adult populations. Adult agencies such as vocational rehabilitative services or adult basic education often use different SLD definitions and criteria, are often understaffed, have limited resources, and have a shortage of staff trained on SLD…

  19. Factors influencing Internet usage in older adults (65 years and above) living in rural and urban Sweden.

    PubMed

    Berner, Jessica; Rennemark, Mikael; Jogréus, Claes; Anderberg, Peter; Sköldunger, Anders; Wahlberg, Maria; Elmståhl, Sölve; Berglund, Johan

    2015-09-01

    Older adults living in rural and urban areas have shown to distinguish themselves in technology adoption; a clearer profile of their Internet use is important in order to provide better technological and health-care solutions. Older adults' Internet use was investigated across large to midsize cities and rural Sweden. The sample consisted of 7181 older adults ranging from 59 to 100 years old. Internet use was investigated with age, education, gender, household economy, cognition, living alone/or with someone and rural/urban living. Logistic regression was used. Those living in rural areas used the Internet less than their urban counterparts. Being younger and higher educated influenced Internet use; for older urban adults, these factors as well as living with someone and having good cognitive functioning were influential. Solutions are needed to avoid the exclusion of some older adults by a society that is today being shaped by the Internet.

  20. Telecommunications: Characteristics and Choices of Internet Users. Report to the Ranking Minority Member, Subcommittee on Telecommunications, Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerwinski, Stanley J.

    This study examined the demographic characteristics of Internet users compared with those of the general U.S. population, the characteristics of areas where broadband Internet transport is available and of consumers who selected a broadband transport provider, and the factors influencing consumers' choice of an ISP (Internet service provider) and…

  1. End User Information Searching on the Internet: How Do Users Search and What Do They Search For? (SIG USE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracevic, Tefko

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes a presentation that discussed findings and implications of research projects using an Internet search service and Internet-accessible vendor databases, representing the two sides of public database searching: query formulation and resource utilization. Presenters included: Tefko Saracevic, Amanda Spink, Dietmar Wolfram and Hong Xie.…

  2. Anthropometric data of adult wheelchair users for Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Lucero-Duarte, Karla; de la Vega-Bustillos, Enrique; López-Millán, Francisco; Soto-Félix, Selene

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain anthropometric data of adult wheelchair users at Mexico. This study count with 108 disabled people (56 men and 52 women) using the wheelchair and having the upper extremities sufficiently efficient to perform professional activities. The subjects were aged 18-60. From the measurements obtained, it can be said that in each of these measures was observed that men have larger dimensions than women, except for body depth, in which women had a slightly greater difference. When comparing the data in this study against other studies it shows that there is a significant difference between the averages of these studies. Similar results were obtained when comparing our data against data of standard population. Anthropometric data obtained through this study appear to be the only of this kind in Mexico and showed significant differences between measures of disabled persons and standard persons. the use of these data may be helpful for the proper design of workstations designed for use by adults who use.

  3. Associations between online friendship and Internet addiction among adolescents and emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Smahel, David; Brown, B Bradford; Blinka, Lukas

    2012-03-01

    The past decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of youths using the Internet, especially for communicating with peers. Online activity can widen and strengthen the social networks of adolescents and emerging adults (Subrahmanyam & Smahel, 2011), but it also increases the risk of Internet addiction. Using a framework derived from Griffiths (2000a), this study examined associations between online friendship and Internet addiction in a representative sample (n = 394) of Czech youths ages 12-26 years (M = 18.58). Three different approaches to friendship were identified: exclusively offline, face-to-face oriented, Internet oriented, on the basis of the relative percentages of online and offline associates in participants' friendship networks. The rate of Internet addiction did not differ by age or gender but was associated with communication styles, hours spent online, and friendship approaches. The study revealed that effects between Internet addiction and approaches to friendship may be reciprocal: Being oriented toward having more online friends, preferring online communication, and spending more time online were related to increased risk of Internet addiction; on the other hand, there is an alternative causal explanation that Internet addiction and preference for online communication conditions young people's tendency to seek friendship from people met online.

  4. Transformation for Adults in an Internet-Based Learning Environment--Is It Necessary to Be Self-Directed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Regina Juchun; Chu, Anita Zichun; Weng, Cathy; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Lin, Chia-chun

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the relationships between self-directed learning readiness and transformative learning theory (TLT) reflected by the Constructivist Internet-based Learning Environment Scale (CILES). A questionnaire survey about adult learner's perceptions of Internet-based learning was administered to adults enrolled in classes in community…

  5. Prevalence and correlates of internet cigarette purchasing among adult smokers in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Hrywna, M; Delnevo, C; Staniewska, D

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence and correlates of internet cigarette purchasing among adult smokers. Design: Analysis of internet purchasing in data from a population based telephone survey of New Jersey households. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with internet cigarette purchasing, adjusting for year, demographic, and smoking behaviour variables. Participants: 3447 current cigarette smokers pooled from three cross sectional surveys conducted in 2000, 2001, and 2002. Main outcome measures: Ever purchasing tobacco and usually buying cigarettes via the internet. Results: Among all current cigarette smokers, ever having purchased tobacco via the internet increased from 1.1% in 2000 to 6.7% in 2002 and usually buying cigarettes via the internet increased from 0.8% in 2000 to 3.1% in 2002. Among current cigarette smokers with internet access, ever having purchased tobacco via the internet was higher among those who reported smoking 31 or more cigarettes per day (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5 to 10.2) and those without a past year quit attempt (adjusted OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.0). Usually purchasing cigarettes via the internet was higher among those aged 45–64 years (adjusted OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 17.1) and who reported having their first cigarette ⩽ 30 minutes after waking (adjusted OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2 to 9.2). Conclusions: Although higher prices are known to reduce the demand for cigarettes, internet cigarette purchasing is likely to weaken this effect, particularly among heavy, more dependent smokers who are less interested in quitting. PMID:15333887

  6. Pro-Nets versus No-Nets: Differences in Urban Older Adults' Predilections for Internet Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cresci, M. Kay; Yarandi, Hossein N.; Morrell, Roger W.

    2010-01-01

    Enthusiasm for information technology (IT) is growing among older adults. Many older adults enjoy IT and the Internet (Pro-Nets), but others have no desire to use it (No-Nets). This study found that Pro-Nets and No-Nets were different on a number of variables that might predict IT use. No-Nets were older, had less education and income, were…

  7. Effectiveness of Guided and Unguided Low-Intensity Internet Interventions for Adult Alcohol Misuse: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riper, Heleen; Blankers, Matthijs; Hadiwijaya, Hana; Cunningham, John; Clarke, Stella; Wiers, Reinout; Ebert, David; Cuijpers, Pim

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol misuse ranks within the top ten health conditions with the highest global burden of disease. Low-intensity, Internet interventions for curbing adult alcohol misuse have been shown effective. Few meta-analyses have been carried out, however, and they have involved small numbers of studies, lacked indicators of drinking within low risk guidelines, and examined the effectiveness of unguided self-help only. We therefore conducted a more thorough meta-analysis that included both guided and unguided interventions. Methods Systematic literature searches were performed up to September 2013. Primary outcome was the mean level of alcohol consumption and drinking within low risk guidelines for alcohol consumption at post-treatment. Findings We selected 16 randomised controlled trials (with 23 comparisons and 5,612 participants) for inclusion. Results, showed a small but significant overall effect size in favour of Internet interventions (g = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.13–0.27, p<.001). Participants in Internet interventions drunk on average 22 grams of ethanol less than controls and were significantly more likely to be adhering to low-risk drinking guidelines at post-treatment (RD 0.13, 95% CI: 0.09–0.17, p<.001). Subgroup analyses revealed no significant differences in potential moderators for the outcome of alcohol consumption, although there was a near-significant difference between comparisons with waitlist control and those with assessment-only or alcohol information control conditions (p = .056). Conclusions Internet interventions are effective in reducing adult alcohol consumption and inducing alcohol users to adhere to guidelines for low-risk drinking. This effect is small but from a public health point of view this may warrant large scale implementation at low cost of Internet interventions for adult alcohol misuse. Moderator analyses with sufficient power are, however, needed in order to assess the robustness of these overall results and to

  8. Growing up Perfect: Perfectionism, Problematic Internet Use, and Career Indecision in Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Ilana S.; Konstam, Varda

    2011-01-01

    Among emerging adults who are career indecisive, perfectionism and problematic Internet use (PIU) are underdeveloped areas of inquiry. The authors examined the relationship between perfectionism and PIU to measure their contributions to career indecision. The full model was significant, yielding an R[superscript 2] of 0.46 (p less than 0.0001).…

  9. Caregivers of Older Adults: Advantages and Disadvantages of Internet-Based Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Jan; Chenoweth, Lillian; Bold, Mary; Harding, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    We explored the perceptions of caregivers of older adults using Internet-based social support networks regarding the unique advantages and disadvantages of online social support. Participants were recruited with permission of Web owners through 15 Web sites that offered social networks, and responses from 63 electronically submitted surveys were…

  10. Silver Surfers: Training and Evaluating Internet Use Among Older Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cody, Michael J.; Dunn, Deborah; Hoppin, Shari; Wendt, Pamela

    1999-01-01

    Describes a training program for adults (average age 80 years) involving weekly meetings with a mentor who helped subjects visit Web sites. Finds that those who learned to surf the Internet had more positive attitudes toward aging, and higher levels of perceived social support and connectivity. Associates participation in the four-month program…

  11. An Evolving User-oriented Model of Internet Health Information Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Gaie, Martha J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an evolving user-oriented model of Internet health information seeking (IS) based on qualitative data collected from 22 lung cancer (LC) patients and caregivers. This evolving model represents information search behavior as more highly individualized, complex, and dynamic than previous models, including pre-search psychological activity, use of multiple heuristics throughout the process, and cost-benefit evaluation of search results. This study’s findings suggest that IS occurs in four distinct phases: search initiation/continuation, selective exposure, message processing, and message evaluation. The identification of these phases and the heuristics used within them suggests a higher order of complexity in the decision-making processes that underlie IS, which could lead to the development of a conceptual framework that more closely reflects the complex nature of contextualized IS. It also illustrates the advantages of using qualitative methods to extract more subtle details of the IS process and fill in the gaps in existing models. PMID:17238347

  12. Adult IT Programs: Discourse on Pedagogy, Strategy and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maule, R. William

    1997-01-01

    Degree programs and continuing education for information professionals concern most organizations as they reorganize to capitalize on innovations in networking, online services, and electronic commerce. This article examines theoretical and conceptual foundations for adult information technology (IT) programs and strategies for implementing…

  13. Information search in health care decision-making: a study of word-of-mouth and internet information users.

    PubMed

    Snipes, Robin L; Ingram, Rhea; Jiang, Pingjun

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates how individual consumers may differ in their information search behavior in health care decision-making. Results indicate that most consumers still use word-of-mouth as a primary information source for health care decisions. However, usage of the Internet is increasing. The results of this study indicate that consumers who are most likely to use the Internet for health care information are single, younger, and less educated, whereas consumers who are most likely to use word-of-mouth are middle-aged, married, with higher income and higher education. Surprisingly, no significant gender difference was found in information search behavior for health care decision-making. The results also suggest that consumers with the highest tendency to use word-of-mouth are also the lowest users of the Internet in health care decision-making. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. Childhood Conduct Problems and Other Early Risk Factors in Rural Adult Stimulant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Teresa L.; Han, Xiaotong; Leukefeld, Carl; Booth, Brenda M.; Edlund, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Context: Understanding childhood risk factors associated with adult substance use and legal problems is important for treatment and prevention. Purpose: To examine the relationship of early substance use, conduct problems before age 15, and family history of substance abuse on adult outcomes in rural, stimulant users. Methods: Adult cocaine and…

  15. A Lead User Approach to Universal Design - Involving Older Adults in the Design Process.

    PubMed

    Raviselvam, Sujithra; Wood, Kristin L; Hölttä-Otto, Katja; Tam, Victoria; Nagarajan, Kamya

    2016-01-01

    The concept of Universal Design has received increasing appreciation over the past two decades. Yet, there are very few existing designs that cater to the needs of extraordinary users who experience some form of physical challenge. Previous work has shown promising results on involving users with physical challenges as lead users - users who have the potential to identify needs that could be latent among the general population. It has also been shown that older adults can act as such lead users. They can help design universal product ideas that satisfy both older adults and the general population. In this paper we build on this and examine if involving older adults in the design phase can result in universal products, products preferred by both older adults and the general population over a current option. Eighty-nine older adult participants and thirty-four general population participants took part in the study. Products were redesigned and prototyped based on the needs of older adults and tested among both populations. Results show that, although older adults and the general population did share certain needs and demands, the majority of older adults had needs and demands that were different from those of the general population. However, even though the needs differed between the populations, on average 89% of the general population participants preferred products designed based on design needs expressed by older adults over the current option. This provides further evidence supporting the use of older adults in designing products for all.

  16. A Lead User Approach to Universal Design - Involving Older Adults in the Design Process.

    PubMed

    Raviselvam, Sujithra; Wood, Kristin L; Hölttä-Otto, Katja; Tam, Victoria; Nagarajan, Kamya

    2016-01-01

    The concept of Universal Design has received increasing appreciation over the past two decades. Yet, there are very few existing designs that cater to the needs of extraordinary users who experience some form of physical challenge. Previous work has shown promising results on involving users with physical challenges as lead users - users who have the potential to identify needs that could be latent among the general population. It has also been shown that older adults can act as such lead users. They can help design universal product ideas that satisfy both older adults and the general population. In this paper we build on this and examine if involving older adults in the design phase can result in universal products, products preferred by both older adults and the general population over a current option. Eighty-nine older adult participants and thirty-four general population participants took part in the study. Products were redesigned and prototyped based on the needs of older adults and tested among both populations. Results show that, although older adults and the general population did share certain needs and demands, the majority of older adults had needs and demands that were different from those of the general population. However, even though the needs differed between the populations, on average 89% of the general population participants preferred products designed based on design needs expressed by older adults over the current option. This provides further evidence supporting the use of older adults in designing products for all. PMID:27534296

  17. Why the offline are offline: a survey of internet use by educated Pakistani adults.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Farzana; Mahmood, Khalid

    2009-06-01

    The study reported here explored the reasons for the relatively limited use of the Internet among educated Pakistani adults. A fairly large sample of Internet nonusers from different cities of the Punjab Province with at least secondary school education participated in a survey. Some graduate students and cyber café owners were also interviewed. The results of this study are reported in the main body of this paper, indicating that a variety of cultural, educational, and economic factors are responsible for this state of affairs.

  18. Feedback from users of energy efficiency information on the Internet: Analysis of the US CADDET home page

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Voss, M.K.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the US experience to date with providing energy efficiency information from the Center for the Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET) on the Internet. The paper begins by describing the way that information is displayed in the US CADDET home page system. Statistics are then provided on numbers and types of users of the home page. Next we describe the frequency with which different types of CADDET information have been accessed and summarize the feedback provided by users. Drawing on this experience with the US CADDET home page system, the authors conclude that energy efficiency information systems on the World Wide Web can contribute significantly to the goals of CADDET and other information outreach programs. However, to reach a wider range of audiences, Internet systems need to be supplemented by other dissemination efforts aimed at reaching individuals in countries and organizations that are not currently using Internet services. In addition, more personal and customized information sources are needed to provide users with the types of assistance guidance that may be required to translate knowledge of a technology`s technical financial performance, into a decision to adopt the technology.

  19. Searching Scientific Information on the Internet: A Dutch Academic User Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorbij, Henk J.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the use and perceived importance of the Internet among students and faculty in the Netherlands through questionnaires and focus-group interviews. Highlights include electronic journals, learning to use the Internet, search engines, needed library support, and problems with subject searching. A copy of the questionnaire is…

  20. Factors Influencing the Internet Resource Users' Satisfaction: An Analytical Study on Omani Undergraduate Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriram, B.

    2016-01-01

    The internet resources are one of the important knowledge sharing tools in day-to-day business processes. These internet resources have greater impact on education field too. The learning processes have become comparatively easy due to these electronic resources. The online resources help the students to acquire the required knowledge through…

  1. Impact of the High-Speed Internet on User Behaviors: Case Study in Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Sungbin; Byun, Jae-Ho; Sung, Minje

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the growth of Internet use and the resulting changes in customer behaviors related to the Internet, attitudes toward the traditional mass media, and satisfaction. Describes a study that investigated types of changes that have been made in Korea due to the transition of the networking environment. (Author/LRW)

  2. The effect of the internet on teen and young adult tobacco use: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Susan R; Kennedy, Christine; Malone, Ruth E

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that a positive association exists between exposure to smoking imagery, such as that found in movies and print advertising, and the subsequent uptake of cigarette smoking. Children appear to be especially vulnerable to advertising messaging and other positive portrayals of smoking, given that most adult smokers develop the habit before age 18 years. Although many traditional types of media have been studied, the current generation of youth is growing up as digital natives, with young people increasingly using the Internet for entertainment and to obtain information. Currently the Internet is an essentially unregulated marketplace of ideas and images. However, the effect of the Internet on teen smoking initiation has received little attention in studies. In this literature review, we summarize and critique the existing work, identify current knowledge gaps, and offer suggestions to health care providers about how to address this issue. PMID:22521497

  3. [Internet-based approaches in prevention and treatment of depressive symptoms in adolescents and young adults ].

    PubMed

    Berking, Matthias; Ebert, David D; Lehr, Dirk; Riper, Heleen; Sieland, Bernhard; Wiencke, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological findings indicate that up to 18.5 % of the German adolescents suffer from depressive symptoms and that younger adults display the highest risk for relevant symptoms of depression (9.9 %) within the German adult population. Internet-based interventions have been shown to be useful for preventing and treating depression and are more easily disseminated in internet-savvy generations. Available programs are usually based on principles of cognitive behavioural therapy. They differ significantly with regard to target groups, structure, content, degree of guidance provided by online-coaches and evidence for their efficacy. Whereas some studies could not prove the use of the trainings there are others that show large effect sizes (up to d = 0.84) for the reduction of depressive symptoms. In Germany there are some online counseling programs for children and adolescents in (acute) crises available. However, at this point no structured intervention program for the treatment of depression exists. PMID:24877779

  4. Problematic Internet Use, Mental Health and Impulse Control in an Online Survey of Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Yvonne H. C.; Potenza, Marc N.; White, Marney A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Internet use has become a popular entertainment source and has become highly integrated into daily life. However, some people display problematic or addictive usage of the Internet. The present study attempts to fill current knowledge gaps regarding at-risk/problematic Internet use (ARPIU) and its relation to various health and functioning measures. Methods Online survey data from 755 adults in the United States were analyzed using chi-square and ANOVAs. Results The ARPIU group did not differ from the non-ARPIU group with respect to substance use. Individuals with ARPIU were, however, more likely to report at-risk/problematic engagement in video-game playing and gambling. Compared to the non-ARPIU group, the ARPIU group reported poorer self-control and higher levels of impulsivity and depression. Conclusions ARPIU appears associated with other risk behaviors, particularly those that might be performed on the Internet. Future studies should examine the extent to which the Internet may promote engagement in these risk behaviors and the extent to which preventative interventions targeting better self-control or negative mood states might help a range of non-substance-related addictive behaviors. PMID:24294501

  5. Caring for Others: Internet Video-Conferencing Group Intervention for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Neurodegenerative Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marziali, Elsa; Donahue, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to evaluate the effects of an innovative, Internet-based psychosocial intervention for family caregivers of older adults with neurodegenerative disease. Design and Methods: After receiving signed informed consent from each participant, we randomly assigned 66 caregivers to an Internet-based…

  6. Computer and Internet Interventions for Loneliness and Depression in Older Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mona; Kong, Saelom

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effectiveness of computer and Internet training interventions intended to reduce loneliness and depression in older adults. Methods Searches were performed to retrieve studies that had been published in peer-reviewed journals from January 2001 to July 2012 and written in English or Korean from PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, KoreaMed, KMbase, KISS, MEDLIS, and RISS. We used combinations of the keywords for population, intervention, and psychosocial problems. A meta-analysis was employed to summarize the findings of studies on computer and Internet interventions for older adults. An overall mean weighted effect size for each outcome was calculated, and Q statistics were used to test the heterogeneity of variance in the effect sizes of the selected studies. Results As the Q statistics revealed heterogeneity, random effects models were chosen for the meta-analysis. The overall mean weighted effect size for loneliness from five studies was statistically significant for decreased loneliness (Z = 2.085, p = 0.037). However, the overall mean weighted effect size for depression from five studies was not statistically significant (Z = 1.528, p = 0.126). Conclusions These results suggest that computer and Internet programs were effective in managing loneliness among older adults. Therefore, further computer-mediated social support should be considered to help manage loneliness in this population. PMID:23115742

  7. What Are Young Adults Saying About Mental Health? An Analysis of Internet Blogs

    PubMed Central

    Westra, Henny A; Eastwood, John D; Barnes, Kirsten L

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the high prevalence of mental health concerns, few young adults access treatment. While much research has focused on understanding the barriers to service access, few studies have explored unbiased accounts of the experiences of young adults with mental health concerns. It is through hearing these experiences and gaining an in-depth understanding of what is being said by young adults that improvements can be made to interventions focused on increasing access to care. Objective To move beyond past research by using an innovative qualitative research method of analyzing the blogs of young adults (18–25 years of age) with mental health concerns to understand their experiences. Methods We used an enhanced Internet search vehicle, DEVONagent, to extract Internet blogs using primary keywords related to mental health. Blogs (N = 8) were selected based on age of authors (18–25 years), gender, relevance to mental health, and recency of the entries. Blogs excerpts were analyzed using a combination of grounded theory and consensual qualitative research methods. Results Two core categories emerged from the qualitative analysis of the bloggers accounts: I am powerless (intrapersonal) and I am utterly alone (interpersonal). Overall, the young adult bloggers expressed significant feelings of powerlessness as a result of their mental health concerns and simultaneously felt a profound sense of loneliness, alienation, and lack of connection with others. Conclusions The present study suggests that one reason young adults do not seek care might be that they view the mental health system negatively and feel disconnected from these services. To decrease young adults’ sense of powerlessness and isolation, efforts should focus on creating and developing resources and services that allow young adults to feel connected and empowered. Through an understanding of the experiences of young adults with mental health problems, and their experiences of and attitudes toward

  8. Comparing Intervention Strategies among Rural, Low SES, Young Adult Tobacco Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanis, David A.; Hollm, Ronald E.; Derr, Daniel; Ibrahim, Jennifer K.; Collins, Bradley N.; Coviello, Donna; Melochick, Jennifer Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate 3-month tobacco quit rates of young adult tobacco users randomized to 2 intervention conditions. Methods: Overall 192 non-treatment-seeking 18-to-24-year-old tobacco users received educational information and advice to quit smoking. Participants were then block randomized to 2 brief intervention conditions: (1) a telephone…

  9. Involving Adult Service Users with Learning Disabilities in the Training of Speech and Language Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Celia

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a pilot project carried out at City University London, Department of Language and Communication Science, where adult service users with learning disabilities trained first-year speech and language therapy students. The training involved presentations by the service users on their involvement in interviewing support staff,…

  10. Stages in Learning New Technology: Naive Adult Email Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Anne L.

    1995-01-01

    Identifies six stages adult learners pass through as they become confident using electronic mail. Understanding the stages of learning to use technology empowers the learner through the knowledge that feelings of tension and frustration will be overcome. (Author/AEF)

  11. Real People Don't Do Boolean: How To Teach End Users To Find High-Quality Information on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vine, Rita

    2001-01-01

    Explains how to train users in effective Web searching. Discusses challenges of teaching Web information retrieval; a framework for information searching; choosing the right search tools for users; the seven-step lesson planning process; tips for delivering group Internet training; and things that help people work faster and smarter on the Web.…

  12. Characteristics and Outcomes of Young Adult Opiate Users Receiving Residential Substance Abuse Treatment.

    PubMed

    Morse, Siobhan; MacMaster, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Opiate use patterns, user characteristics, and treatment response among young adults are of interest due to current high use prevalence and historical low levels of treatment engagement relative to older populations. Prior research in this population suggests that overall, young adults present at treatment with different issues. In this study the authors investigated potential differences between young adult (18-25 years of age) and older adult (26 and older) opiate users and the impact of differences relative to treatment motivation, length and outcomes. Data for this study was drawn from 760 individuals who entered voluntary, private, residential treatment. Study measures included the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), the Treatment Service Review (TSR), and University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA). Interviews were conducted at program intake and 6-month post-discharge. Results indicate that older adults with a history of opiate use present at treatment with higher levels of severity for alcohol, medical, and psychological problems and young adults present at treatment with greater drug use and more legal issues. Significant improvement for both groups was noted at 6 months post treatment; there were also fewer differences between the two age groups of opiate users. Results suggest different strategies within treatment programs may provide benefit in targeting the disparate needs of younger opiate users. Overall, however, results suggest that individualized treatment within a standard, abstinence-based, residential treatment model can be effective across opiate users at different ages and with different issues, levels of severity, and impairment at intake.

  13. Characteristics and Outcomes of Young Adult Opiate Users Receiving Residential Substance Abuse Treatment.

    PubMed

    Morse, Siobhan; MacMaster, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Opiate use patterns, user characteristics, and treatment response among young adults are of interest due to current high use prevalence and historical low levels of treatment engagement relative to older populations. Prior research in this population suggests that overall, young adults present at treatment with different issues. In this study the authors investigated potential differences between young adult (18-25 years of age) and older adult (26 and older) opiate users and the impact of differences relative to treatment motivation, length and outcomes. Data for this study was drawn from 760 individuals who entered voluntary, private, residential treatment. Study measures included the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), the Treatment Service Review (TSR), and University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA). Interviews were conducted at program intake and 6-month post-discharge. Results indicate that older adults with a history of opiate use present at treatment with higher levels of severity for alcohol, medical, and psychological problems and young adults present at treatment with greater drug use and more legal issues. Significant improvement for both groups was noted at 6 months post treatment; there were also fewer differences between the two age groups of opiate users. Results suggest different strategies within treatment programs may provide benefit in targeting the disparate needs of younger opiate users. Overall, however, results suggest that individualized treatment within a standard, abstinence-based, residential treatment model can be effective across opiate users at different ages and with different issues, levels of severity, and impairment at intake. PMID:25879396

  14. How we view competitions between the converging Internet social platforms: Does higher user number mean the final victory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tao; Li, Chenguang; Guo, Liping; Wang, Yanni

    2015-12-01

    We propose a special opinion model on Internet users' social platform selections where users only view those converging platforms as tools to maintain their communications with all of their friends or partners and one may use more than one platform at the same time. We construct the time evolution differential equations, seek the fixed points, and study their attractability and repellency by analyzing those equations. Then, we verify the analytical results and observe their accuracy by numerical simulation. The conclusion shows that in any practical system described by our model, one platform will completely eliminate its competitor sooner or later, and when the average degree of the interaction network is relatively low, the laggard may have more chance to turn the tide, but when that average degree is high, that chance is extremely limited.

  15. Colorado Late Cenozoic Fault and Fold Database and Internet Map Server: User-friendly technology for complex information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, K.S.; Pattyn, G.J.; Morgan, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Internet mapping applications for geologic data allow simultaneous data delivery and collection, enabling quick data modification while efficiently supplying the end user with information. Utilizing Web-based technologies, the Colorado Geological Survey's Colorado Late Cenozoic Fault and Fold Database was transformed from a monothematic, nonspatial Microsoft Access database into a complex information set incorporating multiple data sources. The resulting user-friendly format supports easy analysis and browsing. The core of the application is the Microsoft Access database, which contains information compiled from available literature about faults and folds that are known or suspected to have moved during the late Cenozoic. The database contains nonspatial fields such as structure type, age, and rate of movement. Geographic locations of the fault and fold traces were compiled from previous studies at 1:250,000 scale to form a spatial database containing information such as length and strike. Integration of the two databases allowed both spatial and nonspatial information to be presented on the Internet as a single dataset (http://geosurvey.state.co.us/pubs/ceno/). The user-friendly interface enables users to view and query the data in an integrated manner, thus providing multiple ways to locate desired information. Retaining the digital data format also allows continuous data updating and quick delivery of newly acquired information. This dataset is a valuable resource to anyone interested in earthquake hazards and the activity of faults and folds in Colorado. Additional geologic hazard layers and imagery may aid in decision support and hazard evaluation. The up-to-date and customizable maps are invaluable tools for researchers or the public.

  16. Internet-based psychotherapy in young adult survivors of pediatric cancer: feasibility and participants' satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Diana C M; Knaevelsrud, Christine; Duran, Gabriele; Waadt, Sabine; Goldbeck, Lutz

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The Internet-based psychotherapeutic intervention Onco-STEP for adolescent and young adult (AYA)-aged survivors of pediatric cancer was developed, implemented, and participants' satisfaction was evaluated by use of questionnaires. The intervention consisted of two modules: "Looking Back," aimed to reduce posttraumatic stress symptoms, and "Looking Ahead," supported coping with cancer-related fears of relapse and progression. The writing program was fully completed by 20 participants (Mage=27.3±4.8 years at study; 70% female). The majority was satisfied and perceived the treatment components as helpful. Results demonstrate that an Internet-based psychotherapeutic intervention for AYA-aged survivors of pediatric cancer is feasible and accepted by the target population.

  17. Boredom Proneness, Social Connectedness, and Sexual Addiction among Men Who Have Sex with Male Internet Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Michael P.; Blalock, Andrew C.

    2006-01-01

    The authors collected surveys from 517 men who have sex with men (MSM) recruited from Internet chat rooms to examine the relationships among boredom, social connectedness, and sexual addiction. The results provide addictions professionals psychosocial factors to assess when working with sexually addicted MSM. (Contains 3 tables.)

  18. Loneliness and Shyness in Adolescent Problematic Internet Users: The Role of Social Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huan, Vivien S.; Ang, Rebecca P.; Chye, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Davis' ("Comput Hum Behav" 17:187-195, 2001) cognitive-behavioral model of problematic Internet use (PIU) proposed and theorized that certain psychopathological characteristics present within an individual, predispose him to PIU. Objective: This study extended Davis' model in hypothesizing that social anxiety…

  19. First-Time-Users' Impressions of Continuing Education Using the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conte, Nelly

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The paper's aim is to describe the first experiences of, opinions and attitudes toward, continuing education using the internet of a group of Puerto Rican pharmacists after an online course. Design/methodology/approach: This is a descriptive study using a focus group of practicing pharmacists who participated in continuing education using…

  20. Identifying users of traditional and Internet-based resources for meal ideas: An association rule learning approach.

    PubMed

    Doub, Allison E; Small, Meg L; Levin, Aron; LeVangie, Kristie; Brick, Timothy R

    2016-08-01

    Increasing home cooking while decreasing the consumption of food prepared away from home is a commonly recommended weight management strategy, however research on where individuals obtain ideas about meals to cook at home is limited. This study examined the characteristics of individuals who reported using traditional and Internet-based resources for meal ideas. 583 participants who were ≥50% responsible for household meal planning were recruited to approximate the 2014 United States Census distribution on sex, age, race/ethnicity, and household income. Participants reported demographic characteristics, home cooking frequency, and their use of 4 traditional resources for meal ideas (e.g., cookbooks), and 7 Internet-based resources for meal ideas (e.g., Pinterest) in an online survey. Independent samples t-tests compared home cooking frequency by resource use. Association rule learning identified those demographic characteristics that were significantly associated with resource use. Family and friends (71%), food community websites (45%), and cookbooks (41%) were the most common resources reported. Cookbook users reported preparing more meals at home per week (M = 9.65, SD = 5.28) compared to non-cookbook users (M = 8.11, SD = 4.93; t = -3.55, p < 0.001). Resource use was generally higher among parents and varied systematically with demographic characteristics. Findings suggest that home cooking interventions may benefit by modifying resources used by their target population.

  1. Identifying users of traditional and Internet-based resources for meal ideas: An association rule learning approach.

    PubMed

    Doub, Allison E; Small, Meg L; Levin, Aron; LeVangie, Kristie; Brick, Timothy R

    2016-08-01

    Increasing home cooking while decreasing the consumption of food prepared away from home is a commonly recommended weight management strategy, however research on where individuals obtain ideas about meals to cook at home is limited. This study examined the characteristics of individuals who reported using traditional and Internet-based resources for meal ideas. 583 participants who were ≥50% responsible for household meal planning were recruited to approximate the 2014 United States Census distribution on sex, age, race/ethnicity, and household income. Participants reported demographic characteristics, home cooking frequency, and their use of 4 traditional resources for meal ideas (e.g., cookbooks), and 7 Internet-based resources for meal ideas (e.g., Pinterest) in an online survey. Independent samples t-tests compared home cooking frequency by resource use. Association rule learning identified those demographic characteristics that were significantly associated with resource use. Family and friends (71%), food community websites (45%), and cookbooks (41%) were the most common resources reported. Cookbook users reported preparing more meals at home per week (M = 9.65, SD = 5.28) compared to non-cookbook users (M = 8.11, SD = 4.93; t = -3.55, p < 0.001). Resource use was generally higher among parents and varied systematically with demographic characteristics. Findings suggest that home cooking interventions may benefit by modifying resources used by their target population. PMID:27067739

  2. Residual Neural Processing of Musical Sound Features in Adult Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Lydia; Vuust, Peter; Brattico, Elvira; Agrawal, Deepashri; Debener, Stefan; Büchner, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Wittfoth, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Auditory processing in general and music perception in particular are hampered in adult cochlear implant (CI) users. To examine the residual music perception skills and their underlying neural correlates in CI users implanted in adolescence or adulthood, we conducted an electrophysiological and behavioral study comparing adult CI users with normal-hearing age-matched controls (NH controls). We used a newly developed musical multi-feature paradigm, which makes it possible to test automatic auditory discrimination of six different types of sound feature changes inserted within a musical enriched setting lasting only 20 min. The presentation of stimuli did not require the participants’ attention, allowing the study of the early automatic stage of feature processing in the auditory cortex. For the CI users, we obtained mismatch negativity (MMN) brain responses to five feature changes but not to changes of rhythm, whereas we obtained MMNs for all the feature changes in the NH controls. Furthermore, the MMNs to deviants of pitch of CI users were reduced in amplitude and later than those of NH controls for changes of pitch and guitar timber. No other group differences in MMN parameters were found to changes in intensity and saxophone timber. Furthermore, the MMNs in CI users reflected the behavioral scores from a respective discrimination task and were correlated with patients’ age and speech intelligibility. Our results suggest that even though CI users are not performing at the same level as NH controls in neural discrimination of pitch-based features, they do possess potential neural abilities for music processing. However, CI users showed a disrupted ability to automatically discriminate rhythmic changes compared with controls. The current behavioral and MMN findings highlight the residual neural skills for music processing even in CI users who have been implanted in adolescence or adulthood. Highlights: -Automatic brain responses to musical feature changes

  3. Requirements of older adults for a daily use of an internet-based cognitive training platform.

    PubMed

    Haesner, Marten; O'Sullivan, Julie L; Gövercin, Mehmet; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    A decline of cognitive abilities is a part of normal human ageing. However, recent research has demonstrated that an enriched environment can have a beneficial impact on cognitive function in old age. Accordingly, mentally and socially active lifestyles are associated with less cognitive decline in old age. Specific interventions such as computerized cognitive training programs for older adults are also known to have a positive effect on the level of cognitive functioning. Therefore, online platforms combining cognitive training with web 2.0 features may yield multiple benefits for older users. However, to date only little research exists on technological acceptance and media use in this age-group especially for cognitively-impaired seniors. Therefore, in order to assess specific preferences and potential barriers of older adults regarding a web-based platform for cognitive training, we conducted qualitative interviews with 12 older adults. Half of the participants were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Most importantly, our results show that cognitive exercises should incorporate themes and topics older adults are interested in. Additional communication features could serve as ideal methods for increasing user motivation. Furthermore, we derived eight critical requirements of older adults concerning daily use of a web-based cognitive training platform. Implications for future research and development are discussed.

  4. An Internet survey of marijuana and hot shower use in adults with cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS).

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Thangam; Sengupta, Jyotirmoy; Lodhi, Atena; Schroeder, Abigail; Adams, Kathleen; Hogan, Walter J; Wang, Yanzhi; Andrews, Christopher; Storr, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a chronic disorder characterized by episodic nausea and vomiting. A large proportion of patients use marijuana to control their symptoms. Several case reports implicate marijuana as a cause of intractable vomiting with compulsive hot water bathing considered pathognomonic of "cannabinoid hyperemesis." We sought to examine the relationship between marijuana use and CVS. Patients >18 years of age diagnosed by a health care provider were invited to participate in an anonymous internet-based survey. A total of 514 patients participated and 437 completed questions about marijuana use. Mean age was 34 ± 12 years with patients being predominantly female (63%), Caucasian (92%) and from the USA (82%). Nineteen percent never used marijuana and 81% did. Fifty-four percent used marijuana for health issues and 43% for recreational purposes. Users stated that it improved nausea, appetite, general well-being, stress levels and vomiting. Users were more likely to be male and have an associated anxiety disorder. Sixty-seven percent of patients reported taking hot showers/baths for symptom relief, and this was associated with marijuana use. (OR 2.54, CI 1.50-4.31, P = 0.0006). Eighty-one percent of patients with CVS who completed an internet survey reported frequent use of marijuana. With marijuana use, patients noted the greatest improvement with stress levels, appetite and nausea. Marijuana users were more likely to be male and have associated anxiety. Hot showers were not pathognomonic of marijuana use though they were more likely to be associated with its use.

  5. An Internet Survey of Marijuana and Hot Shower Use in Adults with Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS)

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Thangam; Sengupta, Jyotiromy; Lodhi, Atena; Schroeder, Abigail; Adams, Kathleen; Hogan, Walter J.; Wang, Yanzhi; Andrews, Christopher; Storr, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a chronic disorder characterized by episodic nausea and vomiting. A Large proportion of patients use marijuana to control their symptoms. Several case reports implicate marijuana as a cause of intractable vomiting with compulsive hot water bathing considered pathognomonic of “cannabinoid hyperemesis.” We sought to examine the relationship between marijuana use and CVS. Patients >18 years of age diagnosed by a health care provider were invited to participate in an anonymous internet-based survey. A total of 514 patients participated and 437 completed questions about marijuana use. Mean age was 34 ± 12 years with patients being predominantly female (63%), Caucasian (92%) and from the USA (82%). Nineteen percent never used marijuana and 81% did. Fifty-four percent used marijuana for health issues and 43% for recreational purposes. Users stated that it improved nausea, appetite, general well-being, stress levels and vomiting. Users were more likely to be male and have an associated anxiety disorder. Sixty-seven percent of patients reported taking hot showers/baths for symptom relief, and this was associated with marijuana use. (OR 2.54, CI 1.50–4.31, P – 0.0006). Eight-one percent of patients with CVS who completed an internet survey reported frequent use of marijuana. With marijuana use, patients note greatest improvement with stress levels, appetite and nausea. Marijuana users were more likely to be male and have associated anxiety. Hot showers were pathognomonic of marijuana use though they were more likely to be associated with its use. PMID:24792504

  6. [A review of research on music perception ability for adult cochlear implant users].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziye; Liu, Bo; Wang, Shuo

    2012-11-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is a kind of surgically implanted electronic device that provides a sense of sound to a person who has severe to profound sensorineural hearing impairment. However, studies have shown that the performance in music perception for CI users has not been achieved to an ideal level. It is important to evaluate the ability to perceive music using well designed music perception test materials, in order to improve the quality of life for cochlear implant users. This paper reviewed the studies on assessing music perception ability for adult cochlear implant users from the existing literature. PMID:23379124

  7. Prevalence of problematic internet use in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Király, Orsolya; Maraz, Aniko; Nagygyörgy, Katalin; Demetrovics, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Internet use is an integral part of our everyday activities; however, Internet use may become problematic and harmful in a minority of cases. The majority of reported prevalence rates of problematic Internet use refer to adolescent samples, whereas epidemiological studies on representative adult populations are lacking. This study aimed to reveal the prevalence and characteristics of problematic Internet use in Slovenia. Methods Problematic Internet Use Questionnaire (PIUQ) was included in European Health Interview Study (EHIS) on representative Slovenian sample. The frequency of Internet use and problematic Internet use were both assessed. Results 59.9% of Slovenian adult population uses the Internet daily, and 3.1% are at risk of becoming problematic Internet users, 11% in the age group from 20 to 24 years. Those being at risk for becoming problematic Internet users are younger (mean age 31.3 vs. 48.3 for non-problematic users), more likely to be males (3.6% of males, whereas 2.6% of females are affected), students (12.0%), unemployed (6.3%) or unable to work (8.7%), single (6.5%), with high education (4.5%). Regression analysis revealed that the strongest predictor of being at risk for problematic Internet use is age (ß=-0.338, p<0.001); followed by high educational level (ß=0.145; p<0.001) and student status (ß=0.136; p<0.001). Conclusion 3.1% of Slovenian adult population are at risk of becoming problematic Internet users, whereas 3 out of 20 Slovenian adolescents aged from 18 to 19 years are at risk (14.6%). Prevention programs and treatment for those affected are paramount, especially for the young generation. PMID:27703540

  8. Internet User and Electronic Journals Perception: An Inservice Science Teacher Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuangchalerm, Prasart

    2010-01-01

    The growth and diversity of electronic academic journals had been widely distributed. It can be made our beliefs that future electronic scholarly journals will be different from their print antecedents and that both will fill a different niche of user, and will be necessary for the growth of any field knowledge. This study aims to investigate…

  9. Understanding Instructional Support Needs of Emerging Internet Users for Web-Based Information Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Naman K.; Penstein Rosé, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    As the wealth of information available on the Web increases, Web-based information seeking becomes a more and more important skill for supporting both formal education and lifelong learning. However, Web-based information access poses hurdles that must be overcome by certain student populations, such as low English competency users, low literacy…

  10. Technical Report and Data File User's Manual for the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Irwin; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Norris, Norma; Rock, Donald; Jungeblut, Ann; O'Reilly, Patricia; Berlin, Martha; Mohadjer, Leyla; Waksberg, Joseph; Goksel, Huseyin; Burke, John; Rieger, Susan; Green, James; Klein, Merle; Campbell, Anne; Jenkins, Lynn; Kolstad, Andrew; Mosenthal, Peter; Baldi, Stephane

    Chapter 1 of this report and user's manual describes design and implementation of the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS). Chapter 2 reviews stages of sampling for national and state survey components; presents weighted and unweighted response rates for the household component; and describes non-incentive and prison sample designs. Chapter…

  11. The influence of sexually explicit Internet material on sexual risk behavior: a comparison of adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Peter, Jochen; Valkenburg, Patti M

    2011-08-01

    This study had three goals: first, to investigate whether sexually explicit Internet material (SEIM) affects sexual risk behavior; second, to study whether these effects differ between adolescents and adults; and third, to analyze, separately for adolescents and adults, whether gender and age moderate an influence of SEIM on sexual risk behavior. The authors conducted a 2-wave panel survey among nationally representative random samples of 1,445 Dutch adolescents and 833 Dutch adults. SEIM use increased sexual risk behavior among adults, but not among adolescents. More specifically, moderator analyses showed that SEIM use increased sexual risk behavior only among male adults, but not among female adults. In the adolescent sample, no moderating gender effect occurred. Neither among adolescents nor among adults did age moderate the effects. Our study shows that SEIM may influence outcomes related to people's sexual health. It also suggests that male adults may present a potential risk group for adverse effects of SEIM. PMID:21476164

  12. Problematic Internet Users' Discounting Behaviors Reflect an Inability to Delay Gratification, Not Risk Taking.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Tian, Moqian; Taxer, Jamie; Zheng, Ya; Wu, Haiyan; Sun, Shiyue; Liu, Xun

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between impulse control disorder (ICD) behaviors and problematic Internet use (PIU) has been established in the literature. Our aim was to further investigate whether the ICDs of individuals suffering from PIU primarily involve an inability to delay gratification or a tendency to take risks. Using delay and probability discounting tasks, we compared the subjective value of discounting between PIU individuals and controls in conditions of gaining or losing different monetary amounts. The results of the present study revealed a significant positive relationship between PIU and impulsivity scores. PIU individuals discounted delayed amounts more steeply than controls, regardless of the reward sign and monetary amount. Conversely, there were no significant group differences in the probability discounting task. These findings suggest that PIU individuals may be more impulsive than controls when impulsivity is framed as insensitivity to delayed outcomes rather than as a tendency to take risks, which is inconsistent with the view of impulsivity as a general trait. PMID:26894438

  13. Risk perceptions of smokeless tobacco among adolescents and adult users and nonusers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sherry T.; Nemeth, Julianna M.; Klein, Elizabeth G.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Kwan, Mei-Po; Wewers, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth in smokeless tobacco (ST) consumption has raised questions about consumer risk perceptions of ST products, especially in high-risk vulnerable populations. This qualitative study examined risk perceptions of ST among adolescent and adult users and non-users in Ohio Appalachia. Focus groups and interviews were held with adolescents (n=53; mean age of 17 years) and adults (n=63; mean age of 34 years) from four Ohio Appalachian counties. Participants were asked about their perceptions of ST-related health risks, ST safety, and the relative safety of ST compared to cigarettes. Transcriptions were coded independently by two individuals. Overall, participants were knowledgeable about health problems from ST use (e.g., oral cancers, periodontal disease). Nearly all participants stated that ST use is not safe; however, there was disagreement about its relative safety. Some perceived all tobacco products as equally harmful; others believed that ST is safer than cigarettes for either the user or those around the user. Disagreements about ST relative safety may reflect mixed public health messages concerning the safety of ST. Comprehensive consumer messages about the relative safety of ST compared to cigarettes are needed. Messages should address the effect of ST on the health of the user as well as those exposed to the user. PMID:25832126

  14. Strengthening the safety net for online seniors: factors influencing differences in health information seeking among older internet users.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Sally J; Macias, Wendy

    2008-12-01

    Earlier studies clearly have shown that older adults are going online and accessing health information, but they are not a monolithic group. The goal of this study is to identify different types of older online Americans and to examine their online health information attitudes and behaviors. A total of 424 individuals age 55+ responded to an online survey. Three types of users were found based on demographic and computer-use factors: power users, well-to-do, and older men. Two types were found based on health attitudes and behaviors: health traditionalists and health technologists. The study found interesting relationships among these groups and also explored their use and evaluation of specific types of health-related websites and their motivations for going online. Suggestions are made for extending this research to other populations and further exploring the theoretical model of senior's online health interactions (SOHI) that drives the study.

  15. Internet-delivered lifestyle physical activity intervention: limited inflammation and antioxidant capacity efficacy in overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek T; Carr, Lucas J; Dorozynski, Chris; Gomashe, Chirag

    2009-01-01

    Overweight and physical inactivity are associated with elevated reactive oxygen species and chronic low-grade inflammation. Exercise training studies have measured changes in systemic inflammatory and oxidative/antioxidative biomarkers but predominantly at moderate-high intensities. Few low-intensity, lifestyle-based physical activity (PA) studies have been conducted. The purpose of this study was to determine whether improvements in lifestyle-oriented PA resulting from a 16-wk Internet-delivered PA program [Active Living Every Day-Internet (ALED-I)] elicit cardioprotective improvements in measures of inflammation, oxidation, or antioxidant enzyme capacity. Forty-one men and women (age 23-62 yr) were randomized to either the ALED-I intervention [n = 19; age = 40.4 +/- 1.9 yr; body mass index (BMI) = 31.4 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)] or a delayed intent-to-treat control condition (n = 22; age = 46.6 +/- 1.3 yr; BMI = 31.0 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2)). TNF-alpha, C-reactive protein, myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, total antioxidative capacity, change in PA, and other cardiometabolic disease risk factors were measured at baseline and postintervention. The ALED-I group increased PA and decreased central adiposity without changes in the control group. There was no change in the control group for any inflammation, oxidation, or antioxidant biomarkers. TNF-alpha decreased (P = 0.01) in the intervention group but was not statistically different from the control group. In conclusion, modest improvements in daily low-intensity ambulatory PA as a result of an Internet-delivered lifestyle PA intervention may be cardioprotective in sedentary and overweight adults through reductions in central adiposity and inflammation. However, the absence of favorable changes in other inflammation, oxidation, and antioxidant biomarkers highlights the need for further attention to the dose response of lifestyle-structured PA promotion strategies for health maintenance/improvement.

  16. Delivery of rural and remote health care via a broadband Internet Protocol network - views of potential users.

    PubMed

    Jennett, P; Yeo, M; Scott, R; Hebert, M; Teo, W

    2005-01-01

    We asked the views of potential users of a proposed Canadian broadband Internet Protocol (IP) network for health, the Alberta SuperNet. The three user groups were drawn from the public, provider and private sectors. In all, 35 health-sector participants were selected (17 government, nine health-care organizations, five providers/practitioners and four private sector). The questionnaire was Web-based, semistructured and self-administered. It consisted of four major areas: value, readiness, effect on usual care and limitations. A total of 28 (80%) individuals responded to the questionnaire: 21 (81%) were from the public sector (three provincial, nine regional and nine organizational), three (60%) were from the provider sector and four (100%) were from the private sector. Overall, the items related to health services and health human resources were considered to be the most valuable to rural communities. Respondents identified the expansion of telehealth services as the most important, except those from the private sector, who ranked this a close second. The health system's move to the use of electronic health records was ranked second in importance by all respondents. The private-sector respondents viewed all user groups to be generally less ready (mean score 2.5 on a seven-point scale from 1 = not ready to 7 = ready), while the public-sector respondents were the most optimistic (mean score 4.0). Specific socioeconomic impact data were limited. The top-ranked disadvantage of the 10 suggested was that 'Changes in health-service delivery practices and/or processes will be required'. PMID:16356317

  17. Exploring the Neural Basis of Avatar Identification in Pathological Internet Gamers and of Self-Reflection in Pathological Social Network Users.

    PubMed

    Leménager, Tagrid; Dieter, Julia; Hill, Holger; Hoffmann, Sabine; Reinhard, Iris; Beutel, Martin; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Kiefer, Falk; Mann, Karl

    2016-09-01

    Background and aims Internet gaming addiction appears to be related to self-concept deficits and increased angular gyrus (AG)-related identification with one's avatar. For increased social network use, a few existing studies suggest striatal-related positive social feedback as an underlying factor. However, whether an impaired self-concept and its reward-based compensation through the online presentation of an idealized version of the self are related to pathological social network use has not been investigated yet. We aimed to compare different stages of pathological Internet game and social network use to explore the neural basis of avatar and self-identification in addictive use. Methods About 19 pathological Internet gamers, 19 pathological social network users, and 19 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing a self-retrieval paradigm, asking participants to rate the degree to which various self-concept-related characteristics described their self, ideal, and avatar. Self-concept-related characteristics were also psychometrically assessed. Results Psychometric testing indicated that pathological Internet gamers exhibited higher self-concept deficits generally, whereas pathological social network users exhibit deficits in emotion regulation only. We observed left AG hyperactivations in Internet gamers during avatar reflection and a correlation with symptom severity. Striatal hypoactivations during self-reflection (vs. ideal reflection) were observed in social network users and were correlated with symptom severity. Discussion and conclusion Internet gaming addiction appears to be linked to increased identification with one's avatar, evidenced by high left AG activations in pathological Internet gamers. Addiction to social networks seems to be characterized by emotion regulation deficits, reflected by reduced striatal activation during self-reflection compared to during ideal reflection. PMID:27415603

  18. Exploring the Neural Basis of Avatar Identification in Pathological Internet Gamers and of Self-Reflection in Pathological Social Network Users.

    PubMed

    Leménager, Tagrid; Dieter, Julia; Hill, Holger; Hoffmann, Sabine; Reinhard, Iris; Beutel, Martin; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Kiefer, Falk; Mann, Karl

    2016-09-01

    Background and aims Internet gaming addiction appears to be related to self-concept deficits and increased angular gyrus (AG)-related identification with one's avatar. For increased social network use, a few existing studies suggest striatal-related positive social feedback as an underlying factor. However, whether an impaired self-concept and its reward-based compensation through the online presentation of an idealized version of the self are related to pathological social network use has not been investigated yet. We aimed to compare different stages of pathological Internet game and social network use to explore the neural basis of avatar and self-identification in addictive use. Methods About 19 pathological Internet gamers, 19 pathological social network users, and 19 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing a self-retrieval paradigm, asking participants to rate the degree to which various self-concept-related characteristics described their self, ideal, and avatar. Self-concept-related characteristics were also psychometrically assessed. Results Psychometric testing indicated that pathological Internet gamers exhibited higher self-concept deficits generally, whereas pathological social network users exhibit deficits in emotion regulation only. We observed left AG hyperactivations in Internet gamers during avatar reflection and a correlation with symptom severity. Striatal hypoactivations during self-reflection (vs. ideal reflection) were observed in social network users and were correlated with symptom severity. Discussion and conclusion Internet gaming addiction appears to be linked to increased identification with one's avatar, evidenced by high left AG activations in pathological Internet gamers. Addiction to social networks seems to be characterized by emotion regulation deficits, reflected by reduced striatal activation during self-reflection compared to during ideal reflection.

  19. Optimizing Performance in Adult Cochlear Implant Users through Clinician Directed Auditory Training.

    PubMed

    Plant, Geoff; Bernstein, Claire Marcus; Levitt, Harry

    2015-11-01

    Clinician-directed auditory training using the KTH Speech Tracking Procedure can be a powerful approach for maximizing outcomes with adult cochlear implant (CI) users. This article first reviews prior research findings from an 8-week clinician-directed auditory training (AT) program using speech tracking that yielded significant gains in speech tracking rate and sentence recognition scores following training. The second focus of the article is to illustrate the value of intensive face-to-face long-term AT using speech tracking with adult CI users. A detailed case study report is presented that demonstrates major ongoing and progressive gains in tracking rate, sentence recognition, and improvements in self-perceived competence and confidence over the course of intensive long-term training. Given the potential of both short- and long-term clinician-directed auditory training via KTH speech tracking to help CI users reach their optimal performance level, consideration for more widespread clinical use is proposed in the overall rehabilitation of adult CI users. PMID:27587916

  20. The Problematic and Risky Internet Use Screening Scale (PRIUSS) for Adolescents and Young Adults: Scale Development and Refinement

    PubMed Central

    Jelenchick, Lauren A.; Eickhoff, Jens; Christakis, Dimitri A; Brown, Richard L.; Zhang, Chong; Benson, Meghan; Moreno, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    Problematic Internet use (PIU) is a growing health concern among adolescents and young adults. The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to develop and refine a theoretically-grounded and psychometrically-validated assessment instrument for PIU specifically tailored to adolescents and young adults. An item pool was developed using concept mapping and a review of the literature, and administered to 714 students from two universities between 18 and 25 years of age. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used in a development subsample (n=500) to construct the scale. A cross-validation sample (n=214) was used to confirm the scale’s reliability. The Problematic and Risky Internet Use Screening Scale (PRIUSS) is an 18-item scale with three subscales: Social Impairment, Emotional Impairment, and Risky/Impulsive Internet Use. Based on its strong theoretical foundation and promising psychometric performance, the PRIUSS may be a valuable tool for screening and prevention efforts in this population. PMID:24882938

  1. Internet-Based Interventions Have Potential to Affect Short-Term Mediators and Indicators of Dietary Behavior of Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Amanda; Nitzke, Susan; Kritsch, Karen; Kattelmann, Kendra; White, Adrienne; Boeckner, Linda; Lohse, Barbara; Hoerr, Sharon; Greene, Geoffrey; Zhang, Zhumin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a theory-based, Internet-delivered nutrition education module. Design: Randomized, treatment-control design with pre-post intervention assessments. Setting and Participants: Convenience sample of 160 young adults (aged 18-24) recruited by community educators in 4 states. Study completers (n = 96) included a mix of…

  2. An Exploration of Factors Related to Dissemination of and Exposure to Internet-Delivered Behavior Change Interventions Aimed at Adults: A Delphi Study Approach

    PubMed Central

    Oenema, Anke; Crutzen, Rik; de Nooijer, Jascha; de Vries, Nanne K; Brug, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    . The provision of tailored feedback, relevant and reliable information, and an easy navigation structure were related to an extended visit. Provision of regular new content and the possibility to monitor personal progress toward behavior change were identified as important factors to encourage a revisit. Primarily traditional promotion strategies, like word-of-mouth by family and friends, a publicity campaign with simultaneous use of various mass media, and recommendation by health professionals, were indicated as effective ways to encourage adults to visit an Internet intervention. Conclusions This systematic study identified important factors related to the dissemination of and exposure to Internet interventions aimed at adults. In order to improve optimal use of and exposure to Internet interventions, potential users may need to be motivated to visit such an intervention and the information provided needs to be personally relevant. Furthermore, several (technical) aspects of the intervention itself need to be taken into account when developing Internet interventions. PMID:18417443

  3. A tailored Internet-delivered intervention for smoking cessation designed to encourage social support and treatment seeking: usability testing and user tracing.

    PubMed

    Houston, Tom K; Ford, Daniel E

    2008-03-01

    While Internet technologies show promise for changing behavior, new methods for engaging individuals are needed to maximize effectiveness. The aim of this study is to design and evaluate an Internet-delivered intervention for smoking cessation that encouraged seeking support from family and treatment from doctors. To evaluate different introductions to the Internet site. We conducted usability testing and analyzed server logs to trace user participation in the website. Two groups of users (current smokers) were recruited using Google advertisements. In Phase 1, 58% (75/126) of users accessed the self-management strategies, but few users accessed the social support (28%) and treatment-seeking modules (33%). Then, a brief motivational introduction was added, stating the proven effectiveness of content in the unused modules, low use of these modules, and recommendations by two doctors to use all modules. Compared with Phase 1, in Phase 2 the mean time spent on the website per session increased (8 to 18 min, p = 0.01) and use of the social support (50%) and treatment seeking modules (56%) increased (both p < 0.01). At 1-month follow-up, reports of talking to family about smoking cessation also increased from 84% to 100% (p = 0.038). Changing the rationale and context of Web-based health information using a motivational introduction can change user behavior.

  4. A tailored Internet-delivered intervention for smoking cessation designed to encourage social support and treatment seeking: usability testing and user tracing.

    PubMed

    Houston, Tom K; Ford, Daniel E

    2008-03-01

    While Internet technologies show promise for changing behavior, new methods for engaging individuals are needed to maximize effectiveness. The aim of this study is to design and evaluate an Internet-delivered intervention for smoking cessation that encouraged seeking support from family and treatment from doctors. To evaluate different introductions to the Internet site. We conducted usability testing and analyzed server logs to trace user participation in the website. Two groups of users (current smokers) were recruited using Google advertisements. In Phase 1, 58% (75/126) of users accessed the self-management strategies, but few users accessed the social support (28%) and treatment-seeking modules (33%). Then, a brief motivational introduction was added, stating the proven effectiveness of content in the unused modules, low use of these modules, and recommendations by two doctors to use all modules. Compared with Phase 1, in Phase 2 the mean time spent on the website per session increased (8 to 18 min, p = 0.01) and use of the social support (50%) and treatment seeking modules (56%) increased (both p < 0.01). At 1-month follow-up, reports of talking to family about smoking cessation also increased from 84% to 100% (p = 0.038). Changing the rationale and context of Web-based health information using a motivational introduction can change user behavior. PMID:18604759

  5. Information Technologies as Health Management Tools: Urban Elders' Interest and Ability in Using the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cresci, M. Kay; Novak, Julie M.

    2012-01-01

    Older adults represent an increasing percentage of both the whole U.S. population and persons living with one or more chronic health conditions. However, extant research has largely overlooked older adults when examining current Internet users and the potential for the Internet as a health management resource. In this study, the researchers…

  6. Public library computer training for older adults to access high-quality Internet health information.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Bugg, Julie M

    2009-09-01

    An innovative experiment to develop and evaluate a public library computer training program to teach older adults to access and use high-quality Internet health information involved a productive collaboration among public libraries, the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and a Library and Information Science (LIS) academic program at a state university. One hundred and thirty-one older adults aged 54-89 participated in the study between September 2007 and July 2008. Key findings include: a) participants had overwhelmingly positive perceptions of the training program; b) after learning about two NIH websites (http://nihseniorhealth.gov and http://medlineplus.gov) from the training, many participants started using these online resources to find high quality health and medical information and, further, to guide their decision-making regarding a health- or medically-related matter; and c) computer anxiety significantly decreased (p < .001) while computer interest and efficacy significantly increased (p = .001 and p < .001, respectively) from pre- to post-training, suggesting statistically significant improvements in computer attitudes between pre- and post-training. The findings have implications for public libraries, LIS academic programs, and other organizations interested in providing similar programs in their communities.

  7. National Assessment of Adult Literacy, 2003: Public-Use Data File User's Guide. NCES 2007-464

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Elizabeth; Jin, Ying; White, Sheida

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics has updated the household and prison public-use data files for the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy and the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey. The accompanying 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy Public-Use Data File User's Guide explains how the data…

  8. “Most of the Time You Already Know”: Pharmaceutical Information Assembly by Young Adults on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Gilbert; Bundy, Henry

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the utilization of the Internet by young adults as a source of information for the non-medical use of prescription drugs. Collected during 2008 and 2009, the data presented here comes from semi-structured interviews (N=62) conducted in a northwestern city of the United States through support from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Previous studies have characterized young adults as particularly vulnerable to online prescription drug information which analysts portray as having a significant, invariably detrimental, impact on youth drug use behaviors. The results presented here suggest that young adults are more skeptical and information-savvy than many substance abuse analysts acknowledge. PMID:21599506

  9. Use of the Internet to Meet Sexual Partners, Sexual Risk Behavior, and Mental Health in Transgender Adults.

    PubMed

    Benotsch, Eric G; Zimmerman, Rick S; Cathers, Laurie; Heck, Ted; McNulty, Shawn; Pierce, Juan; Perrin, Paul B; Snipes, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the internet to meet sexual partners among transgender individuals and examine correlates of this use, including sexual risk behavior, discrimination experiences, and mental health. A sample of 166 transgender adults (112 male-to-female transgender women and 54 female-to-male transgender men) were recruited in community venues and anonymously completed measures assessing these variables. Most participants (64.5 %) were HIV-negative, 25.2 % were HIV-positive, and 10.3 % did not know their HIV status. Overall, 33.7 % of participants reported having met a sexual partner over the internet, which did not differ significantly between transgender women and men. Among these individuals, transgender women reported significantly more lifetime internet sexual partners (median = 3) than transgender men (median = 1). Use of the internet to meet sexual partners was associated with lower self-esteem but not with depression, anxiety, somatic distress or discrimination experiences. Among transgender women, use of the internet to meet sexual partners was associated with each of the 11 sexual risk behaviors examined, including having multiple partners, sex under the influence of drugs, number of unprotected anal or vaginal sex acts, and history of commercial sex work. The use of the internet to meet partners was not associated with sexual risk behavior among transgender men (0/11 variables assessed). Although the internet is a common mode of meeting sexual partners among some transgender adults, it may also be a potential venue for prevention interventions targeting transgender individuals at particularly high risk for HIV acquisition.

  10. A preliminary report of music-based training for adult cochlear implant users: rationales and development

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, Kate; Guthe, Emily; Driscoll, Virginia; Brown, Carolyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper provides a preliminary report of a music-based training program for adult cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Included in this report are descriptions of the rationale for music-based training, factors influencing program development, and the resulting program components. Methods Prior studies describing experience-based plasticity in response to music training, auditory training for persons with hearing impairment, and music training for cochlear implant recipients were reviewed. These sources revealed rationales for using music to enhance speech, factors associated with successful auditory training, relevant aspects of electric hearing and music perception, and extant evidence regarding limitations and advantages associated with parameters for music training with CI users. This information formed the development of a computer-based music training program designed specifically for adult CI users. Results Principles and parameters for perceptual training of music, such as stimulus choice, rehabilitation approach, and motivational concerns were developed in relation to the unique auditory characteristics of adults with electric hearing. An outline of the resulting program components and the outcome measures for evaluating program effectiveness are presented. Conclusions Music training can enhance the perceptual accuracy of music, but is also hypothesized to enhance several features of speech with similar processing requirements as music (e.g., pitch and timbre). However, additional evaluation of specific training parameters and the impact of music-based training on speech perception of CI users are required. PMID:26561884

  11. A User-Centric Knowledge Creation Model in a Web of Object-Enabled Internet of Things Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kibria, Muhammad Golam; Fattah, Sheik Mohammad Mostakim; Jeong, Kwanghyeon; Chong, Ilyoung; Jeong, Youn-Kwae

    2015-01-01

    User-centric service features in a Web of Object-enabled Internet of Things environment can be provided by using a semantic ontology that classifies and integrates objects on the World Wide Web as well as shares and merges context-aware information and accumulated knowledge. The semantic ontology is applied on a Web of Object platform to virtualize the real world physical devices and information to form virtual objects that represent the features and capabilities of devices in the virtual world. Detailed information and functionalities of multiple virtual objects are combined with service rules to form composite virtual objects that offer context-aware knowledge-based services, where context awareness plays an important role in enabling automatic modification of the system to reconfigure the services based on the context. Converting the raw data into meaningful information and connecting the information to form the knowledge and storing and reusing the objects in the knowledge base can both be expressed by semantic ontology. In this paper, a knowledge creation model that synchronizes a service logistic model and a virtual world knowledge model on a Web of Object platform has been proposed. To realize the context-aware knowledge-based service creation and execution, a conceptual semantic ontology model has been developed and a prototype has been implemented for a use case scenario of emergency service. PMID:26393609

  12. A User-Centric Knowledge Creation Model in a Web of Object-Enabled Internet of Things Environment.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Muhammad Golam; Fattah, Sheik Mohammad Mostakim; Jeong, Kwanghyeon; Chong, Ilyoung; Jeong, Youn-Kwae

    2015-09-18

    User-centric service features in a Web of Object-enabled Internet of Things environment can be provided by using a semantic ontology that classifies and integrates objects on the World Wide Web as well as shares and merges context-aware information and accumulated knowledge. The semantic ontology is applied on a Web of Object platform to virtualize the real world physical devices and information to form virtual objects that represent the features and capabilities of devices in the virtual world. Detailed information and functionalities of multiple virtual objects are combined with service rules to form composite virtual objects that offer context-aware knowledge-based services, where context awareness plays an important role in enabling automatic modification of the system to reconfigure the services based on the context. Converting the raw data into meaningful information and connecting the information to form the knowledge and storing and reusing the objects in the knowledge base can both be expressed by semantic ontology. In this paper, a knowledge creation model that synchronizes a service logistic model and a virtual world knowledge model on a Web of Object platform has been proposed. To realize the context-aware knowledge-based service creation and execution, a conceptual semantic ontology model has been developed and a prototype has been implemented for a use case scenario of emergency service.

  13. Internet-based interventions for eating disorders in adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This systematic review evaluates the efficacy of internet-based interventions for the treatment of different eating disorders in adults. Method A search for peer reviewed journal articles detailing Randomised Control Trials (RCT) and Controlled Trials (CT) addressing participants with eating disorders aged at least 16 was completed in the electronic databases Web of Science, PsycInfo and PubMed. The quality of the included articles was assessed, results were reviewed and effect sizes and corresponding confidence intervals were calculated. Results Eight studies, including a total of N = 609 participants, fulfilled the selection criteria and were included. The majority of treatments applied in these studies were based on CBT principles. Six studies described guided self-help interventions that showed significant symptom reduction in terms of primary and secondary outcomes regarding eating behaviour and abstinence rates. These studies produced significant medium to high effect sizes both within and between the groups after utilisation of guided self-help programs or a self-help book backed up with supportive e-mails. The two remaining studies utilised a specific writing task or e-mail therapy that did not follow a structured treatment program. Here, no significant effects could be found. Treatment dropout rates ranged from 9% to 47.2%. Furthermore, reductions in other symptoms, for example depression and anxiety, and an increase in quality of life were found by four studies. Conclusions Overall, the results support the value of internet-based interventions that use guided self-help to tackle eating disorders, but further research is needed due to the heterogeneity of the studies. PMID:23919625

  14. Everything you might want to know about the Internet but are afraid to ask!. A new users resource

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, E.

    1993-09-01

    This document is a guide to accessing the Internet and the services available on Internet. The document contains a short explanation of the Internet by E. Kroll and E. Hoffman, brief descriptions of the primary access tools, a glossary, answers to frequently asked questions about the Internet, J. Martin`s `Search for Internet Treasure` and other helpful information. The data access tools discussed in this document include Gopher, World Wide Web, WAIS, ASTRA, ARCHIE, WHOIS, NETSERV, and TRICKLE. The file transfer tool discussed is BITFTP. The two communication services discussed are NETNEWS and LISTSERV.

  15. Problematic Internet Use, Loneliness and Dating Anxiety among Young Adult University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odaci, Hatice; Kalkan, Melek

    2010-01-01

    The Internet, an important modern means of obtaining information and establishing communication with others, has become an increasingly essential element of human life. Although Internet use makes life easier, it can become problematic in the event of non-functional use. Debate and research into whether Internet addiction is a cause or an effect…

  16. High risk and little knowledge: Overdose experiences and knowledge among young adult nonmedical prescription opioid users

    PubMed Central

    Frank, David; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Guarino, Honoria; Bennett, Alex; Wendel, Travis; Jessell, Lauren; Teper, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioid-involved overdoses in the United States have dramatically increased in the last 15 years, largely due to a rise in prescription opioid (PO) use. Yet few studies have examined the overdose knowledge and experience of nonmedical PO users. Methods In depth, semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews were conducted with 46 New York City young adults (ages 18–32) who reported using POs nonmedically within the past 30 days. Verbatim interview transcripts were coded for key themes in an analytic process informed by grounded theory. Results Despite significant experience with overdose (including overdose deaths), either personally or within opioid-using networks, participants were relatively uninformed about overdose awareness, avoidance and response strategies, in particular the use of naloxone. Overdose experiences typically occurred when multiple pharmaceuticals were used (often in combination with alcohol) or after participants had transitioned to heroin injection. Participants tended to see themselves as distinct from traditional heroin users, and were often outside of the networks reached by traditional opioid safety/overdose prevention services. Consequently, they were unlikely to utilize harm reduction services, such as syringe exchange programs (SEPs), that address drug users' health and safety. Conclusions These findings suggest that many young adult nonmedical PO users are at high risk of both fatal and non-fatal overdose. There is a pressing need to develop innovative outreach strategies and overdose prevention programs to better reach and serve young PO users and their network contacts. Prevention efforts addressing risk for accidental overdose, including opioid safety/overdose reversal education and naloxone distribution, should be tailored for and targeted to this vulnerable group. PMID:25151334

  17. Tobacco May Mask Poorer Episodic Memory among Young Adult Cannabis Users

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Randi M.; Crane, Natania A.; Mermelstein, Robin; Gonzalez, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Objective Co-occurring cannabis and tobacco use has become increasingly prevalent among young adults, but it is not clear how tobacco use may alter the neurocognitive profile typically observed among cannabis users. Although there is substantial evidence citing cannabis and tobacco's individual impact on episodic memory and related brain structures, few studies have examined the impact of combined cannabis and tobacco use on memory. Method This investigation examined relationships between amount of past year cannabis and tobacco use on four different indices of episodic memory among a sample of young adults who identified cannabis as their drug of choice. Results Results indicated that more cannabis use was linked with poorer initial acquisition, total learning and delayed recall on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test--Revised (HVLT-R), but only among cannabis users who sporadically smoked cigarettes in the past year. Conversely, amount of past year cannabis use was not associated with episodic memory performance among individuals who more consistently smoked cigarettes in the past year. These differences could not be explained by several relevant potential confounds. Conclusions These findings provide important insight into a potential mechanism (i.e., attenuation of cognitive decrements) that might reinforce use of both substances and hamper cessation attempts among cannabis users who also smoke cigarettes. Ongoing and future research will help to better understand how co-use of cannabis and tobacco impacts memory during acute intoxication and abstinence, and the stability of these associations over time. PMID:25558879

  18. Perceptual dialect categorization by an adult cochlear implant user: a case study.

    PubMed

    Clopper, Cynthia G; Pisoni, David B

    2004-11-01

    Research on the perception of indexical properties of speech in normal-hearing listeners has revealed that speech perception and spoken word recognition involve not only encoding of the linguistic message, but also processing and storage of talker-specific "indexical" properties of the speech signal, such as age, gender, and dialect. The perceptual processing of talker-specific information in speech has also been shown to affect the speech perception abilities of pediatric and adult cochlear implant users. In the current study, "Mr. S.", a post-lingually deafened adult cochlear implant user with 8 years of implant experience participated in a six-alternative forced-choice perceptual dialect categorization task without training or feedback. Normal-hearing adults can categorize unfamiliar talkers by regional dialect of American English with about 30% accuracy in a six-alternative forced-choice task. While this performance is poor, it is statistically above chance. Like the normal-hearing listeners, "Mr. S."'s performance was also statistically above chance and his scores were within one standard deviation of the mean performance of 30 normal-hearing controls. The present results suggest that "Mr. S." was able to perceive and encode non-linguistic talker-specific information from the speech signal that he received through his implant and use that information in an explicit test of dialect categorization. PMID:21423817

  19. Perceptual dialect categorization by an adult cochlear implant user: a case study.

    PubMed

    Clopper, Cynthia G; Pisoni, David B

    2004-11-01

    Research on the perception of indexical properties of speech in normal-hearing listeners has revealed that speech perception and spoken word recognition involve not only encoding of the linguistic message, but also processing and storage of talker-specific "indexical" properties of the speech signal, such as age, gender, and dialect. The perceptual processing of talker-specific information in speech has also been shown to affect the speech perception abilities of pediatric and adult cochlear implant users. In the current study, "Mr. S.", a post-lingually deafened adult cochlear implant user with 8 years of implant experience participated in a six-alternative forced-choice perceptual dialect categorization task without training or feedback. Normal-hearing adults can categorize unfamiliar talkers by regional dialect of American English with about 30% accuracy in a six-alternative forced-choice task. While this performance is poor, it is statistically above chance. Like the normal-hearing listeners, "Mr. S."'s performance was also statistically above chance and his scores were within one standard deviation of the mean performance of 30 normal-hearing controls. The present results suggest that "Mr. S." was able to perceive and encode non-linguistic talker-specific information from the speech signal that he received through his implant and use that information in an explicit test of dialect categorization.

  20. Psychological characteristics of Internet dating service users: the effect of self-esteem, involvement, and sociability on the use of Internet dating services.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mikyoung; Kwon, Kyoung-Nan; Lee, Mira

    2009-08-01

    This study explores the three major consumer characteristics that underlie the use of Internet dating services: self-esteem, involvement in romantic relationships, and sociability. A significant three-way interaction effect among these factors emerged. Among sociable people, individuals with high self-esteem are more likely to use Internet dating services than are those with low self-esteem when they are highly involved in romantic relationships. The opposite pattern was revealed for sociable people, however, when they are less involved in romantic relationships. That is, individuals with low self-esteem used Internet dating services more often than did those with high self-esteem when romantic relationships were not important. The implications for academic researchers and practitioners are discussed. PMID:19630586

  1. Revisualising 'porn': how young adults' consumption of sexually explicit Internet movies can inform approaches to Canadian sexual health promotion.

    PubMed

    Hare, Kathleen A; Gahagan, Jacqueline; Jackson, Lois; Steenbeek, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The Internet offers an invaluable opportunity to re-imagine ideas, constructs and disciplines to create innovative sexual health promotion interventions. To gain insight into what young adults (aged 19-28) may be seeking in online sexual resources and approaches, this study explored how young people perceived their sexual health to be influenced by their consumption of the highly utilised sexual medium of Sexually Explicit Internet Movies [SEIM]. Employing an exploratory, qualitative methodology, data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 12 urban, heterosexual young adults, who self-identified as having consumed SEIM for a period of at least one year. All interviews were audiotaped with permission, transcribed verbatim and the data were analysed to identify emergent thematic concepts. Participants described utilising SEIM as an all-inclusive sexual forum to learn more about the positive aspects of sexual health, in a context that they viewed as being devoid of alternatives. Young adults' perceptions of the utility of SEIM suggest that it would be beneficial to create novel, sex-positive online sexual health interventions. Further exploration is clearly warranted on how Internet resources that are related to sexual health, such as SEIM, can be utilised to facilitate innovative approaches to online sexual health promotion. PMID:24917353

  2. Revisualising 'porn': how young adults' consumption of sexually explicit Internet movies can inform approaches to Canadian sexual health promotion.

    PubMed

    Hare, Kathleen A; Gahagan, Jacqueline; Jackson, Lois; Steenbeek, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The Internet offers an invaluable opportunity to re-imagine ideas, constructs and disciplines to create innovative sexual health promotion interventions. To gain insight into what young adults (aged 19-28) may be seeking in online sexual resources and approaches, this study explored how young people perceived their sexual health to be influenced by their consumption of the highly utilised sexual medium of Sexually Explicit Internet Movies [SEIM]. Employing an exploratory, qualitative methodology, data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 12 urban, heterosexual young adults, who self-identified as having consumed SEIM for a period of at least one year. All interviews were audiotaped with permission, transcribed verbatim and the data were analysed to identify emergent thematic concepts. Participants described utilising SEIM as an all-inclusive sexual forum to learn more about the positive aspects of sexual health, in a context that they viewed as being devoid of alternatives. Young adults' perceptions of the utility of SEIM suggest that it would be beneficial to create novel, sex-positive online sexual health interventions. Further exploration is clearly warranted on how Internet resources that are related to sexual health, such as SEIM, can be utilised to facilitate innovative approaches to online sexual health promotion.

  3. An Internet-Based Computer-Tailored Intervention to Promote Responsible Drinking: Findings from a Pilot Test with Employed Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, Leanne M.; Gökbayrak, N. Simay; Van Marter, Deborah F.; Paiva, Andrea L.; Prochaska, Janice M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes pilot test findings of an Internet-based, Transtheoretical Model-based, computer tailored intervention for adults who exceed national guidelines for low-risk drinking. In a pilot test, 166 adults recruited from worksites completed one session and evaluated the program. Pre and post assessments indicate intention to make behavioral changes. Importantly, 94.3% of participants indicated that they would recommend the program. Ratings were positive with the majority of participants ‘agreeing’ or ‘strongly agreeing’ with all 14 evaluation items. Feasibility was demonstrated by recruiting and engaging employed adults. This program is a cost-effective prevention program promoting responsible drinking to adults. PMID:22448087

  4. The Influence of User Characteristics and a Periodic Email Prompt on Exposure to an Internet-Delivered Computer-Tailored Lifestyle Program

    PubMed Central

    van Osch, Liesbeth; Schulz, Daniela N; Kremers, Stef PJ; de Vries, Hein

    2012-01-01

    Background The Internet is a promising medium in the field of health promotion for offering tailored and targeted lifestyle interventions applying computer-tailored (CT) techniques to the general public. Actual exposure to CT interventions is not living up to its high expectations, as only a (limited) proportion of the target group is actually using these programs. Objective To investigate exposure to an Internet-delivered, CT lifestyle intervention, targeting physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, smoking behavior, and alcohol intake, we focused on three processes: first use, prolonged use, and sustained use. The first objectives were to identify user characteristics that predict initiation of an online CT lifestyle program (first use) and completion of this program (prolonged use). Furthermore, we studied the effect of using a proactive strategy, consisting of periodic email prompts, on program revisits (sustained use). Methods The research population for this study consisted of Dutch adults participating in the Adult Health Monitor, offered by the regional public health services. We used a randomized controlled trial design to assess predictors of first use, prolonged use, and sustained use. Demographics and behavioral characteristics, as well as the strategy used for revisiting, were included as predictors in the model. Results A total of 9169 participants indicated their interest in the new program and 5168 actually logged in to the program. Participants significantly more likely to initiate one of the CT modules were male, older, and employed, and had a lower income, higher body mass index, and relatively unhealthy lifestyle. Participants significantly more likely to complete one of the CT modules were older and had a higher income and a relatively healthier lifestyle. Finally, using a proactive strategy influenced sustained use, with people from the prompting condition being more likely to revisit the program (odds ratio 28.92, 95% confidence

  5. Learning Online? Educational Internet Use and Participation in Adult Learning, 2002 to 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Patrick; Selwyn, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Covering a decade during which the "digital divide" came to popular and political attention, and written at a time when the Internet continues to be championed as a means of widening access to educational opportunities, this paper presents an analysis of the social, economic and educational characteristics associated with using the Internet for…

  6. Using the NIATx Model to Implement User-Centered Design of Technology for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Adam; Judkins, Julianne; Dinauer, Susan; Isham, Andrew; Johnson, Roberta; Landucci, Gina; Atwood, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    What models can effectively guide the creation of eHealth and mHealth technologies? This paper describes the use of the NIATx model as a framework for the user-centered design of a new technology for older adults. The NIATx model is a simple framework of process improvement based on the following principles derived from an analysis of decades of research from various industries about why some projects fail and others succeed: (1) Understand and involve the customer; (2) fix key problems; (3) pick an influential change leader; (4) get ideas from outside the field; (5) use rapid-cycle testing. This paper describes the use of these principles in technology development, the strengths and challenges of using this approach in this context, and lessons learned from the process. Overall, the NIATx model enabled us to produce a user-focused technology that the anecdotal evidence available so far suggests is engaging and useful to older adults. The first and fourth principles were especially important in developing the technology; the fourth proved the most challenging to use. PMID:27025985

  7. Interview as intervention: The case of young adult multidrug users in the club scene

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven P.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Buttram, Mance E.; Levi-Minzi, Maria A.; Chen, Minxing

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on changes in substance use and substance dependence symptoms - without intervention - among young adult multidrug users in the club scene, ages 18–29, (N=444) who participated in a natural history study. Computer-assisted personal interviews at baseline and 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-ups included well-tested measures of substance use and dependence. Changes in substance dependence symptoms and drug use frequencies were calculated using the Cohen’s d statistic. Mean age was 22; 40% were female; 58% Hispanic, 17% White, and 21% Black. At 18-month follow-up assessment, participants reported significantly fewer days of cocaine (d= −.85 at 18 months), ecstasy (d= −.93), benzodiazepine (d= −.82), and prescription opioid (d= −.81) use, as well as reduced substance dependence symptoms (d= −.42). These results, together with data from focus groups with completers, suggest that comprehensive health and social risk assessments may have quite strong intervention effects among young adult multidrug users. PMID:22971689

  8. Internet use and decision making in community-based older adults

    PubMed Central

    James, Bryan D.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Yu, Lei; Bennett, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Use of the internet may provide tools and resources for better decision making, yet little is known about the association of internet use with decision making in older persons. We examined this relationship in 661 community-dwelling older persons without dementia from the Rush Memory and Aging Project, an ongoing longitudinal study of aging. Participants were asked to report if they had access to the internet and how frequently they used the internet and email. A 12-item instrument was used to assess financial and healthcare decision making using materials designed to approximate those used in real world settings. Items were summed to yield a total decision making score. Associations were tested via linear regression models adjusted for age, sex, race, education, and a measure of global cognitive function. Secondary models further adjusted for income, depression, loneliness, social networks, social support, chronic medical conditions, instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), life space size, and health and financial literacy. Interaction terms were used to test for effect modification. Almost 70% of participants had access to the internet, and of those with access, 55% used the internet at least several times a week. Higher frequency of internet use was associated with better financial and healthcare decision making (β = 0.11, p = 0.002). The association persisted in a fully adjusted model (β = 0.08, p = 0.024). Interaction models indicated that higher frequency of internet use attenuated the relationships of older age, poorer cognitive function, and lower levels of health and financial literacy with poorer healthcare and financial decision making. These findings indicate that internet use is associated with better health and financial decision making in older persons. Future research is required to understand whether promoting the use of the internet can produce improvements in healthcare and financial decision making. PMID:24578696

  9. Cannabis Use Is Quantitatively Associated with Nucleus Accumbens and Amygdala Abnormalities in Young Adult Recreational Users

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Kuster, John K.; Lee, Sang; Lee, Myung Joo; Kim, Byoung Woo; Makris, Nikos; van der Kouwe, Andre; Blood, Anne J.

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, but little is known about its effects on the human brain, particularly on reward/aversion regions implicated in addiction, such as the nucleus accumbens and amygdala. Animal studies show structural changes in brain regions such as the nucleus accumbens after exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, but less is known about cannabis use and brain morphometry in these regions in humans. We collected high-resolution MRI scans on young adult recreational marijuana users and nonusing controls and conducted three independent analyses of morphometry in these structures: (1) gray matter density using voxel-based morphometry, (2) volume (total brain and regional volumes), and (3) shape (surface morphometry). Gray matter density analyses revealed greater gray matter density in marijuana users than in control participants in the left nucleus accumbens extending to subcallosal cortex, hypothalamus, sublenticular extended amygdala, and left amygdala, even after controlling for age, sex, alcohol use, and cigarette smoking. Trend-level effects were observed for a volume increase in the left nucleus accumbens only. Significant shape differences were detected in the left nucleus accumbens and right amygdala. The left nucleus accumbens showed salient exposure-dependent alterations across all three measures and an altered multimodal relationship across measures in the marijuana group. These data suggest that marijuana exposure, even in young recreational users, is associated with exposure-dependent alterations of the neural matrix of core reward structures and is consistent with animal studies of changes in dendritic arborization. PMID:24741043

  10. The association of Internet addiction symptoms with impulsiveness, loneliness, novelty seeking and behavioral inhibition system among adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Li, Wendi; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Lin; Nie, Jia

    2016-09-30

    The aims of this study were to test the associations of the Internet addiction symptoms with impulsiveness, loneliness, novelty seeking and behavioral inhibition systems among adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and adults with non-ADHD. A total of 146 adults aged between 19 and 33 years involved in this study. Participants were assessed with the Chinese version of the adult ADHD Self-report scale (ASRS), the Revised Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS-R), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11 (BIS-11), the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ), the UCLA loneliness scale, and the Behavioral Inhibition System and Behavioral Activation System Scale (BIS/BAS Scale). The results of hierarchical regression analysis indicated that impulsiveness, loneliness, and behavioral inhibition system were significant predictors of Internet addition among adults with ADHD. Higher loneliness was significantly associated with more severe Internet addition symptoms among the non-ADHD group. Adults with high impulsiveness, loneliness, and BIS should be treated with caution for preventing Internet addiction. In addition, adults with and without ADHD should be provided with different preventative strategies. PMID:27449004

  11. The association of Internet addiction symptoms with impulsiveness, loneliness, novelty seeking and behavioral inhibition system among adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Li, Wendi; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Lin; Nie, Jia

    2016-09-30

    The aims of this study were to test the associations of the Internet addiction symptoms with impulsiveness, loneliness, novelty seeking and behavioral inhibition systems among adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and adults with non-ADHD. A total of 146 adults aged between 19 and 33 years involved in this study. Participants were assessed with the Chinese version of the adult ADHD Self-report scale (ASRS), the Revised Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS-R), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11 (BIS-11), the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ), the UCLA loneliness scale, and the Behavioral Inhibition System and Behavioral Activation System Scale (BIS/BAS Scale). The results of hierarchical regression analysis indicated that impulsiveness, loneliness, and behavioral inhibition system were significant predictors of Internet addition among adults with ADHD. Higher loneliness was significantly associated with more severe Internet addition symptoms among the non-ADHD group. Adults with high impulsiveness, loneliness, and BIS should be treated with caution for preventing Internet addiction. In addition, adults with and without ADHD should be provided with different preventative strategies.

  12. No site unseen: predicting the failure to control problematic Internet use among young adults.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuhiro; Moshier, Samantha J; Otto, Michael W

    2016-11-01

    Problematic Internet use has been associated with the neglect of valued activities such as work, exercise, social activities, and relationships. In the present study, we expanded the understanding of problematic Internet use by identifying an important predictor of the inability to curb Internet use despite the desire to do so. Specifically, in a college student sample reporting a mean of 27.8 h of recreational Internet use in the past week, we investigated the role of distress intolerance (DI)-an individual difference variable that refers to the inability of an individual to tolerate emotional discomfort and to engage in goal-directed behavior when distressed-to predict the failure to meet personal restrictions on Internet use. Consistent with hypotheses, DI emerged as a significant predictor of the failure to meet self-control goals in both bivariate and multivariate models, indicating that DI offers unique prediction of self-control failure with problematic Internet use. Given that DI is a modifiable trait, these results encourage consideration of DI-focused early intervention strategies. PMID:27426432

  13. No site unseen: predicting the failure to control problematic Internet use among young adults.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuhiro; Moshier, Samantha J; Otto, Michael W

    2016-11-01

    Problematic Internet use has been associated with the neglect of valued activities such as work, exercise, social activities, and relationships. In the present study, we expanded the understanding of problematic Internet use by identifying an important predictor of the inability to curb Internet use despite the desire to do so. Specifically, in a college student sample reporting a mean of 27.8 h of recreational Internet use in the past week, we investigated the role of distress intolerance (DI)-an individual difference variable that refers to the inability of an individual to tolerate emotional discomfort and to engage in goal-directed behavior when distressed-to predict the failure to meet personal restrictions on Internet use. Consistent with hypotheses, DI emerged as a significant predictor of the failure to meet self-control goals in both bivariate and multivariate models, indicating that DI offers unique prediction of self-control failure with problematic Internet use. Given that DI is a modifiable trait, these results encourage consideration of DI-focused early intervention strategies.

  14. Evaluating User Perceptions of Mobile Medication Management Applications With Older Adults: A Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication nonadherence has a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals with chronic disease. Several mobile medication management applications are available to help users track, remember, and read about their medication therapy. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the usability and usefulness of existing medication management applications for older adults. Methods We recruited 35 participants aged 50 and over to participate in a 2-hour usability session. The average age ranged from 52-78 years (mean 67 years) and 71% (25/35) of participants were female. Each participant was provided with an iPad loaded with four medication management applications: MyMedRec, DrugHub, Pillboxie, and PocketPharmacist. These applications were evaluated using the 10 item System Usability Scale (SUS) and visual analog scale. An investigator-moderated 30-minute discussion followed, and was recorded. We used a grounded theory (GT) approach to analyze qualitative data. Results When assessing mobile medication management applications, participants struggled to think of a need for the applications in their own lives. Many were satisfied with their current management system and proposed future use only if cognition and health declined. Most participants felt capable of using the applications after a period of time and training, but were frustrated by their initial experiences with the applications. The early experiences of participants highlighted the benefits of linear navigation and clear wording (eg, “undo” vs “cancel”) when designing for older users. While there was no order effect, participants attributed their poor performance to the order in which they tried the applications. They also described being a part of a technology generation that did not encounter the computer until adulthood. Of the four applications, PocketPharmacist was found to be the least usable with a score of 42/100 (P<.0001) though it offered a drug interaction

  15. Frequency of word occurrence in communication samples produced by adult communication aid users.

    PubMed

    Beukelman, D R; Yorkston, K M; Poblete, M; Naranjo, C

    1984-11-01

    Communication samples generated by five nonspeaking adults using Canon Communicators were collected for 14 consecutive days. Samples were analyzed to determine frequency of word occurrence. A core vocabulary of the 500 most frequently occurring words was analyzed further to determine spelling level and proportion of complete communication samples represented by subsets of the core vocabulary list. The 500 core vocabulary words represented 80% of the total words in the combined communication samples for the 5 subjects. Of all messages generated by the subjects, 33% could be communicated in their entirety using words from the core vocabulary list. The communication of the remaining messages required one or more words in addition to the core vocabulary. The spelling grade level of the words in the core vocabulary list did not exceed the seventh grade. The implications of the results for designing and customizing communication aids and for potential user training are discussed.

  16. Modelling and Predicting eHealth Usage in Europe: A Multidimensional Approach From an Online Survey of 13,000 European Union Internet Users

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Ramos, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Background More advanced methods and models are needed to evaluate the participation of patients and citizens in the shared health care model that eHealth proposes. Objective The goal of our study was to design and evaluate a predictive multidimensional model of eHealth usage. Methods We used 2011 survey data from a sample of 13,000 European citizens aged 16–74 years who had used the Internet in the previous 3 months. We proposed and tested an eHealth usage composite indicator through 2-stage structural equation modelling with latent variables and measurement errors. Logistic regression (odds ratios, ORs) to model the predictors of eHealth usage was calculated using health status and sociodemographic independent variables. Results The dimensions with more explanatory power of eHealth usage were health Internet attitudes, information health Internet usage, empowerment of health Internet users, and the usefulness of health Internet usage. Some 52.39% (6811/13,000) of European Internet users’ eHealth usage was more intensive (greater than the mean). Users with long-term health problems or illnesses (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.12–1.29) or receiving long-term treatment (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.03–1.20), having family members with long-term health problems or illnesses (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.34–1.55), or undertaking care activities for other people (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.40–1.77) had a high propensity toward intensive eHealth usage. Sociodemographic predictors showed that Internet users who were female (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.14–1.31), aged 25–54 years (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.05–1.21), living in larger households (3 members: OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.15–1.36; 5 members: OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.97–1.28; ≥6 members: OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.10–1.57), had more children <16 years of age (1 child: OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.18–1.14; 2 children: OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.94–1.17; 4 children: OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.88–2.08), and had more family members >65 years of age (1 member: OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.18–1.50; ≥4 members

  17. Predicting compulsive Internet use: it's all about sex!

    PubMed

    Meerkerk, Gert-Jan; Van Den Eijnden, Regina J J M; Garretsen, Henk F L

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the predictive power of various Internet applications on the development of compulsive Internet use (CIU). The study has a two-wave longitudinal design with an interval of 1 year. The first measurement contained 447 adult heavy Internet users who used the Internet at least 16 h per week and had Internet access at home for at least 1 year. For the second measurement, all participants were invited again, of whom 229 responded. By means of an online questionnaire, the respondents were asked about the time spent on various Internet applications and CIU. On a cross-sectional basis, gaming and erotica seem the most important Internet applications related to CIU. On a longitudinal basis, spending a lot of time on erotica predicted an increase in CIU 1 year later. The addictive potential of the different applications varies; erotica appears to have the highest potential. PMID:16497122

  18. Characteristics and treatment response of self-identified problematic Internet users in a behavioral addiction outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    Thorens, Gabriel; Achab, Sophia; Billieux, Joël; Khazaal, Yasser; Khan, Riaz; Pivin, Edward; Gupta, Vishal; Zullino, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Controversies remain about the validity of the diagnosis of problematic Internet use. This might be due in part to the lack of longitudinal naturalistic studies that have followed a cohort of patients who self-identify as having Internet-related problems. Methods: This retrospective study included 57 patients who consulted the Geneva Addiction Outpatient Clinic from January 1, 2007, to January 1, 2010. Patients underwent an initial clinical psychiatric evaluation that included collection of data on socio-demographics, method of referral, specific Internet usage, psychiatric diagnosis, and Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) scores. Treatment consisted of individual psychotherapeutic sessions. Results: Of these patients, 98% were male and 37% were 18 years or younger. Most patients were online gamers (46% playing massively multiplayer online role-playing games). The mean IAT score was 52.9 (range 20–90). Sixty-eight percent of patients had a co-morbid psychiatric diagnosis, with social phobia being the most prevalent (17.8%). Patients who remained in treatment (dropout rate 24%) showed an overall improvement of symptoms: 38.6% showed significant or average improvement on their CGI score, 26.3% showed minimal improvement, and 14% showed no change. Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that there are specific types of Internet use, with online gaming mainly affecting young male patients. As Internet addiction is not yet an official diagnosis, better instruments are needed to screen patients and to avoid false-negative and false-positive diagnoses. Successful care should integrate the treatment of co-morbid symptoms and involve families and relatives in the therapeutic process. PMID:25215217

  19. Understanding self-harm and suicide websites: a qualitative interview study of young adult website users.

    PubMed

    Baker, Darren; Fortune, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Self-harm and suicide websites have been heavily criticized both in the literature and the wider media, despite the fact that very little is known about them. To date, no study has interviewed users of these sites about them. This qualitative study aims to explore the accounts of young adults who engage in self-harming and suicidal behaviors and use websites dedicated to these issues, in order to develop a broader understanding of these websites and to identify potential implications for future research. In-depth interviews were conducted via e-mail with 10 participants, who were recruited directly from self-harm and suicide websites. Using discourse analysis, we identified three main ways in which participants wrote about the sites. They constructed them as sources of empathy and understanding, as communities, and as a way of coping with social and psychological distress. These discourses gave users access to important, socially valued identities, such as being understood, belonging to a community and coping with their problems. If health professionals and researchers hope to understand people who use self-harm and suicide websites, and engage them in their services, they must take a more balanced view and not focus solely on the possible risks associated with using such sites.

  20. A randomized controlled trial of guided internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for older adults with generalized anxiety.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shannon L; Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D; Soucy, Joelle N

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to establish the efficacy of guided Internet-delivered cognitive-behaviour therapy (ICBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) or subclinical GAD. Participants were randomized to receive seven modules of ICBT (n=24) or to a waiting list condition (WLC; n=22). Faster improvements in symptoms of anxiety and depression were observed for participants in the ICBT condition relative to the WLC, with large between-group effect sizes on the Generalized anxiety disorder-7 (d=.85) and the Patient health questionnaire (d=1.17) obtained at post-treatment. Further reduction in generalized anxiety symptoms was reported over the one-month follow-up. Treatment effects were replicated when control participants subsequently underwent treatment. Higher ratings of treatment credibility, but not expectancy, prior to ICBT predicted improvements over time. The results support the efficacy of ICBT as treatment for older adults with GAD.

  1. An Internet-Based Intervention to Promote Mental Fitness for Mildly Depressed Adults: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haverman, Merel; Kramer, Jeannet; Westerhof, Gerben J; Riper, Heleen; Walburg, Jan A; Boon, Brigitte; Bohlmeijer, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a worldwide problem warranting global solutions to tackle it. Enhancing well-being has benefits in its own right and could be a good strategy for preventing depression. Providing well-being interventions via the Internet may have synergetic effects. Objective Psyfit (“mental fitness online”) is a fully automated self-help intervention to improve well-being based on positive psychology. This study examines the clinical effects of this intervention. Methods We conducted a 2-armed randomized controlled trial that compared the effects of access to Psyfit for 2 months (n=143) to a waiting-list control condition (n=141). Mild to moderately depressed adults in the general population seeking self-help were recruited. Primary outcome was well-being measured by Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF) and WHO Well-being Index (WHO-5); secondary outcomes were depressive symptoms, anxiety, vitality, and general health measured by Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Anxiety subscale (HADS-A), and Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form (MOS-SF) vitality and general health subscales, respectively. Online measurements were taken at baseline, 2 months, and 6 months after baseline. Results The dropout rate was 37.8% in the Psyfit group and 22.7% in the control group. At 2-month follow-up, Psyfit tended to be more effective in enhancing well-being (nonsignificantly for MHC-SF: Cohen’s d=0.27, P=.06; significantly for WHO-5: Cohen’s d=0.31, P=.01), compared to the waiting-list control group. For the secondary outcomes, small but significant effects were found for general health (Cohen’s d=0.14, P=.01), vitality (d=0.22, P=.02), anxiety symptoms (Cohen’s d=0.32, P=.001), and depressive symptoms (Cohen’s d=0.36, P=.02). At 6-month follow-up, there were no significant effects on well-being (MHC-SF: Cohen’s d=0.01, P=.90; WHO-5: Cohen’s d=0.26, P=.11), whereas depressive symptoms

  2. The Internet as Social Support for Older Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Elizabeth A.; LaMartin, Kimberly M.

    2012-01-01

    Social support is a potentially powerful mediator of well-being for family carers. Given that social engagement often decreases with age, the Internet broadens the opportunities for aging carers of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) to provide support to one another. This article reviews what constitutes social…

  3. User Preferences for Content, Features, and Style for an App to Reduce Harmful Drinking in Young Adults: Analysis of User Feedback in App Stores and Focus Group Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Khadjesari, Zarnie; Fincham-Campbell, Stephanie; Deluca, Paolo; Watson, Rod; Drummond, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic screening and brief intervention (eSBI) is effective in reducing weekly alcohol consumption when delivered by a computer. Mobile phone apps demonstrate promise in delivering eSBI; however, few have been designed with an evidence-based and user-informed approach. Objective This study aims to explore from a user perspective, preferences for content, appearance, and operational features to inform the design of a mobile phone app for reducing quantity and frequency of drinking in young adults engaged in harmful drinking (18-30 year olds). Methods Phase 1 included a review of user reviews of available mobile phone apps that support a reduction in alcohol consumption. Apps were identified on iTunes and Google Play and were categorized into alcohol reduction support, entertainment, blood alcohol content measurement (BAC), or other. eSBI apps with ≥18 user reviews were subject to a content analysis, which coded praise, criticism, and recommendations for app content, functionality, and esthetics. Phase 2 included four focus groups with young adults drinking at harmful levels and residing in South London to explore their views on existing eSBI apps and preferences for future content, functionality, and appearance. Detailed thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Results In Phase 1, of the 1584 apps extracted, 201 were categorized as alcohol reduction, 154 as BAC calculators, 509 as entertainment, and 720 as other. We classified 32 apps as eSBI apps. Four apps had ≥18 user reviews: Change for Life Drinks Tracker, Drinksmeter, Drinkaware, and Alcohol Units Calculator. The highest proportion of content praises were for information and feedback provided in the apps (12/27, 44%), followed by praise for the monitoring features (5/27, 19%). Many (8/12, 67%) criticisms were for the drinking diary; all of these were related to difficulty entering drinks. Over half (18/32, 56%) of functionality criticisms were descriptions of software bugs, and over

  4. Social Media & Mobile Internet Use among Teens and Young Adults. Millennials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenhart, Amanda; Purcell, Kristen; Smith, Aaron; Zickuhr, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006, blogging has dropped among teens and young adults while simultaneously rising among older adults. As the tools and technology embedded in social networking sites change, and use of the sites continues to grow, youth may be exchanging "macro blogging" for microblogging with status updates. Blogging has declined in popularity among both…

  5. Adult, Career, and Vocational Education: An Internet Guide. ERIC Digest No. 196.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Judith O.

    This ERIC Digest is an annotated list of 40 websites and listservs devoted to adult, career, and vocational education. The following websites and listservs are included: six ERIC sites (ACCESS ERIC; AskERIC; the Education Resource Organizations Directory; the ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education; ORYX Press/Current Index…

  6. Influence of early linguistic experience on regional dialect categorization by an adult cochlear implant user: a case study.

    PubMed

    Tamati, Terrin N; Gilbert, Jaimie L; Pisoni, David B

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the ability of a cochlear implant user to categorize talkers by region of origin and examine the influence of prior linguistic experience on the perception of regional dialect variation. A postlingually deafened adult cochlear implant user from the Southern region of the United States completed a six-alternative forced-choice dialect categorization task. The cochlear implant user was most accurate at categorizing unfamiliar talkers from his own region and another familiar dialect region, and least accurate at categorizing talkers from less familiar regions. Although the dialect-specific information made available by a cochlear implant may be degraded compared with information available to normal-hearing listeners, this experienced cochlear implant user was able to reliably categorize unfamiliar talkers by region of origin. The participant made use of dialect-specific acoustic-phonetic information in the speech signal and previously stored knowledge of regional dialect differences from early exposure before implantation despite an early hearing loss.

  7. Internet Addiction and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between university students' internet addiction and psychopathology in Turkey. The study was based on data drawn from a national survey of university students in Turkey. 174 university students completed the SCL-90-R scale and Addicted Internet Users Inventory. Results show that students who use internet six…

  8. Evaluation of an Internet-Based, Bibliographic Database: Results of the NASA STI Program's ASAP User Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, John; Egge, Robert; McAfee, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    This document summarizes the feedback gathered during the user-testing phase in the development of an electronic library application: the Aeronautics and Space Access Pages (ASAP). It first provides some historical background on the NASA Scientific and Technical Information (STI) program and its efforts to enhance the services it offers the aerospace community. Following a brief overview of the ASAP project, it reviews the results of an online user survey, and from the lessons learned therein, outlines direction for future development of the project.

  9. Being an Informed Consumer of Health Information and Assessment of Electronic Health Literacy in a National Sample of Internet Users: Validity and Reliability of the e-HLS Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, Dale; Hughes, Susan; Hudson, Cassie; Bell, Valarie

    2016-01-01

    Background The Internet, with its capacity to provide information that transcends time and space barriers, continues to transform how people find and apply information to their own lives. With the current explosion in electronic sources of health information, including thousands of websites and hundreds of mobile phone health apps, electronic health literacy is gaining an increasing prominence in health and medical research. An important dimension of electronic health literacy is the ability to appraise the quality of information that will facilitate everyday health care decisions. Health information seekers explore their care options by gathering information from health websites, blogs, Web-based forums, social networking websites, and advertisements, despite the fact that information quality on the Internet varies greatly. Nonetheless, research has lagged behind in establishing multidimensional instruments, in part due to the evolving construct of health literacy itself. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine psychometric properties of a new electronic health literacy (ehealth literacy) measure in a national sample of Internet users with specific attention to older users. Our paper is motivated by the fact that ehealth literacy is an underinvestigated area of inquiry. Methods Our sample was drawn from a panel of more than 55,000 participants maintained by Knowledge Networks, the largest national probability-based research panel for Web-based surveys. We examined the factor structure of a 19-item electronic Health Literacy Scale (e-HLS) through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis, internal consistency reliability, and construct validity on sample of adults (n=710) and a subsample of older adults (n=194). The AMOS graphics program 21.0 was used to construct a measurement model, linking latent factors obtained from EFA with 19 indicators to determine whether this factor structure achieved a good fit with our entire sample

  10. Where Do U.S. Adults Who Do Not Use the Internet Get Health Information? Examining Digital Health Information Disparities From 2008 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Massey, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    With more people turning to the Internet for health information, a few questions remain: Which populations represent the remaining few who have never used the Internet, and where do they go for health information? The purpose of this study is to describe population characteristics and sources of health information among U.S. adults who do not use the Internet. Data from 3 iterations of the Health Information National Trends Survey (n = 1,722) are used to examine trends in health information sources. Weighted predicted probabilities demonstrate changes in information source over time. Older adults, minority populations, and individuals with low educational attainment represent a growing percentage of respondents who have looked for health information but have never used the Internet, highlighting trends in digital information disparities. However, 1 in 10 respondents who have never used the Internet also indicate that the Internet was their first source of health information, presumably through surrogates. Findings highlight digital disparities in information seeking and the complex nature of online information seeking. Future research should examine how individuals conceptualize information sources, measure skills related to evaluating information and sources, and investigate the social nature of information seeking. Health care organizations and public health agencies can leverage the multifaceted nature of information seeking to better develop information resources to increase information access by vulnerable populations. PMID:26166484

  11. Where Do U.S. Adults Who Do Not Use the Internet Get Health Information? Examining Digital Health Information Disparities From 2008 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Massey, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    With more people turning to the Internet for health information, a few questions remain: Which populations represent the remaining few who have never used the Internet, and where do they go for health information? The purpose of this study is to describe population characteristics and sources of health information among U.S. adults who do not use the Internet. Data from 3 iterations of the Health Information National Trends Survey (n = 1,722) are used to examine trends in health information sources. Weighted predicted probabilities demonstrate changes in information source over time. Older adults, minority populations, and individuals with low educational attainment represent a growing percentage of respondents who have looked for health information but have never used the Internet, highlighting trends in digital information disparities. However, 1 in 10 respondents who have never used the Internet also indicate that the Internet was their first source of health information, presumably through surrogates. Findings highlight digital disparities in information seeking and the complex nature of online information seeking. Future research should examine how individuals conceptualize information sources, measure skills related to evaluating information and sources, and investigate the social nature of information seeking. Health care organizations and public health agencies can leverage the multifaceted nature of information seeking to better develop information resources to increase information access by vulnerable populations.

  12. Are consumers of Internet health information “cyberchondriacs”? Characteristics of 24,965 users of a depression screening site

    PubMed Central

    Leykin, Yan; Muñoz, Ricardo F.; Contreras, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Background The number of individuals looking for health information on the Internet continues to expand. The purpose of the study was to understand the prevalence of major depression, among English-speaking individuals worldwide looking for information on depression online. Methods An automated online Mood Screener website was created and advertised via Google AdWords, for one year. Participants (N = 24,965) completed a depression screening measure and received feedback based on their results. Participants were then invited to participate in a longitudinal mood screening study. Results Of the 24,965 who completed the screening, 66.6% screened positive for current major depression, 44.4% indicated current suicidality, and 7.8% reported a recent (past two weeks) suicide attempt. Of those consenting to participate in the longitudinal study (n = 1,327, from 86 countries), 77.4% screened positive for past depression, 64.6% reported past suicidality, and 17.5% a past suicide attempt. Yet, only 25% of those screening positive for current depression, and only 37.2% of those reporting a recent suicide attempt are in treatment. Conclusions Many of the consumers of Internet health information may genuinely need treatment and are not “cyberchondriacs”. Online screening, treatment, and prevention efforts may have the potential to serve many currently untreated clinically depressed and suicidal individuals. PMID:21681872

  13. Challenges and Opportunities: A Report of the 1998 Library Survey of Internet Users at Seton Hall University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bao, Xue-Ming

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 786 students and faculty found 78.6% used the World Wide Web on a daily or weekly basis and provided information about user demographics, frequency of use and satisfaction, search results and problems, university library home-page use, search strategies, and search training. Discusses challenges and opportunities for librarians…

  14. Characteristics and Psychiatric Symptoms of Internet Gaming Disorder among Adults Using Self-Reported DSM-5 Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Ri; Hwang, Samuel Suk-Hyun; Choi, Jung-Seok; Kim, Dai-Jin; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Király, Orsolya; Nagygyörgy, Katalin; Griffiths, Mark. D.; Hyun, So Yeon; Youn, Hyun Chul

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Section III of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) proposed nine diagnostic criteria and five cut-point criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD). We aimed to examine the efficacy of such criteria. Methods Adults (n=3041, men: 1824, women: 1217) who engaged in internet gaming within last 6 months completed a self-report online survey using the suggested wordings of the criteria in DSM-5. Major characteristics, gaming behavior, and psychiatric symptoms of IGD were analyzed using ANOVA, chi-square, and correlation analyses. Results The sociodemographic variables were not statistically significant between the healthy controls and the risk group. Among the participants, 419 (13.8%) were identified and labeled as the IGD risk group. The IGD risk group scored significantly higher on all motivation subscales (p<0.001). The IGD risk group showed significantly higher scores than healthy controls in all nine psychiatric symptom dimensions, i.e., somatization, obsession-compulsion, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism (p<0.001). Conclusion The IGD risk group showed differential psychopathological manifestations according to DSM-5 IGD diagnostic criteria. Further studies are needed to evaluate the reliability and validity of the specific criteria, especially for developing screening instruments. PMID:26766947

  15. Evaluation of language and communication skills in adult key word signing users with intellectual disability: advantages of a narrative task.

    PubMed

    Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; Zink, Inge

    2014-10-01

    The evaluation of language and communication skills in adults who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) in general and key word signing (KWS) in particular, can be an elaborate task. Besides being time-consuming and not very similar to natural communication, standard language tests often do not take AAC or KWS into account. Therefore, we developed a narrative task specifically for adults with intellectual disability (ID) who use KWS. The task was evaluated in a group of 40 adult KWS users. Outcome measures on the narrative task correlated significantly with measures of standard language and communication tests for verbal language, but not for use of manual signs. All narrative measures, for both verbal language and manual signing, correlated highly with similar measures from a conversation sample. The developed narrative task proved useful and valid to evaluate the language and communication skills of adults with ID taking into account both their verbal language and manual sign use.

  16. Gaze patterns during identity and emotion judgments in hearing adults and deaf users of American Sign Language.

    PubMed

    Letourneau, Susan M; Mitchell, Teresa V

    2011-01-01

    Deaf individuals rely on facial expressions for emotional, social, and linguistic cues. In order to test the hypothesis that specialized experience with faces can alter typically observed gaze patterns, twelve hearing adults and twelve deaf, early-users of American Sign Language judged the emotion and identity of expressive faces (including whole faces, and isolated top and bottom halves), while accuracy and fixations were recorded. Both groups recognized individuals more accurately from top than bottom halves, and emotional expressions from bottom than top halves. Hearing adults directed the majority of fixations to the top halves of faces in both tasks, but fixated the bottom half slightly more often when judging emotion than identity. In contrast, deaf adults often split fixations evenly between the top and bottom halves regardless of task demands. These results suggest that deaf adults have habitual fixation patterns that may maximize their ability to gather information from expressive faces. PMID:21882720

  17. Gaze patterns during identity and emotion judgments in hearing adults and deaf users of American Sign Language.

    PubMed

    Letourneau, Susan M; Mitchell, Teresa V

    2011-01-01

    Deaf individuals rely on facial expressions for emotional, social, and linguistic cues. In order to test the hypothesis that specialized experience with faces can alter typically observed gaze patterns, twelve hearing adults and twelve deaf, early-users of American Sign Language judged the emotion and identity of expressive faces (including whole faces, and isolated top and bottom halves), while accuracy and fixations were recorded. Both groups recognized individuals more accurately from top than bottom halves, and emotional expressions from bottom than top halves. Hearing adults directed the majority of fixations to the top halves of faces in both tasks, but fixated the bottom half slightly more often when judging emotion than identity. In contrast, deaf adults often split fixations evenly between the top and bottom halves regardless of task demands. These results suggest that deaf adults have habitual fixation patterns that may maximize their ability to gather information from expressive faces.

  18. Understanding User Reactions and Interactions With an Internet-Based Intervention for Tinnitus Self-Management: Mixed-Methods Process Evaluation Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Sereda, Magdalena; Coulson, Neil; Hoare, Derek J

    2016-01-01

    Background Tinnitus is a common medical symptom that can affect an individual’s emotional and functional quality of life. Psychological therapies are acknowledged as beneficial to people with tinnitus; however, such therapies are not always readily accessible. With their global reach, automated Internet-based interventions have the potential to reduce the disparity in access to psychological support that people with tinnitus currently experience. However, the evidence on the acceptability and efficacy of these interventions is lacking. Process evaluations that develop an in-depth understanding of how users experience these interventions provide an essential first step when evaluating complex psychological interventions. Objective To describe the protocol for a study that will explore past, current, and new users’ reactions to and interactions with the Tinnitus E-Programme, an Internet-based intervention for the self-management of tinnitus. Methods Two parallel mixed-methods studies will be carried out with 2 different populations. Study 1 will use an online survey to gather past and current users’ views of the program. Study 2 will recruit new program users to take part in an interview and complete a relaxation log to explore how well they were able to implement the skills they learned during the program in their everyday lives. The findings from both studies will be triangulated to develop an in-depth understanding of the program’s mechanisms of impact and identify any implementation or contextual factors that strengthen or impede its delivery and functioning. Results Study 1 is open for recruitment with a projected completion in June 2016 and Study 2 was completed November 2015. At the time of submission, 36 participants have been recruited to Study 1 and 12 participants have taken part in Study 2. Conclusions Findings will inform the optimization of the Tinnitus E-Programme and guide future evaluation work to assess the program’s effectiveness as a

  19. What Makes People Decide to Visit and Use an Internet-Delivered Behavior-Change Intervention?: A Qualitative Study among Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouwer, W.; Oenema, A.; Crutzen, R.; de Nooijer, J.; de Vries, N. K.; Brug, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore adults' cognitive deliberations in deciding to visit an internet intervention, to extend the visit to use and process the intervention's content, and to revisit the intervention. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study was conducted consisting of five focus group interviews (n = 29, 25-69…

  20. Strategies to Facilitate Exposure to Internet-Delivered Health Behavior Change Interventions Aimed at Adolescents or Young Adults: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutzen, Rik; de Nooijer, Jascha; Brouwer, Wendy; Oenema, Anke; Brug, Johannes; de Vries, Nanne K.

    2011-01-01

    The Internet is considered to be a promising delivery channel of interventions aimed at promoting healthful behaviors, especially for adolescents and young adults. Exposure to these interventions, however, is generally low. A more extensive exploration of methods, strategies, and their effectiveness with regard to facilitating exposure is…

  1. An Internet-Based Physical Activity Intervention to Improve Quality of Life of Inactive Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Broekhuizen, Karen; de Gelder, Jelle; Wijsman, Carolien A; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Verhagen, Evert; Slagboom, Pieternella E; van Mechelen, Willem; van Heemst, Diana; van der Ouderaa, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing physical activity is a viable strategy for improving both the health and quality of life of older adults. Objective The aim of this study was to assess if an Internet-based intervention aimed to increase physical activity was effective in improving quality of life of inactive older adults. In addition, we analyzed the effect of the intervention on quality of life among those participants who successfully reached their individually targeted increase in daily physical activity as indicated by the intervention program, as well as the dose-response effect of increasing physical activity on quality of life. Methods The intervention was tested in a randomized controlled trial and was comprised of an Internet program—DirectLife (Philips)—aimed at increasing physical activity using monitoring and feedback by accelerometry and feedback by digital coaching (n=119). The control group received no intervention (n=116). Participants were inactive 60-70-year-olds and were recruited from the general population. Quality of life and physical activity were measured at baseline and after 3 months using the Research ANd Development 36-item health survey (RAND-36) and wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer, respectively. Results After 3 months, a significant improvement in quality of life was seen in the intervention group compared to the control group for RAND-36 subscales on emotional and mental health (2.52 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.03) and health change (8.99 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.01). A total of 50 of the 119 participants (42.0%) in the intervention group successfully reached their physical activity target and showed a significant improvement in quality of life compared to the control group for subscales on emotional and mental health (4.31 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.009) and health change (11.06 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.004). The dose-response analysis showed that there was a significant association between increase in minutes spent in moderate

  2. Tele-Presence Microscopy: An interactive multi-user environment for Collaborative research using high speed networks and the Internet

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1996-03-01

    Tele-Presence Microscopy (TPM) is an advanced concept in the integration of computers and high speed networks with scientific instruments for operation, control, communication, and research, which makes use of ANL`s Advanced Analytical Electron Microscope and Analytical Scanning Electron Microscope as development/test bed sites. Implementation of a TPM facility allows a user from a remote location to either observe and/or control state-of-the-art instrumentation in a real time interactive mode. Using TPM, a user will be able to {ital actively} participate in scientific investigations at unique resources such as user facilities without being physically present at those locations. Manufacturers would be able to configure demonstration equipment and to remotely service/diagnose the system. Students would be able to initiate tele- presence operation of instruments which may not be available at their host institution; they would also be able to consult an advisor or nonlocal expert on-line. The generic TPM/LabSpace system is composed of both software and hardware which operate in a client/server relationship.

  3. Neuropsychological Sex Differences Associated with Age of Initiated Use Among Young Adult Cannabis Users

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Natania A.; Schuster, Randi Melissa; Mermelstein, Robin J.; Gonzalez, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Earlier initiation of cannabis use is associated with poorer neuropsychological functioning across several domains. Given well-documented sex differences in neuromaturation during adolescence, initiation of cannabis use during this time may affect neuropsychological functioning differently for males and females. Method In the current study, we examined sex differences in the relationship between age of initiated cannabis use and neuropsychological performance after controlling for amount of lifetime cannabis use in 44 male and 25 female young adult cannabis users. Results We found that an earlier age of initiated use was related to poorer episodic memory, especially immediate recall, in females, but not in males. On the other hand, we found that, surprisingly, an earlier age of initiated use was associated with better decision-making overall. However, exploratory analyses found sex-specific factors associated with decision-making and age of initiated use, specifically that ADHD symptoms in females may drive the relationship between an earlier age of initiated use and better decision-making. Further, an earlier age of initiated use was associated with less education, a lower IQ, and fewer years of mother’s education for females, but more lifetime cannabis use for males. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest there are sex-differences in the associations between age of initiated cannabis use and neuropsychological functioning. The current study provides preliminary evidence that males and females may have different neuropsychological vulnerabilities that place them at risk for initiating cannabis use and continued cannabis use, highlighting the importance of examining the impact of cannabis on neuropsychological functioning separately for males and females. PMID:25832823

  4. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    PubMed

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  5. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    PubMed

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  6. What Influences Children's and Adolescents' Understanding of the Complexity of the Internet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Zheng

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing complex relationships among Internet use, Internet users, and conceptual understanding of the Internet. It used path models to examine factors related to Internet use (duration of Internet use, frequency of Internet use, and informal Internet classes) and Internet users (age and gender) in affecting understanding of…

  7. Assessing the user experience of older adults using a neural network trained to recognize emotions from brain signals.

    PubMed

    Meza-Kubo, Victoria; Morán, Alberto L; Carrillo, Ivan; Galindo, Gilberto; García-Canseco, Eloisa

    2016-08-01

    The use of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies as a means to cope with problems that arise due to an increasing and aging population is becoming usual. AAL technologies are used to prevent, cure and improve the wellness and health conditions of the elderly. However, their adoption and use by older adults is still a major challenge. User Experience (UX) evaluations aim at aiding on this task, by identifying the experience that a user has while interacting with an AAL technology under particular conditions. This may help designing better products and improve user engagement and adoption of AAL solutions. However, evaluating the UX of AAL technologies is a difficult task, due to the inherent limitations of their subjects and of the evaluation methods. In this study, we validated the feasibility of assessing the UX of older adults while they use a cognitive stimulation application using a neural network trained to recognize pleasant and unpleasant emotions from electroencephalography (EEG) signals by contrasting our results with those of additional self-report and qualitative analysis UX evaluations. Our study results provide evidence about the feasibility of assessing the UX of older adults using a neural network that take as input the EEG signals; the classification accuracy of our neural network ranges from 60.87% to 82.61%. As future work we will conduct additional UX evaluation studies using the three different methods, in order to appropriately validate these results. PMID:27392644

  8. Assessing the user experience of older adults using a neural network trained to recognize emotions from brain signals.

    PubMed

    Meza-Kubo, Victoria; Morán, Alberto L; Carrillo, Ivan; Galindo, Gilberto; García-Canseco, Eloisa

    2016-08-01

    The use of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies as a means to cope with problems that arise due to an increasing and aging population is becoming usual. AAL technologies are used to prevent, cure and improve the wellness and health conditions of the elderly. However, their adoption and use by older adults is still a major challenge. User Experience (UX) evaluations aim at aiding on this task, by identifying the experience that a user has while interacting with an AAL technology under particular conditions. This may help designing better products and improve user engagement and adoption of AAL solutions. However, evaluating the UX of AAL technologies is a difficult task, due to the inherent limitations of their subjects and of the evaluation methods. In this study, we validated the feasibility of assessing the UX of older adults while they use a cognitive stimulation application using a neural network trained to recognize pleasant and unpleasant emotions from electroencephalography (EEG) signals by contrasting our results with those of additional self-report and qualitative analysis UX evaluations. Our study results provide evidence about the feasibility of assessing the UX of older adults using a neural network that take as input the EEG signals; the classification accuracy of our neural network ranges from 60.87% to 82.61%. As future work we will conduct additional UX evaluation studies using the three different methods, in order to appropriately validate these results.

  9. Inclusion and the Internet: Teaching Adults with Developmental Disabilities to Use Information and Communication Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moisey, Susan; van de Keere, Rhonda

    2007-01-01

    Adults with developmental disabilities are often excluded from participating in a variety of online activities, which are part of everyday life in our digital, knowledge-based society, using information and communication technology (ICT). Numerous barriers are associated with their non-participation, including a lack of basic computer and Internet…

  10. Problematic Internet Users Show Impaired Inhibitory Control and Risk Taking with Losses: Evidence from Stop Signal and Mixed Gambles Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Nan, Weizhi; Taxer, Jamie; Dai, Weine; Zheng, Ya; Liu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    According to the balance model of self-regulation, dysfunction of the inhibitory control and reward processing might be a behavioral marker for addiction and problematic behaviors. Although several studies have separately examined the inhibitory control or reward processing of individuals exhibiting problematic Internet use (PIU), no study has explored these two functions simultaneously to examine the potential imbalance of these functions. This study aimed to investigate whether the self-regulatory failure of PIU individuals results from deficits in both inhibitory control [indexed with the stop signal reaction time (SSRT) in a stop signal task] and risk taking with losses (measured as the acceptance rates of risky gables or the ratio of win/loss in a mixed gambles task). The results revealed that PIU individuals, compared with controls, showed decreased SSRT and increased error rates as well as reduced risk taking with losses. Correlational analyses revealed a significant positive relationship between the SSRT and risk taking with losses. These findings suggest that both the inhibitory control and reward functions are impaired in PIU individuals and reveal an association between these two systems. These results strengthen the balance model of self-regulation theory’s argument that deficits in inhibitory control and risk taking with losses may assist in identifying risk markers for early diagnosis, progression, and prediction of PIU. PMID:27014170

  11. Problematic Internet Users Show Impaired Inhibitory Control and Risk Taking with Losses: Evidence from Stop Signal and Mixed Gambles Tasks.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Nan, Weizhi; Taxer, Jamie; Dai, Weine; Zheng, Ya; Liu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    According to the balance model of self-regulation, dysfunction of the inhibitory control and reward processing might be a behavioral marker for addiction and problematic behaviors. Although several studies have separately examined the inhibitory control or reward processing of individuals exhibiting problematic Internet use (PIU), no study has explored these two functions simultaneously to examine the potential imbalance of these functions. This study aimed to investigate whether the self-regulatory failure of PIU individuals results from deficits in both inhibitory control [indexed with the stop signal reaction time (SSRT) in a stop signal task] and risk taking with losses (measured as the acceptance rates of risky gables or the ratio of win/loss in a mixed gambles task). The results revealed that PIU individuals, compared with controls, showed decreased SSRT and increased error rates as well as reduced risk taking with losses. Correlational analyses revealed a significant positive relationship between the SSRT and risk taking with losses. These findings suggest that both the inhibitory control and reward functions are impaired in PIU individuals and reveal an association between these two systems. These results strengthen the balance model of self-regulation theory's argument that deficits in inhibitory control and risk taking with losses may assist in identifying risk markers for early diagnosis, progression, and prediction of PIU.

  12. Problematic Internet Users Show Impaired Inhibitory Control and Risk Taking with Losses: Evidence from Stop Signal and Mixed Gambles Tasks.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Nan, Weizhi; Taxer, Jamie; Dai, Weine; Zheng, Ya; Liu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    According to the balance model of self-regulation, dysfunction of the inhibitory control and reward processing might be a behavioral marker for addiction and problematic behaviors. Although several studies have separately examined the inhibitory control or reward processing of individuals exhibiting problematic Internet use (PIU), no study has explored these two functions simultaneously to examine the potential imbalance of these functions. This study aimed to investigate whether the self-regulatory failure of PIU individuals results from deficits in both inhibitory control [indexed with the stop signal reaction time (SSRT) in a stop signal task] and risk taking with losses (measured as the acceptance rates of risky gables or the ratio of win/loss in a mixed gambles task). The results revealed that PIU individuals, compared with controls, showed decreased SSRT and increased error rates as well as reduced risk taking with losses. Correlational analyses revealed a significant positive relationship between the SSRT and risk taking with losses. These findings suggest that both the inhibitory control and reward functions are impaired in PIU individuals and reveal an association between these two systems. These results strengthen the balance model of self-regulation theory's argument that deficits in inhibitory control and risk taking with losses may assist in identifying risk markers for early diagnosis, progression, and prediction of PIU. PMID:27014170

  13. How happy is your web browsing? A model to quantify satisfaction of an Internet user searching for desired information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, Anirban; Magarkar, Aniket

    2012-09-01

    We feel happy when web browsing operations provide us with necessary information; otherwise, we feel bitter. How to measure this happiness (or bitterness)? How does the profile of happiness grow and decay during the course of web browsing? We propose a probabilistic framework that models the evolution of user satisfaction, on top of his/her continuous frustration at not finding the required information. It is found that the cumulative satisfaction profile of a web-searching individual can be modeled effectively as the sum of a random number of random terms, where each term is a mutually independent random variable, originating from ‘memoryless’ Poisson flow. Evolution of satisfaction over the entire time interval of a user’s browsing was modeled using auto-correlation analysis. A utilitarian marker, a magnitude of greater than unity of which describes happy web-searching operations, and an empirical limit that connects user’s satisfaction with his frustration level-are proposed too. The presence of pertinent information in the very first page of a website and magnitude of the decay parameter of user satisfaction (frustration, irritation etc.) are found to be two key aspects that dominate the web user’s psychology. The proposed model employed different combinations of decay parameter, searching time and number of helpful websites. The obtained results are found to match the results from three real-life case studies.

  14. The return of the house call: the role of internet-based interactivity in bringing health information home to older adults.

    PubMed

    Macias, Wendy; McMillan, Sally

    2008-01-01

    This study provides qualitative insight into how older adults are using the Internet for health communication. The research is framed with theory from several disciplines, including health and interactive communication, as well as related theoretical models. Data from focus groups was used to develop a model of seniors' online health interactions. Three primary themes that emerged in focus groups form the key elements of the model: the health situation, health information, and the medical field. Implications are suggested for advertising and marketing on the Internet, health information providers, and academic researchers in these areas.

  15. The return of the house call: the role of internet-based interactivity in bringing health information home to older adults.

    PubMed

    Macias, Wendy; McMillan, Sally

    2008-01-01

    This study provides qualitative insight into how older adults are using the Internet for health communication. The research is framed with theory from several disciplines, including health and interactive communication, as well as related theoretical models. Data from focus groups was used to develop a model of seniors' online health interactions. Three primary themes that emerged in focus groups form the key elements of the model: the health situation, health information, and the medical field. Implications are suggested for advertising and marketing on the Internet, health information providers, and academic researchers in these areas. PMID:18443991

  16. Relationships of Dietary Histidine and Obesity in Northern Chinese Adults, an Internet-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Chuan; Li, Chun-Long; Qi, Jia-Yue; Huang, Li-Na; Shi, Dan; Du, Shan-Shan; Liu, Li-Yan; Feng, Ren-Nan; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that histidine supplementation significantly ameliorates inflammation and oxidative stress in obese women and high-fat diet-induced obese rats. However, the effects of dietary histidine on general population are not known. The objective of this Internet-based cross-sectional study was to evaluate the associations between dietary histidine and prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity in northern Chinese population. A total of 2376 participants were randomly recruited and asked to finish our Internet-based dietary questionnaire for the Chinese (IDQC). Afterwards, 88 overweight/obese participants were randomly selected to explore the possible mechanism. Compared with healthy controls, dietary histidine was significantly lower in overweight (p < 0.05) and obese (p < 0.01) participants of both sexes. Dietary histidine was inversely associated with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure in overall population and stronger associations were observed in women and overweight/obese participants. Higher dietary histidine was associated with lower prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity, especially in women. Further studies indicated that higher dietary histidine was associated with lower fasting blood glucose (FBG), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 2-h postprandial glucose (2 h-PG), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), malonaldehyde (MDA) and vaspin and higher glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and adiponectin of overweight/obese individuals of both sexes. In conclusion, higher dietary histidine is inversely associated with energy intake, status of insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight/obese participants and lower prevalence of overweight/obesity in northern Chinese adults. PMID:27409634

  17. Relationships of Dietary Histidine and Obesity in Northern Chinese Adults, an Internet-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Chuan; Li, Chun-Long; Qi, Jia-Yue; Huang, Li-Na; Shi, Dan; Du, Shan-Shan; Liu, Li-Yan; Feng, Ren-Nan; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that histidine supplementation significantly ameliorates inflammation and oxidative stress in obese women and high-fat diet-induced obese rats. However, the effects of dietary histidine on general population are not known. The objective of this Internet-based cross-sectional study was to evaluate the associations between dietary histidine and prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity in northern Chinese population. A total of 2376 participants were randomly recruited and asked to finish our Internet-based dietary questionnaire for the Chinese (IDQC). Afterwards, 88 overweight/obese participants were randomly selected to explore the possible mechanism. Compared with healthy controls, dietary histidine was significantly lower in overweight (p < 0.05) and obese (p < 0.01) participants of both sexes. Dietary histidine was inversely associated with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure in overall population and stronger associations were observed in women and overweight/obese participants. Higher dietary histidine was associated with lower prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity, especially in women. Further studies indicated that higher dietary histidine was associated with lower fasting blood glucose (FBG), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 2-h postprandial glucose (2 h-PG), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), malonaldehyde (MDA) and vaspin and higher glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and adiponectin of overweight/obese individuals of both sexes. In conclusion, higher dietary histidine is inversely associated with energy intake, status of insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight/obese participants and lower prevalence of overweight/obesity in northern Chinese adults. PMID:27409634

  18. PDM and the Internet: A Look at Product Management and Its Internet Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the impact of internet technology on product data management (PDM) vendor's and the users' purchasing decisions. Internet users anticipate graphical user interface (GUI) and two-way communication which allow users to enter and modify data as well as access it. Examines PDM and the Internet: price and performance, the World Wide Web,…

  19. Exploring clinical and personality characteristics of adult male internet-only child pornography offenders.

    PubMed

    Magaletta, Philip R; Faust, Erik; Bickart, William; McLearen, Alix M

    2014-02-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in the number of convicted child pornography offenders, little is known about their potential clinical needs. The few studies that do explore this subgroup of sex offenders suggest clinical heterogeneity compared with other sex offender subgroups. However, research designs used in many studies have limited generalizability, have examined primarily treated or treatment samples, and have not included comparisons with nontreatment, community samples of men. The current study addresses such limitations by using nontreatment samples and multiple comparison groups to examine mean scales score differences on a commonly used clinical and personality assessment, the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI). The sample, drawn from an admissions cohort of federal offenders, those Internet-only Child Pornography Offenders (ICPOs; n = 35) and those with a history of child molesting exclusively (child molesters, n = 26). They were compared with each other and the male normative sample from the PAI. Results indicate that interpersonal deficits and depression featured most prominently in the profiles of the ICPOs. Consistent with prior research, they also obtained lower scores on aggression and dominance compared with the child molesters and the male normative sample. Implications for future research, training, and clinical practice with incarcerated ICPOs are offered. PMID:23174820

  20. Exploring clinical and personality characteristics of adult male internet-only child pornography offenders.

    PubMed

    Magaletta, Philip R; Faust, Erik; Bickart, William; McLearen, Alix M

    2014-02-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in the number of convicted child pornography offenders, little is known about their potential clinical needs. The few studies that do explore this subgroup of sex offenders suggest clinical heterogeneity compared with other sex offender subgroups. However, research designs used in many studies have limited generalizability, have examined primarily treated or treatment samples, and have not included comparisons with nontreatment, community samples of men. The current study addresses such limitations by using nontreatment samples and multiple comparison groups to examine mean scales score differences on a commonly used clinical and personality assessment, the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI). The sample, drawn from an admissions cohort of federal offenders, those Internet-only Child Pornography Offenders (ICPOs; n = 35) and those with a history of child molesting exclusively (child molesters, n = 26). They were compared with each other and the male normative sample from the PAI. Results indicate that interpersonal deficits and depression featured most prominently in the profiles of the ICPOs. Consistent with prior research, they also obtained lower scores on aggression and dominance compared with the child molesters and the male normative sample. Implications for future research, training, and clinical practice with incarcerated ICPOs are offered.

  1. The relationship between the speech perception and the degree of satisfaction among adult users of cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Granço, Fernanda Soares; Fernandes, Nayara Freitas; Morettin, Marina; Filho, Orozimbo Alves Costa; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecília

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: In recent years, the benefits associated with the use of cochlear implants (CIs), especially with regard to speech perception, have proven to surpass those produced by the use of hearing aids, making CIs a highly efficient resource for patients with severe/profound hearing loss. However, few studies so far have assessed the satisfaction of adult users of CIs. Objective: To analyze the relationship between the level of speech perception and degree of satisfaction of adult users of CI. Method: This was a prospective cross-sectional study conducted in the Audiological Research Center (CPA) of the Hospital of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of São Paulo (HRAC/USP), in Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil. A total of 12 users of CIs with pre-lingual or post-lingual hearing loss participated in this study. The following tools were used in the assessment: a questionnaire, “Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life” (SADL), culturally adapted to Brazilian Portuguese, as well as its relationship with the speech perception results; a speech perception test under quiet conditions; and the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT)Brazil under free field conditions. Results: The participants in the study were on the whole satisfied with their devices, and the degree of satisfaction correlated positively with the ability to perceive monosyllabic words under quiet conditions. The satisfaction did not correlate with the level of speech perception in noisy environments. Conclusion: Assessments of satisfaction may help professionals to predict what other factors, in addition to speech perception, may contribute to the satisfaction of CI users in order to reorganize the intervention process to improve the users' quality of life. PMID:25992014

  2. Longitudinal psychosocial factors related to symptoms of Internet addiction among adults in early midlife.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenshu; Brook, Judith S; Leukefeld, Carl G; Brook, David W

    2016-11-01

    In this longitudinal study, we applied structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine the psychosocial factors from adolescence to adulthood as related to symptoms of Internet addiction (IA) during early midlife. We gathered longitudinal data on a prospective cohort of community-dwelling men and women (N=548) followed from adolescence to early midlife (mean age=43; SD=2.8). The findings supported a meditational model: adolescent (mean age=16) conflictual parent-child relationship was associated with internalizing problem behaviors at mean age 21 in emerging adulthood (b=0.13, p<0.01), which, in turn, were associated with both alcohol/drug use problems at mean age 27-32 (b=0.24, p<0.001) and affective disorders at mean age 37 (b=0.29, p<0.001), which, ultimately, were associated with symptoms of IA in early midlife (b=0.23, p<0.01; b=0.21, p<0.05, respectively). In addition, alcohol/drug use problems were associated with affective disorders (b=0.22, p<0.05). Among the constructs, alcohol/drug use problems had the greatest total effects on symptoms of IA in early midlife (b=0.28, p<0.001). Findings suggest that family therapy focused on an increase in the affectionate relationship between the adolescent and his/her parents, cognitive-behavioral treatment of internalizing problem behaviors, and effective treatment of individuals who have alcohol/drug use problems may reduce the likelihood of having symptoms of IA in early midlife. PMID:27341513

  3. Validation and User Evaluation of a Sensor-Based Method for Detecting Mobility-Related Activities in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Geraedts, Hilde A. E.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Van Keeken, Helco G.; Zhang, Wei; Stevens, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is essential for older adults to stay healthy and independent. However, daily physical activity is generally low among older adults and mainly consists of activities such as standing and shuffling around indoors. Accurate measurement of this low-energy expenditure daily physical activity is crucial for stimulation of activity. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of a necklace-worn sensor-based method for detecting time-on-legs and daily life mobility related postures in older adults. In addition user opinion about the practical use of the sensor was evaluated. Twenty frail and non-frail older adults performed a standardized and free movement protocol in their own home. Results of the sensor-based method were compared to video observation. Sensitivity, specificity and overall agreement of sensor outcomes compared to video observation were calculated. Mobility was assessed based on time-on-legs. Further assessment included the categories standing, sitting, walking and lying. Time-on-legs based sensitivity, specificity and percentage agreement were good to excellent and comparable to laboratory outcomes in other studies. Category-based sensitivity, specificity and overall agreement were moderate to excellent. The necklace-worn sensor is considered an acceptable valid instrument for assessing home-based physical activity based upon time-on-legs in frail and non-frail older adults, but category-based assessment of gait and postures could be further developed. PMID:26361009

  4. Characterisation of User-Defined Health Status in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, J. M.; Marsden, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Older adults with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) have an excess disease burden that standard health assessments are designed to detect. Older adults with ID have a broader concept of health with dimensions of well being in addition to absence of disease in line with the World Health Organization's health definition. We sought to…

  5. Understanding Tobacco-Related Attitudes among College and Noncollege Young Adult Hookah and Cigarette Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Youn Ok; Bahreinifar, Sareh; Ling, Pamela M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine differences in tobacco-related attitudes and hookah and cigarette use among college and noncollege young adults. Participants: Time-location samples of young adult bar patrons in San Diego, California ("N" = 2,243), Tulsa ("N" = 2,095) and Oklahoma City ("N" = 2,200), Oklahoma, Albuquerque…

  6. Multivitamin Use and Serum Vitamin B12 Concentrations in Older-Adult Metformin Users in REGARDS, 2003-2007.

    PubMed

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Garn, Joshua V; Zakai, Neil A; Williamson, Rebecca S; Cashion, Winn T; Odewole, Oluwaseun; Judd, Suzanne E; Oakley, Godfrey P

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, an insulin-sensitizing drug, is a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes. Long-term use of metformin has been associated with subsequent reductions in vitamin B12 concentrations. The objective of our study was to determine whether metformin use is associated with lower serum vitamin B12 concentrations in older adults, and whether concurrent use of multivitamins modifies this association. We examined 2,510 participants aged 50 years and over, participating in the national population-based Reasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to assess associations between multivitamin use and serum vitamin B12 concentrations. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (aOR)s and confidence intervals (CI)s. Results were stratified by three metformin/diabetes sub-groups: 1) participants with diabetes who were metformin users; 2) participants with diabetes who were not metformin users; and 3) participants without diabetes. We found that diabetic metformin users had significantly lower geometric mean serum B12 concentrations (409 pmol/L) than the group with diabetes not taking metformin (485 pmol/L; P<0.01), and the group without diabetes (445 pmol/L; P = 0.02). The geometric mean serum B12 concentrations were greater for multivitamin users (509 pmol/L) compared to those who did not use multivitamins (376 pmol/L; p<0.01). Among the participants with diabetes who were on metformin therapy, multivitamin use was associated with geometric mean serum vitamin B12 concentrations that were 50% (or 161 pmol/L) higher, compared to those not using multivitamins. Among metformin users, multivitamin use was associated with lower prevalence of combined low and borderline vitamin B12 concentrations (aOR = 0.14; 95% CI = 0.04, 0.54) compared to those not using multivitamins. In conclusion, metformin use was associated with lower geometric mean serum vitamin B12 concentrations among diabetic older

  7. Multivitamin Use and Serum Vitamin B12 Concentrations in Older-Adult Metformin Users in REGARDS, 2003-2007

    PubMed Central

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Garn, Joshua V.; Zakai, Neil A.; Williamson, Rebecca S.; Cashion, Winn T.; Odewole, Oluwaseun; Judd, Suzanne E.; Oakley, Godfrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, an insulin-sensitizing drug, is a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes. Long-term use of metformin has been associated with subsequent reductions in vitamin B12 concentrations. The objective of our study was to determine whether metformin use is associated with lower serum vitamin B12 concentrations in older adults, and whether concurrent use of multivitamins modifies this association. We examined 2,510 participants aged 50 years and over, participating in the national population-based Reasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to assess associations between multivitamin use and serum vitamin B12 concentrations. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (aOR)s and confidence intervals (CI)s. Results were stratified by three metformin/diabetes sub-groups: 1) participants with diabetes who were metformin users; 2) participants with diabetes who were not metformin users; and 3) participants without diabetes. We found that diabetic metformin users had significantly lower geometric mean serum B12 concentrations (409 pmol/L) than the group with diabetes not taking metformin (485 pmol/L; P<0.01), and the group without diabetes (445 pmol/L; P = 0.02). The geometric mean serum B12 concentrations were greater for multivitamin users (509 pmol/L) compared to those who did not use multivitamins (376 pmol/L; p<0.01). Among the participants with diabetes who were on metformin therapy, multivitamin use was associated with geometric mean serum vitamin B12 concentrations that were 50% (or 161 pmol/L) higher, compared to those not using multivitamins. Among metformin users, multivitamin use was associated with lower prevalence of combined low and borderline vitamin B12 concentrations (aOR = 0.14; 95% CI = 0.04, 0.54) compared to those not using multivitamins. In conclusion, metformin use was associated with lower geometric mean serum vitamin B12 concentrations among diabetic older

  8. A Contextual Comparison of Risk Behaviors Among Older Adult Drug Users and Harm Reduction in Suburban Versus Inner-City Social Environments

    PubMed Central

    Boeri, Miriam W.; Tyndall, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent epidemiological data show that older adults comprise a growing age group of drug users and new AIDS cases in the United States. Prevention and intervention studies show that risk behaviors leading to HIV infection are increasing among older users, particularly among the socially vulnerable. Yet older adults remain an under-researched population of drug users and little is known about their risk behaviors. Our aim is to address this gap in knowledge on older users by comparing contextual factors that influence risk behaviors and harm reduction strategies practiced by older drug users living in different communities. This study is based on ethnographic fieldwork in suburban and inner-city neighborhoods in a large metropolitan area in the southeastern USA. Interviewers conducted face-to-face, in-depth, life-history interviews with 69 older adults (age 45 and older) who used heroin, cocaine, and/or methamphetamine. Findings show that while risk behaviors were similar among older adult drug users living in suburban and inner-city environments, the provision of harm reduction education and paraphernalia varied widely. The results show the need for the expansion of harm reduction services focused on older adult drug users who are homeless, uninsured, or socially isolated. This application-oriented research will inform healthcare and treatment providers and generate new directions for future collaborative harm reduction services aimed to decrease the spread of HIV and other infectious diseases associated with drug use. PMID:23162176

  9. Reliability and validity of the Marijuana Motives Measure among young adult frequent cannabis users and associations with cannabis dependence.

    PubMed

    Benschop, Annemieke; Liebregts, Nienke; van der Pol, Peggy; Schaap, Rick; Buisman, Renate; van Laar, Margriet; van den Brink, Wim; de Graaf, Ron; Korf, Dirk J

    2015-01-01

    The Marijuana Motives Measure (MMM) has so far been examined mainly in student populations, often with relatively limited involvement in cannabis use. This study evaluated the factor structure of the MMM in a demographically mixed sample of 600 young adult (18-30 years) frequent (≥ 3 days per week) cannabis users in the Netherlands. Analysis confirmed a five-factor solution, denoting coping, enhancement, social, conformity and expansion motives. Additionally, the original MMM was extended with two items (boredom and habit), which formed a distinct, internally consistent sixth factor labelled routine motives. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, coping and routine motives showed significant associations with 12-month DSM-IV cannabis dependence. The results suggest general reliability and validity of the MMM in a heterogeneous population of experienced cannabis users.

  10. Andragogical Characteristics and Expectations of University of Hawai'i Adult Learners in a 3D Multi-User Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeder, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover which andragogical characteristics and expectations of adult learners manifested themselves in the three-dimensional, multi-user virtual environment known as Second Life. This digital ethnographic study focused specifically on adult students within the University of Hawai'i Second Life group and their…

  11. Usability Testing of an Internet-Based e-Counseling Platform for Adults With Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Surikova, Jelena; Liu, Sam; Ross, Heather; Mechetiuc, Teodora; Nolan, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a major cause of hospitalization and mortality. In order to maintain heart function and quality of life, patients with CHF need to follow recommended self-care guidelines (ie, eating a heart healthy diet, exercising regularly, taking medications as prescribed, monitoring their symptoms, and living a smoke-free life). Yet, adherence to self-care is poor. We have developed an Internet-based e-Counseling platform, Canadian e-Platform to Promote Behavioral Self-Management in Chronic Heart Failure (CHF-CePPORT), that aims to improve self-care adherence and quality of life in people with CHF. Before assessing the efficacy of this e-platform in a multisite, double-blind, randomized controlled trial, we evaluated the usability of the prototype website. Objective The objective of the study was to assess the usability of the CHF-CePPORT e-Counseling platform in terms of navigation, content, and layout. Methods CHF patients were purposively sampled from the Heart Function Clinic at the Peter Munk Cardiac Center, University Health Network, to participate in this study. We asked the consented participants to perform specific tasks on the website. These tasks included watching self-help videos and reviewing content as directed. Their interactions with the website were captured using the “think aloud” protocol. After completing the tasks, research personnel conducted a semi-structured interview with each participant to assess their experience with the website. Content analysis of the transcripts from the “think aloud” sessions and the interviews was conducted to identify themes related to navigation, content, and layout of the website. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the satisfaction data. Results A total of 7 men and women (ages 39-77) participated in 2 iterative rounds of testing. Overall, all participants were very satisfied with the content and layout of the website. They reported that the content was helpful to

  12. Perspectives on Health among Adult Users of Illicit Stimulant Drugs in Rural Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Draus, Paul J.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan

    2006-01-01

    Context: Although the nonmedical use of stimulant drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine is increasingly common in many rural areas of the United States, little is known about the health beliefs of people who use these drugs. Purpose: This research describes illicit stimulant drug users' views on health and health-related concepts that may…

  13. Internet Relay Chat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Carol

    2000-01-01

    Describes Internet Relay Chats (IRCs), electronic conversations over the Internet that allow multiple users to write messages, and their applications to educational settings such as teacher collaboration and conversations between classes. Explains hardware and software requirements, IRC organization into nets and channels, and benefits and…

  14. Evaluating an Online Cognitive Training Platform for Older Adults: User Experience and Implementation Requirements.

    PubMed

    Haesner, Marten; Steinert, Anika; O'Sullivan, Julie Lorraine; Weichenberger, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Decline of cognitive function is a part of aging. However, intensive cognitive training can improve important cognitive functions, such as attention and working memory. Because existing systems are not older adult-friendly and are usually not based on scientific evidence, an online platform was developed for cognitive training with information and communication features and evaluated in an 8-week field test. In a randomized clinical trial with 80 older adults, findings from log data analysis and questionnaires revealed a good use of the online platform. Communication or assistive features were not used often. Good usability ratings were given to the cognitive exercises. Subjective improvements of cognitive functions due to the training were reported. The current article presents concrete requirements and recommendations for deploying cognitive training software in older adult residential homes.

  15. Treatment Implications for Young Adult Users of MDMA (3,4-Methylenedyoxymethamphetamine)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dew, Brian J.; Elifson, Kirk W.; Sterk, Claire E.

    2006-01-01

    Young adults' 3,4-methylenedyoxymethamphetamine (MDMA) use is a national public health concern. Although research on the epidemiology of MDMA use has increased, inquiry into intervention and treatment is needed. The authors examine results from an epidemiological investigation from a clinical perspective and provide suggestions for clinicians…

  16. A cross-sectional online survey of compulsive internet use and mental health of young adults in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Kutty, Nizar A. M.; Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The last decade has seen the emergence of the internet as the prime communication medium changing the way people live and interact. Studies from various countries have reported on internet addiction and its association with mental health, but none have come from Malaysia. Objectives: We aimed at assessing the frequency of the use of various internet applications and exploring the association of compulsive internet use with mental health and socio-demographic factors. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was carried out among participants registered for the monthly opinion poll survey of University Tunku Abdul Rahman, Malaysia. The questionnaire contained socio-demographic information, the use of various internet applications on a five-point Likert scale, compulsive internet use scale (CIUS) and 12 item general health questionnaire (GHQ-12). Correlations and linear regression analyzes were carried out. Results: Of the 330 respondents, 182 were females and 148 were males. The mean age was 23.17 (SD = 3.84). Mean CIUS score was 19.85 (SD = 10.57) and mean GHQ score was 15.47 (SD = 6.29). Correlation coefficients of CIUS score with age, years of use and daily hours of internet use were −0.118 (P = 0.03), −0.014 (P = 0.81) and 0.242 (P < 0.001) respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that age (β = −0.111, P = 0.033) and marital status (β = −0.124, P = 0.018) were negatively associated with CIUS scores whereas daily hours of internet use (β = 0.269, P = 0.001) and GHQ score (β = 0.259, P = 0.001) were positively associated with the CIUS score. Conclusions: Compulsive internet use was correlated with GHQ score. More research is needed to confirm our results. Psychologists may consider assessing internet addiction when evaluating young psychiatric patients. PMID:24696631

  17. Risk Factors Associated with Unsafe Injection Practices at the First Injection Episode among Intravenous Drug Users in France: Results from PrimInject, an Internet Survey

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Anne; Guignard, Romain; Lert, France; Roy, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Background. New drug use patterns may increase the risk of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis infections. In France, new injection patterns among youths with diverse social backgrounds have emerged, which may explain the persistently high rates of hepatitis C virus infection. This study explores factors associated with injection risk behaviours at first injection among users who began injecting in the post-2000 era. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted on the Internet from October 2010 to March 2011, through an online questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression identified the independent correlates of needle sharing and equipment (cooker/cotton filter) sharing. Results. Among the 262 respondents (mean age 25 years), 65% were male. Both risk behaviours were positively associated with initiation before 18 years of age (aOR 3.7 CI 95% 1.3–10.6 and aOR 3.0 CI 95% 1.3–7.0) and being injected by another person (aOR 3.1 CI 95% 1.0–9.9 and aOR 3.0 CI 95% 1.3–7.1). Initiation at a party was an independent correlate of equipment sharing (aOR 2.6 95% CI 1.0–6.8). Conclusions. Results suggest a need for innovative harm reduction programmes targeting a variety of settings and populations, including youths and diverse party scenes. Education of current injectors to protect both themselves and those they might initiate into injection is critically important. PMID:26504609

  18. Internet Uses and Gratifications: Understanding Motivations for Using the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Hanjun

    In this study, the uses and gratifications theory was applied to investigate the Internet users' motivations and their relationship with attitudes toward the Internet as well as types of Web site visited by users. Subjects were 185 college students who completed a self-report questionnaire. Four motivations and five types of Web sites were…

  19. Internet Advertising: Ethics and Etiquette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the growth of the Internet and the attitudes of users toward advertising, provides examples of kinds of advertising used on electronic networks, and lists several companies that help advertisers use the Internet. Fifteen guidelines are suggested to help advertisers use the Internet in a reasonable and appropriate way. (Contains 11…

  20. Exposure to, and searching for, information about suicide and self-harm on the Internet: Prevalence and predictors in a population based cohort of young adults

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Becky; Heron, Jon; Biddle, Lucy; Donovan, Jenny L.; Holley, Rachel; Piper, Martyn; Potokar, John; Wyllie, Clare; Gunnell, David

    2015-01-01

    Background There is concern over the potential impact of the Internet on self-harm and suicidal behaviour, particularly in young people. However, little is known about the prevalence and patterns of suicide/self-harm related Internet use in the general population. Methods Cross sectional study of 3946 of the 8525 participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) who were sent a self-report questionnaire including questions on suicide/self-harm related Internet use and self-harm history at age 21 years. Results Suicide/self-harm related Internet use was reported by 22.5% (886/3946) of participants; 11.9% (470/3946) had come across sites/chatrooms discussing self-harm or suicide, 8.2% (323/3946) had searched for information about self-harm, 7.5% (296/3946) had searched for information about suicide and 9.1% (357/3946) had used the Internet to discuss self-harm or suicidal feelings. Suicide/self-harm related Internet use was particularly prevalent amongst those who had harmed with suicidal intent (70%, 174/248), and was strongly associated with the presence of suicidal thoughts, suicidal plans, and history of self-harm. Sites offering help, advice, or support were accessed by a larger proportion of the sample (8.2%, 323/3946) than sites offering information on how to hurt or kill yourself (3.1%, 123/3946). Most individuals (81%) who had accessed these potentially harmful sites had also accessed help sites. Limitations (i) There were differences between questionnaire responders and non-responders which could lead to selection bias and (ii) the data were cross-sectional, and we cannot conclude that associations are causal. Conclusions Suicide/self-harm related Internet use is common amongst young adults, particularly amongst those with suicidal thoughts and behaviour. Both harmful and helpful sites were accessed, highlighting that the Internet presents potential risks but also offers opportunities for suicide prevention. PMID:26150198

  1. [Prevalence and alcohol user profile in adult population in a south Brazilian city].

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Traebert, Jefferson; Loguercio, Alessandro; Kehrig, Ruth Terezinha

    2010-05-01

    This is an observational cross-sectional survey which included 707 individuals from a south Brazilian city (Joaçaba, in Santa Catarina State) aiming to know the alcohol user prevalence as well as the profile of the user. The results showed that 45.5% (322) of that population consume alcohol on regular basis and had used it at least once in the last month. The regular alcohol consumption occurs predominantly on males (p <0.001), in people under 39 years old (p =0.007), occurring predominantly with ones working comparing to the ones not working, (p <0.001), have more than 8 years of education (p <0.001) and with income greater than 1738.00 reais - Brazilian currency (p <0.001). The regular alcohol consumption was greater on those who classified his health status as regular, good or very good (p <0.006), also this relation happen to those people who haven't been under hospital internment in the last year (p <0.013). The depression levels scored by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) showed low levels to those who regularly consume alcohol (p <0.047). PMID:20464180

  2. A league of their own: demographics, motivations and patterns of use of 1,955 male adult non-medical anabolic steroid users in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jason; Collins, Rick; Darkes, Jack; Gwartney, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Background Rule violations among elite-level sports competitors and tragedies among adolescents have largely defined the issue of non-medical anabolic-androgenic steroid (NMAAS) use for the public and policy makers. However, the predominant and oft-ignored segment of the NMAAS community exists in the general population that is neither participating in competitive sports nor adolescent. A clearer profile of NMAAS users within the general population is an initial step in developing a full understanding of NMAAS use and devising appropriate policy and interventions. This survey sought to provide a more comprehensive profile of NMAAS users by accessing a large sample of user respondents from around the United States. Methods U.S.-based male NMAAS users (n = 1955) were recruited from various Internet websites dedicated to resistance training activities and use of ergogenic substances, mass emails, and print media to participate in a 291-item web-based survey. The Internet was utilized to provide a large and geographically diverse sample with the greatest degree of anonymity to facilitate participation. Results The majority of respondents did not initiate AAS use during adolescence and their NMAAS use was not motivated by athletics. The typical user was a Caucasian, highly-educated, gainfully employed professional approximately 30 years of age, who was earning an above-average income, was not active in organized sports, and whose use was motivated by increases in skeletal muscle mass, strength, and physical attractiveness. These findings question commonly held views of the typical NMAAS user and the associated underlying motivations. Conclusion The focus on "cheating" athletes and at risk youth has led to ineffective policy as it relates to the predominant group of NMAAS users. Effective policy, prevention or intervention should address the target population(s) and their reasons for use while utilizing their desire for responsible use and education. PMID:17931410

  3. The influence of sexually explicit Internet material and peers on stereotypical beliefs about women's sexual roles: similarities and differences between adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Peter, Jochen; Valkenburg, Patti M

    2011-09-01

    Previous research on the influence of sexually explicit Internet material (SEIM) on adolescents' stereotypical beliefs about women's sexual roles has three shortcomings. First, the role of peers has been neglected; second, stereotypical beliefs have rarely been studied as causing the use of SEIM and the selection of specific peers; and third, it is unclear whether adolescents are more vulnerable to the effects of SEIM than adults. We used data from two nationally representative two-wave panel surveys among 1,445 Dutch adolescents and 833 Dutch adults, focusing on the stereotypical belief that women engage in token resistance to sex (i.e., the notion that women say "no" when they actually intend to have sex). Structural equation modeling showed that peers who supported traditional gender roles elicited, both among adolescents and adults, stronger beliefs that women use token resistance to sex. Further, the belief that women engage in token resistance predicted adolescents' and adults' selection of gender-role traditional peers, but it did not predict adolescents' and adults' use of SEIM. Finally, adults, but not adolescents, were susceptible to the impact of SEIM on beliefs that women engage in token resistance to sex. PMID:21332367

  4. Individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices among young adult injection drug users in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Fátima; Burgos, José Luis; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Teshale, Eyasu; Garfein, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices significantly increase the risk of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among injection drug users (IDUs). We examined individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices in young adult IDUs in San Diego, California. Of 494 IDUs, 46.9% reported receptive syringe sharing and 68.8% sharing drug preparation paraphernalia in the last 3 months. Unsafe injection practices were associated with increased odds of having friends who injected drugs with used syringes, injecting with friends, sexual partners, and injecting heroin. Perceived high susceptibility to HIV and perceived barriers to obtaining sterile syringes were associated with increased odds of receptive syringe sharing, but not with sharing injection paraphernalia. Over half IDUs reported unsafe injection practices, and our results suggest that personal relationships might influence IDUs’ perceptions that dictate behavior. Integrated interventions addressing individual and socio-environmental factors are needed to promote safe injection practices in this population. PMID:24920342

  5. Individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices among young adult injection drug users in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Fátima; Burgos, José Luis; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Teshale, Eyasu; Garfein, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices significantly increase the risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among injection drug users (IDUs). We examined individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices in young adult IDUs in San Diego, California. Of 494 IDUs, 46.9 % reported receptive syringe sharing and 68.8 % sharing drug preparation paraphernalia in the last 3 months. Unsafe injection practices were associated with increased odds of having friends who injected drugs with used syringes, injecting with friends or sexual partners, and injecting heroin. Perceived high susceptibility to HIV and perceived barriers to obtaining sterile syringes were associated with increased odds of receptive syringe sharing, but not with sharing injection paraphernalia. Over half the IDUs reported unsafe injection practices. Our results suggest that personal relationships might influence IDUs' perceptions that dictate behavior. Integrated interventions addressing individual and socio-environmental factors are needed to promote safe injection practices in this population. PMID:24920342

  6. Working memory training for adult hearing aid users: study protocol for a double-blind randomized active controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One in ten people aged between 55 to 74 years have a significant hearing impairment in their better hearing ear (as defined by audiometric hearing thresholds). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the challenges faced by older listeners cannot be explained by the audiogram alone. The ability for people with hearing loss to use cognition to support speech perception allows for compensation of the degraded auditory input. This in turn offers promise for new cognitive-based rehabilitative interventions. Working memory is known to be highly associated with language comprehension and recent evidence has shown significant generalization of learning from trained working memory tasks to improvements in sentence-repetition skills of children with severe to profound hearing loss. This evidence offers support for further investigation into the potential benefits of working memory training to improve speech perception abilities in other hearing impaired populations. Methods/Design This is a double-blind randomized active controlled trial aiming to assess whether a program of working memory training results in improvements in untrained measures of cognition, speech perception and self-reported hearing abilities in adult hearing aid users (aged 50 to 74 years) with mild-to-moderate hearing loss, compared with an active control group who receive a placebo version of the working memory training program. Discussion The present study aims to generate high-quality preliminary evidence for the efficacy of working memory training for adults with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss who are existing hearing aid users. This trial addresses a number of gaps in the published literature assessing training interventions for people with hearing loss, and in the general literature surrounding working memory training, such as the inclusion of an active control group, participant and tester blinding, and increased transparency in reporting. Trial registration

  7. Young Adult Cannabis Users Report Greater Propensity for Risk-Taking Only in Non-Monetary Domains

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Calderon, Vanessa; Curran, Max T.; Evins, A. Eden

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Though substance use is often associated with elevated risk-taking in real-world scenarios, many risk-taking tasks in experimental psychology using financial gambles fail to find significant differences between individuals with substance use disorders and healthy controls. We assessed whether participants using marijuana would show a greater propensity for risk-taking in distinct domains including, but not limited to, financial risk-taking. METHODS In the current study, we assessed risk-taking in young adult (age 18–25) regular marijuana users and in non-using control participants using a domain-specific risk-taking self-report scale (DOSPERT) encompassing five domains of risk-taking (social, financial, recreational, health/safety, and ethical). We also measured behavioral risk-taking using a laboratory monetary risk-taking task. RESULTS Marijuana users and controls reported significant differences on the social, health/safety, and ethical risk-taking scales, but no differences in the propensity to take recreational or financial risks. Complementing the self-report finding, there were no differences between marijuana users and controls in their performance on the laboratory risk-taking task. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that financial risk-taking may be less sensitive than other domains of risk-taking in assessing differences in risky behavior between those who use marijuana and those who do not. In order to more consistently determine whether increased risk-taking is a factor in substance use, it may be necessary to use both monetary risk-taking tasks and complementary assessments of non-monetary-based risk-taking measures. PMID:25577478

  8. Internet opportunities for the petroleum industry professional

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    Following the lead of other AAPG Sections, the Rocky Mountain Section is adding an Internet Poster Session to the presentations this year. The purpose of this presentation is first, to show non-internet users how easy it is to get up to speed on the net, and second, to lead users to internet sites that will contribute useful data to their particular needs.

  9. Development of an internet-based support and coaching model for adolescents and young adults with ADHD and autism spectrum disorders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wentz, Elisabet; Nydén, A; Krevers, B

    2012-11-01

    The aims of this paper were to develop an internet-based support and coaching model for young people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and to validate the model. A user-centred design was applied to develop a model for internet-based support and coaching, where individuals received 8-week support via internet (chat). The model was validated by 10 individuals, 15-26 years of age, with ASD and/or ADHD. Self-report questionnaires [Sense of Coherence (SOC), the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale] were distributed before and after intervention. A structured interview regarding the quality of the model, the Patient perspective of Care and Rehabilitation process (POCR), was used after the intervention. The validation showed significant improvement of SOC, self-esteem and subjective Quality of Life at follow-up and the majority perceived high fulfilment/importance on the POCR. In conclusion, The model can be an important complement to other interventions for young people with ASD and/or ADHD.

  10. Providing Internet Access to the Ohio Career Information System for All Residents: A Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Morgan V.

    Expanded Internet access to the Ohio Career Information System (OCIS) would provide adults in Ohio who need to or wish to make career changes with the best available information about occupations, education and training programs, and financial aid. In order to determine the feasibility of improving access without cost to users, an advisory group,…

  11. Comparing adult users of public and private dental services in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Studying the factors associated with the use of dental services can provide the necessary knowledge to understand the reasons why individuals seek out public healthcare services and the formulation of more appropriate public policies for the present-day reality. Methods This work was a cross-sectional epidemiological study consisting of a sample of adults found in a research databank concerning the conditions of the oral health of the population of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. This study examined both main oral health disorders and relevant socioeconomic aspects. The dependent variable was defined as the type of service used, categorized under public and private use. The independent variables were selected and grouped to be inserted in the analysis model according to an adaptation of the behavioral model described by Andersen and Davidson. A hierarchical model was used to analyze the data. The description of variables and bivariate analyses were performed in an attempt to verify possible associations. For each group of variables at each hierarchical level, the gross and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and the respective 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by means of logistic regression. The Complex Samples model from the SPSS statistics program, version 19.0, was used to analyze the sample framework. Results In the final model, the factors associated with the use of public healthcare services by adults were directly related to the socioeconomic and demographic conditions of the individuals, including: being of a dark-skinned black race/color, belonging to families with more than four household residents and with a lower income level, residing in small towns, having more teeth that need treatment. Conclusions According to the findings from this study, socioeconomic and demographic factors, as well as normative treatment needs, are associated with the use of public dental services. PMID:25099268

  12. The Role of Study and Work in Cannabis Use and Dependence Trajectories among Young Adult Frequent Cannabis Users

    PubMed Central

    Liebregts, Nienke; van der Pol, Peggy; Van Laar, Margriet; de Graaf, Ron; van den Brink, Wim; Korf, Dirk J.

    2013-01-01

    Life course theory considers events in study and work as potential turning points in deviance, including illicit drug use. This qualitative study explores the role of occupational life in cannabis use and dependence in young adults. Two and three years after the initial structured interview, 47 at baseline frequent cannabis users were interviewed in-depth about the dynamics underlying changes in their cannabis use and dependence. Overall, cannabis use and dependence declined, including interviewees who quit using cannabis completely, in particular with students, both during their study and after they got employed. Life course theory appeared to be a useful framework to explore how and why occupational life is related to cannabis use and dependence over time. Our study showed that life events in this realm are rather common in young adults and can have a strong impact on cannabis use. While sometimes changes in use are temporary, turning points can evolve from changes in educational and employment situations; an effect that seems to be related to the consequences of these changes in terms of amount of leisure time and agency (i.e., feelings of being in control). PMID:23950748

  13. Internet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose, Rajan Mathew

    The World Wide Web and the Internet are rapidly expanding spaces, of great economic and social significance, which offer an opportunity to study many phenomena, often previously inaccessible, on an unprecedented scale and resolution with relative ease. These phenomena are measurable on the scale of tens of millions of users and hundreds of millions of pages. By virtue of nearly complete electronic mediation, it is possible in principle to observe the time and ``spatial'' evolution of nearly all choices and interactions. This cyber-space therefore provides a view into a number of traditional research questions (from many academic disciplines) and creates its own new phenomena accessible for study. Despite its largely self-organized and dynamic nature, a number of robust quantitative regularities are found in the aggregate statistics of interesting and useful quantities. These regularities can be understood with the help of models that draw on ideas from statistical physics as well as other fields such as economics, psychology and decision theory. This thesis develops models that can account for regularities found in the statistics of Internet congestion and user surfing patterns and discusses some practical consequences. practical consequences.

  14. International Collaboration on Internet Subject Gateways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Place, Emma

    A number of libraries in Europe are involved in the development of Internet subject gateways--services that aim to help users find high quality resources on the Internet. Subject gateways such as SOSIG (Social Science Information Gateway) have been available on the Internet for some years now, and they offer an alternative to Internet search…

  15. User-controlled photographic animations, photograph-based questions, and questionnaires: three Internet-based instruments for measuring drivers' risk-taking behavior.

    PubMed

    Horswill, M S; Coster, M E

    2001-02-01

    The Internet has been exploited successfully in the past as a medium for behavioral research. This paper presents a series of studies designed to assess Internet-based measures of drivers' risk-taking behavior. First, we compared responses from an Internet sample with a traditional pencil-and-paper sample using established questionnaire measures of risk taking. No significant differences were found. Second, we assessed the validity of new Internet-based instruments, involving photographs and photographic animations, that measured speed, gap acceptance, and passing. Responses were found to reflect known demographic patterns of actual behavior to some degree. Also, a roadside survey of speeds was carried out at the locations depicted in the photographic measure of speeding and, with certain exceptions, differences between the two appeared to be constant. Third, a between-subject experimental manipulation involving the photographic animation measure of gap acceptance was used to demonstrate one application of these techniques.

  16. Structural and Functional Imaging Studies in Chronic Cannabis Users: A Systematic Review of Adolescent and Adult Findings

    PubMed Central

    Batalla, Albert; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Yücel, Murat; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Crippa, Jose Alexandre; Nogué, Santiago; Torrens, Marta; Pujol, Jesús; Farré, Magí; Martin-Santos, Rocio

    2013-01-01

    Background The growing concern about cannabis use, the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide, has led to a significant increase in the number of human studies using neuroimaging techniques to determine the effect of cannabis on brain structure and function. We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence of the impact of chronic cannabis use on brain structure and function in adults and adolescents. Methods Papers published until August 2012 were included from EMBASE, Medline, PubMed and LILACS databases following a comprehensive search strategy and pre-determined set of criteria for article selection. Only neuroimaging studies involving chronic cannabis users with a matched control group were considered. Results One hundred and forty-two studies were identified, of which 43 met the established criteria. Eight studies were in adolescent population. Neuroimaging studies provide evidence of morphological brain alterations in both population groups, particularly in the medial temporal and frontal cortices, as well as the cerebellum. These effects may be related to the amount of cannabis exposure. Functional neuroimaging studies suggest different patterns of resting global and brain activity during the performance of several cognitive tasks both in adolescents and adults, which may indicate compensatory effects in response to chronic cannabis exposure. Limitations However, the results pointed out methodological limitations of the work conducted to date and considerable heterogeneity in the findings. Conclusion Chronic cannabis use may alter brain structure and function in adult and adolescent population. Further studies should consider the use of convergent methodology, prospective large samples involving adolescent to adulthood subjects, and data-sharing initiatives. PMID:23390554

  17. The Diabetes App Challenge: User-Led Development and Piloting of Internet Applications Enabling Young People With Diabetes to Set the Focus for Their Diabetes Consultations

    PubMed Central

    Ashurst, Emily J; Abraham, Charles; Jenner, Martin; Boddy, Kate; Besser, Rachel EJ; Hammersley, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditionally, some teenagers and young adults with diabetes have not engaged well at diabetes appointments, giving rise to concerns about long-term health risks. We considered that apps might help this group of patients to improve preparation for, and therefore engagement at their appointments. Although there are already many apps for young people with type 1 diabetes (YPD), we thought that by supporting YPD themselves to develop apps, the resulting products would have greater “authenticity” and relevance. Objective To test the feasibility of an online competition to (1) recruit and support YPD to develop apps (mobile or Internet based) to help prepare for clinic appointments, and (2) for these apps to be tested and rated by YPD. Methods The “Diabetes App Challenge” was a United Kingdom (UK) national competition, run between June and October 2012 for teams including at least one YPD (aged 16-25) to pilot the design and development of apps for use by other YPD prior to clinic appointments. The competition was advertised by social media, email, AdWords and postings on the Diabetes UK website. Registrants for the competition were supported via email and discussion forum. After app development, other YPD were invited (November 2012-February 2013) to trial the apps, choose and use one prior to a clinic appointment, and review their experiences. Results Of 56 people (including 28 YPD) who expressed interest in the competition, 6 teams (14 people) developed and submitted an app. Two apps aimed to facilitate agenda setting in clinic consultations, 2 enabled data logging and 2 helped insulin dose calculation. Of 135 YPD who registered to trial the apps, 83 (61.5%) took part (mean age 18.98, 37/83 male). Agenda setting apps were considered most useful for preparing for and setting the focus of clinic appointments (P=.02). Just over half (46/83, 55%) said they would use their chosen app again and 4/5 (67/83, 81%) would recommend it to a friend. Conclusions

  18. The New Curriculum in the Age of Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backer, Jimmy

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how each of the four domains of Israel's New English Curriculum takes on additional definitions in the age of the Internet. Provides Internet addresses for both new and experienced Internet users. (Author/VWL)

  19. The impact of early parenting bonding on young adults' internet addiction, through the mediation effects of negative relating to others and sadness.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzaki, Argyroula E; Birtchnell, John

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study is the investigation of the potential role of negative relating to others, perceived loneliness, sadness, and anxiety, as mediators of the association between early parental bonding and adult Internet Addiction (IA). The factorial structure of the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the prevalence rates of it in a Greek sample will also be investigated. A total of 774 participants were recruited from a Technological Education Institute (mean age=20.2, SD=2.8) and from high school technical schools (mean age=19.9, SD=7.4). The IAT was used to measure the degree of problematic Internet use behaviors; the Parental Bonding Instrument was used to assess one's recalled parenting experiences during the first 16years of life; the shortened Person's Relating to Others Questionnaire was used to assess one's negative (i.e. maladaptive) relating to others (NRO). Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the three-factor structure of the IAT. Only 1.0% of the sample was severely addicted to the Internet. The mediated effects of only the NRO and sadness were confirmed. Negative relating to others was found to fully mediate the effect of both the father's optimal parenting and affectionless control on IA, whereas sadness was found to fully mediate the effect of the mother's optimal parenting on IA. Overall, the results suggest that parenting style has an indirect impact on IA, through the mediating role of negative relating to others or sadness in later life. Both family-based and individual-based prevention and intervention efforts may reduce the incidence of IA. PMID:24368006

  20. The impact of early parenting bonding on young adults' internet addiction, through the mediation effects of negative relating to others and sadness.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzaki, Argyroula E; Birtchnell, John

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study is the investigation of the potential role of negative relating to others, perceived loneliness, sadness, and anxiety, as mediators of the association between early parental bonding and adult Internet Addiction (IA). The factorial structure of the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the prevalence rates of it in a Greek sample will also be investigated. A total of 774 participants were recruited from a Technological Education Institute (mean age=20.2, SD=2.8) and from high school technical schools (mean age=19.9, SD=7.4). The IAT was used to measure the degree of problematic Internet use behaviors; the Parental Bonding Instrument was used to assess one's recalled parenting experiences during the first 16years of life; the shortened Person's Relating to Others Questionnaire was used to assess one's negative (i.e. maladaptive) relating to others (NRO). Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the three-factor structure of the IAT. Only 1.0% of the sample was severely addicted to the Internet. The mediated effects of only the NRO and sadness were confirmed. Negative relating to others was found to fully mediate the effect of both the father's optimal parenting and affectionless control on IA, whereas sadness was found to fully mediate the effect of the mother's optimal parenting on IA. Overall, the results suggest that parenting style has an indirect impact on IA, through the mediating role of negative relating to others or sadness in later life. Both family-based and individual-based prevention and intervention efforts may reduce the incidence of IA.

  1. Sexually Explicit Media on the Internet: A Content Analysis of Sexual Behaviors, Risk, and Media Characteristics in Gay Male Adult Videos

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Martin J.; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Antebi, Nadav; Siegel, Karolynn

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that viewing sexually explicit media (SEM), i.e., adult videos, may influence sexual risk taking among men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite this evidence, very little is known about the content of gay male SEM on the Internet, including the prevalence of sexual risk behaviors and their relation to video- and performer-characteristics, viewing frequency, and favorability. The current study content analyzed 302 sexually explicit videos featuring male same-sex performers that were posted to five highly trafficked adult-oriented websites. Findings revealed that gay male SEM on the Internet features a variety of conventional and nonconventional sexual behaviors. There was a substantial prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) (34%) and was virtually the same as the prevalence of anal sex with a condom (36%). The presence of UAI was not associated with video length, amateur production, number of video views, favorability, or website source. However, the presence of other potentially high-risk behaviors (e.g., ejaculation in the mouth, and ejaculation on/in/rubbed into the anus) was associated with longer videos, more views, and group sex videos (three or more performers). The findings of high levels of sexual risk behavior and the fact that there was virtually no difference in the prevalence of anal sex with and without a condom in gay male SEM have important implications for HIV prevention efforts, future research on the role of SEM on sexual risk taking, and public health policy. PMID:23733156

  2. Comparing Internet and Mobile Phone Digital Divides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Ronald E.; Katz, James E.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the digital divide focuses on the Internet and mobile phone digital divide. Analyses of a telephone survey from 2000 considers similarities and differences in three kinds of digital dividers for both the Internet and the mobile phone: users and nonusers, users and dropouts, and recent and veteran users. (Author/LRW)

  3. Illicit Use of Buprenorphine in a Community Sample of Young Adult Non-Medical Users of Pharmaceutical Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Daniulaityte, Raminta; Falck, Russel; Carlson, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is growing evidence about illicit use of buprenorphine in the U.S. The study aims to: 1) identify prevalence and predictors of illicit buprenorphine use in a community sample of 396 young adult (18-23 years old) non-medical users of pharmaceutical opioids; 2) describe knowledge, attitudes and behaviors linked to illicit buprenorphine use as reported by a qualitative sub-sample (n=51). METHODS Participants were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Qualitative interview participants were selected from the larger sample. The sample (n=396) was 54% male and 50% white; 7.8% reported lifetime illicit use of buprenorphine. RESULTS Logistic regression analysis results indicate that white ethnicity, intranasal inhalation of pharmaceutical opioids, symptoms of opioid dependence, and a greater number of pharmaceutical opioids used in lifetime were statistically significant predictors of illicit buprenorphine use. Qualitative interviews revealed that buprenorphine was more commonly used by more experienced users who were introduced to it by their “junkie friends.” Those who used buprenorphine to self-medicate withdrawal referred to it as a “miracle pill.” When used to get high, reported experiences ranged from “the best high ever” to “puking for days.” Participants reported using buprenorphine/naloxone orally or by intranasal inhalation. Injection of buprenorphine without naloxone was also reported. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that illicit buprenorphine use is gaining ground primarily among whites and those who are more advanced in their drug use careers. Continued monitoring is needed to better understand evolving patterns and trends of illicit buprenorphine use. PMID:22036303

  4. Treating anxiety and depression in older adults: randomised controlled trial comparing guided v. self-guided internet-delivered cognitive–behavioural therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fogliati, Vincent J.; Staples, Lauren G.; Gandy, Milena; Johnston, Luke; Wootton, Bethany; Nielssen, Olav; Dear, Blake F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Symptoms of anxiety and depression are prevalent in older adults. Aims To compare clinician-guided and self-guided versions of a transdiagnostic internet-delivered cognitive–behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention for adults aged 60 years and above. Method Adults (n=433) with symptoms of anxiety and depression were randomly allocated to: (1) clinician-guided treatment (n=153); (2) initial clinician interview followed by self-guided treatment (n=140); or (3) self-guided treatment without interview (n=140). Results Large reductions (d ≥1.00) in symptoms of depression and anxiety were observed across groups, and sustained at follow-up. No differences were observed in clinical outcomes or satisfaction ratings. Age did not affect outcomes. Conclusions Carefully developed iCBT interventions may significantly reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression in older adults when delivered in either clinician-guided or self-guided formats. Declaration of interest N.T. and B.F.D. developed the Wellbeing Plus Course but derive no financial benefit from it. Copyright and usage © 2016 The Royal College of Psychiatrists. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703754

  5. Trust in online prescription drug information among internet users: the impact on information search behavior after exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising.

    PubMed

    Menon, Ajit M; Deshpande, Aparna D; Perri, Matthew; Zinkhan, George M

    2002-01-01

    The proliferation of both manufacturer-controlled and independent medication-related websites has aroused concern among consumers and policy-makers concerning the trustworthiness of Web-based drug information. The authors examine consumers' trust in on-line prescription drug information and its influence on information search behavior. The study design involves a retrospective analysis of data from a 1998 national survey. The findings reveal that trust in drug information from traditional media sources such as television and newspapers transfers to the domain of the Internet. Furthermore, a greater trust in on-line prescription drug information stimulates utilization of the Internet for information search after exposure to prescription drug advertising.

  6. Using the Internet as an Instructional Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson River Center for Program Development, Glenmont, NY.

    This manual is designed to help adult educators to understand and use the Internet in teaching adult students. The manual examines what the Internet is, how one can connect to it, and how it can be used. It also describes ways to communicate on the Internet, identifies sites where information can be accessed, and explains how search tools are…

  7. Respondent-Driven Sampling to Recruit Young Adult Non-Medical Users of Pharmaceutical Opioids: Problems and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Daniulaityte, Raminta; Falck, Russel; Li, Linna; Nahhas, Ramzi W.; Carlson, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) has been promoted as a superior method in recruiting hard-to-reach and hidden populations. Although its application has expanded enormously, there remains a need for empirical data evaluating the performance of RDS in different settings. This study describes the application of RDS to recruit a community sample (N=396) of young adults (18–23 years old) into a natural history study of non-medical pharmaceutical opioid use. Since recruitment targeted non-dependent pharmaceutical opioid users, and applied other eligibility restrictions, several modifications had to be made to make RDS work with this narrowly-defined target population. RDS recruitment was less efficient than expected, and produced greater numbers of African American recruits than anticipated. Although the sampling quota was met, sample analysis revealed a lack of equilibrium in terms of ethnic composition and very strong in-group recruitment tendencies among White and African American respondents. This study contributes potentially helpful insights into the strengths and limitations of using RDS which may benefit future studies. PMID:21885213

  8. Teaching the Internet to Library Staff and Users: 10 Ready-To-Go Workshops That Work. Neal-Schuman NetGuide Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollands, William D.

    This guide features 10 customizable, ready-to-run workshops for librarians wishing to establish or refine ongoing Internet training for staff members or patrons. Each workshop in the book includes an introduction, an objective, a timed lesson plan, tips, a sample script, and reproducible handouts. In order to provide for the variety of settings…

  9. Predictors and patterns of problematic Internet game use using a decision tree model.

    PubMed

    Rho, Mi Jung; Jeong, Jo-Eun; Chun, Ji-Won; Cho, Hyun; Jung, Dong Jin; Choi, In Young; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Background and aims Problematic Internet game use is an important social issue that increases social expenditures for both individuals and nations. This study identified predictors and patterns of problematic Internet game use. Methods Data were collected from online surveys between November 26 and December 26, 2014. We identified 3,881 Internet game users from a total of 5,003 respondents. A total of 511 participants were assigned to the problematic Internet game user group according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Internet gaming disorder criteria. From the remaining 3,370 participants, we used propensity score matching to develop a normal comparison group of 511 participants. In all, 1,022 participants were analyzed using the chi-square automatic interaction detector (CHAID) algorithm. Results According to the CHAID algorithm, six important predictors were found: gaming costs (50%), average weekday gaming time (23%), offline Internet gaming community meeting attendance (13%), average weekend and holiday gaming time (7%), marital status (4%), and self-perceptions of addiction to Internet game use (3%). In addition, three patterns out of six classification rules were explored: cost-consuming, socializing, and solitary gamers. Conclusion This study provides direction for future work on the screening of problematic Internet game use in adults. PMID:27499227

  10. Predictors and patterns of problematic Internet game use using a decision tree model.

    PubMed

    Rho, Mi Jung; Jeong, Jo-Eun; Chun, Ji-Won; Cho, Hyun; Jung, Dong Jin; Choi, In Young; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Background and aims Problematic Internet game use is an important social issue that increases social expenditures for both individuals and nations. This study identified predictors and patterns of problematic Internet game use. Methods Data were collected from online surveys between November 26 and December 26, 2014. We identified 3,881 Internet game users from a total of 5,003 respondents. A total of 511 participants were assigned to the problematic Internet game user group according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Internet gaming disorder criteria. From the remaining 3,370 participants, we used propensity score matching to develop a normal comparison group of 511 participants. In all, 1,022 participants were analyzed using the chi-square automatic interaction detector (CHAID) algorithm. Results According to the CHAID algorithm, six important predictors were found: gaming costs (50%), average weekday gaming time (23%), offline Internet gaming community meeting attendance (13%), average weekend and holiday gaming time (7%), marital status (4%), and self-perceptions of addiction to Internet game use (3%). In addition, three patterns out of six classification rules were explored: cost-consuming, socializing, and solitary gamers. Conclusion This study provides direction for future work on the screening of problematic Internet game use in adults.

  11. The Internet and Education: Some Lessons on Privacy and Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Don E.

    1997-01-01

    Most users have misconceptions about how the Internet works. Provides a brief history of the Internet and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP); discusses electronic mail, privacy, and voluntary and involuntary information gathering; and contrasts the Internet and libraries, focusing on the Internet's lack of consistent…

  12. Technical Report and Data File User's Manual: For the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy. NCES 2009-476

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldi, Stephane, Ed.; Kutner, Mark; Greenberg, Elizabeth; Jin, Ying; Baer, Justin; Moore, Elizabeth; Dunleavy, Eric; Berlin, Martha; Mohadjer, Leyla; Binzer, Greg; Krenzke, Thomas; Hogan, Jacqueline; Amsbary, Michelle; Forsyth, Barbara; Clark, Lyn; Annis, Terri; Bernstein, Jared; White, Sheida

    2009-01-01

    The 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL) assessed the English literacy skills of a nationally representative sample of more than 19,000 U.S. adults (age 16 and older) residing in households and correctional institutions. NAAL is the first national assessment of adult literacy since the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS). The…

  13. Saving the internet.

    PubMed

    Zittrain, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    The Internet goose has laid countless golden eggs, along with a growing number of rotten ones. But it's the rotten ones that now tempt commercial, governmental, and consumer interests to threaten the Internet's uniquely creative power. The expediently selected, almost accidentally generative properties of the Internet - its technical openness, ease of access and mastery, and adaptability - have combined, especially when coupled with those of the PC, to produce an unsurpassed environment for innovative experiment. Those same properties, however, also make the Internet hospitable to various forms of wickedness: hacking, porn, spam, fraud, theft, predation, and attacks on the network itself. As these undesirable phenomena proliferate, business, government, and many users find common cause for locking down Internet and PC architecture in the interests of security and order. PC and Internet security vulnerabilities are a legitimate menace. However, the most likely reactions - if they are not forestalled - will be at least as unfortunate as the security problems themselves. Consider the growing profusion of "tethered appliances" - devices whose functions cannot readily be altered by their owners (think TiVo). Such appliances take Internet innovations and wrap them up in a neat, easy-to-use package, which is good - but only if the Internet and PC can remain sufficiently in the center of the digital ecosystem to produce the next round of innovations and to generate competition. People buy these devices for their convenience or functionality and may appreciate the fact that they are safer to use (they limit the damage users can do through ignorance or carelessness). But the risk is that users, by migrating to such appliances, will unwittingly trade away the future benefits of generativity - a loss that will go unappreciated even as innovation tapers off. PMID:17580647

  14. Saving the internet.

    PubMed

    Zittrain, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    The Internet goose has laid countless golden eggs, along with a growing number of rotten ones. But it's the rotten ones that now tempt commercial, governmental, and consumer interests to threaten the Internet's uniquely creative power. The expediently selected, almost accidentally generative properties of the Internet - its technical openness, ease of access and mastery, and adaptability - have combined, especially when coupled with those of the PC, to produce an unsurpassed environment for innovative experiment. Those same properties, however, also make the Internet hospitable to various forms of wickedness: hacking, porn, spam, fraud, theft, predation, and attacks on the network itself. As these undesirable phenomena proliferate, business, government, and many users find common cause for locking down Internet and PC architecture in the interests of security and order. PC and Internet security vulnerabilities are a legitimate menace. However, the most likely reactions - if they are not forestalled - will be at least as unfortunate as the security problems themselves. Consider the growing profusion of "tethered appliances" - devices whose functions cannot readily be altered by their owners (think TiVo). Such appliances take Internet innovations and wrap them up in a neat, easy-to-use package, which is good - but only if the Internet and PC can remain sufficiently in the center of the digital ecosystem to produce the next round of innovations and to generate competition. People buy these devices for their convenience or functionality and may appreciate the fact that they are safer to use (they limit the damage users can do through ignorance or carelessness). But the risk is that users, by migrating to such appliances, will unwittingly trade away the future benefits of generativity - a loss that will go unappreciated even as innovation tapers off.

  15. Internet use and self-injurious behaviors among adolescents and young adults: an interdisciplinary literature review and implications for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Messina, Emily S; Iwasaki, Yoshitaka

    2011-03-01

    The ease and accessibility of the Internet has created an environment where individuals can both remain anonymous and interact with others who share their interests. Electronic discussion boards and social-networking sites allow individuals to communicate with others, via public postings, regarding specific topics of interest. These interactions have taken a therapeutic form for adolescents and young adults seeking practical and emotional support on the Internet. Support sites exist for many issues and illnesses, but sites focusing on self-injurious behaviors (SIB) have garnered recent attention because of their potential to either aid in recovery or exacerbate symptoms. SIB are those behaviors in which an individual purposely inflicts harm to his or her body. Based on an interdisciplinary literature review, self-injurious Web sites have been shown to provide anonymous support for individuals experiencing SIB from others who have experienced similar emotions. However, the literature also reveals that some peers who are providing the support are accepting of SIB and guilty of glossing over potentially serious posts. The emotional support received on these sites differs from services those individuals would receive from professionals, such as coping strategies to deal with stressors and a more detailed examination of ominous signs. The use of these Web sites as a help or a hindrance to an individual's recovery from SIB remains highly contested; health professionals should be aware of the pros and cons associated with this phenomenon and should be able to identify safe means of communication for clients suffering from SIB. PMID:20677983

  16. Strategies to facilitate exposure to internet-delivered health behavior change interventions aimed at adolescents or young adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, Rik; de Nooijer, Jascha; Brouwer, Wendy; Oenema, Anke; Brug, Johannes; de Vries, Nanne K

    2011-02-01

    The Internet is considered to be a promising delivery channel of interventions aimed at promoting healthful behaviors, especially for adolescents and young adults. Exposure to these interventions, however, is generally low. A more extensive exploration of methods, strategies, and their effectiveness with regard to facilitating exposure is therefore timely, because this knowledge is crucial to improve the use of such interventions and, subsequently, to increase behavioral change. Therefore, a systematic review of the literature was conducted, resulting in 838 studies based on title selection, of which 26 studies met the eligibility criteria. The systematic review resulted in an overview of methods and strategies that have been used to facilitate exposure. Patterns of effective strategies could be observed, such as the combination of tailored communication and the use of reminders and incentives. Nevertheless, exposure-specific theories need to be developed and objective exposure measures should be tracked and reported in future studies.

  17. The association between psychopathology and substance use: adolescent and young adult substance users in inpatient treatment in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Saban, Amina; Flisher, Alan; Laubscher, Ria; London, Leslie; Morojele, Neo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that comorbid psychopathology can negatively affect treatment outcomes in substance users. In South Africa, limited information exists regarding the prevalence, nature and role of psychiatric comorbidity in substance users. This study examined psychiatric comorbidity and its association with specific substance use, and young adult substance users in treatment for substance use. Methods Male and female inpatient substance users (n=95; ages 17-30 years) were sampled consecutively in order of admission from three clinics in Cape Town. An interview schedule was administered to elicit patients’ sociodemographic and substance use history details. The computer-assisted Diagnostic Interview Schedule DSM IV (C-DIS IV) was administered to screen patients for current psychiatric disorders. Resuls The sample was largely male, Coloured, Muslim and single. Cannabis (51.6%) and crystal methamphetamine (17.9%) were the most common first substances of use. Heroin (53.7%) and crystal methamphetamine (33.7%) were the most common substances for which treatment was sought (primary substances). The most common comorbid psychopathologies were anti-social personality disorder (ASPD 87.4%) and conduct disorder (CD 67.4%). Regression analyses showed a marginally significant association between specific phobia and first use of cannabis, but indicated no statistically significant associations between psychopathology and substance use. Conclusion The results demonstrated a high proportion of previously unidentified comorbid psychopathology in inpatient substance users. Further research is needed to investigate psychiatric comorbidity in inpatient substance users. PMID:24643118

  18. Patterns of federal Internet offenders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ann W; Carretta, Carrie M; Burgess, Allen G

    2012-09-01

    Internet-facilitated sexual offending is receiving increased forensic and clinical attention. Two issues confront this field. First, studies are equivocal as to whether (or not) the possession of Internet pornography can escalate to contact sexual offenses against a child, and second, federal judges have been questioning the length of sentences for users only of child pornography. The findings of this pilot study of 101 federal Internet offenders revealed over half of the men at the time of arrest were employed, educated, were in (or had been in) a relationship, had children, and did not have a prior criminal offense, suggesting a changing profile of a convicted sex offender. Forensic and psychiatric nurses who evaluate users of child pornography contraband need to be knowledgeable of Internet file transfer technology and the various types of contraband viewed specifically for the age of the preferred child, extreme acts to the child (e.g., bondage, S&M), and whether the user prefers images of adults with children or images of children only. PMID:22925126

  19. Patterns of federal Internet offenders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ann W; Carretta, Carrie M; Burgess, Allen G

    2012-09-01

    Internet-facilitated sexual offending is receiving increased forensic and clinical attention. Two issues confront this field. First, studies are equivocal as to whether (or not) the possession of Internet pornography can escalate to contact sexual offenses against a child, and second, federal judges have been questioning the length of sentences for users only of child pornography. The findings of this pilot study of 101 federal Internet offenders revealed over half of the men at the time of arrest were employed, educated, were in (or had been in) a relationship, had children, and did not have a prior criminal offense, suggesting a changing profile of a convicted sex offender. Forensic and psychiatric nurses who evaluate users of child pornography contraband need to be knowledgeable of Internet file transfer technology and the various types of contraband viewed specifically for the age of the preferred child, extreme acts to the child (e.g., bondage, S&M), and whether the user prefers images of adults with children or images of children only.

  20. Can the Internet Be Saved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischman, Josh

    2007-01-01

    The Internet has great difficulty coping with the sharp increase in mobile devices like cellphones and laptops, and handling bandwidth-hungry traffic such as video, now demanded by an increasing number of users. According to Ellen W. Zegura, chairwoman of computer sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Internet is like a big…

  1. Drugs, Youth, and the Internet. Information Bulletin, October 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    Adolescents and young adults have become the largest segment of the U.S. population with Internet access. Because of the large numbers of adolescents and young adults who have access to the Internet, the threat posed by drug-related activity occurring on the Internet is quite serious. The large number of young Americans accessing the Internet has…

  2. Is Internet search better than structured instruction for web-based health education?

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Bedra, McKenzie

    2013-01-01

    Internet provides access to vast amounts of comprehensive information regarding any health-related subject. Patients increasingly use this information for health education using a search engine to identify education materials. An alternative approach of health education via Internet is based on utilizing a verified web site which provides structured interactive education guided by adult learning theories. Comparison of these two approaches in older patients was not performed systematically. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a web-based computer-assisted education (CO-ED) system versus searching the Internet for learning about hypertension. Sixty hypertensive older adults (age 45+) were randomized into control or intervention groups. The control patients spent 30 to 40 minutes searching the Internet using a search engine for information about hypertension. The intervention patients spent 30 to 40 minutes using the CO-ED system, which provided computer-assisted instruction about major hypertension topics. Analysis of pre- and post- knowledge scores indicated a significant improvement among CO-ED users (14.6%) as opposed to Internet users (2%). Additionally, patients using the CO-ED program rated their learning experience more positively than those using the Internet.

  3. Lizzy Kinsey and the Adult Friendfinders: an ethnographic study of Internet sex and pornographic self-display in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Katrien

    2010-08-01

    This paper investigates web users, their sexual behaviours and self-representations as observed on a sex and dating site. The website concerned is a massive social network for sexual self-display and encourages members to find real-life partners for sex--whether this be casual sex affairs between singles, swinging couples or extra-marital affairs between 'aba' (attached but available) individuals and their lovers. The paper analyses the imaging strategies of Chinese and non-Chinese web users in reference to the playful adoption of commonplace notions of sexiness as 'cybertypes'. The aim is to reflect on these online behaviours as changing sexual culture while also debating the use of libidinal online personalities as a cognitive apparatus within sex research. The paper thus explores sexual identity within social networks as auto-ethnography and the dual identities and boundary-crossing agencies of web-based researchers and their subjects. PMID:20473800

  4. Lizzy Kinsey and the Adult Friendfinders: an ethnographic study of Internet sex and pornographic self-display in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Katrien

    2010-08-01

    This paper investigates web users, their sexual behaviours and self-representations as observed on a sex and dating site. The website concerned is a massive social network for sexual self-display and encourages members to find real-life partners for sex--whether this be casual sex affairs between singles, swinging couples or extra-marital affairs between 'aba' (attached but available) individuals and their lovers. The paper analyses the imaging strategies of Chinese and non-Chinese web users in reference to the playful adoption of commonplace notions of sexiness as 'cybertypes'. The aim is to reflect on these online behaviours as changing sexual culture while also debating the use of libidinal online personalities as a cognitive apparatus within sex research. The paper thus explores sexual identity within social networks as auto-ethnography and the dual identities and boundary-crossing agencies of web-based researchers and their subjects.

  5. Visualizing Internet routing changes.

    PubMed

    Lad, Mohit; Massey, Dan; Zhang, Lixia

    2006-01-01

    Today's Internet provides a global data delivery service to millions of end users and routing protocols play a critical role in this service. It is important to be able to identify and diagnose any problems occurring in Internet routing. However, the Internet's sheer size makes this task difficult. One cannot easily extract out the most important or relevant routing information from the large amounts of data collected from multiple routers. To tackle this problem, we have developed Link-Rank, a tool to visualize Internet routing changes at the global scale. Link-Rank weighs links in a topological graph by the number of routes carried over each link and visually captures changes in link weights in the form of a topological graph with adjustable size. Using Link-Rank, network operators can easily observe important routing changes from massive amounts of routing data, discover otherwise unnoticed routing problems, understand the impact of topological events, and infer root causes of observed routing changes.

  6. Internet-delivered treatment for older adults with anxiety and depression: implementation of the Wellbeing Plus Course in routine clinical care and comparison with research trial outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Lauren G.; Fogliati, Vincent J.; Dear, Blake F.; Nielssen, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Background The Wellbeing Plus Course is an internet-delivered psychological intervention for older adults with anxiety or depression. Aims To compare the effectiveness of the Wellbeing Plus Course in a public health setting (clinic group) with its efficacy in a randomised controlled trial (research group). Method Participants (n=949) were Australian adults aged 60 and above. Primary outcome measures were the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7). Results Initial symptom severity was higher in the clinic group and course completion was lower. Both groups showed significant symptom reductions at post-treatment and were satisfied with the treatment. Results were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Within-group symptom changes were comparable between settings; there were no between-group differences on primary outcomes or satisfaction. Conclusions The Wellbeing Plus Course is as effective and acceptable in routine clinical care, as it is in controlled research trials. Declaration of interest N.T. and B.F.D developed the Wellbeing Plus Course but derived no financial benefit from it. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27703794

  7. College Student Internet Use: Convenience and Amusement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve M.

    2007-01-01

    Four hundred five college students completed a questionnaire that assessed patterns of Internet use. Results describe college students, with rare exception, as Internet users. The vast majority of college students frequently communicate online and access websites. While an Internet game experience is typical, relatively few college students are…

  8. The Internet: A Ready Reference Library?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    An academic librarian answered 24 questions using reference books, then tried to answer the same questions using an Internet search engine (Metacrawler). Evaluates the results of the Internet searches and discusses implications for library reference services and reference book publishers; Internet user expectations and satisfaction; and librarians…

  9. The Implementation of Internet Interventions for Depression: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Vaskinn, Linda; Bergsund, Hans Bugge; Haga, Silje Marie; Slinning, Kari; Bjørkli, Cato Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is one of the most common mental health problems among adults, but effective treatments are not widely accessible. The Internet holds promise as a cost-effective and convenient delivery platform of interventions for depression. However, studies suggest that Internet interventions are not widely available in routine settings. Objective The aim of this study was to review the literature and examine whether there are systematic differences in reporting of the various implementation components on Internet interventions for depression, and then to examine what is known about and is characteristic of the implementation of these Internet interventions in regular care settings. Methods We performed a scoping review, drawing upon a broad range of the literature on Internet interventions for depression in regular care, and used the active implementation framework to extract data. Results Overall, the results suggested that knowledge about the implementation of Internet interventions for depression in regular care is limited. However, guided support from health professionals emphasizing program adherence and recruitment of end users to the interventions emerged as 2 main themes. We identified 3 additional themes among practitioners, including their qualifications, training, and supervision, but these were scarcely described in the literature. The competency drivers (ie, staff and user selection, training, and supervision) have received the most attention, while little attention has been given to organizational (ie, decision support, administration, and system intervention) and leadership drivers. Conclusions Research has placed little emphasis on reporting on the implementation of interventions in practice. Leadership and organizational drivers, in particular, have been largely neglected. The results of this scoping review have implications for future research and efforts to successfully implement Internet interventions for depression in regular care

  10. Performance of Young Adult Cannabis Users on Neurocognitive Measures of Impulsive Behavior and their Relationship to Symptoms of Cannabis Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Raul; Schuster, Randi Melissa; Mermelstein, Robin J.; Vassileva, Jasmin; Martin, Eileen M.; Diviak, Kathleen R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that abstinent cannabis users show deficits on neurocognitive laboratory tasks of impulsive behavior. But results are mixed and less is known on the performance of non-treatment seeking, young adult cannabis users. Importantly, relationships between performance on measures of impulsive behavior and symptoms of cannabis addiction remain relatively unexplored. We compared young adult current cannabis users (CU, n = 65) and non-using controls (NU, n = 65) on several laboratory measures of impulsive behavior, as well as on a measure of episodic memory commonly impacted by cannabis use. The CU group performed more poorly than the NU group on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Total Immediate Recall and Delayed Recall. No significant differences were observed on the measures of impulsive behavior (i.e., Iowa Gambling Task [IGT], Go-Stop Task, Monetary Choice Questionnaire, Balloon Analogue Risk Task). We examined relationships between neurocognitive performance and symptoms of cannabis use disorder symptoms (DSM-IV CUD) among the CU group, which revealed that poorer IGT performance was associated with more symptoms of DSM-IV CUD. Our results show poorer memory performance among young adult cannabis users relative to healthy controls, but no differences on measures of impulsive behavior. However, performance on a specific type of impulsive behavior (i.e., poorer decision-making) was associated with more cannabis use disorder symptoms. These results provide preliminary evidence to suggest that decision-making deficits may be more strongly associated with problems experienced from cannabis use, rather than solely being a consequence of cannabis use, per se. PMID:22882144

  11. Performance of young adult cannabis users on neurocognitive measures of impulsive behavior and their relationship to symptoms of cannabis use disorders.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Raul; Schuster, Randi Melissa; Mermelstein, Robin J; Vassileva, Jasmin; Martin, Eileen M; Diviak, Kathleen R

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that abstinent cannabis users show deficits on neurocognitive laboratory tasks of impulsive behavior. But results are mixed, and less is known on the performance of non-treatment-seeking, young adult cannabis users. Importantly, relationships between performance on measures of impulsive behavior and symptoms of cannabis addiction remain relatively unexplored. We compared young adult current cannabis users (CU, n = 65) and nonusing controls (NU, n = 65) on several laboratory measures of impulsive behavior, as well as on a measure of episodic memory commonly impacted by cannabis use. The CU group performed more poorly than the NU group on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Total Immediate Recall and Delayed Recall. No significant differences were observed on the measures of impulsive behavior (i.e., Iowa Gambling Task, IGT; Go-Stop Task; Monetary Choice Questionnaire; Balloon Analogue Risk Task). We examined relationships between neurocognitive performance and symptoms of cannabis use disorder symptoms (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition, DSM-IV CUD) among the CU group, which revealed that poorer IGT performance was associated with more symptoms of DSM-IV CUD. Our results show poorer memory performance among young adult cannabis users than among healthy controls, but no differences on measures of impulsive behavior. However, performance on a specific type of impulsive behavior (i.e., poorer decision making) was associated with more cannabis use disorder symptoms. These results provide preliminary evidence to suggest that decision-making deficits may be more strongly associated with problems experienced from cannabis use, rather than solely being a consequence of cannabis use, per se. PMID:22882144

  12. Library resources on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Nancy L.

    1995-07-01

    Library resources are prevalent on the Internet. Library catalogs, electronic books, electronic periodicals, periodical indexes, reference sources, and U.S. Government documents are available by telnet, Gopher, World Wide Web, and FTP. Comparatively few copyrighted library resources are available freely on the Internet. Internet implementations of library resources can add useful features, such as full-text searching. There are discussion lists, Gophers, and World Wide Web pages to help users keep up with new resources and changes to existing ones. The future will bring more library resources, more types of library resources, and more integrated implementations of such resources to the Internet.

  13. Randomized Effectiveness Trial of an Internet, Pure Self-Help, Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Depressive Symptoms in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Greg; Kelleher, Chris; Hornbrook, Matt; DeBar, Lynn; Dickerson, John; Gullion, Christina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated an Internet-delivered, cognitive behavioral skills training program versus a treatment-as-usual (TAU) control condition targeting depression symptoms in youth ages 18 to 24. Potential participants were mailed a recruitment brochure; if interested they accessed the study website to complete an online consent and baseline assessment. Intervention participants could access the website at their own pace and at any time. Reminder postcards were mailed periodically to encourage return use of the intervention. The pure self-help intervention was delivered without contact with a live therapist. The primary depression outcome measure was the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8), administered at 0, 5, 10, 16, and 32 weeks after enrollment. A small but significant between-group effect was found from week 0 to week 32 for the entire sample (n=160; d=.20, 95% CI=0.00-0.50), with a moderate effect among females (n=128; d=.42, 95% CI=0.09-0.77). Greater depression reduction was associated with two measures of lower website usage, total minutes and total number of page hits. While intervention effects were modest, they were observed against a background of substantial TAU depression pharmacotherapy and psychosocial services. Highly disseminable, low-cost, and self-help interventions such as this have the potential to deliver a significant public health benefit. PMID:19440896

  14. Pedophilia on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Deirmenjian, John M

    2002-09-01

    The Internet provides adults and children with a medium for professional and personal communication throughout the world. As widespread communication in cyberspace grows exponentially, the potential for Internet-related crimes, such as cyberstalkng, has accelerated. Children are particularly vulnerable to sexual predators, such as pedophiles, on the Internet. This article reports cases of pedophiles who used the information superhighway to exploit child victims. Two models of pedophilia on the Internet are discussed: a trust-based seductive model and a direct sexual model. This article explores the role that mental health professionals may play in the assessment of Internet pedophilia. For example, mental health professionals may provide psychiatric treatment to victims of Internet pedophiles. Psychiatrists may be involved in the evaluation of perpetrators of Internet crimes in a clinical or forensic setting. Governmental agencies, the criminal justice system, school, or the media may request consultations by mental health professionals as part of a multi-disciplinary approach to prevention. Methods of government intervention are discussed.

  15. Automated Filtering of Internet Postings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Louis B.; Holland, Maurita P.

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of the use of dynamic data resources, such as Internet LISTSERVs or Usenet newsgroups, focuses on an experiment using an automated filtering system with Usenet newsgroups. Highlights include user satisfaction, based on retrieval size, data sources, and user interface and the need for some human mediation. (Contains two references.) (LRW)

  16. Effectiveness of an Activity Tracker- and Internet-Based Adaptive Walking Program for Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Josée; Bennett, Wendy L; Jerome, Gerald J; Shah, Nina G; Lazo, Mariana; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Clark, Jeanne M

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefits of physical activity are well documented, but scalable programs to promote activity are needed. Interventions that assign tailored and dynamically adjusting goals could effect significant increases in physical activity but have not yet been implemented at scale. Objective Our aim was to examine the effectiveness of an open access, Internet-based walking program that assigns daily step goals tailored to each participant. Methods A two-arm, pragmatic randomized controlled trial compared the intervention to no treatment. Participants were recruited from a workplace setting and randomized to a no-treatment control (n=133) or to treatment (n=132). Treatment participants received a free wireless activity tracker and enrolled in the walking program, Walkadoo. Assessments were fully automated: activity tracker recorded primary outcomes (steps) without intervention by the participant or investigators. The two arms were compared on change in steps per day from baseline to follow-up (after 6 weeks of treatment) using a two-tailed independent samples t test. Results Participants (N=265) were 66.0% (175/265) female with an average age of 39.9 years. Over half of the participants (142/265, 53.6%) were sedentary (<5000 steps/day) and 44.9% (119/265) were low to somewhat active (5000-9999 steps/day). The intervention group significantly increased their steps by 970 steps/day over control (P<.001), with treatment effects observed in sedentary (P=.04) and low-to-somewhat active (P=.004) participants alike. Conclusions The program is effective in increasing daily steps. Participants benefited from the program regardless of their initial activity level. A tailored, adaptive approach using wireless activity trackers is realistically implementable and scalable. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02229409, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02229409 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6eiWCvBYe) PMID:26860434

  17. The effects of Internet addiction on the lifestyle and dietary behavior of Korean adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeonsoo; Park, Jin Young; Kim, Sung Byuk; Jung, In-Kyung; Lim, Yun Sook

    2010-01-01

    We performed this study to examine lifestyle patterns and dietary behavior based on the level of Internet addiction of Korean adolescents. Data were collected from 853 Korean junior high school students. The level of Internet addiction was determined based on the Korean Internet addiction self-scale short form for youth, and students were classified as high-risk Internet users, potential-risk Internet users, and no risk Internet users. The associations between the students' levels of Internet addiction and lifestyle patterns and dietary behavior were analyzed using a chi-square test. Irregular bedtimes and the use of alcohol and tobacco were higher in high-risk Internet users than no risk Internet users. Moreover, in high-risk Internet users, irregular dietary behavior due to the loss of appetite, a high frequency of skipping meals, and snacking might cause imbalances in nutritional intake. Diet quality in high-risk Internet users was also worse than in potential-risk Internet users and no risk Internet users. We demonstrated in this study that high-risk Internet users have inappropriate dietary behavior and poor diet quality, which could result in stunted growth and development. Therefore, nutrition education targeting high-risk Internet users should be conducted to ensure proper growth and development. PMID:20198209

  18. How to Protect Children from Internet Predators: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Rodney T.

    2012-01-01

    Teenage Internet users are the fastest growing segment in the Internet user population. These teenagers are at risk of sexual assault from Internet predators. This phenomenological study explored teacher and counselors' perceptions of how to prevent this sexual assault. Twenty-five teacher and counselor participants were interviewed. A…

  19. Useful Internet Information for Oklahoma Literacy Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Libraries, Oklahoma City.

    This publication introduces some Internet sites relevant to adult education and literacy. It begins with some definitions for the Internet. Next, it lists two guides to using the Internet. A listing of listservs includes name, brief description of literacy-related topics covered, and directions for subscribing. The listservs are as follows:…

  20. Using the Internet As an Instructional Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson River Center for Program Development, Glenmont, NY.

    This manual is designed to introduce adult educators to the Internet and examine ways that it can enhance instruction. An overview of the Internet covers its evolution. These three sections focus on the three areas of the Internet essential to instructional application: communication, information access, and search tools. The section on…

  1. Patterns of User Engagement with Mobile- and Web-Delivered Self-Care Interventions for Adults with T2DM: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Lyndsay A; Coston, Taylor D; Cherrington, Andrea L; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2016-07-01

    Technology-delivered interventions can improve the health behaviors and clinical outcomes of persons with diabetes, but only if end users engage with these interventions. To summarize the current knowledge on engagement with technology-based interventions, we conducted a review of recent mobile- and web-delivered intervention studies for adults with type 2 diabetes published from 2011 to 2015. Among 163 identified studies, 24 studies satisfied our inclusion criteria. There was substantial variation in how intervention engagement was reported across studies. Engagement rates were lower among interventions with a longer duration, and engagement decreased over time. In several studies, older age and lower health literacy were associated with less engagement, and more engagement was associated with intervention improvement in at least one outcome, including glycemic control. Future technology-based intervention studies should report on engagement, examine and report on associations between user characteristics and engagement, and aim to standardize how this is reported, particularly in longer trials.

  2. Cross-Modal Functional Reorganization of Visual and Auditory Cortex in Adult Cochlear Implant Users Identified with fNIRS

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Jeremy D.; Bleichner, Martin G.; Debener, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users show higher auditory-evoked activations in visual cortex and higher visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex compared to normal hearing (NH) controls, reflecting functional reorganization of both visual and auditory modalities. Visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex is a maladaptive functional reorganization whereas auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex is beneficial for speech recognition in CI users. We investigated their joint influence on CI users' speech recognition, by testing 20 postlingually deafened CI users and 20 NH controls with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Optodes were placed over occipital and temporal areas to measure visual and auditory responses when presenting visual checkerboard and auditory word stimuli. Higher cross-modal activations were confirmed in both auditory and visual cortex for CI users compared to NH controls, demonstrating that functional reorganization of both auditory and visual cortex can be identified with fNIRS. Additionally, the combined reorganization of auditory and visual cortex was found to be associated with speech recognition performance. Speech performance was good as long as the beneficial auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex was higher than the visual-evoked activation in the auditory cortex. These results indicate the importance of considering cross-modal activations in both visual and auditory cortex for potential clinical outcome estimation. PMID:26819766

  3. "CAN Stop" - Implementation and evaluation of a secondary group prevention for adolescent and young adult cannabis users in various contexts - study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current research shows that overall numbers for cannabis use among adolescents and young adults dropped in recent years. However, this trend is much less pronounced in continuous cannabis use. With regard to the heightened risk for detrimental health- and development-related outcomes, adolescents and young adults with continuous cannabis use need special attention. The health services structure for adolescents and young adults with substance related problems in Germany, is multifaceted, because different communal, medical and judicial agencies are involved. This results in a rather decentralized organizational structure of the help system. This and further system-inherent characteristics make the threshold for young cannabis users rather high. Because of this, there is a need to establish evidence-based low-threshold help options for young cannabis users, which can be easily disseminated. Therefore, a training programme for young cannabis users (age 14-21) was developed in the "CAN Stop" project. Within the project, we seek to implement and evaluate the training programme within different institutions of the help system. The evaluation is sensitive to the different help systems and their specific prerequisites. Moreover, within this study, we also test the practicability of a training provision through laypersons. Methods/Design The CAN Stop study is a four-armed randomized wait-list controlled trial. The four arms are needed for the different help system settings, in which the CAN Stop training programme is evaluated: (a) the drug addiction aid and youth welfare system, (b) the out-patient medical system, (c) the in-patient medical system and (d) prisons for juvenile offenders. Data are collected at three points, before and after the training or a treatment as usual, and six months after the end of either intervention. Discussion The CAN Stop study is expected to provide an evidence-based programme for young cannabis users seeking to reduce or quit

  4. Do We Really Have an Internet Problem? Statistics, Credibility and Issues Concerning Public Internet Access in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cubbage, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    Discusses problems with patron Internet access in academic libraries and describes a study conducted at Northwestern University (Illinois) that used Internet tracking software to assess user Internet behavior. Topics include Internet use policies; pornography; and loss of control over library services and information content that is provided. (LRW)

  5. Brains online: structural and functional correlates of habitual Internet use.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    In the past decades, the Internet has become one of the most important tools to gather information and communicate with other people. Excessive use is a growing concern of health practitioners. Based on the assumption that excessive Internet use bears resemblance with addictive behaviour, we hypothesized alterations of the fronto-striatal network in frequent users. On magnetic resonance imaging scans of 62 healthy male adults, we computed voxel-based morphometry to identify grey matter (GM) correlates of excessive Internet use, assessed by means of the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and functional connectivity analysis and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) measures on resting state data to explore the functional networks associated with structural alterations. We found a significant negative association between the IAT score and right frontal pole GM volume (P < 0.001, family wise error corrected). Functional connectivity of right frontal pole to left ventral striatum was positively associated with higher IAT scores. Furthermore, the IAT score was positively correlated to ALFF in bilateral ventral striatum. The alterations in the fronto-striatal circuitry associated with growing IAT scores could reflect a reduction of top-down modulation of prefrontal areas, in particular, the ability to maintain long-term goals in face of distraction. The higher activation of ventral striatum at rest may indicate a constant activation in the context of a diminished prefrontal control. The results demonstrate that excessive Internet use may be driven by neuronal circuits relevant for addictive behaviour.

  6. Internet use among Turkish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tahiroglu, Aysegul Yolga; Celik, Gonca G; Uzel, Mehtap; Ozcan, Neslihan; Avci, Ayse

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate Internet use habits and problematic Internet use (PIU) in Turkish adolescents. Participants were 3,975 undergraduate students, 7.6% of whom used the Internet for more than 12 hours weekly. The Online Cognition Scale (OCS) was used. The most common purpose for using the Internet was playing games, followed by general information search. Female users mostly preferred searching for general information; male users preferred playing games (p < 0.001, gamma = 995.205). The most preferred type of game was violent games. While preference for strategy and fantasy role-play (FRP) games increased with age, preference for other games decreased (p < 0.0001, gamma = 283.767). Participants who used the Internet mostly for general information searches and school-related searches had lower OCS scores (p < 0.0001). The highest OCS scores were related to violent games, followed by FRP, strategy, and sports and motor racing games. Computers and the Internet are useful, important inventions, but like other inventions, if used improperly, they may be harmful. Risk of harm raises concerns about who should use the Internet and computers, and where, when, and why the Internet and computers should be used. PMID:18785800

  7. The Mac Internet Tour Guide: Cruising the Internet the Easy Way. [First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraase, Michael

    Published exclusively for MacIntosh computer users, this guide provides an overview of Internet resources for new and experienced users. E-mail, file transfer, and decompression software used to access the resources are included on a 800k, 3.5 inch disk. The following chapters are included: (1) "What Is the Internet" covers finding your way…

  8. Internet Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehr, William H.; Pupillo, Lorenzo Maria

    The Internet is now widely regarded as essential infrastructure for our global economy and society. It is in our homes and businesses. We use it to communicate and socialize, for research, and as a platform for E-commerce. In the late 1990s, much was predicted about what the Internet has become at present; but now, we have actual experience living with the Internet as a critical component of our everyday lives. Although the Internet has already had profound effects, there is much we have yet to realize. The present volume represents a third installment in a collaborative effort to highlight the all-encompassing, multidisciplinary implications of the Internet for public policy. The first installment was conceived in 1998, when we initiated plans to organize an international conference among academic, industry, and government officials to discuss the growing policy agenda posed by the Internet. The conference was hosted by the European Commission in Brussels in 1999 and brought together a diverse mix of perspectives on what the pressing policy issues would be confronting the Internet. All of the concerns identified remain with us today, including how to address the Digital Divide, how to modify intellectual property laws to accommodate the new realities of the Internet, what to do about Internet governance and name-space management, and how to evolve broadcast and telecommunications regulatory frameworks for a converged world.

  9. [Internet addiction].

    PubMed

    Korkeila, Jyrki

    2012-01-01

    Internet addiction is defined as uncontrolled and harmful use of Internet, which manifests in three forms: gaming, various sexual activities and excessive use of emails, chats or SMS messaging. Several studies have found that abuse of alcohol and other substances, depression and other health problems are associated with Internet addiction. In boys and men depression may be more a consequence of the addiction than a cause for it. ADHD seems to be a significant background factor for developing the condition. Because it is almost impossible to lead a life without Internet and computers nowadays, it is unrealistic to aim towards full abstinence. Treatment has generally followed the guidelines adapted for pathological gambling.

  10. Factors associated with prevalent hepatitis C: differences among young adult injection drug users in lower and upper Manhattan, New York City.

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, T; Des Jarlais, D C; Vlahov, D; Perlis, T E; Edwards, V; Friedman, S R; Rockwell, R; Hoover, D; Williams, I T; Monterroso, E R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined correlates of prevalent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among young adult injection drug users in 2 neighborhoods in New York City. METHODS: Injection drug users aged 18 to 29 years were street recruited from the Lower East Side and Harlem. Participants were interviewed about drug use and sex practices; venipuncture was performed for hepatitis B virus (HBV), HCV, and HIV serologies. RESULTS: In both sites, testing positive for HCV antibody (anti-HCV) was associated with having injected for more than 3 years. Additionally, HCV infection was positively associated with injecting with someone known to have had hepatitis (but the association was significant only in the Lower East Side) and with sharing cotton (but the association was statistically significant only in Harlem). Being in drug treatment and older than 24 years were associated with HCV in the Lower East Side but not in Harlem. Receiving money for sex was associated with anti-HCV positivity in Harlem but not in the Lower East Side. CONCLUSIONS: Several differences in factors associated with prevalent HCV infection existed among 2 populations of young injection drug users from the same city. Indirect transmission of HCV may occur. PMID:11189819

  11. Aspects of Dealing with Digital Information: "Mature" Novices on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruiter, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    Considers problems encountered by mature Internet users who are information literate with printed materials but not with Internet sources. Topics include a definition of mature Internet users; computer skills; choosing information sources to meet information needs; Internet content; search strategies; and training strategies for individuals and…

  12. Women, Violence and the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Pamela M.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores a hypothesis that the Internet and the World Wide Web form an alternative resource to that provided by conventional adult education providers. The example used is the dissemination and transfer of information on and analysis of issues concerning women and violence. Four important issues for adult (that is, post-compulsory)…

  13. Internet use and misuse: a multivariate regression analysis of the predictive factors of internet use among Greek adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tsitsika, Artemis; Critselis, Elena; Kormas, Georgios; Filippopoulou, Anastasia; Tounissidou, Despoina; Freskou, Aliki; Spiliopoulou, Theodora; Louizou, Amalia; Konstantoulaki, Eleftheria; Kafetzis, Dimitrios

    2009-06-01

    The internet is an integral tool for information, communication, and entertainment among adolescents. As adolescents devote increasing amounts of time to utilizing the internet, the risk for adopting excessive and pathological internet use is inherent. The study objectives include assessing the characteristics and predictors of excessive internet use and evaluating the prevalence of pathological internet use among Greek adolescents. A cross-sectional study design was applied to this effect. The study population (n = 897) consisted of a random sample of adolescents residing in Athens, Greece. Self-completed questionnaires, pertaining to internet access characteristics and Young's Internet Addiction Scale (YIAS) score, were applied in order to investigate the study objectives. The multivariate regression analysis indicated that the most significant predictors of overall internet use included accessing the internet via one's own home portal and for the purpose of social interaction. Internet access via the school environment was a significant deterrent among low (1-3 h/week) internet users, while access via internet cafés was a significant predictor for high (11-20 h/week) internet users. Moreover, accessing the internet for the purposes of game playing was the most significant predictor for excessive (>20 h/week) internet use. The prevalence of borderline internet use among the study population was 12.8%, while 1.00% reported addictive internet use. Also, 10.4% of male excessive internet users reported addictive internet use (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, excessive internet use is predicted solely by the location of internet access (own home portal) and the scope of internet use (i.e., sites relating to socialization and game playing) and may lead to internet addiction, particularly among male adolescents. PMID:18762980

  14. Substance abuse precedes Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sik; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Sun Mi; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate possible overlapping substance abuse and internet addiction in a large, uniformly sampled population, ranging in age from 13 to 18 years. Participants (N=73,238) in the current study were drawn from the 6th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-V) for students from 400 middle schools and 400 high schools in 16 cities within South Korea. Of adolescent internet users, 85.2% were general users (GU), 11.9% were users with potential risk for internet addiction (PR), and 3.0% were users with high risk for internet addiction (HR). There was a difference in the number of students with alcohol drinking among the GU, PR, and HR groups (20.8% vs 23.1% vs 27.4%). There was a difference in the number of students who smoked among the GS, PR, and HR groups (11.7% vs 13.5% vs 20.4%). There was a difference in the number of students with drug use among the GU, PR, and HR groups (1.7% vs 2.0% vs 6.5%). After adjusting for sex, age, stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation, smoking may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=1.203, p=0.004). In addition, drug use may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=2.591, p<0.001). Because students with a high risk for internet addiction have vulnerability for addictive behaviors, co-morbid substance abuse should be evaluated and, if found, treated in adolescents with internet addiction.

  15. The Brustkrebs-Studien.de website for breast cancer patients: User acceptance of a German internet portal offering information on the disease and treatment options, and a clinical trials matching service

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The internet portal http://www.brustkrebs-studien.de (BKS) was launched in 2000 by the German Society of Senology (DGS) and the Baden-Württemberg Institute for Women's Health (IFG) to provide expert-written information on breast cancer online and to encourage and facilitate the participation of breast cancer patients in clinical trials. We describe the development of BKS and its applications, and report on website statistics and user acceptance. Methods Existing registries, including ClinicalTrials.gov, were analysed before we designed BKS, which combines a trial registry, a knowledge portal, and an online second opinion service. An advisory board guided the process. Log files and patient enquiries for trial participation and second opinions were analysed. A two-week user satisfaction survey was conducted online. Results During 10/2005-06/2010, the portal attracted 702,655 visitors, generating 15,507,454 page views. By 06/2010, the website's active scientific community consisted of 189 investigators and physicians, and the registry covered 163 clinical trial protocols. In 2009, 143 patients requested trial enrolment and 119 sought second opinions or individual treatment advice from the expert panel. During the two-week survey in 2008, 5,702 BKS visitors submitted 507 evaluable questionnaires. Portal acceptance was high. Respondents trusted information correctness (80%), welcomed self-matching to clinical trials (79%) and planned to use the portal in the future (76%) and recommend it to others (81%). Conclusions BKS is an established and trusted breast cancer information platform offering up-to-date resources and protocols to the growing physician and patient community to encourage participation in clinical trials. Further studies are needed to assess potential increases in trial enrolment by eligibility matching services. PMID:21126358

  16. User Centric Policy Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Gorrell P.

    2013-01-01

    Internet use, in general, and online social networking sites, in particular, are experiencing tremendous growth with hundreds of millions of active users. As a result, there is a tremendous amount of privacy information and content online. Protecting this information is a challenge. Access control policy composition is complex, laborious and…

  17. Predicting Outcome in Internet-Based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Major Depression: A Large Cohort Study of Adult Patients in Routine Psychiatric Care

    PubMed Central

    Ljótsson, Brjánn; Hedman, Erik; Svanborg, Cecilia; Kaldo, Viktor; Lindefors, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the effectiveness of therapist-guided internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) for treating depression has been well documented, knowledge of outcome predictors and risk factors associated with lower treatment response is limited, especially when the treatment has been conducted within a naturalistic clinical setting. Identification of such factors is important for clinicians when making treatment recommendations. Methods Data from a large cohort (N = 1738) of adult outpatients having been treated with ICBT for depression at an outpatient psychiatric clinic were analysed. A multilevel modelling approach was used to identify patient and treatment variables associated with the speed of recovery during treatment using weekly measurements of the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale Self-Rated (MADRS-S). Outcomes Adhering to the treatment, perceiving it as credible and working full-time emerged as predictors of a faster pace of recovery and were also associated with a lower level of depression at the end of treatment. Higher pre-treatment depression and sleep problems were associated with a greater improvement rate, but predicted higher depression after treatment. Having a history of psychotropic medication was associated with both slower improvement and higher post-treatment depression. Conclusion Perceived credibility of ICBT is a strong predictor of treatment response. Assessing patient beliefs and expectations may be a useful aid for clinicians when identifying those who are more or less likely to benefit from ICBT. Helping patients improve expectations prior to treatment may be an important goal for clinicians during the initial assessment phase. PMID:27618548

  18. Internet addiction among Greek adolescent students.

    PubMed

    Siomos, Konstantinos E; Dafouli, Evaggelia D; Braimiotis, Dimitrios A; Mouzas, Odysseas D; Angelopoulos, Nikiforos V

    2008-12-01

    This research aimed to assess the prevalence of Internet addiction among Greek adolescent students, ages 12 to 18. The sample of 2,200 students was recruited from 120 classes among 85 schools in Thessaly, Greece. The sample included 10% of all classes in schools of Thessaly. The method of randomized stratified selection in every school was used for its constitution. Participants were asked to complete the Diagnostic Questionnaire for Internet Addiction (YDQ), based on eight criteria, as well as an inventory that included sociodemographic factors and questions about the use of Internet, their social life, and their habits. In Greece, 70.8% of adolescents had access to the Internet. The consistency of the YDQ was tested with Cronbach's alpha (0.719), with standardized item alpha (0.728). Proportions are also calculated only on the frequent Internet users, which results in 11% fulfilling five YDQ criteria. The most frequent type of Internet use is online games, representing 50.9% of Internet users, and information services, representing 46.8%. The prevalence of Internet addiction among Internet users of Central Greece is 8.2%, and it concerns mainly the male students who play online games and visit Internet cafés. PMID:18991535

  19. The Impact of an Internet-Based Self-Management Intervention (HeLP-Diabetes) on the Psychological Well-Being of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Mixed-Method Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Megan; Dack, Charlotte; Barker, Chris; Murray, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-method study assessed the impact of an internet-based, self-management intervention (“HeLP-Diabetes”) on the psychological well-being of adults with type 2 diabetes. Nineteen participants were recruited from 3 general practices. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 weeks follow-up. Access to HeLP-Diabetes was associated with a significant decrease in participants' diabetes-related distress (Z = 2.04, p = 0.04, and d = 0.28). No significant differences were found in emotional distress or self-efficacy. The qualitative data found that participants reported improvements including increased self-efficacy and support, better management of low mood, greater diabetes awareness, and taking the condition more seriously. Participants also reported making improvements to their eating habits, exercise routine, and medical management. Some negative experiences associated with using the intervention were mentioned including feelings of guilt for not using the intervention as suggested or not making any behavioral changes, as well as technical and navigational frustrations with the intervention. Internet-based self-management interventions may have the potential to decrease diabetes-related distress in people with type 2 diabetes. The qualitative data also suggests internet interventions can positively impact both psychological and behavioural outcomes of adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26682226

  20. Improving smoking cessation policy by assessing user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service in adult psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kathy; Creamer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Smoking rates are higher among people with mental health conditions compared to the general population. Smoking reduces physical, mental and financial well-being, and interacts with psychotropic drugs. An inpatient admission provides an opportunity to engage and support smokers in smoking cessation. Compliance with Trust/NICE smoking cessation guidelines was assessed in two inpatient wards, and a questionnaire evaluated user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service. A need for improved documentation of smoking status to identify and treat smokers routinely was revealed. A new electronic health form was designed and introduced, and a clear pathway for onward referrals was developed. This intervention preceded the introduction of the Trust-wide smoke free policy from October 2014. The intervention doubled rates of documentation of smoking status, cessation advice and offer of NRT/referral. There were large differences between the two wards, highlighting the need for a tailored approach. PMID:26734337

  1. Improving smoking cessation policy by assessing user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service in adult psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kathy; Creamer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Smoking rates are higher among people with mental health conditions compared to the general population. Smoking reduces physical, mental and financial well-being, and interacts with psychotropic drugs. An inpatient admission provides an opportunity to engage and support smokers in smoking cessation. Compliance with Trust/NICE smoking cessation guidelines was assessed in two inpatient wards, and a questionnaire evaluated user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service. A need for improved documentation of smoking status to identify and treat smokers routinely was revealed. A new electronic health form was designed and introduced, and a clear pathway for onward referrals was developed. This intervention preceded the introduction of the Trust-wide smoke free policy from October 2014. The intervention doubled rates of documentation of smoking status, cessation advice and offer of NRT/referral. There were large differences between the two wards, highlighting the need for a tailored approach.

  2. Radiology uses of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Krug, H; Cheng, D

    1995-01-01

    The Internet promises to be an essential resource for radiology administrators. In addition to offering remarkable access to colleagues all over the world, the Internet offers specialized information resources for radiology, many of which are described in this article. The Internet is many networks that communicate with each other and whose general purpose is to share information. Although there are several consortium organizations that support and regulate it, no single body or organization "owns" the Internet. Many employees and students at large teaching centers already have access to the Internet through their institution's connection. Individuals and small institutions can contract with independent service providers for Internet access. Internet functions covered in this article include: e-mail, listservs, newsgroups, file transfer protocols, Gopher, and the World Wide Web. The rapid pace of information exchange is making the world of radiology smaller and more intimate. Communication and knowledge are becoming so accessible that individuals are privy to the most minute happenings in the industry. Sharing information on the Internet will benefit not only individual users and the industry, but also patients.

  3. Internet Technology on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    approaches. The cost to implement is much less than current approaches due to the availability of highly reliable and standard Internet tools. Use of standard Internet applications onboard reduces the risk of obsolescence inherent in custom protocols due to extremely wide use across all domains. These basic building blocks provide the framework for building onboard software to support direct user communication with payloads including payload control. Other benefits are payload to payload communication from dissimilar spacecraft, constellations of spacecraft, and reconfigurability on orbit. This work is funded through contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC).

  4. Relationship between Internet use and general belief in a just world among Chinese retirees.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Jianxin; Zhu, Tingshao

    2013-07-01

    As an emerging medium for acquiring information, the Internet might affect how users, including older adults, view or think about the world around them. Using data from a survey of retirees aged 50 years and above (N=12,309) in China, the present study examined the relationship between Internet use for acquiring information about the world and general belief in a just world (GBJW). The results indicated that Internet use primarily for obtaining news information was negatively related to GBJW. Specifically, Internet users had lower levels of GBJW than nonusers; the more time retirees spent visiting Web sites to acquire news information, the less likely they were to believe that the world is just. In addition, compared with retirees who had acquired information about the world through other means (including books, newspapers or magazines, radio and television, and direct communication with other people), those who had acquired information primarily using the Internet showed lower levels of GBJW. The significance and limitations of the current study are discussed.

  5. Relationship Between Internet Use and General Belief in a Just World Among Chinese Retirees

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianxin; Zhu, Tingshao

    2013-01-01

    Abstract As an emerging medium for acquiring information, the Internet might affect how users, including older adults, view or think about the world around them. Using data from a survey of retirees aged 50 years and above (N=12,309) in China, the present study examined the relationship between Internet use for acquiring information about the world and general belief in a just world (GBJW). The results indicated that Internet use primarily for obtaining news information was negatively related to GBJW. Specifically, Internet users had lower levels of GBJW than nonusers; the more time retirees spent visiting Web sites to acquire news information, the less likely they were to believe that the world is just. In addition, compared with retirees who had acquired information about the world through other means (including books, newspapers or magazines, radio and television, and direct communication with other people), those who had acquired information primarily using the Internet showed lower levels of GBJW. The significance and limitations of the current study are discussed. PMID:23865811

  6. Brief: Touch the world through Internet

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, T.C. )

    1994-06-01

    Internet is the world's largest computer network. Access to Internet allows users to communicate with colleagues around the world, to access vast software archives, to visit university and public libraries, to search on-line databases, to participate in lively discussions on thousands of topics, to receive electronic journals, and much more. This paper describes Internet and discusses its current and future uses, ways to obtain access, and some of the resources available.

  7. Evaluating Internet for Extension in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelb, E. M.; Bonati, G.

    1998-01-01

    Participants in an international agriculture extension workshop rated the following as critical subjects to study regarding farmers' use of the Internet: technical problems, user benefits, drawbacks, and accessibility. Ways to improve effective use in agriculture were identified. (SK)

  8. Internet Censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyotsna; Kapil; Aayush

    2012-09-01

    Censorship on Internet has always wet its hands in the water of controversies, It is said to go in with synonym of "FILTERING THE NET" i.e. Either done to protect minors or for nationís privacy, some take it as snatching their freedom over internet and some take it as an appropriate step to protect minor, It has its supporters as well as opponents.Google has reported a whooping number of requests from Governments of U.K, China, Poland, Spain, and Canada to remove videos and search links that led to harassment, sensitive issues or suspicious people. This paper deals with the cons of censorship on internet and to make people aware of the fact that Internet is not a single body owned by an org. but an open sky of information shared equally by all. Research done has found out many unseen aspects of different people's view point.

  9. The Internet in Swaziland: Services under Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muswazi, Paiki

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the history of libraries in Swaziland and discusses the introduction of computers in 1974 and Internet access in 1996. Topics include censorship laws that have restricted access; e-commerce; e-mail; obstacles, including limited user access in libraries and lack of computer literacy; and suggestions for extending Internet information…

  10. Investigation of a secondary syringe exchange program for homeless young adult injection drug users in San Francisco, California, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Sears, C; Guydish, J R; Weltzien, E K; Lum, P J

    2001-06-01

    This study investigated an HIV prevention program for homeless young adult injection drug users (IDUs) that combined a secondary syringe exchange program (SEP) with community-level activities. Homeless young IDUs were recruited from street-based settings in San Francisco, and a structured questionnaire was administered. The secondary SEP operated in a circumscribed geographic area, and for analytic purposes respondents were assigned to the intervention site group if they primarily spent time in this area (n = 67), or the comparison site group if they primarily spent time elsewhere (n = 55). Almost all (96%) intervention site youth had used the secondary SEP in the past 30 days and were significantly more likely to regularly use SEP. In bivariate analysis, comparison site IDUs were more likely to share syringes, reuse syringes, share the cotton used to filter drugs, and use condoms with casual sex partners only inconsistently. In multivariate analysis, comparison site remained positively associated with sharing syringes (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.748; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.406-9.988), reusing syringes (AOR, 2.769; 95% CI,1.120-6.847), and inconsistent condom use with casual sex partners (AOR, 4.825; 95% CI, 1.392- 16.721). This suggests that the intervention was effective in delivering SEP services to homeless young adult IDUs, and that IDUs who frequented the intervention site had a lower HIV risk than comparison group IDUs.

  11. Cocaine use and characteristics of young adult users from 1987 to 1992: the CARDIA Study. Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, B L; Murray, D; Hannan, P; Sidney, S; Le, C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship of sociodemographic factors and use of substances other than cocaine to cocaine use from 1987 to 1992 in a cohort of Black and White men and women 20 to 32 years of age. METHODS: Data were collected as part of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study. Self-reported cocaine use was analyzed through chi-square tests and repeated measures analyses of variance to determine the bivariate and multivariate relationships of sociodemographics and substance use behaviors to cocaine use over the 5-year period. RESULTS: Cocaine use declined in Whites but remained stable in Blacks from 1987 to 1992. Cross-sectional results showed that use was related to being Black, male and in the older half of the cohort, single, and unemployed; it was also related to higher levels of other substance use in 1987 and 1992. Over time, the magnitude and strength of the relationship were consistent for each variable except for increased odds of cocaine use among the unemployed and Blacks in 1992. CONCLUSIONS: Sociodemographic characteristics and substance use behavior consistently identify individuals at risk for cocaine use. As a result, intervention programs should be targeted at these high-risk groups. PMID:9003130

  12. The physician and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Wang, K K; Wong Kee Song, L M

    1997-01-01

    The Internet is one of the greatest developments in informational exchange during the past century. It allows almost anyone to access information available throughout the world. Nonetheless, the Internet is often misunderstood by physicians. It can be considered a super computer network that allows users to transfer a wide variety of information at a low cost. The information can be transferred through functions such as electronic mail, file transfer protocols, the Usenet, or the most widely recognized World Wide Web. Electronic mail functions like the usual postal service but is carried through the Internet, and delivery is usually within the hour. It can serve as a method of communication between physicians and patients. File transfer protocols function as a method for transferring large amounts of information such as software through the Internet. The Usenet acts like an international bulletin board service, allowing users anywhere to post messages and to respond to messages from other users. Several patient support groups have Usenet sites for exchanging specific disease information. The World Wide Web has received the greatest attention because most of the information on the Internet is text, sound, or pictures. Numerous medical organizations have established Web sites. This article attempts to describe each of these functions and the benefits to physicians. PMID:9005289

  13. Usability Issues in the User Interfaces of Privacy-Enhancing Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaTouche, Lerone W.

    2013-01-01

    Privacy on the Internet has become one of the leading concerns for Internet users. These users are not wrong in their concerns if personally identifiable information is not protected and under their control. To minimize the collection of Internet users' personal information and help solve the problem of online privacy, a number of…

  14. Internet and Advertisement.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-02-01

    The Internet has revolutionized the way knowledge is currently produced, stored and disseminated. A few finger clicks on a keyboard can save time and many hours of search in libraries or shopping in stores. Online trademarks with an (e-) prefix such as e-library, e-business, e-health etc., are increasingly part of our daily professional vocabularies. However, the Internet has also produced multiple negative side effects, ranging from an unhealthy dependency to a dehumanization of human relationships. Fraudulent, unethical and scam practices are also flourishing through for example misleading online advertising methods. Some social and professional networks gather users' profiles for selling and advertising purposes, sometimes by making it technically difficult to unsubscribe. Here, I discuss some of these unethical aspects and propose some potential solutions to reduce them.

  15. Internet and Advertisement.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-02-01

    The Internet has revolutionized the way knowledge is currently produced, stored and disseminated. A few finger clicks on a keyboard can save time and many hours of search in libraries or shopping in stores. Online trademarks with an (e-) prefix such as e-library, e-business, e-health etc., are increasingly part of our daily professional vocabularies. However, the Internet has also produced multiple negative side effects, ranging from an unhealthy dependency to a dehumanization of human relationships. Fraudulent, unethical and scam practices are also flourishing through for example misleading online advertising methods. Some social and professional networks gather users' profiles for selling and advertising purposes, sometimes by making it technically difficult to unsubscribe. Here, I discuss some of these unethical aspects and propose some potential solutions to reduce them. PMID:25842044

  16. Internet Business Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cogent Software, Inc. was formed in January 1995 by David Atkinson and Irene Woerner, both former employees of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Several other Cogent employees also worked at JPL. Atkinson headed JPL's Information Systems Technology section and Woerner lead the Advanced User Interfaces Group. Cogent's mission is to help companies organize and manage their online content by developing advanced software for the next generation of online directories and information catalogs. The company offers a complete range of Internet solutions, including Internet access, Web site design, local and wide-area networks, and custom software for online commerce applications. Cogent also offers DesignSphere Online, an electronic community for the communications arts industry. Customers range from small offices to manufacturers with thousands of employees, including Chemi-Con, one of the largest manufacturers of capacitors in the world.

  17. Measuring the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molyneux, Robert E.; Williams, Robert V.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the literature that measures characteristics of the Internet. Discusses: conclusions about the Internet measurement literature; definition of the Internet from a technical standpoint; history of Internet measurement; nature of the Internet data environment; Internet technical characteristics; information measurement and the Internet;…

  18. Factor Structure of the Internet Addiction Test in Online Gamers and Poker Players

    PubMed Central

    Achab, Sophia; Billieux, Joel; Thorens, Gabriel; Zullino, Daniele; Dufour, Magali; Rothen, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Background The Internet Addiction Test (IAT) is the most widely used questionnaire to screen for problematic Internet use. Nevertheless, its factorial structure is still debated, which complicates comparisons among existing studies. Most previous studies were performed with students or community samples despite the probability of there being more problematic Internet use among users of specific applications, such as online gaming or gambling. Objective To assess the factorial structure of a modified version of the IAT that addresses specific applications, such as video games and online poker. Methods Two adult samples—one sample of Internet gamers (n=920) and one sample of online poker players (n=214)—were recruited and completed an online version of the modified IAT. Both samples were split into two subsamples. Two principal component analyses (PCAs) followed by two confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) were run separately. Results The results of principal component analysis indicated that a one-factor model fit the data well across both samples. In consideration of the weakness of some IAT items, a 17-item modified version of the IAT was proposed. Conclusions This study assessed, for the first time, the factorial structure of a modified version of an Internet-administered IAT on a sample of Internet gamers and a sample of online poker players. The scale seems appropriate for the assessment of such online behaviors. Further studies on the modified 17-item IAT version are needed. PMID:26543917

  19. Prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidities, and suicidality in a community population with problematic Internet use.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Soo; Chang, Sung Man; Park, Jee Eun; Seong, Su Jeong; Won, Seung Hee; Cho, Maeng Je

    2016-10-30

    We examined the prevalence, correlates, and psychiatric comorbidities of community-dwelling subjects with problematic Internet use (PIU). In an epidemiological survey of mental disorders among Korean adults conducted in 2006, 6510 subjects (aged 18-64 years) completed the Korean version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV psychiatric disorders; Diagnostic Interview Schedule exploring pathological gambling; Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale-Version 1.1 Screener; questionnaire for sleep disturbances; and questionnaire for suicidal ideations, plans, and attempts. Young's Internet Addiction Test was administered to 3212 individuals who had used the Internet within one month before the interviews in order to identify problematic Internet users (cutoff >39). The prevalence of PIU was 9.3% in the general population of South Korea. Being male, younger, never married, or unemployed were all associated with increased risks of PIU. Significant positive associations were observed between PIU and nicotine use disorders, alcohol use disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, pathological gambling, adult type ADHD symptoms, sleep disturbances, suicide ideas and suicide plans compare to subjects without PIU, after controlling for socio-demographic variables. These findings suggest that careful evaluation and management of such psychiatric disorders is needed for individuals with PIU. PMID:27500456

  20. Prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidities, and suicidality in a community population with problematic Internet use.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Soo; Chang, Sung Man; Park, Jee Eun; Seong, Su Jeong; Won, Seung Hee; Cho, Maeng Je

    2016-10-30

    We examined the prevalence, correlates, and psychiatric comorbidities of community-dwelling subjects with problematic Internet use (PIU). In an epidemiological survey of mental disorders among Korean adults conducted in 2006, 6510 subjects (aged 18-64 years) completed the Korean version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV psychiatric disorders; Diagnostic Interview Schedule exploring pathological gambling; Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale-Version 1.1 Screener; questionnaire for sleep disturbances; and questionnaire for suicidal ideations, plans, and attempts. Young's Internet Addiction Test was administered to 3212 individuals who had used the Internet within one month before the interviews in order to identify problematic Internet users (cutoff >39). The prevalence of PIU was 9.3% in the general population of South Korea. Being male, younger, never married, or unemployed were all associated with increased risks of PIU. Significant positive associations were observed between PIU and nicotine use disorders, alcohol use disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, pathological gambling, adult type ADHD symptoms, sleep disturbances, suicide ideas and suicide plans compare to subjects without PIU, after controlling for socio-demographic variables. These findings suggest that careful evaluation and management of such psychiatric disorders is needed for individuals with PIU.

  1. Factors Related to Choosing between the Internet and a Financial Planner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Jiyeon

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I aim to clarify the factors affecting a consumers' choice between the Internet and a financial planner for making saving and investment decisions, based on household production theory. Moreover, I explore the likelihood of an individual being an Internet user (vs. a non-user), a financial planner user (vs. a non-user),…

  2. Crossing the Internet Threshold: An Instructional Handbook. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy; Ober, John; Lipow, Anne G.

    This how-to manual for the beginning Internet user contains sections on: the authors; an overview of computer networking; Internet basics, including a glossary, information on getting connected and keeping current, and a bibliography; electronic mail, including electronic discussions and electronic journals: Internet Remote Login (Telnet); File…

  3. Influences on the Intent To Make Internet Purchases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Joey F.

    2002-01-01

    Using the theory of planned behavior as the theoretical base, data collected through a semi-annual survey of Web users were used to determine if beliefs about privacy and Internet trustworthiness helped determine attitudes toward the Internet, which were thought to affect intent to make Internet purchases. (Author/LRW)

  4. The Internet for Newbies: An Easy Access Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Constance D.

    This book provides beginning Internet users with basic information about what's out there, how to find it, and what to do with it when you find it. Instructions are provided on connecting to the Internet and using it effectively and appropriately. Aspects of Internet communication are reviewed, including e-mail, netiquette, mailing lists, and…

  5. Looking for the Information Needle in the Internet Haystack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausen, Helge

    This paper presents the results of an empirical survey conducted in the winter of 1995-96 among 413 Danish Internet users (business people, higher education/research and students). Data from a recent Danish Mediacenter Internet survey (n=2981) are also included. Findings indicate that women tend to use the Internet to solve well-defined problems,…

  6. Variations in internet-related problems and psychosocial functioning in online sexual activities: implications for social and sexual development of young adults.

    PubMed

    Boies, Sylvain C; Cooper, Al; Osborne, Cynthia S

    2004-04-01

    This survey of 760 university students examined differences in Internet-related problems and psychosocial functioning between four patterns of participation in online sexual information and entertainment activities. Students who did not participate in either online sexual activity were more satisfied with their offline life and more connected to friends and family. Those who engaged in both online sexual activities were more dependent on the Internet and reported lower offline functioning. Students who only sought sexual information maintained strong offline affiliations. Those who only sought entertainment did not report lower offline functioning. Respondents most deficient in offline social support did not report compensatory online support. Despite students' common participation in online sexual activities (OSA) as a venue for social and sexual development, those relying on the Internet and the affiliations it provides appear at risk of decreased social integration. The authors discussed the finding's implications for social and sexual development. PMID:15140364

  7. Examining Internet Usage Demographic Differences and the Relationship between Internet Usage and Business Outcomes in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamara, Mohamed K.

    2013-01-01

    This study utilized the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) to determine Internet users' perceptions and behavioral intentions to accept Wi-Fi technology deployment in Sierra Leone. The study sought to investigate (a) the Internet usage rates before and after Wi-Fi adaption in Freetown; (b) differences in Internet usage…

  8. Internet Sexualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  9. Internet bullying.

    PubMed

    Donnerstein, Ed

    2012-06-01

    There is substantial literature on the impact of the mass media on children's and adolescents' health and development. The question of what role new technology plays in the media's influence is now a subject of both review and discussion, particularly regarding health risks and intervention. This article takes a brief look at online usage and the theoretical mechanisms that might make Internet access more problematic in terms of risks, compared with more traditional media such as television and film. One of these risks, known today as cyberbullying or Internet harassment, is scrutinized in detail. PMID:22643169

  10. Characterizing Internet Searchers of Smoking Cessation Information

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Amanda L

    2006-01-01

    Background The Internet is a viable channel to deliver evidence-based smoking cessation treatment that has the potential to make a large population impact on reducing smoking prevalence. There is high demand for smoking cessation information and support on the Internet. Approximately 7% (10.2 million) of adult American Internet users have searched for information on quitting smoking. Little is known about these individuals, their smoking status, what type of cessation services they are seeking on the Internet, or how frequently these searches for cessation information are conducted. Objective The primary goal of this study was to characterize individuals who search for smoking cessation information on the Internet to determine appropriate triage and treatment strategies. The secondary goal was to estimate the incidence of searches for cessation information using publicly available search engine data. Methods We recruited individuals who clicked on a link to a leading smoking cessation website (QuitNet) from within the results of a search engine query. Individuals were “intercepted” before seeing the QuitNet home page and were invited to participate in the study. Those accepting the invitation were routed to an online survey about demographics, smoking characteristics, preferences for specific cessation services, and Internet search patterns. To determine the generalizability of our sample, national datasets on search engine usage patterns, market share, and keyword rankings were examined. These datasets were then used to estimate the number of queries for smoking cessation information each year. Results During the 10-day study period, 2265 individuals were recruited and 29% (N = 655) responded. Of these, 59% were female and overall tended to be younger than the previously characterized general Internet population. Most (76%) respondents were current smokers; 17% had quit within the last 7 days, and 7% had quit more than 7 days ago. Slightly more than half of

  11. Influence of age on Salvia divinorum use: results of an Internet survey.

    PubMed

    Nyi, Pearl P; Lai, Emily P; Lee, Diana Y; Biglete, Shannon A; Torrecer, Gilsky I; Anderson, Ilene B

    2010-09-01

    An Internet-based survey of Salvia divinorum ("salvia") users was conducted to identify correlates surrounding its use. Salvia-knowledgeable persons were recruited via "social networking Internet websites" (n = 23) where notices were posted on recreational salvia group message boards (n = 69). Data collection included demographics, use circumstances, experiences, and age (current and at first salvia use). A total of 219 surveys were analyzed. Salvia users who were young adults (< or = 21 yrs) at first use favored salvia for fun (OR = 1.94, CI = 1.08-3.49, p = 0.03) or to relieve boredom (OR = 2.06 CI = 1.09-3.91, p = 0.02), while salvia users who were adults (> or = 22 yrs) at first use favored salvia for spiritual effects (OR = 2.63, CI = 1.02-6.75, p = 0.04). Being an adult at first use was associated with higher odds of concurrent marijuana (OR = 2.68, CI = 1.50-4.78, p = 0.0007) or tobacco use (OR = 1.94, CI = 1.05-3.60, p = 0.03). Over half of all respondents reported use reduction or cessation in the past 12 months (114 of 219, 52%), citing dislike of the high (33.3%) or loss of interest in salvia (28.9%). Reports of cessation suggest salvia use may be more attributed to curiosity than continual abuse. PMID:21053761

  12. Web N.0, the New Development Trend of Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiguo; Wang, Wensheng

    This article analyzes the Internet basic theory, the network foundation environment and the user behavior change and so on, Which analyzes the development tendency of existing partial Internet products in the future Internet environment. The article also hot on the concept of cloud computing, Demonstrates the relation between Cloud Computing and Web 2.0 from the angle of Cloud-based end-user applications, The possibly killing application in the future was discussed.

  13. The internet

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shahi, R; Sadler, M; Rees, G; Bateman, D

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of email and the world wide web (WWW), by the public, academics, and clinicians—as well as the increasing availability of high quality information on the WWW—make a working knowledge of the internet important. Although this article aims to enhance readers' existing use of the internet and medical resources on the WWW, it is also intelligible to someone unfamiliar with the internet. A web browser is one of the central pieces of software in modern computing: it is a window on the WWW, file transfer protocol sites, networked newsgroups, and your own computer's files. Effective use of the internet for professional purposes requires an understanding of the best strategies to search the WWW and the mechanisms for ensuring secure data transfer, as well as a compendium of online resources including journals, textbooks, medical portals, and sites providing high quality patient information. This article summarises these resources, available to incorporate into your web browser as downloadable "Favorites" or "Bookmarks" from www.jnnp.com, where there are also freely accessible hypertext links to the recommended sites. PMID:12438460

  14. [Internet addiction].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Susumu

    2015-09-01

    Internet technologies have made a rapid progress, bringing convenience to daily life. On the other hand, internet use disorder and internet addiction (IA) have become reportedly serious health and social problems. In 2013, internet gaming disorder criteria have been proposed in the section of Conditions for Further Study of DSM-5. Existing epidemiological studies by questionnaire methods have reported that the prevalence of IA ranges between 2.8% and 9.9% among youths in Japan. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), sleeping disorders, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and phobic anxiety disorder are extremely common comorbid mental disorders with IA. Some psychotherapies (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing) and medical treatments (e.g., antidepressant drugs, methylphenidate) for comorbid mental disorders as well as rehabilitation (e.g., treatment camp) are effective for IA remission. However, some serious cases of IA may be difficult to treat, and prevention is very important. In future, the prevention, rehabilitations and treatments for IA will be more required in Japan.

  15. Internet India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahl, Ronald H.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews a number of Internet sites containing information on every aspect of life in Modern India. The various sites provide information on such diverse topics as the Indian film industry, politics, the booming Indian computer industry, changing status of women, and financial and political issues. (MJP)

  16. Developing WWW Information Systems on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jianqun; Reid, Edna O. F.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses basic concepts and technologies related to World Wide Web information system development. Describes the design and implementation of Virtual Travel Mart, a Web-based end- user oriented information system. Emphasizes design considerations, which focus on user needs; creativity; integration of in-house databases on the Internet; currency;…

  17. Incidence of acne vulgaris in young adult users of protein-calorie supplements in the city of João Pessoa - PB*

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Thaís de Carvalho; Fernandes Filho, Gilson Mauro Costa; Trindade, Arthur de Sousa Pereira; Sobral Filho, Jader Freire

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Based on personal observations of dermatologists, nutritionists and patients, a new problem emerges in the gyms: development and exacerbation of acne in users of whey protein, which is a protein derived from cow's milk. Whey Protein extract contains growth factors that may be related to acne. Its purity and composition are not fully known and there is no scientific research on its potential to cause acne. OBJECTIVES Assess the relationship between the use of proteincalorie supplements and onset or exacerbation of acne vulgaris in young adults in the city of João Pessoa. METHODS Descriptive observational study conducted in gyms and in a dermatology clinic. Each participant was examined for acne on three occasions and followed for 60 days. RESULTS 30 patients were examined. Onset or exacerbation of acneiform lesions were observed (p <0.0005). The effect was more prominent in females and in individuals without current acne and no family history of acne. CONCLUSION This study showed the onset of acne with the progressive use of protein-calorie supplementation, in a two-month period. It is suggested that this type of supplementation be discouraged. PMID:24474098

  18. Internet use by the socially fearful: addiction or therapy?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew J; Cumming, Steven R; Hughes, Ian

    2006-02-01

    The Internet has often been argued to have adverse psychological consequences, such as depression or anxiety symptoms, among "over-users." The present study offers an alternative understanding, suggesting the Internet may be used as a forum for expanding social networks and consequently enhancing the chance of meaningful relationships, self-confidence, social abilities, and social support. An online sample of 188 people was recruited over the Internet, while paper and pencil tests were administered to an offline sample group of 27 undergraduate university students, who were regular Internet users. Subjects completed the Zung Depression Scale (ZDS), Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire?Revised Short Scale (EPQ-R Short), Fear of Negative Evaluation (FNE) scale, Internet Use Questionnaire (IUQ), and an Internet Effects Questionnaire (IEQ). Results suggested that there was no relationship between time spent online and depression, anxiety, or social fearfulness. Those who primarily used the Internet for online chat believed that the Internet is psychologically beneficial to them, but also believed that frequent Internet users are lonely and that the Internet can be addictive. It is argued that "chat" users who are socially fearful may be using the Internet as a form of low-risk social approach and an opportunity to rehearse social behavior and communication skills, which, may help them improve interaction with offline, face-to-face, social environments.

  19. Internet safety education for youth: stakeholder perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Internet use is nearly ubiquitous among US youth; risks to internet use include cyberbullying, privacy violations and unwanted solicitation. Internet safety education may prevent these negative consequences; however, it is unclear at what age this education should begin and what group is responsible for teaching this topic. Methods Surveys were distributed to key stakeholders in youth safety education including public school teachers, clinicians, parents and adolescents. Surveys assessed age at which internet safety education should begin, as well as experiences teaching and learning internet safety. Surveys of adults assessed willingness to teach internet safety. Finally, participants were asked to identify a group whose primary responsibility it should be to teach internet safety. Results A total of 356 participants completed the survey (93.4% response rate), including 77 teachers, 111 clinicians, 72 parents and 96 adolescents. Stakeholders felt the optimal mean age to begin teaching internet safety was 7.2 years (SD = 2.5), range 2-15. Internet safety was regularly taught by some teachers (20.8%), few clinicians (2.6%) and many parents (40.3%). The majority of teachers, clinicians and parents were willing to teach internet safety, but all groups surveyed identified parents as having primary responsibility for teaching this topic. Conclusions Findings suggest agreement among key stakeholders for teaching internet safety at a young age, and for identifying parents as primary teachers of this topic. Clinicians have a unique opportunity to support parents by providing resources, guidance and support. PMID:23738647

  20. “It’s not smoke. It’s not tar. It’s not 4000 chemicals. Case closed”: Exploring attitudes, beliefs, and perceived social norms of e-cigarette use among adult users

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Blair N.; Johnson, Sarah E.; Tessman, Greta K.; Tworek, Cindy; Alexander, Jennifer; Dickinson, Denise M.; Rath, Jessica; Green, Kerry M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is rapidly increasing among adults in the U.S. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore consumer perceptions about e-cigarettes, including knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and perceived social norms. Methods A total of 14 focus groups (N = 116) were conducted with current adult e-cigarette users in five U.S. cities from March through May, 2014. Focus groups were segmented by age (young adults aged 18–29 and older adults aged 30 and older) as well as by e-cigarette use status (exclusive e-cigarette users and non-exclusive e-cigarette users). Focus group discussions lasted approximately 60-min and were audio-recorded and transcribed; data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach. Results Participants expressed many positive attitudes towards e-cigarettes and simultaneously reported a lack of information and knowledge about the products. Focus group participants overwhelmingly felt as though the ingredients of e-cigarettes were likely less harmful than conventional cigarettes. Additionally, many described positive reactions from family and friends, especially when e-cigarettes were used in place of conventional cigarettes. Conclusions Findings from this qualitative study provide insight into consumer knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about e-cigarettes increasing our understanding of why and how they are being used. Such information will help provide insight into the potential public health impact of these emerging products. PMID:26708706

  1. Does Personality Predict Depression and Use of an Internet-Based Intervention for Depression among Adolescents?

    PubMed Central

    Vangberg, Hans Christian B.; Lillevoll, Kjersti R.; Waterloo, Knut; Eisemann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background. Focus upon depression and prevention of its occurrence among adolescents is increasing. Novel ways of dealing with this serious problem have become available especially by means of internet-based prevention and treatment programs of depression and anxiety. The use of Internet-based intervention programs among adolescents has revealed some difficulties in implementation that need to be further elucidated. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between personality and adolescent depression and the characteristics of users of an Internet-based intervention program. Method. The Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (JTCI), the General Self-Efficacy scale (GSE) and the Centre for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D) have been administered to a sample (n = 1234) of Norwegian senior high-school students. Results. Multiple regression analysis revealed associations between depression and gender, and several JTCI domains and facets. In line with previous findings in adults, high Harm Avoidance and low Self-Directedness emerged as the strongest predictors of adolescent depressive symptoms. Further, in logistic regression analysis with the covariates JTCI, GSE and CES-D, the only significant variables predicting use/non-use were the CES-D and the temperament domain Reward Dependence. Conclusion. The results in this study revealed level of depressive symptoms as the strongest predictor of the use of the Internet based intervention and that personality might provide useful information about the users. PMID:22928095

  2. Installing computers in older adults' homes and teaching them to access a patient education web site: a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Dauz, Emily; Moore, Jan; Smith, Carol E; Puno, Florence; Schaag, Helen

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of nurses who, as part of a large clinical trial, brought the Internet into older adults' homes by installing a computer, if needed, and connecting to a patient education Web site. Most of these patients had not previously used the Internet and were taught even basic computer skills when necessary. Because of increasing use of the Internet in patient education, assessment, and home monitoring, nurses in various roles currently connect with patients to monitor their progress, teach about medications, and answer questions about appointments and treatments. Thus, nurses find themselves playing the role of technology managers for patients with home-based Internet connections. This article provides step-by-step procedures for computer installation and training in the form of protocols, checklists, and patient user guides. By following these procedures, nurses can install computers, arrange Internet access, teach and connect to their patients, and prepare themselves to install future generations of technological devices.

  3. Prevalence and Correlates of Internet Addiction in Undergraduate Students as Assessed by Two Different Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The current study addressed some of the methodological shortcomings of previous studies on internet addiction. The main purpose of the study was to determine if two different internet addiction assessments would identify the same individuals as addicted to the internet. A total of 224 undergraduate internet users were surveyed using a stratified…

  4. An Analysis of Internet Addiction Levels of Individuals according to Various Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Cengiz

    2011-01-01

    The concept of internet addiction refers to the excessive use of internet which in turn causes various problems in individual, social and professional aspects. The aim of this study was to determine internet addiction levels of internet users from all age groups. The study used survey model. Study group of the study consisted of a total of 596…

  5. Affecting Factors and Outcome on Intermittent Internet Pulling Behavior in Taiwan's Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hui-Jen; Lay, Yun-Long

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays people's lives heavily rely on Internet facilities. Internet users generally have constant Internet connectivity and intermittently click on sites they want to access even amidst studying or working. In this study, we sought to examine the factors affecting intermittent Internet pulling behavior on undergraduate students. Furthermore, the…

  6. Not-so-clean fun: a profile of bath salt users among a college sample in the United States.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bryan Lee; Stogner, John M

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the characteristics of users of synthetic stimulants marketed as "bath salts." Synthetic stimulants such as MDPV (3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone), Mephedrone (4-Methylmethcathinone), and Methylone (3,4-Methylenedioxymethcathinone) are often contained in products sold at convenience stores and over the Internet in the United States. Despite the recent legal action banning these types of synthetic stimulants, little is known about the characteristics of the users of these substances. This research provides a profile of bath salt users in the United States among an emerging adult population. A self-report survey instrument was administered to 2,349 students at a large university in the southeastern United States. Respondents indicated whether they had used synthetic stimulants and reported demographic characteristics. Results indicated that users of bath salts were more likely to be male, Hispanic or Native American, student athletes, employed, identify as a members of the LGBT community, and users of other substances. PMID:25052791

  7. Internet use and attitudes towards illicit internet use behavior in a sample of Russian college students.

    PubMed

    Palesh, Oxana; Saltzman, Kasey; Koopman, Cheryl

    2004-10-01

    This study assessed Internet use and attitudes toward illicit use of the Internet in a sample of Russian college students. A sample comprised of 198 students was recruited from a university in Moscow. Each participant completed a survey assessing demographic characteristics, Internet use, and attitudes towards engaging in illicit behaviors over the Internet. About half of the students reported that they used the Internet at least several times a year, with 8% reporting daily use of the Internet. Among Internet users, most reported having Internet access either at home or at a friends' home, and 16 % reported having Internet access from work, school, or a computer center. Among Internet users, the main purpose was for school-related activities (60%), followed by e-mail (55%), entertainment (50%), chatting (24%), and searching for pornography (6%). Although most students thought it was inappropriate to read someone else's e-mail, use someone else's password or credit card information without their permission, or break into someone's computer, many students did endorse those illicit behaviors. Over a fifth of the students reported that they knew hackers. Forty three percent of students agreed that people make too much fuss about watching videos, movies or downloading music on the Internet without paying. Males were more likely than females to report using the Internet for entertainment purposes (p = 0.006) and were more likely to agree that it was okay to break into someone's computer (p = 0.04). The results of this study suggest that these Russian college students predominately use the Internet to help with their schoolwork, to communicate with others, and for entertainment. These results also suggest that interventions may be useful to change attitudes endorsing illicit uses of the Internet.

  8. The Effects of Computer Training and Internet Usage on the Use of Everyday Technology by Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slegers, Karin; van Boxtel, Martin P. J.; Jolles, Jelle

    2007-01-01

    According to the skill transfer concept, people may use general technological skills to solve new problems. To test this concept, a technological transfer test was included in a randomized controlled-intervention study aimed at the causal relationship between computer use and autonomy of older adults. Older adults with and without exposure to…

  9. Internet censorship.

    PubMed

    1996-12-27

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to review a lower court ruling that found the Communications Decency Act to be an unconstitutional infringement on free speech. The judges from the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia said that parents should monitor material that children are exposed to on the Internet. AIDS groups that publish information on safer sex, HIV prevention and AIDS treatments are not responsible for censoring content.

  10. Results of a Culturally Adapted Internet-Enhanced Physical Activity Pilot Intervention for Overweight and Obese Young Adult African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Rodney P.; Pekmezi, Dori; Dutton, Gareth R.; Cherrington, Andrea L.; Kim, Young-II; Allison, Jeroan J.; Durant, Nefertiti H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated a culturally relevant, social cognitive theory–based, Internet-enhanced physical activity (PA) pilot intervention developed for overweight/obese African American (AA) female college students. Design Using a 3-month, single group, pretest–posttest design, participants accessed a culturally relevant PA promotion website and engaged in four moderate-intensity PA sessions each week. Results Study completers (n = 25, mean age = 21.9 years) reported a decrease in sedentary screen time (p < .0001); however, no changes in moderate-to-vigorous PA were reported (p = .150). A significant increase in self-regulation for PA (p < .0001) and marginally significant increases in social support (p = .052) and outcome expectations (p = .057) for PA were observed. No changes in body mass index (p = .162), PA enjoyment (p = .151), or exercise self-efficacy (p = .086) were reported. Conclusions Findings of this exploratory study show some preliminary support for Internet-enhanced approaches to promote PA among overweight/obese AA women. Implications for Practice Future studies with larger samples are needed to further explore culturally relevant Internet-enhanced PA programs in this underserved population. PMID:24934566

  11. Seeking health- and nutrition-related information on the Internet in a large population of French adults: results of the NutriNet-Santé study.

    PubMed

    Fassier, Philippine; Chhim, Anne-Sophie; Andreeva, Valentina A; Hercberg, Serge; Latino-Martel, Paule; Pouchieu, Camille; Touvier, Mathilde

    2016-06-01

    The Internet has become a major source of health and nutrition information. Little is known about the type of consulted websites (institutional v. non-institutional) and the tendency to discuss with a healthcare professional (HCP) the information found on the Internet. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate health- and nutrition-related Internet use in a large French population-based study. Data were collected in 2013 using self-administered, web-based questionnaires from 42 113 participants of the NutriNet-Santé study (mean age=51·2 years, 76 % women). Unconditional multivariate logistic regression analyses and χ 2 tests were used for comparisons. In total, 85·1 % of the subjects used the Internet to search for health and/or nutrition information, and 23·6 % used the Internet to read or post messages on health/nutrition forums. Only 16·0 % discussed with a HCP the information found online. This proportion was lower in subjects with lower educational level (OR 0·77; 95 % CI 0·72, 0·82) and lower computer skills (OR 0·70; 95 % CI 0·65, 0·76). In total, 8038 health/nutrition websites were cited, with institutional websites representing only 12·9 % of that number. Only one institutional website was present in the top 10. Older subjects (OR 1·49; 95 % CI 1·28-1·74), those with lower educational level (OR 2·08; 95 % CI 1·75, 2·50) and lower nutritional knowledge (OR 1·33; 1·12, 1·59) were more likely to cite non-institutional websites. This large population-based study showed that institutional websites were infrequently accessed and that a few participants discussed the information found online with their HCP. This particular trend was especially visible among individuals who were more vulnerable regarding misleading information. This supports the need to increase awareness of high-quality websites providing reliable health/nutrition information.

  12. Study on the contract characteristics of Internet architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chuan; Zhang, Guoqing; Yang, Jing; Liu, Xiaona

    2011-11-01

    The importance of Internet architecture goes beyond the technical aspects. The architecture of Internet has a profound influence on the Internet-based economy in term of how the profits are shared by different market participants (Internet Server Provider, Internet Content Provider), since it is the physical foundation upon which the profit-sharing contracts are derived. In order to facilitate the continuing growth of the Internet, it is necessary to systematically study factors that curtail the Internet-based economy including the existing Internet architecture. In this paper, we used transaction cost economics and contract economics as new tools to analyse the contracts derived from the current Internet architecture. This study sheds light on how the macro characteristics of Internet architecture effect the microeconomical decisions of market participants. Based on the existing Internet architecture, we discuss the possibility of promoting Internet-based economy by encouraging user to connect their private stub network to the Internet and giving the user more right of self-governing.

  13. Current research knowledge about adolescent victimization via the Internet.

    PubMed

    Wolak, Janis; Ybarra, Michele L; Mitchell, Kimberly; Finkelhor, David

    2007-08-01

    We review current knowledge about adolescent Internet-mediated victimization, including Internet-initiated sex crimes in which offenders use the Internet to meet victims, unwanted online sexual solicitations, Internet harassment, and unwanted and wanted exposure to online pornography. Internet-initiated sex crimes have received considerable publicity, but the media stories have contributed to stereotypes that do not accurately portray adolescent Internet experience. Adults' concerns are valid but need to be supported with information that illuminates the real safety issues and targets the specific population of youth impacted.

  14. Development and pilot-testing of the perceived health Web Site usability questionnaire (PHWSUQ) for older adults.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Resnick, Barbara; Mills, Mary Etta

    2006-01-01

    With an increasing number of older adult online users, the Internet has become recognized as an efficient medium to disseminate health information to these individuals. Usability of health Web sites is particularly important for older adults who have unique Web design needs. Although several Web usability questionnaires have been developed for younger adults, there is a lack of such measure for older adults. In this study, based on prior research findings and consultation with usability experts, a 12-item Perceived Health Web Site Usability Questionnaire (PHWSUQ) was developed for older adults. The preliminary reliability and validity of this measure was assessed in a study that tested the usability of three health Web sites employing 10 older adult online users. The findings provided some evidence of internal consistency and construct validity for the PHWSUQ. The major limitation of this study was its small sample size, hence further psychometric testing is needed with larger samples. PMID:17102214

  15. Internet Passport: NorthWestNet's Guide to Our World Online. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochmer, Jonathan

    The purpose of this guide is to help computer network users get over the hurdle of new technologies. Every Internet user is different, but most network activities depend on the mastery of three basic skills: using electronic mail (e-mail) to communicate with other Internet users; logging in to remote computers with a service called Telnet, and…

  16. Internet-Based Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    Google the question, "How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?," and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting…

  17. The Internet and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smigielski, Alan

    1997-01-01

    This issue of "Art to Zoo" examines the "mysteries" surrounding the Internet and offers simple "pointers" on how to access the Smithsonian's teaching materials. Many of the materials are available online. Articles include: (1) "What is the Internet?"; (2) "Connecting to the Internet"; (3) "Internet Shopping List"; (4) "Internet Terms"; (5) "A…

  18. To tweet, or not to tweet: gender differences and potential positive and negative health outcomes of adolescents' social internet use.

    PubMed

    Pujazon-Zazik, Melissa; Park, M Jane

    2010-03-01

    Adolescents and young adults are avid Internet users. Online social media, such as social networking sites (e.g., Facebook, MySpace), blogs, status updating sites (e.g., Twitter) and chat rooms, have become integral parts of adolescents' and young adults' lives. Adolescents are even beginning to enter the world of online dating with several websites dedicated to "teenage online dating." This paper reviews recent peer-reviewed literature and national data on 1) adolescents use of online social media, 2) gender differences in online social media and 3) potential positive and negative health outcomes from adolescents' online social media use. We also examine parental monitoring of adolescents' online activities. Given that parental supervision is a key protective factor against adolescent risk-taking behavior, it is reasonable to hypothesize that unmonitored Internet use may place adolescents' at significant risk, such as cyberbullying, unwanted exposure to pornography, and potentially revealing personal information to sexual predators.

  19. To tweet, or not to tweet: gender differences and potential positive and negative health outcomes of adolescents' social internet use.

    PubMed

    Pujazon-Zazik, Melissa; Park, M Jane

    2010-03-01

    Adolescents and young adults are avid Internet users. Online social media, such as social networking sites (e.g., Facebook, MySpace), blogs, status updating sites (e.g., Twitter) and chat rooms, have become integral parts of adolescents' and young adults' lives. Adolescents are even beginning to enter the world of online dating with several websites dedicated to "teenage online dating." This paper reviews recent peer-reviewed literature and national data on 1) adolescents use of online social media, 2) gender differences in online social media and 3) potential positive and negative health outcomes from adolescents' online social media use. We also examine parental monitoring of adolescents' online activities. Given that parental supervision is a key protective factor against adolescent risk-taking behavior, it is reasonable to hypothesize that unmonitored Internet use may place adolescents' at significant risk, such as cyberbullying, unwanted exposure to pornography, and potentially revealing personal information to sexual predators. PMID:20164062

  20. Next Generation Internet Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    desJardins, R.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with next generation Internet are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Internet architecture; 2) NASA's advanced networking; 3) Internet capability, capacity and applications; and 4) Systems engineering.

  1. The Mental Health Impact of Computer and Internet Training on a Multi-ethnic Sample of Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results of a Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Laganá, Luciana; García, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We preliminarily explored the effects of computer and internet training in older age and attempted to address the diversity gap in the ethnogeriatric literature, given that, in our study’s sample, only one-third of the participants self-identified as White. The aim of this investigation was to compare two groups - the control and the experimental conditions - regarding theme 1) computer attitudes and related self-efficacy, and theme 2) self-esteem and depressive symptomatology. Methods: Sixty non-institutionalized residents of Los Angeles County (mean age ± SD: 69.12 ± 10.37 years; age range: 51-92) were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (n=30) or the waitlist/control group (n=30). The experimental group was involved in 6 weeks of one-on-one computer and internet training for one 2-hour session per week. The same training was administered to the control participants after their post-test. Outcome measures included the four variables, organized into the two aforementioned themes. Results: There were no significant between-group differences in either post-test computer attitudes or self-esteem. However, findings revealed that the experimental group reported greater computer self-efficacy, compared to the waitlist/control group, at post-test/follow-up [F(1,56)=28.89, p=0.001, η2=0.01]. Additionally, at the end of the computer and internet training, there was a substantial and statistically significant decrease in depression scores among those in the experimental group when compared to the waitlist/control group [F(1,55)=9.06, p<0.004, η2=0.02]. Conclusions: There were significant improvements in favour of the experimental group in computer self-efficacy and, of noteworthy clinical relevance, in depression, as evidenced by a decreased percentage of significantly depressed experimental subjects from 36.7% at baseline to 16.7% at the end of our intervention. PMID:24151452

  2. Usage and Users of Online Self-Management Programs for Adult Patients With Atopic Dermatitis and Food Allergy: An Explorative Study

    PubMed Central

    van Leent- de Wit, Ilse; de Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Knulst, André

    2015-01-01

    Background Two online self-management programs for patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) or food allergy (FA) were developed with the aim of helping patients cope with their condition, follow the prescribed treatment regimen, and deal with the consequences of their illness in daily life. Both programs consist of several modules containing information, personal stories by fellow patients, videos, and exercises with feedback. Health care professionals can refer their patients to the programs. However, the use of the program in daily practice is unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the use and characteristics of users of the online self-management programs “Living with eczema,” and “Living with food allergy,” and to investigate factors related to the use of the trainings. Methods A cross-sectional design was carried out in which the outcome parameters were the number of log-ins by patients, the number of hits on the system’s core features, disease severity, quality of life, and domains of self-management. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize sample characteristics and to describe number of log-ins and hits per module and per functionality. Correlation and regression analyses were used to explore the relation between the number of log-ins and patient characteristics. Results Since the start, 299 adult patients have been referred to the online AD program; 173 logged in for at least one occasion. Data from 75 AD patients were available for analyses. Mean number of log-ins was 3.1 (range 1-11). Linear regression with the number of log-ins as dependent variable showed that age and quality of life contributed most to the model, with betas of .35 ( P=.002) and .26 (P=.05), respectively, and an R 2 of .23. Two hundred fourteen adult FA patients were referred to the online FA training, 124 logged in for at least one occasion and data from 45 patients were available for analysis. Mean number of log-ins was 3.0 (range 1-11). Linear regression

  3. Correlates of the Use of Different Tobacco Cessation Methods by Smokers and Smokeless Tobacco Users According to Their Socio-Demographic Characteristics: Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) India 2009-10

    PubMed Central

    Ruhil, Rohini

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tobacco control has two aspects. One involves preventing non-tobacco users from using tobacco and the second involves tobacco cessation (quitting) by existing tobacco users. There are various methods of tobacco cessation. Pharmacotherapy [e.g., nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and medications such as bupropion] and behavioral counselling are some of the internationally approved methods of tobacco cessation. Objective: This paper intends to study how age, gender, residence (rural/urban), education, and occupation influence the use of various tobacco cessation methods by smokers and smokeless tobacco users. Materials and Methods: The study was a cross-sectional secondary data analysis of the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) India 2009-2010. There were 3725 smokers and 6354 smokeless tobacco users included in the study who made attempts to quit in the 12 months prior to the survey by use of different cessation methods (NRT, drugs such as bupropion, counselling, and other methods). Results: A significant association was demonstrated between increasing educational attainment and use of cessation methods for all the methods among smokers. Being employed (Govt. or non-Govt.) was positively associated with the use of NRT as a cessation method by smokers. Students and homemakers had higher odds of using pharmacotherapy methods among smokers. A significant association was demonstrated for the gender and age of tobacco users with the use of counselling as a cessation method among smokeless tobacco users. Conclusion: The findings of this study have important implications for tobacco cessation service providers in view of supporting their decision of choosing a particular tobacco cessation method for tobacco users according to certain kinds of sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:27385871

  4. The internet worm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    In November 1988 a worm program invaded several thousand UNIX-operated Sun workstations and VAX computers attached to the Research Internet, seriously disrupting service for several days but damaging no files. An analysis of the work's decompiled code revealed a battery of attacks by a knowledgeable insider, and demonstrated a number of security weaknesses. The attack occurred in an open network, and little can be inferred about the vulnerabilities of closed networks used for critical operations. The attack showed that passwork protection procedures need review and strengthening. It showed that sets of mutually trusting computers need to be carefully controlled. Sharp public reaction crystalized into a demand for user awareness and accountability in a networked world.

  5. Internet-based self-management support for adults with asthma: a qualitative study among patients, general practitioners and practice nurses on barriers to implementation

    PubMed Central

    van Gaalen, Johanna L; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Bakker, Moira J; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B; Sont, Jacob K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore barriers among patients, general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses to implement internet-based self-management support as provided by PatientCoach for asthma in primary care. Setting Primary care within South Holland, the Netherlands. Participants Twenty-two patients (12 women, mean age 38 years), 21 GPs (6 women, mean age 52 years) and 13 practice nurses (all women, mean age 41 years). Design A qualitative study using focus groups and interviews. Outcomes Barriers as perceived by patients, GPs and practice nurses to implementation of PatientCoach. Methods 10 focus groups and 12 interviews were held to collect data: 4 patient focus groups, 4 GP focus groups, 2 practice nurse focus group, 2 patient interviews, 5 GP interviews and 5 practice nurse interviews. A prototype of PatientCoach that included modules for coaching, personalised information, asthma self-monitoring, medication treatment plan, feedback, e-consultations and a forum was demonstrated. A semistructured topic guide was used. Directed content analysis was used to analyse data. Reported barriers were classified according to a framework by Grol and Wensing. Results A variety of barriers emerged among all participant groups. Barriers identified among patients include a lack of a patient–professional partnership in using PatientCoach and a lack of perceived benefit in improving asthma symptoms. Barriers identified among GPs include a low sense of urgency towards asthma care and current work routines. Practice nurses identified a low level of structured asthma care and a lack of support by colleagues as barriers. Among all participant groups, insufficient ease of use of PatientCoach, lack of financial arrangements and patient characteristics such as a lack of asthma symptoms were reported as barriers. Conclusions We identified a variety of barriers to implementation of PatientCoach. An effective implementation strategy for internet-based self

  6. Poultry Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheok, Adrian David

    Poultry are one of the most badly treated animals in the modern world. It has been shown that they have high levels of both cognition and feelings, and as a result there has been a recent trend of promoting poultry welfare. There is also a tradition of keeping poultry as pets in some parts of the world. However, in modern cities and societies, it is often difficult to maintain contact with pets, particularly for office workers. We propose and describe a novel cybernetics system to use mobile and Internet technology to improve human-pet interaction. It can also be used for people who are allergic to touching animals and thus cannot stroke them directly. This interaction encompasses both visualization and tactile sensation of real objects.

  7. VARIATIONS IN RECRUITMENT YIELD, COSTS, SPEED AND PARTICIPANT DIVERSITY ACROSS INTERNET PLATFORMS IN A GLOBAL STUDY EXAMINING THE EFFICACY OF AN HIV/AIDS AND HIV TESTING ANIMATED AND LIVE-ACTION VIDEO AMONG ENGLISH- OR SPANISH-SPEAKING INTERNET OR SOCIAL MEDIA USERS

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Winnie; Guan, Wentao; Clark, Melissa A.; Liu, Tao; Santelices, Claudia; Cortés, Dharma E.; Merchant, Roland C.

    2016-01-01

    For a world-wide, Internet-based study on HIV/AIDS and HIV testing knowledge, we compared the yields, speed and costs of recruitment and participant diversity across free postings on 13 Internet or social media platforms, paid advertising or postings on 3 platforms, and separate free postings and paid advertisements on Facebook. Platforms were compared by study completions (yield), time to completion, completion to enrollment ratios (CERs), and costs/ completion; and by participants’ demographic characteristics, HIV testing history, and health literacy levels. Of the 482 English-speaking participants, Amazon Mechanical Turk yielded the most participants, recruited participants at the fastest rate and had the highest CER (0.78) and lowest costs / completion. Of the 335 Spanish-speaking participants, Facebook yielded the most participants and recruited participants at the fastest rate, although Amazon Mechanical Turk had the highest CER (0.72) and lowest costs/completion. Across platforms participants differed substantially according to their demographic characteristics, HIV testing history and health literay skills. The study results highlight the need for researchers to strongly consider choice of Internet or social media plaforms when conducting Internet-based research. Because of the sample specifications and cost restraints of studies, specific Internet/ social media or participant selection plaforms will be much more effective or appropriate than others. PMID:27330570

  8. Internet addiction among elementary and middle school students in China: a nationally representative sample study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yajun; Zhang, Xinghui; Lu, Furong; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Yun

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of Internet addiction in a nationally representative sample of Chinese elementary and middle school students and to investigate Internet addiction among Internet users with different usages. The data were from the National Children's Study of China (NCSC) in which 24,013 fourth- to ninth-grade students were recruited from 100 counties in 31 provinces in China. Only 54.2% of the students had accessed the Internet. According to the criteria of Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire (YDQ), an eight-item instrument, the prevalence of Internet addiction in the total sample was 6.3%, and among Internet users was 11.7%. Among the Internet users, males (14.8%) and rural students (12.1%) reported Internet addiction more than females (7.0%) and urban students (10.6%). The percentage of Internet addicts in elementary school students (11.5%) was not significantly lower than the percentage of middle school students (11.9%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four geographical regions (9.6%, 11.5%, 12.3%, 11.1%) characterized by different levels of economy, health, education, and social environment. As the frequency of Internet use and time spent online per week increased, the percentage of Internet addicts increased. When considering the location and purpose of Internet use, the percentage of Internet addicts was highest in adolescents typically surfing in Internet cafes (18.1%) and playing Internet games (22.5%).

  9. Seniors, health information, and the Internet: motivation, ability, and Internet knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiaojing; Simpson, Penny M

    2013-10-01

    Providing health information to older adults is crucial to empowering them to better control their health, and the information is readily available on the Internet. Yet, little is known about the factors that are important in affecting seniors' Internet search for health information behavior. This work addresses this research deficit by examining the role of health information orientation (HIO), eHealth literacy, and Internet knowledge (IK) in affecting the likelihood of using the Internet as a source for health information. The analysis reveals that each variable in the study is significant in affecting Internet search likelihood. Results from the analysis also demonstrate the partial mediating role of eHealth literacy and the interaction between eHealth literacy and HIO. The findings suggest that improving seniors' IK and eHealth literacy would increase their likelihood of searching for and finding health information on the Internet that might encourage better health behaviors.

  10. Problematic internet use and internet searches for medical information: the role of health anxiety.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Thomas A; Dolan, Sara L

    2014-12-01

    Individuals frequently use the Internet to search for medical information. For some individuals, repeated searches for medical information on the Internet exacerbate health anxiety. Researchers have termed this phenomenon "cyberchondria" and have suggested that cyberchondria might relate to the excessive use of the Internet for other purposes as well. The present study examined associations among Internet searches for medical information, health anxiety, and problematic Internet use (PIU) using a large sample of medically healthy community adults located in the United States (N=430). As predicted, respondents who experienced increased health anxiety following Internet searches for medical information reported significantly greater PIU than respondents for whom such searches either had no impact on or decreased their health anxiety. This effect was not attributable to the frequency of health-related online searching behavior or negative affect. Conceptual and therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:25412398

  11. A Comparison of the Effects of Classroom and Multi-User Virtual Environments on the Perceived Speaking Anxiety of Adult Post-Secondary English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abal, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    The population of English Language Learners (ELLs) globally has been increasing substantially every year. In the United States alone, adult ELLs are the fastest growing portion of learners in adult education programs (Yang, 2005). There is a significant need to improve the teaching of English to ELLs in the United States and other English-speaking…

  12. Problem Internet Overuse Behaviors in College Students: Readiness-to-Change and Receptivity to Treatment.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jennifer E; Li, Wen; Snyder, Susan M; Howard, Matthew O

    2016-01-01

    This mixed methods study explores college students' readiness-to-change and receptivity to treatment for problem Internet overuse behaviors. Focus groups were conducted with 27 college students who self-identified as Internet over-users, and had experienced biopsychosocial problems related to Internet overuse. Participants completed standardized questionnaires assessing their Internet use and sociodemographic forms. Focus groups explored readiness to change problem Internet overuse behaviors and receptivity to treatment. Similar to college students with other addictive behaviors, students with problem Internet overuse fall along a continuum vis-à-vis readiness-to-change their behaviors. Over half of the participants were receptive to treatment for their problem Internet overuse behaviors.

  13. Ethical and Professional Issues in Career Assessment on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Azy

    2003-01-01

    Concerns about Internet-based career assessments include the following: users' technical skill level, lack of screening, psychological factors, cultural bias, unprotected results, technical failures, lack of standardization, digital divide, interpretation problems, outdated tests, copyright violations, administrator qualifications, and hidden…

  14. Internet Addiction among Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargin, Nurten

    2012-01-01

    Each innovation brings along many risks. One of the risks related with the Internet use is Internet addiction. The aim of this study is to examine Internet addiction in adolescence in terms of gender, Internet access at home and grades. The research design used was survey method. The study population consisted of second stage students attending…

  15. Prospero - A tool for organizing Internet resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, B. C.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes Prospero, a distributed file system based on the Virtual System Model. Prospero provides tools to help users organize Internet resources. These tools allow users to construct customized views of available resources, while taking advantage of the structure imposed by others. Prospero provides a framework that can tie together various indexing services producing the fabric on which resource discovery techniques can be applied.

  16. Internet Use and Its Impact on Engagement in Leisure Activities in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ronggang; Fong, Patrick S. W.; Tan, Peking

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Internet use has become an increasingly common leisure time activity among Chinese citizens. The association between Internet use and engagement in leisure activities is especially unclear among China population. This study aims to investigate Internet usage and to determine whether active Internet use is a marker for low or high levels of leisure time activities. Methods/Principal Findings With the use of a face-to-face structured questionnaire interview, a total of 2,400 respondents who met all screening requirements were surveyed to answer the questions in eight major cities in China. 66.2% (n = 1,589) of all respondents were identified as Internet users. Of these Internet users, 30.0%, 24.1%, 26.4%, and 19.6% were clustered as “informative or instrumental users,” “entertainment users,” “communication users,” and “advanced users,” respectively. Regarding time spent on Internet use in leisure time, more than 96% reported going online in non-work situations, and 26.2% (n = 416) were classified as “heavy Internet users.” A logistic regression analysis revealed that there were significant differences in some leisure activities between non-Internet users and Internet users, with an observed one-unit increase in the leisure time dependence category increasing the probability of engaging in mental or social activities. In contrast, Internet users were less engaged in physical exercise-related activities. In addition, advanced Internet users were generally more active in leisure time activities than non-Internet users and other types of users. Conclusion/Significance Internet use is one of very common leisure activities in Chinese citizens, and age, gender, income, and education are the key factors affecting Internet access. According to different types of leisure activities, Internet usage has different impacts on leisure activity engagement. High Internet dependence has no significant negative influence on engagement in mental

  17. "On the Internet no one knows I'm an introvert": extroversion, neuroticism, and Internet interaction.

    PubMed

    Amichai-Hamburger, Yair; Wainapel, Galit; Fox, Shaul

    2002-04-01

    Social communication is one of the most common reasons for using the Internet. This paper examines how the personality characteristics of the user affect the meaning and importance of Internet social interaction in comparison with "real life," face-to-face interactions. Forty subjects all of whom were familiar with using "chat" participated in this study. After a at" session, they were instructed to answer several questionnaires. It was found that introverted and neurotic people locate their "real me" on the Internet, while extroverts and nonneurotic people locate their "real me" through traditional social interaction. The implications of our results for understanding the user-net interaction, the "real-me" location, extroversion, neuroticism, and Internet interaction, and the treatment of social phobics are examined. PMID:12025878

  18. Understanding Student Internet Rights Begins with the First Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Megan M.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests the rights of high school students to access and use their schools' Internet resources are confusing and complicated. Discusses authorized user policies, freedom of expression, and the Internet as a library. Concludes that until the Supreme Court establishes a legal precedent, students, parents, administrators, and teachers are left the…

  19. Sensation Seeking and Internet Dependence of Taiwanese High School Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Sunny S. J.; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    This paper presents the second year follow-up research on Internet addiction among Taiwanese high school students from surveys of 753 students. A psychological profile of users was determined in order to differentiate motivation of Internet dependence and non-dependence. Data was analyzed to establish whether sensation seeking was a part of…

  20. 47 CFR 64.611 - Internet-based TRS registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... valid number portability request as set forth in 47 CFR 52.34; or, if the user does not wish to port a... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Internet-based TRS registration. 64.611 Section... Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities § 64.611 Internet-based TRS registration....

  1. 47 CFR 64.611 - Internet-based TRS registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... valid number portability request as set forth in 47 CFR 52.34; or, if the user does not wish to port a... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Internet-based TRS registration. 64.611 Section... Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities § 64.611 Internet-based TRS registration....

  2. 47 CFR 64.611 - Internet-based TRS registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... valid number portability request as set forth in 47 CFR 52.34; or, if the user does not wish to port a... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internet-based TRS registration. 64.611 Section... Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities § 64.611 Internet-based TRS registration....

  3. 47 CFR 64.611 - Internet-based TRS registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... valid number portability request as set forth in 47 CFR 52.34; or, if the user does not wish to port a... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Internet-based TRS registration. 64.611 Section... Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities § 64.611 Internet-based TRS registration....

  4. 47 CFR 64.611 - Internet-based TRS registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... valid number portability request as set forth in 47 CFR 52.34; or, if the user does not wish to port a... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Internet-based TRS registration. 64.611 Section... Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities § 64.611 Internet-based TRS registration....

  5. The effective use of search engines on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Younger, P

    This article explains how nurses can get the most out of researching information on the internet using the search engine Google. It also explores some of the other types of search engines that are available. Internet users are shown how to find text, images and reports and search within sites. Copyright issues are also discussed.

  6. The Internet Compendium: Subject Guides to Humanities Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Louis; And Others

    This guide describes and evaluates the Internet's humanities resources by subject. It offers information on a multitude of listservs; Usenet newsgroups; forums; electronic journals; topical mailing lists; text archives; Freenets; bulletin boards; FAQs; newsletters; real-time chats; databases; and library catalogs. Internet users can draw upon…

  7. Determinants of Internet use in Imo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anunobi, C. V.; Mbagwu, F. C.

    2009-01-01

    The research was designed to determine the use of internet in Imo state, Nigeria with a view to enlighten societal stakeholders on their implications to development. Self designed questionnaire was distributed to users from five internet centers in the three local government areas of Imo State. 219 (73%) of the 300 distributed questionnaires were…

  8. Get Linked or Get Lost: Marketing Strategy for the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Alicia; Forcht, Karen; Pierson, Joan

    1997-01-01

    To cultivate an online market share, companies must design marketing strategies specifically for the Internet. This article examines the nature of business on the Internet, highlighting demographics, user control, accessibility, communication, authenticity, competition, and security and proposes a marketing strategy, including targeting and…

  9. College Life On-Line: Healthy and Unhealthy Internet Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Kathy

    1997-01-01

    Examines Internet use among 531 college students. Results indicate that 73% of the students accessed the Internet at least once a week, with 13% of weekly users reporting excessive use that significantly interfered with personal functioning. Findings support the development of educational programming. Presents implications for mental health and…

  10. The Generation Gap: Minitel in the Face of the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Philippe

    Starting in the 1980s the online world has seen two models: the French model, Minitel, and the American model, Internet. At the end of 1995 the Minitel network was the biggest and oldest online service with 7 million users and 20,000 service providers; one year later, the Internet arrived. Tomorrow's online model will need to be: as familiar to…

  11. Differentiation of Psychoactive Drug Users and Non-Users and Prediction of Their Using Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzeng, Oliver C. S.; Skafidas, Thomas

    1975-01-01

    Thirteen Semantic Differential bipolar variables representing various socio-cultural correlates and personality factors of psychoactive drug users as well as non-users were measured from a group of 80 college students and 20 adults. Drug users (n=44) within the last six months differed significantly from non-users in their intention of taking…

  12. [Medical research using Internet questionnaire in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Hideo; Ide, Hiroo; Imamura, Tomoaki; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    As the method for questionnaire studies, mail survey and interview survey are frequently used. The utility and validity of applying the Internet method to medical studies have yet to be fully evaluated. For the present investigation, we reviewed 36 Japanese original articles using Internet questionnaire reported through to April 2005. Although original papers using the Internet method have been increasing in recent years, they are still limited in number. There is comparatively much research on disease with many patients in youth and early manhood, such as allergic ailments (allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and hives). As compared with conventional methods, the advantages of the Internet approach are convenience for both investigators and respondents and the ability to quickly collect data. The disadvantage is that the user's age range is more concentrated. Since samples are extracted from individuals who are registered as monitors, a greater sampling error may occur as compared with a random sampling method. However, it is to be expected that continued explosive growth of the Internet would decrease the limitation in user's age. If more elderly people participate in questionnaire studies using the web, research into more illnesses should be facilitated. Considering the inherent advantage, it is thought that Internet method can become the leading tool for sociomedical and clinical research in the near future. PMID:16502854

  13. Are Mental Health Effects of Internet Use Attributable to the Web-Based Content or Perceived Consequences of Usage? A Longitudinal Study of European Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hadlaczky, Gergö; Westerlund, Joakim; Wasserman, Danuta; Balazs, Judit; Germanavicius, Arunas; Machín, Núria; Meszaros, Gergely; Sarchiapone, Marco; Värnik, Airi; Varnik, Peeter; Westerlund, Michael; Carli, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Background Adolescents and young adults are among the most frequent Internet users, and accumulating evidence suggests that their Internet behaviors might affect their mental health. Internet use may impact mental health because certain Web-based content could be distressing. It is also possible that excessive use, regardless of content, produces negative consequences, such as neglect of protective offline activities. Objective The objective of this study was to assess how mental health is associated with (1) the time spent on the Internet, (2) the time spent on different Web-based activities (social media use, gaming, gambling, pornography use, school work, newsreading, and targeted information searches), and (3) the perceived consequences of engaging in those activities. Methods A random sample of 2286 adolescents was recruited from state schools in Estonia, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Questionnaire data comprising Internet behaviors and mental health variables were collected and analyzed cross-sectionally and were followed up after 4 months. Results Cross-sectionally, both the time spent on the Internet and the relative time spent on various activities predicted mental health (P<.001), explaining 1.4% and 2.8% variance, respectively. However, the consequences of engaging in those activities were more important predictors, explaining 11.1% variance. Only Web-based gaming, gambling, and targeted searches had mental health effects that were not fully accounted for by perceived consequences. The longitudinal analyses showed that sleep loss due to Internet use (ß=.12, 95% CI=0.05-0.19, P=.001) and withdrawal (negative mood) when Internet could not be accessed (ß=.09, 95% CI=0.03-0.16, P<.01) were the only consequences that had a direct effect on mental health in the long term. Perceived positive consequences of Internet use did not seem to be associated with mental health at all. Conclusions The magnitude of Internet use is

  14. First Things First: Internet Relay Chat Openings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rintel, E. Sean; Mulholland, Joan; Pittam, Jeffery

    2001-01-01

    Argues that Internet Relay Chat (IRC) research needs to systematically address links between interaction structures, technological mediation and the instantiation and development of interpersonal relationships. Finds that openings that occur directly following user's entries into public IRC channels are often ambiguous, can disrupt relationship…

  15. Directing Traffic: Managing Internet Bandwidth Fairly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paine, Thomas A.; Griggs, Tyler J.

    2008-01-01

    Educational institutions today face budgetary restraints and scarce resources, complicating the decision of how to allot bandwidth for campus network users. Additionally, campus concerns over peer-to-peer networking (specifically outbound Internet traffic) have increased because of bandwidth and copyright issues. In this article, the authors…

  16. Trust Management and Accountability for Internet Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Wayne W.

    2011-01-01

    Adversarial yet interacting interdependent relationships in information sharing and service provisioning have been a pressing issue of the Internet. Such relationships exist among autonomous software agents, in networking system peers, as well as between "service users and providers." Traditional "ad hoc" security approaches effective in…

  17. EEVL: An Internet Gateway for Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Linda; MacLeod, Roddy

    1997-01-01

    Explains EEVL (Edinburgh Engineering Virtual Library), a gateway to Internet resources in engineering that was developed to improve access to networked engineering information for United Kingdom users. Design and implementation of the Web site, classification of resources, evaluation, use statistics, marketing, and future possibilities are…

  18. Revocable Anonymous Access to the Internet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claessens, Joris; Diaz, Claudia; Goemans, Caroline; Preneel, Bart; Vandewalle, Joos; Dumortier, Jos

    2003-01-01

    Users of telecommunications networks are concerned about privacy, and desire anonymous access, while some organizations are concerned about how this anonymous access might be abused. Proposes a solution for revocable anonymous access to the Internet. Presents some legal background and motivation for such a solution. Indicates some difficulties and…

  19. The Internet, Intercultural Communication and Cultural Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcoccia, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The internet affords its users an unprecedented level of contact with people from other cultural and social groups. It is often assumed that because of this it can facilitate intercultural communication and reduce the perceived distance between cultures. This article will examine this assumption by exploring two questions. Firstly, do the…

  20. MEDLINE on the Internet: "Healthier" than Before?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buntrock, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    Examines some of the many Internet/World Wide Web versions of MEDLINE and reports whether the file is "healthier" now than it was before. Describes two search examples and two non-National Library of Medicine Web MEDLINE sites. Notes that for MEDLINE searching, the user should pick a couple of sites and perform a personal comparisons and…

  1. Security incidents on the Internet, 1989--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an analysis of trends in Internet security based on an investigation of 4,299 Internet security-related incidents reported to the CERT{reg_sign} Coordination Center (CERT{reg_sign}/CC) from 1989 through 1995. Prior to this research, knowledge of actual Internet security incidents was limited and primarily anecdotal. This research: (1) developed a taxonomy to classify Internet attacks and incidents, (2) organized, classified, and analyzed CERT{reg_sign}/CC incident records, (3) summarized the relative frequency of the use of tools and vulnerabilities, success in achieving access, and results of attacks, (4) estimated total Internet incident activity, (5) developed recommendations for Internet users and suppliers, and (6) developed recommendations for future research. With the exception of denial-of-service attacks, security incidents were found to be increasing at a rate less than Internet growth. Estimates showed that most, if not all, severe incidents were reported to the CERT{reg_sign}/CC, and that more than one out of three above average incidents (in terms of duration and number of sites) were reported. Estimates also indicated that a typical Internet site was involved in, at most, around one incident (of any kind) per year, and a typical Internet host in, at most, around one incident in 45 years. The probability of unauthorized privileged access was around an order of magnitude less likely. As a result, simple and reasonable security precautions should be sufficient for most Internet users.

  2. The Internet for Louisiana physicians.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M S

    2000-09-01

    Fewer than 50% of Louisiana physicians actively use the Internet, and many of them confine their usage to e-mailing among family and friends. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with many of the benefits of exploiting the incredible potential of this technological invention. I provide addresses and information about sites that I believe warrant usage by our colleagues. Of the vast smorgasbord of data available we highlight educational Web sites for professionals and the public, how to determine credibility of information, clinical research of scientific articles, computer security, federal and state government sites, newspapers, political and socioeconomic functions, medical supply shops, e-mail and other computerized communication, electronic medical records, personal or professional Web sites, and future medical internet uses. It is hoped that this process will encourage nonparticipating colleagues to begin using this modality while also supplying sites that current users may not yet have discovered. PMID:11064554

  3. The Ratio of Dietary Branched-Chain Amino Acids is Associated with a Lower Prevalence of Obesity in Young Northern Chinese Adults: An Internet-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Chuan; Li, Ying; Liu, Li-Yan; Chen, Yang; Zi, Tian-Qi; Du, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Yong-Shuai; Feng, Ren-Nan; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the association between the ratio of dietary branched chain amino acids (BCAA) and risk of obesity among young northern Chinese adults. A total of 948 randomly recruited participants were asked to finish our internet-based dietary questionnaire for the Chinese (IDQC). Associations between dietary BCAA ratio and prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity were analyzed. Furthermore, 90 subjects were randomly selected to explore the possible mechanism. Dietary BCAA ratio in obese participants was significantly lower than non-obese participants. We found negative correlations between the ratio of dietary BCAA and body mass index (BMI) (r = −0.197, p < 0.001) or waist circumference (r = −0.187, p < 0.001). Compared with those in the first quartile, the multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of the 3rd and 4th quartiles of dietary BCAA ratio for overweight/obesity were 0.508 (0.265–0.972) and 0.389 (0.193–0.783), respectively (all p < 0.05). After stratification by gender, the significance still existed in the 3rd and 4th quartile in males and the 4th quartile in females. For abdominal obesity, the multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of the 3rd and 4th quartile of dietary BCAA ratio were 0.351 (0.145–0.845) and 0.376 (0.161–0.876), respectively (all p < 0.05). This significance was stronger in males. Further studies indicated that dietary BCAA ratio was inversely associated with 2-h postprandial glucose (2 h-PG) and status of inflammation. In conclusion, a higher ratio of dietary BCAA is inversely associated with prevalence of obesity, postprandial glucose and status of inflammation in young northern Chinese adults. PMID:26593945

  4. The Ratio of Dietary Branched-Chain Amino Acids is Associated with a Lower Prevalence of Obesity in Young Northern Chinese Adults: An Internet-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Chuan; Li, Ying; Liu, Li-Yan; Chen, Yang; Zi, Tian-Qi; Du, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Yong-Shuai; Feng, Ren-Nan; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to examine the association between the ratio of dietary branched chain amino acids (BCAA) and risk of obesity among young northern Chinese adults. A total of 948 randomly recruited participants were asked to finish our internet-based dietary questionnaire for the Chinese (IDQC). Associations between dietary BCAA ratio and prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity were analyzed. Furthermore, 90 subjects were randomly selected to explore the possible mechanism. Dietary BCAA ratio in obese participants was significantly lower than non-obese participants. We found negative correlations between the ratio of dietary BCAA and body mass index (BMI) (r = -0.197, p < 0.001) or waist circumference (r = -0.187, p < 0.001). Compared with those in the first quartile, the multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of the 3rd and 4th quartiles of dietary BCAA ratio for overweight/obesity were 0.508 (0.265-0.972) and 0.389 (0.193-0.783), respectively (all p < 0.05). After stratification by gender, the significance still existed in the 3rd and 4th quartile in males and the 4th quartile in females. For abdominal obesity, the multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of the 3rd and 4th quartile of dietary BCAA ratio were 0.351 (0.145-0.845) and 0.376 (0.161-0.876), respectively (all p < 0.05). This significance was stronger in males. Further studies indicated that dietary BCAA ratio was inversely associated with 2-h postprandial glucose (2 h-PG) and status of inflammation. In conclusion, a higher ratio of dietary BCAA is inversely associated with prevalence of obesity, postprandial glucose and status of inflammation in young northern Chinese adults. PMID:26593945

  5. User Data on the Social Web: Authorship, Agency, and Appropriation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyman, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Social web services catalog users' activities across the Internet, aggregating, analyzing, and selling a vast array of user data to be used largely for consumer profiling and target marketing. This article interrogates the tacit agreements and terms-of-use policies that govern who owns user data, how it circulates, and how it can be used. Relying…

  6. Users Views about the Usability of Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koohang, Alex; Ondracek, James

    2005-01-01

    This study examined users' views about the usability of digital libraries' current and perceived importance. Age, gender, prior experience with the Internet, college status, and digital library proficiency are the independent variables. Users' current views about the usability of digital libraries and users perceived importance of digital library…

  7. Digital Archival Image Collections: Who Are the Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herold, Irene M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Archival digital image collections are a relatively new phenomenon in college library archives. Digitizing archival image collections may make them accessible to users worldwide. There has been no study to explore whether collections on the Internet lead to users who are beyond the institution or a comparison of users to a national or…

  8. Characteristics of Internet use in relation to game genre in Korean adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moon-Soo; Ko, Young-Hoon; Song, Hyoung-Seok; Kwon, Ku-Hyung; Lee, Hyeon-Soo; Nam, Min; Jung, In-Kwa

    2007-04-01

    As the number of internet users increases, a new game genre using the internet as a networking tool is emerging. Some game genres are regarded as having greater addiction potentials than others. Games and the internet are closely related. We investigated games frequently used by adolescents and classified each of them with the help of game professionals. We also examined internet use patterns to identify relationships between game genre and internet use patterns. 627 middle school and high school students (male 488, female 139) completed questionnaires concerning computer and game use patterns and Korean internet addiction scales. Game genres were divided into eight criteria (simulation, role playing game, web board, community, action, adventure, shooting, and sports). Using Korean internet addiction scales, 627 participants were divided into a normal group (474), a potential risk group (128), and a high-risk group (25). Each group showed significant differences in total internet addiction scores. We classified players into specific game users based upon the game types they most prefer. Role playing game users showed significantly higher internet addiction scores than web board and sports game users. Game and internet addictions are also connected with interpersonal relationship patterns. We suggest that users of some game genre have unique psychological addiction potentials that are different from others and that this influences both game selection and internet use. PMID:17474846

  9. Internet resources for the petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, A.

    1995-12-31

    You`ve sur`ed http://www.yahoo.com/Science/already, you`ve checked out your Federal Express package`s location at http://www.fedex.com/ and you`ve chuckled at the latest Dilbert cartoon at http://www.unitedmedia.com/comics/dilbert/ when all of a sudden your manager walks in and wants to know what you doing about declining production (in your field, in your wells, or in yourself). Consequently, some frustrated users of the INTERNET have become skeptical of the real business value the INTERNET provides to their company. Therefore, various INTERNET resources for oil companies and experiences of a reservoir engineering accessing those resources will be presented. Examples and opinions of the INTERNET delivering tangible benefit to our industry will be highlighted.

  10. A Role-Play Game to Facilitate the Development of Students' Reflective Internet Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Admiraal, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Although adolescents are currently the most frequent users of the Internet, many youngsters still have difficulties with a critical, reflective, and responsible use of the Internet. A study was carried out on teaching with a digital role-play game to increase students' reflective Internet skills. In this game, students had to promote a fictional…

  11. Purposes, Causes and Consequences of Excessive Internet Use among Turkish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akar, Filiz

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: Excessive internet use, particularly problematic and negative consequences of internet use, is rapidly increasing among children and adolescents throughout the World and in Turkey. While the internet provides potential advantages for users in terms of the academic support, sharing ideas & feelings, and freedom of expression,…

  12. Young Children's Internet Use at Home and School: Patterns and Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve Marie

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-eight children in first and second grade completed a 10-item rating scale on Internet use at home and school. Results suggested that, in general, more children used the Internet at school than at home but home-based use was more often perceived as enjoyable. Three patterns of Internet use emerged suggesting three types of young users:…

  13. Effects of Internet Connectedness and Information Literacy on Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Louis

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory research is to examine the inter-linkage among Internet connectedness, information literacy, and quality of life. Results from a telephone survey, based on a probability sample of 756 Internet users, found that Internet connectedness is not related to quality of life. However, there is a significant relationship…

  14. Internet-based versus Paper-and-Pencil Assessment: Measuring Career Decision-Making Difficulties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar; Saka, Noa

    2001-01-01

    The Career Decision-Making Difficulties Questionnaire was completed in a Hebrew paper version (n=417) and Internet version (n=837), showing similar internal consistency and reliability in both versions. Response pattern of 24% of Internet users was questionable. Comparison of results from English paper (n=403) and Internet (n=182) versions found…

  15. Cocaine-dependent adults and recreational cocaine users are more likely than controls to choose immediate unsafe sex over delayed safer sex.

    PubMed

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Johnson, Matthew W; Thompson-Lake, Daisy G Y; Wesley, Michael J; Lohrenz, Terry; Montague, P Read; Bickel, Warren K

    2016-08-01

    Cocaine users have a higher incidence of risky sexual behavior and HIV infection than nonusers. Our aim was to measure whether safer sex discount rates-a measure of the likelihood of having immediate unprotected sex versus waiting to have safer sex-differed between controls and cocaine users of varying severity. Of the 162 individuals included in the primary data analyses, 69 met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR) criteria for cocaine dependence, 29 were recreational cocaine users who did not meet the dependence criteria, and 64 were controls. Participants completed the Sexual Discounting Task, which measures a person's likelihood of using a condom when one is immediately available and how that likelihood decreases as a function of delay to condom availability with regard to 4 images chosen by the participants of hypothetical sexual partners differing in perceived desirability and likelihood of having a sexually transmitted infection. When a condom was immediately available, the stated likelihood of condom use sometimes differed between cocaine users and controls, which depended on the image condition. Even after controlling for rates of condom use when one is immediately available, the cocaine-dependent and recreational users groups were more sensitive to delay to condom availability than controls. Safer sex discount rates were also related to intelligence scores. The Sexual Discounting Task identifies delay as a key variable that impacts the likelihood of using a condom among these groups and suggests that HIV prevention efforts may be differentially effective based on an individual's safer sex discount rate. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27454677

  16. Remote Thermal Analysis Through the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malroy, Eric T.

    2002-07-01

    The Heater of the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) was modeled using SINDA/FLUINT thermal software. A description of the model is given. The project presented the opportunity of interfacing the thermal model with the Internet and was a demonstration that complex analysis is possible through the Internet. Some of the issues that need to be addressed related to interfacing software with the Internet are the following: justification for using the Internet, selection of the web server, choice of the CGI language, security of the system, communication among the parties, maintenance of state between web pages, and simultaneous users on the Internet system. The opportunities available for using the Internet for analysis are many and can present a significant jump in technology. This paper presents a vision how interfacing with the Internet could develop in the future. Using a separate Optical Internet (OI) for analysis, coupled with virtual reality analysis rooms (VRAR), could provide a synergistic environment to couple together engineering analysis within industry, academia, and government. The process of analysis could be broken down into sub-components so that specialization could occur resulting in superior quality, minimized cost and reduced time for engineering analysis and manufacturing. Some possible subcomponents of the system are solver routines, databases, Graphical User Interfaces, engineering design software, VRARs, computer processing, CAD systems, manufacturing, and a plethora of other options only limited by ones imagination. On a larger scope, the specialization of companies on the optical network would allow companies to rapidly construct and reconstruct their infrastructure based on changing economic conditions. This could transform business.

  17. Internet-Based Communication

    PubMed Central

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2015-01-01

    Google the question, “How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?,” and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting our preference for writing over speaking. I propose that our preference for communicating through Internet-based text derives from a fundamental feature of writing: In contrast to speech, which is most often synchronous, text is most often asynchronous. PMID:26330702

  18. Window to the World. Are You and Your Students Ready to Explore the Internet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seguin, Armand; Seguin, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Internet and offers suggestions for vocational educators to make the best use possible of the information offered. Includes information on electronic mail, listservs such as VOCNET, USENET user groups, and services such as AskERIC. Suggests that the Internet's usefulness is limited only by the user's level of commitment. (JOW)

  19. Determining the Navigational Aids Use on the Internet: The Information Technologies Teacher Candidates' Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzu, Abdullah; Firat, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    The Internet users who fail to cope with navigation may generally face various problems such as disorientation, distraction, low motivation and abandonment of information retrieval. Therefore, navigational aids are frequently used in today's Web browsers and Web sites to help users navigate on the Internet. However, it is asserted that…

  20. The Internet as a Source of Academic Research Information: Findings of Two Pilot Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibirige, Harry M.; DePalo, Lisa

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of information available on the Internet focuses on two pilot studies that investigated how academic users perceive search engines and subject-oriented databases as sources of topical information. Highlights include information seeking behavior of academic users; undergraduate users; graduate users; faculty; and implications for…

  1. The Internet: a new instrument in a virtual "doctor's bag".

    PubMed

    Glover, J; Grossetta Nardini, H K

    1996-07-01

    The Internet is a valuable professional tool, and savvy physicians should understand its strengths and weaknesses. This worldwide network of networks allows doctors to communicate using any of several common Internet tools-electronic mail, mailing lists, newsgroups, telnet, file transfer protocol, gopher, and the World Wide Web. Many sites on the World Wide Web are expressly designed for physicians, although users must be careful to evaluate information for accuracy and currency. In Connecticut, physicians can use CHIME-Net, which provides access to the Internet and easy exchange of financial and patient data. Physicians ready to plunge into the Internet should consult their hospital library or information services department for more information.

  2. Adding tools to the open source toolbox: The Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porth, Tricia

    1994-01-01

    The Internet offers researchers additional sources of information not easily available from traditional sources such as print volumes or commercial data bases. Internet tools such as e-mail and file transfer protocol (ftp) speed up the way researchers communicate and transmit data. Mosaic, one of the newest additions to the Internet toolbox, allows users to combine tools such as ftp, gopher, wide area information server, and the world wide web with multimedia capabilities. Mosaic has quickly become a popular means of making information available on the Internet because it is versatile and easily customizable.

  3. Social and Psychological Effects of the Internet Use

    PubMed Central

    Diomidous, Marianna; Chardalias, Kostis; Magita, Adrianna; Koutonias, Panagiotis; Panagiotopoulou, Paraskevi; Mantas, John

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Over the past two decades there was an upsurge of the use of Internet in human life. With this continuous development, Internet users are able to communicate with any part of the globe, to shop online, to use it as a mean of education, to work remotely and to conduct financial transactions. Unfortunately, this rapid development of the Internet has a detrimental impact in our life, which leads to various phenomena such as cyber bullying, cyber porn, cyber suicide, Internet addiction, social isolation, cyber racism etc. The main purpose of this paper is to record and analyze all these social and psychological effects that appears to users due to the extensive use of the Internet. Materials and Methods: This review study was a thorough search of bibliography data conducted through Internet and library research studies. Key words were extracted from search engines and data bases including Google, Yahoo, Scholar Google, PubMed. Findings: The findings of this study showed that the Internet offers a quick access to information and facilitates communication however; it is quite dangerous, especially for young users. For this reason, users should be aware of it and face critically any information that is handed from the website PMID:27041814

  4. The Use of the Internet for Alternative Views on Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgoin, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Today, the majority of American adults uses the internet and looks for health information online. Of interest in this dissertation are people who do not subscribe to mainstream views of health, and may use the internet to discover, bolster, or share their alternative views. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have named…

  5. Risks and threats from internet access: Protecting the institution

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, E.A.

    1994-12-31

    The Internet provides a number of capabilities to users. They can be divided into four general categories: (1) Email - to virtually anyone on an Internet node. (2) Telnet - a direct connection to remote computers on the Internet, providing access to files, indices and other information resources at those locations. (3) File Transfer Protocol (FTP) - a procedure which enables copying of files (documents, programs, pictures) between computing systems at different Internet locations. The ability to search for and retrieve files on the Internet may be accomplished with a variety of techniques having names like Gopher, Archie and Veronica. For our purposes, these fall into the FTP category. (4) News Groups - thousands of electronic discussion groups through which messages are disseminated to subscribing users at Internet locations. Each of these categories poses some threat to the institution providing Internet access to users. Those responsible for this resource must understand the threats and take appropriate action to protect both the resource and the institution. At Bentley College an Internet Policy (see Appendix A) is in place, which along with other policies and practices meets these challenges.

  6. How To Protect Children From Internet Predators: A Phenomenological Study.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Teenage Internet users are the fastest growing segment in the Internet user population. These teenagers are at risk of sexual assault from Internet predators. This phenomenological study explored teacher and counselors' perceptions of how to prevent this sexual assault. Twenty-five teacher and counselor participants were interviewed. A modified van Kaam method was used to analyze the data and develop themes. Participants stated that mainly the lack of parental support and social networking website were the circumstances leading to teenage Internet sexual assault, while teen needs and gratification usually played a role in teen encounters with predators on the Internet. There were 5 emergent themes in this phenomenological study and those themes were; lack of parental support, social networking websites and chat rooms, teenage need for relationships, instant gratification among teenagers, improved parental support. PMID:26799884

  7. Internet Evolution and the Role of Software Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zave, Pamela

    The classic Internet architecture is a victim of its own success. Having succeeded so well at empowering users and encouraging innovation, it has been made obsolete by explosive growth in users, traffic, applications, and threats. For the past decade, the networking community has been focused on the many deficiencies of the current Internet and the possible paths toward a better future Internet. This paper explains why the Internet is likely to architectures running on multiple virtual networks, rather than having a single architecture. In this context, there is an urgent need for research that starts from the requirements of Internet applications and works downward toward network resources, in addition to the predominantly bottom-up work of the networking community. This paper aims to encourage the software-engineering community to participate in this research by providing a starting point and a broad program of research questions and projects.

  8. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  9. Internet and Internet Use: Teacher Trainees' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinoglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the development and issues of internet and internet use. The study has a descriptive survey design and 185 randomly selected teacher trainees at Marmara University, Ataturk Education Faculty in the 2001-2002 academic year constitute the sample. Data were collected via a questionnaire prepared by the researcher…

  10. Social bonds and internet pornographic exposure among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mesch, Gustavo S

    2009-06-01

    Concern has grown regarding possible harm to the social and psychological development of children and adolescents exposed to Internet pornography. Parents, academics and researchers have documented pornography from the supply side, assuming that its availability explains consumption satisfactorily. The current paper explored the user's dimension, probing whether pornography consumers differed from other Internet users, as well as the social characteristics of adolescent frequent pornography consumers. Data from a 2004 survey of a national representative sample of the adolescent population in Israel were used (n=998). Adolescent frequent users of the Internet for pornography were found to differ in many social characteristics from the group that used the Internet for information, social communication and entertainment. Weak ties to mainstream social institutions were characteristic of the former group but not of the latter. X-rated material consumers proved to be a distinct sub-group at risk of deviant behaviour. PMID:18694593

  11. Shyness and locus of control as predictors of internet addiction and internet use.

    PubMed

    Chak, Katherine; Leung, Louis

    2004-10-01

    The new psychological disorder of Internet addiction is fast accruing both popular and professional recognition. Past studies have indicated that some patterns of Internet use are associated with loneliness, shyness, anxiety, depression, and self-consciousness, but there appears to be little consensus about Internet addiction disorder. This exploratory study attempted to examine the potential influences of personality variables, such as shyness and locus of control, online experiences, and demographics on Internet addiction. Data were gathered from a convenient sample using a combination of online and offline methods. The respondents comprised 722 Internet users mostly from the Net-generation. Results indicated that the higher the tendency of one being addicted to the Internet, the shyer the person is, the less faith the person has, the firmer belief the person holds in the irresistible power of others, and the higher trust the person places on chance in determining his or her own course of life. People who are addicted to the Internet make intense and frequent use of it both in terms of days per week and in length of each session, especially for online communication via e-mail, ICQ, chat rooms, newsgroups, and online games. Furthermore, full-time students are more likely to be addicted to the Internet, as they are considered high-risk for problems because of free and unlimited access and flexible time schedules. Implications to help professionals and student affairs policy makers are addressed.

  12. The pediatric Internet.

    PubMed

    Spooner, S A

    1996-12-01

    The Internet is a set of rules for computer communications that has created easy access to electronic mail, electronic mailing lists, and the World Wide Web. The "pediatric Internet" consists of a growing collection of Internet resources that deal specifically with the health care of the young. Locating this information, judging its quality, and determining its appropriate use presents difficulties, but the ubiquity of the Internet makes it imperative for child health professionals to learn the skills necessary to access and provide information via this medium. The Internet will be used increasingly for scientific publishing, the original purpose of the World Wide Web. This article presents basic definitions for the Internet, some characteristics of the pediatric Internet, guidance on how to locate information, and what the future of the pediatric Internet holds. PMID:8951274

  13. How Much Is Too Much to Pay for Internet Access? A Behavioral Economic Analysis of Internet Use.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Julie; Dakki, Michelle A

    2015-08-01

    The popularity of online recreational activities, such as social networking, has dramatically increased the amount of time spent on the Internet. Excessive or inappropriate use of the Internet can result in serious adverse consequences. The current study used a behavioral economic task to determine if the amount of time spent online by problematic and nonproblematic users can be modified by price. The Internet Purchase Task was used to determine how much time undergraduate students (N=233) would spend online at 13 different prices. Despite high demand for Internet access when access was free, time spent online by both problematic and nonproblematic users decreased dramatically, even at low prices. These results suggest that the amount of time spent online may be modified by having a tangible cost associated with use, whereas having free access to the Internet may encourage excessive, problematic use. PMID:26252930

  14. How Much Is Too Much to Pay for Internet Access? A Behavioral Economic Analysis of Internet Use.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Julie; Dakki, Michelle A

    2015-08-01

    The popularity of online recreational activities, such as social networking, has dramatically increased the amount of time spent on the Internet. Excessive or inappropriate use of the Internet can result in serious adverse consequences. The current study used a behavioral economic task to determine if the amount of time spent online by problematic and nonproblematic users can be modified by price. The Internet Purchase Task was used to determine how much time undergraduate students (N=233) would spend online at 13 different prices. Despite high demand for Internet access when access was free, time spent online by both problematic and nonproblematic users decreased dramatically, even at low prices. These results suggest that the amount of time spent online may be modified by having a tangible cost associated with use, whereas having free access to the Internet may encourage excessive, problematic use.

  15. Experimental Internet Environment Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.

    1998-01-01

    Geographically distributed project teams need an Internet based collaborative work environment or "Intranet." The Virtual Research Center (VRC) is an experimental Intranet server that combines several services such as desktop conferencing, file archives, on-line publishing, and security. Using the World Wide Web (WWW) as a shared space paradigm, the Graphical User Interface (GUI) presents users with images of a lunar colony. Each project has a wing of the colony and each wing has a conference room, library, laboratory, and mail station. In FY95, the VRC development team proved the feasibility of this shared space concept by building a prototype using a Netscape commerce server and several public domain programs. Successful demonstrations of the prototype resulted in approval for a second phase. Phase 2, documented by this report, will produce a seamlessly integrated environment by introducing new technologies such as Java and Adobe Web Links to replace less efficient interface software.

  16. Don't Just Sit There - Do Something!: Engaging and Empowering U.S. Adults Through Short, Funny, Internet Videos About Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portlock, J.; Laird, H.

    2015-12-01

    Communitopia, a 501(c)3 organization, uses humor, new media, and the short video format to engage and empower audiences and improve climate literacy. Our main project, the Don't Just Sit There - Do Something! video series (http://djst.tv), takes the complex subject of climate science, breaks it down into digestible nuggets of short, funny video, and couples it with easy actions viewers can take to make a difference. The series has 25 episodes so far, and more than 80,000 views on YouTube. We are reaching our target audience of high-school-age and adult viewers in the United States (94% of viewers are known to fit this demographic). Don't Just Sit There - Do Something! uses a strategic model for breaking through the fear and dread around climate change in the general population. It uses humor, positivity and brevity to frame the issue, and gives the audience simple actions designed to empower in each self-contained episode. We approach each piece of the climate puzzle with scientific rigor, and cite all our sources. Our approach is light-hearted and fun, because it is a more productive way to have a conversation about tough issues than scolding and guilt. The series is ongoing, and we are always focused on climate change. To determine the efficacy of our approach and efforts, we measure video views and other metrics through our YouTube channel, compile feedback and comments through YouTube and other social media outlets, and track actions taken through web metrics (click-through rates). We are also currently working with the Behavioral and Community Health Sciences Department at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health to evaluate the videos' impact. From August-October 2015, we are using an online survey to evaluate the Don't Just Sit There - Do Something! series. We will assess viewers' climate change education and awareness, commitment to support action steps that alleviate climate change, and inclination to support policy action before and

  17. Imagining the Digital Library in a Commercialized Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckart, Ronald J.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses digital library planning in light of Internet commerce and technological innovation in marketing and customer relations that are transforming user expectations about Web sites that offer products and services. Topics include user self-sufficiency; personalized service; artificial intelligence; collaborative filtering; and electronic…

  18. Basic Internet Software Toolkit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Once schools are connected to the Internet, the next step is getting network workstations configured for Internet access. This article describes a basic toolkit comprising software currently available on the Internet for free or modest cost. Lists URLs for Web browser, Telnet, FTP, file decompression, portable document format (PDF) reader,…

  19. Internet-Savvy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2003-01-01

    Describes national study of the attitudes and behaviors of middle and high school students who use the Internet. Finds that Internet-savvy students use the Internet as a virtual book and reference library, a tutor and study shortcut, a study group, a guidance counselor, and a locker, backpack, and notebook. Offers several explanations about the…

  20. Evaluating Internet Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Vicca, Edmund F.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Three articles on evaluation cover the use of the Internet as a reference resource and raise network policy issues: "The Internet as a Reference and Research Tool" (Edmund F. Santa Vicca); "NREN Update, 1993: Washington Policy" (Carolyn S. Elliot); and "Evaluating Physical Science Reference Sources on the Internet" (Susan S. Starr). (Contains 36…

  1. Advertising on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jugenheimer, Donald W.

    1996-01-01

    States that although many advertisers have intentions of utilizing the Internet for advertising, which can provide specific audience targeting and buyer/seller interactivity, few have been successful. Explains advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet for advertising purposes. Cites special problems with Internet advertising and successes…

  2. Online Community Use Predicts Abstinence in Combined Internet/Phone Intervention for Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Papandonatos, George D.; Erar, Bahar; Stanton, Cassandra A.; Graham, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the causal effects of online community use on 30-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 months among smokers randomized to combined Internet+Phone intervention for smoking cessation. Method Participants were N=399 adult smokers in the Internet+Phone arm of The iQUITT Study, a randomized trial of Internet and proactive telephone counseling for smoking cessation. All participants accessed a web-based smoking-cessation program with an established online community and received telephone counseling. Automated tracking metrics of passive (e.g., reading posts, viewing profiles) and active (e.g., writing posts, sending messages) community use were extracted at 3 months. Self-selected community use defines the groups of interest: None, Passive, and Both (passive+active). Inverse probability of treatment weighting corrected for baseline imbalances on demographic, smoking, and psychosocial variables. Propensity weights estimated via generalized boosted models were used to calculate Average Treatment Effects (ATE) and Average Treatment effects on the Treated (ATT). Results Patterns of community use were: None=145 (36.3%), Passive=82 (20.6%), and Both=172 (43.1%). ATE-weighted abstinence rates were: None=12.2% (95% CI=6.7–17.7); Passive=25.2% (95% CI=15.1–35.2); Both=35.5% (95% CI=28.1–42.9). ATT-weighted abstinence rates indicated even greater benefits of passive community use by non-users. Conclusions More than one third of participants who received telephone counseling and used the community both passively and actively achieved abstinence. Participation in an established online community as part of a combined Internet+phone intervention has the potential to promote short-term abstinence. Results also demonstrated that information and support that originate in the community can serve as a resource for all users. PMID:27100127

  3. Profiles of Internet Use among ALBE Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Jim I.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to create profiles of adult literacy and basic education (ALBE) instructors and their use of the Internet in their classrooms. I used Rogers' diffusion of innovations framework and results of a previous study to develop a 56-item survey. Twelve hundred surveys were distributed in 24 states; 219 were returned for a response rate…

  4. Characteristics of Internet Addiction/Pathological Internet Use in U.S. University Students: A Qualitative-Method Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; O’Brien, Jennifer E.; Snyder, Susan M.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have identified high rates and severe consequences of Internet Addiction/Pathological Internet Use (IA/PIU) in university students. However, most research concerning IA/PIU in U.S. university students has been conducted within a quantitative research paradigm, and frequently fails to contextualize the problem of IA/PIU. To address this gap, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study using the focus group approach and examined 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as intensive Internet users, spent more than 25 hours/week on the Internet for non-school or non-work-related activities and who reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. Students completed two IA/PIU measures (Young’s Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and participated in focus groups exploring the natural history of their Internet use; preferred online activities; emotional, interpersonal, and situational triggers for intensive Internet use; and health and/or psychosocial consequences of their Internet overuse. Students’ self-reports of Internet overuse problems were consistent with results of standardized measures. Students first accessed the Internet at an average age of 9 (SD = 2.7), and first had a problem with Internet overuse at an average age of 16 (SD = 4.3). Sadness and depression, boredom, and stress were common triggers of intensive Internet use. Social media use was nearly universal and pervasive in participants’ lives. Sleep deprivation, academic under-achievement, failure to exercise and to engage in face-to-face social activities, negative affective states, and decreased ability to concentrate were frequently reported consequences of intensive Internet use/Internet overuse. IA/PIU may be an underappreciated problem among U.S. university students and warrants additional research. PMID:25647224

  5. Characteristics of internet addiction/pathological internet use in U.S. university students: a qualitative-method investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; O'Brien, Jennifer E; Snyder, Susan M; Howard, Matthew O

    2015-01-01

    Studies have identified high rates and severe consequences of Internet Addiction/Pathological Internet Use (IA/PIU) in university students. However, most research concerning IA/PIU in U.S. university students has been conducted within a quantitative research paradigm, and frequently fails to contextualize the problem of IA/PIU. To address this gap, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study using the focus group approach and examined 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as intensive Internet users, spent more than 25 hours/week on the Internet for non-school or non-work-related activities and who reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. Students completed two IA/PIU measures (Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and participated in focus groups exploring the natural history of their Internet use; preferred online activities; emotional, interpersonal, and situational triggers for intensive Internet use; and health and/or psychosocial consequences of their Internet overuse. Students' self-reports of Internet overuse problems were consistent with results of standardized measures. Students first accessed the Internet at an average age of 9 (SD = 2.7), and first had a problem with Internet overuse at an average age of 16 (SD = 4.3). Sadness and depression, boredom, and stress were common triggers of intensive Internet use. Social media use was nearly universal and pervasive in participants' lives. Sleep deprivation, academic under-achievement, failure to exercise and to engage in face-to-face social activities, negative affective states, and decreased ability to concentrate were frequently reported consequences of intensive Internet use/Internet overuse. IA/PIU may be an underappreciated problem among U.S. university students and warrants additional research.

  6. Characteristics of internet addiction/pathological internet use in U.S. university students: a qualitative-method investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; O'Brien, Jennifer E; Snyder, Susan M; Howard, Matthew O

    2015-01-01

    Studies have identified high rates and severe consequences of Internet Addiction/Pathological Internet Use (IA/PIU) in university students. However, most research concerning IA/PIU in U.S. university students has been conducted within a quantitative research paradigm, and frequently fails to contextualize the problem of IA/PIU. To address this gap, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study using the focus group approach and examined 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as intensive Internet users, spent more than 25 hours/week on the Internet for non-school or non-work-related activities and who reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. Students completed two IA/PIU measures (Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and participated in focus groups exploring the natural history of their Internet use; preferred online activities; emotional, interpersonal, and situational triggers for intensive Internet use; and health and/or psychosocial consequences of their Internet overuse. Students' self-reports of Internet overuse problems were consistent with results of standardized measures. Students first accessed the Internet at an average age of 9 (SD = 2.7), and first had a problem with Internet overuse at an average age of 16 (SD = 4.3). Sadness and depression, boredom, and stress were common triggers of intensive Internet use. Social media use was nearly universal and pervasive in participants' lives. Sleep deprivation, academic under-achievement, failure to exercise and to engage in face-to-face social activities, negative affective states, and decreased ability to concentrate were frequently reported consequences of intensive Internet use/Internet overuse. IA/PIU may be an underappreciated problem among U.S. university students and warrants additional research. PMID:25647224

  7. Web Accessibility for Older Adults: A Comparative Analysis of Disability Laws.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Chen, Brian

    2015-10-01

    Access to the Internet is increasingly critical for health information retrieval, access to certain government benefits and services, connectivity to friends and family members, and an array of commercial and social services that directly affect health. Yet older adults, particularly those with disabilities, are at risk of being left behind in this growing age- and disability-based digital divide. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was designed to guarantee older adults and persons with disabilities equal access to employment, retail, and other places of public accommodation. Yet older Internet users sometimes face challenges when they try to access the Internet because of disabilities associated with age. Current legal interpretations of the ADA, however, do not consider the Internet to be an entity covered by law. In this article, we examine the current state of Internet accessibility protection in the United States through the lens of the ADA, sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, state laws and industry guidelines. We then compare U.S. rules to those of OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) countries, notably in the European Union, Canada, Japan, Australia, and the Nordic countries. Our policy recommendations follow from our analyses of these laws and guidelines, and we conclude that the biggest challenge in bridging the age- and disability-based digital divide is the need to extend accessibility requirements to private, not just governmental, entities and organizations. PMID:26156518

  8. Impact of smokeless tobacco packaging on perceptions and beliefs among youth, young adults, and adults in the U.S: findings from an internet-based cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research demonstrates that tobacco packaging elements (including health warning labels, descriptive characteristics, and corporate branding) are associated with knowledge of health risks and product appeal with cigarettes. Yet, little research has assessed this with smokeless tobacco (SLT) packaging. This study evaluates the association between three SLT packaging elements with knowledge of health risks and perceptions of novelty and appeal. Additionally, we assess how effects of these messages may differ across age groups, including youth (14-17 years), young adults (18-25 years), and older adults (26-65 years). Methods 1000 participants were administered a web-based survey in 2010 and shown three sets of SLT packs in random order, varied by descriptor (flavor descriptor vs. none), warning label format (graphic vs. text), and corporate branding (branded vs. plain packaging). Participants rated the packs compared with “no difference” on appeal, novelty, and risk perceptions associated with product use. Chi-square tests were used to test for significant differences in pack selections. Multinomial regression was employed to evaluate the association between effects of packaging elements and participant age. Results More respondents selected the pack with the graphic warning label as the pack to make them consider the health risks associated with SLT use, attract their attention, and be least attractive to a smoker. The product with the text warning label was the product someone their age would want to be seen using and would appeal to peers. The SLT pack with the flavor descriptor was not associated with health risks associated with product use. The pack with corporate branding was selected as more appealing, to attract attention, and one they would want to be seen using; the plain pack was less attractive to smokers. Youth and young adults were more likely to indicate that pack elements affected their perceptions of appeal and risk associated with SLT

  9. Cybersuicide: review of the role of the internet on suicide.

    PubMed

    Alao, Adekola O; Soderberg, Maureen; Pohl, Elyssa L; Alao, Abosede Lola

    2006-08-01

    The internet as a widespread source of communication is already having a significant influence in medicine and psychiatry. Although the internet has great potential in psychiatric education, clinical care, and research, its impact on social issues should not be underestimated. Firstly, the internet as a means of communication may encourage suicidal behavior by depicting ways by which suicide may be committed. Secondly, some internet websites may discourage people with mental illness from seeking psychiatric help, condone suicide, and forbid entry to anyone offering to discourage users from committing suicide. However, the internet could be a resource to help a potentially suicidal person get help, and can be used to identify those at risk for suicide, communicate with them, and potentially prevent suicide. If used appropriately, the internet is a powerful communication tool that can be used to benefit suicidal patients.

  10. Internet Use among Community College Students: Implications in Designing Healthcare Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanauer, David; Dibble, Emily; Fortin, Jennifer; Col, Nananda F.

    2004-01-01

    The Internet has become a commonly used venue for seeking healthcare information. Young adults search the Internet for health information more than any other group, yet little is known about use patterns among community college students. The authors surveyed a diverse community college to assess students' use of the Internet for health-related…

  11. Content Knowledge of the Internet Among Public Reference Librarians at the Cleveland Heights Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustine, Matthew J.

    The Internet is becoming an increasingly important medium of electronic information dissemination, and thus an increasingly important library reference tool. This study examines the Internet skills of a sample group of 15 public reference librarians in the Adult Services Department at the Cleveland Heights Public Library. The Internet skills that…

  12. Webpress: An Internet Outreach from NASA Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biezad, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    The Technology and Commercialization Office at NASA DRyden has developed many educational outreach programs for K-12 educators. This project concentrates on the internet portion of that effort, specifically focusing on the development of an internet tool for educators called Webpress. This tool will not only provide a user-friendly access to aeronautical topics and interesting individuals on the world wide web (web), but will also enable teachers to rapidly submit and display their own materials and links for use in the classroom.

  13. Internet recruitment and e-mail interviews in qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Rebekah J; Bowers, Barbara J

    2006-07-01

    In 2004, 111 million adults accessed the Internet looking for health and medical information. Qualitative researchers can apply long-standing principles of recruitment and interviewing to the Internet. The purpose of this article is to examine the theoretical and methodological aspects of Internet recruitment and e-mail interviewing. The authors address issues of appropriateness, adequacy, representativeness, sample bias, data fraud, flexibility and consistency in interviewing, timing, elimination of the need for transcription, oral versus written communication, reliability and validity, and ethical concerns. They include some practical suggestions on a research design for a qualitative study employing both Internet recruitment and e-mail interviewing.

  14. Sign language vocabulary development practices and internet use among educational interpreters.

    PubMed

    Storey, Brian C; Jamieson, Janet R

    2004-01-01

    Sign language interpreters working in schools often face isolation in terms of their sign language vocabulary development opportunities. The purposes of this study were to determine the key demographic characteristics of educational interpreters in British Columbia, to identify the resources they use to learn new vocabulary, and to shed light on their Internet use and access levels, with a view to exploring the viability of this resource as a tool for vocabulary development for interpreters working in educational settings. Key demographics associated with interpreters' access to time and materials in advance of a lesson were job title and graduation from an interpreter training program. Interpreters with job titles that reflected their status as interpreters had more preparatory time each week than interpreters who had job titles focused on their roles as educational assistants. Interpreters overwhelmingly expressed the need for continuing professional development with respect to vocabulary development. In terms of the resources currently used, human resources (colleagues, deaf adults) were used significantly more often than nonhuman (books, videotapes, Internet). The resource use results showed that convenience was more important than quality. Books were used more often than videotapes, CD-ROMs, and the Internet, although the latter three had higher percentages of very satisfied users than did books. The design and content of online vocabulary resources and limited interpreter preparation time were identified as current issues keeping the Internet from reaching its potential as an easily accessible visual resource. Recommendations aimed at enhancing the viability of the Internet as a vocabulary development tool for educational interpreters are discussed.

  15. Sitewide task team report for Internet policy

    SciTech Connect

    Aichele, D.R.

    1995-03-01

    The Internet is rapidly becoming the standard for communications, information transfer, and information sharing among U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) organizations. It has long been used by the major laboratories, but is now beginning to be used by headquarters staff to communicate with field offices and contractors and as the access point to DOE`s repositories of information. It will soon become key to efficient conduct of operations. Sites without effective access to the Internet will have to rely on secondary, less effective communications. Therefore, the task team believes it is essential that Hanford become a full participant in utilizing this resource. To make this happen an effective access and delivery infrastructure must be provided to DOE and contractor staff and standard ways of doing business on the Internet are required. Much of the technology exists today for robust electronic interchange of information. The use of this technology needs to be expanded and coordinated throughout the DOE and Hanford contractor community. As the use of Internet within DOE is advancing rapidly, it will become the preferred method for communication and information sharing within 5 years. The conclusion of the Internet Inter-Contractor task team is that the use of the Internet is essential to communicate as well as provide and obtain information and knowledge. The Hanford Site must foster, support, and implement necessary changes to the technology infrastructure to improve user access, maintain security, and assure we are effective participants in the networked community.

  16. Sex, Drugs (Methamphetamines), and the Internet: Increasing Syphilis Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in California, 2004–2008

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Michael C.; Lo, Terrence; Bernstein, Kyle T.; Aynalem, Getahun; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Bolan, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined primary and secondary syphilis cases among men who have sex with men (MSM) in California, and the association of methamphetamine use and Internet use to meet sex partners (Internet use) with number of sex partners. Methods. We analyzed California surveillance data for MSM who were diagnosed with syphilis between 2004 and 2008, to assess differences in the mean number of sex partners by methamphetamine use and mutually exclusive groups of patients reporting Internet use (Internet users). Results. Large proportions of patients reported methamphetamine use (19.2%) and Internet use (36.4%). From 2006 through 2008, Adam4Adam was the most frequently reported Web site statewide, despite temporal and regional differences in Web site usage. Methamphetamine users reported more sex partners (mean = 11.7) than nonmethamphetamine users (mean = 5.6; P < .001). Internet users reported more sex partners (mean = 9.8) than non-Internet users (mean = 5.0; P < .001). Multivariable analysis of variance confirmed an independent association of methamphetamine and Internet use with increased numbers of sex partners. Conclusions. Higher numbers of partners among MSM syphilis patients were associated with methamphetamine and Internet use. Collaboration between currently stand-alone interventions targeting methamphetamine users and Internet users may offer potential advances in sexually transmitted disease control efforts. PMID:23153138

  17. Older Adults' Use of Online and Offline Sources of Health Information and Constructs of Reliance and Self-Efficacy for Medical Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Hall, Amanda K; Bernhardt, Jay M; Dodd, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    We know little about older adults' use of online and offline health information sources for medical decision making despite increasing numbers of older adults who report using the Internet for health information to aid in patient-provider communication and medical decision making. Therefore we investigated older adult users and nonusers of online and offline sources of health information and factors related to medical decision making. Survey research was conducted using random digit dialing of Florida residents' landline telephones. The Decision Self-Efficacy Scale and the Reliance Scale were used to measure relationships between users and nonusers of online health information. Study respondents were 225 older adults (age range = 50-92 years, M = 68.9, SD = 10.4), which included users (n = 105) and nonusers (n = 119) of online health information. Users and nonusers differed in frequency and types of health sources sought. Users of online health information preferred a self-reliant approach and nonusers of online health information preferred a physician-reliant approach to involvement in medical decisions on the Reliance Scale. This study found significant differences between older adult users and nonusers of online and offline sources of health information and examined factors related to online health information engagement for medical decision making. PMID:26054777

  18. Internet-based interface for STRMDEPL08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Howard W.; Asher, A. Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    The core of the computer program STRMDEPL08 that estimates streamflow depletion by a pumping well with one of four analytical solutions was re-written in the Javascript software language and made available through an internet-based interface (web page). In the internet-based interface, the user enters data for one of the four analytical solutions, Glover and Balmer (1954), Hantush (1965), Hunt (1999), and Hunt (2003), and the solution is run for constant pumping for a desired number of simulation days. Results are returned in tabular form to the user. For intermittent pumping, the interface allows the user to request that the header information for an input file for the stand-alone executable STRMDEPL08 be created. The user would add the pumping information to this header information and run the STRMDEPL08 executable that is available for download through the U.S. Geological Survey. Results for the internet-based and stand-alone versions of STRMDEPL08 are shown to match.

  19. The effect of computer usage in internet café on cigarette smoking and alcohol use among chinese adolescents and youth: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liyun; Delva, Jorge

    2012-02-01

    We used longitudinal data to investigate the relationship between computer use in internet cafés and smoking/drinking behavior among Chinese adolescents and young adults. Data are from two waves of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (2004 and 2006). Fixed effects models were used to examine if changes in internet café use were associated with changes in cigarette smoking and drinking of alcohol. Male café users spent on average 17.3 hours in front of the computer/week. This was associated with an increase in the probability of being a current smoker by 13.3% and with smoking 1.7 more cigarettes. Female café users spent on average 11 hours on the computer/week. This was associated with an increase in the probability of drinking wine and/or liquor by 14.74% and was not associated with smoking. Internet cafés are an important venue by which adolescent and young adults in China are exposed to smoking and drinking. Multi-component interventions are needed ranging from policies regulating cigarette and alcohol availability in these venues to anti-tobacco campaigns aimed at the general population but also at individuals who frequent these establishments.

  20. The effect of computer usage in internet café on cigarette smoking and alcohol use among chinese adolescents and youth: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liyun; Delva, Jorge

    2012-02-01

    We used longitudinal data to investigate the relationship between computer use in internet cafés and smoking/drinking behavior among Chinese adolescents and young adults. Data are from two waves of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (2004 and 2006). Fixed effects models were used to examine if changes in internet café use were associated with changes in cigarette smoking and drinking of alcohol. Male café users spent on average 17.3 hours in front of the computer/week. This was associated with an increase in the probability of being a current smoker by 13.3% and with smoking 1.7 more cigarettes. Female café users spent on average 11 hours on the computer/week. This was associated with an increase in the probability of drinking wine and/or liquor by 14.74% and was not associated with smoking. Internet cafés are an important venue by which adolescent and young adults in China are exposed to smoking and drinking. Multi-component interventions are needed ranging from policies regulating cigarette and alcohol availability in these venues to anti-tobacco campaigns aimed at the general population but also at individuals who frequent these establishments. PMID:22470305