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Sample records for adult intestinal epithelium

  1. The crypt cycle. Crypt and villus production in the adult intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Totafurno, J; Bjerknes, M; Cheng, H

    1987-01-01

    We propose a model for the growth of individual crypts that is able to account for the observed changes in the number of cells in crypts under normal conditions, after irradiation, and after 30% resection. Parameter values for this model are estimated both for mouse and man, and detailed predictions of crypt growth rates are made. This model does not predict a steady-state crypt size; rather it suggests that crypts grow until they bifurcate. We therefore propose a crypt cycle (analogous to the cell cycle) and present evidence that most if not all crypts in the adult mouse are cycling asynchronously and independently. This evidence consists of four experiments that indicate that branching crypts are randomly distributed over the intestinal epithelium, that the plane of bifurcation of branching crypts is randomly oriented with respect to the villus base, and that the size distribution of crypts is consistent with an expanding crypt population. We also report for the first time evidence of villus production in the adult mouse intestinal epithelium. We conclude that the crypt and villus populations in the adult mouse are not in a steady state. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:3663832

  2. Ex vivo culture of the intestinal epithelium: strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    Leushacke, Marc; Barker, Nick

    2014-08-01

    Limited pools of resident adult stem cells are critical effectors of epithelial renewal in the intestine throughout life. Recently, significant progress has been made regarding the isolation and in vitro propagation of fetal and adult intestinal stem cells in mammals. It is now possible to generate ever-expanding, three-dimensional epithelial structures in culture that closely parallel the in vivo epithelium of the intestine. Growing such organotypic epithelium ex vivo facilitates a detailed description of endogenous niche factors or stem-cell characteristics, as they can be monitored in real time. Accordingly, this technology has already greatly contributed to our understanding of intestinal adult stem-cell renewal and differentiation. Transplanted organoids have also been proven to readily integrate into, and effect the long-term repair of, mouse colonic epithelia in vivo, establishing the organoid culture as a promising tool for adult stem cell/gene therapy. In another exciting development, novel genome-editing techniques have been successfully employed to functionally repair disease loci in cultured intestinal stem cells from human patients with a hereditary defect. It is anticipated that this technology will be instrumental in exploiting the regenerative medicine potential of human intestinal stem cells for treating human disorders in the intestinal tract and for creating near-physiological ex vivo models of human gastrointestinal disease.

  3. The 'de novo' DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3b compensates the Dnmt1-deficient intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Ellen N; Sheaffer, Karyn L; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2016-01-25

    Dnmt1 is critical for immediate postnatal intestinal development, but is not required for the survival of the adult intestinal epithelium, the only rapidly dividing somatic tissue for which this has been shown. Acute Dnmt1 deletion elicits dramatic hypomethylation and genomic instability. Recovery of DNA methylation state and intestinal health is dependent on the de novo methyltransferase Dnmt3b. Ablation of both Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b in the intestinal epithelium is lethal, while deletion of either Dnmt1 or Dnmt3b has no effect on survival. These results demonstrate that Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b cooperate to maintain DNA methylation and genomic integrity in the intestinal epithelium.

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Ellen N.; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is an ideal model system for the study of normal and pathological differentiation processes. The mammalian intestinal epithelium is a single cell layer comprised of proliferative crypts and differentiated villi. The crypts contain both proliferating and quiescent stem cell populations that self-renew and produce all the differentiated cell types, which are replaced every 3 to 5 days. The genetics of intestinal development, homeostasis, and disease are well defined, but less is known about the contribution of epigenetics in modulating these processes. Epigenetics refers to heritable phenotypic traits, including gene expression, which are independent of mutations in the DNA sequence. We have known for several decades that human colorectal cancers contain hypomethylated DNA, but the causes and consequences of this phenomenon are not fully understood. In contrast, tumor suppressor gene promoters are often hypermethylated in colorectal cancer, resulting in decreased expression of the associated gene. In this review, we describe the role that epigenetics plays in intestinal homeostasis and disease, with an emphasis on results from mouse models. We highlight the importance of producing and analyzing next-generation sequencing data detailing the epigenome from intestinal stem cell to differentiated intestinal villus cell. PMID:26220502

  5. The significance of small intestinal epithelium in gastric antral biopsies in children.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Arthur G

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal metaplasia of the gastric antrum is common in adults with chronic gastritis and occurs in Helicobacter -associated gastritis in children. This study examined the frequency and clinical correlates of intestinal epithelium in 1690 consecutive antral biopsies obtained from children over a 2-year period in a tertiary pediatric care facility. Intestinal epithelium in gastric glands not associated with overlying villi was present in 22 (1.3%) biopsies. These came from 20 patients, 2-17 years of age, none of whom had clinical or histologic evidence of Helicobacter infection or significant chronic gastritis. Eight (40%) had an antral pancreatic rest, 8 had some other localized antral abnormality, and 4 were endoscopically normal. Four additional patients with a pancreatic rest had no intestinal epithelium. Six surgically resected rests and 2 rests found at autopsy were also reviewed. Heterotopic intestinal epithelium was present in 1 of the 2 postmortem specimens but was absent from all 6 surgically resected lesions. No intestinal epithelium was present in 67 antral biopsies with Helicobacter gastritis observed during this same period. Although the intestinal epithelium in these patients could be metaplastic, it more likely represents inadvertent sampling of the gastroduodenal junction induced by a lesion in the distal antrum or a focus of heterotopic epithelium and might best be addressed in the surgical pathology report by a comment to this effect. The distinction from metaplasia is more than semantic, because a diagnosis of intestinal metaplasia can have adverse clinical implications and should be made with caution in a child.

  6. STUDIES ON SMALL INTESTINAL CRYPT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Jerry S.

    1963-01-01

    Small intestinal crypt epithelium obtained from normal fasting humans by peroral biopsy of the mucosa was studied with the electron microscope. Paneth cells were identified at the base of the crypts by their elaborate highly organized endoplasmic reticulum, large secretory granules, and small lysosome-like dense bodies within the cytoplasm. Undifferentiated cells were characterized by smaller cytoplasmic membrane-bounded granules which were presumed to be secretory in nature, a less elaborate endoplasmic reticulum, many unattached ribosomes and, in some cells, the presence of glycogen. Some undifferentiated cells at the base of the crypts contained lobulated nuclei and striking paranuclear accumulations of mitochondria. Membrane-bounded cytoplasmic fragments, probably originating from undifferentiated and Paneth cells, were frequently apparent within crypt lumina. Of the goblet cells, some were seen actively secreting mucus. In these, apical mucus appeared to exude into the crypt lumen between gaps in the microvilli. The membrane formerly surrounding the apical mucus appeared to fuse with and become part of the plasma membrane of the cell, suggesting a merocrine secretory mechanism. Enterochromaffin cells were identified by their location between the basal regions of other crypt cells and by their unique intracytoplasmic granules. PMID:14064112

  7. Identification of Lgr5-independent spheroid-generating progenitors of the mouse fetal intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Mustata, Roxana C; Vasile, Gabriela; Fernandez-Vallone, Valeria; Strollo, Sandra; Lefort, Anne; Libert, Frédérick; Monteyne, Daniel; Pérez-Morga, David; Vassart, Gilbert; Garcia, Marie-Isabelle

    2013-10-31

    Immortal spheroids were generated from fetal mouse intestine using the culture system initially developed to culture organoids from adult intestinal epithelium. Spheroid proportion progressively decreases from fetal to postnatal period, with a corresponding increase in production of organoids. Like organoids, spheroids show Wnt-dependent indefinite self-renewing properties but display a poorly differentiated phenotype reminiscent of incompletely caudalized progenitors. The spheroid transcriptome is strikingly different from that of adult intestinal stem cells, with minimal overlap of Wnt target gene expression. The receptor LGR4, but not LGR5, is essential for their growth. Trop2/Tacstd2 and Cnx43/Gja1, two markers highly enriched in spheroids, are expressed throughout the embryonic-day-14 intestinal epithelium. Comparison of in utero and neonatal lineage tracing using Cnx43-CreER and Lgr5-CreERT2 mice identified spheroid-generating cells as developmental progenitors involved in generation of the prenatal intestinal epithelium. Ex vivo, spheroid cells have the potential to differentiate into organoids, qualifying as a fetal type of intestinal stem cell.

  8. Cell dynamics in fetal intestinal epithelium: implications for intestinal growth and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Ann S.; Pressprich, Mark F.; Curley, Lauren B.; Hamilton, Kara L.; Margolis, Ben; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D.; Gumucio, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms that drive growth and remodeling of the early intestinal epithelium are poorly understood. Current dogma suggests that the murine fetal intestinal epithelium is stratified, that villi are formed by an epithelial remodeling process involving the de novo formation of apical surface at secondary lumina, and that radial intercalation of the stratified cells constitutes a major intestinal lengthening mechanism. Here, we investigate cell polarity, cell cycle dynamics and cell shape in the fetal murine intestine between E12.5 and E14.5. We show that, contrary to previous assumptions, this epithelium is pseudostratified. Furthermore, epithelial nuclei exhibit interkinetic nuclear migration, a process wherein nuclei move in concert with the cell cycle, from the basal side (where DNA is synthesized) to the apical surface (where mitosis takes place); such nuclear movements were previously misinterpreted as the radial intercalation of cells. We further demonstrate that growth of epithelial girth between E12.5 and E14.5 is driven by microtubule- and actinomyosin-dependent apicobasal elongation, rather than by progressive epithelial stratification as was previously thought. Finally, we show that the actin-binding protein Shroom3 is crucial for the maintenance of the single-layered pseudostratified epithelium. In mice lacking Shroom3, the epithelium is disorganized and temporarily stratified during villus emergence. These results favor an alternative model of intestinal morphogenesis in which the epithelium remains single layered and apicobasally polarized throughout early intestinal development. PMID:21880782

  9. Human milk hyaluronan enhances innate defense of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hill, David R; Rho, Hyunjin K; Kessler, Sean P; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K; de la Motte, Carol A

    2013-10-04

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn.

  10. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James; Nimmo, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia in the adult may be characterized as a disorder with dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine and resultant hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia. Most often, intestinal lymphangiectasia has been recorded in children, often in neonates, usually with other congenital abnormalities but initial definition in adults including the elderly has become increasingly more common. Shared clinical features with the pediatric population such as bilateral lower limb edema, sometimes with lymphedema, pleural effusion and chylous ascites may occur but these reflect the severe end of the clinical spectrum. In some, diarrhea occurs with steatorrhea along with increased fecal loss of protein, reflected in increased fecal alpha-1-antitrypsin levels, while others may present with iron deficiency anemia, sometimes associated with occult small intestinal bleeding. Most lymphangiectasia in adults detected in recent years, however, appears to have few or no clinical features of malabsorption. Diagnosis remains dependent on endoscopic changes confirmed by small bowel biopsy showing histological evidence of intestinal lymphangiectasia. In some, video capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy have revealed more extensive changes along the length of the small intestine. A critical diagnostic element in adults with lymphangiectasia is the exclusion of entities (e.g. malignancies including lymphoma) that might lead to obstruction of the lymphatic system and "secondary" changes in the small bowel biopsy. In addition, occult infectious (e.g. Whipple's disease from Tropheryma whipplei) or inflammatory disorders (e.g. Crohn's disease) may also present with profound changes in intestinal permeability and protein-losing enteropathy that also require exclusion. Conversely, rare B-cell type lymphomas have also been described even decades following initial

  11. Diet, Microbiome, and the Intestinal Epithelium: An Essential Triumvirate?

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Javier Rivera; Conlin, Victoria Susan; Jobin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents a critical barrier protecting the host against diverse luminal noxious agents, as well as preventing the uncontrolled uptake of bacteria that could activate an immune response in a susceptible host. The epithelial monolayer that constitutes this barrier is regulated by a meshwork of proteins that orchestrate complex biological function such as permeability, transepithelial electrical resistance, and movement of various macromolecules. Because of its key role in maintaining host homeostasis, factors regulating barrier function have attracted sustained attention from the research community. This paper will address the role of bacteria, bacterial-derived metabolism, and the interplay of dietary factors in controlling intestinal barrier function. PMID:23586037

  12. Expression of interleukin-18 by porcine airway and intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Muneta, Yoshihiro; Goji, Noriko; Tsuji, Noriko M; Mikami, Osamu; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Yokomizo, Yuichi; Mori, Yasuyuki

    2002-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the expression of interleukin-18 (IL-18) in porcine airway and intestinal epithelium. We found constitutive protein expression of precursor IL-18 in primary culture of porcine airway epithelium. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that porcine IL-18 was localized in the porcine airway epithelium and that it was significantly upregulated with experimental endotoxemia induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inoculation. We also confirmed by immunohistochemical staining that IL-18 was expressed in porcine intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, the concentration of IL-18 in intestinal cell lysates of 1-day-old piglets was about 3-fold and 6-fold less than that in those of 1-month-old and 6-month-old piglets, respectively. Exogenous IL-18 was able to induce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the peripheral blood of 1-day-old piglets, whereas concanavalin A (ConA) was not able to induce IFN-gamma in the same condition. These results suggest that mucosal epithelial cells are among the major sources of IL-18 in pig and that IL-18 may be useful as a therapeutic agent for the enhancement of immune responses and as a vaccine adjuvant, especially in neonatal piglets.

  13. Regulation and expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transcripts in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Li, M; Hurren, R; Zastawny, R L; Ling, V; Buick, R N

    1999-01-01

    A paucity of information exists on the regulation of gene expression in the undifferentiated intestine. The intestinal epithelium is one of the few normal tissues expressing the multidrug resistance (MDR) genes that confer the multidrug resistant phenotype to a variety of tumours. Expression of mdr1a has been observed in the primitive rat intestinal epithelial cell line, IEC-18. It is hypothesized that characterization of MDR gene expression in IEC-18 cells will provide insight into gene regulation in undifferentiated intestinal cells. A series of hamster mdr1a promoter deletion constructs was studied in IEC-18 and a region with 12–13-fold enhancer activity was identified. This region was shown to function in an orientation- and promoter context-independent manner, specifically in IEC-18 cells. Unexpectedly, Northern probing revealed a greater expression of mdr1b than mdr1a in IEC-18 cells. A quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay was used to compare the relative expression of MDR genes in IEC cells, fetal intestine, and in the undifferentiated and differentiated components of adult intestinal epithelium. MDR transcript levels in IEC cells were found to resemble those of fetal intestine and small intestinal crypts, where a conversion from mixed mdr1a/mdr1b to predominantly mdr1a expression occurs as cells mature. This work describes two contributions to the field of gene regulation in the undifferentiated intestine – first, the initial characterization of a putative mdr1a enhancer region with specificity for primitive intestinal cells and secondly, the first report of mdr1b detection in the intestine and its expression in primitive cell types. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10376961

  14. Intermediate Filaments and Polarization in the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Coch, Richard A.; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic intermediate filament cytoskeleton provides a tissue-specific three-dimensional scaffolding with unique context-dependent organizational features. This is particularly apparent in the intestinal epithelium, in which the intermediate filament network is localized below the apical terminal web region and is anchored to the apical junction complex. This arrangement is conserved from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The review summarizes compositional, morphological and functional features of the polarized intermediate filament cytoskeleton in intestinal cells of nematodes and mammals. We emphasize the cross talk of intermediate filaments with the actin- and tubulin-based cytoskeleton. Possible links of the intermediate filament system to the distribution of apical membrane proteins and the cell polarity complex are highlighted. Finally, we discuss how these properties relate to the establishment and maintenance of polarity in the intestine. PMID:27429003

  15. Metabolic competence and susceptibility of intestinal epithelium to genotoxic injury during regeneration.

    PubMed

    Patel, H R; Hewer, A; Phillips, D H; Hayes, J D; Wolf, C R; Campbell, F C

    1997-11-01

    The carcinogenic potency of many mutagens is increased in conditions of tissue regeneration. This involves fundamental changes of cellular division and differentiation, in intestinal epithelium. However, effects on epithelial capacity for carcinogen metabolism and susceptibility to genotoxic injury are unknown. Using a novel rat model, this study assessed expression of cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenases (Cyps), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase (UGT) in intestinal epithelium during sequential stages of regeneration. Enzyme induction and DNA adduct formation were also assessed after benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) exposure. Control assays were carried out in normal intestinal epithelium. Fewer phase I and II xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes were expressed in regenerating intestinal epithelium than in normal control intestinal epithelium (GSTA3, UGT in regeneration vs Cyp2B, GSTA1/2, GSTA4, GSTP1, UGT in control). Benzo[a]pyrene induced GSTA3 and UGT in regeneration vs Cyp1A, Cyp2B, GSTA1/2, GSTA3, GSTA4, GSTP1 and UGT in control normal intestinal epithelium. Benzo[a]pyrene induced low levels of GSTA3 in early regenerating intestinal epithelium but induction increased by >2-fold at late stage regeneration. Higher levels of benzo[a]pyrene 7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE) DNA adducts were formed at early stages of regeneration, than at later stages. Intestinal epithelium displayed reduced metabolic competence and differential susceptibility to genotoxic injury from BaP, during regeneration.

  16. Cytoskeleton as a target for injury in damaged intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Miller, T A; Smith, G S; Banan, A; Kokoska, E R

    2000-10-15

    This report summarizes the findings of a series of studies undertaken to discern the role of the cytoskeleton in intestinal injury and defense. Two established cell lines were used for these studies. IEC-6 cells (a rat intestinal cell line) were incubated in Eagle's minimal essential medium with and without 16, 16 dimethyl prostaglandin E(2) (dmPGE(2); 2.6 microM) for 15 minutes and subsequently incubated in medium containing 10% ethanol (EtOH). The effects on cell viability and the actin cytoskeleton were then determined. Using a similar protocol, Caco-2 cells (a human colonic cell line) were employed to assess the microtubule cytoskeleton under these conditions. In both cell lines, EtOH extensively disrupted the cytoskeletal component being evaluated coincident with adversely affecting cell viability. Pretreatment with dmPGE(2) increased cell viability and abolished the disruptive effects on both the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton in cells exposed to EtOH. Prior incubation with cytochalasin D, an actin disruptive agent, prevented the protective capabilities of dmPGE(2) in IEC-6 cells challenged with EtOH. Phalloidin, an actin stabilizing agent, demonstrated similar effects to that of dmPGE(2) by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton and preserving cellular viability in IEC-6 cells in response to EtOH. In Caco-2 cells, taxol, a microtubule stabilizing agent, mimicked the effects of dmPGE(2) by increasing cell viability in cells exposed to EtOH and enhancing microtubular integrity. In contrast, pretreatment with colchicine, an inhibitor of microtubule integrity, prevented the protective effects of dmPGE(2). These findings support the hypothesis that the cytoskeleton may be a major target for injury in damaged intestinal epithelium, and that the protective action of dmPGE(2) is orchestrated through preservation of this target.

  17. Age-Dependent TLR3 Expression of the Intestinal Epithelium Contributes to Rotavirus Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Johanna; Stockinger, Silvia; Torow, Natalia; Smoczek, Anna; Lindner, Cornelia; McInerney, Gerald; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Baumann, Ulrich; Pabst, Oliver; Bleich, André; Hornef, Mathias W.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhea worldwide and exhibits a pronounced small intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) tropism. Both human infants and neonatal mice are highly susceptible, whereas adult individuals remain asymptomatic and shed only low numbers of viral particles. Here we investigated age-dependent mechanisms of the intestinal epithelial innate immune response to rotavirus infection in an oral mouse infection model. Expression of the innate immune receptor for viral dsRNA, Toll-like receptor (Tlr) 3 was low in the epithelium of suckling mice but strongly increased during the postnatal period inversely correlating with rotavirus susceptibility, viral shedding and histological damage. Adult mice deficient in Tlr3 (Tlr3−/−) or the adaptor molecule Trif (TrifLps2/Lps2) exerted significantly higher viral shedding and decreased epithelial expression of proinflammatory and antiviral genes as compared to wild-type animals. In contrast, neonatal mice deficient in Tlr3 or Trif did not display impaired cell stimulation or enhanced rotavirus susceptibility. Using chimeric mice, a major contribution of the non-hematopoietic cell compartment in the Trif-mediated antiviral host response was detected in adult animals. Finally, a significant age-dependent increase of TLR3 expression was also detected in human small intestinal biopsies. Thus, upregulation of epithelial TLR3 expression during infancy might contribute to the age-dependent susceptibility to rotavirus infection. PMID:22570612

  18. Effect of syngeneic thymocytes on proliferation of the small intestinal epithelium in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shmakov, A.N.; Aparovich, G.G.; Trufakin, V.A.

    1986-12-01

    This paper describes the study of the action of syngeneic thymocytes on proliferation of the epithelium of the mouse small intestine. The mice were injected with /sup 3/H-thymidine in the experiments. Under the experimental conditions presented here, syngeneic thymocytes can reduce the number of DNA-synthesizing cells in the intestinal epithelium, causing narrowing of the zone of proliferation and enlargement of the zone of differentiation of the enterocytes.

  19. Sox9 regulates cell proliferation and is required for Paneth cell differentiation in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bastide, Pauline; Darido, Charbel; Pannequin, Julie; Kist, Ralf; Robine, Sylvie; Marty-Double, Christiane; Bibeau, Frédéric; Scherer, Gerd; Joubert, Dominique; Hollande, Frédéric; Blache, Philippe; Jay, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    The HMG-box transcription factor Sox9 is expressed in the intestinal epithelium, specifically, in stem/progenitor cells and in Paneth cells. Sox9 expression requires an active β-catenin–Tcf complex, the transcriptional effector of the Wnt pathway. This pathway is critical for numerous aspects of the intestinal epithelium physiopathology, but processes that specify the cell response to such multipotential signals still remain to be identified. We inactivated the Sox9 gene in the intestinal epithelium to analyze its physiological function. Sox9 inactivation affected differentiation throughout the intestinal epithelium, with a disappearance of Paneth cells and a decrease of the goblet cell lineage. Additionally, the morphology of the colon epithelium was severely altered. We detected general hyperplasia and local crypt dysplasia in the intestine, and Wnt pathway target genes were up-regulated. These results highlight the central position of Sox9 as both a transcriptional target and a regulator of the Wnt pathway in the regulation of intestinal epithelium homeostasis. PMID:17698607

  20. When Insult Is Added to Injury: Cross Talk between ILCs and Intestinal Epithelium in IBD.

    PubMed

    van der Gracht, Esmé; Zahner, Sonja; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by an impairment of the integrity of the mucosal epithelial barrier, which causes exacerbated inflammation of the intestine. The intestinal barrier is formed by different specialized epithelial cells, which separate the intestinal lumen from the lamina propria. In addition to its crucial role in protecting the body from invading pathogens, the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal homeostasis by its biochemical properties and communication to underlying immune cells. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently described population of lymphocytes that have been implicated in both mucosal homeostasis and inflammation. Recent findings indicate a critical feedback loop in which damaged epithelium activates these innate immune cells to restore epithelial barrier function. This review will focus on the signalling pathways between damaged epithelium and ILCs involved in repair of the epithelial barrier and tissue homeostasis and the relationship of these processes with the control of IBD.

  1. When Insult Is Added to Injury: Cross Talk between ILCs and Intestinal Epithelium in IBD

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by an impairment of the integrity of the mucosal epithelial barrier, which causes exacerbated inflammation of the intestine. The intestinal barrier is formed by different specialized epithelial cells, which separate the intestinal lumen from the lamina propria. In addition to its crucial role in protecting the body from invading pathogens, the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal homeostasis by its biochemical properties and communication to underlying immune cells. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently described population of lymphocytes that have been implicated in both mucosal homeostasis and inflammation. Recent findings indicate a critical feedback loop in which damaged epithelium activates these innate immune cells to restore epithelial barrier function. This review will focus on the signalling pathways between damaged epithelium and ILCs involved in repair of the epithelial barrier and tissue homeostasis and the relationship of these processes with the control of IBD. PMID:27578924

  2. Trop2 marks transient gastric fetal epithelium and adult regenerating cells after epithelial damage.

    PubMed

    Fernandez Vallone, Valeria; Leprovots, Morgane; Strollo, Sandra; Vasile, Gabriela; Lefort, Anne; Libert, Frederick; Vassart, Gilbert; Garcia, Marie-Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    Mouse fetal intestinal progenitors lining the epithelium prior to villogenesis grow as spheroids when cultured ex vivo and express the transmembrane glycoprotein Trop2 as a marker. Here, we report the characterization of Trop2-expressing cells from fetal pre-glandular stomach, growing as immortal undifferentiated spheroids, and their relationship with gastric development and regeneration. Trop2(+) cells generating gastric spheroids differed from adult glandular Lgr5(+) stem cells, but appeared highly related to fetal intestinal spheroids. Although they shared a common spheroid signature, intestinal and gastric fetal spheroid-generating cells expressed organ-specific transcription factors and were committed to intestinal and glandular gastric differentiation, respectively. Trop2 expression was transient during glandular stomach development, being lost at the onset of gland formation, whereas it persisted in the squamous forestomach. Undetectable under homeostasis, Trop2 was strongly re-expressed in glands after acute Lgr5(+) stem cell ablation or following indomethacin-induced injury. These highly proliferative reactive adult Trop2(+) cells exhibited a transcriptome displaying similarity with that of gastric embryonic Trop2(+) cells, suggesting that epithelium regeneration in adult stomach glands involves the partial re-expression of a fetal genetic program.

  3. Role of GATA factors in development, differentiation, and homeostasis of the small intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Boaz E.; Stapleton, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium develops from embryonic endoderm into a highly specialized layer of cells perfectly suited for the digestion and absorption of nutrients. The development, differentiation, and regeneration of the small intestinal epithelium require complex gene regulatory networks involving multiple context-specific transcription factors. The evolutionarily conserved GATA family of transcription factors, well known for its role in hematopoiesis, is essential for the development of endoderm during embryogenesis and the renewal of the differentiated epithelium in the mature gut. We review the role of GATA factors in the evolution and development of endoderm and summarize our current understanding of the function of GATA factors in the mature small intestine. We offer perspective on the application of epigenetics approaches to define the mechanisms underlying context-specific GATA gene regulation during intestinal development. PMID:24436352

  4. Epithelium

    MedlinePlus

    The term "epithelium" refers to layers of cells that line hollow organs and glands. It is also those cells that make ... Epithelium. In: Kierszenbaum AL, Tres LL. Histology and Cell Biology - An Introduction to Pathology , 3rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  5. Robust bioengineered 3D functional human intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Lin, Yinan; Davis, Kimberly M.; Wang, Qianrui; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Li, Chunmei; Isberg, Ralph R.; Kumamoto, Carol A.; Mecsas, Joan; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal functions are central to human physiology, health and disease. Options to study these functions with direct relevance to the human condition remain severely limited when using conventional cell cultures, microfluidic systems, organoids, animal surrogates or human studies. To replicate in vitro the tissue architecture and microenvironments of native intestine, we developed a 3D porous protein scaffolding system, containing a geometrically-engineered hollow lumen, with adaptability to both large and small intestines. These intestinal tissues demonstrated representative human responses by permitting continuous accumulation of mucous secretions on the epithelial surface, establishing low oxygen tension in the lumen, and interacting with gut-colonizing bacteria. The newly developed 3D intestine model enabled months-long sustained access to these intestinal functions in vitro, readily integrable with a multitude of different organ mimics and will therefore ensure a reliable ex vivo tissue system for studies in a broad context of human intestinal diseases and treatments. PMID:26374193

  6. Robust bioengineered 3D functional human intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Lin, Yinan; Davis, Kimberly M; Wang, Qianrui; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Li, Chunmei; Isberg, Ralph R; Kumamoto, Carol A; Mecsas, Joan; Kaplan, David L

    2015-09-16

    Intestinal functions are central to human physiology, health and disease. Options to study these functions with direct relevance to the human condition remain severely limited when using conventional cell cultures, microfluidic systems, organoids, animal surrogates or human studies. To replicate in vitro the tissue architecture and microenvironments of native intestine, we developed a 3D porous protein scaffolding system, containing a geometrically-engineered hollow lumen, with adaptability to both large and small intestines. These intestinal tissues demonstrated representative human responses by permitting continuous accumulation of mucous secretions on the epithelial surface, establishing low oxygen tension in the lumen, and interacting with gut-colonizing bacteria. The newly developed 3D intestine model enabled months-long sustained access to these intestinal functions in vitro, readily integrable with a multitude of different organ mimics and will therefore ensure a reliable ex vivo tissue system for studies in a broad context of human intestinal diseases and treatments.

  7. Crosstalk between B lymphocytes, microbiota and the intestinal epithelium governs immunity versus metabolism in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Shulzhenko, Natalia; Morgun, Andrey; Hsiao, William; Battle, Michele; Yao, Michael; Gavrilova, Oksana; Orandle, Marlene; Mayer, Lloyd; Macpherson, Andrew J; McCoy, Kathy D; Fraser-Liggett, Claire; Matzinger, Polly

    2014-01-01

    Using a systems biology approach, we discovered and dissected a three-way interaction between the immune system, the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota. We found that, in the absence of B cells, or of IgA, and in the presence of the microbiota, the intestinal epithelium launches its own protective mechanisms, upregulating interferon-inducible immune response pathways and simultaneously repressing Gata4-related metabolic functions. This shift in intestinal function leads to lipid malabsorption and decreased deposition of body fat. Network analysis revealed the presence of two interconnected epithelial-cell gene networks, one governing lipid metabolism and another regulating immunity, that were inversely expressed. Gene expression patterns in gut biopsies from individuals with common variable immunodeficiency or with HIV that also have intestinal malabsorption were very similar to those of the B cell–deficient mice, providing a possible explanation for a longstanding enigmatic association between immunodeficiency and defective lipid absorption in humans. PMID:22101768

  8. Crosstalk between B lymphocytes, microbiota and the intestinal epithelium governs immunity versus metabolism in the gut.

    PubMed

    Shulzhenko, Natalia; Morgun, Andrey; Hsiao, William; Battle, Michele; Yao, Michael; Gavrilova, Oksana; Orandle, Marlene; Mayer, Lloyd; Macpherson, Andrew J; McCoy, Kathy D; Fraser-Liggett, Claire; Matzinger, Polly

    2011-11-20

    Using a systems biology approach, we discovered and dissected a three-way interaction between the immune system, the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota. We found that, in the absence of B cells, or of IgA, and in the presence of the microbiota, the intestinal epithelium launches its own protective mechanisms, upregulating interferon-inducible immune response pathways and simultaneously repressing Gata4-related metabolic functions. This shift in intestinal function leads to lipid malabsorption and decreased deposition of body fat. Network analysis revealed the presence of two interconnected epithelial-cell gene networks, one governing lipid metabolism and another regulating immunity, that were inversely expressed. Gene expression patterns in gut biopsies from individuals with common variable immunodeficiency or with HIV infection and intestinal malabsorption were very similar to those of the B cell-deficient mice, providing a possible explanation for a longstanding enigmatic association between immunodeficiency and defective lipid absorption in humans.

  9. Dynamic T cell migration program provides resident memory within intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Daniel; Vezys, Vaiva; Wherry, E. John; Duraiswamy, Jaikumar; Akondy, Rama; Wang, Jun; Casey, Kerry A.; Barber, Daniel L.; Kawamura, Kim S.; Fraser, Kathryn A.; Webby, Richard J.; Brinkmann, Volker; Butcher, Eugene C.; Newell, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Migration to intestinal mucosa putatively depends on local activation because gastrointestinal lymphoid tissue induces expression of intestinal homing molecules, whereas skin-draining lymph nodes do not. This paradigm is difficult to reconcile with reports of intestinal T cell responses after alternative routes of immunization. We reconcile this discrepancy by demonstrating that activation within spleen results in intermediate induction of homing potential to the intestinal mucosa. We further demonstrate that memory T cells within small intestine epithelium do not routinely recirculate with memory T cells in other tissues, and we provide evidence that homing is similarly dynamic in humans after subcutaneous live yellow fever vaccine immunization. These data explain why systemic immunization routes induce local cell-mediated immunity within the intestine and indicate that this tissue must be seeded with memory T cell precursors shortly after activation. PMID:20156972

  10. Probiotic-induced changes in the intestinal epithelium: implications in gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, B S

    2009-01-01

    There is resurgent interest in the use of probiotics to maintain gastrointestinal and systemic health, driven by recent advances in knowledge of bacterial interactions with the epithelium and innate immune system of the intestine. The effects of probiotic bacteria on the intestinal epithelium and their downstream consequences are reviewed. Probiotics prevent pathogen adherence and invasion of the epithelium, partly by blocking adherence sites but also by upregulating gene expression of MUC2 and of antimicrobial peptides. Metabolic effects of probiotics on the intestinal epithelium include production of short chain fatty acids which influence epithelial cell metabolism, turnover and apoptosis. Bacterial metabolism of unabsorbed dietary constituents with production of free radicals and phenolic metabolites can lead to DNA damage and cancer; probiotics restore eubiosis and potentially prevent this. Probiotics alter expression and redistribution of tight junction proteins and reduce intestinal permeability limiting absorption of noxious molecules from the gut lumen. Most studied are the effects of probiotics on epithelial cells which are the first line of innate immune-capable cells that encounter luminal flora. Probiotics, through secreted molecules, influence the innate inflammatory response of epithelial cells to stimuli from the gut lumen, and reduce mucosal inflammation. Through effects on dendritic, and possibly epithelial, cells they influence naïve T cells in the lamina propria of the gut and thus influence adaptive immunity. These varied effects of probiotics have implications for the treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases including antibiotic-associated colitis, acute gastroenteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, and irritable bowel syndrome.

  11. Regenerative Inflammation: Lessons from Drosophila Intestinal Epithelium in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Panayidou, Stavria; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is widely recognized as a pivotal player in health and disease. Defined cytologically as the infiltration of leukocytes in the lamina propria layer of the intestine, it can damage the epithelium and, on a chronic basis, induce inflammatory bowel disease and potentially cancer. The current view thus dictates that blood cell infiltration is the instigator of intestinal inflammation and tumor-promoting inflammation. This is based partially on work in humans and mice showing that intestinal damage during microbially mediated inflammation activates phagocytic cells and lymphocytes that secrete inflammatory signals promoting tissue damage and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, extensive parallel work in the Drosophila midgut shows that intestinal epithelium damage induces inflammatory signals and growth factors acting mainly in a paracrine manner to induce intestinal stem cell proliferation and tumor formation when genetically predisposed. This is accomplished without any apparent need to involve Drosophila hemocytes. Therefore, recent work on Drosophila host defense to infection by expanding its main focus on systemic immunity signaling pathways to include the study of organ homeostasis in health and disease shapes a new notion that epithelially emanating cytokines and growth factors can directly act on the intestinal stem cell niche to promote “regenerative inflammation” and potentially cancer. PMID:25437036

  12. Microfold (M) cells: important immunosurveillance posts in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Mabbott, Neil A.; Donaldson, David S.; Ohno, Hiroshi; Williams, Ifor R.; Mahajan, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The transcytosis of antigens across the gut epithelium by microfold cells (M cells) is important for the induction of efficient immune responses to some mucosal antigens in Peyer’s patches. Recently, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the factors that influence the development and function of M cells. This review highlights these important advances, with particular emphasis on: the host genes which control the functional maturation of M cells; how this knowledge has led to the rapid advance in our understanding of M-cell biology in the steady-state and during aging; molecules expressed on M cells which appear to be used as “immunosurveillance” receptors to sample pathogenic microorganisms in the gut; how certain pathogens appear to exploit M cells to infect the host; and finally how this knowledge has been used to specifically target antigens to M cells to attempt to improve the efficacy of mucosal vaccines. PMID:23695511

  13. Age-specific colonization of porcine intestinal epithelium by 987P-piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, E A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal (less than 1-day-old), 3- and 7-day old, and older (3-week-old postweaning) pigs were challenged by intragastric inoculation with 987P-piliated (987P+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) 987. Neonatal pigs were colonized (i.e., there were greater than or equal to 10(8) CFU of test strain per 10-cm ileal segment) and developed diarrhea. Intestinal colonization and the incidence and severity of diarrhea were lower in 3- and 7-day old pigs than in neonates. Older pigs were not colonized and did not develop diarrhea following oral inoculation with five strains of 987P+ ETEC. Strain 987 (987P+) adhered in vitro to intestinal epithelial cell brush borders isolated from both neonatal (sensitive) and older (resistant) pigs. The in vivo growth and expression of 987P pilus by strain 987 in ligated ileal loops created in neonatal and older pigs were similar. The in vivo adherence of 987P+ ETEC to intestinal epithelium in ligated ileal loops in neonatal and older pigs was compared. In neonatal pigs, most of the bacteria were in layers associated with the villous epithelium. In older pigs, most of the bacteria were associated with mucus-like material in the intestinal lumen. We concluded that swine develop an innate resistance to 987P+ ETEC by 3 weeks of age. This resistance does not appear to be due to an absence of 987P-specific receptors in the intestines of the older pig or to an inability of 987P+ bacteria to grow and express pili in the older pig. We hypothesized that the resistance of older pigs to 987P-mediated disease is due to release of 987P-specific receptors into the intestinal lumen, where these receptors facilitate bacterial clearance rather than bacterial adherence to intestinal epithelium and colonization. Images PMID:2562837

  14. Age-specific colonization of porcine intestinal epithelium by 987P-piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dean, E A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal (less than 1-day-old), 3- and 7-day old, and older (3-week-old postweaning) pigs were challenged by intragastric inoculation with 987P-piliated (987P+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) 987. Neonatal pigs were colonized (i.e., there were greater than or equal to 10(8) CFU of test strain per 10-cm ileal segment) and developed diarrhea. Intestinal colonization and the incidence and severity of diarrhea were lower in 3- and 7-day old pigs than in neonates. Older pigs were not colonized and did not develop diarrhea following oral inoculation with five strains of 987P+ ETEC. Strain 987 (987P+) adhered in vitro to intestinal epithelial cell brush borders isolated from both neonatal (sensitive) and older (resistant) pigs. The in vivo growth and expression of 987P pilus by strain 987 in ligated ileal loops created in neonatal and older pigs were similar. The in vivo adherence of 987P+ ETEC to intestinal epithelium in ligated ileal loops in neonatal and older pigs was compared. In neonatal pigs, most of the bacteria were in layers associated with the villous epithelium. In older pigs, most of the bacteria were associated with mucus-like material in the intestinal lumen. We concluded that swine develop an innate resistance to 987P+ ETEC by 3 weeks of age. This resistance does not appear to be due to an absence of 987P-specific receptors in the intestines of the older pig or to an inability of 987P+ bacteria to grow and express pili in the older pig. We hypothesized that the resistance of older pigs to 987P-mediated disease is due to release of 987P-specific receptors into the intestinal lumen, where these receptors facilitate bacterial clearance rather than bacterial adherence to intestinal epithelium and colonization.

  15. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Walsham, Alistair D. S.; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L.; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:26973622

  16. Contraction of isolated brush borders from the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Brush borders isolated from epithelial cells from the small intestine of neonatal rats are able to contract in the presence of ATP and Mg2+; Ca2+ is not required. Contraction is characterized by a pinching-in of the plasma membrane in the region of the zonula adherens and a subsequent rounding of the brush borders. No movement or consistent shortening of the microvilli is observed. The contraction appears to involve the 5- to 7-nm diameter microfilaments in the terminal web which associate with the zonula adherens. These filaments bind heavy meromyosin as do the actin core filaments of the microvilli. A model for contraction is presented in which, in the intact cell, terminal web filaments and core filaments interact to produce shortening of the microvilli. PMID:783170

  17. The injury of serotonin on intestinal epithelium cell renewal of weaned diarrhoea mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y; Yang, C; Wang, Z; Qin, Z; Cao, J; Chen, Y

    2016-12-28

    Diarrhoea is a common cause of death in children and weaned animals. Recent research has found that serotonin (5-HT) in the gastrointestinal tract plays an important role in regulating growth and the maintenance of mucosa, which protect against diarrhoea. To determine the influence of 5-HT on intestinal epithelium cell renewal under weaned stress diarrhoea, a weaned-stress diarrhoea mouse model was established with senna infusion (15 mL/Kg) via intragastric administration and stress restraint (SR). Mice with an increase in 5-HT were induced by intraperitoneal injection with citalopram hydrobromide (CH, 10 mg/Kg). The results demonstrated that compared with the control animals, diarrhoea appeared in weaned stress mice and the 5-HT content in the small intestine was significantly increased (P<0.05). Further, the caspase-3 cells and cells undergoing apoptosis in the small intestine were significantly increased, but the VH (villus height), V/C (villus height /crypt depth), and PCNA-positive rate significantly decreased. Compared with the control animals, CH increased the intestinal 5-HT content, caspase-3 cells and cells undergoing apoptosis but decreased the VH and V/C. Compared with both control and weaned stress animals, weaned stress animals that were pre-treated with CH showed higher 5-HT concentrations, positive caspase-3 cells and cells undergoing apoptosis but lower VH, V/C and PCNA-positive rate. In vitro, a low concentration of 5-HT inhibit, IEC-6 cell line apoptosis but a higher concentration of 5-HT promoted it. Therefore, weaned stress diarrhoea mice were accompanied by a 5-HT increase in the small intestine and vice versa, and the increase in 5-HT induced by CH caused diarrhoea. In brief, 5-HT and diarrhoea slowed the intestinal epithelium cell renewal and injured the abortion function and mucosal barrier by decreasing VH, V/C and proliferation and increasing epithelium cell apoptosis.

  18. Desmoplakin controls microvilli length but not cell adhesion or keratin organization in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Lechler, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining proper cell–cell adhesion in the intestine is essential for tissue homeostasis and barrier function. This adhesion is thought to be mediated by cell adhesion structures, including tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, which concentrate in the apical junctional region. While clear roles for adherens and tight junctions have been established in simple epithelia, the function of desmosomes has not been addressed. In stratified epithelia, desmosomes impart mechanical strength to tissues by organizing and anchoring the keratin filament network. In this paper, we report that the desmosomal protein desmoplakin (DP) is not essential for cell adhesion in the intestinal epithelium. Surprisingly, when DP is lacking, keratin filament localization is also unperturbed, although keratin filaments no longer anchor at desmosomes. Unexpectedly, DP is important for proper microvillus structure. Our study highlights the tissue-specific functions of desmosomes and reveals that the canonical functions for these structures are not conserved in simple epithelium. PMID:22238362

  19. [Effects of ischemia and revascularization on the epithelium of the small intestine: study on swine].

    PubMed

    Barthod, F

    1994-05-01

    Ischaemia of the small intestine leads to the destruction of the intestinal mucosa. The capacity of the epithelium to regenerate is proportional to the duration of revascularization. The aim of this work was to analyze the kinetic aspects of intestinal epithelial regeneration after destruction due to prolonged ischaemia. This study was conducted in 44 animals (swine) after development of an ischaemia-revascularization protocol of a jejunal loop and bipolar secondary cutaneous exteriorization. After a first series with ischaemia times of 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours, the 4 hour period of ischaemia was chosen for further analysis of the regeneration kinetics over a period of 21 days since it leads to regular and total destruction of the epithelium compatible with regeneration. This analysis included (1) a histological examination (semi-thin slices), (2) immunofluorescent detection of intestinal brush border proteins on frozen slices (villin, saccharase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV) and mucines, (3) measurement of specific intestinal hydrolase activities (saccharase, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV and alkaline phosphatase) in enriched brush border fractions, and (4) an analysis of variations in intestinal flora. After the 4 hour ischaemia, total destruction of the epithelium with disappearance of the villin and intestinal hydrolases and disorganization of the mucosa invaded by mucosal lacks was observed. Epithelial regeneration was rapid and two days later the histological aspect of the mucosa showed apical expression (still discontinuous), villin and intestinal hydrolase activity. Luminal apical expression of the markers became continuous on day 4, demonstrating the total recovery of the intestinal barrier as confirmed by stable microbial flora. Mucine expression also returned to normal. This regeneration was however incomplete since the mucosa was seen to be flat, without villosities. Immunofluorescence showed the weak intensity of brush

  20. Disruption of retinoblastoma protein expression in the intestinal epithelium impairs lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pamela M; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R; Wandu, Wambui S; Leinicke, Jennifer A; Xie, Yan; Davidson, Nicholas O; Warner, Brad W

    2014-05-15

    We previously demonstrated increased villus height following genetic deletion, or knockout, of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) in the intestinal epithelium (Rb-IKO). Here we determined the functional consequences of augmented mucosal growth on intestinal fat absorption and following a 50% small bowel resection (SBR). Mice with constitutively disrupted Rb expression in the intestinal epithelium (Rb-IKO) along with their floxed (wild-type, WT) littermates were placed on a high-fat diet (HFD, 42% kcal fat) for 54 wk. Mice were weighed weekly, and fat absorption, indirect calorimetry, and MRI body composition were measured. Rb-IKO mice were also subjected to a 50% SBR, followed by HFD feeding for 33 wk. In separate experiments, we examined intestinal fat absorption in mice with conditional (tamoxifen-inducible) intestinal Rb (inducible Rb-IKO) deletion. Microarray revealed that the transcriptional expression of lipid absorption/transport genes was significantly reduced in constitutive Rb-IKO mice. These mice demonstrated greater mucosal surface area yet manifested paradoxically impaired intestinal long-chain triglyceride absorption and decreased cholesterol absorption. Despite attenuated lipid absorption, there were no differences in metabolic rate, body composition, and weight gain in Rb-IKO and WT mice at baseline and following SBR. We also confirmed fat malabsorption in inducible Rb-IKO mice. We concluded that, despite an expanded mucosal surface area, Rb-IKO mice demonstrate impaired lipid absorption without compensatory alterations in energy homeostasis or body composition. These findings underscore the importance of delineating structural/functional relationships in the gut and suggest a previously unknown role for Rb in the regulation of intestinal lipid absorption.

  1. Disruption of retinoblastoma protein expression in the intestinal epithelium impairs lipid absorption

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Pamela M.; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.; Wandu, Wambui S.; Leinicke, Jennifer A.; Xie, Yan; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated increased villus height following genetic deletion, or knockout, of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) in the intestinal epithelium (Rb-IKO). Here we determined the functional consequences of augmented mucosal growth on intestinal fat absorption and following a 50% small bowel resection (SBR). Mice with constitutively disrupted Rb expression in the intestinal epithelium (Rb-IKO) along with their floxed (wild-type, WT) littermates were placed on a high-fat diet (HFD, 42% kcal fat) for 54 wk. Mice were weighed weekly, and fat absorption, indirect calorimetry, and MRI body composition were measured. Rb-IKO mice were also subjected to a 50% SBR, followed by HFD feeding for 33 wk. In separate experiments, we examined intestinal fat absorption in mice with conditional (tamoxifen-inducible) intestinal Rb (inducible Rb-IKO) deletion. Microarray revealed that the transcriptional expression of lipid absorption/transport genes was significantly reduced in constitutive Rb-IKO mice. These mice demonstrated greater mucosal surface area yet manifested paradoxically impaired intestinal long-chain triglyceride absorption and decreased cholesterol absorption. Despite attenuated lipid absorption, there were no differences in metabolic rate, body composition, and weight gain in Rb-IKO and WT mice at baseline and following SBR. We also confirmed fat malabsorption in inducible Rb-IKO mice. We concluded that, despite an expanded mucosal surface area, Rb-IKO mice demonstrate impaired lipid absorption without compensatory alterations in energy homeostasis or body composition. These findings underscore the importance of delineating structural/functional relationships in the gut and suggest a previously unknown role for Rb in the regulation of intestinal lipid absorption. PMID:24742992

  2. Ablating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in CD11c+ cells perturbs intestinal epithelium development and intestinal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Song Hui; Kundu, Parag; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Teo, Wei Ling; Kawajiri, Kaname; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Mak, Tak Wah; Pettersson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Diet and microbiome derived indole derivatives are known to activate the ligand induced transcription factor, the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). While the current understanding of AhR biology has confirmed its role in mucosal lymphocytes, its function in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) is poorly understood. Here, we report that Cre-mediated deletion of AhR in CD11c-expressing cells in C57/BL6 mice is associated with altered intestinal epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Moreover, when co-cultured with AhR-deficient DCs ex vivo, intestinal organoids showed reduced SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 and increased Mucin 2 expression, which correlates with reduced Paneth cells and increased goblet cell differentiation, similar to the data obtained in vivo. Further, characterization of intestinal APC subsets, devoid of AhR, revealed an expression pattern associated with aberrant intrinsic Wnt pathway regulation. At a functional level, the loss of AhR in APCs resulted in a dysfunctional epithelial barrier, associated with a more aggressive chemically induced colitis compared to wild type animals. Our results are consistent with a model whereby the AhR signalling pathway may participate in the regulation of innate immunity through intestinal epithelium development and mucosal immunity. PMID:27068235

  3. Ablating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in CD11c+ cells perturbs intestinal epithelium development and intestinal immunity.

    PubMed

    Chng, Song Hui; Kundu, Parag; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Teo, Wei Ling; Kawajiri, Kaname; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Mak, Tak Wah; Pettersson, Sven

    2016-04-12

    Diet and microbiome derived indole derivatives are known to activate the ligand induced transcription factor, the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). While the current understanding of AhR biology has confirmed its role in mucosal lymphocytes, its function in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) is poorly understood. Here, we report that Cre-mediated deletion of AhR in CD11c-expressing cells in C57/BL6 mice is associated with altered intestinal epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Moreover, when co-cultured with AhR-deficient DCs ex vivo, intestinal organoids showed reduced SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 and increased Mucin 2 expression, which correlates with reduced Paneth cells and increased goblet cell differentiation, similar to the data obtained in vivo. Further, characterization of intestinal APC subsets, devoid of AhR, revealed an expression pattern associated with aberrant intrinsic Wnt pathway regulation. At a functional level, the loss of AhR in APCs resulted in a dysfunctional epithelial barrier, associated with a more aggressive chemically induced colitis compared to wild type animals. Our results are consistent with a model whereby the AhR signalling pathway may participate in the regulation of innate immunity through intestinal epithelium development and mucosal immunity.

  4. [Morpho-functional changes in small intestine epithelium of frog Rana temporaria during hibernation].

    PubMed

    Seliverstova, E V; Prutskova, N P

    2012-01-01

    Structure and function of small intestinal epithelium were studied in overwintering frogs Rana temporaria at various stages of hibernation. In the process of testing of absorption of arginine vasotocin (AVT) in experiments in vitro it is established that at the period of hibernation there is preserved the capability of the epithelium for absorption of this nonapeptide without hydrolysis. However, as compared with October-December, in January-February and later, a decrease of the AVT absorption takes place, which is the most pronounced in March-April. Changes in epithelial structures appear by the middle of winter and are progressing by spring. In April-May, as compared with the beginning of hibernation, the height of enterocytes, the length of microvilli, and the number of microvilli decrease by 33 %, 40 %, and 57 %, respectively. The absence of features of destruction indicates an adaptive character of the observed changes. Dynamics of the studied parameters indicates morphological plasticity of the small intestine epithelium of R. temporaria at the period of hibernation.

  5. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  6. Postnatal regulation of MAMDC4 in the porcine intestinal epithelium is influenced by bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Alex J; Hamonic, Glenn M; Van Kessel, Andrew; Wilson, Heather L

    2016-11-01

    The MAM domain-containing 4 (MAMDC4) protein is associated with the unique endocytotic mechanism observed in the intestine of mammals during the immediate postnatal period. Transcriptional expression of MAMDC4 was substantially upregulated at birth in both the piglet jejunum and ileum and its expression decreases after birth. The protein was found localized specifically to the apical region of the luminal epithelium, however, MAMDC4 protein expression was lost at day 10 and 15 in the jejunum and ileum, respectively, and was not associated with "fetal" enterocyte replacement. Although spatial variation in the subcellular localization of Claudin 1 (CLDN1) was noted at day 3, the loss of MAMDC4 at later stages of development did not appear to have any effect on the tight junction structure. Germ-free (GF) piglets and piglets whose gastrointestinal flora consists exclusively of Escherichia coli (EC) or Lactobacillus fermentum (LF) maintained MAMDC4 protein expression to 14 days of age in distal regions of the small intestine whereas those with conventionalized intestinal flora (CV) showed no MAMDC4 protein at this age. MAMDC4 protein expression was most pronounced in the LF and GF colonized piglets which showed staining in the epithelial cells at 75% and 95% of the length of the small intestine, respectively, which matched that of the newborn. In contrast, EC animals showed only a low abundance at these regions as well as a discontinuous staining pattern. Collectively these results suggest that maturation of MAMDC4 expression in the porcine epithelium occurs more rapidly than what is reported in previously studied rodent species. Furthermore, intestinal bacterial colonization is a major regulator of MAMDC4 in a manner specific to bacterial species and independent of enterocyte turnover.

  7. Cl- secretion in a model intestinal epithelium induced by a neutrophil-derived secretagogue.

    PubMed Central

    Madara, J L; Parkos, C; Colgan, S; MacLeod, R J; Nash, S; Matthews, J; Delp, C; Lencer, W

    1992-01-01

    A secreted product of activated neutrophils, NDS (neutrophil-derived secretagogue), elicits a short circuit current (Isc) in epithelial monolayers derived from the human intestinal cell line T84 (J. Clin. Invest. 1991. 87:1474-1477). Here, we identify and characterize the source of this Isc and examine associated signaling pathways. 125I efflux studies suggested that NDS activates an anion conductive channel. Bidirectional 22Na 36Cl flux studies showed that electrogenic Cl- secretion fully accounts for the NDS-induced Isc response. NDS behaved in many respects as a cAMP-mediated secretagogue: NDS did not further increase maximal cAMP-induced Cl- secretion; NDS potentiated Ca(2+)-mediated Cl secretion; and NDS elicited measurable 125I but not 86Rb effluxes. However, NDS did not elicit a detectable rise in intracellular cAMP. Such data suggest that NDS may elicit Cl- secretion by effecting distal events in the cAMP-mediated pathway. Data derived from cell volume assays of isolated guinea pig intestinal crypt cells indicated that NDS also directly elicits Cl- secretion from natural intestinal epithelia. Additionally, since NDS activity is released from PMN by stimuli normally present in the colonic lumen, since NDS is active when applied apically to this model intestinal epithelium, and since the NDS-elicited Isc response is indicative of electrogenic chloride secretion, we speculate NDS may contribute to the secretory diarrhea encountered in many patients with inflammatory intestinal disease. Images PMID:1602001

  8. [Electron microscopic study of the intestinal epithelium of Saccoglossus mereschkowskii (Enteropneusta, Hemichordata)].

    PubMed

    Stoliarova, M V

    2011-01-01

    Epithelium of the hepatic region of the intestine in Saccoglossus mereschkowskii, a representative of enteropneusts (Enteropneusta, Hemichordata) standing at the base of Chordata, has been investigated using electron microscope. The ultrastructure of ciliated and granular epithelial cells, elements of the intraepithelial nerve layer, and intercellular junctions have been characterized. The data concerning details of the organization of the ciliary apparatus and rootlets system are presented. It is justified the presence of complicated supporting construction of cilia which performs a mechanical stabilizing function and possibly also provide synchronization of ciliary movements. The presence of cilia with two centrioles is considered as an adaptation to high functional load on ciliary apparatus. Well developed bundles of myofilaments are found in the cytoplasm of the basal portions of ciliary cells that characterizes these cells as myoepithelial. The features indicating the role of ciliary cells in absorption are described. The capability of these cells to balloon-like secretion is considered. Data on the accumulation of food reserves in the form of lipid droplets and glycogen in the cell cytoplasm are presented. Ciliated cells are characterized by their function as ciliated secretory-absorptive myoepithelial cells. Based on the location of secretory granules both in the apical and basal portions of granular cells, an exocrine-endocrine function of these cells has been suggested. Typical endocrine cells in the intestinal epithelium of S. mereschkowskii are absent. Several types of granules in the nerve fibers cytoplasm are described. Junctions between the nerve fibers and basal portions of ciliary and granular epithelial cells are found. Nerve regulation of contractile and secretory functions of epithelial cells is supposed. The presence of the regulatory nerve-endocrine system that includes receptor cells of open type, secretory endocrine-like cells and nerve

  9. Cell Death and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Autophagy in the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cell death mechanisms have been associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases in humans and mice. Recent studies suggested that a complex crosstalk between autophagy/apoptosis, microbe sensing, and enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress in the epithelium could play a critical role in these diseases. In addition, necroptosis, a relatively novel programmed necrosis-like pathway associated with TNF receptor activation, seems to be also present in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease and in specific animal models for intestinal inflammation. This review attempts to cover new data related to cell death mechanisms and inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25126549

  10. Correlation between electrophysiological phenomena and transport of macromolecules in intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Groot, J A

    1998-01-01

    This review discuss some recent findings in the study of the regulation of the permeability of the intestinal epithelial layer. Comparison of electrical phenomena and transport of macromolecules suggests that secretory activity and increased transepithelial transport of macromolecules are related when secretion is mediated by the Ca2+ and PKC dependent pathways. The transport of the macromolecules is via the transcellular and via the paracellular route. The barrier function of the intestinal epithelium may be diminished during nervous (acetylcholine)- and immuno-(histamine) mediated secretion. It is hypothesised that some bacterial toxins may also induce Ca2+ and PKC dependent secretion and thereby can reduce the epithelial barrier. The cAMP and cGMP mediated secretion, which can be recognised by their long-lasting transepithelial potential changes, are not coupled to increased transepithelial transport of macromolecules. Some forms of secretory diarrhea may therefore be related to the development of food-allergy or inflammation.

  11. Regulation of intestinal lactase in adult hypolactasia.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, M; Mevissen, G; Fischer, M; Olsen, W; Goodspeed, D; Genini, M; Boll, W; Semenza, G; Mantei, N

    1992-01-01

    Relative deficiency of intestinal lactase activity during adulthood, adult hypolactasia, is a common condition worldwide. We studied the regulation of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase in normal and adult hypolactasic subjects by correlating transcript abundance in intestinal biopsies with relative synthetic rates for the protein in cultured intestinal explants. After metabolic labelling studies in six subjects, precursor lactase-phlorizin hydrolase was identified in amounts directly proportional to the enzyme-specific activity suggesting that levels of intestinal lactase are regulated by synthetic rate. Total intestinal RNA was extracted from biopsies of these subjects and three hypolactasic adults who had participated in previous biosynthesis studies. Transcript levels were markedly reduced in deficient subjects who demonstrated diminished lactase-phlorizin hydrolase synthesis. The sequence of 1 kb of 5'-flanking region of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene was determined in two hypolactasic subjects and two controls. No sequence variability was identified to account for differences in mRNA levels or biosynthetic rates between the two groups. A single hypolactasic subject previously characterized as demonstrating delayed posttranslational processing, showed message levels intermediate between other deficients and controls. These results suggest that in the majority of our subjects, pretranslational mechanisms account for the predominate regulatory control of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase expression in the proximal intestine. Images PMID:1737843

  12. Erlotinib promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated injury in the intestinal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Lu; Hu, Lingna; Yang, Baofang; Fang, Xianying; Gao, Zhe; Li, Wanshuai; Sun, Yang; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xuefeng; Shu, Yongqian; Gu, Yanhong; Wu, Xudong; Xu, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    Erlotinib, a popular drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), causes diarrhea in approximately 55% of patients receiving this drug. In the present study, we found that erlotinib induced barrier dysfunction in rat small intestine epithelial cells (IEC-6) by increasing epithelial permeability and down-regulating E-cadherin. The mRNA levels of various pro-inflammatory cytokines (Il-6, Il-25 and Il-17f) were increased after erlotinib treatment in IEC-6 cells. Erlotinib concentration- and time-dependently induced apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in both IEC-6 and human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoN). Intestinal epithelial injury was also observed in male C57BL/6J mice administrated with erlotinib. Knockdown of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) with small interference RNA partially reversed erlotinib-induced apoptosis, production of IL-6 and down-regulation of E-cadherin in cultured intestinal epithelial cells. In conclusion, erlotinib caused ER stress-mediated injury in the intestinal epithelium, contributing to its side effects of diarrhea in patients. - Highlights: • Erlotinib destroyed barrier integrity both in vitro and in vivo. • Erlotinib induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. • Erlotinib induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. • ER stress contributed to erlotinib-induced barrier dysfunction.

  13. Pathogen-induced chemokine secretion from model intestinal epithelium is inhibited by lipoxin A4 analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Gewirtz, A T; McCormick, B; Neish, A S; Petasis, N A; Gronert, K; Serhan, C N; Madara, J L

    1998-01-01

    Enteric pathogens induce intestinal epithelium to secrete chemokines that direct movement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Mechanisms that might downregulate secretion of these proinflammatory chemokines and thus contain intestinal inflammation have not yet been elucidated. The antiinflammatory activities exhibited by the arachidonate metabolite lipoxin A4 (LXA4) suggests that this eicosanoid, which is biosynthesized in vivo at sites of inflammation, might play such a role. We investigated whether chemokine secretion could be regulated by stable analogs of LXA4. Monolayers of T84 intestinal epithelial cells were infected with Salmonella typhimurium, which elicits secretion of distinct apical (pathogen-elicited epithelial chemoattractant) and basolateral (IL-8) chemokines. Stable analogs of LXA4 inhibited S. typhimurium-induced (but not phorbol ester-induced) secretion of both IL-8 and pathogen-elicited epithelial chemoattractant. LXA4 stable analogs did not alter bacterial adherence to nor internalization by epithelia, indicating that LXA4 stable analogs did not block all signals that Salmonella typhimurium activates in intestinal epithelia, but likely led to attenuation of signals that mediate chemokine secretion. Inhibition of S. typhimurium-induced IL-8 secretion by LXA4 analogs was concentration- (IC50 approximately 1 nM) and time-dependent (maximal inhibition approximately 1 h). As a result of these effects, LXA4 stable analogs inhibited the ability of bacteria-infected epithelia to direct polymorphonuclear leukocyte movement. These data suggest that LXA4 and its stable analogs may be useful in downregulating active inflammation at mucosal surfaces. PMID:9576749

  14. Intestinal Organoids as a Novel Tool to Study Microbes-Epithelium Interactions.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Giulia; Hanson, Melissa; Fevre, Cindy; Lecuit, Marc; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2016-09-15

    The gut, particularly the colon, is the host of approximately 1000 bacterial species, the so-called gut microbiota. The relationship between the gut microbiota and the host is symbiotic and mutualistic, influencing many aspects of the biology of the host. This homeostatic balance can be disrupted by enteric pathogens, such as Shigella flexneri or Listeria monocytogenes, which are able to invade the epithelial layer and consequently subvert physiological functions. To study the host-microbe interactions in vitro, the crypt culture model, known as intestinal organoids, is a powerful tool. Intestinal organoids provide a model in which to examine the response of the epithelium, particularly the response of intestinal stem cells, to the presence of bacteria. Furthermore, the organoid model enables the study of pathogens during the early steps of enteric pathogen invasion.Here, we describe methods that we have established to study the cellular microbiology of symbiosis between the gut microbiota and host intestinal surface and secondly the disruption of host homeostasis due to an enteric pathogen.

  15. Postprandial morphological response of the intestinal epithelium of the Burmese python (Python molurus).

    PubMed

    Lignot, Jean-Hervé; Helmstetter, Cécile; Secor, Stephen M

    2005-07-01

    The postprandial morphological changes of the intestinal epithelium of Burmese pythons were examined using fasting pythons and at eight time points after feeding. In fasting pythons, tightly packed enterocytes possess very short microvilli and are arranged in a pseudostratified fashion. Enterocyte width increases by 23% within 24 h postfeeding, inducing significant increases in villus length and intestinal mass. By 6 days postfeeding, enterocyte volume had peaked, following as much as an 80% increase. Contributing to enterocyte hypertrophy is the cellular accumulation of lipid droplets at the tips and edges of the villi of the proximal and middle small intestine, but which were absent in the distal small intestine. At 3 days postfeeding, conventional and environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed cracks and lipid extrusion along the narrow edges of the villi and at the villus tips. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the rapid postprandial lengthening of enterocyte microvilli, increasing 4.8-fold in length within 24 h, and the maintaining of that length through digestion. Beginning at 24 h postfeeding, spherical particles were found embedded apically within enterocytes of the proximal and middle small intestine. These particles possessed an annular-like construction and were stained with the calcium-stain Alizarine red S suggesting that they were bone in origin. Following the completion of digestion, many of the postprandial responses were reversed, as observed by the atrophy of enterocytes, the shortening of villi, and the retraction of the microvilli. Further exploration of the python intestine will reveal the underlying mechanisms of these trophic responses and the origin and fate of the engulfed particles.

  16. Intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to cytopathic injury and altered permeability than the lung epithelium in the context of acute sepsis.

    PubMed

    Julian, Mark W; Bao, Shengying; Knoell, Daren L; Fahy, Ruairi J; Shao, Guohong; Crouser, Elliott D

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial morphology and function are altered in intestinal epithelia during endotoxemia. However, it is unclear whether mitochondrial abnormalities occur in lung epithelial cells during acute sepsis or whether mitochondrial dysfunction corresponds with altered epithelial barrier function. Thus, we hypothesized that the intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to mitochondrial injury than the lung epithelium during acute sepsis and that mitochondrial dysfunction precedes impaired barrier function. Using a resuscitated feline model of Escherichia coli-induced sepsis, lung and ileal tissues were harvested after 6 h for histological and mitochondrial ultrastructural analyses in septic (n = 6) and time-matched controls (n = 6). Human lung epithelial cells (HLEC) and Caco-2 monolayers (n = 5) were exposed to 'cytomix' (TNFα: 40 ng/ml, IL-1β: 20 ng/ml, IFNγ: 10 ng/ml) for 24-72 h, and measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), epithelial permeability and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) were taken. Lung epithelial morphology, mitochondrial ultrastructure and pulmonary gas exchange were unaltered in septic animals compared to matching controls. While histologically intact, ileal epithelia demonstrated marked mitochondrial ultrastructural damage during sepsis. Caco-2 monolayers treated with cytomix showed a significant decrease in mitochondrial ΔΨ within 24 h, which was associated with a progressive reduction in TER and increased epithelial permeability over the subsequent 48 h. In contrast, mitochondrial ΔΨ and epithelial barrier functions were preserved in HLEC following cytomix. These findings indicate that intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to mitochondrial damage and dysfunction than the lung epithelium in the context of sepsis. Early alterations in mitochondrial function portend subsequent epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  17. RIPK1 ensures intestinal homeostasis by protecting the epithelium against apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nozomi; Vereecke, Lars; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Duprez, Linde; Berger, Scott B; Divert, Tatyana; Gonçalves, Amanda; Sze, Mozes; Gilbert, Barbara; Kourula, Stephanie; Goossens, Vera; Lefebvre, Sylvie; Günther, Claudia; Becker, Christoph; Bertin, John; Gough, Peter J; Declercq, Wim; van Loo, Geert; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2014-09-04

    Receptor interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) has an essential role in the signalling triggered by death receptors and pattern recognition receptors. RIPK1 is believed to function as a node driving NF-κB-mediated cell survival and inflammation as well as caspase-8 (CASP8)-dependent apoptotic or RIPK3/MLKL-dependent necroptotic cell death. The physiological relevance of this dual function has remained elusive because of the perinatal death of RIPK1 full knockout mice. To circumvent this problem, we generated RIPK1 conditional knockout mice, and show that mice lacking RIPK1 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) spontaneously develop severe intestinal inflammation associated with IEC apoptosis leading to early death. This early lethality was rescued by antibiotic treatment, MYD88 deficiency or tumour-necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 deficiency, demonstrating the importance of commensal bacteria and TNF in the IEC Ripk1 knockout phenotype. CASP8 deficiency, but not RIPK3 deficiency, rescued the inflammatory phenotype completely, indicating the indispensable role of RIPK1 in suppressing CASP8-dependent apoptosis but not RIPK3-dependent necroptosis in the intestine. RIPK1 kinase-dead knock-in mice did not exhibit any sign of inflammation, suggesting that RIPK1-mediated protection resides in its kinase-independent platform function. Depletion of RIPK1 in intestinal organoid cultures sensitized them to TNF-induced apoptosis, confirming the in vivo observations. Unexpectedly, TNF-mediated NF-κB activation remained intact in these organoids. Our results demonstrate that RIPK1 is essential for survival of IECs, ensuring epithelial homeostasis by protecting the epithelium from CASP8-mediated IEC apoptosis independently of its kinase activity and NF-κB activation.

  18. Detection of melatonin production from the intestinal epithelium using electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Paul P; Polglaze, Kate E; Bertrand, Rebecca L; Sandow, Shaun L; Pozo, Maria J

    2014-01-01

    The role of melatonin in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract had previously been limited to its well-described anti-oxidant properties. Recent studies have, however, expanded the role of melatonin in the intestine, showing that it acts as a hormone with local paracrine actions to modulate GI function and the release of other hormones. The GI epithelium produces melatonin from the active precursor serotonin, which is thought to come from the serotonin synthesising enterochromaffin cells (EC). The receptors for melatonin, the membrane bound melatonin receptors 1 and 2, are present on some smooth muscles, neurons, and epithelium. Endogenous release of melatonin has been linked with secretory reflexes and the ileal brake reflex, while exogenous application of melatonin in pharmacological doses has been associated with reduced inflammation in a variety of animal models. Recent studies have begun to look at melatonin release from the GI epithelium using real-time electrochemical detection methods. Using these techniques, the time course of melatonin production shows similarities to that of 5-HT release while the ratio of 5-HT to melatonin is altered during aging. In addition, the effects of melatonin supplementation on the production of endogenous melatonin and its precursor serotonin are suppressed. In summary, the role of melatonin in the GI tract is coming of age. There are many studies showing a clear role for endogenously produced melatonin and clear effects of melatonin supplementation. Newly developed electrochemical techniques for exploring melatonin availability in real-time promise to accelerate our understanding of GI melatonin in the years to come.

  19. [In vitro model for the analysis of the interaction between Shigella flexneri and the intestinal epithelium].

    PubMed

    Raygoza-Anaya, M; González-Robles, A; Mora-Galindo, J

    1990-01-01

    An in vitro study of the adhesion and invasion of Shigella flexneri was implemented, by means of incubation of laminary cuts of cecal mucosa of Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs in a suspension of Shigella flexneri, which was isolated from a patient with bacillary dysentery. The laminae were placed in plastic chambers for two hours at 37%C. After this the bacterial suspension was discarded so as to eliminate the bacilli which were not adhered. The epithelium was washed with saline and was processed for analysis with scanning electron microscope. The topology of the mucosa incubated with Shigella flexneri was similar to that of the witnesses. The bacteria which adhered to the mucosa were dispersed individually or in clumps of varied numbers. The main alteration observed upon the epithelial surface were depressions due to a lateral separation of the microvilli which may have originated the endocytic stomas containing bacterias. The results of this study allow the proposition of the use of explants, so as to study the interaction between Shigella flexneri and the intestinal epithelium, with the possibility of modifying different experimental variables.

  20. Translocation of 40 nm diameter nanowires through the intestinal epithelium of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Karin; Adolfsson, Karl; Ekvall, Mikael T; Borgström, Magnus T; Linse, Sara; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Cedervall, Tommy; Prinz, Christelle N

    2016-10-01

    Nanowires (NWs) have unique electrical and optical properties of value for many applications including lighting, sensing, and energy harnessing. Consumer products containing NWs increase the risk of NWs being released in the environment, especially into aquatic ecosystems through sewage systems. Daphnia magna is a common, cosmopolitan freshwater organism sensitive to toxicity tests and represents a likely entry point for nanoparticles into food webs of aquatic ecosystems. Here we have evaluated the effect of NW diameter on the gut penetrance of NWs in Daphnia magna. The animals were exposed to NWs of two diameters (40 and 80 nm) and similar length (3.6 and 3.8 μm, respectively) suspended in water. In order to locate the NWs in Daphnia, the NWs were designed to comprise one inherently fluorescent segment of gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) flanked by a gallium phosphide (GaP) segment. Daphnia mortality was assessed directly after 24 h of exposure and 7 days after exposure. Translocation of NWs across the intestinal epithelium was investigated using confocal fluorescence microscopy directly after 24 h of exposure and was observed in 89% of Daphnia exposed to 40 nm NWs and in 11% of Daphnia exposed to 80 nm NWs. A high degree of fragmentation was observed for NWs of both diameters after ingestion by the Daphnia, although 40 nm NWs were fragmented to a greater extent, which could possibly facilitate translocation across the intestinal epithelium. Our results show that the feeding behavior of animals may enhance the ability of NWs to penetrate biological barriers and that penetrance is governed by the NW diameter.

  1. Cyclophilin A is a new M cell marker of bovine intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hondo, Tetsuya; Someya, Shunsuke; Nagasawa, Yuya; Terada, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Chen, Xiangning; Watanabe, Kouichi; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Rose, Michael T; Nochi, Tomonori; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-06-01

    Microfold (M) cells in the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) of Peyer's patches contribute to the mucosal immune response by the transcytosis of microorganisms. The mechanism by which M cells take up microorganisms, and the functional proteins by which they do this, are not clear. In order to explore one such protein, we developed a 2H5-F3 monoclonal antibody (2H5-F3 mAb) through its binding to bovine M cells, and identified the antibody reactive molecule as cyclophilin A (Cyp-A). The localization patterns of Cyp-A were very similar to the localization pattern of cytokeratin (CK) 18-positive M cells. Cyp-A was identified at the luminal surface of CK18-positive M cells in bovine jejunal and ileal FAE. The membranous localization of Cyp-A in the bovine intestinal cell line (BIE cells) increased as cells differentiated toward M cells, as determined by flow cytometry analysis. Additionally, BIE cells released Cyp-A to the extracellular space and the differentiation of BIE cells to M cells increased the secretion of Cyp-A, as determined by western blotting. Accordingly, Cyp-A may be localized in M cells in the small intestinal epithelium of cattle. The rise of the membranous localization and secretion of Cyp-A by differentiation toward M cells indicates that Cyp-A has an important role in the function of M cells. While Cyp-A of the M cell membrane may contribute to the uptake of viruses with peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity, in the extracellular space Cyp-A may work as a chemokine and contribute to the distribution of immuno-competent cells.

  2. Translocation of 40 nm diameter nanowires through the intestinal epithelium of Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Karin; Adolfsson, Karl; Ekvall, Mikael T.; Borgström, Magnus T.; Linse, Sara; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Cedervall, Tommy; Prinz, Christelle N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nanowires (NWs) have unique electrical and optical properties of value for many applications including lighting, sensing, and energy harnessing. Consumer products containing NWs increase the risk of NWs being released in the environment, especially into aquatic ecosystems through sewage systems. Daphnia magna is a common, cosmopolitan freshwater organism sensitive to toxicity tests and represents a likely entry point for nanoparticles into food webs of aquatic ecosystems. Here we have evaluated the effect of NW diameter on the gut penetrance of NWs in Daphnia magna. The animals were exposed to NWs of two diameters (40 and 80 nm) and similar length (3.6 and 3.8 μm, respectively) suspended in water. In order to locate the NWs in Daphnia, the NWs were designed to comprise one inherently fluorescent segment of gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) flanked by a gallium phosphide (GaP) segment. Daphnia mortality was assessed directly after 24 h of exposure and 7 days after exposure. Translocation of NWs across the intestinal epithelium was investigated using confocal fluorescence microscopy directly after 24 h of exposure and was observed in 89% of Daphnia exposed to 40 nm NWs and in 11% of Daphnia exposed to 80 nm NWs. A high degree of fragmentation was observed for NWs of both diameters after ingestion by the Daphnia, although 40 nm NWs were fragmented to a greater extent, which could possibly facilitate translocation across the intestinal epithelium. Our results show that the feeding behavior of animals may enhance the ability of NWs to penetrate biological barriers and that penetrance is governed by the NW diameter. PMID:27181920

  3. Interactions between bacteria and the gut mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on the mucosal epithelium influence intestinal colonization or infection?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These includ...

  4. Interactions between bacteria and the gut mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on the mucosal epithelium influence intestinal colonization or infection?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These include ...

  5. Retromer dependent recycling of the Wnt secretion factor Wls is dispensable for stem cell maintenance in the mammalian intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Reinoud E A; Farin, Henner F; Macůrková, Marie; van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans C; Korswagen, Hendrik C

    2013-01-01

    In C. elegans and Drosophila, retromer mediated retrograde transport of Wntless (Wls) from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) is required for Wnt secretion. When this retrograde transport pathway is blocked, Wls is missorted to lysosomes and degraded, resulting in reduced Wnt secretion and various Wnt related phenotypes. In the mammalian intestine, Wnt signaling is essential to maintain stem cells. This prompted us to ask if retromer mediated Wls recycling is also important for Wnt signaling and stem cell maintenance in this system. To answer this question, we generated a conditional Vps35 (fl) allele. As Vps35 is an essential subunit of the retromer complex, this genetic tool allowed us to inducibly interfere with retromer function in the intestinal epithelium. Using a pan-intestinal epithelial Cre line (Villin-CreERT2), we did not observe defects in crypt or villus morphology after deletion of Vps35 from the intestinal epithelium. Wnt secreted from the mesenchyme of the intestine may compensate for a reduction in epithelial Wnt secretion. To exclude the effect of the mesenchyme, we generated intestinal organoid cultures. Loss of Vps35 in intestinal organoids did not affect the overall morphology of the organoids. We were able to culture Vps35 (∆/∆) organoids for many passages without Wnt supplementation in the growth medium. However, Wls protein levels were reduced and we observed a subtle growth defect in the Vps35 (∆/∆) organoids. These results confirm the role of retromer in the retrograde trafficking of Wls in the intestine, but show that retromer mediated Wls recycling is not essential to maintain Wnt signaling or stem cell proliferation in the intestinal epithelium.

  6. Cannabinoid-induced autophagy regulates suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 in intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Koay, Luan C; Rigby, Rachael J; Wright, Karen L

    2014-07-15

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in homeostatic and regulated cellular protein recycling and degradation via the lysosomal degradation pathway. Emerging data associate impaired autophagy, increased activity in the endocannabinoid system, and upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) protein expression during intestinal inflammation. We have investigated whether these three processes are linked. By assessing the impact of the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD), the synthetic cannabinoid arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA), and the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) on autophagosome formation, we explored whether these actions were responsible for cyclic SOCS3 protein levels. Our findings show that all three cannabinoids induce autophagy in a dose-dependent manner in fully differentiated Caco-2 cells, a model of mature intestinal epithelium. ACEA and AEA induced canonical autophagy, which was cannabinoid type 1 receptor-mediated. In contrast, CBD was able to bypass the cannabinoid type 1 receptor and the canonical pathway to induce autophagy, albeit to a lesser extent. Functionally, all three cannabinoids reduced SOCS3 protein expression, which was reversed by blocking early and late autophagy. In conclusion, the regulatory protein SOCS3 is regulated by autophagy, and cannabinoids play a role in this process, which could be important when therapeutic applications for the cannabinoids in inflammatory conditions are considered.

  7. Morphological and molecular evidence for functional organization along the rostrocaudal axis of the adult zebrafish intestine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The zebrafish intestine is a simple tapered tube that is folded into three sections. However, whether the intestine is functionally similar along its length remains unknown. Thus, a systematic structural and functional characterization of the zebrafish intestine is desirable for future studies of the digestive tract and the intestinal biology and development. Results To characterize the structure and function of the adult zebrafish intestine, we divided the intestine into seven roughly equal-length segments, S1-S7, and systematically examined the morphology of the mucosal lining, histology of the epithelium, and molecular signatures from transcriptome analysis. Prominent morphological features are circumferentially-oriented villar ridges in segments S1-S6 and the absence of crypts. Molecular characterization of the transcriptome from each segment shows that segments S1-S5 are very similar while S6 and S7 unique. Gene ontology analyses reveal that S1-S5 express genes whose functions involve metabolism of carbohydrates, transport of lipids and energy generation, while the last two segments display relatively limited function. Based on comparative Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, the first five segments share strong similarity with human and mouse small intestine while S6 shows similarity with human cecum and rectum, and S7 with human rectum. The intestinal tract does not display the anatomical, morphological, and molecular signatures of a stomach and thus we conclude that this organ is absent from the zebrafish digestive system. Conclusions Our genome-wide gene expression data indicate that, despite the lack of crypts, the rostral, mid, and caudal portions of the zebrafish intestine have distinct functions analogous to the mammalian small and large intestine, respectively. Organization of ridge structures represents a unique feature of zebrafish intestine, though they produce similar cross sections to mammalian intestines. Evolutionary lack of stomach, crypts

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SAP-1 protects against colitis through regulation of CEACAM20 in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoji; Kotani, Takenori; Supriatna, Yana; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Kawahara, Kohichi; Nishio, Miki; Daniwijaya, Edwin Widyanto; Sadakata, Hisanobu; Kusakari, Shinya; Mori, Munemasa; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akira; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-08-04

    Intestinal epithelial cells contribute to regulation of intestinal immunity in mammals, but the detailed molecular mechanisms of such regulation have remained largely unknown. Stomach-cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1, also known as PTPRH) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is localized specifically at microvilli of the brush border in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that SAP-1 ablation in interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice, a model of inflammatory bowel disease, resulted in a marked increase in the severity of colitis in association with up-regulation of mRNAs for various cytokines and chemokines in the colon. Tyrosine phosphorylation of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 20, an intestinal microvillus-specific transmembrane protein of the Ig superfamily, was greatly increased in the intestinal epithelium of the SAP-1-deficient animals, suggesting that this protein is a substrate for SAP-1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM20 by the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src and the consequent association of CEACAM20 with spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) promoted the production of IL-8 in cultured cells through the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, SAP-1 and CEACAM20 were found to form a complex through interaction of their ectodomains. SAP-1 and CEACAM20 thus constitute a regulatory system through which the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal immunity.

  9. TSC2/mTORC1 signaling controls Paneth and goblet cell differentiation in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y; Rychahou, P; Wang, Q; Weiss, H L; Evers, B M

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa undergoes a continual process of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, which is regulated by multiple signaling pathways. Notch signaling is critical for the control of intestinal stem cell maintenance and differentiation. However, the precise mechanisms involved in the regulation of differentiation are not fully understood. Previously, we have shown that tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) positively regulates the expression of the goblet cell differentiation marker, MUC2, in intestinal cells. Using transgenic mice constitutively expressing a dominant negative TSC2 allele, we observed that TSC2 inactivation increased mTORC1 and Notch activities, and altered differentiation throughout the intestinal epithelium, with a marked decrease in the goblet and Paneth cell lineages. Conversely, treatment of mice with either Notch inhibitor dibenzazepine (DBZ) or mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin significantly attenuated the reduction of goblet and Paneth cells. Accordingly, knockdown of TSC2 activated, whereas knockdown of mTOR or treatment with rapamycin decreased, the activity of Notch signaling in the intestinal cell line LS174T. Importantly, our findings demonstrate that TSC2/mTORC1 signaling contributes to the maintenance of intestinal epithelium homeostasis by regulating Notch activity. PMID:25654764

  10. Distinct ATOH1 and Neurog3 requirements define tuft cells as a new secretory cell type in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Gerbe, François; van Es, Johan H.; Makrini, Leila; Brulin, Bénédicte; Mellitzer, Georg; Robine, Sylvie; Romagnolo, Béatrice; Shroyer, Noah F.; Bourgaux, Jean-François; Pignodel, Christine; Clevers, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The unique morphology of tuft cells was first revealed by electron microscopy analyses in several endoderm-derived epithelia. Here, we explore the relationship of these cells with the other cell types of the intestinal epithelium and describe the first marker signature allowing their unambiguous identification. We demonstrate that although mature tuft cells express DCLK1, a putative marker of quiescent stem cells, they are post-mitotic, short lived, derive from Lgr5-expressing epithelial stem cells, and are found in mouse and human tumors. We show that whereas the ATOH1/MATH1 transcription factor is essential for their differentiation, Neurog3, SOX9, GFI1, and SPDEF are dispensable, which distinguishes these cells from enteroendocrine, Paneth, and goblet cells, and raises from three to four the number of secretory cell types in the intestinal epithelium. Moreover, we show that tuft cells are the main source of endogenous intestinal opioids and are the only epithelial cells that express cyclooxygenase enzymes, suggesting important roles for these cells in the intestinal epithelium physiopathology. PMID:21383077

  11. Binding Studies on Isolated Porcine Small Intestinal Mucosa and in vitro Toxicity Studies Reveal Lack of Effect of C. perfringens Beta-Toxin on the Porcine Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Simone; Wyder, Marianne; Candi, Ahmet; Regenscheit, Nadine; Nathues, Christina; van Immerseel, Filip; Posthaus, Horst

    2015-01-01

    Beta-toxin (CPB) is the essential virulence factor of C. perfringens type C causing necrotizing enteritis (NE) in different hosts. Using a pig infection model, we showed that CPB targets small intestinal endothelial cells. Its effect on the porcine intestinal epithelium, however, could not be adequately investigated by this approach. Using porcine neonatal jejunal explants and cryosections, we performed in situ binding studies with CPB. We confirmed binding of CPB to endothelial but could not detect binding to epithelial cells. In contrast, the intact epithelial layer inhibited CPB penetration into deeper intestinal layers. CPB failed to induce cytopathic effects in cultured polarized porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and primary jejunal epithelial cells. C. perfringens type C culture supernatants were toxic for cell cultures. This, however, was not inhibited by CPB neutralization. Our results show that, in the porcine small intestine, CPB primarily targets endothelial cells and does not bind to epithelial cells. An intact intestinal epithelial layer prevents CPB diffusion into underlying tissue and CPB alone does not cause direct damage to intestinal epithelial cells. Additional factors might be involved in the early epithelial damage which is needed for CPB diffusion towards its endothelial targets in the small intestine. PMID:25860161

  12. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  13. Effects of epithelium removal on relaxation of airway smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Togo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. We have studied the effect of epithelium removal on relaxation of guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or stimulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerves. Also examined were the effects of inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). 2. Epithelium removal produced a 3.6 +/- 0.4 fold leftward shift in the VIP concentration-response curve. The supersensitivity to VIP, following epithelium removal was abolished by phosphoramidon or thiorphan (NEP inhibitors), but unaffected by captopril (an ACE inhibitor). In intact trachea, the NEP inhibitors produced leftward shifts in the VIP curves similar to those produced by epithelium removal. 3. In contrast to responses to exogenous VIP, neurogenic NANC inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were affected neither by epithelial denudation nor by the peptidase inhibitors. 4. As in previous studies, epithelium removal increased tracheal sensitivity to isoprenaline. This was not altered by pretreatment with a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors. Thus, the effect of the NEP inhibitors on responses to VIP appears to be relatively specific. 5. These data indicate that exogenous VIP is a substrate for airway NEP, since inhibition of the enzyme potentiates the peptide. This is further evidence that the airway epithelium provides a source for the metabolism of mediators. 6. In guinea-pig trachea the NEP responsible for cleaving VIP may be located largely in the epithelial layer, since NEP inhibition was without effect on sensitivity to VIP in epithelium-denuded preparations. If VIP is a NANC inhibitory neurotransmitter in this tissue its degradation endogenously does not appear to involve epithelial NEP. PMID:2196967

  14. Intracellular Heat Shock Protein-70 Negatively Regulates Toll-like Receptor-4 Signaling in the Newborn Intestinal Epithelium1

    PubMed Central

    Afrazi, Amin; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Good, Misty; Jia, Hongpeng; Siggers, Richard; Yazji, Ibrahim; Neal, Matthew D.; Prindle, Thomas; Grant, Zachary; Branca, Maria F.; Ozolek, John; Chang, Eugene; Hackam, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the leading cause of gastrointestinal-related mortality in premature infants, and develops under conditions of exaggerated Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) signaling in the newborn intestinal epithelium. Since NEC does not develop spontaneously despite the presence of seemingly tonic stimulation of intestinal TLR4, we hypothesized that mechanisms must exist to constrain TLR4 signaling that become diminished during NEC pathogenesis, and focused on the intracellular stress response protein and chaperone Heat Shock Protein-70 (Hsp70). We now demonstrate that the induction of intracellular Hsp70 in enterocytes dramatically reduced TLR4 signaling as assessed by LPS-induced NFkB translocation, cytokine expression and apoptosis. These findings were confirmed in vivo, using mice that either globally lacked Hsp70 or which over-expressed Hsp70 within the intestinal epithelium. TLR4 activation itself significantly increased Hsp70 expression in enterocytes, which provided a mechanism of auto-inhibition of TLR4 signaling in enterocytes. In seeking to define the mechanisms involved, intracellular Hsp70-mediated inhibition of TLR4 signaling required both its substrate-binding EEVD-domain and association with the co-chaperone CHIP, resulting in ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation of TLR4. The expression of Hsp70 in the intestinal epithelium was significantly decreased in murine and human NEC compared to healthy controls, suggesting loss of Hsp70 protection from TLR4 could lead to NEC. In support of this, intestinal-Hsp70 overexpression in mice and pharmacologic upregulation of Hsp70 reversed TLR4-induced cytokines and enterocyte apoptosis, and prevented and treated experimental NEC. Thus, a novel TLR4 regulatory pathway exists within the newborn gut involving Hsp70 that may be pharmacologically activated to limit NEC severity. PMID:22461698

  15. Roles of the cytoskeleton and of protein phosphorylation events in the osmotic stress response in eel intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lionetto, Maria G; Pedersen, Stine F; Hoffmann, Else K; Giordano, Maria E; Schettino, Trifone

    2002-01-01

    The eel intestinal epithelium responds to an acute hypertonic challenge by a biphasic increase of the rate of Cl(-) absorption (measured as short circuit current, Isc, and creating a negative transepithelial potential, V(te), at the basolateral side of the epithelium). While the first, transient phase is bumetanide-insensitive, the second, sustained phase is bumetanide-sensitive, reflecting activation of the apically located Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) (NKCC) cotransporter, which correlates with the cellular RVI response. Here, we investigated the involvement of the cytoskeleton and of serine/threonine phosphorylation events in the osmotic stress-induced ion transport in the eel intestinal epithelium, focusing on the sustained RVI phase, as well as on the previously uncharacterized response to hypotonic stress. The study was carried out using confocal laser scanning microscopy, a quantitative F-actin assay, and transepithelial electrophysiological measurements (V(te) and Isc) in Ussing chambers. Hypertonic stress did not detectably alter either net F-actin content or F-actin organization. In contrast, a brief exposure to hypotonic stress decreased the total cellular F-actin content in eel intestinal epithelium by about 15%, detectable morphologically mainly as a decrease in the intensity of the apical brush border F-actin labeling.The bumetanide-sensitive response of V(te) and Isc to hypertonicity was potently inhibited by treatment with either cytochalasin, latrunculin A, colchicine, the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine, the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, or the serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor Calyculin A, but was unaffected by the PKA inhibitor H-89. The electrophysiological response of the epithelium to hypotonic stress was characterized by a sustained decrease of V(te) and Isc, which was smaller and recovered faster in the presence of either cytochalasin, latrunculin A, or colchicine. It is concluded that in eel intestinal

  16. The sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells controls organ size and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Bruno; Khadayate, Sanjay; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Sex differences in physiology and disease susceptibility are commonly attributed to developmental and/or hormonal factors, but there is increasing realisation that cell-intrinsic mechanisms play important and persistent roles1,2. Here we use the Drosophila melanogaster intestine to investigate the nature and significance of cellular sex in an adult somatic organ in vivo. We find that the adult intestinal epithelium is a cellular mosaic of different sex differentiation pathways, and displays extensive sex differences in expression of genes with roles in growth and metabolism. Cell-specific reversals of the sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells uncover its key roles in controlling organ size, its reproductive plasticity and its response to genetically induced tumours. Unlike previous examples of sexually dimorphic somatic stem cell activity, the sex differences in intestinal stem cell behaviour arise from intrinsic mechanisms, which control cell cycle duration and involve a new doublesex- and fruitless-independent branch of the sex differentiation pathway downstream of transformer. Together, our findings indicate that the plasticity of an adult somatic organ is reversibly controlled by its sexual identity, imparted by a new mechanism that may be active in more tissues than previously recognised. PMID:26887495

  17. Intestinal colonization and adhesion by enteroxigenic Escherichia coli: ultrastructural observations on adherence to ileal epithelium of the pig.

    PubMed

    Moon, H W; Nagy, B; Isaacson, R E

    1977-08-01

    Colonization of pig ileum by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that were enteropathogenic for pigs but that lacked K88 antigen (K88-) resulted in morphological characteristics similar to those reported for K88+ strains. Strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli from three different K88-serotypes adhered to the villous epithelium. In sections examined by transmission electron microscopy, adherent bacteria were separated from each other and from epithelial microvilli by peribacterial electron-lucent regions. The enterotoxigenic E. coli had appendages that extended into these regions. The appendages were morphologically characteristic for each strain. It is possible that these appendages were pili, polysaccharide K antigens, or structures resulting from some interaction between pili and polysaccharide. Certain pili or pilus-like structures may be virulence attributes that facilitate adhesion of enterotoxigenic E. coli to the intestinal epithelium.

  18. Kinetics of early cholera infection in the removable intestinal tie-adult rabbit diarrhea model.

    PubMed Central

    Spira, W M; Sack, R B

    1982-01-01

    The colonization of the small intestine of adult rabbits challenged with 5 X 10(7) cells of Vibrio cholerae strain Ogawa 395 has been examined in the removable intestinal tie-adult rabbit diarrhea (RITARD) model. During the first 6 h of infection, numbers of both free and adherent vibrios increased at a rate representing a generation time of about 71 min. Detectable fluid output in response to infection began at about 4 to 5 h postchallenge, and overt diarrhea was observed as early as 11 h. By 8 h after challenge, adherent V. cholerae reached a saturation concentration on the intestinal epithelium of approximately 5 X 10(8) cells per g of intestine, whereas numbers of free cells continued to increase at an exponential rate for at least 12 to 14 h. The concentration of adherent cells remained relatively constant at the saturation level during this period. This saturation level was similar in all parts of the small intestine. The concentration of adherent organisms increased significantly in moribund animals, suggesting that factors responsible for the earlier saturation equilibrium began changing as animals neared death. PMID:7068225

  19. Association of Escherichia coli with the Small Intestinal Epithelium I. Comparison of Enteropathogenic and Nonenteropathogenic Porcine Strains in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bertschinger, Hans U.; Moon, Harley W.; Whipp, Shannon C.

    1972-01-01

    Two enteropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli (EEC) differed from a nonenteropathogenic strain of E. coli (NEEC) in their association with porcine small intestinal epithelium. The EEC characteristically were found along villi from tip to base and contiguous to the brush border. They were not in crypts. In contrast, the NEEC characteristically remained in the central lumen near the tips of villi and was only occasionally contiguous to the brush border. No organisms were detected within epithelial cells. The difference in distribution between EEC and NEEC was apparent in ligated jejunal loops 45 min postexposure. The association between host and bacterial cells was most consistently demonstrated on frozen sections of intestine, as other histological techniques removed many bacteria. However, cellular details of the association were best demonstrated in chemically fixed tissues. Images PMID:4564680

  20. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  1. Constitutive TLR4 signalling in intestinal epithelium reduces tumor load by increasing apoptosis in APC(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Teo, W L; Low, M J; Meijer, L; Sanderson, I; Pettersson, S; Greicius, G

    2014-01-16

    The microbial pattern-recognizing Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are major signal transducers known to shape and influence the postnatal maturation of host intestinal epithelium. Perturbations in this intricate host-microbe cross-talk have been reported to be associated with uncontrolled epithelial cell growth and thus potential cancer development by mechanisms which are largely unknown. We therefore generated transgenic mice carrying a constitutively active TLR4 (CD4-TLR4) linked to an intestinal epithelial cell-specific promoter. Ex vivo analysis of transgenic crypt-villus organoid cultures revealed an increased proliferative capacity and a lowered cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) expression in these organoids compared with wild-type control cultures. Introducing the CD4-TLR4 transgene into APC(Min/+) mice (CD4-TLR4-APC(Min/+)), a model of colorectal carcinoma, resulted in a dramatic drop in tumor load as compared with control APC(Min/+) mice. Intestinal tumors from CD4-TLR4-APC(Min/+) mice displayed reduced Cox-2 protein, elevated interferon β expression and increased caspase-3 activity, which correlated with increased apoptosis in vivo. Thus, our data reveal that host microbiota-mediated signal transduction via TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells is far more complex than what is previously reported.

  2. Oral administration of the immunomodulator JBT-3002 induces endogenous interleukin 15 in intestinal macrophages for protection against irinotecan-mediated destruction of intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, H; Killion, J J; Bucana, C D; Yano, S; Fidler, I J

    1999-08-01

    We recently reported that p.o. administration of the new synthetic bacterial lipopeptide JBT-3002 can protect mice from irinotecan (CPT-11)-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism was not known. Because interleukin-15 (IL-15) is associated with maintenance of intestinal epithelial cell integrity, we examined whether p.o. administration of JBT-3002 elevates expression of this monocyte-derived cytokine. Four daily i.p. injections of 100 mg/kg CPT-11 were effective against liver metastases produced by CT-26 murine colon cancer cells, but severe damage to the intestinal epithelium and early death of the mice also resulted. Three consecutive daily p.o. doses of JBT-3002 prior to i.p. injection of irinotecan prevented the undesirable side effects of irinotecan without reducing its ability to eradicate liver metastases. Immunohistochemical analyses of the intestines of mice treated with JBT-3002 and CPT-11 demonstrated an increase in the number of dividing cells in the crypts and enhanced expression of IL-15 in lamina propria cells; the increase correlated with increased expression of the IL-15 gene as determined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. In vitro studies demonstrated that JBT-3002 induced expression of IL-15 in peritoneal macrophages but not in normal intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Moreover, the presence of IL-15 decreased irinotecan-mediated cytotoxicity of IEC-6 epithelial cells. These data show that the p.o. administration of JBT-3002 induces expression of IL-15 by macrophages in the lamina propria, which can prevent irinotecan-induced injury to the intestinal mucosa.

  3. Xenobiotic effects on intestinal stem cell proliferation in adult honey bee (Apis mellifera L) workers.

    PubMed

    Forkpah, Cordelia; Dixon, Luke R; Fahrbach, Susan E; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-01-01

    The causes of the current global decline in honey bee health are unknown. One major group of hypotheses invokes the pesticides and other xenobiotics to which this important pollinator species is often exposed. Most studies have focused on mortality or behavioral deficiencies in exposed honey bees while neglecting other biological functions and target organs. The midgut epithelium of honey bees presents an important interface between the insect and its environment. It is maintained by proliferation of intestinal stem cells throughout the adult life of honey bees. We used caged honey bees to test multiple xenobiotics for effects on the replicative activity of the intestinal stem cells under laboratory conditions. Most of the tested compounds did not alter the replicative activity of intestinal stem cells. However, colchicine, methoxyfenozide, tetracycline, and a combination of coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate significantly affected proliferation rate. All substances except methoxyfenozide decreased proliferation rate. Thus, the results indicate that some xenobiotics frequently used in apiculture and known to accumulate in honey bee hives may have hitherto unknown physiological effects. The nutritional status and the susceptibility to pathogens of honey bees could be compromised by the impacts of xenobiotics on the maintenance of the midgut epithelium. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that more comprehensive testing of xenobiotics may be required before novel or existing compounds can be considered safe for honey bees and other non-target species.

  4. Xenobiotic Effects on Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation in Adult Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L) Workers

    PubMed Central

    Forkpah, Cordelia; Dixon, Luke R.; Fahrbach, Susan E.; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-01-01

    The causes of the current global decline in honey bee health are unknown. One major group of hypotheses invokes the pesticides and other xenobiotics to which this important pollinator species is often exposed. Most studies have focused on mortality or behavioral deficiencies in exposed honey bees while neglecting other biological functions and target organs. The midgut epithelium of honey bees presents an important interface between the insect and its environment. It is maintained by proliferation of intestinal stem cells throughout the adult life of honey bees. We used caged honey bees to test multiple xenobiotics for effects on the replicative activity of the intestinal stem cells under laboratory conditions. Most of the tested compounds did not alter the replicative activity of intestinal stem cells. However, colchicine, methoxyfenozide, tetracycline, and a combination of coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate significantly affected proliferation rate. All substances except methoxyfenozide decreased proliferation rate. Thus, the results indicate that some xenobiotics frequently used in apiculture and known to accumulate in honey bee hives may have hitherto unknown physiological effects. The nutritional status and the susceptibility to pathogens of honey bees could be compromised by the impacts of xenobiotics on the maintenance of the midgut epithelium. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that more comprehensive testing of xenobiotics may be required before novel or existing compounds can be considered safe for honey bees and other non-target species. PMID:24608542

  5. Organ Culture as a Model System for Studies on Enterotoxin Interactions with the Intestinal Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Ulver Spangsberg; Hansen, Gert H; Danielsen, E Michael

    2016-01-01

    Studies on bacterial enterotoxin-epithelium interactions require model systems capable of mimicking the events occurring at the molecular and cellular levels during intoxication. In this chapter, we describe organ culture as an often neglected alternative to whole-animal experiments or enterocyte-like cell lines. Like cell culture, organ culture is versatile and suitable for studying rapidly occurring events, such as enterotoxin binding and uptake. In addition, it is advantageous in offering an epithelium with more authentic permeability/barrier properties than any cell line, as well as a subepithelial lamina propria, harboring the immune cells of the gut mucosa.

  6. Spatial differentiation of the intestinal epithelium: analysis of enteroendocrine cells containing immunoreactive serotonin, secretin, and substance P in normal and transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, K A; Gordon, J I

    1990-01-01

    The mammalian intestinal epithelium undergoes continuous and rapid renewal of its four principal terminally differentiated cell types. These cells arise from multipotent stem cells located at or near the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn. The differentiation process is precisely organized along two spatial dimensions (axes)--from the crypt to the villus tip and from the duodenum to the colon. The enteroendocrine cell population provides a sensitive marker of the intestine's topologic differentiation. At least 15 different regionally distributed subsets have been described based on their principal neuroendocrine products. We have used immunocytochemical methods to characterize the spatial relationships of the serotonin-, secretin-, and substance P-containing enteroendocrine cell subsets in normal adult C57BL/6J x LT/Sv mice as well as in transgenic littermates that contain rat liver fatty acid-binding protein-human growth hormone fusion genes. Our results reveal precise spatial interrelationships between these populations and suggest a differentiation pathway that may involve the sequential expression of substance P, serotonin, and secretin. Images PMID:1696730

  7. Direct Activation of Amidohydrolase Domain-Containing 1 Gene by Thyroid Hormone Implicates a Role in the Formation of Adult Intestinal Stem Cells During Xenopus Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Morihiro; Miller, Thomas C; Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2015-09-01

    The T3-dependent anuran metamorphosis resembles postembryonic development in mammals, the period around birth when plasma T3 levels peak. In particular, the remodeling of the intestine during metamorphosis mimics neonatal intestinal maturation in mammals when the adult intestinal epithelial self-renewing system is established. We have been using intestinal metamorphosis to investigate how the organ-specific adult stem cells are formed during vertebrate development. Early studies in Xenopus laevis have shown that this process involves complete degeneration of the larval epithelium and de novo formation of adult stem cells. A tissue-specific microarray analysis of intestinal gene expression during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis has identified a number of candidate stem cell genes. Here we have carried out detailed analyses of one such gene, amidohydrolase domain containing 1 (AMDHD1) gene, which encodes an enzyme in the histidine catabolic pathway. We show that AMDHD1 is exclusively expressed in the proliferating adult epithelial stem cells during metamorphosis with little expression in other intestinal tissues. We further provide evidence that T3 activates AMDHD1 gene expression directly at the transcription level through T3 receptor binding to the AMDHD1 gene in the intestine. In addition, we have reported earlier that histidine ammonia-lyase gene, another gene in histidine catabolic pathway, is similarly regulated by T3 in the intestine. These results together suggest that histidine catabolism plays a critical role in the formation and/or proliferation of adult intestinal stem cells during metamorphosis.

  8. Molecular and functional expression of high conductance Ca 2+ activated K+ channels in the eel intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lionetto, Maria G; Rizzello, Antonia; Giordano, Maria E; Maffia, Michele; De Nuccio, Francesco; Nicolardi, Giuseppe; Hoffmann, Else K; Schettino, Trifone

    2008-01-01

    Several types of K(+) channels have been identified in epithelial cells. Among them high conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK channels) are of relevant importance for their involvement in regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response following hypotonic stress. The aim of the present work was to investigate the functional and molecular expression of BK in the eel intestine, which is a useful experimental model for cell volume regulation research. In the present paper using rat BK channel-specific primer, a RT-PCR signal of 696 pb cDNA was detected in eel intestine, whole nucleotide sequence showed high similarity (83%) to the alpha subunit of BK channel family. BK channel protein expression was verified by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy, while the functional role of BK channels in epithelial ion transport mechanisms and cell volume regulation was examined by electrophysiological and morphometric analysis on the intact tissue. BK(Ca) channels appeared to be localized along all the plasma membrane of the enterocytes; the apical part of the villi showed the most intense immunostaining. These channels were silent in basal condition, but were activated on both membranes (apical and basolateral) by increasing intracellular Ca(2+) concentration with the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin (1 microM). BK(Ca) channels were also activated on both membranes by hypotonic swelling of the epithelium and their inhibition by 100 nM iberiotoxin (specific BK(Ca) inhibitor) abolished the Regulatory Volume Decrease (RVD) of the intestinal cells after hypotonic swelling. In conclusion, our results demonstrated the molecular and functional expression of high conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels in eel intestine; the physiological role of these channels is mainly related to the RVD response of the epithelial cells following hypotonic swelling.

  9. Does the adult human ciliary body epithelium contain "true" retinal stem cells?

    PubMed

    Frøen, Rebecca; Johnsen, Erik O; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Facskó, Andrea; Petrovski, Goran; Moe, Morten C

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports of retinal stem cells being present in several locations of the adult eye have sparked great hopes that they may be used to treat the millions of people worldwide who suffer from blindness as a result of retinal disease or injury. A population of proliferative cells derived from the ciliary body epithelium (CE) has been considered one of the prime stem cell candidates, and as such they have received much attention in recent years. However, the true nature of these cells in the adult human eye has still not been fully elucidated, and the stem cell claim has become increasingly controversial in light of new and conflicting reports. In this paper, we will try to answer the question of whether the available evidence is strong enough for the research community to conclude that the adult human CE indeed harbors stem cells.

  10. DLL4 promotes continuous adult intestinal lacteal regeneration and dietary fat transport

    PubMed Central

    Bernier-Latmani, Jeremiah; Cisarovsky, Christophe; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Bruand, Marine; Jaquet, Muriel; Davanture, Suzel; Ragusa, Simone; Siegert, Stefanie; Dormond, Olivier; Benedito, Rui; Radtke, Freddy; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Petrova, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    The small intestine is a dynamic and complex organ that is characterized by constant epithelium turnover and crosstalk among various cell types and the microbiota. Lymphatic capillaries of the small intestine, called lacteals, play key roles in dietary fat absorption and the gut immune response; however, little is known about the molecular regulation of lacteal function. Here, we performed a high-resolution analysis of the small intestinal stroma and determined that lacteals reside in a permanent regenerative, proliferative state that is distinct from embryonic lymphangiogenesis or quiescent lymphatic vessels observed in other tissues. We further demonstrated that this continuous regeneration process is mediated by Notch signaling and that the expression of the Notch ligand delta-like 4 (DLL4) in lacteals requires activation of VEGFR3 and VEGFR2. Moreover, genetic inactivation of Dll4 in lymphatic endothelial cells led to lacteal regression and impaired dietary fat uptake. We propose that such a slow lymphatic regeneration mode is necessary to match a unique need of intestinal lymphatic vessels for both continuous maintenance, due to the constant exposure to dietary fat and mechanical strain, and efficient uptake of fat and immune cells. Our work reveals how lymphatic vessel responses are shaped by tissue specialization and uncover a role for continuous DLL4 signaling in the function of adult lymphatic vasculature. PMID:26529256

  11. Transcriptome profiling of the small intestinal epithelium in germfree versus conventional piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain insight into host-microbe interactions in a piglet model, a functional genomics approach was used to address the working hypothesis that transcriptionally regulated genes associated with promoting epithelial barrier function are activated as a defensive response to the intestinal microbiota....

  12. Microbiota modulate transcription in the intestinal epithelium without remodeling the accessible chromatin landscape

    PubMed Central

    Camp, J. Gray; Frank, Christopher L.; Lickwar, Colin R.; Guturu, Harendra; Rube, Tomas; Wenger, Aaron M.; Chen, Jenny; Bejerano, Gill; Crawford, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiota regulate intestinal physiology by modifying host gene expression along the length of the intestine, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unresolved. Transcriptional specificity occurs through interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and cis-regulatory regions (CRRs) characterized by nucleosome-depleted accessible chromatin. We profiled transcriptome and accessible chromatin landscapes in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from mice reared in the presence or absence of microbiota. We show that regional differences in gene transcription along the intestinal tract were accompanied by major alterations in chromatin accessibility. Surprisingly, we discovered that microbiota modify host gene transcription in IECs without significantly impacting the accessible chromatin landscape. Instead, microbiota regulation of host gene transcription might be achieved by differential expression of specific TFs and enrichment of their binding sites in nucleosome-depleted CRRs near target genes. Our results suggest that the chromatin landscape in IECs is preprogrammed by the host in a region-specific manner to permit responses to microbiota through binding of open CRRs by specific TFs. PMID:24963153

  13. Molecular events in the cell types of the olfactory epithelium during adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adult neurogenesis, fundamental for cellular homeostasis in the mammalian olfactory epithelium, requires major shifts in gene expression to produce mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) from multipotent progenitor cells. To understand these dynamic events requires identifying not only the genes involved but also the cell types that express each gene. Only then can the interrelationships of the encoded proteins reveal the sequences of molecular events that control the plasticity of the adult olfactory epithelium. Results Of 4,057 differentially abundant mRNAs at 5 days after lesion-induced OSN replacement in adult mice, 2,334 were decreased mRNAs expressed by mature OSNs. Of the 1,723 increased mRNAs, many were expressed by cell types other than OSNs and encoded proteins involved in cell proliferation and transcriptional regulation, consistent with increased basal cell proliferation. Others encoded fatty acid metabolism and lysosomal proteins expressed by infiltrating macrophages that help scavenge debris from the apoptosis of mature OSNs. The mRNAs of immature OSNs behaved dichotomously, increasing if they supported early events in OSN differentiation (axon initiation, vesicular trafficking, cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesions) but decreasing if they supported homeostatic processes that carry over into mature OSNs (energy production, axon maintenance and protein catabolism). The complexity of shifts in gene expression responsible for converting basal cells into neurons was evident in the increased abundance of 203 transcriptional regulators expressed by basal cells and immature OSNs. Conclusions Many of the molecular changes evoked during adult neurogenesis can now be ascribed to specific cellular events in the OSN cell lineage, thereby defining new stages in the development of these neurons. Most notably, the patterns of gene expression in immature OSNs changed in a characteristic fashion as these neurons differentiated. Initial patterns

  14. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium.

    PubMed

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Klein, Ophir D; Barlow, Linda A

    2014-08-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation.

  15. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Klein, Ophir D.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation. PMID:24993944

  16. Taurine drinking attenuates the burden of intestinal adult worms and muscle larvae in mice with Trichinella spiralis infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan-Rong; Liu, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Jin-Sheng; Ji, Chao-Yue; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2013-10-01

    The parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis can cause trichinellosis, which leads to pathological processes in the intestine and muscle. The intestinal invasion determines the development, subsequent course, and consequences of the disease. Gastrointestinal nematode infection, including with T. spiralis, is accompanied by a rapid and reversible expansion of mucosal mast cell and goblet cell in the intestinal epithelium, which play important roles in the host immune response to parasite and worm expulsion from the intestine. Taurine and its derivatives have anti-infection and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated whether taurine supplementation in mice could influence the development and pathological processes of infection with T. spiralis. Supplementing 1% taurine in drinking water in mice infected with T. spiralis could alleviate the burden of intestinal adult worms on days 7 and 10 postinfection (all p < 0.01) and the formation of infective muscle larvae in striated muscle during T. spiralis infection (p < 0.01). As compared with T. spiralis infection alone, taurine treatment increased the number of goblet cells on days 7, 10, and 15 (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05) and alleviated intestinal mucosal mast cell hyperplasia on days 10 and 15 (all p < 0.01). So taurine supplementation in drinking water increased infection-induced intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia and ameliorated mucosal mastocytosis. Thus, taurine can ameliorate the pathological processes of trichinellosis and may be of great value for the treatment and prevention of infection with T. spiralis and other gastrointestinal nematodes.

  17. Thyroid Hormone-Induced Activation of Notch Signaling is Required for Adult Intestinal Stem Cell Development During Xenopus Laevis Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenta; Kajita, Mitsuko; Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko

    2016-11-21

    In Xenopus laevis intestine during metamorphosis, the larval epithelial cells are removed by apoptosis, and the adult epithelial stem (AE) cells appear concomitantly. They proliferate and differentiate to form the adult epithelium (Ep). Thyroid hormone (TH) is well established to trigger this remodeling by regulating the expression of various genes including Notch receptor. To study the role of Notch signaling, we have analyzed the expression of its components, including the ligands (DLL and Jag), receptor (Notch), and targets (Hairy), in the metamorphosing intestine by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry. We show that they are up-regulated during both natural and TH-induced metamorphosis in a tissue-specific manner. Particularly, Hairy1 is specifically expressed in the AE cells. Moreover, up-regulation of Hairy1 and Hairy2b by TH was prevented by treating tadpoles with a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI), which inhibits Notch signaling. More importantly, TH-induced up-regulation of LGR5, an adult intestinal stem cell marker, was suppressed by GSI treatment. Our results suggest that Notch signaling plays a role in stem cell development by regulating the expression of Hairy genes during intestinal remodeling. Furthermore, we show with organ culture experiments that prolonged exposure of tadpole intestine to TH plus GSI leads to hyperplasia of secretory cells and reduction of absorptive cells. Our findings here thus provide evidence for evolutionarily conserved role of Notch signaling in intestinal cell fate determination but more importantly reveal, for the first time, an important role of Notch pathway in the formation of adult intestinal stem cells during vertebrate development. Stem Cells 2016.

  18. Intestinal mast cells and eosinophils in relation to Strongyloides ratti adult expulsion from the small and large intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Shintoku, Y; Kadosaka, T; Kimura, E; Takagi, H; Kondo, S; Itoh, M

    2013-04-01

    Mucosal mast cells (MMC) play a crucial role in the expulsion of Strongyloides ratti adults from the small intestine of mice. We reported the large intestinal parasitism of S. ratti in rats, and there has been no report on MMC in the large intestine of the natural host. We studied kinetics of MMC, together with eosinophils, in the upper and lower small intestines, caecum and colon of infected rats. Two distinct phases of mastocytosis were revealed: one in the upper small intestine triggered by stimulation of 'ordinary' adults, and the other in the colon stimulated by 'immune-resistant' adults that started parasitizing the colon around 19 days post-infection. In all 4 intestinal sites, the MMC peaks were observed 5-7 days after the number of adult worms became the maximum and the height of MMC peaks appeared to be dependent on the number of parasitic adults, suggesting an important role played by worms themselves in the MMC buildup.

  19. Rapid fucosylation of intestinal epithelium sustains host-commensal symbiosis in sickness

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Joseph M.; Maurice, Corinne F.; Kinnebrew, Melissa A.; Abt, Michael C.; Schenten, Dominik; Golovkina, Tatyana; Bogatyrev, Said R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Pamer, Eric G.; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Chervonsky, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic infection induces conserved physiological responses that include both resistance and ‘tolerance of infection’ mechanisms1. Temporary anorexia associated with an infection is often beneficial2,3 reallocating energy from food foraging towards resistance to infection4 or depriving pathogens of nutrients 5. It imposes, however, a stress on intestinal commensals, as they also experience reduced substrate availability and impacting host fitness due to the loss of caloric intake and colonization resistance (protection from additional infections)6. We hypothesized that the host might utilize internal resources to support the gut microbiota during the acute phase of the disease. Here we show that systemic exposure to Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands causes rapid α1,2-fucosylation of the small intestine epithelial cells (IEC), which requires sensing of TLR agonists and production of IL-23 by dendritic cells, activation of innate lymphoid cells and expression of α1,2-Fucosyltransferase-2 (Fut2) by IL-22-stimulated IECs. Fucosylated proteins are shed into the lumen and fucose is liberated and metabolized by the gut microbiota, as shown by reporter bacteria and community-wide analysis of microbial gene expression. Fucose affects the expression of microbial metabolic pathways and reduces the expression of bacterial virulence genes. It also improves host tolerance of the mild pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Thus, rapid IEC fucosylation appears to be a protective mechanism that utilizes the host's resources to maintain host-microbial interactions during pathogen-induced stress. PMID:25274297

  20. Permeability of milk protein antigens across the intestinal epithelium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Marcon-Genty, D; Tomé, D; Dumontier, A M; Kheroua, O; Desjeux, J F

    1989-01-01

    Degradations by proteolytic enzymes and intestinal epithelial permeability represent two major drawbacks to the transfer of food protein antigens to blood. These steps were studied in vitro for the milk protein antigens beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg), alpha-Lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-casein (beta-cas). Pepsin-trypsin hydrolysis and permeability in isolated rabbit ileum in Ussing chamber were suited by ELISA and radiolabelled-protein measurement. Pepsin-trypsin hydrolysis showed an increasing resistance in the order beta-cas less than alpha-La less than beta-Lg. The rate of absorption of the antigenic proteins by isolated rabbit ileum was in the same order, and the rate of absorption of the whole proteins (degraded and antigenic forms) was significantly higher for beta-Lg than for alpha-La and beta-cas. These results suggest a selective intestinal permeability for milk protein antigens. This selectivity is probably important in the mechanism of food protein sensitization via the oral route.

  1. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Toll-Interacting Protein in the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kurihara, Kenta; Nakata, Kazuaki; Narabayashi, Hikari; Hamamoto, Yuji; Suzuki, Makoto; Tsuda, Masato; Hanazawa, Shigemasa; Hosono, Akira; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses against gut microbiota should be minimized to avoid unnecessary inflammation at mucosal surface. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of Toll-interacting protein (Tollip), an inhibitor of TLRs and IL-1 family cytokine-related intracellular signaling, in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Comparable mRNA expression was observed in murine small and large IECs (S-IECs and L-IECs). However, Tollip protein was only detected in L-IECs, but not in S-IECs. Similar results were obtained in germ-free mice, indicating that L-IEC-specific TOLLIP expression does not depend on bacterial colonization. Next, to understand the mechanisms underlying the post-transcriptional repression of Tollip, 3´-UTR-mediated translational regulation was evaluated. The region +1876/+2398 was responsible for the repression of Tollip expression. This region included the target sequence of miR-31. The inhibition of miR-31 restored the 3´-UTR-meditaed translational repression. In addition, miR-31 expression was significantly higher in S-IECs than in L-IECs, suggesting that miR-31 represses the translation of Tollip mRNA in S-IECs. Collectively, we conclude that the translation of Tollip is inhibited in S-IECs, at least in part, by miR-31 to yield L-IEC-specific high-level expression of the Tollip protein, which may contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. PMID:27741296

  2. Organoids as an ex vivo model for studying the serotonin system in the murine small intestine and colon epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Takeshi; Saito, Shinichi; Osaki, Yosuke; Hamada, Akihiro; Aoki-Yoshida, Ayako; Sonoyama, Kei

    2016-05-20

    Intestinal organoids were recently established as an ex vivo model of the intestinal epithelium. The present study investigated the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system using organoids. Organoids from murine small intestinal and colonic crypts were successfully cultured. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that small intestinal and colonic organoids express mRNAs encoding tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1) (the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT synthesis), serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), 5-HT receptor (HTR)2A, HTR2B, and HTR4. SERT mRNA levels were significantly higher in the small intestine than in the colon in both the mucosal tissues and organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Although the 5-HT concentration and levels of chromogranin A (CgA) (an enteroendocrine cell marker), TPH1, and HTR4 mRNAs were significantly higher in the colonic mucosa than the small intestinal mucosa, they were the same in small intestinal and colonic organoids. There were no significant differences in HTR2A and HTR2B mRNA levels between the small intestine and colon in either the mucosal tissues or organoids. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the number of CgA-positive cells in the colonic organoids appeared to increase upon culturing with acetate. Acetate supplementation significantly increased CgA, TPH1, and HTR4 mRNA levels in the colonic organoids. We propose that organoids are useful for investigating the 5-HT system in the intestinal epithelium, even though colonic organoids may require gut microbiota-derived factors such as short-chain fatty acids.

  3. Midgut malrotation causing intermittent intestinal obstruction in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Bektasoglu, Huseyin Kazim; Idiz, Ufuk Oguz; Hasbahceci, Mustafa; Yardimci, Erkan; Firat, Yurdakul Deniz; Karatepe, Oguzhan; Muslumanoglu, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    Midgut malrotation is a congenital anomaly of intestinal rotation and fixation that is generally seen in neonatal population. Adult cases are rarely reported. Early diagnosis is crucial to avoid life threatening complications. Here, we present an adulthood case of midgut volvulus as a rare cause of acute abdomen.

  4. Microvillus inclusion disease: a genetic defect affecting apical membrane protein traffic in intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ameen, N A; Salas, P J

    2000-01-01

    The striking similarities between microvillus inclusions (MIs) in enterocytes in microvillus inclusion disease (MID) and vacuolar apical compartment in tissue culture epithelial cells, led us to analyze endoscopic biopsies of duodenal mucosa of a patient after the samples were used for diagnostic procedures. Samples from another patient with an unrelated disease were used as controls. The MID enterocytes showed a decrease in the thickness of the apical F-actin layer, and normal microtubules. The immunofluorescence analysis of the distribution of five apical membrane markers (sucrase isomaltase, alkaline phosphatase, NHE-3 Na+/H+ exchanger, cGMP-dependent protein kinase, and cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator), showed low levels of these proteins in their standard localization at the apical membrane as compared with normal duodenal epithelium processed in parallel. Instead, four of these markers were found in a diffuse distribution in the apical cytoplasm, below the terminal web (as indicated by co-localization with F-actin and cytokeratin 19), and in MIs as well. The basolateral protein Na(+)-K+ATPase, in contrast, was normally localized. These results support the hypothesis that MID may represent the first genetic defect affecting apical membrane traffic, possibly in a late step of apical exocytosis.

  5. Morphology of the epithelium of the lower rectum and the anal canal in the adult human.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Noguchi, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Kaoruko; Akashi, Yuichi; Kawahara, Katsunobu; Shimada, Tatsuo

    2012-06-01

    The anal canal is an important body part clinically. However, there is no agreement about the epithelium of the anal canal, the anal transitional zone (ATZ) epithelium in particular. The aim of this study is to clarify the structure of the epithelium of the human lower rectum and anal canal. Intact rectum and anus obtained from patients who underwent surgery for rectal carcinoma were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy (LM and SEM). By LM, three types of epithelium were observed in the anal canal: simple columnar epithelium, stratified squamous epithelium, and stratified columnar epithelium. The lower rectum was composed of simple columnar epithelium. SEM findings showed stratified squamous epithelium that consisted of squamous cells with microridges, changing to simple columnar epithelium consisting of columnar cells with short microvilli at the anorectal line. LM and SEM observations in a one-to-one ratio revealed that the area of stratified columnar epithelium based on LM corresponded to the anal crypt and sinus. In conclusion, the epithelium of the human anal canal was fundamentally composed of simple columnar epithelium and stratified squamous epithelium. We found no evidence of the ATZ.

  6. Crypt stem cell survival in the mouse intestinal epithelium is regulated by prostaglandins synthesized through cyclooxygenase-1.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, S M; Schloemann, S; Tessner, T; Seibert, K; Stenson, W F

    1997-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are important mediators of epithelial integrity and function in the gastrointestinal tract. Relatively little is known, however, about the mechanism by which PGs affect stem cells in the intestine during normal epithelial turnover, or during wound repair. PGs are synthesized from arachidonate by either of two cyclooxygenases, cyclooxygenase-1 (Cox-1) or cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), which are present in a wide variety of mamalian cells. Cox-1 is thought to be a constitutively expressed enzyme, and the expression of Cox-2 is inducible by cytokines or other stimuli in a variety of cell types. We investigated the role of PGs in mouse intestinal stem cell survival and proliferation following radiation injury. The number of surviving crypt stem cells was determined 3.5 d after irradiation by the microcolony assay. Radiation injury induced a dose-dependent decrease in the number of surviving crypts. Indomethacin, an inhibitor of Cox-1 and Cox-2, further reduced the number of surviving crypts in irradiated mice. The indomethacin dose response for inhibition of PGE2 production and reduction of crypt survival were similar. DimethylPGE2 reversed the indomethacin-induced decrease in crypt survival. Selective Cox-2 inhibitors had no effect on crypt survival. PGE2, Cox-1 mRNA, and Cox-1 protein levels all increase in the 3 d after irradiation. Immunohistochemistry for Cox-1 demonstrated localization in epithelial cells of the crypt in the unirradiated mouse, and in the regenerating crypt epithelium in the irradiated mouse. We conclude that radiation injury results in increased Cox-1 levels in crypt stem cells and their progeny, and that PGE2 produced through Cox-1 promotes crypt stem cell survival and proliferation. PMID:9077547

  7. Protective effects of ID331 Triticum monococcum gliadin on in vitro models of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Iacomino, Giuseppe; Di Stasio, Luigia; Fierro, Olga; Picariello, Gianluca; Venezia, Antonella; Gazza, Laura; Ferranti, Pasquale; Mamone, Gianfranco

    2016-12-01

    A growing interest in developing new strategies for preventing coeliac disease has motivated efforts to identify cereals with null or reduced toxicity. In the current study, we investigate the biological effects of ID331 Triticum monococcum gliadin-derived peptides in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Triticum aestivum gliadin derived peptides were employed as a positive control. The effects on epithelial permeability, zonulin release, viability, and cytoskeleton reorganization were investigated. Our findings confirmed that ID331 gliadin did not enhance permeability and did not induce zonulin release, cytotoxicity or cytoskeleton reorganization of Caco-2 cell monolayers. We also demonstrated that ID331 ω-gliadin and its derived peptide ω(105-123) exerted a protective action, mitigating the injury of Triticum aestivum gliadin on cell viability and cytoskeleton reorganization. These results may represent a new opportunity for the future development of innovative strategies to reduce gluten toxicity in the diet of patients with gluten intolerance.

  8. Seirogan (wood creosote) inhibits stress-induced ion secretion in rat intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ataka, Koji; Kuge, Tomoo; Venkova, Kalina; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2003-07-01

    Acute stress in often associated with abnormalities in gastrointestinal function, including enhanced secretion of water and electrolytes that leads to diarrhea. The goal of our study was to investigate whether Seirogan inhibits stress-induced intestinal secretion in Wistar-Kyoto rats. Electrogenic ion secretion was measured in modified Ussing chambers as an increase in basal short-circuit current (Isc) across isolated rat jejunal or colonic mucosal sheets. Mucosal preparations from rats exposed to cold restraint stress showed a significant increase in basal Isc compared to controls. The cumulative addition of Seirogan to the Ussing chamber caused a concentration-dependent reduction of the stress-induced increase of basal Isc to levels resembling nonstressed controls. In a separate experiment, Seirogan (15 mg/kg) administered by oral gavage inhibited stress-induced secretion and normalized basal Isc in the jejunum and colon. The results suggest that Seirogan may be an effective therapy for patients with stress-associated diarrhea.

  9. Starving for more: Nutrient sensing by LIN-28 in adult intestinal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In this Extra View, we extend our recent work on the protein LIN-28 and its role in adult stem cell divisions. LIN-28 is an mRNA- and microRNA-binding protein that is conserved from worms to humans. When expressed ectopically, it promotes the reprogramming of differentiated vertebrate cells into pluripotent stem cells as well as the regeneration of vertebrate tissues after injury. However, its endogenous function in stem cell populations is less clear. We recently reported that LIN-28 is specifically expressed in progenitor cells in the adult Drosophila intestine and enhances insulin signaling within this population. Loss of lin-28 alters the division patterns of these progenitor cells, limiting the growth of the intestinal epithelium that is ordinarily caused by feeding. Thus, LIN-28 is part of an uncharacterized circuit used to remodel a tissue in response to environmental cues like nutrition. Here, we extend this analysis by reporting that the levels of LIN-28 in progenitor cells are sensitive to nutrient availability. In addition, we speculate about the role of LIN-28 in the translational control of target mRNAs such as Insulin Receptor (InR) and how such translational control may be an important mechanism that underlies the stem cell dynamics needed for tissue homeostasis and growth.

  10. Transport of aspalathin, a Rooibos tea flavonoid, across the skin and intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao; du Plessis, Jeanetta; du Preez, Jan; Hamman, Josias; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2008-05-01

    Since Rooibos tea contains high levels of flavonoid antioxidants with potential health benefits when taken orally or applied topically, the quantity of the antioxidants crossing the physiological barriers is of scientific, clinical and commercial importance. This study investigated the in vitro transport of aspalathin, a unique flavonoid constituent of Rooibos tea, across intestinal epithelial cells and the human skin. The transport studies were conducted for both pure aspalathin solutions and extracts from unfermented (or green) Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) aerial plant material across human abdominal skin in vertical Franz diffusion cells and Caco-2 cell monolayers in Transwell 6-well plates. The results obtained from the percutaneous permeation studies demonstrated that only 0.01% of the initial aspalathin dose from both the test solution and extract permeated through the skin, which was in accordance with the prediction from its log P value of -0.347. A portion of 0.07% of the initial aspalathin dose penetrated the different layers of the skin for the green Rooibos extract solution and 0.08% for the pure aspalathin solution. The transport of aspalathin across Caco-2 cell monolayers was concentration dependent and reached almost 100% (P(app) = 20.93 x 10(-6) cm/s) of the initial dose in the highest concentration tested for the extract, while it was only 79.03% (P(app) = 15.34 x 10(-6) cm/s) of the initial dose for the highest concentration of the aspalathin solution.

  11. Cross-talk between Akkermansia muciniphila and intestinal epithelium controls diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Everard, Amandine; Belzer, Clara; Geurts, Lucie; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P.; Druart, Céline; Bindels, Laure B.; Guiot, Yves; Derrien, Muriel; Muccioli, Giulio G.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; de Vos, Willem M.; Cani, Patrice D.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier disruption. Microbial composition and the mechanisms of interaction with the host that affect gut barrier function during obesity and type 2 diabetes have not been elucidated. We recently isolated Akkermansia muciniphila, which is a mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the mucus layer. The presence of this bacterium inversely correlates with body weight in rodents and humans. However, the precise physiological roles played by this bacterium during obesity and metabolic disorders are unknown. This study demonstrated that the abundance of A. muciniphila decreased in obese and type 2 diabetic mice. We also observed that prebiotic feeding normalized A. muciniphila abundance, which correlated with an improved metabolic profile. In addition, we demonstrated that A. muciniphila treatment reversed high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders, including fat-mass gain, metabolic endotoxemia, adipose tissue inflammation, and insulin resistance. A. muciniphila administration increased the intestinal levels of endocannabinoids that control inflammation, the gut barrier, and gut peptide secretion. Finally, we demonstrated that all these effects required viable A. muciniphila because treatment with heat-killed cells did not improve the metabolic profile or the mucus layer thickness. In summary, this study provides substantial insight into the intricate mechanisms of bacterial (i.e., A. muciniphila) regulation of the cross-talk between the host and gut microbiota. These results also provide a rationale for the development of a treatment that uses this human mucus colonizer for the prevention or treatment of obesity and its associated metabolic disorders. PMID:23671105

  12. Cross-talk between Akkermansia muciniphila and intestinal epithelium controls diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Everard, Amandine; Belzer, Clara; Geurts, Lucie; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P; Druart, Céline; Bindels, Laure B; Guiot, Yves; Derrien, Muriel; Muccioli, Giulio G; Delzenne, Nathalie M; de Vos, Willem M; Cani, Patrice D

    2013-05-28

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier disruption. Microbial composition and the mechanisms of interaction with the host that affect gut barrier function during obesity and type 2 diabetes have not been elucidated. We recently isolated Akkermansia muciniphila, which is a mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the mucus layer. The presence of this bacterium inversely correlates with body weight in rodents and humans. However, the precise physiological roles played by this bacterium during obesity and metabolic disorders are unknown. This study demonstrated that the abundance of A. muciniphila decreased in obese and type 2 diabetic mice. We also observed that prebiotic feeding normalized A. muciniphila abundance, which correlated with an improved metabolic profile. In addition, we demonstrated that A. muciniphila treatment reversed high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders, including fat-mass gain, metabolic endotoxemia, adipose tissue inflammation, and insulin resistance. A. muciniphila administration increased the intestinal levels of endocannabinoids that control inflammation, the gut barrier, and gut peptide secretion. Finally, we demonstrated that all these effects required viable A. muciniphila because treatment with heat-killed cells did not improve the metabolic profile or the mucus layer thickness. In summary, this study provides substantial insight into the intricate mechanisms of bacterial (i.e., A. muciniphila) regulation of the cross-talk between the host and gut microbiota. These results also provide a rationale for the development of a treatment that uses this human mucus colonizer for the prevention or treatment of obesity and its associated metabolic disorders.

  13. The lack of protective effects of tea supplementation on liver and jejunal epithelium in adult rats exposed to cadmium and lead.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ewa; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Dobrowolski, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    Adult rats at the age of 12 weeks were divided into the control group and groups supplemented with green (GT), black (BT), red (RT), or white (WT) tea extracts. The diet (except that for the control) was mixed with 7 mg Cd/kg and 50 mg Pb/kg. The experiment lasted 12 weeks. Basal haematology and plasma biochemical parameters as well as the histomorphometrical parameters of jejunal epithelium and liver were determined. The lowest body mass was found in the RT and WT groups. Some functional (increased plasma ALT and AST, and the de Ritis coefficient) and structural changes in the liver (slight fatty degenerative changes, an increase in the intercellular space) were evident irrespective of the type of tea in the Cd and Pb poisoned rats. This toxic effect was visible especially in rats drinking black or red tea. However, the rats had no elevated LDH and ALT activities. The highest content of Cd and Pb in the liver and blood plasma was found in rats drinking red tea. Based on the results obtained, it is clear that long-term exposure of adult rats with a mature intestinal barrier to Cd and Pb contamination, under higher exposure conditions than the current estimates of weekly exposure of the general population to Cd and Pb through diet, causes a toxic effect, especially in the liver, and can change the structure of intestinal mucosa, irrespective of tea administration.

  14. Neural stem cells in the adult ciliary epithelium express GFAP and are regulated by Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ani V.; Zhao Xing; James, Jackson; Kim, Min; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Ahmad, Iqbal . E-mail: iahmad@unmc.edu

    2006-01-13

    The identification of neural stem cells with retinal potential in the ciliary epithelium (CE) of the adult mammals is of considerable interest because of their potential for replacing or rescuing degenerating retinal neurons in disease or injury. The evaluation of such a potential requires characterization of these cells with regard to their phenotypic properties, potential, and regulatory mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that rat CE stem cells/progenitors in neurosphere culture display astrocytic nature in terms of expressing glial intermediate neurofilament protein, GFAP. The GFAP-expressing CE stem cells/progenitors form neurospheres in proliferating conditions and generate neurons when shifted to differentiating conditions. These cells express components of the canonical Wnt pathway and its activation promotes their proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activation of the canonical Wnt pathway influences neuronal differentiation of CE stem cells/progenitors in a context dependent manner. Our observations suggest that CE stem cells/progenitors share phenotypic properties and regulatory mechanism(s) with neural stem cells elsewhere in the adult CNS.

  15. Structural alteration of tight and adherens junctions in villous and crypt epithelium of the small and large intestine of conventional nursing piglets infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Eyerly, Bryan; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J

    2015-06-12

    Integrity of the intestinal epithelium is critical for proper functioning of the barrier that regulates absorption of water and restricts uptake of luminal bacteria. It is maintained mainly by tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). We conducted immunofluorescence (IF) staining for in situ identification of zonula occludin (ZO)-1 proteins for TJ and E-Cadherin proteins for AJ in the small and large intestinal villous and crypt epithelium of nursing pigs infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Twenty 9-day-old piglets [PEDV-infected (n=9) and Mock (n=11)] from PEDV seronegative sows, were orally inoculated [8.9 log₁₀ genomic equivalents/pig] with PEDV PC21A strain or mock. At post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1-5, infected pigs showed severe watery diarrhea and/or vomiting and severe atrophic enteritis. By immunohistochemistry, PEDV antigens were evident in enterocytes lining the villous epithelium. At PIDs 1-5, PEDV-infected pigs exhibited mildly to extensively disorganized, irregular distribution and reduced expression of ZO-1 or E-Cadherin in villous, but not crypt epithelial cells of the jejunum and ileum, but not in the large intestine, when compared to the negative controls. The structural destruction and disorganization of TJ and AJ were extensive in PEDV-infected pigs at PIDs 1-3, but then appeared to reversibly recover at PID 5, as evident by increased numbers of ZO-1-positive epithelial cells and markedly improved appearance of E-Cadherin-positive villous epithelium. Our results suggest a possible involvement of structurally impaired TJ and AJ in the pathogenesis of PEDV, potentially leading to secondary bacterial infections.

  16. Association of Escherichia coli with the Small Intestinal Epithelium II. Variations in Association Index and the Relationship Between Association Index and Enterosorption in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bertschinger, Hans U.; Moon, Harley W.; Whipp, Shannon C.

    1972-01-01

    The association between small intestinal epithelium and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EEC) was studied in ligated intestinal loops of pigs and rabbits. The association indexes (degree of association) for each of two porcine EEC strains varied widely among pigs and independently of each other. Significant litter-to-litter variations in association indexes among colostrum-deprived newborn pigs were interpreted to be the result of congenital resistance to association with specific EEC in some pigs. Since enterosorption occurred in loops with low association indexes, it was not necessary for EEC to establish a high association index for them to cause enterosorption in ligated intestinal loops. Two strains of EEC which are enteropathogenic for humans caused enterosorption in ligated loops in pigs 3 weeks old or less but not in 6-week-old pigs. Images PMID:4564681

  17. Critical role of microbiota within cecal crypts on the regenerative capacity of the intestinal epithelium following surgical stress

    PubMed Central

    Zaborin, Alexander; Krezalek, Monika; Hyoju, Sanjiv; Defazio, Jennifer R.; Setia, Namrata; Belogortseva, Natalia; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Guo, Qiti; Zaborina, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Cecal crypts represent a unique niche that are normally occupied by the commensal microbiota. Due to their density and close proximity to stem cells, microbiota within cecal crypts may modulate epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that surgical stress, a process that invariably involves a short period of starvation, antibiotic exposure, and tissue injury, results in cecal crypt evacuation of their microbiota. Crypts devoid of their microbiota display pathophysiological features characterized by abnormal stem cell activation as judged by leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) staining, expansion of the proliferative zone toward the tips of the crypts, and an increase in apoptosis. In addition, crypts devoid of their microbiota display loss of their regenerative capacity as assessed by their ability to form organoids ex vivo. When a four-member human pathogen community isolated from the stool of a critically ill patient is introduced into the cecum of mice with empty crypts, crypts become occupied by the pathogens and further disruption of crypt homeostasis is observed. Fecal microbiota transplantation restores the cecal crypts’ microbiota, normalizes homeostasis within crypts, and reestablishes crypt regenerative capacity. Taken together, these findings define an emerging role for the microbiota within cecal crypts to maintain epithelial cell homeostasis in a manner that may enhance recovery in response to the physiological stress imposed by the process of surgery. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study provides novel insight into the process by which surgical injury places the intestinal epithelium at risk for colonization by pathogenic microbes and impairment of its regenerative capacity via loss of its microbiota. We show that fecal transplant restores crypt homeostasis in association with repopulation of the microbiota within cecal crypts. PMID:27979825

  18. Administration of Panobinostat Is Associated with Increased IL-17A mRNA in the Intestinal Epithelium of HIV-1 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bjerg Christensen, Ane; Dige, Anders; Vad-Nielsen, Johan; Brinkmann, Christel R.; Bendix, Mia; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Søgaard, Ole S.; Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Randel Nyengaard, Jens; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal CD4+ T cell depletion is rapid and profound during early HIV-1 infection. This leads to a compromised mucosal barrier that prompts chronic systemic inflammation. The preferential loss of intestinal T helper 17 (Th17) cells in HIV-1 disease is a driver of the damage within the mucosal barrier and of disease progression. Thus, understanding the effects of new therapeutic strategies in the intestines has high priority. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (e.g., panobinostat) are actively under investigation as potential latency reversing agents in HIV eradication studies. These drugs have broad effects that go beyond reactivating virus, including modulation of immune pathways. We examined colonic biopsies from ART suppressed HIV-1 infected individuals (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01680094) for the effects of panobinostat on intestinal T cell activation and on inflammatory cytokine production. We compared biopsy samples that were collected before and during oral panobinostat treatment and observed that panobinostat had a clear biological impact in this anatomical compartment. Specifically, we observed a decrease in CD69+ intestinal lamina propria T cell frequency and increased IL-17A mRNA expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results suggest that panobinostat therapy may influence the restoration of mucosal barrier function in these patients. PMID:26696749

  19. Adult retinal pigment epithelium cells express neural progenitor properties and the neuronal precursor protein doublecortin.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Maren; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Aigner, Ludwig

    2005-04-08

    The adult mammalian retina is devoid of any detectable neurogenesis. However, different cell types have been suggested to potentially act as neural progenitors in the adult mammalian retina in vitro, such as ciliary body (CB), Muller glia, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. In rodents and humans, strong evidence for neural stem or progenitor properties exists only for CB-derived cells, but not for other retinal cell types. Here, we provide a comparative analysis of adult rat CB- and RPE-derived cells suggesting that the two cell types share certain neural progenitor properties in vitro. CB and RPE cells expressed neural progenitor markers such as Nestin, Flk-1, Hes1, and Musashi. They proliferated under adherent and neurosphere conditions and showed limited self-renewal. Moreover, they differentiated into neuronal and glial cells based on the expression of differentiation markers such as the young neuronal marker beta-III tubulin and the glial and progenitor markers GFAP and NG2. Expression of beta-III tubulin was found in cells with neuronal and non-neuronal morphology. A subpopulation of RPE- and CB-derived progenitor cells expressed the neurogenesis-specific protein doublecortin (DCX). Interestingly, DCX expression defined a beta-III tubulin-positive CB and RPE fraction with a distinct neuronal morphology. In summary, the data suggest that RPE cells share with CB cells the potential to de-differentiate into a cell type with neural progenitor-like identity. In addition, DCX expression might define the neuronal-differentiating RPE- and CB-derived progenitor population.

  20. Differential expression of TYRP1 in adult human retinal pigment epithelium and uveal melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    QIU, CHUN; LI, PENG; BI, JIANJUN; WU, QING; LU, LINNA; QIAN, GUANXIANG; JIA, RENBING; JIA, RONG

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most frequently occurring primary intraocular malignancy in adults. Tyrosinase (TYR) is a copper-containing enzyme and a type I membrane protein that is involved in the generation of melanin, the main pigment in vertebrates. TYR-related protein 1 (TYRP1) is regarded to have a crucial role in the immunotherapy of melanoma. As biomarkers, the TYR-related proteins, TYRP1 and TYRP2, exhibit specific expression in melanocytes, while also contributing to melanin synthesis within melanosomes. In the present study, the differential expression of TYRP1 was investigated at the mRNA, protein and morphological levels in four human UM cell lines (SP6.5, OM431, OCM1 and OCM290) and the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line, using polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. It was found that SP6.5 cells expressed the highest level of TYRP1, in comparison to SP6.5 OCM1 and OM431 cells, which produced less TYRP1, and OCM290 cells, which produced almost no TYRP1. No TYRP1 protein expression was identified in the RPE cell line. These findings indicate the potential use of TYRP1 in the development of therapy for UM. PMID:27073483

  1. Differentiation of epithelial cells to M cells in response to bacterial colonization on the follicle-associated epithelium of Peyer's patch in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Chin, Keigi; Onishi, Sachiko; Yuji, Midori; Inamoto, Tetsurou; Qi, Wang-Mei; Warita, Katsuhiko; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2006-10-01

    To clarify the relationship between M cells and intestinal microflora, histoplanimetrical investigation into the bacterial colonization and the differentiation to M cells was carried out in rat Peyer's patch under physiological conditions. The follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), except for the narrow area of apical region, was closely covered with both neighboring intestinal villi and a thick mucous layer, the latter of which also filled the intervillous spaces as well as the space between the FAE and the neighboring intestinal villi. Indigenous bacteria adhered almost constantly to the narrow areas of apical regions of both intestinal villi and the FAE. Bacterial colonies were occasionally located on the basal to middle region of FAE, where M cells also appeared, forming large pockets. When bacterial colonies were located on the basal to middle region of FAE, bacteria with the same morphological characteristics also proliferated in the intervillous spaces neighboring the Peyer's patch. In cases with no bacterial colonies on the basal to middle region of FAE, however, M cells were rare in the FAE. Histoplanimetrical analysis showed the similar distribution pattern of bacterial colonies on the FAE and M cells in the FAE. M cells ultrastructurally engulfed indigenous bacteria, which were then transported to the pockets. These results suggest that indigenous bacterial colonization on the FAE stimulates the differentiation of M cells in the FAE under physiological conditions. The uptake of bacteria by M cells might contribute the regulation of the development of indigenous bacterial colonies in the small intestine.

  2. Dual labeling with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine for estimation of cell migration rate in the small intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Asano, Mami; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Nishimura, Naomichi; Sonoyama, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Small intestinal epithelium is a self-renewing system in which the entire sequence of cell proliferation, differentiation, and removal is coupled to cell migration along the crypt-villus axis. We examined whether dual labeling with different thymidine analogues, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), can be used to estimate cell migration rates on the villi of small intestines in rats. Rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of BrdU and EdU within a time interval, and signals in tissue sections were examined by immunohistochemistry and the "click" reaction, respectively. We successfully observed BrdU- and EdU-positive cells on the epithelium with no cross-reaction. In addition, we observed an almost complete overlapping of BrdU- and EdU-positive cells in rats administered simultaneously with BrdU and EdU. By calculating the cell migration rate by dividing the distance between the median cell positions of the distribution of BrdU- and EdU-positive cells by the time between the injection of BrdU and EdU, we estimated approximately 9 and 5 μm/h for the cell migration rates on the villi in the jejunum and ileum, respectively. We propose that dual labeling with BrdU and EdU within a time interval, followed by detecting with immunohistochemistry and the click reaction, respectively, is useful to estimate accurately the cell migration rate in the intestinal epithelium in a single animal.

  3. Expression and developmental regulation of oxytocin (OT) and oxytocin receptors (OTR) in the enteric nervous system (ENS) and intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Welch, Martha G; Tamir, Hadassah; Gross, Kara J; Chen, Jason; Anwar, Muhammad; Gershon, Michael D

    2009-01-10

    Although oxytocin (OT) and oxytocin receptor (OTR) are known for roles in parturition and milk let-down, they are not hypothalamus-restricted. OT is important in nurturing and opposition to stress. Transcripts encoding OT and OTR have been reported in adult human gut, and OT affects intestinal motility. We tested the hypotheses that OT is endogenous to the enteric nervous system (ENS) and that OTR signaling may participate in enteric neurophysiology. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction confirmed OT and OTR transcripts in adult mouse and rat gut and in precursors of enteric neurons immunoselected from fetal rats. Enteric OT and OTR expression continued through adulthood but was developmentally regulated, peaking at postnatal day 7. Coincidence of the immunoreactivities of OTR and the neural marker Hu was 100% in the P3 and 71% in the adult myenteric plexus, when submucosal neurons were also OTR-immunoreactive. Co-localization with NeuN established that intrinsic primary afferent neurons are OTR-expressing. Because OTR transcripts and protein were detected in the nodose ganglia, OT signaling might also affect extrinsic primary afferent neurons. Although OT immunoreactivity was found only in approximately 1% of myenteric neurons, extensive OT-immunoreactive varicosities surrounded many others. Villus enterocytes were OTR-immunoreactive through postnatal day 17; however, by postnatal day 19, immunoreactivity waned to become restricted to crypts and concentrated at crypt-villus junctions. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed plasmalemmal OTR at enterocyte adherens junctions. We suggest that OT and OTR signaling might be important in ENS development and function and might play roles in visceral sensory perception and neural modulation of epithelial biology.

  4. Expression and Developmental Regulation of Oxytocin (OT) and Oxytocin Receptors (OTR) in the Enteric Nervous System (ENS) and Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Martha G.; Tamir, Hadassah; Gross, Kara J.; Chen, Jason; Anwar, Muhammad; Gershon, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Although oxytocin (OT) and oxytocin receptor (OTR) are known for roles in parturition and milk let-down, they are not hypothalamus-restricted. OT is important in nurturing and opposition to stress. Transcripts encoding OT and OTR have been reported in adult human gut, and OT affects intestinal motility. We tested the hypotheses that OT is endogenous to the enteric nervous system (ENS) and that OTR signaling may participate in enteric neurophysiology. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction confirmed OT and OTR transcripts in adult mouse and rat gut and in precursors of enteric neurons immunoselected from fetal rats. Enteric OT and OTR expression continued through adulthood but was developmentally regulated, peaking at postnatal day 7. Coincidence of the immunoreactivities of OTR and the neural marker Hu was 100% in the P3 and 71% in the adult myenteric plexus, when submucosal neurons were also OTR-immunoreactive. Co-localization with NeuN established that intrinsic primary afferent neurons are OTR-expressing. Because OTR transcripts and protein were detected in the nodose ganglia, OT signaling might also affect extrinsic primary afferent neurons. Although OT immunoreactivity was found only in ~1% of myenteric neurons, extensive OT-immunoreactive varicosities surrounded many others. Villus enterocytes were OTR-immunoreactive through postnatal day 17; however, by postnatal day 19, immunoreactivity waned to become restricted to crypts and concentrated at crypt-villus junctions. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed plasmalemmal OTR at enterocyte adherens junctions. We suggest that OT and OTR signaling might be important in ENS development and function and might play roles in visceral sensory perception and neural modulation of epithelial biology. PMID:19003903

  5. Characterization of human foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Comparison with the isoenzymes from the adult intestine and human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, C M; Enns, C A; Sussman, H H

    1983-01-01

    The molecular structure of human foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatase was defined by high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and amino acid inhibition studies. Comparison was made with the adult form of intestinal alkaline phosphatase, as well as with alkaline phosphatases isolated from cultured foetal amnion cells (FL) and a human tumour cell line (KB). Two non-identical subunits were isolated from the foetal intestinal isoenzyme, one having same molecular weight and isoelectric point as placental alkaline phosphatase, and the other corresponding to a glycosylated subunit of the adult intestinal enzyme. The FL-cell and KB-cell alkaline phosphatases were also found to contain two subunits similar to those of the foetal intestinal isoenzyme. Characterization of neuraminidase digests of the non-placental subunit showed it to be indistinguishable from the subunits of the adult intestinal isoenzyme. This implies that no new phosphatase structural gene is involved in the transition from the expression of foetal to adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase, but that the molecular changes involve suppression of the placental subunit and loss of neuraminic acid from the non-placental subunit. Enzyme-inhibition studies demonstrated an intermediate response to the inhibitors tested for the foetal intestinal, FL-cell and KB-cell isoenzymes when compared with the placental, adult intestinal and liver forms. This result is consistent with the mixed-subunit structure observed for the former set of isoenzymes. In summary, this study has defined the molecular subunit structure of the foetal intestinal form of alkaline phosphatase and has demonstrated its expression in a human tumour cell line. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6882358

  6. The seminiferous epithelium cycle and daily spermatic production in the adult maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger, 1811).

    PubMed

    Bitencourt, Viviane Lewicki; de Paula, Tarcízio Antônio Rego; da Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto; Fonseca, Cláudio César; dos Anjos Benjamin, Laércio; Costa, Deiler Sampaio

    2007-01-01

    The duration of the seminiferous epithelium cycle was estimated in adult maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger, 1811), by applying intratesticular injections with tritiated thymidine. The total duration of the seminiferous epithelium cycle in this species was calculated in 8.99 days. So, taking into account that approximately 4.5 cycles of the seminiferous epithelium are necessary for the whole spermatogenesis process to complete, the production of spermatozoa from one spermatogonia will take about 40.45 days. The duration of the spermiogenesis was calculated to be 12.3 days. The eight stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle were described by the tubular morphology method, which is based either on the form and position of the spermatid nuclei and the occurrence of meiotic divisions. The values of the relative frequency for the pre-meiotic, meiotic and post-meiotic phases in this species were 3.5, 0.78 and 4.8 days, respectively. The maned wolf produces about 29 million spermatozoa a day for each testis gram, therefore being classified among the species provided with a high spermatogenetic efficiency.

  7. Sonic hedgehog acts as a negative regulator of {beta}-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Fabian T; Schänzer, Anne; Czupalla, Cathrin J; Thom, Sonja; Engels, Knut; Schmidt, Mirko H H; Plate, Karl H; Liebner, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in taste papilla development; however, its role in epithelial maintenance and tumor progression in the adult tongue remains elusive. We show Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activation in reporter mice and by nuclear beta-catenin staining in the epithelium and taste papilla of adult mouse and human tongues. beta-Catenin activation in APC(min/+) mice, which carry a mutation in adenomatous poliposis coli (APC), up-regulates Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Jagged-2 (JAG2) in the tongue epithelium without formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We demonstrate that Shh suppresses beta-catenin transcriptional activity in a signaling-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. A similar regulation and function was observed for JAG2, suggesting that both pathways negatively regulate beta-catenin, thereby preventing SCC formation in the tongue. This was supported by reduced nuclear beta-catenin in the tongue epithelium of Patched(+/-) mice, exhibiting dominant active Shh signaling. At the invasive front of human tongue cancer, nuclear beta-catenin and Shh were increased, suggesting their participation in tumor progression. Interestingly, Shh but not JAG2 was able to reduce beta-catenin signaling in SCC cells, arguing for a partial loss of negative feedback on beta-catenin transcription in tongue cancer. We show for the first time that the putative Wnt/beta-catenin targets Shh and JAG2 control beta-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium, a function that is partially lost in lingual SCC.

  8. Sonic Hedgehog Acts as a Negative Regulator of β-Catenin Signaling in the Adult Tongue Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Fabian T.; Schänzer, Anne; Czupalla, Cathrin J.; Thom, Sonja; Engels, Knut; Schmidt, Mirko H.H.; Plate, Karl H.; Liebner, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in taste papilla development; however, its role in epithelial maintenance and tumor progression in the adult tongue remains elusive. We show Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation in reporter mice and by nuclear β-catenin staining in the epithelium and taste papilla of adult mouse and human tongues. β-Catenin activation in APCmin/+ mice, which carry a mutation in adenomatous poliposis coli (APC), up-regulates Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Jagged-2 (JAG2) in the tongue epithelium without formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We demonstrate that Shh suppresses β-catenin transcriptional activity in a signaling-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. A similar regulation and function was observed for JAG2, suggesting that both pathways negatively regulate β-catenin, thereby preventing SCC formation in the tongue. This was supported by reduced nuclear β-catenin in the tongue epithelium of Patched+/− mice, exhibiting dominant active Shh signaling. At the invasive front of human tongue cancer, nuclear β-catenin and Shh were increased, suggesting their participation in tumor progression. Interestingly, Shh but not JAG2 was able to reduce β-catenin signaling in SCC cells, arguing for a partial loss of negative feedback on β-catenin transcription in tongue cancer. We show for the first time that the putative Wnt/β-catenin targets Shh and JAG2 control β-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium, a function that is partially lost in lingual SCC. PMID:20508033

  9. Endocrine remodelling of the adult intestine sustains reproduction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Reiff, Tobias; Jacobson, Jake; Cognigni, Paola; Antonello, Zeus; Ballesta, Esther; Tan, Kah Junn; Yew, Joanne Y; Dominguez, Maria; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The production of offspring is energetically costly and relies on incompletely understood mechanisms that generate a positive energy balance. In mothers of many species, changes in key energy-associated internal organs are common yet poorly characterised functionally and mechanistically. In this study, we show that, in adult Drosophila females, the midgut is dramatically remodelled to enhance reproductive output. In contrast to extant models, organ remodelling does not occur in response to increased nutrient intake and/or offspring demands, but rather precedes them. With spatially and temporally directed manipulations, we identify juvenile hormone (JH) as an anticipatory endocrine signal released after mating. Acting through intestinal bHLH-PAS domain proteins Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and Germ cell-expressed (Gce), JH signals directly to intestinal progenitors to yield a larger organ, and adjusts gene expression and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activity in enterocytes to support increased lipid metabolism. Our findings identify a metabolically significant paradigm of adult somatic organ remodelling linking hormonal signals, epithelial plasticity, and reproductive output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06930.001 PMID:26216039

  10. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schall, K A; Holoyda, K A; Grant, C N; Levin, D E; Torres, E R; Maxwell, A; Pollack, H A; Moats, R A; Frey, M R; Darehzereshki, A; Al Alam, D; Lien, C; Grikscheit, T C

    2015-08-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation.

  11. The mycotoxin patulin alters the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium: mechanism of action of the toxin and protective effects of glutathione.

    PubMed

    Mahfoud, Radhia; Maresca, Marc; Garmy, Nicolas; Fantini, Jacques

    2002-06-15

    Patulin is a mycotoxin mainly found in apple and apple products. In addition to being toxic for animals, mutagenic, carcinogenic and teratogenic, patulin induces intestinal injuries, including epithelial cell degeneration, inflammation, ulceration, and hemorrhages. In a study of the cellular mechanisms associated with the intestinal toxicity of patulin, two human epithelial intestinal cell lines (HT-29-D4 and Caco-2-14) were exposed to the mycotoxin. Micromolar concentrations of patulin were found to induce a rapid and dramatic decrease of transepithelial resistance (TER) in both cell lines without major signs of toxicity as assessed by the LDH release assay. Since TER reflects the organization of tight junctions, these data indicate that patulin affected the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium. The inhibitory effect of patulin on TER was closely associated with its reactivity for SH groups: (i) cysteine and glutathione prevented the cells from patulin injury; (ii) patulin toxicity was potentiated by buthionine sulfoximine, a specific glutathione-depleting agent; (iii) treatment of the cells with N-ethylmaleimide, a compound known to react with SH groups, resulted in a marked decrease of TER. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of patulin on TER was mimicked and potentiated by phenylarsine oxide, a specific inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). This cellular enzyme is a key regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier function. The active site of PTP contains a cysteine residue (Cys215) that is essential for phosphatase activity. Sulfhydryl-reacting compounds such as acetaldehyde decrease TER through covalent modification of Cys215 of PTP. We propose that the toxicity of patulin for intestinal cells involves, among other potential mechanisms, an inactivation of the active site of PTP.

  12. Epithelium-intrinsic NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome drives infected enterocyte expulsion to restrict Salmonella replication in the intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Sellin, Mikael E; Müller, Anna A; Felmy, Boas; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Diard, Médéric; Tardivel, Aubry; Maslowski, Kendle M; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-08-13

    The gut mucosal epithelium separates the host from the microbiota, but enteropathogens such as Salmonella Typhimurium (S.Tm) can invade and breach this barrier. Defenses against such acute insults remain incompletely understood. Using a murine model of Salmonella enterocolitis, we analyzed mechanisms limiting pathogen loads in the epithelium during early infection. Although the epithelium-invading S.Tm replicate initially, this intraepithelial replicative niche is restricted by expulsion of infected enterocytes into the lumen. This mechanism is compromised if inflammasome components (NAIP1-6, NLRC4, caspase-1/-11) are deleted, or ablated specifically in the epithelium, resulting in ∼100-fold higher intraepithelial loads and accelerated lymph node colonization. Interestingly, the cytokines downstream of inflammasome activation, interleukin (IL)-1α/β and IL-18, appear dispensable for epithelial restriction of early infection. These data establish the role of an epithelium-intrinsic inflammasome, which drives expulsion of infected cells to restrict the pathogen's intraepithelial proliferation. This may represent a general defense mechanism against mucosal infections.

  13. Evidence of progenitor cells of glandular and myoepithelial cell lineages in the human adult female breast epithelium: a new progenitor (adult stem) cell concept.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Werner; Buerger, Horst

    2003-10-01

    Although experimental data clearly confirm the existence of self-renewing mammary stem cells, the characteristics of such progenitor cells have never been satisfactorily defined. Using a double immunofluorescence technique for simultaneous detection of the basal cytokeratin 5, the glandular cytokeratins 8/18 and the myoepithelial differentiation marker smooth muscle actin (SMA), we were able to demonstrate the presence of CK5+ cells in human adult breast epithelium. These cells have the potential to differentiate to either glandular (CK8/18+) or myoepithelial cells (SMA+) through intermediary cells (CK5+ and CK8/18+ or SMA+). We therefore proceeded on the assumption that the CK5+ cells are phenotypically and behaviourally progenitor (committed adult stem) cells of human breast epithelium. Furthermore, we furnish evidence that most of these progenitor cells are located in the luminal epithelium of the ductal lobular tree. Based on data obtained in extensive analyses of proliferative breast disease lesions, we have come to regard usual ductal hyperplasia as a progenitor cell-derived lesion, whereas most breast cancers seem to evolve from differentiated glandular cells. Double immunofluorescence experiments provide a new tool to characterize phenotypically progenitor (adult stem) cells and their progenies. This model has been shown to be of great value for a better understanding not only of normal tissue regeneration but also of proliferative breast disease. Furthermore, this model provides a new tool for unravelling further the regulatory mechanisms that govern normal and pathological cell growth.

  14. Characterization of translocation of silver nanoparticles and effects on whole-genome gene expression using an in vitro intestinal epithelium coculture model.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, Hans; Poortman, Jenneke; Peters, Ruud J; Wijma, Elly; Kramer, Evelien; Makama, Sunday; Puspitaninganindita, Kinarsashanti; Marvin, Hans J P; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Hendriksen, Peter J M

    2011-05-24

    Applications of nanoparticles in the food sector are eminent. Silver nanoparticles are among the most frequently used, making consumer exposure to silver nanoparticles inevitable. Information about uptake through the intestines and possible toxic effects of silver nanoparticles is therefore very important but still lacking. In the present study, we used an in vitro model for the human intestinal epithelium consisting of Caco-2 and M-cells to study the passage of silver nanoparticles and their ionic equivalents and to assess their effects on whole-genome mRNA expression. This in vitro intestine model was exposed to four sizes of silver nanoparticles for 4 h. Exposure to silver ions was included as a control since 6-17% of the silver nanoparticles were found to be dissociated into silver ions. The amount of silver ions that passed the Caco-2 cell barrier was equal for the silver ion and nanoparticle exposures. The nanoparticles induced clear changes in gene expression in a range of stress responses including oxidative stress, endoplasmatic stress response, and apoptosis. The gene expression response to silver nanoparticles, however, was very similar to that of AgNO(3). Therefore, the observed effects of the silver nanoparticles are likely exerted by the silver ions that are released from the nanoparticles.

  15. Enterobacteria-secreted particles induce production of exosome-like S1P-containing particles by intestinal epithelium to drive Th17-mediated tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhongbin; Mu, Jingyao; Tseng, Michael; Wattenberg, Binks; Zhuang, Xiaoying; Egilmez, Nejat K; Wang, Qilong; Zhang, Lifeng; Norris, James; Guo, Haixun; Yan, Jun; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Miller, Donald; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Gut-associated inflammation plays a crucial role in the progression of colon cancer. Here, we identify a novel pathogen-host interaction that promotes gut inflammation and the development of colon cancer. We find that enteropathogenic bacteria-secreted particles (ET-BSPs) stimulate intestinal epithelium to produce IDENs (intestinal mucosa-derived exosome-like nanoparticles) containing elevated levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate, CCL20 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). CCL20 and PGE2 are required for the recruitment and proliferation, respectively, of Th17 cells, and these processes also involve the MyD88-mediated pathway. By influencing the recruitment and proliferation of Th17 cells in the intestine, IDENs promote colon cancer. We demonstrate the biological effect of sphingosine-1-phosphate contained in IDENs on tumor growth in spontaneous and transplanted colon cancer mouse models. These findings provide deeper insights into how host-microbe relationships are mediated by particles secreted from both bacterial and host cells. PMID:25907800

  16. Enterobacteria-secreted particles induce production of exosome-like S1P-containing particles by intestinal epithelium to drive Th17-mediated tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhongbin; Mu, Jingyao; Tseng, Michael; Wattenberg, Binks; Zhuang, Xiaoying; Egilmez, Nejat K; Wang, Qilong; Zhang, Lifeng; Norris, James; Guo, Haixun; Yan, Jun; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Miller, Donald; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2015-04-24

    Gut-associated inflammation plays a crucial role in the progression of colon cancer. Here, we identify a novel pathogen-host interaction that promotes gut inflammation and the development of colon cancer. We find that enteropathogenic bacteria-secreted particles (ET-BSPs) stimulate intestinal epithelium to produce IDENs (intestinal mucosa-derived exosome-like nanoparticles) containing elevated levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate, CCL20 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). CCL20 and PGE2 are required for the recruitment and proliferation, respectively, of Th17 cells, and these processes also involve the MyD88-mediated pathway. By influencing the recruitment and proliferation of Th17 cells in the intestine, IDENs promote colon cancer. We demonstrate the biological effect of sphingosine-1-phosphate contained in IDENs on tumour growth in spontaneous and transplanted colon cancer mouse models. These findings provide deeper insights into how host-microbe relationships are mediated by particles secreted from both bacterial and host cells.

  17. Laparoscopic versus Open Ladd's Procedure for Intestinal Malrotation in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Frasier, Lane L.; Leverson, Glen; Gosain, Ankush; Greenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Background Intestinal malrotation results from errors in fetal intestinal rotation and fixation. While most patients are diagnosed in childhood, some present as adults. Laparoscopic Ladd's procedure is an accepted alternative to laparotomy in children but has not been well-studied in adults. This study was designed to investigate outcomes for adults undergoing laparoscopic Ladd's repair for malrotation. Methods We performed a single-institution retrospective chart review over eleven years. Data collected included: patient age, details of pre-operative work-up and diagnosis, surgical management, complications, rates of re-operation, and symptom resolution. Patients were evaluated on an intent-to-treat basis based on their planned operative approach. Categorical data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Continuous data were analyzed using Student's T-test. Results Twenty-two patients were identified (age range 18-63). Fifteen were diagnosed pre-operatively; of the remaining seven patients, four received an intra-operative malrotation diagnosis during elective surgery for another problem. Most had some type of pre-operative imaging, with Computed Tomography being the most common (77.3%). Comparing patients on an intent-to-treat basis, the two groups were similar with respect to age, operative time, and estimated blood loss. Six patients underwent successful laparoscopic repair; three began laparoscopically but were converted to laparotomy. There was a statistically significant difference in length of stay (LOS) (5.0±2.5d vs 11.6±8.1d, p=0.0148) favoring the laparoscopic approach. Three patients required re-operation: 2 underwent side-to-side duodeno-duodenostomy and 1 underwent a re-do Ladd's procedure. Ultimately, 3 (2 laparoscopic, 1 open) had persistent symptoms of bloating (n=2), constipation (n=2), and/or pain (n=1). Conclusion Laparoscopic repair appears to be safe and effective in adults. While a small sample size limits the power of this study, we found

  18. Neurogenesis in the vomeronasal epithelium of adult garter snakes: 3. Use of /sup 3/H-thymidine autoradiography to trace the genesis and migration of bipolar neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.T.; Halpern, M.

    1988-10-01

    Use of 3H-thymidine autoradiography and unilateral vomeronasal (VN) axotomy has permitted us to demonstrate directly the existence of VN stem cells in the adult garter snake and to trace continuous bipolar neuron development and migration in the normal VN and deafferentated VN epithelium in the same animal. The vomeronasal epithelium and olfactory epithelium of adult garter snakes are both capable of incorporating 3H-thymidine. In the sensory epithelium of the vomeronasal organ, 3H-thymidine-labeled cells were initially restricted to the base of the undifferentiated cell layer in animals surviving 1 day following 3H-thymidine injection. With increasing survival time, labeled cells progressively migrated vertically within the receptor cell column toward the apex of the bipolar neuron layer. In both the normal and denervated VN epithelium, labeled cells were observed through the 56 days of postoperative survival. In the normal epithelium, labeled cells were always located within the matrix of the intact receptor cell columns. However, labeled cells of the denervated epithelium were always located at the apical front of the newly formed cell mass following depletion of the original neuronal cell population. In addition, at postoperative days 28 and 56, labeled cells of the denervated VN epithelium achieved neuronal differentiation and maturation by migrating much farther away from the base of the receptor cell column than the labeled cells on the normal, unoperated contralateral side. This study directly demonstrates that basal cells initially incorporating 3H-thymidine are indeed stem cells of the VN epithelium in adult garter snakes.

  19. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Wang, Zhenghan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the major compartment boundaries of the adult intestine, has essential functions. Wg pathway activation in the intestinal epithelium is required not only to specify cell fate near compartment boundaries during development, but also to control ISC proliferation within compartments during homeostasis. Further, in contrast with the previous focus on Wg pathway activation within ISCs, we demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which Wg signaling regulates ISC proliferation during homeostasis is non-autonomous. Activation of the Wg pathway in absorptive enterocytes is required to suppress JAK-STAT signaling in neighboring ISCs, and thereby their proliferation. We conclude that Wg signaling gradients have essential roles during homeostasis and development of the adult intestine, non-autonomously controlling stem cell proliferation inside compartments, and autonomously specifying cell fate near compartment boundaries. PMID:26845150

  20. Toll-like receptor 2 mediates ischemia-reperfusion injury of the small intestine in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Kobata, Atsushi; Takeda, Shogo; Nadatani, Yuji; Otani, Koji; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) recognizes conserved molecular patterns associated with both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, and detects some endogenous ligands. Previous studies demonstrated that in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury of the small intestine, the TLR2-dependent signaling exerted preventive effects on the damage in young mice, but did not have a significant effect in neonatal mice. We investigated the role of TLR2 in adult ischemia-reperfusion injury in the small intestine. Wild-type and TLR2 knockout mice at 16 weeks of age were subjected to intestinal I/R injury. Some wild-type mice received anti-Ly-6G antibodies to deplete circulating neutrophils. In wild-type mice, I/R induced severe small intestinal injury characterized by infiltration by inflammatory cells, disruption of the mucosal epithelium, and mucosal bleeding. Compared to wild-type mice, TLR2 knockout mice exhibited less severe mucosal injury induced by I/R, with a 35%, 33%, and 43% reduction in histological grading score and luminal concentration of hemoglobin, and the numbers of apoptotic epithelial cells, respectively. The I/R increased the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a marker of neutrophil infiltration, and the levels of mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the small intestine of the wild-type mice by 3.3-, 3.2-, and 13.0-fold, respectively. TLR2 deficiency significantly inhibited the I/R-induced increase in MPO activity and the expression of mRNAs for TNF-α and ICAM-1, but did not affect the expression of COX-2 mRNA. I/R also enhanced TLR2 mRNA expression by 2.9-fold. TLR2 proteins were found to be expressed in the epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and endothelial cells. Neutrophil depletion prevented intestinal I/R injury in wild-type mice. These findings suggest that TLR2 may mediate I/R injury of the small intestine in adult mice via induction of inflammatory mediators

  1. Advanced oxidation protein products decrease the expression of calcium transport channels in small intestinal epithelium via the p44/42 MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiqun; Xie, Fang; Xue, Minmin; Xu, Xiaoping; He, Shuying; Lin, Minyi; Bai, Lan

    2015-05-01

    Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), novel protein markers of oxidative damage, accumulate in the plasma of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Osteoporosis, which is closely related to the regulation of intestinal calcium transport channels (CTCs), is a prevalent extraintestinal complication of IBD and is associated with oxidative stress. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. The present study aimed to verify whether AOPPs inhibit CTCs in the small intestinal epithelium and to identify the underlying mechanisms that may contribute to IBD-associated osteoporosis. Normal Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with AOPP-modified rat serum albumin. The calcium ion level in serum was not significantly altered, while the duodenal expression of CTCs (e.g. transient receptor potential vanilloid [TRPV6], calbindin-D9k [CaBP-D9k], plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase 1 [PMCA1], and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 1 [NCX1]) were decreased. In contrast, the levels of the related hormones that regulate calcium absorption including parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25-(OH)D₃, and 1,25-(OH)₂D₃ were increased, although the trend toward an increase in PTH levels was not significant. In order to further investigate the effects of AOPP exposure, we also evaluated the expression of CTCs (including the voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel [CaV1.3], TRPV6, CaBP-D9k, PMCA1, and NCX1) in cultured human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2). The expression levels of total CTC protein and mRNA, except for CaV1.3, were significantly down-regulated in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was observed in vivo and in vitro. The p44/42 inhibitor U0126 reversed the down-regulation of CTCs induced by AOPPs in the Caco-2 monolayer. Our results indicate that AOPPs down-regulate the expression of CTCs through p44/42 MAPK signaling mechanisms in the small intestinal epithelium. These data provide new

  2. Isolating intestinal stem cells from adult Drosophila midguts by FACS to study stem cell behavior during aging.

    PubMed

    Tauc, Helen M; Tasdogan, Alpaslan; Pandur, Petra

    2014-12-16

    Aging tissue is characterized by a continuous decline in functional ability. Adult stem cells are crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis particularly in tissues that have a high turnover rate such as the intestinal epithelium. However, adult stem cells are also subject to aging processes and the concomitant decline in function. The Drosophila midgut has emerged as an ideal model system to study molecular mechanisms that interfere with the intestinal stem cells' (ISCs) ability to function in tissue homeostasis. Although adult ISCs can be easily identified and isolated from midguts of young flies, it has been a major challenge to study endogenous molecular changes of ISCs during aging. This is due to the lack of a combination of molecular markers suitable to isolate ISCs from aged intestines. Here we propose a method that allows for successful dissociation of midgut tissue into living cells that can subsequently be separated into distinct populations by FACS. By using dissociated cells from the esg-Gal4, UAS-GFP fly line, in which both ISCs and the enteroblast (EB) progenitor cells express GFP, two populations of cells are distinguished based on different GFP intensities. These differences in GFP expression correlate with differences in cell size and granularity and represent enriched populations of ISCs and EBs. Intriguingly, the two GFP-positive cell populations remain distinctly separated during aging, presenting a novel technique for identifying and isolating cell populations enriched for either ISCs or EBs at any time point during aging. The further analysis, for example transcriptome analysis, of these particular cell populations at various time points during aging is now possible and this will facilitate the examination of endogenous molecular changes that occur in these cells during aging.

  3. Deoxycholic acid (DCA) confers an intestinal phenotype on esophageal squamous epithelium via induction of the stemness-associated reprogramming factors OCT4 and SOX2.

    PubMed

    Shen, Caifei; Zhang, Haoxiang; Wang, Pu; Feng, Ji; Li, Jingwen; Xu, Yin; Zhang, Anran; Shao, Shunzi; Yu, Xiaona; Yan, Wu; Xia, Yiju; Hu, Jiali; Fang, Dianchun

    2016-06-02

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is essentially a metaplasia in which the normal stratified squamous epithelium is replaced by columnar epithelium. This study focuses on the involvement of OCT4 and SOX2, 2 key cell-reprogramming factors, in the deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced expression of the intestinal hallmarks Cdx2 and MUC2 using both in vivo and in vitro models. Up-regulated expression of OCT4 and down-regulated expression of SOX2 were observed in BE compared with normal esophagus and esophagitis. Consistent with the data in vivo, DCA induced time-dependent expression of OCT4 at both the mRNA and protein levels and decreased nuclear expression of SOX2 in Het-1A cells. Down-regulation of OCT4 expression by siRNA abrogated DCA-induced expression of Cdx2 and MUC2, whereas siRNA against SOX2 significantly upregulated the expression of both Cdx2 and MUC2. Our data indicate that both OCT4 and SOX2 play important roles in the development of BE triggered by bile acid reflux.

  4. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schall, K. A.; Holoyda, K. A.; Grant, C. N.; Levin, D. E.; Torres, E. R.; Maxwell, A.; Pollack, H. A.; Moats, R. A.; Frey, M. R.; Darehzereshki, A.; Al Alam, D.; Lien, C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. PMID:26089336

  5. Enterococcus faecium HDRsEf1 Protects the Intestinal Epithelium and Attenuates ETEC-Induced IL-8 Secretion in Enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuncai; Wang, Xiliang; Bi, Dingren

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Enterococcus faecium HDRsEf1 (Ef1) has been shown to have positive effects on piglet diarrhoea, but the mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In this study, using the IPEC-J2 cell line to mimic intestinal epithelial cells and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88ac as a representative intestinal pathogen, the mechanism underlying Ef1 protection against an enteropathogen was investigated. The results demonstrated that Ef1 was effective in displacing K88ac from the IPEC-J2 cell layer. Moreover, Ef1 and its cell-free supernatant (S-Ef1) modulate IL-8 released by IPEC-J2 cells. Ef1 and its cell-free supernatant showed the potential to protect enterocytes from an acute inflammatory response. In addition, Ef1 and its cell-free supernatant increased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of the enterocyte monolayer, thus strengthening the intestinal barrier against ETEC. These results may contribute to the development of therapeutic interventions using Ef1 in intestinal disorders of piglets. PMID:27890970

  6. Perturbation of neddylation-dependent NF-κB responses in the intestinal epithelium drives apoptosis and inhibits resolution of mucosal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ehrentraut, Stefan F; Curtis, Valerie F; Wang, Ruth X; Saeedi, Bejan J; Ehrentraut, Heidi; Onyiah, Joseph C; Kelly, Caleb J; Campbell, Eric L; Glover, Louise E; Kominsky, Douglas J; Colgan, Sean P

    2016-09-28

    Recent work has revealed a central role for neddylation (the conjugation of a Nedd8-moiety to Cullin proteins) in the fine tuning of the NF-κB response (via Cullin-1). In the present study, we investigated the contribution of Cullin-1 neddylation and NF-κB signaling to mucosal inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Initial in vitro studies using cultured intestinal epithelial cells revealed that the neddylation inhibitor MLN4924 prominently induces the deneddylation of Cullin-1. Parallel western blot, luciferase reporter and gene target assays identified MLN4924 as a potent inhibitor of intestinal epithelial NF-κB. Subsequent studies revealed that MLN4924 potently induces epithelial apoptosis but only in the presence of additional inflammatory stimuli. In vivo administration of MLN4924 (3 mg/kg/d) in a TNBS-induce colitis model significantly accentuated disease severity. Indeed, MLN4924 resulted in worsened clinical scores and increased mortality early in the inflammatory response. Histologic analysis of the colon revealed that neddylation inhibition results in increased tissue damage and significantly increased mucosal apoptosis as determined by TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3 staining, particularly prominent within the epithelium. Extensions of these studies revealed that ongoing inflammation is associated with significant loss of deneddylase-1 (SENP8) expresssion. These studies reveal that intact Cullin-1 neddylation is central to resolution of acute inflammation.

  7. Perturbation of neddylation-dependent NF-κB responses in the intestinal epithelium drives apoptosis and inhibits resolution of mucosal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ehrentraut, Stefan F.; Curtis, Valerie F.; Wang, Ruth X.; Saeedi, Bejan J.; Ehrentraut, Heidi; Onyiah, Joseph C.; Kelly, Caleb J.; Campbell, Eric L.; Glover, Louise E.; Kominsky, Douglas J.; Colgan, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has revealed a central role for neddylation (the conjugation of a Nedd8 moiety to Cullin proteins) in the fine-tuning of the NF-κB response (via Cullin-1). In the present study, we investigated the contribution of Cullin-1 neddylation and NF-κB signaling to mucosal inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Initial in vitro studies using cultured intestinal epithelial cells revealed that the neddylation inhibitor MLN4924 prominently induces the deneddylation of Cullin-1. Parallel Western blot, luciferase reporter, and gene target assays identified MLN4924 as a potent inhibitor of intestinal epithelial NF-κB. Subsequent studies revealed that MLN4924 potently induces epithelial apoptosis but only in the presence of additional inflammatory stimuli. In vivo administration of MLN4924 (3 mg/kg per day) in a TNBS-induced colitis model significantly accentuated disease severity. Indeed, MLN4924 resulted in worsened clinical scores and increased mortality early in the inflammatory response. Histologic analysis of the colon revealed that neddylation inhibition results in increased tissue damage and significantly increased mucosal apoptosis as determined by TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3 staining, which was particularly prominent within the epithelium. Extensions of these studies revealed that ongoing inflammation is associated with significant loss of deneddylase-1 (SENP8) expression. These studies reveal that intact Cullin-1 neddylation is central to resolution of acute inflammation. PMID:27682585

  8. Fate of marginal neuroblasts in the vomeronasal epithelium of adult mice.

    PubMed

    De La Rosa-Prieto, C; Saiz-Sanchez, D; Ubeda-Bañon, I; Argandoña-Palacios, L; Garcia-Muñozguren, S; Martinez-Marcos, A

    2009-12-10

    Chemical stimuli are sensed through the olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia, and the sensory cells of both systems undergo neuronal turnover during adulthood. In the vomeronasal epithelium, stem cells adjacent to the basal lamina divide and migrate to replace two classes of sensory neurons: apical neurons that express G(i2alpha)-linked V1R vomeronasal receptors and project to the anterior accessory olfactory bulb, and basal neurons that express G(oalpha)-linked V2R receptors and project to the posterior accessory olfactory bulb. Most of the dividing cells are present in the margins of the epithelium and only migrate locally. Previous studies have suggested that these marginal cells may participate in growth, sensory cell replacement or become apoptotic before maturation; however, the exact fate of these cells have remained unclear. In this work we investigated the fate of these marginal cells by analyzing markers of neurogenesis (bromodeoxyuridine incorporation), apoptosis (caspase-3), and neuronal maturation (olfactory marker protein and Neurotrace Nissl stain). Our data reveal a pool of dividing cells in the epithelial margins that predominantly give rise to mature neurons and only rarely undergo apoptosis. Newly generated cells are several times more numerous than apoptotic cells. These marginal neuroblasts could therefore constitute a net neural addition zone during adulthood.

  9. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 enhances the differentiation and reduces the proliferation of adult human olfactory epithelium neural precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Manceur, Aziza P.; Tseng, Michael; Holowacz, Tamara; Witterick, Ian; Weksberg, Rosanna; McCurdy, Richard D.; Warsh, Jerry J.; Audet, Julie

    2011-09-10

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) contains neural precursor cells which can be easily harvested from a minimally invasive nasal biopsy, making them a valuable cell source to study human neural cell lineages in health and disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the etiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in the regulation of murine neural precursor cell fate in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the impact of decreased GSK-3 activity on the fate of adult human OE neural precursors in vitro. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using ATP-competitive (6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime and CHIR99021) or substrate-competitive (TAT-eIF2B) inhibitors to eliminate potential confounding effects on cell fate due to off-target kinase inhibition. GSK-3 inhibitors decreased the number of neural precursor cells in OE cell cultures through a reduction in proliferation. Decreased proliferation was not associated with a reduction in cell survival but was accompanied by a reduction in nestin expression and a substantial increase in the expression of the neuronal differentiation markers MAP1B and neurofilament (NF-M) after 10 days in culture. Taken together, these results suggest that GSK-3 inhibition promotes the early stages of neuronal differentiation in cultures of adult human neural precursors and provide insights into the mechanisms by which alterations in GSK-3 signaling affect adult human neurogenesis, a cellular process strongly suspected to play a role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Induction of immunomodulatory miR-146a and miR-155 in small intestinal epithelium of Vibrio cholerae infected patients at acute stage of cholera

    PubMed Central

    Melgar, Silvia; Aung, Kyaw Min; Rahman, Arman; Qadri, Firdausi; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Shirin, Tahmina

    2017-01-01

    The potential immunomodulatory role of microRNAs in small intestine of patients with acute watery diarrhea caused by Vibrio cholerae O1 or enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection was investigated. Duodenal biopsies were obtained from study-participants at the acute (day 2) and convalescent (day 21) stages of disease, and from healthy individuals. Levels of miR-146a, miR-155 and miR-375 and target gene (IRAK1, TRAF6, CARD10) and 11 cytokine mRNAs were determined by qRT-PCR. The cellular source of microRNAs in biopsies was analyzed by in situ hybridization. The ability of V. cholerae bacteria and their secreted products to cause changes in microRNA- and mRNA levels in polarized tight monolayers of intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. miR-146a and miR-155 were expressed at significantly elevated levels at acute stage of V. cholerae infection and declined to normal at convalescent stage (P<0.009 versus controls; P = 0.03 versus convalescent stage, pairwise). Both microRNAs were mainly expressed in the epithelium. Only marginal down-regulation of target genes IRAK1 and CARD10 was seen and a weak cytokine-profile was identified in the acute infected mucosa. No elevation of microRNA levels was seen in ETEC infection. Challenge of tight monolayers with the wild type V. cholerae O1 strain C6706 and clinical isolates from two study-participants, caused significant increase in miR-155 and miR-146a by the strain C6706 (P<0.01). One clinical isolate caused reduction in IRAK1 levels (P<0.05) and none of the strains induced inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, secreted factors from these strains caused markedly increased levels of IL-8, IL-1β, and CARD10 (P<0.001), without inducing microRNA expression. Thus, miR-146a and miR-155 are expressed in the duodenal epithelium at the acute stage of cholera. The inducer is probably the V. cholerae bacterium. By inducing microRNAs the bacterium can limit the innate immune response of the host, including inflammation

  11. Transport of mistletoe lectin by M cells in human intestinal follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Su-Yun; Park, Won-Bong

    2008-12-01

    Purified mistletoe lectins are known to have cytotoxic and stimulating activities in the immune system. Mistletoe extract has been given subcutaneously because of its unstablity and poor absorption in the Gastrointestinal (GI) tract. A hallmark of M cells is their capacity to internalize material from the lumen and to transfer it efficiently to the underlying lymphoid cells. Although lectins are the prime candidates for oral vaccine delivery, the mechanisms whereby lectins are taken up, transported by M cells, and affect underlying immune cells remain poorly understood. In this study, uptake mechanism of Korean mistletoe lectin (Viscum album L. var. coloratum aggulutinin, VCA) across the human FAE (follicle associated epithelium) was investigated. An inverted FAE model of co-culture was obtained by a co-culture system of Caco-2 cells and human Raji B lymphocytes, and VCA transport across the in vitro model of human FAE was investigated. There was a greater transport of VCA across FAE monolayer cells than that of Caco-2 monolayer cells. These observations will be useful to assess the transport of other orally administered material in the GI tract.

  12. Rapid lamina propria retraction and zipper-like constriction of the epithelium preserves the epithelial lining in human small intestine exposed to ischaemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Grootjans, Joep; Thuijls, Geertje; Derikx, Joep P M; van Dam, Ronald M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Buurman, Wim A

    2011-07-01

    To ensure a sufficient barrier between a host and noxious luminal content, the intestinal epithelium must be equipped with efficient mechanisms to limit damage to the epithelial lining. Using a human model, we were able to investigate these mechanisms in the human gut exposed to ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) over the time course of 150 min. In 10 patients a part of jejunum, to be removed for surgical reasons, was selectively exposed to IR. Control tissue was collected, as well as tissue exposed to 30 min of ischaemia with 0, 30 or 120 min of reperfusion. Haematoxylin/eosin staining demonstrated the appearance of subepithelial spaces following 30 min of ischaemia, while the epithelial lining remained intact at this stage. Western blot for myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) revealed a significant increase in protein levels after ischaemia (p < 0.01), and selective staining of MLCK and phosphorylated MLC (pMLC) in lamina propria muscle fibres indicated that appearance of subepithelial spaces was a consequence of active villus contraction. Early during reperfusion, accumulation of pMLC was observed exclusively at the basal side of enterocytes that had lost contact with the collagen-IV-positive basement membrane. These epithelial sheets were pulled together like a zipper, even before these cells were shed. This constriction, verified by increased F-actin and pMLC double staining, accounted for a 45% reduction in virtual wound surface (p < 0.001) at 30 min of reperfusion. In addition, these mechanisms were involved in resealing remaining small epithelial defects, resulting in a fully restored epithelial lining within 120 min of reperfusion. In conclusion, we show in a human in vivo model that the human jejunum has the ability to preserve the epithelial lining during intestinal IR by rapid lamina propria contraction and zipper-like constriction of epithelial cells that are to be shed into the lumen. These newly described phenomena limit exposure to noxious luminal content.

  13. Anti-inflammatory properties of fruit juices enriched with pine bark extract in an in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium: the effect of gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Frontela-Saseta, Carmen; López-Nicolás, Rubén; González-Bermúdez, Carlos A; Martínez-Graciá, Carmen; Ros-Berruezo, Gaspar

    2013-03-01

    Enrichment of fruit juices with pine bark extract (PBE) could be a strategy to compensate for phenolic losses during the gastrointestinal digestion. A coculture system with Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages was established as an in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium for evaluating the anti-inflammatory capacity of fruit juices enriched with PBE (0.5 g L(-1)) before and after in vitro digestion. The digestion of both PBE-enriched pineapple and red fruit juice led to significant changes in most of the analysed phenolic compounds. The in vitro inflammatory state showed cell barrier dysfunction and overproduction of IL-8, nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the inflamed cells, incubation with nondigested samples reduced (P<0.05) the production of IL-8 and NO compared with digested samples. ROS production increased in the inflamed cells exposed to digested commercial red fruit juice (86.8±1.3%) compared with fresh juice (77.4±0.8%) and increased in the inflamed cells exposed to digested enriched red fruit juice (82.6±1.6%) compared with the fresh enriched juice (55.8±6%). The anti-inflammatory properties of PBE-enriched fruit juices decreased after digestion; further research on the bioavailability of the assayed compounds is needed to properly assess their usefulness for the treatment of gut inflammation.

  14. A preliminary study on the potential of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to induce dyskaryotic change in respiratory epithelium in adult community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    An, Shu-Chang; Yang, Dong-Hong; Luo, Chao-Feng; Chen, Xin; Liu, Guo-Tian; Weng, Yan; Liu, Jing-Zhe; Shang, Ying; Wang, Rui-Qin; Gao, Zhan-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to explore the cellular morphology of respiratory epithelium in Mycoplasma pneumonia (MpP) patients. Materials and Methods: The cast-off cell morphological findings from bronchoscopic brushings in MpP and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by typical pathogens were reviewed. Results: Compared with the CAP group, cellular dysplasia in respiratory tract epithelial brushings was significantly greater in MpP patients (P = 0.033). Conclusion: Unique biological characteristics and mechanisms of pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) may result in dyskaryotic changes in respiratory epithelium in adult MpP. PMID:28163727

  15. Functional and Molecular Characterization of Rod-like Cells from Retinal Stem Cells Derived from the Adult Ciliary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Demontis, Gian Carlo; Aruta, Claudia; Comitato, Antonella; De Marzo, Anna; Marigo, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    In vitro generation of photoreceptors from stem cells is of great interest for the development of regenerative medicine approaches for patients affected by retinal degeneration and for high throughput drug screens for these diseases. In this study, we show unprecedented high percentages of rod-fated cells from retinal stem cells of the adult ciliary epithelium. Molecular characterization of rod-like cells demonstrates that they lose ciliary epithelial characteristics but acquire photoreceptor features. Rod maturation was evaluated at two levels: gene expression and electrophysiological functionality. Here we present a strong correlation between phototransduction protein expression and functionality of the cells in vitro. We demonstrate that in vitro generated rod-like cells express cGMP-gated channels that are gated by endogenous cGMP. We also identified voltage-gated channels necessary for rod maturation and viability. This level of analysis for the first time provides evidence that adult retinal stem cells can generate highly homogeneous rod-fated cells. PMID:22432014

  16. Histological alterations in the intestinal epithelium caused by the inclusion of full-fat sunflower kernels in broiler chicken diets.

    PubMed

    Arija, I; Viveros, A; Brenes, A; Canales, R; Pizarro, M; Castaño, M

    2000-09-01

    Changes in small intestinal morphology (jejunum) were examined at 28 d of age in chicks fed with full-fat sunflower kernels (FFSK)-based diets. Jejunal mucosa of chicks (six chicks per treatment) were embedded in Epon-812 for examination by a conventional electron microscope procedure. A portion of the tissues was also sectioned and embedded in paraffin for examination by light microscopy. Brush border, goblet cells, and intraepithelial lymphocytes, on the one hand, and fibroblast and mononuclear cells (lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages) were observed in the enterocytes and lamina propria, respectively. The results showed that the birds fed 150 g kg(-1) of FFSK showed a shortening and thickening of the villi, hyperplasia and vacuolar degeneration of enterocytes, and hypertrophy and hyperplasia of goblet cells. Likewise, an increment of intraepithelial lymphoid cells and hypercellularity of the lamina propria was observed. In addition, electron microscopy showed large vacuoles in the enterocytes, which could be dilations of agranular and granular endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi. There were many dark granules within the vacuoles that could be triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (portomicrons). These lesions could have been due to the presence of chlorogenic acid or to the greater concentration of oil in the FFSK diet. Our observations demonstrated that addition of 150 g kg(-1) FFSK to broiler chicken diets caused alterations in jejunal mucosa that could explain the decrease in fat digestibility observed in a previous experiment in which we incorporated FFSK into broiler diets.

  17. Spontaneous free perforation of the small intestine in adults

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous free perforation of the small intestine is uncommon, especially if there is no prior history of visceral trauma. However, free, even recurrent, perforation may complicate a defined and established clinical disorder, such as Crohn’s disease. In addition, free perforation may be the initial clinical presentation of an occult intestinal disorder, such as a lymphoma complicating celiac disease, causing diffuse peritonitis and an acute abdomen. Initial diagnosis of the precise cause may be difficult, but now has been aided by computerized tomographic imaging. The site of perforation may be helpful in defining a cause (e.g., ileal perforation in Crohn’s disease, jejunal perforation in celiac disease, complicated by lymphoma or collagenous sprue). Urgent surgical intervention, however, is usually required for precise diagnosis and treatment. During evaluation, an expanding list of other possible causes should be considered, even after surgery, as subsequent management may be affected. Free perforation may not only complicate an established intestinal disorder, but also a new acute process (e.g., caused by different infectious agents) or a longstanding and unrecognized disorder (e.g., congenital, metabolic and vascular causes). Moreover, new endoscopic therapeutic and medical therapies, including use of emerging novel biological agents, have been complicated by intestinal perforation. Recent studies also support the hypothesis that perforation of the small intestine may be genetically-based with different mutations causing altered connective tissue structure, synthesis and repair. PMID:25110427

  18. Zinc sulfide in intestinal cell granules of Ancylostoma caninum adults

    SciTech Connect

    Gianotti, A.J.; Clark, D.T.; Dash, J. )

    1991-04-01

    A source of confusion has existed since the turn of the century about the reddish brown, weakly birefringent 'sphaerocrystals' located in the intestines of strongyle nematodes, Strongylus and Ancylostoma. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometric analyses were used for accurate determination of the crystalline order and elemental composition of the granules in the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The composition of the intestinal pigmented granules was identified unequivocally as zinc sulfide. It seems most probable that the granules serve to detoxify high levels of metallic ions (specifically zinc) present due to the large intake of host blood.

  19. Isolated intestinal transplants vs. liver-intestinal transplants in adult patients in the United States: 22 yr of OPTN data.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag S; Gruessner, Angelika C; Khan, Khalid M; Fishbein, Thomas M; Jie, Tun; Rodriguez Rilo, Horacio L; Gruessner, Rainer W G

    2012-01-01

    We examined the outcomes of adult intestinal transplants (ITx); isolated ITx vs. liver-intestinal transplants (L-ITx) were compared using the UNOS database (1987-2009). Of 759 ITx transplants in 687 patients, 463 (61%) were isolated and 296 (39%) were L-ITx. Patient survival for primary isolated ITx at one, three, and five yr was 84%, 66.7%, and 54.2%; and primary L-ITx was, 67%, 53.3%, and 46% (p = 0.0005). Primary isolated ITx graft survival at one, three, and five yr was 80.7%, 57.6%, 42.8%; primary L-ITx was 64.1%, 51%, 44.1% (p = 0.0003 at one, three yr, Wilcoxon test). For retransplants (n = 72), patient and graft survival for isolated ITx (n = 41) at five yr was 40% in era 1 (1987-2000) and 16% in era 2 (p = 0.47); for retransplanted L-ITx (n = 31), it improved from 14% to 64% in era 2 (p = 0.01). Cox regression: creatinine >1.3 mg/dL and pre-transplant hospitalization were negative predictors for outcome of both; bilirubin >1.3 mg/dL was a negative predictor for isolated ITx and donor age >40 yr for L-ITx. Isolated ITx should be considered prior to liver disease for adults with intestinal failure; L-ITx is preferable for retransplantation.

  20. Rotavirus Infection Is Not Associated with Small Intestinal Fluid Secretion in the Adult Mouse▿

    PubMed Central

    Kordasti, Shirin; Istrate, Claudia; Banasaz, Mahanez; Rottenberg, Martin; Sjövall, Henrik; Lundgren, Ove; Svensson, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    In contrast to humans, adult but not infant small animals are resistant to rotavirus diarrhea. The pathophysiological mechanism behind this age-restricted diarrhea is currently unresolved, and this question was investigated by studying the secretory state of the small intestines of adult mice infected with rotavirus. Immunohistochemistry and histological examinations revealed that rotavirus (strain EDIM) infects all parts of the small intestines of adult mice, with significant numbers of infected cells in the ilea at 2 and 4 days postinfection. Furthermore, quantitative PCR revealed that 100-fold more viral RNA was produced in the ilea than in the jejuna or duodena of adult mice. In vitro perfusion experiments of the small intestine did not reveal any significant changes in net fluid secretion among mice infected for 3 days or 4 days or in those that were noninfected (37 ± 9 μl · h−1 · cm−1, 22 ± 13 μl · h−1 · cm−1, and 33 ± 6 μl · h−1 · cm−1, respectively) or in transmucosal potential difference (4.0 ± 0.3 mV versus 3.9 ± 0.4 mV), a marker for active chloride secretion, between control and rotavirus-infected mice. In vivo experiments also did not show any differences in potential difference between uninfected and infected small intestines. Furthermore, no significant differences in weight between infected and uninfected small intestines were found, nor were any differences in fecal output observed between infected and control mice. Altogether, these data suggest that rotavirus infection is not sufficient to stimulate chloride and water secretion from the small intestines of adult mice. PMID:16943290

  1. Expression and Role of VEGF in the Adult Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Knatokie M.; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Walshe, Tony; Zahr, Alisar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Despite a lack of active angiogenesis, VEGF is expressed in nearly every adult tissue, and recent evidence suggests that VEGF may serve as a survival factor for both vascular and nonvascular tissues. VEGF blockade is a widely used treatment for neovascular diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Therefore, it was sought in this study to evaluate the expression and role of endogenous VEGF in RPE. Methods. VEGF and VEGFR2 expression in the murine retina were assessed during development. Bevacizumab was used to neutralize VEGF in ARPE-19 cells, and the effects on cell survival and apical microvill were assessed by TUNEL and SEM, respectively. VEGF was systemically neutralized in vivo by adenoviral-mediated overexpression of soluble VEGFR1 (sFlt). RPE and choriocapillaris were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Changes in gene expression were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Results. VEGF expression was detected in the developing RPE as early as embryonic day (E) 9.5, whereas VEGFR2 expression by RPE began nonuniformly between postnatal (P) day 6.5 and P8.5. VEGF neutralization in vitro led to increased apoptosis and reduced microvilli density and length. Systemic VEGF neutralization led to transient degenerative changes; RPE were vacuolated and separated from photoreceptor outer segments, and choriocapillaris fenestrations were decreased. VEGF levels were elevated in RPE of Ad-sFlt1 mice at day 4 postinfection, and there was increased expression of the neurotrophic factor CD59a at day 14. Conclusions. These results indicate that VEGF plays a critical role in survival and maintenance of RPE integrity. Potential undesired off-target effects should be considered with chronic use of anti-VEGF agents. PMID:22058334

  2. Liganded thyroid hormone receptor induces nucleosome removal and histone modifications to activate transcription during larval intestinal cell death and adult stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kazuo; Fujimoto, Kenta; Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid hormone (T(3)) plays an important role in regulating multiple cellular and metabolic processes, including cell proliferation, cell death, and energy metabolism, in vertebrates. Dysregulation of T(3) signaling results in developmental abnormalities, metabolic defects, and even cancer. We used T(3)-dependent Xenopus metamorphosis as a model to study how T(3) regulates transcription during vertebrate development. T(3) exerts its metamorphic effects through T(3) receptors (TR). TR recruits, in a T(3)-dependent manner, cofactor complexes that can carry out chromatin remodeling/histone modifications. Whether and how histone modifications change upon gene regulation by TR during vertebrate development is largely unknown. Here we analyzed histone modifications at T(3) target genes during intestinal metamorphosis, a process that involves essentially total apoptotic degeneration of the simple larval epithelium and de novo development of the adult epithelial stem cells, followed by their proliferation and differentiation into the complex adult epithelium. We demonstrated for the first time in vivo during vertebrate development that TR induces the removal of core histones at the promoter region and the recruitment of RNA polymerase. Furthermore, a number of histone activation and repression marks have been defined based on correlations with mRNA levels in cell cultures. Most but not all correlate with gene expression induced by liganded TR during development, suggesting that tissue and developmental context influences the roles of histone modifications in gene regulation. Our findings provide important mechanistic insights on how chromatin remodeling affects developmental gene regulation in vivo.

  3. Adult stem cells in the small intestine are intrinsically programmed with their location-specific function.

    PubMed

    Middendorp, Sabine; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Wiegerinck, Caroline L; Mokry, Michal; Akkerman, Ronald D L; van Wijngaarden, Simone; Clevers, Hans; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S

    2014-05-01

    Differentiation and specialization of epithelial cells in the small intestine are regulated in two ways. First, there is differentiation along the crypt-villus axis of the intestinal stem cells into absorptive enterocytes, Paneth, goblet, tuft, enteroendocrine, or M cells, which is mainly regulated by WNT. Second, there is specialization along the cephalocaudal axis with different absorptive and digestive functions in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum that is controlled by several transcription factors such as GATA4. However, so far it is unknown whether location-specific functional properties are intrinsically programmed within stem cells or if continuous signaling from mesenchymal cells is necessary to maintain the location-specific identity of the small intestine. Using the pure epithelial organoid technique, we show that region-specific gene expression profiles are conserved throughout long-term cultures of both mouse and human intestinal stem cells and correlated with differential Gata4 expression. Furthermore, the human organoid culture system demonstrates that Gata4-regulated gene expression is only allowed in absence of WNT signaling. These data show that location-specific function is intrinsically programmed in the adult stem cells of the small intestine and that their differentiation fate is independent of location-specific extracellular signals. In light of the potential future clinical application of small intestine-derived organoids, our data imply that it is important to generate GATA4-positive and GATA4-negative cultures to regenerate all essential functions of the small intestine.

  4. Intestinal toxemia botulism in 3 adults, Ontario, Canada, 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Yolanda D; Middleton, Dean; Whitfield, Yvonne; Tyndel, Felix; Haider, Shariq; Spiegelman, Jamie; Swartz, Richard H; Nelder, Mark P; Baker, Stacey L; Landry, Lisa; Maceachern, Ross; Deamond, Sherri; Ross, Lorrie; Peters, Garth; Baird, Michelle; Rose, David; Sanders, Greg; Austin, John W

    2012-01-01

    Five cases of intestinal toxemia botulism in adults were identified within an 18-month period in or near Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We describe findings for 3 of the 5 case-patients. Clinical samples contained Clostridium botulinum spores and botulinum neurotoxins (types A and B) for extended periods (range 41-61 days), indicative of intestinal toxemia botulism. Patients' clinical signs improved with supportive care and administration of botulinum antitoxin. Peanut butter from the residence of 1 case-patient yielded C. botulinum type A, which corresponded with type A spores found in the patient's feces. The food and clinical isolates from this case-patient could not be distinguished by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Two of the case-patients had Crohn disease and had undergone previous bowel surgery, which may have contributed to infection with C. botulinum. These cases reinforce the view that an underlying gastrointestinal condition is a risk factor for adult intestinal toxemia botulism.

  5. α3/4 Fucosyltransferase 3-dependent synthesis of Sialyl Lewis A on CD44 variant containing exon 6 mediates polymorphonuclear leukocyte detachment from intestinal epithelium during transepithelial migration.

    PubMed

    Brazil, Jennifer C; Liu, Renpeng; Sumagin, Ronen; Kolegraff, Keli N; Nusrat, Asma; Cummings, Richard D; Parkos, Charles A; Louis, Nancy A

    2013-11-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) migration across the intestinal epithelium closely parallels disease symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMN transepithelial migration (TEM) is a multistep process that terminates with PMN detachment from the apical epithelium into the lumen. Using a unique mAb (GM35), we have previously demonstrated that engagement of the CD44 variant containing exon 6 (CD44v6) blocks both PMN detachment and cleavage of CD44v6. In this article, we report that PMN binding to CD44v6 is mediated by protein-specific O-glycosylation with sialyl Lewis A (sLe(a)). Analyses of glycosyltransferase expression identified fucosyltransferase 3 (Fut3) as the key enzyme driving sLe(a) biosynthesis in human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Fut3 transfection of sLe(a)-deficient IECs resulted in robust expression of sLe(a). However, this glycan was not expressed on CD44v6 in these transfected IECs; therefore, engagement of sLe(a) had no effect on PMN TEM across these cells. Analyses of sLe(a) in human colonic mucosa revealed minimal expression in noninflamed areas, with striking upregulation under colitic conditions that correlated with increased expression of CD44v6. Importantly, intraluminal administration of mAb GM35 blocked PMN TEM and attenuated associated increases in intestinal permeability in a murine intestinal model of inflammation. These findings identify a unique role for protein-specific O-glycosylation in regulating PMN-epithelial interactions at the luminal surface of the intestine.

  6. Bilateral lesions of suprachiasmatic nuclei affect circadian rhythms in (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into deoxyribonucleic acid in mouse intestinal tract, mitotic index of corneal epithelium, and serum corticosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Scheving, L.E.; Tsai, T.H.; Powell, E.W.; Pasley, J.N.; Halberg, F.; Dunn, J.

    1983-03-01

    Investigations into the role of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the coordination of circadian rhythms have presented differing results. Several reports have shown that ablation of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCNA) alters the phase and amplitude of rhythms but does not abolish them. The present study investigates the effect of SCNA on the rhythms in cell proliferation in various regions of the intestinal tract as measured by the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-thymidine into deoxyribonucleic acid, in the mitotic activity of the corneal epithelium, and in serum corticosterone levels. The study involved mice with verified lesions of the SCN (six to 13 mice per time point) and control groups of both sham-operated and unoperated mice (seven of each per time point). The mice were killed in groups that represented seven time points over a single 24 hr span (3 hr intervals with the 0800 hr sampled both at start and end of the series). The tissues examined were the tongue, esophagus, gastric stomach, and colon for DNA synthesis, the corneal epithelium for mitotic index, and blood serum for corticosterone level. The most consistent result of SCNA was a phase advance in the rhythms in cell proliferation in the tongue, esophagus, gastric stomach, colon, and corneal epithelium. A reduction in rhythm amplitude occurred in the tongue, esophagus, and corneal epithelium; however, there was an amplitude increase for the stomach, colon, and serum corticosterone. The mesor (rhythm-adjusted mean) was increased by SCNA in all tissues except the corneal epithelium. These findings further support the role of the suprachiasmatic nuclear area in the control of rhythms in cell proliferation and corticosterone production, by acting as a ''phase-resetter'' and as a modulator of rhythm amplitude.

  7. The Developmental Intestinal Regulator ELT-2 Controls p38-Dependent Immune Responses in Adult C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Block, Dena H. S.; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Kang, Hae Sung; Carlisle, Jolie A.; Hanganu, Alexandru; Lai, Ty Yu-Jen; Shapira, Michael

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors play critical roles in cellular differentiation and development. However, their roles in mature tissues are less understood. In C. elegans larvae, the transcription factor ELT-2 regulates terminal differentiation of the intestine. It is also expressed in the adult intestine, where it was suggested to maintain intestinal structure and function, and where it was additionally shown to contribute to infection resistance. To study the function of elt-2 in adults we characterized elt-2-dependent gene expression following its knock-down specifically in adults. Microarray analysis identified two ELT-2-regulated gene subsets: one, enriched for hydrolytic enzymes, pointed at regulation of constitutive digestive functions as a dominant role of adult elt-2; the second was enriched for immune genes that are induced in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Focusing on the latter, we used genetic analyses coupled to survival assays and quantitative RT-PCR to interrogate the mechanism(s) through which elt-2 contributes to immunity. We show that elt-2 controls p38-dependent gene induction, cooperating with two p38-activated transcription factors, ATF-7 and SKN-1. This demonstrates a mechanism through which the constitutively nuclear elt-2 can impact induced responses, and play a dominant role in C. elegans immunity. PMID:26016853

  8. The Developmental Intestinal Regulator ELT-2 Controls p38-Dependent Immune Responses in Adult C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Block, Dena H S; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Kang, Hae Sung; Carlisle, Jolie A; Hanganu, Alexandru; Lai, Ty Yu-Jen; Shapira, Michael

    2015-05-01

    GATA transcription factors play critical roles in cellular differentiation and development. However, their roles in mature tissues are less understood. In C. elegans larvae, the transcription factor ELT-2 regulates terminal differentiation of the intestine. It is also expressed in the adult intestine, where it was suggested to maintain intestinal structure and function, and where it was additionally shown to contribute to infection resistance. To study the function of elt-2 in adults we characterized elt-2-dependent gene expression following its knock-down specifically in adults. Microarray analysis identified two ELT-2-regulated gene subsets: one, enriched for hydrolytic enzymes, pointed at regulation of constitutive digestive functions as a dominant role of adult elt-2; the second was enriched for immune genes that are induced in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Focusing on the latter, we used genetic analyses coupled to survival assays and quantitative RT-PCR to interrogate the mechanism(s) through which elt-2 contributes to immunity. We show that elt-2 controls p38-dependent gene induction, cooperating with two p38-activated transcription factors, ATF-7 and SKN-1. This demonstrates a mechanism through which the constitutively nuclear elt-2 can impact induced responses, and play a dominant role in C. elegans immunity.

  9. Anoctamins support calcium-dependent chloride secretion by facilitating calcium signaling in adult mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Rainer; Faria, Diana; Skryabin, Boris V; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Rock, Jason R; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal epithelial electrolyte secretion is activated by increase in intracellular cAMP or Ca(2+) and opening of apical Cl(-) channels. In infants and young animals, but not in adults, Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels may cause secretory diarrhea during rotavirus infection. While detailed knowledge exists concerning the contribution of cAMP-activated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels, analysis of the role of Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels became possible through identification of the anoctamin (TMEM16) family of proteins. We demonstrate expression of several anoctamin paralogues in mouse small and large intestines. Using intestinal-specific mouse knockout models for anoctamin 1 (Ano1) and anoctamin 10 (Ano10) and a conventional knockout model for anoctamin 6 (Ano6), we demonstrate the role of anoctamins for Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion induced by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCH). Ano1 is preferentially expressed in the ileum and large intestine, where it supports Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) secretion. In contrast, Ano10 is essential for Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion in jejunum, where expression of Ano1 was not detected. Although broadly expressed, Ano6 has no role in intestinal cholinergic Cl(-) secretion. Ano1 is located in a basolateral compartment/membrane rather than in the apical membrane, where it supports CCH-induced Ca(2+) increase, while the essential and possibly only apical Cl(-) channel is CFTR. These results define a new role of Ano1 for intestinal Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion and demonstrate for the first time a contribution of Ano10 to intestinal transport.

  10. Purification of human adult and foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatases by monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Vockley, J; Harris, H

    1984-01-01

    We have used the technique of monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography to purify adult and foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatases. Pure adult intestinal enzyme was obtained from a crude tissue extract with a single immunoaffinity chromatographic step in yields exceeding 95%. An additional ion-exchange chromatographic step was necessary for purification of the foetal enzyme, but yields still exceeded 70%. Experiments to optimize the efficiency of the monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography procedure suggest that the relative strength of binding of an antibody to its antigen is the most important factor to consider when constructing such columns. A column made from an antibody of too low an avidity will not retain the enzyme, while one of too high an avidity will make elution of enzyme in the active state difficult. A scheme is suggested for the application of this technique to a general approach to enzyme purification. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6365087

  11. The Par complex and integrins direct asymmetric cell division in adult intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Spyros; Conder, Ryan; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2012-10-05

    The adult Drosophila midgut is maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that generate both self-renewing and differentiating daughter cells. How this asymmetry is generated is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that asymmetric ISC division is established by a unique combination of extracellular and intracellular polarity mechanisms. We show that Integrin-dependent adhesion to the basement membrane induces cell-intrinsic polarity and results in the asymmetric segregation of the Par proteins Par-3, Par-6, and aPKC into the apical daughter cell. Cell-specific knockdown and overexpression experiments suggest that increased activity of aPKC enhances Delta/Notch signaling in one of the two daughter cells to induce terminal differentiation. Perturbing this mechanism or altering the orientation of ISC division results in the formation of intestinal tumors. Our data indicate that mechanisms for intrinsically asymmetric cell division can be adapted to allow for the flexibility in lineage decisions that is required in adult stem cells.

  12. An essential and evolutionarily conserved role of protein arginine methyltransferase 1 for adult intestinal stem cells during postembryonic development.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroki; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2010-11-01

    Organ-specific adult stem cells are critical for the homeostasis of adult organs and organ repair and regeneration. Unfortunately, it has been difficult to investigate the origins of these stem cells and the mechanisms of their development, especially in mammals. Intestinal remodeling during frog metamorphosis offers a unique opportunity for such studies. During the transition from an herbivorous tadpole to a carnivorous frog, the intestine is completely remodeled as the larval epithelial cells undergo apoptotic degeneration and are replaced by adult epithelial cells developed de novo. The entire metamorphic process is under the control of thyroid hormone, making it possible to control the development of the adult intestinal stem cells. Here, we show that the thyroid hormone receptor-coactivator protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is upregulated in a small number of larval epithelial cells and that these cells dedifferentiate to become the adult stem cells. More importantly, transgenic overexpression of PRMT1 leads to increased adult stem cells in the intestine, and conversely, knocking down the expression of endogenous PRMT1 reduces the adult stem cell population. In addition, PRMT1 expression pattern during zebrafish and mouse development suggests that PRMT1 may play an evolutionally conserved role in the development of adult intestinal stem cells throughout vertebrates. These findings are not only important for the understanding of organ-specific adult stem cell development but also have important implications in regenerative medicine of the digestive tract.

  13. Intestinal helminth infections amongst HIV-infected adults in Mthatha General Hospital, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Wright, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, studies on the prevalence of intestinal helminth co-infection amongst HIV-infected patients as well as possible interactions between these two infections are limited. Aim To investigate the prevalence of intestinal helminth infestation amongst adults living with HIV or AIDS at Mthatha General Hospital. Setting Study participants were recruited at the outpatient department of Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2013 amongst consecutive consenting HIV-positive adult patients. Socio-demographic and clinical information were obtained using data collection forms and structured interviews. Stool samples were collected to investigate the presence of helminths whilst blood samples were obtained for the measurement of CD4+ T-cell count and viral load. Results Data were obtained on 231 participants, with a mean age of 34.9 years, a mean CD4 count of 348 cells/µL and a mean viral load of 4.8 log10 copies/mL. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 24.7%, with Ascaris Lumbricoides (42.1%) the most prevalent identified species. Statistically significant association was found between CD4 count of less than 200 cells/µL and helminth infection (p = 0.05). No statistically significant association was found between intestinal helminth infection and the mean CD4 count (p = 0.79) or the mean viral load (p = 0.98). Conclusion A high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was observed amongst the study population. Therefore, screening and treatment of helminths should be considered as part of the management of HIV and AIDS in primary health care. PMID:26842519

  14. Characterization of intestinal bacteria in wild and domesticated adult black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Rungrassamee, Wanilada; Klanchui, Amornpan; Maibunkaew, Sawarot; Chaiyapechara, Sage; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2014-01-01

    The black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) is a marine crustacean of economic importance in the world market. To ensure sustainability of the shrimp industry, production capacity and disease outbreak prevention must be improved. Understanding healthy microbial balance inside the shrimp intestine can provide an initial step toward better farming practice and probiotic applications. In this study, we employed a barcode pyrosequencing analysis of V3-4 regions of 16S rRNA genes to examine intestinal bacteria communities in wild-caught and domesticated P. monodon broodstock. Shrimp faeces were removed from intestines prior to further analysis in attempt to identify mucosal bacterial population. Five phyla, Actinobacteria, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, were found in all shrimp from both wild and domesticated environments. The operational taxonomic unit (OTU) was assigned at 97% sequence identity, and our pyrosequencing results identified 18 OTUs commonly found in both groups. Sequences of the shared OTUs were similar to bacteria in three phyla, namely i) Proteobacteria (Vibrio, Photobacterium, Novosphingobium, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas and Undibacterium), ii) Firmicutes (Fusibacter), and iii) Bacteroidetes (Cloacibacterium). The shared bacterial members in P. monodon from two different habitats provide evidence that the internal environments within the host shrimp also exerts selective pressure on bacterial members. Intestinal bacterial profiles were compared using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The sequences from DGGE bands were similar to those of Vibrio and Photobacterium in all shrimp, consistent with pyrosequencing results. This work provides the first comprehensive report on bacterial populations in the intestine of adult black tiger shrimp and reveals some similar bacterial members between the intestine of wild-caught and domesticated shrimp.

  15. Inflammatory cues acting on the adult intestinal stem cells and the early onset of cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DE LERMA BARBARO, A.; PERLETTI, G.; BONAPACE, I.M.; MONTI, E.

    2014-01-01

    The observation that cancer often arises at sites of chronic inflammation has prompted the idea that carcinogenesis and inflammation are deeply interwoven. In fact, the current literature highlights a role for chronic inflammation in virtually all the steps of carcinogenesis, including tumor initiation, promotion and progression. The aim of the present article is to review the current literature on the involvement of chronic inflammation in the initiation step and in the very early phases of tumorigenesis, in a type of cancer where adult stem cells are assumed to be the cells of origin of neoplasia. Since the gastrointestinal tract is regarded as the best-established model system to address the liaison between chronic inflammation and neoplasia, the focus of this article will be on intestinal cancer. In fact, the anatomy of the intestinal epithelial lining is uniquely suited to study adult stem cells in their niche, and the bowel crypt is an ideal developmental biology system, as proliferation, differentiation and cell migration are all distributed linearly along the long axis of the crypt. Moreover, crypt stem cells are regarded today as the most likely targets of neoplastic transformation in bowel cancer. More specifically, the present review addresses the molecular mechanisms whereby a state of chronic inflammation could trigger the neoplastic process in the intestine, focusing on the generation of inflammatory cues evoking enhanced proliferation in cells not initiated but at risk of neoplastic transformation because of their stemness. Novel experimental approaches, based on triggering an inflammatory stimulus in the neighbourhood of adult intestinal stem cells, are warranted to address some as yet unanswered questions. A possible approach, the targeted transgenesis of Paneth cells, may be aimed at ‘hijacking’ the crypt stem cell niche from a status characterized by the maintenance of homeostasis to local chronic inflammation, with the prospect of initiating

  16. Prebiotic effects of almonds and almond skins on intestinal microbiota in healthy adult humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibin; Lin, Xiuchun; Huang, Guangwei; Zhang, Wen; Rao, Pingfan; Ni, Li

    2014-04-01

    Almonds and almond skins are rich in fiber and other components that have potential prebiotic properties. In this study we investigated the prebiotic effects of almond and almond skin intake in healthy humans. A total of 48 healthy adult volunteers consumed a daily dose of roasted almonds (56 g), almond skins (10 g), or commercial fructooligosaccharides (8 g) (as positive control) for 6 weeks. Fecal samples were collected at defined time points and analyzed for microbiota composition and selected indicators of microbial activity. Different strains of intestinal bacteria had varying degrees of growth sensitivity to almonds or almond skins. Significant increases in the populations of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were observed in fecal samples as a consequence of almond or almond skin supplementation. However, the populations of Escherichia coli did not change significantly, while the growth of the pathogen Clostridum perfringens was significantly repressed. Modification of the intestinal microbiota composition induced changes in bacterial enzyme activities, specifically a significant increase in fecal β-galactosidase activity and decreases in fecal β-glucuronidase, nitroreductase and azoreductase activities. Our observations suggest that almond and almond skin ingestion may lead to an improvement in the intestinal microbiota profile and a modification of the intestinal bacterial activities, which would induce the promotion of health beneficial factors and the inhibition of harmful factors. Thus we believe that almonds and almond skins possess potential prebiotic properties.

  17. Multi-Scale In Vivo Systems Analysis Reveals the Influence of Immune Cells on TNF-α-Induced Apoptosis in the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Ken S.; Cortez-Retamozo, Virna; Philips, Sarah R.; Pittet, Mikael J.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Haigis, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells exist within a complex environment that affects how they interpret and respond to stimuli. We have applied a multi-scale in vivo systems approach to understand how intestinal immune cells communicate with epithelial cells to regulate responses to inflammatory signals. Multivariate modeling analysis of a large dataset composed of phospho-signals, cytokines, and immune cell populations within the intestine revealed an intimate relationship between immune cells and the epithelial response to TNF-α. Ablation of lymphocytes in the intestine prompted a decrease in the expression of MCP-1, which in turn increased the steady state number of intestinal plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). This change in the immune compartment affected the intestinal cytokine milieu and subsequent epithelial cell signaling network, with cells becoming hypersensitive to TNF-α-induced apoptosis in a way that could be predicted by mathematical modeling. In summary, we have uncovered a novel cellular network that regulates the response of intestinal epithelial cells to inflammatory stimuli in an in vivo setting. PMID:23055830

  18. Requirement of matrix metalloproteinase-1 for intestinal homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Chung, Hae-Young; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2012-03-10

    Stem cells are tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteolytic enzymes, modulate the turnover of numerous substrates, including cytokine precursors, growth factors, and ECM molecules. However, the roles of MMPs in the regulation of adult stem cells are poorly understood. In the present study, we utilize the Drosophila midgut, which is an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology, to show that Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). The results showed that Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut and that its expression increases with age and with exposure to oxidative stress. Mmp1 knockdown or Timp-overexpressing flies and flies heterozygous for a viable, hypomorphic Mmp1 allele increased ISC proliferation in the gut, as shown by staining with an anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. Reduced Mmp1 levels induced intestinal hyperplasia, and the Mmp1depletion-induced ISC proliferation was rescued by the suppression of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that Mmp1 regulates ISC proliferation through the EGFR signaling pathway. Furthermore, adult gut-specific knockdown and whole-animal heterozygotes of Mmp1 increased additively sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress and shortened lifespan. Our data suggest that Drosophila Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation for maintenance of gut homeostasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1-related ISC proliferation is associated with EGFR signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 in the gut is required for the intestinal homeostasis and longevity.

  19. Laboratory findings in four cases of adult botulism suggest colonization of the intestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    McCroskey, L M; Hatheway, C L

    1988-01-01

    There was laboratory evidence of intestinal colonization in four cases of adult botulism confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control. No performed toxin was detected in available foods, but Clostridium botulinum was isolated from foods in two instances. Botulinal toxin was detected in the sera of all four patients, in one case at 47 days after ingestion of suspected food. C. botulinum was demonstrated in the stool of all four patients and persisted for 119 days after the onset of illness in one patient. Two patients had surgical alterations of the gastrointestinal tract, which may have promoted the colonization. The apparent lack of ingestion of performed toxin in these cases and the persistence of botulinal toxin or C. botulinum, or both, for long periods in three of the patients suggest that colonization of the intestinal tract occurred. PMID:3290234

  20. Renewed hope for a vaccine against the intestinal adult Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Edda; Rosas, Gabriela; Cruz-Revilla, Carmen; Toledo, Andrea; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Hernández, Marisela; Hernándezt, Beatríz; Goldbaum, Fernando A; de Aluja, Aline S; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos

    2007-08-01

    Review of experimental and observational evidence about various cestode infections of mammalian hosts revives hope for the development of an effective vaccine against adult intestinal tapeworms, the central protagonists in their transmission dynamics. As for Taenia solium, there are abundant immunological data regarding cysticercosis in humans and pigs, but information about human taeniasis is scarce. A single publication reporting protection against T. solium taeniasis by experimental primo infection and by vaccination of an experimental foster host, the immunocompetent female hamster, kindles the hope of a vaccine against the tapeworm to be used in humans, its only natural definitive host.

  1. Cranberry extract inhibits in vitro adhesion of F4 and F18(+)Escherichia coli to pig intestinal epithelium and reduces in vivo excretion of pigs orally challenged with F18(+) verotoxigenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Coddens, Annelies; Loos, Michaela; Vanrompay, Daisy; Remon, Jean Paul; Cox, Eric

    2017-01-20

    F4(+)E. coli and F18(+)E. coli infections are an important threat for pig industry worldwide. Antibiotics are commonly used to treat infected piglets, but the emerging development of resistance against antibiotics raises major concerns. Hence, alternative therapies to prevent pigs from F4(+)E. coli and F18(+)E. coli infections need to be developed. Since cranberry previously showed anti-adhesive activity against uropathogenic E. coli, we aimed to investigate whether cranberry extract could also inhibit binding of F4(+)E. coli and F18(+)E. coli to pig intestinal epithelium. Using the in vitro villus adhesion assay, we found that low concentrations of cranberry extract (20μg or 100μg/ml) have strong inhibitory activity on F4(+)E. coli (75.3%, S.D.=9.31 or 95.8%, S.D.=2.56, respectively) and F18(+)E. coli adherence (100% inhibition). This effect was not due to antimicrobial activity. Moreover, cranberry extract (10mg or 100mg) could also abolish in vivo binding of F4 and F18 fimbriae to the pig intestinal epithelium in ligated loop experiments. Finally, two challenge experiments with F18(+)E. coli were performed to address the efficacy of in-feed or water supplemented cranberry extract. No effect could be observed in piglets that received cranberry extract only in feed (1g/kg or 10g/kg). However, supplementation of feed (10g/kg) and drinking water (1g/L) significantly decreased excretion and diarrhea. The decreased infection resulted in a decreased serum antibody response indicating reduced exposure to F18(+)E. coli.

  2. Establishment of a novel lingual organoid culture system: generation of organoids having mature keratinized epithelium from adult epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kanno, Shohei; Tokuyama, Yoko; Komai, Yoshihiro; Ohe, Shuichi; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Omachi, Taichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-11-15

    Despite the strong need for the establishment of a lingual epithelial cell culture system, a simple and convenient culture method has not yet been established. Here, we report the establishment of a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Histological analyses showed that the generated organoids had both a stratified squamous epithelial cell layer and a stratum corneum. Very recently, we showed via a multicolor lineage tracing method that Bmi1-positive stem cells exist at the base of the epithelial basal layer in the interpapillary pit. Using our new culture system, we found that organoids could be generated by single Bmi1-positive stem cells and that in the established organoids, multiple Bmi1-positive stem cells were generated at the outermost layer. Moreover, we observed that organoids harvested at an early point in culture could be engrafted and maturate in the tongue of recipient mice and that the organoids generated from carcinogen-treated mice had an abnormal morphology. Thus, this culture system presents valuable settings for studying not only the regulatory mechanisms of lingual epithelium but also lingual regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  3. Establishment of a Novel Lingual Organoid Culture System: Generation of Organoids Having Mature Keratinized Epithelium from Adult Epithelial Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kanno, Shohei; Tokuyama, Yoko; Komai, Yoshihiro; Ohe, Shuichi; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Omachi, Taichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-11-01

    Despite the strong need for the establishment of a lingual epithelial cell culture system, a simple and convenient culture method has not yet been established. Here, we report the establishment of a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Histological analyses showed that the generated organoids had both a stratified squamous epithelial cell layer and a stratum corneum. Very recently, we showed via a multicolor lineage tracing method that Bmi1-positive stem cells exist at the base of the epithelial basal layer in the interpapillary pit. Using our new culture system, we found that organoids could be generated by single Bmi1-positive stem cells and that in the established organoids, multiple Bmi1-positive stem cells were generated at the outermost layer. Moreover, we observed that organoids harvested at an early point in culture could be engrafted and maturate in the tongue of recipient mice and that the organoids generated from carcinogen-treated mice had an abnormal morphology. Thus, this culture system presents valuable settings for studying not only the regulatory mechanisms of lingual epithelium but also lingual regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  4. mTOR disruption causes intestinal epithelial cell defects and intestinal atrophy postinjury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Leesa L.; Davis, Ashley K.; Grogg, Matthew W.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) drive small intestinal epithelial homeostasis and regeneration. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates stem and progenitor cell metabolism and is frequently dysregulated in human disease, but its physiologic functions in the mammalian small intestinal epithelium remain poorly defined. We disrupted the genes mTOR, Rptor, Rictor, or both Rptor and Rictor in mouse ISCs, progenitors, and differentiated intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) using Villin-Cre. Mutant tissues and wild-type or heterozygous littermate controls were analyzed by histologic immunostaining, immunoblots, and proliferation assays. A total of 10 Gy irradiation was used to injure the intestinal epithelium and induce subsequent crypt regeneration. We report that mTOR supports absorptive enterocytes and secretory Paneth and goblet cell function while negatively regulating chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cell number. Through additional Rptor, Rictor, and Rptor/Rictor mutant mouse models, we identify mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 as the major IEC regulatory pathway, but mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 also contributes to ileal villus maintenance and goblet cell size. Homeostatic adult small intestinal crypt cell proliferation, survival, and canonical wingless-int (WNT) activity are not mTOR dependent, but Olfm4+ ISC/progenitor population maintenance and crypt regeneration postinjury require mTOR. Overall, we conclude that mTOR regulates multiple IEC lineages and promotes stem and progenitor cell activity during intestinal epithelium repair postinjury.—Sampson, L. L., Davis, A. K., Grogg, M. W., Zheng, Y. mTOR disruption causes intestinal epithelial cell defects and intestinal atrophy postinjury in mice. PMID:26631481

  5. Intestinal organoids as tissue surrogates for toxicological and pharmacological studies.

    PubMed

    Kuratnik, Anton; Giardina, Charles

    2013-06-15

    Recently developed cell culture protocols have allowed for the derivation of multi-cellular structures dubbed intestinal "organoids" from embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs), and adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs). These structures resemble in vivo intestinal crypts, both in structure and developmental processes, and can be grown quickly and in relatively large quantities. Although much research has focused on developing intestinal organoids for tissue repair, more immediate applications include high-throughput screening for agents that target intestinal epithelium. Here we describe current methods for deriving mouse and human intestinal organoids and discuss some applications aimed at developing novel therapies or preventive agents for diseases of the lower GI tract such as inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer.

  6. Oral exposure to environmental pollutant benzo[a]pyrene impacts the intestinal epithelium and induces gut microbial shifts in murine model

    PubMed Central

    Ribière, Céline; Peyret, Pierre; Parisot, Nicolas; Darcha, Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre J.; Barnich, Nicolas; Peyretaillade, Eric; Boucher, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota dysbiosis are associated with a wide range of human diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases. The physiopathology of these diseases has multifactorial aetiology in which environmental factors, particularly pollution could play a crucial role. Among the different pollutants listed, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are subject to increased monitoring due to their wide distribution and high toxicity on Humans. Here, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the impact of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP, most toxic PAH) oral exposure on the faecal and intestinal mucosa-associated bacteria in C57BL/6 mice. Intestinal inflammation was also evaluated by histological observations. BaP oral exposure significantly altered the composition and the abundance of the gut microbiota and led to moderate inflammation in ileal and colonic mucosa. More severe lesions were observed in ileal segment. Shifts in gut microbiota associated with moderate inflammatory signs in intestinal mucosa would suggest the establishment of a pro-inflammatory intestinal environment following BaP oral exposure. Therefore, under conditions of genetic susceptibility and in association with other environmental factors, exposure to this pollutant could trigger and/or accelerate the development of inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27503127

  7. Evidence of lactoferrin transportation into blood circulation from intestine via lymphatic pathway in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Takashi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Etsumori

    2004-05-01

    Using adult rats, the characteristic transporting system for lactoferrin (LF) from intestinal lumen into the blood circulation was investigated. The rats were randomly divided into two groups, a non-collected thoracic lymph (NC) group and a collected thoracic lymph (LC) group. Peripheral blood and thoracic lymph were collected from a jugular vein and a thoracic lymph duct, respectively, under anaesthesia. Bovine LF (bLF) was infused into the duodenal lumen by needle over a 1-min period at a dose of 1 g kg(-1). The transported bLF in the plasma and lymph was assayed quantitatively by double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Morphological investigation was also carried out in the intestine, lymph node, and liver. Following intraduodenal administration of bLF, the transported bLF in the NC group was detected in the plasma, and reached a peak value at 2 h. Furthermore, the bLF concentration in the thoracic duct lymph fluid in the LC group increased significantly, and peaked 2 h after the administration. In addition, bLF was not detected in the plasma of the LC group. Immunohistochemical analysis clearly showed anti-bLF positive particles in the epithelial cells of the apical villi. The striated border and baso-lateral membrane were also bLF positive. These results suggest that intraduodenally infused bLF is transported into the blood circulation via the lymphatic pathway, not via portal circulation in adult rats.

  8. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity.

    PubMed

    van de Heijning, Bert J M; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M

    2015-07-08

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%-75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed.

  9. Differences between the neurogenic and proliferative abilities of Müller glia with stem cell characteristics and the ciliary epithelium from the adult human eye.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Bhairavi; Jayaram, Hari; Singhal, Shweta; Jones, Megan F; Limb, G Astrid

    2011-12-01

    Much controversy has arisen on the nature and sources of stem cells in the adult human retina. Whilst ciliary epithelium has been thought to constitute a source of neural stem cells, a population of Müller glia in the neural retina has also been shown to exhibit neurogenic characteristics. This study aimed to compare the neurogenic and proliferative abilities between these two major cell populations. It also examined whether differences exist between the pigmented and non-pigmented ciliary epithelium (CE) from the adult human eye. On this basis, Müller glia with stem cell characteristics and pigmented and non-pigmented CE were isolated from human neural retina and ciliary epithelium respectively. Expression of glial, epithelial and neural progenitor markers was examined in these cells following culture under adherent and non-adherent conditions and treatments to induce neural differentiation. Unlike pigmented CE which did not proliferate, non-pigmented CE cells exhibited limited proliferation in vitro, unless epidermal growth factor (EGF) was present in the culture medium to prolong their survival. In contrast, Müller glial stem cells (MSC) cultured as adherent monolayers reached confluence within a few weeks and continued to proliferative indefinitely in the absence of EGF. Both MSC and non-pigmented CE expressed markers of neural progenitors, including SOX2, PAX6, CHX10 and NOTCH. Nestin, a neural stem cell marker, was only expressed by MSC. Non-pigmented CE displayed epithelial morphology, limited photoreceptor gene expression and stained strongly for pigmented epithelial markers upon culture with neural differentiation factors. In contrast, MSC adopted neural morphology and expressed markers of retinal ganglion cells and photoreceptors when cultured under similar conditions. This study provides the first demonstration that pigmented CE possess different proliferative abilities from non-pigmented CE. It also showed that although non-pigmented CE express genes

  10. ELT-2 is the predominant transcription factor controlling differentiation and function of the C. elegans intestine, from embryo to adult.

    PubMed

    McGhee, James D; Fukushige, Tetsunari; Krause, Michael W; Minnema, Stephanie E; Goszczynski, Barbara; Gaudet, Jeb; Kohara, Yuji; Bossinger, Olaf; Zhao, Yongjun; Khattra, Jaswinder; Hirst, Martin; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Ruzanov, Peter; Warner, Adam; Zapf, Richard; Moerman, Donald G; Kalb, John M

    2009-03-15

    Starting with SAGE-libraries prepared from C. elegans FAC-sorted embryonic intestine cells (8E-16E cell stage), from total embryos and from purified oocytes, and taking advantage of the NextDB in situ hybridization data base, we define sets of genes highly expressed from the zygotic genome, and expressed either exclusively or preferentially in the embryonic intestine or in the intestine of newly hatched larvae; we had previously defined a similarly expressed set of genes from the adult intestine. We show that an extended TGATAA-like sequence is essentially the only candidate for a cis-acting regulatory motif common to intestine genes expressed at all stages. This sequence is a strong ELT-2 binding site and matches the sequence of GATA-like sites found to be important for the expression of every intestinal gene so far analyzed experimentally. We show that the majority of these three sets of highly expressed intestinal-specific/intestinal-enriched genes respond strongly to ectopic expression of ELT-2 within the embryo. By flow-sorting elt-2(null) larvae from elt-2(+) larvae and then preparing Solexa/Illumina-SAGE libraries, we show that the majority of these genes also respond strongly to loss-of-function of ELT-2. To test the consequences of loss of other transcription factors identified in the embryonic intestine, we develop a strain of worms that is RNAi-sensitive only in the intestine; however, we are unable (with one possible exception) to identify any other transcription factor whose intestinal loss-of-function causes a phenotype of comparable severity to the phenotype caused by loss of ELT-2. Overall, our results support a model in which ELT-2 is the predominant transcription factor in the post-specification C. elegans intestine and participates directly in the transcriptional regulation of the majority (>80%) of intestinal genes. We present evidence that ELT-2 plays a central role in most aspects of C. elegans intestinal physiology: establishing the structure

  11. Plasticity of interstitial cells of cajal: a study in the small intestine of adult Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Mei, Feng; Han, Juan; Huang, Yue; Jiang, Zhong-Yong; Xiong, Cheng-Jie; Zhou, De-Shan

    2009-07-01

    Although it is well known that the reduction of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) is associated with several gastrointestinal motility disorders in clinic, it is unknown whether the mature ICCs still have an active plasticity in adult mammals. This study focused on the issues of the reduction of ICCs during Imatinib administration and the recovery of ICCs following drug withdrawal in the small intestine of adult guinea pigs. ICCs were revealed by immunofluorescence on whole mount preparations with anti-Kit, alpha-smooth muscle actin, (alpha-SMA), and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) antibodies. Moreover, the occurrence of apoptosis was also assayed. Imatinib treatment led to a gradual reduction of ICCs in number around the myenteric plexus and deep muscular plexus, which was dependent on the time but no apoptosis of ICCs was detected with the TUNEL method. During Imatinib treatment, some ICC-like cells were double labeled for Kit and alpha-SMA and a few ICC-like cells were only stained with alpha-SMA. When Imatinib was discontinued, the number of ICCs recovered to normal within 32 days. During this time, some proliferating ICCs were demonstrated by double labeling with Kit and BrdU antibodies. Our results indicated that Kit signaling was essential for the maintenance of survival and proliferation of the mature ICCs in the small intestine of adult guinea pigs. Moreover, ICCs might transdifferentiate to a type of alpha-SMA(+) cells, perhaps a phenotype of smooth muscle cells, when there is a loss-of-function of Kit.

  12. Effect of in ovo administration of an adult-derived microbiota on establishment of the intestinal microbiome in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Adriana A; Batal, Amy B; Lee, Margie D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of in ovo administration of a probiotic on development of the intestinal microbiota of 2 genetic lineages (modern and heritage) of chickens. SAMPLE 10 newly hatched chicks and 40 fertile eggs to determine intestinal microbiota at hatch, 900 fertile eggs to determine effects of probiotic on hatchability, and 1,560 chicks from treated or control eggs. PROCEDURES A probiotic competitive-exclusion product derived from adult microbiota was administered in ovo to fertile eggs of both genetic lineages. Cecal contents and tissues were collected from embryos, newly hatched chicks, and chicks. A PCR assay was used to detect bacteria present within the cecum of newly hatched chicks. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and vitality staining were used to detect viable bacteria within intestines of embryos. The intestinal microbiota was assessed by use of 16S pyrosequencing. RESULTS Microscopic evaluation of embryonic cecal contents and tissues subjected to differential staining techniques revealed viable bacteria in low numbers. Development of the intestinal microbiota of broiler chicks of both genetic lineages was enhanced by in ovo administration of adult microbiota. Although the treatment increased diversity and affected composition of the microbiota of chicks, most bacterial species present in the probiotic were transient colonizers. However, the treatment decreased the abundance of undesirable bacterial species within heritage lineage chicks. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In ovo inoculation of a probiotic competitive-exclusion product derived from adult microbiota may be a viable method of managing development of the microbiota and reducing the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria in chickens.

  13. Changes in intestinal microbiota composition and metabolism coincide with increased intestinal permeability in young adults under prolonged physiologic stress.

    PubMed

    Karl, J Philip; Margolis, Lee M; Madslien, Elisabeth H; Murphy, Nancy E; Castellani, John W; Gundersen, Yngvar; Hoke, Allison V; Levangie, Michael W; Kumar, Raina; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Gautam, Aarti; Hammamieh, Rasha; Martini, Svein; Montain, Scott J; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2017-03-23

    The magnitude, temporal dynamics, and physiologic effects of intestinal microbiome responses to physiologic stress are poorly characterized. This study used a systems biology approach and multiple-stressor military training environment to determine the effects of physiologic stress on intestinal microbiota composition and metabolic activity, and intestinal permeability (IP). 73 Soldiers were provided three rations/d with or without protein- or carbohydrate-based supplements during a four day cross-country ski march (STRESS). IP was measured before and during STRESS. Blood and stool samples were collected before and after STRESS to measure inflammation, stool microbiota, and stool and plasma global metabolite profiles. IP increased 62%±57% (mean±SD, P<0.001) during STRESS independent of diet group, and was associated with increased inflammation. Intestinal microbiota responses were characterized by increased α-diversity, and changes in the relative abundance of >50% of identified genera, including increased abundances of less dominant taxa at the expense of more dominant taxa such as Bacteroides. Changes in intestinal microbiota composition were linked to 23% of metabolites that were significantly altered in stool after STRESS. Pre-STRESS Actinobacteria relative abundance, and changes in serum IL-6 and stool cysteine concentrations, collectively, accounted for 84% of the variability in the change in IP. Findings demonstrate that a multiple-stressor military training environment induced increases in IP that were associated with alterations in markers of inflammation, and with intestinal microbiota composition and metabolism. Observed associations between IP, the pre-stress microbiota, and microbiota metabolites suggest targeting the intestinal microbiota could provide novel strategies for preserving IP during physiologic stress.

  14. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine.

  15. Congenital Vitelline Band Causing Intestinal Obstruction in an Adult with a Double Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Pussepitiya, Kumari; Samarasinghe, Bandula; Wickramasinghe, Nuwan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Vitelline artery remnants are rare causes of intra-abdominal bands leading to bowel obstruction. These bands may be associated with Meckel's diverticulum. Double inferior vena cava (IVC) is a rare presentation and is usually identified incidentally. Case Presentation. A sixty-year-old male presented with progressive vomiting for five days and he was clinically diagnosed with intestinal obstruction. Plain X-ray abdomen showed evidence of small bowel obstruction. CT scan of the abdomen revealed dilated small bowel loops with a small outpouching in the distal ileum with a band like structure attached to it. In the CT, left sided patent IVC draining into the left renal vein was identified. Left external iliac vein was in continuity with the left IVC. Left internal iliac vein was draining into the right IVC. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a Meckel's diverticulum with a band identified as the vitelline remnant attached to its apex and inserting at the anterior abdominal wall near the umbilicus. Discussion. Meckel's diverticulum with vitelline bands, although rare, should be borne in mind in adult patients with intestinal obstruction. Identification of this anomaly can be difficult in imaging studies. Presence of double IVC should be mentioned in the imaging findings to prevent possible catastrophic complications during surgery. PMID:27843667

  16. Protein-engineered scaffolds for in vitro 3D culture of primary adult intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    DiMarco, Rebecca L; Dewi, Ruby E; Bernal, Gabriela; Kuo, Calvin; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2015-10-15

    Though in vitro culture of primary intestinal organoids has gained significant momentum in recent years, little has been done to investigate the impact of microenvironmental cues provided by the encapsulating matrix on the growth and development of these fragile cultures. In this work, the impact of various in vitro culture parameters on primary adult murine organoid formation and growth are analyzed with a focus on matrix properties and geometric culture configuration. The air-liquid interface culture configuration was found to result in enhanced organoid formation relative to a traditional submerged configuration. Additionally, through use of a recombinantly engineered extracellular matrix (eECM), the effects of biochemical and biomechanical cues were independently studied. Decreasing mechanical stiffness and increasing cell adhesivity were found to increase organoid yield. Tuning of eECM properties was used to obtain organoid formation efficiency values identical to those observed in naturally harvested collagen I matrices but within a stiffer construct with improved ease of physical manipulation. Increased ability to remodel the surrounding matrix through mechanical or enzymatic means was also shown to enhance organoid formation. As the engineering and tunability of recombinant matrices is essentially limitless, continued property optimization may result in further improved matrix performance and may help to identify additional microenvironmental cues that directly impact organoid formation, development, differentiation, and functional behavior. Continued culture of primary organoids in recombinant matrices could therefore prove to be largely advantageous in the field of intestinal tissue engineering for applications in regenerative medicine and in vitro tissue mimics.

  17. Concise review: the yin and yang of intestinal (cancer) stem cells and their progenitors.

    PubMed

    Stange, Daniel E; Clevers, Hans

    2013-11-01

    The intestine has developed over the last few years into a prime model system for adult stem cell research. Intestinal cells have an average lifetime of 5 days, moving within this time from the bottom of intestinal crypts to the top of villi. This rapid self-renewal capacity combined with an easy to follow (mostly) unidirectional movement of cells offers an ideal site to conduct adult stem cell research. The delineation of the active pathways in the intestinal epithelium together with the development of molecular techniques to prove stemness laid the grounds for the identification of the intestinal stem cell. In vitro systems and transgenic mouse models broaden our knowledge on the role of the stem cell niche and those cells that reestablish homeostasis after perturbation of the system. These insights expedited also research on the role of normal adult stem cells in cancer initiation and the factors influencing the maintenance of cancer stem cells.

  18. Transfer across mucosal epithelium, tissue content and metabolic fate of 125I-(ipodate-sodium) on isolated everted segments of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Komp, B; Forth, W

    1980-04-01

    unchanged ipodate. 7. Apparently, the process of the conjugation of ipodate-sodium in the mucosal cells is involved in the transfer of the 125I-radioactivity across the mucosal epithelium.

  19. Strongyloides ratti: transplantation of adults recovered from the small intestine at different days after infection into the colon of naive and infection-primed Wistar rats, and the effect of antioxidant treatment on large intestinal parasitism.

    PubMed

    Shintoku, Y; Takagi, H; Kadosaka, T; Nagaoka, F; Kondo, S; Itoh, M; Honda, S; Kimura, E

    2011-07-01

    Strongyloides ratti (Nagoya strain) is unique in that a portion of adults parasitizing the small intestine withstands 'worm expulsion', which starts at around day 8 post-infection (p.i.) by host immunity, and establishes in the large intestine after day 19 p.i. To investigate the mechanism, adults obtained from the small intestine at day 7 or 19 p.i. were transplanted into the colon of infection-primed immune rats. Adults obtained at day 7 p.i. were rejected quickly, whereas those obtained at day 19 p.i. could establish infection. Moreover, the body length and the number of intrauterine eggs increased in the large intestine. In a separate experiment, large intestinal parasitism was abolished by the treatment of host rats with an anti-oxidant, butylated hydroxyanisole. These results indicate that small intestinal adults between days 7 and 19 p.i. acquired the ability to parasitize the large intestine of immune rats, and that free radicals produced by the host may have played a significant role in the process.

  20. Effect of immunologic reactions on rat intestinal epithelium. Correlation of increased permeability to chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and ovalbumin during acute inflammation and anaphylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramage, J.K.; Stanisz, A.; Scicchitano, R.; Hunt, R.H.; Perdue, M.H.

    1988-06-01

    In these studies we compared jejunal permeability to two probes--chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) (mol wt, 360) and ovalbumin (mol wt, 45,000)--under control conditions, during acute intestinal inflammation, and in response to systemic anaphylaxis. Acute inflammation was produced after infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and rats were studied at day 0 (control), day 4 (early), day 10 (acute), and day 35 (postinfection). At the latter stage, immune rats were also studied during anaphylaxis induced by i.v. N. brasiliensis antigen. In each study, blood and urine were sampled over 5 h after the probes were simultaneously injected into ligated loops in anesthetized rats. In controls, small quantities (less than 0.04% and 0.002% of the administered dose for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin, respectively) appeared in the circulation and plateaued at 1 h. During acute inflammation, the appearance of both probes continued to increase with time. Compared with controls, 5-h values for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin were (a) significantly elevated at day 4 (p less than 0.005), (b) increased approximately 20-fold at day 10 (p less than 0.005 and less than 0.01, respectively), and (c) normal at day 35. Urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA followed the same pattern. During anaphylaxis, appearance of the probes in the circulation increased at 1 h to values approximately 10-fold those in controls (p less than 0.001 and less than 0.01, for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin, respectively), and then declined. Urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA over 5 h was also significantly increased. We conclude that epithelial barrier function becomes impaired during both acute inflammation and anaphylaxis. In this rat model, gut permeability changes to 51Cr-EDTA reflect gut permeability changes to macromolecular antigens.

  1. A protocol for lentiviral transduction and downstream analysis of intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Van Lidth de Jeude, Jooske F; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L M; Montenegro-Miranda, Paula S; Van den Brink, Gijs R; Heijmans, Jarom

    2015-04-20

    Intestinal crypt-villus structures termed organoids, can be kept in sustained culture three dimensionally when supplemented with the appropriate growth factors. Since organoids are highly similar to the original tissue in terms of homeostatic stem cell differentiation, cell polarity and presence of all terminally differentiated cell types known to the adult intestinal epithelium, they serve as an essential resource in experimental research on the epithelium. The possibility to express transgenes or interfering RNA using lentiviral or retroviral vectors in organoids has increased opportunities for functional analysis of the intestinal epithelium and intestinal stem cells, surpassing traditional mouse transgenics in speed and cost. In the current video protocol we show how to utilize transduction of small intestinal organoids with lentiviral vectors illustrated by use of doxycylin inducible transgenes, or IPTG inducible short hairpin RNA for overexpression or gene knockdown. Furthermore, considering organoid culture yields minute cell counts that may even be reduced by experimental treatment, we explain how to process organoids for downstream analysis aimed at quantitative RT-PCR, RNA-microarray and immunohistochemistry. Techniques that enable transgene expression and gene knock down in intestinal organoids contribute to the research potential that these intestinal epithelial structures hold, establishing organoid culture as a new standard in cell culture.

  2. Intestinal M cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We have an enormous number of commensal bacteria in our intestine, moreover, the foods that we ingest and the water we drink is sometimes contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. The intestinal epithelium is always exposed to such microbes, friend or foe, so to contain them our gut is equipped with specialized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), literally the largest peripheral lymphoid tissue in the body. GALT is the intestinal immune inductive site composed of lymphoid follicles such as Peyer’s patches. M cells are a subset of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) residing in the region of the epithelium covering GALT lymphoid follicles. Although the vast majority of IEC function to absorb nutrients from the intestine, M cells are highly specialized to take up intestinal microbial antigens and deliver them to GALT for efficient mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M-cell differentiation and functions. PMID:26634447

  3. Human small intestinal epithelial cells differentiated from adult intestinal stem cells as a novel system for predicting oral drug absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Toru; Harada, Naomoto; Kuze, Jiro; Chiba, Masato; Iwao, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2014-11-01

    Adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs) possess both a long-term proliferation ability and differentiation capability into enterocytes. As a novel in vitro system for the evaluation of drug absorption, we characterized a human small intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) monolayer that differentiated from adult ISCs. Continuous proliferation/differentiation from ISCs consistently conferred the capability of maturation of enterocytes to HIECs over 25 passages. The morphologically matured HIEC monolayer consisted of polarized columnar epithelia with dense microvilli, tight junctions, and desmosomes 8 days after seeding onto culture inserts. Transepithelial electrical resistance across the monolayer was 9-fold lower in HIECs (98.9 Ω × cm(2)) than in Caco-2 cells (900 Ω × cm(2)), which indicated that the looseness of the tight junctions in the HIEC monolayer was similar to that in the human small intestine (approximately 40 Ω × cm(2)). No significant differences were observed in the overall gene expression patterns of the major drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters between the HIEC and Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, the functions of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein in the HIEC monolayer were confirmed by the vectorial transport of marker substrates and their disappearance in the presence of specific inhibitors. The apparent drug permeability values of paracellularly transported compounds (fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4000, atenolol, and terbutaline) and nucleoside transporter substrates (didanosine, ribavirin, and doxifluridine) in the HIEC monolayer were markedly higher than those of Caco-2 cells, whereas transcellularly transported drugs (pindolol and midazolam) were equally well permeated. In conclusion, the HIEC monolayer can serve as a novel and superior alternative to the conventional Caco-2 cell monolayer for predicting oral absorption in humans.

  4. Intestinal Obstruction Caused by Ileocolic and Colocolic Intussusception in an Adult Patient with Cecal Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Masetto, Alessandro; Beltramo, Massimo; Girlando, Mauro; Di Bella, Camillo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Intussusception is a rare clinical entity in adults (<1% of intestinal obstructions). Colonic intussusception is even rarer, particularly when caused by lipomas. Case Presentation. A 47-year-old woman presented to our emergency department complaining of abdominal pain with vomiting and diarrhoea. X-ray and CT showed bowel obstruction due to ileocolonic and colocolonic intussusception; a giant colonic lipoma (9 × 4 × 4 cm) was recognizable immediately distally to the splenic flexure of the colon. The patient underwent emergency laparotomy and right hemicolectomy. Assessment of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of giant colonic polypoid lesion near to the ileocecal valve, causing a 12 cm long intussusception with moderate ischemic damage. Conclusion. Colonic obstruction due to intussusception caused by lipomas is a very rare condition that needs urgent treatment. CT is the radiologic modality of choice for diagnosis (sensitivity 80%, specificity near 100%); since the majority of colonic intussusceptions are caused by primary adenocarcinoma, if the etiology is uncertain, the lesion must be interpreted as malignant and extensive resection is recommended. At present, surgery is the treatment of choice and determines an excellent outcome. PMID:28044120

  5. Use of transgenic mice to map cis-acting elements in the intestinal fatty acid binding protein gene (Fabpi) that control its cell lineage- specific and regional patterns of expression along the duodenal-colonic and crypt-villus axes of the gut epithelium

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The mouse intestinal epithelium is able to establish and maintain complex lineage-specific, spatial, and temporal patterns of gene expression despite its rapid and continuous renewal. A multipotent stem cell located near the base of each intestinal crypt gives rise to progeny which undergo amplification and allocation to either enterocytic, Paneth cell, goblet cell, or enteroendocrine cell lineages. Differentiation of these four lineages occurs during their geographically ordered migration along the crypt-villus axis. Gut stem cells appear to have a "positional address" which is manifested by differences in the differentiation programs of their lineal descendants along the duodenal-colonic (cephalocaudal) axis. We have used the intestinal fatty acid binding protein gene (Fabpi) as a model to identify cis-acting elements which regulate cell- and region-specific patterns of gene expression in the gut. Nucleotides -1178 to +28 of rat Fabpi direct a pattern of expression of a reporter (human growth hormone [hGH]) which mimics that of mouse Fabpi (a) steady-state levels of hGH mRNA are highest in the distal jejunum of adult transgenic mice and fall progressively toward both the duodenum and the mid-colon; and (b) hGH is confined to the enterocytic lineage and first appears as postmitotic, differentiating cells exit the crypt and migrate to the base of small intestinal villi or their colonic homologs, the surface epithelial cuffs. Nucleotides -103 to +28, which are highly conserved in rat, mouse and human Fabpi, are able to correctly initiate transgene expression in late fetal life, restrict hGH to the enterocytic lineage, and establish an appropriate cephalocaudal gradient of reporter expression. This cephalocaudal gradient is also influenced by cis- acting elements located between nucleotides -1178 and -278, and -277 and -185 that enhance and suppress (respectively) expression in the ileum and colon and by element(s) located upstream of nucleotide -277 that are needed

  6. The morphology and kinetics of spermatogonial degeneration in normal adult rats: an analysis using a simplified classification of the germinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huckins, C

    1978-04-01

    The phenomena of spermatogonial degeneration have been studied in normal adult rat testes using a simplified classification of the germinal epthelium based upon the six types of differentiating spermatogonia. The following features distinguished this from schemes based on acrosome development. Rather than 14 states of unequal duration, there are only six stages, five of which are the same length. The classification starts at the beginning of spermatogenesis with A1 spermatogonia rather than at the onset of spermiogenesis. The classification is derived from acutal biological events in spermatogenesis, namely generation times of spermatogonia, rather than upon arbitrary events in acrosome development. Most importantly, this new classification can be used with most types of preparations and in most experimental conditions. Examination of tubular whole mounts reveals that degeneration preferentially occurs in types A2 and A3 and to a lesser extent A4 spermatogonia, and is rarely seen in generations of A1, In or B cells. Deterioration is first manifested in clusters of cells joined by the intercellular bridges as they complete DNA synthesis and enter the 2 phase of cell cycle. It is characterized by a denser staining of the nuclear membrane, coalescence of chromatin into several pyknotic bodies, and eventual extrusion of the nuclear mass, leaving a cytoplasmic ghost. The sequential steps in degeneration may often be traced from one end of a synctial chain to the other, suggesting that the process may start with just one cell and then spread via intercellular bridges to involve all spermatogonia within the clone. Quanitatively, degeneration is a relatively constant feature of spermatogonial development. Only 25% of the theoretically possible number of pre-leptotene spermatocytes are produced from th original population of A1 spermatogonia; most of this loss is incurred during the maturation of A2 and A3 generations. While the reason for spermatogonial degeneration in the

  7. The immunolocalization of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles in testicular cells during the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Moussa, F; Oko, R; Hermo, L

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the cellular and subcellular distribution of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) in the adult rat testis in relation to the different cell types at the various stages of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. The distribution of snRNPs in the nucleus and cytoplasm of germ cells was quantitated in an attempt to correlate RNA processing with morphological and functional changes occurring during the development of these cells. Light-microscopic immunoperoxidase staining of rat testes with polyclonal anti-Sm and monoclonal anti-Y12 antibodies localized spliceosome snRNPs in the nuclei and cytoplasm of germ cells up to step 10 spermatids. Nuclear staining was intense in Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and in the early steps of round spermatid development. Although comparatively weaker, cytoplasmic staining for snRNPs was strongest in mid and late pachytene spermatocytes and early round spermatids. Quantitative electron-microscopic immunogold labeling of Lowicryl embedded testicular sections confirmed the light-microscopic observations but additionally showed that the snRNP content peaked in the cytoplasm of midpachytene spermatocytes and in the nuclei of late pachytene spermatocytes. The immunogold label tended to aggregate into distinct loci over the nuclear chromatin. The chromatoid body of spermatids and spermatocytes and the finely granular material in the interstices of mitochondrial aggregates of spermatocytes were found to be additional sites of snRNP localization and were intensely labeled. This colocalization suggests that these dense cytoplasmic structures may be functionally related. Anti-U1 snRNP antibodies applied to frozen sections showed the same LM localization pattern as spliceosome snRNPs. Anti-U3 snRNP antibodies applied to frozen sections stained nucleoli of germ cells where pre-rRNA is spliced.

  8. Organ-Specific and Size-Dependent Ag Nanoparticle Toxicity in Gills and Intestines of Adult Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Olivia J; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Yu, Xuechen; Wang, Xiang; Lin, Shuo; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-10-27

    We studied adult zebrafish to determine whether the size of 20 and 110 nm citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgC NPs) differentially impact the gills and intestines, known target organs for Ag toxicity in fish. Following exposure for 4 h, 4 days, or 4 days plus a 7 day depuration period, we obtained different toxicokinetic profiles for different particle sizes, as determined by Ag content of the tissues. Ionic AgNO3 served as a positive control. The gills showed a significantly higher Ag content for the 20 nm particles at 4 h and 4 days than the 110 nm particles, while the values were more similar in the intestines. Both particle types were retained in the intestines even after depuration. These toxicokinetics were accompanied by striking size-dependent differences in the ultrastructural features and histopathology in the target organs in response to the particulates. Ag staining of the gills and intestines confirmed prominent Ag deposition in the basolateral membranes for the 20 nm but not for the 110 nm particles. Furthermore, it was possible to link the site of tissue deposition to disruption of the Na(+)/K(+) ion channel, which is also localized to the basolateral membrane. This was confirmed by a reduction in ATPase activity and immunohistochemical detection of the α subunit of this channel in both target organs, with the 20 nm particles causing significantly higher inhibition and disruption than the larger size particles or AgNO3. These results demonstrate the importance of particle size in determining the hazardous impact of AgNPs in the gills and intestines of adult zebrafish.

  9. Early Changes in Microbial Colonization Selectively Modulate Intestinal Enzymes, but Not Inducible Heat Shock Proteins in Young Adult Swine

    PubMed Central

    Arnal, Marie-Edith; Zhang, Jing; Messori, Stefano; Bosi, Paolo; Smidt, Hauke; Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic diseases and obesity are developing worldwide in a context of plethoric intake of high energy diets. The intestine may play a pivotal role due to diet-induced alterations in microbiota composition and increased permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide inducing metabolic inflammation. Early programming of metabolic disorders appearing in later life is also suspected, but data on the intestine are lacking. Therefore, we hypothesized that early disturbances in microbial colonization have short- and long-lasting consequences on selected intestinal components including key digestive enzymes and protective inducible heat shock proteins (HSP). The hypothesis was tested in swine offspring born to control mothers (n = 12) or mothers treated with the antibiotic amoxicillin around parturition (n = 11), and slaughtered serially at 14, 28 and 42 days of age to assess short-term effects. To evaluate long-term consequences, young adult offspring from the same litters were offered a normal or a fat-enriched diet for 4 weeks between 140 and 169 days of age and were then slaughtered. Amoxicillin treatment transiently modified both mother and offspring microbiota. This was associated with early but transient reduction in ileal alkaline phosphatase, HSP70 (but not HSP27) and crypt depth, suggesting a milder or delayed intestinal response to bacteria in offspring born to antibiotic-treated mothers. More importantly, we disclosed long-term consequences of this treatment on jejunal alkaline phosphatase (reduced) and jejunal and ileal dipeptidylpeptidase IV (increased and decreased, respectively) of offspring born to antibiotic-treated dams. Significant interactions between early antibiotic treatment and later diet were observed for jejunal alkaline phosphatase and sucrase. By contrast, inducible HSPs were not affected. In conclusion, our data suggest that early changes in bacterial colonization not only modulate intestinal architecture and function transiently, but

  10. Id2 controls specification of Lgr5+ intestinal stem cell progenitors during gut development.

    PubMed

    Nigmatullina, Lira; Norkin, Maxim; Dzama, Margarita M; Messner, Berith; Sayols, Sergi; Soshnikova, Natalia

    2017-01-11

    The adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs), their hierarchies, mechanisms of maintenance and differentiation have been extensively studied. However, when and how ISCs are established during embryogenesis remains unknown. We show here that the transcription regulator Id2 controls the specification of embryonic Lgr5(+) progenitors in the developing murine small intestine. Cell fate mapping analysis revealed that Lgr5(+) progenitors emerge at E13.5 in wild-type embryos and differ from the rest on the intestinal epithelium by a characteristic ISC signature. In the absence of Id2, the intestinal epithelium differentiates into Lgr5(+) cells already at E9.5. Furthermore, the size of the Lgr5(+) cell pool is significantly increased. We show that Id2 restricts the activity of the Wnt signalling pathway at early stages and prevents precocious differentiation of the embryonic intestinal epithelium. Id2-deficient embryonic epithelial cells cultured ex vivo strongly activate Wnt target genes as well as markers of neoplastic transformation and form fast growing undifferentiated spheroids. Furthermore, adult ISCs from Id2-deficient mice display a distinct transcriptional signature, supporting an essential role for Id2 in the correct specification of ISCs.

  11. Stem cell self-renewal in intestinal crypt

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, Benjamin D.

    2011-11-15

    As a rapidly cycling tissue capable of fast repair and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium has emerged as a favored model system to explore the principles of adult stem cell biology. However, until recently, the identity and characteristics of the stem cell population in both the small intestine and colon has remained the subject of debate. Recent studies based on targeted lineage tracing strategies, combined with the development of an organotypic culture system, have identified the crypt base columnar cell as the intestinal stem cell, and have unveiled the strategy by which the balance between proliferation and differentiation is maintained. These results show that intestinal stem cells operate in a dynamic environment in which frequent and stochastic stem cell loss is compensated by the proliferation of neighboring stem cells. We review the basis of these experimental findings and the insights they offer into the mechanisms of homeostatic stem cell regulation.

  12. Ability of transplanted cultured epithelium to respond to dermal papillae.

    PubMed

    Xing, L; Kobayashi, K

    2001-10-01

    Cultured epithelium has been used successfully in the treatment of extensive burns. Regenerated epidermis, however, lacks such as hair follicles and sweat glands that are common in mammalian skin. We attempted to determine whether cultured epithelium could be induced to form hair follicles by dermal papillae, which are most important for the morphogenesis and growth of hair follicles. We cultivated adult rat sole keratinocytes, obtained the cultured epithelium, and prepared recombinants consisting of cultured epithelium and fresh dermal papillae with or without the sole dermis. These recombinants were then transplanted underneath the dermis of the dorsal skin of syngeneic rats or athymic mice. Histologic examination revealed that the transplanted cultured epithelium formed the follicular structures with sebaceous gland-like structure following induction of the dermal papillae, especially when supported by the dermis. We concluded that transplanted cultured epithelium of adult rat sole keratinocytes can respond to growth signals from adult dermal papillae.

  13. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mami; Yamamoto, Kentaroh; Taketomi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Fumio; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth. PMID:27920659

  14. Release of angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor peptides during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of Parmigiano Reggiano PDO cheese and their absorption through an in vitro model of intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, L; Catalani, E; Morera, P; Cattaneo, S; Stuknytė, M; Bernabucci, U; De Noni, I; Nardone, A

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of 8 bovine casein-derived peptides (VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP, and HLPLP) reported as angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors (ACE-I) was investigated in the 3-kDa ultrafiltered water-soluble extract (WSE) of Parmigiano Reggiano (PR) cheese samples by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry via an electrospray ionization source. Only VPP, IPP, LHLPLP, and HLPLP were revealed in the WSE, and their total amount was in the range of 8.46 to 21.55 mg/kg of cheese. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion, the same ACE-I peptides along with the newly formed AYFYPEL and AYFYPE were found in the 3 kDa WSE of PR digestates. Digestates presented high amounts (1,880-3,053 mg/kg) of LHLPLP, whereas the remaining peptides accounted for 69.24 to 82.82 mg/kg. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values decreased from 7.92 ± 2.08 in undigested cheese to 3.20 ± 1.69 after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The 3-kDa WSE of digested cheeses were used to study the transport of the 8 ACE-I peptides across the monolayers of the Caco-2 cell culture grown on a semipermeable membrane of the transwells. After 1h of incubation, 649.20 ± 148.85 mg/kg of LHLPLP remained in the apical compartment, whereas VPP, IPP, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, and HLPLP accounted in total for less than 36.78 mg/kg. On average, 0.6% of LHLPLP initially present in the digestates added to the apical compartment were transported intact to the basolateral chamber after the same incubation time. Higher transport rate (2.9%) was ascertained for the peptide HLPLP. No other intact ACE-I peptides were revealed in the basolateral compartment. For the first time, these results demonstrated that the ACE-I peptides HLPLP and LHLPLP present in the in vitro digestates of PR cheese are partially absorbed through an in vitro model of human intestinal epithelium.

  15. Tegumental ultrastructure of adult Quinqueserialis quinqueserialis (Trematoda: Notocotylidae): an intestinal parasite of muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus).

    PubMed

    Naem, Soraya; Smythe, Ashleigh B

    2015-07-01

    Ten adult Quinqueserialis quinqueserialis specimens were removed from the intestine of a naturally infected muskrat, and scanning electron microscopy was used to study the morphological characteristics of the trematodes. The mature trematode, which was easy to recognize by the monostome holdfast organ, with no anterior cone, measured 2200-2500 μm in length by 900-1050 μm in width. The body was elongated and tapering at the anterior end, but the posterior end was rounded, and in some specimens was slightly truncated. The mouth opening lay at the anterior end and was surrounded by the oral sucker, which was round, small to medium in size, and subterminal. The tegument of the rim and inside of the oral sucker was smooth and had two types of papillae, domed and rosette papillae. Around the oral sucker, tegument was covered with sharp, pointed spines. The common genital pore was located on the median line of the body, posterior to the oral sucker. The cirrus had smooth tegument at the base and was armed with numerous conical spines throughout its length. The ventral surface was concave and provided with five distinct longitudinal rows of ventral papillae, which extended from the anterior to the posterior end of the body. Each row consisted of 15 to 20 papillae, making 81 to 88 papillae in all. These papillae were variable in size. In most specimens, the papillae were simple knob-like structures, but in some cases, they appeared to be bi- or trifurcate. The tegument at the base of each ventral papilla showed minute spiny pattern, but it was smooth or folded on top and had small rosette and ciliated papillae. Tegument at the edges of the worm was smooth in the mid-parts, spiny on lateral parts, and included rosette papillae. The dorsal surface of the worm was smooth and slightly convex, and the tegument was provided with two large domed papillae in one third of the anterior end of the dorsal part, few thick spines in the mid-part, and excretory pore at the level just

  16. Isolation and Culture of Adult Intestinal, Gastric, and Liver Organoids for Cre-recombinase-Mediated Gene Deletion.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dustin J; Schwab, Renate H M; Tran, Bang M; Phesse, Toby J; Vincan, Elizabeth

    2016-10-05

    The discovery of Lgr5 as a marker of adult stem cells meant that stem cell populations could be purified and studied in isolation. Importantly, when cultured under the appropriate conditions these stem cells form organoids in tissue culture that retain many features of the tissue of origin. The organoid cultures are accessible to genetic and biochemical manipulation, bridging the gap between in vivo mouse models and conventional tissue culture. Here we describe robust protocols to establish organoids from gastrointestinal tissues (stomach, intestine, liver) and Cre-recombinase mediated gene manipulation in vitro.

  17. Expression of neuropeptides and anoctamin 1 in the embryonic and adult zebrafish intestine, revealing neuronal subpopulations and ICC-like cells.

    PubMed

    Uyttebroek, Leen; Shepherd, Iain T; Hubens, Guy; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Van Nassauw, Luc

    2013-11-01

    This immunohistochemical study in zebrafish aims to extend the neurochemical characterization of enteric neuronal subpopulations and to validate a marker for identification of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). The expression of neuropeptides and anoctamin 1 (Ano1), a selective ICC marker in mammals, was analyzed in both embryonic and adult intestine. Neuropeptides were present from 3 days postfertilization (dpf). At 3 dpf, galanin-positive nerve fibers were found in the proximal intestine, while calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)- and substance P-expressing fibers appeared in the distal intestine. At 5 dpf, immunoreactive fibers were present along the entire intestinal length, indicating a well-developed peptidergic innervation at the onset of feeding. In the adult intestine, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), galanin, CGRP and substance P were detected in nerve fibers. Colchicine pretreatment enhanced only VIP and PACAP immunoreactivity. VIP and PACAP were coexpressed in enteric neurons. Colocalization stainings revealed three neuronal subpopulations expressing VIP and PACAP: a nitrergic noncholinergic subpopulation, a serotonergic subpopulation and a subpopulation expressing no other markers. Ano1-immunostaining revealed a 3-dimensional network in the adult intestine containing multipolar cells at the myenteric plexus and bipolar cells interspersed between circular smooth muscle cells. Ano1 immunoreactivity first appeared at 3 dpf, indicative of the onset of proliferation of ICC-like cells. It is shown that the Ano1 antiserum is a selective marker of ICC-like cells in the zebrafish intestine. Finally, it is hypothesized that ICC-like cells mediate the spontaneous regular activity of the embryonic intestine.

  18. Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B regulate intestinal homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yueqin; Li, Zhouhua; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-11-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) tightly regulate stem cells for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Little is known about the regulation of tissue homeostasis by the ECM. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), important components of the ECM, are involved in a variety of biological events. Two heparin sulfate 3-O sulfotransferase (Hs3st) genes, Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B, encode the modification enzymes in heparan sulfate (HS) biosynthesis. Here we demonstrate that Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B are required for adult midgut homeostasis. Depletion of Hs3st-A in enterocytes (ECs) results in increased intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Moreover, increased ISC proliferation is also observed in Hs3st-B null mutant alone, or in combination with Hs3st-A RNAi. Hs3st-A depletion-induced ISC proliferation is effectively suppressed by simultaneous inhibition of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that tissue homeostasis loss in Hs3st-A-deficient intestines is due to increased EGFR signaling. Furthermore, we find that Hs3st-A-depleted ECs are unhealthy and prone to death, while ectopic expression of the antiapoptotic p35 is able to greatly suppress tissue homeostasis loss in these intestines. Together, our data suggest that Drosophila Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B are involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation and midgut homeostasis maintenance.

  19. Induced Wnt5a expression perturbs embryonic outgrowth and intestinal elongation, but is well-tolerated in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Elvira R M; Raghoebir, Lalini; Franken, Patrick F; Helvensteijn, Werner; van Gurp, Léon; Meijlink, Frits; van der Valk, Martin A; Rottier, Robbert J; Kuipers, Ernst J; van Veelen, Wendy; Smits, Ron

    2012-09-01

    Wnt5a is essential during embryonic development, as indicated by mouse Wnt5a knockout embryos displaying outgrowth defects of multiple structures including the gut. The dynamics of Wnt5a involvement in these processes is unclear, and perinatal lethality of Wnt5a knockout embryos has hampered investigation of Wnt5a during postnatal stages in vivo. Although in vitro studies have suggested a relevant role for Wnt5a postnatally, solid evidence for a significant impact of Wnt5a within the complexity of an adult organism is lacking. We generated a tightly-regulated inducible Wnt5a transgenic mouse model and investigated the effects of Wnt5a induction during different time-frames of embryonic development and in adult mice, focusing on the gastrointestinal tract. When induced in embryos from 10.5 dpc onwards, Wnt5a expression led to severe outgrowth defects affecting the gastrointestinal tracts, limbs, facial structures and tails, closely resembling the defects observed in Wnt5a knockout mice. However, Wnt5a induction from 13.5 dpc onwards did not cause this phenotype, indicating that the most critical period for Wnt5a in embryonic development is prior to 13.5 dpc. In adult mice, induced Wnt5a expression did not reveal abnormalities, providing the first in vivo evidence that Wnt5a has no major impact on mouse intestinal homeostasis postnatally. Protein expression of Wnt5a receptor Ror2 was strongly reduced in adult intestine compared to embryonic stages. Moreover, we uncovered a regulatory process where induction of Wnt5a causes downregulation of its receptor Ror2. Taken together, our results indicate a role for Wnt5a during a restricted time-frame of embryonic development, but suggest no impact during homeostatic postnatal stages.

  20. Transcriptional Networks in Liver and Intestinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Sheaffer, Karyn L.; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The development of the gastrointestinal tract is a complex process that integrates signaling processes with downstream transcriptional responses. Here, we discuss the regionalization of the primitive gut and formation of the intestine and liver. Anterior–posterior position in the primitive gut is important for establishing regions that will become functional organs. Coordination of signaling between the epithelium and mesenchyme and downstream transcriptional responses is required for intestinal development and homeostasis. Liver development uses a complex transcriptional network that controls the establishment of organ domains, cell differentiation, and adult function. Discussion of these transcriptional mechanisms gives us insight into how the primitive gut, composed of simple endodermal cells, develops into multiple diverse cell types that are organized into complex mature organs. PMID:22952394

  1. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  2. Xylitol affects the intestinal microbiota and metabolism of daidzein in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motoi; Hoshi, Chigusa; Hori, Sachiko

    2013-12-10

    This study examined the effects of xylitol on mouse intestinal microbiota and urinary isoflavonoids. Xylitol is classified as a sugar alcohol and used as a food additive. The intestinal microbiota seems to play an important role in isoflavone metabolism. Xylitol feeding appears to affect the gut microbiota. We hypothesized that dietary xylitol changes intestinal microbiota and, therefore, the metabolism of isoflavonoids in mice. Male mice were randomly divided into two groups: those fed a 0.05% daidzein with 5% xylitol diet (XD group) and those fed a 0.05% daidzein-containing control diet (CD group) for 28 days. Plasma total cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). Urinary amounts of equol were significantly higher in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). The fecal lipid contents (% dry weight) were significantly greater in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.01). The cecal microbiota differed between the two dietary groups. The occupation ratios of Bacteroides were significantly greater in the CD than in the XD group (p < 0.05). This study suggests that xylitol has the potential to affect the metabolism of daidzein by altering the metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiota and/or gut environment. Given that equol affects bone health, dietary xylitol plus isoflavonoids may exert a favorable effect on bone health.

  3. Consumption of a Bifidobacterium bifidum Strain for 4 Weeks Modulates Dominant Intestinal Bacterial Taxa and Fecal Butyrate in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gargari, Giorgio; Taverniti, Valentina; Balzaretti, Silvia; Ferrario, Chiara; Gardana, Claudio; Simonetti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Modulation of the intestinal microbial ecosystem (IME) is a useful target to establish probiotic efficacy in a healthy population. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, crossover, and placebo-controlled intervention study to determine the impact of Bifidobacterium bifidum strain Bb on the IME of adult healthy volunteers of both sexes. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to characterize the fecal microbiota before and after 4 weeks of daily probiotic cell consumption. The intake of approximately one billion live B. bifidum cells affected the relative abundance of dominant taxa in the fecal microbiota and modulated fecal butyrate levels. Specifically, Prevotellaceae (P = 0.041) and Prevotella (P = 0.034) were significantly decreased, whereas Ruminococcaceae (P = 0.039) and Rikenellaceae (P = 0.010) were significantly increased. We also observed that the probiotic intervention modulated the fecal concentrations of butyrate in a manner dependent on the initial levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). In conclusion, our study demonstrates that a single daily administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum strain Bb can significantly modify the IME in healthy (not diseased) adults. These findings demonstrate the need to reassess the notion that probiotics do not influence the complex and stable IME of a healthy individual. IMPORTANCE Foods and supplements claimed to contain health-promoting probiotic microorganisms are everywhere these days and mainly intended for consumption by healthy people. However, it is still debated what actual effects probiotic products may have on the healthy population. In this study, we report the results of an intervention trial aimed at assessing the modifications induced in the intestinal microbial ecosystem of healthy adults from the consumption of a probiotic product. Our results demonstrate that the introduction of a probiotic product in the dietary habits of healthy people may significantly modify dominant taxa of

  4. Suppression of c-Kit signaling induces adult neurogenesis in the mouse intestine after myenteric plexus ablation with benzalkonium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Tamada, Hiromi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis rarely occurs in the enteric nervous system (ENS). In this study, we demonstrated that, after intestinal myenteric plexus (MP) ablation with benzalkonium chloride (BAC), adult neurogenesis in the ENS was significantly induced in c-kit loss-of-function mutant mice (W/Wv). Almost all neurons and fibers in the MP disappeared after BAC treatment. However, 1 week after ablation, substantial penetration of nerve fibers from the non-damaged area was observed in the MP, longitudinal muscle and subserosal layers in both wildtype and W/Wv mice. Two weeks after BAC treatment, in addition to the penetrating fibers, a substantial number of ectopic neurons appeared in the subserosal and longitudinal muscle layers of W/Wv mice, whereas only a few ectopic neurons appeared in wildtype mice. Such ectopic neurons expressed either excitatory or inhibitory intrinsic motor neuron markers and formed ganglion-like structures, including glial cells, synaptic vesicles and basal lamina. Furthermore, oral administration of imatinib, an inhibitor of c-Kit and an anticancer agent for gastrointestinal stromal tumors, markedly induced appearance of ectopic neurons after BAC treatment, even in wildtype mice. These results suggest that adult neurogenesis in the ENS is negatively regulated by c-Kit signaling in vivo. PMID:27572504

  5. Suppression of c-Kit signaling induces adult neurogenesis in the mouse intestine after myenteric plexus ablation with benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Hiromi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-08-30

    Adult neurogenesis rarely occurs in the enteric nervous system (ENS). In this study, we demonstrated that, after intestinal myenteric plexus (MP) ablation with benzalkonium chloride (BAC), adult neurogenesis in the ENS was significantly induced in c-kit loss-of-function mutant mice (W/W(v)). Almost all neurons and fibers in the MP disappeared after BAC treatment. However, 1 week after ablation, substantial penetration of nerve fibers from the non-damaged area was observed in the MP, longitudinal muscle and subserosal layers in both wildtype and W/W(v) mice. Two weeks after BAC treatment, in addition to the penetrating fibers, a substantial number of ectopic neurons appeared in the subserosal and longitudinal muscle layers of W/W(v) mice, whereas only a few ectopic neurons appeared in wildtype mice. Such ectopic neurons expressed either excitatory or inhibitory intrinsic motor neuron markers and formed ganglion-like structures, including glial cells, synaptic vesicles and basal lamina. Furthermore, oral administration of imatinib, an inhibitor of c-Kit and an anticancer agent for gastrointestinal stromal tumors, markedly induced appearance of ectopic neurons after BAC treatment, even in wildtype mice. These results suggest that adult neurogenesis in the ENS is negatively regulated by c-Kit signaling in vivo.

  6. A method for high purity intestinal epithelial cell culture from adult human and murine tissues for the investigation of innate immune function.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christina L; Harden, Scott W; LaPato, Melissa; Nelson, Michael; Amador, Byron; Sorenson, Heather; Frazier, Charles J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serve as an important physiologic barrier between environmental antigens and the host intestinal immune system. Thus, IECs serve as a first line of defense and may act as sentinel cells during inflammatory insults. Despite recent renewed interest in IEC contributions to host immune function, the study of primary IEC has been hindered by lack of a robust culture technique, particularly for small intestinal and adult tissues. Here, a novel adaptation for culture of primary IEC is described for human duodenal organ donor tissue as well as duodenum and colon of adult mice. These epithelial cell cultures display characteristic phenotypes and are of high purity. In addition, the innate immune function of human primary IEC, specifically with regard to Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and microbial ligand responsiveness, is contrasted with a commonly used intestinal epithelial cell line (HT-29). Specifically, TLR expression at the mRNA level and production of cytokine (IFNγ and TNFα) in response to TLR agonist stimulation is assessed. Differential expression of TLRs as well as innate immune responses to ligand stimulation is observed in human-derived cultures compared to that of HT-29. Thus, use of this adapted method to culture primary epithelial cells from adult human donors and from adult mice will allow for more appropriate studies of IECs as innate immune effectors.

  7. IgG trafficking in the adult pig small intestine: one- or bidirectional transfer across the enterocyte brush border?

    PubMed

    Möller, Rebecca; Hansen, Gert H; Danielsen, E Michael

    2017-03-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) transfer in opposite directions across the small intestinal brush border serves different purposes in early life and in adulthood. In the neonate, maternal IgG is taken up from the gut lumen into the blood, conferring passive immunity to the offspring, whereas in the adult immunoglobulins, including IgG made by plasma cells in the lamina propria, are secreted via the brush border to the lumen as part of the mucosal defense. Here, IgG has been proposed to perform a luminal immune surveillance which eventually includes a reuptake through the brush border as pathogen-containing immune complexes. In the present work, we studied luminal uptake of FITC-conjugated and gold-conjugated IgG in cultured pig jejunal mucosal explants. After 1 h, binding to the brush border was seen in upper crypts and lower parts of the villi. However, no endocytotic uptake into EEA-1-positive compartments was detected, neither at neutral nor acidic pH, despite an ongoing constitutive endocytosis from the brush border, visualized by the polar tracer CF594. The 40-kDa neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn, was present in the microvillus fraction, but noteworthy, a 37 kDa band, most likely a proteolytic cleavage product, bound IgG in a pH-dependent manner more efficiently than did the full-length FcRn. In conclusion, our work does not support the theory that bidirectional transfer of IgG across the intestinal brush border is part of the luminal immune surveillance in the adult.

  8. Lgr5 regulates the regeneration of lesioned nasal respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Qiang; Li, Peng; Zhang, Feng-Qin; Sun, Shao-Jun; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-12-09

    Nasal respiratory epithelium is a ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium. The cellular components of nasal respiratory epithelium include ciliated cells, goblet cells, and basal cells. Until now, our knowledge in the development of nasal respiratory epithelium is still limited and the cellular mechanism of regeneration is still elusive. In this study, we found that adult stem cell marker leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) is expressed in the mice nasal respiratory epithelium. Both immunostaining and lineage tracing analysis indicated Lgr5 positive cells in the nasal respiratory epithelium are proliferative stem/progenitor cells. Using the Rosa-Tdtomato and Rosa26-DTR mice, we elucidated that Lgr5(+) cells participate in the regeneration of lesioned nasal respiratory epithelium, and this group of cells is necessary in the process of epithelium recovery. Using the in vitro culture system, we observed the formation of spheres from Lgr5(+) cells and these spheres have the capacity to generate other types of cells. Above all, this study reported a group of previously unidentified progenitor/stem cells in nasal respiratory epithelium, unveiling the potential cellular mechanism in nasal respiratory epithelium regeneration.

  9. Transplantation of Expanded Fetal Intestinal Progenitors Contributes to Colon Regeneration after Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fordham, Robert P.; Yui, Shiro; Hannan, Nicholas R.F.; Soendergaard, Christoffer; Madgwick, Alison; Schweiger, Pawel J.; Nielsen, Ole H.; Vallier, Ludovic; Pedersen, Roger A.; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru; Jensen, Kim B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Regeneration and homeostasis in the adult intestinal epithelium is driven by proliferative resident stem cells, whose functional properties during organismal development are largely unknown. Here, we show that human and mouse fetal intestine contains proliferative, immature progenitors, which can be expanded in vitro as Fetal Enterospheres (FEnS). A highly similar progenitor population can be established during intestinal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells. Established cultures of mouse fetal intestinal progenitors express lower levels of Lgr5 than mature progenitors and propagate in the presence of the Wnt antagonist Dkk1, and new cultures can be induced to form mature intestinal organoids by exposure to Wnt3a. Following transplantation in a colonic injury model, FEnS contribute to regeneration of colonic epithelium by forming epithelial crypt-like structures expressing region-specific differentiation markers. This work provides insight into mechanisms underlying development of the mammalian intestine and points to future opportunities for patient-specific regeneration of the digestive tract. PMID:24139758

  10. Analysis of Cell Death Induction in Intestinal Organoids In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Grabinger, Thomas; Delgado, Eugenia; Brunner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has an important function in the absorption of nutrients contained in the food. Furthermore, it also has an important barrier function, preventing luminal pathogens from entering the bloodstream. This single cell layer epithelium is quite sensitive to various cell death-promoting triggers, including drugs, irradiation, and TNF family members, leading to loss of barrier integrity, epithelial erosion, inflammation, malabsorption, and diarrhea. In order to assess the intestinal epithelium-damaging potential of treatments and substances specific test systems are required. As intestinal tumor cell lines are a poor substitute for primary intestinal epithelial cells, and in vivo experiments in mice are costly and often unethical, the use of intestinal organoids cultured from intestinal crypts provide an ideal tool to study cell death induction and mechanisms in primary intestinal epithelial cells. This protocol describes the isolation and culture of intestinal organoids from murine small intestinal crypts, and the quantitative assessment of cell death induction in these organoids.

  11. The Three-Dimensional Culture of Epithelial Organoids Derived from Embryonic Chicken Intestine.

    PubMed

    Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Panek, Malgorzata; Czyrnek, Malgorzata; Grabacka, Maja

    2016-10-28

    The intestinal epithelium isolated from chicken embryos in last 3 days of development can be used to establish the 3D culture of intestinal organoids. When fragments of epithelial tissue released by incubation with EGTA (2.5 mM, 2 h) are embedded in Matrigel matrix on cell culture inserts the formation of empty spheres covered by epithelial cells is observed in first 24 h of culture. The growth and survival of organoids are supported by the addition of R-spondin 1, Noggin, and prostaglandin E2 to the culture medium. The organoids are accompanied by myofibroblasts which become visible in the next 2 days of culture. The intestinal enteroids (free of myofibroblasts) can be obtained from adult chicken intestine.

  12. Both direct and indirect effects account for the pro-inflammatory activity of enteropathogenic mycotoxins on the human intestinal epithelium: Stimulation of interleukin-8 secretion, potentiation of interleukin-1{beta} effect and increase in the transepithelial passage of commensal bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Maresca, Marc; Yahi, Nouara; Younes-Sakr, Lama; Boyron, Marilyn; Caporiccio, Bertrand; Fantini, Jacques

    2008-04-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites responsible of food-mediated intoxication in animals and humans. Deoxynivalenol, ochratoxin A and patulin are the best known enteropathogenic mycotoxins able to alter intestinal functions resulting in malnutrition, diarrhea, vomiting and intestinal inflammation in vivo. Although their effects on intestinal barrier and transport activities have been extensively characterized, the mechanisms responsible for their pro-inflammatory effect are still poorly understood. Here we investigated if mycotoxin-induced intestinal inflammation results from a direct and/or indirect pro-inflammatory activity of these mycotoxins on human intestinal epithelial cells, using differentiated Caco-2 cells as model and interleukin 8 (IL-8) as an indicator of intestinal inflammation. Deoxynivalenol was the only mycotoxin able to directly increase IL-8 secretion (10- to 15-fold increase). We also investigated if these mycotoxins could indirectly stimulate IL-8 secretion through: (i) a modulation of the action of pro-inflammatory molecules such as the interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), and/or (ii) an increase in the transepithelial passage of non-invasive commensal Escherichia coli. We found that deoxynivalenol, ochratoxin A and patulin all potentiated the effect of IL-1{beta} on IL-8 secretion (ranging from 35% to 138% increase) and increased the transepithelial passage of commensal bacteria (ranging from 12- to 1544-fold increase). In addition to potentially exacerbate established intestinal inflammation, these mycotoxins may thus participate in the induction of sepsis and intestinal inflammation in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that the pro-inflammatory activity of enteropathogenic mycotoxins is mediated by both direct and indirect effects.

  13. Immunocytochemical detection of vasoactive intestinal peptide-like and peptide histidine isoleucine-like peptides in the nervous system and the excretory system of adult Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Foster, N

    1998-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide-like and peptide histidine isoleucine-like immunoreactivities were detected in the excretory duct of adult male and female Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, thus indicating the source of these two physiologically active peptides previously isolated from the excretory/secretory products of adult N. brasiliensis. In the nervous system immunoreactivity to both these peptides was confined to females and was found in the neurons of the ovijector associated ganglion. This is consistent with co-synthesis of vasoactive intestinal peptide-like and peptide histidine isoleucine-like peptides which has also been shown to occur in all mammalian vasoactive intestinal peptid-ergic neurons studied to date. However, in addition to this, and in common to some previous studies on helminth vasoactive intestinal peptide and peptide histidine isoleucine immunoreactivities, co-synthesis of the peptides was not indicated in a pair of branched neurons which projected posteriorly and peripherally from the ganglion associated with the ovijector of females and which terminated in two pairs of ganglia also exhibiting vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity only. The position of these ganglia indicated that they innervate muscles close to the body wall and may be responsible for the muscular contractions required for expulsion of eggs from female Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. This is also the first study to successfully detect these peptides in the excretory system of gastrointestinal nematodes.

  14. Intestinal Lesions Are Associated with Altered Intestinal Microbiome and Are More Frequent in Children and Young Adults with Cystic Fibrosis and Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Flass, Thomas; Tong, Suhong; Frank, Daniel N.; Wagner, Brandie D.; Robertson, Charles E.; Kotter, Cassandra Vogel; Sokol, Ronald J.; Zemanick, Edith; Accurso, Frank; Hoffenberg, Edward J.; Narkewicz, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Cirrhosis (CIR) occurs in 5–7% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We hypothesized that alterations in intestinal function in CF contribute to the development of CIR. Aims: Determine the frequency of macroscopic intestinal lesions, intestinal inflammation, intestinal permeability and characterize fecal microbiome in CF CIR subjects and CF subjects with no liver disease (CFnoLIV). Methods 11 subjects with CFCIR (6 M, 12.8 yrs ± 3.8) and 19 matched with CFnoLIV (10 M, 12.6 yrs ± 3.4) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, intestinal permeability testing by urinary lactulose: mannitol excretion ratio, fecal calprotectin determination and fecal microbiome characterization. Results CFCIR and CFnoLIV did not differ in key demographics or CF complications. CFCIR had higher GGT (59±51 U/L vs 17±4 p = 0.02) and lower platelet count (187±126 vs 283±60 p = 0.04) and weight (-0.86 ± 1.0 vs 0.30 ± 0.9 p = 0.002) z scores. CFCIR had more severe intestinal mucosal lesions on capsule endoscopy (score ≥4, 4/11 vs 0/19 p = 0.01). Fecal calprotectin was similar between CFCIR and CFnoLIV (166 μg/g ±175 vs 136 ± 193 p = 0.58, nl <120). Lactulose:mannitol ratio was elevated in 27/28 subjects and was slightly lower in CFCIR vs CFnoLIV (0.08±0.02 vs 0.11±0.05, p = 0.04, nl ≤0.03). Small bowel transit time was longer in CFCIR vs CFnoLIV (195±42 min vs 167±68 p<0.001, nl 274 ± 41). Bacteroides were decreased in relative abundance in CFCIR and were associated with lower capsule endoscopy score whereas Clostridium were more abundant in CFCIR and associated with higher capsule endoscopy score. Conclusions CFCIR is associated with increased intestinal mucosal lesions, slower small bowel transit time and alterations in fecal microbiome. Abnormal intestinal permeability and elevated fecal calprotectin are common in all CF subjects. Disturbances in intestinal function in CF combined with changes in the microbiome may contribute to the development of

  15. Stem cells and lineages of the intestine: a developmental and evolutionary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shigeo; Gold, David; Hartenstein, Volker

    2012-01-01

    The intestine consists of epithelial cells that secrete digestive enzymes and mucus (gland cells), absorb food particles (enterocytes), and produce hormones (endocrine cells). Intestinal cells are rapidly turned over and need to be replaced. In cnidarians, mitosis of differentiated intestinal cells accounts for much of the replacement; in addition, migratory, multipotent stem cells (interstitial cells) contribute to the production of intestinal cells. In other phyla, intestinal cell replacement is solely the function of stem cells entering the gut from the outside (such as in case of the neoblasts of platyhelmints) or intestinal stem cells located within the midgut epithelium (as in both vertebrates or arthropods). We will attempt in the following to review important aspects of midgut stem cells in different animal groups: where are they located, what types of lineages do they produce, and how do they develop. We will start out with a comparative survey of midgut cell types found across the animal kingdom; then briefly look at the specification of these cells during embryonic development; and finally focus on the stem cells that regenerate midgut cells during adult life. In a number of model systems, including mouse, zebrafish and Drosophila, the molecular pathways controlling ISC proliferation and the specification of intestinal cell types are under intensive investigation. We will highlight findings of the recent literature, focusing on aspects that are shared between the different models and that point at evolutionary ancient mechanisms of intestinal cell formation. PMID:23179635

  16. Dll1- and Dll4-mediated Notch signaling is required for homeostasis of intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrinet, Luca; Rodilla, Veronica; Liu, Zhenyi; Chen, Shuang; Koch, Ute; Espinosa, Lluis; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Kopan, Raphael; Lewis, Julian; Radtke, Freddy

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Ablation of Notch signaling within the intestinal epithelium results in loss of proliferating crypt progenitors, due to their conversion into post-mitotic secretory cells. We aimed to confirm that Notch was active in stem cells (SC), investigate consequences of loss of Notch signaling within the intestinal SC compartment, and identify the physiological ligands of Notch in mouse intestine. Furthermore, we investigated whether the induction of goblet cell differentiation that results from loss of Notch requires the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4). Methods Trasgenic mice that carried a reporter of Notch1 activation were used for lineage tracing experiments. The in vivo functions of the Notch ligands Jagged1 (Jag1), Delta-like1 (Dll1), Delta-like4 (Dll4), and the transcription factor Klf4 were assessed in mice with inducible, gut-specific gene targeting (Vil-Cre-ERT2). Results Notch1 signaling was found to be activated in intestinal SC. Although deletion of Jag1 or Dll4 did not perturb the intestinal epithelium, inactivation of Dll1 resulted in a moderate increase in number of goblet cells without noticeable effects of progenitor proliferation. However, simultaneous inactivation of Dll1 and Dll4 resulted in the complete conversion of proliferating progenitors into post-mitotic goblet cells, concomitant with loss of SC (Olfm4+, Lgr5+ and Ascl2+). Klf4 inactivation did not interfere with goblet cell differentiation in adult wild-type or in Notch pathway-deficient gut. Conclusions Notch signaling in SC and progenitors is activated by Dll1 and Dll4 ligands and is required for maintenance of intestinal progenitor and SC. Klf4 is dispensable for goblet cell differentiation in intestines of adult Notch-deficient mice. PMID:21238454

  17. The roles of acid-sensing ion channel 1a and ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 on passive Mg2+ transport across intestinal epithelium-like Caco-2 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Thongon, Narongrit; Ketkeaw, Pattamaporn; Nuekchob, Chanin

    2014-03-01

    Intestinal passive Mg(2+) absorption, which is vital for normal Mg(2+) homeostasis, has been shown to be regulated by luminal proton. We aimed to study the regulatory role of intestinal acid sensors in paracellular passive Mg(2+) transport. Omeprazole enhanced the expressions of acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a), ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 in Caco-2 cells. It also inhibited passive Mg(2+) transport across Caco-2 monolayers. The expression and activation of OGR1 resulted in the stimulation of passive Mg(2+) transport via phospholipase C- and protein kinase C-dependent pathways. ASIC1a activation, on the other hand, enhanced apical HCO3 (-) secretion that led, at least in part, by a Ca(2+)-dependent pathway to an inhibition of paracellular Mg(2+) absorption. Our results provided supporting evidence for the roles of OGR1 and ASIC1a in the regulation of intestinal passive Mg(2+) absorption.

  18. Maturation of the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier in Neonatal Rats Coincides with Decreased FcRn Expression, Replacement of Vacuolated Enterocytes and Changed Blimp-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo Sureda, Ester; Weström, Björn; Pierzynowski, Stefan G.; Prykhodko, Olena

    2016-01-01

    Background The intestinal barrier is immature in newborn mammals allowing for transfer of bioactive macromolecules, e.g. protecting antibodies, from mother’s milk to the blood circulation and in neonatal rodents lasts until weaning. This passage involves the neonatal-Fc-receptor (FcRn) binding IgG in the proximal and highly endocytic vacuolated enterocytes in the distal immature small intestine (SI). Recent studies have suggested an involvement of the transcription factor B-lymphocyte-induced maturation-protein-1 (Blimp-1) in the regulation of SI maturation in mice. Hence, the objective of the present study was to monitor the development of the intestinal barrier function, in relation to Blimp-1 expression during both natural and precociously induced intestinal maturation in rats. Results During the suckling period IgG plasma levels increased, while after gut closure it temporarily decreased. This corresponded to a high expression of FcRn in the proximal SI epithelium and the presence of vacuolated enterocytes in the distal SI. The immature foetal-type epithelium was replaced after weaning or induced precocious maturation, by an adult-type epithelium with FcRnneg cells in the proximal and by non-vacuolated enterocytes in the distal SI. In parallel to this epithelial shift, Blimp-1 expression decreased in the distal SI. Conclusion The switch from foetal- to adult-type epithelium, with decreased proximal expression of FcRn and distal replacement of vacuolated enterocytes, was concurrent in the two SI regions and could be used for monitoring SI maturation in the rat. The changes in expression of Blimp-1 in the distal SI epithelium followed the maturation pattern. PMID:27736989

  19. Intestinal Colonization by Enterotoxigenic ’Escherichia Coli’

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    Growth of enterotoxigenic E . coli in porcine small intestine selects for piliated forms which adhere to the intestinal epithelium. Surface antigen...K99 on enterotoxigenic E . coli is a pilus. Antigen K99 occurs on porcine enterotoxigenic E . coli strains and is produced in pig small intestine.

  20. Intestinal lactase (beta-galactosidase) and other disaccharidase activities of suckling and adult common brushtail possums, Trichosurus vulpecula (Marsupialia:Phalangeridae).

    PubMed

    Crisp, E A; Messer, M; Cowan, P E

    1989-01-01

    Small-intestinal disaccharidase activities of eight suckling T. vulpecula, aged from 34 to 150 days, and of two adult animals were investigated. Intestinal maltase, isomaltase and sucrase activities increased with age, whereas lactase activities decreased. Trehalase activities were relatively high in all animals and showed no obvious age-related changes. Three separate beta-galactosidase activities, one neutral and two acid, acted on lactose. The neutral beta-galactosidase activity appeared to be due to a brush border enzyme similar to that of eutherian mammals, whereas the acid beta-galactosidases were soluble and probably of lysosomal origin. One of these, acid beta-galactosidase-1, had similar properties to the sole intestinal beta-galactosidase of macropodid marsupials, whereas the other, acid beta-galactosidase-2, has not previously been described. Galactosyl oligosaccharides isolated from macropodid milk were readily hydrolysed by both acid beta-galactosidases but not by the neutral beta-galactosidase. The total intestinal lactase activity in animals aged up to 125 days was due mainly to acid beta-galactosidase-1, whereas in older animals it was due mostly to the neutral beta-galactosidase; this suggests that late in lactation the young T. vulpecula change from a macropodid mode of digestion of galactosyl oligosaccharides to a eutherian mechanism for the digestion of lactose. These findings may have implications for the hand-rearing of orphaned T. vulpecula.

  1. Effect of a Semi-Purified Oligosaccharide-Enriched Fraction from Caprine Milk on Barrier Integrity and Mucin Production of Co-Culture Models of the Small and Large Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Alicia M.; Roy, Nicole C.; McNabb, Warren C.; Cookson, Adrian L.

    2016-01-01

    Caprine milk contains the highest amount of oligosaccharides among domestic animals, which are structurally similar to human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). This suggests caprine milk oligosaccharides may offer similar protective and developmental effects to that of HMOs. However, to date, studies using oligosaccharides from caprine milk have been limited. Thus, this study aimed to examine the impact of a caprine milk oligosaccharide-enriched fraction (CMOF) on barrier function of epithelial cell co-cultures of absorptive enterocytes (Caco-2 cells) and mucus-secreting goblet cells (HT29-MTX cells), that more closely simulate the cell proportions found in the small (90:10) and large intestine (75:25). Treatment of epithelial co-cultures with 0.4, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/mL of CMOF was shown to have no effect on metabolic activity but did enhance cell epithelial barrier integrity as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), in a dose-dependent manner. The CMOF at the maximum concentration tested (4.0 mg/mL) enhanced TEER, mucin gene expression and mucin protein abundance of epithelial co-cultures, all of which are essential components of intestinal barrier function. PMID:27164134

  2. Italian guidelines for intestinal transplantation: potential candidates among the adult patients managed by a medical referral center for chronic intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Pironi, L; Spinucci, G; Paganelli, F; Merli, C; Masetti, M; Miglioli, M; Pinna, A D

    2004-04-01

    In 2002, the Italian guidelines for eligibility of patients for intestinal transplantation (ITx) were defined as: life-threatening complications of home parenteral nutrition (HPN), lack of venous access for HPN, locally invasive tumors of the abdomen, Chronic intestinal failure (CIF) with a high risk of mortality, primary disease-related poor quality of life (QoL) despite optimal HPN. Our aim was to identify potential candidates for ITx according to these national guidelines among patients managed by a medical referral center for CIF. Records of patients who received HPN were reviewed. CIF was considered reversible or irreversible (energy by HPN <50% or >50% basal energy expenditure). Patients with irreversible CIF were considered eligible for ITx in the absence of a contraindication, as are used for solid organs Tx. From 1986 to 2003 among 64 patients who met the entry criteria 23 showed reversible and 41 irreversible, CIF. Twenty-one patients with irreversible CIF had an indication for ITx, but eight had also contraindications; thus 13 were eligible, including intestinal pseudo-obstruction (n = 6), mesenteric ischemia (n = 3), Crohn's (n = 2), radiation enteritis (n = 1), and desmoid (n = 1). Indications for ITx included HPN liver failure (n = 2), lack of venous access (n = 2), CIF with high risk of mortality (n = 3), very poor QoL (n = 6 including 5 with pseudo-obstruction). According to the Italian guidelines for ITx, 31% of patients with irreversible CIF managed by a medical referral center were eligible for ITx. Primary disease-related poor QoL was the indication in half of them. Studies on the QoL after ITx are required to allow patients to make an educated decision.

  3. [Neutrophils and monocytes in gingival epithelium

    PubMed

    Meng, H X; Zheng, L P

    1994-06-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes of gingival epithellium in health gingiva(H),marginal gingivitis(MG),juvenile periodontitis(JP),adult periodontitis(AP) and subgingival bacteria were quantitated and analyzed,The results showed that the numbers of PMN within either pocket epithelium or oral gingival epithelium in JP were significantly lower than in AP and G.The amounts of PMN in AP were much larger than other three groups.Positive correlation between the number of PMN in sulcular pocket epitelium and the motile bacteri of subgingival plaque was demonstrated by correlation analysis.Monocytes mainly presented in deep pocket and junctional epithelum which were stained by NAE method,however very few Langhans cells were seen in these areas.

  4. Loss of intestinal core 1-derived O-glycans causes spontaneous colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianxin; Wei, Bo; Wen, Tao; Johansson, Malin E V; Liu, Xiaowei; Bradford, Emily; Thomsson, Kristina A; McGee, Samuel; Mansour, Lilah; Tong, Maomeng; McDaniel, J Michael; Sferra, Thomas J; Turner, Jerrold R; Chen, Hong; Hansson, Gunnar C; Braun, Jonathan; Xia, Lijun

    2011-04-01

    Mucin-type O-linked oligosaccharides (O-glycans) are primary components of the intestinal mucins that form the mucus gel layer overlying the gut epithelium. Impaired expression of intestinal O-glycans has been observed in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), but its role in the etiology of this disease is unknown. Here, we report that mice with intestinal epithelial cell-specific deficiency of core 1-derived O-glycans, the predominant form of O-glycans, developed spontaneous colitis that resembled human UC, including massive myeloid infiltrates and crypt abscesses. The colitis manifested in these mice was also characterized by TNF-producing myeloid infiltrates in colon mucosa in the absence of lymphocytes, supporting an essential role for myeloid cells in colitis initiation. Furthermore, induced deletion of intestinal core 1-derived O-glycans caused spontaneous colitis in adult mice. These data indicate a causal role for the loss of core 1-derived O-glycans in colitis. Finally, we detected a biosynthetic intermediate typically exposed in the absence of core 1 O-glycan, Tn antigen, in the colon epithelium of a subset of UC patients. Somatic mutations in the X-linked gene that encodes core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase-specific chaperone 1 (C1GALT1C1, also known as Cosmc), which is essential for core 1 O-glycosylation, were found in Tn-positive epithelia. These data suggest what we believe to be a new molecular mechanism for the pathogenesis of UC.

  5. Intestinal nutrient uptake measurements and tissue damage: validating the everted sleeves method.

    PubMed

    Starck, J M; Karasov, W H; Afik, D

    2000-01-01

    The reliability of methods for nutrient uptake measurements across the intestinal epithelium relies on the integrity of the mucosal epithelium and the enterocytes. We tested effects of tissue handling during the "everted sleeves method" on the length of intestinal villi, the surface magnification, the circumference of the gut, and the thickness of the muscle layer in sunbirds (Nectarinia osea), chicken (Gallus gallus), and mice (Mus domesticus). The sunbird has thin and delicate intestinal villi that are greatly affected by the everted sleeves method. After eversion and incubation, villi lost 30% of their original length. The severe tissue damage coincides with uptake measurements for glucose that were an order of magnitude lower than in other nectar-feeding (nectarivorous) birds of similar body size. Tissue handling during the everted sleeves method had significant effects on morphometric parameters of chicken and mouse intestines, but on a light-microscopical level, the tissue integrity and the cytology of the enterocytes were not altered. Therefore, we think that the everted sleeves method renders reliable and reproducible measurements of nutrient uptake in those species. We conclude that a histological evaluation is necessary to assess the reliability of the method before it is applied to adults or to the developmental stage of any species.

  6. Prostaglandin E2 supports growth of chicken embryo intestinal organoids in Matrigel matrix.

    PubMed

    Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Grabacka, Maja; Michalik, Marta; Zyla, Krzysztof; Pierzchalski, Piotr

    2012-05-01

    Investigating intestinal physiology in vitro remains challenging due to the lack of an effective primary enterocyte culture system. Recently developed protocols for growing organoids containing crypts and villus from adult mouse intestinal epithelium in Matrigel present an attractive alternative to the classical techniques. However, these approaches require the use of sophisticated and expensive serum-free medium supplemented with epithelial growth factor (EGF), Wnt agonist (R-spondin 1), and bone morphogenetic protein inhibitor (Noggin) in high concentrations. Here we demonstrate that is possible to use an isolated chicken embryonic intestinal epithelium to create such an organoid culture. Structures formed in Matrigel matrix in the first two days following isolation survive and enlarge during ensuing weeks. They have the appearance of empty spheres and comprise cells expressing cytokeratin (an epithelial cell marker), villin (a marker of enterocytes), and Sox-9 (a transcription factor characteristic of progenitors and stem cells of intestinal crypts). With chicken embryonic tissue as a source of organoids, prostaglandin E2 is as effective as R-spondin 1 and Noggin in promoting sustained growth and survival of epithelial spheroids.

  7. Mucosal Prevalence and Interactions with the Epithelium Indicate Commensalism of Sutterella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Hiippala, Kaisa; Kainulainen, Veera; Kalliomäki, Marko; Arkkila, Perttu; Satokari, Reetta

    2016-01-01

    Sutterella species have been frequently associated with human diseases, such as autism, Down syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the impact of these bacteria on health still remains unclear. Especially the interactions of Sutterella spp. with the host are largely unknown, despite of the species being highly prevalent. In this study, we addressed the interaction of three known species of Sutterella with the intestinal epithelium and examined their adhesion properties, the effect on intestinal barrier function and the pro-inflammatory capacity in vitro. We also studied the relative abundance and prevalence of the genus Sutterella and Sutterella wadsworthensis in intestinal biopsies of healthy individuals and patients with celiac disease (CeD) or IBD. Our results show that Sutterella spp. are abundant in the duodenum of healthy adults with a decreasing gradient toward the colon. No difference was detected in the prevalence of Sutterella between the pediatric IBD or CeD patients and the healthy controls. Sutterella parvirubra adhered better than the two other Sutterella spp. to differentiated Caco-2 cells and was capable of decreasing the adherence of S. wadsworthensis, which preferably bound to mucus and human extracellular matrix proteins. Furthermore, only S. wadsworthensis induced an interleukin-8 production in enterocytes, which could be due to different lipopolysaccharide structures between the species. However, its pro-inflammatory activity was modest as compared to non-pathogenic Escherichia coli. Sutterella spp. had no effect on the enterocyte monolayer integrity in vitro. Our findings indicate that the members of genus Sutterella are widely prevalent commensals with mild pro-inflammatory capacity in the human gastrointestinal tract and do not contribute significantly to the disrupted epithelial homeostasis associated with microbiota dysbiosis and increase of Proteobacteria. The ability of Sutterella spp. to adhere to intestinal epithelial

  8. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Manifesting as Intestinal Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma in an Adult Renal Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Börcek, Pelin; Özdemir, B Handan; Özgün, Gonca; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a relatively common posttransplant malignancy affecting as many as 10% of all solid-organ recipients. Most cases of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder are of B-cell origin, with common Epstein-Barr virus association. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders of T-cell origin are much rarer and less frequently associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Here, we report an unusual case of Epstein-Barr virus-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma causing an intestinal perforation in an adult renal transplant recipient. A 52-year-old male patient with renal allograft developed cryptogenic end-stage liver failure and was accepted as a candidate for liver transplant. Before transplant, he was admitted with severe abdominal pain, which turned out to result from ileal perforation. Pathologic evaluation of the intestinal resection showed diffuse malignant lymphoid infiltration of the ileum, consistent with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. The tumor was positive for Epstein-Barr virus genome. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma is a rare form of T-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder that is infrequently associated with Epstein-Barr virus. The occurrence of this extraordinary form of post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, its late onset, intestinal localization, and Epstein-Barr virus as sociation represent a unique clinical rarity.

  9. Detection of human cytomegalovirus in normal and neoplastic breast epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes a persistent life-long infection, and can cause severe pathology in the fetus and the immunocompromised host[1]. Breast milk is the primary route of transmission in humans worldwide, and breast epithelium is thus a likely site of persistent infection and/or reactivation, though this phenomenon has not previously been demonstrated. Increasing evidence indicates HCMV infection can modulate signaling pathways associated with oncogenesis. We hypothesized that persistent HCMV infection occurs in normal adult breast epithelium and that persistent viral expression might be associated with normal and neoplastic ductal epithelium. Methods Surgical biopsy specimens of normal breast (n = 38) breast carcinoma (n = 39) and paired normal breast from breast cancer patients (n = 21) were obtained. Specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, PCR and DNA sequencing for evidence of HCMV antigens and nucleic acids. Results We detected HCMV expression specifically in glandular epithelium in 17/27 (63%) of normal adult breast cases evaluated. In contrast, HCMV expression was evident in the neoplastic epithelium of 31/32 (97%) patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases evaluated (p = 0.0009). Conclusions These findings are the first to demonstrate that persistent HCMV infection occurs in breast epithelium in a significant percentage of normal adult females. HCMV expression was also evident in neoplastic breast epithelium in a high percentage of normal and neoplastic breast tissues obtained from breast cancer patients, raising the possibility that viral infection may be involved in the neoplastic process. PMID:21429243

  10. Scanning electron microscopic studies of the surface morphology of the vomeronasal epithelium and olfactory epithelium of garter snakes.

    PubMed

    Wang, R T; Halpern, M

    1980-04-01

    Fixed vomeronasal and olfactory epithelia from normal adult garter snakes were microdissected, fractured, and examined with a scanning electron microscope. The method permits a detailed comparative study of the structural organization and morphological characteristics of the constituent cells of the vomeronasal and olfactory epithelia. Despite similarities in the nomenclature of the constituent cells in both epithelia, significant differences exist in their surface morphology. A unique columnar structure composed of non-neuronal elements is present in the vomeronasal epithelium. These columns house the bioplar neurons and undifferentiated cells. Such a columnar organization is absent in the olfactory epithelium. In vomeronasal epithelium the bipolar neurons possess microvillous terminals at their dendritic tips, while the dendritic tips of the bipolar neurons of the olfactory epithelium possess cilia. Vomeronasal supporting cells are covered with microvilli, while olfactory supporting cells are covered with cytoplasmic protuberances in addition to the microvilli. In the vomeronasal epithelium the pear-shaped neurons have a grossly smooth surface and are organized into clusters, while in the olfactory epithelium the elliptical bipolar neurons are spinous, aligned side-by-side and interdigitate. The basal (undifferentiated) cell layer in the vomeronasal epithelium has a high packing density and is composed of several layers of irregularly shaped cells. In the olfactory epithelium the basal cell layer is loosely organized and composed of a single layer of oval cells. This information on the three-dimensional cell structure of both epithelia provides a basis for experimental observations on changes in morphology of the bipolar neurons during genesis, development, maturation, degeneration, and regeneration in postnatal, adult animals.

  11. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Nancy M.; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R.; Stefanski, Casey D.; Strubberg, Ashlee M.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl− and HCO3− efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3−)-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3−-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl−/HCO3− exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl− concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl− concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl− and HCO3− efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl− and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. PMID:26542396

  12. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium.

    PubMed

    Walker, Nancy M; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R; Stefanski, Casey D; Strubberg, Ashlee M; Clarke, Lane L

    2016-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3 (-))-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3 (-)-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl(-) concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl(-) and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine.

  13. The effects of feeding with synbiotic (Pediococcus acidilactici and fructooligosaccharide) enriched adult Artemia on skin mucus immune responses, stress resistance, intestinal microbiota and performance of angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare).

    PubMed

    Azimirad, Mahmood; Meshkini, Saeed; Ahmadifard, Nasrollah; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of feeding on synbiotic (Pediococcus acidilactici and fructooligosaccharide) enriched adult Artemia franciscana on skin mucus immune responses, stress resistance, intestinal microbiota and growth performance of angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare). Three hundred and sixty fish with initial weight 3.2 ± 0.13 g were randomly divided into twelve aquaria (50 L) assigned to four groups in triplicates. Fish were fed for 7 weeks with dietary treatments, including treatment 1: feeding adult Artemia without enrichment (control group), treatment 2: feeding adult Artemia enriched with lyophilised probiotic P. acidilactici (700 mg L(-1)), 3: feeding adult Artemia enriched with prebiotic fructooligosaccharide (FOS) (100 mg L(-1)), group 4: feeding adult Artemia enriched with synbiotic (P. acidilactici (700 mg L(-1)) + FOS (100 mg L(-1))). Skin mucus immune responses (lysozyme activity, total Immunoglobulin and protease), stress resistance against environmental stress (acute decrease of temperature and increase salinity), intestinal microbiota as well as growth indices were measured at the end of feeding trial. Artemia enriched with synbiotic significantly improved growth performance compared to other treatments (P < 0.05). The highest weight gain and specific growth rate (SGR) was observed in synbiotic fed fish (P < 0.05). Compared to the other treatments, the population of lactic acid bacteria was significantly higher in the intestinal microbiota of fish fed synbiotic supplemented diet (P < 0.05). In the environmental stress challenge test, the maximum resistance to abrupt decrease of temperature (17 °C) or elevation of salinity (12 g per liter) was observed in the synbiotic treatment. Also, the total immunoglobulin and lysozyme activity level of skin mucus was significantly elevated in fish fed Artemia enriched with synbiotic (P < 0.05). These results revealed that feeding angelfish with synbiotic

  14. Conditional genetic deletion of Ano1 in interstitial cells of Cajal impairs Ca(2+) transients and slow waves in adult mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Malysz, John; Gibbons, Simon J; Saravanaperumal, Siva A; Du, Peng; Eisenman, Seth T; Cao, Chike; Oh, Uhtaek; Saur, Dieter; Klein, Sabine; Ordog, Tamas; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2017-03-01

    Myenteric plexus interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY) in the small intestine are Kit(+) electrical pacemakers that express the Ano1/TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel, whose functions in the gastrointestinal tract remain incompletely understood. In this study, an inducible Cre-LoxP-based approach was used to advance the understanding of Ano1 in ICC-MY of adult mouse small intestine. Kit(CreERT2/+);Ano1(Fl/Fl) mice were treated with tamoxifen or vehicle, and small intestines (mucosa free) were examined. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated ~50% reduction in Ano1 mRNA in intestines of conditional knockouts (cKOs) compared with vehicle-treated controls. Whole mount immunohistochemistry showed a mosaic/patchy pattern loss of Ano1 protein in ICC networks. Ca(2+) transients in ICC-MY network of cKOs displayed reduced duration compared with highly synchronized controls and showed synchronized and desynchronized profiles. When matched, the rank order for Ano1 expression in Ca(2+) signal imaged fields of view was as follows: vehicle controls>cKO(synchronized)>cKO(desynchronized). Maintenance of Ca(2+) transients' synchronicity despite high loss of Ano1 indicates a large functional reserve of Ano1 in the ICC-MY network. Slow waves in cKOs displayed reduced duration and increased inter-slow-wave interval and occurred in regular- and irregular-amplitude oscillating patterns. The latter activity suggested ongoing interaction by independent interacting oscillators. Lack of slow waves and depolarization, previously reported for neonatal constitutive knockouts, were also seen. In summary, Ano1 in adults regulates gastrointestinal function by determining Ca(2+) transients and electrical activity depending on the level of Ano1 expression. Partial Ano1 loss results in Ca(2+) transients and slow waves displaying reduced duration, while complete and widespread absence of Ano1 in ICC-MY causes lack of slow wave and desynchronized Ca(2+) transients.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The Ca(2+)-activated

  15. Effect of vitamin A deficiency on permeability of the small intestinal mucosa for macromolecules in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gmoshinskii, I.V.; Khvylya, S.I.; Kon', I.Ya.

    1987-07-01

    The authors study the effect of experimental vitamin A deficiency on absorption of macromolecules of hen's ovalbumin in the intestine. An electron-microscopic study of permeability of small intestine enterocytes for particles of colloidal lanthanum hydroxide La(OH)/sub 3/ was carried out at the same time. The concentration of unsplit hen's ovalbumin in the blood of the rats used in the experiment was determined by competitive radioimmunoassay. Samples of serum were incubated with indicator doses of /sup 125/I-OA. Radioactivity of the precipitates was measured.

  16. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J H

    1992-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops. Images PMID:1576584

  17. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed

    Cross, J H

    1992-04-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops.

  18. Loss of sigma factor RpoN increases intestinal colonization of vibrio parahaemolyticus in an adult mouse model"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagella synthesis as well as a wide range of ...

  19. Intestinal barriers to bacteria and their toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.I.; Owen, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Immunologic and nonimmunologic processes work together to protect the host from the multitude of microorganisms residing within the intestinal lumen. Mechanical integrity of the intestinal epithelium, mucus in combination with secretory antibody, antimicrobial metabolites of indigenous microorganisms, and peristalsis each limit proliferation and systemic dissemination of enteric pathogens. Uptake of microorganisms by Peyer's patches and other intestinal lymphoid structures and translocation circumvent the mucosal barrier, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. Improved understanding of the composition and limitation of the intestinal barrier, coupled with advances in genetic engineering of immunogenic bacteria, development of oral delivery systems, and immunomodulators, now make enhancement of mucosal barriers feasible. 32 references.

  20. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  1. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  2. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  3. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    An intestinal obstruction occurs when food or stool cannot move through the intestines. The obstruction can be complete or partial. ... abdomen Inability to pass gas Constipation A complete intestinal obstruction is a medical emergency. It often requires surgery. ...

  4. Intestinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag Sureshchandra; Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Girlanda, Raffaele; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2012-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for patients with intestinal failure. Intestinal transplantation is now recognized as a treatment for patients who develop complications of parenteral nutrition and in whom attempts at intestinal rehabilitation have failed. Patients with parenteral nutrition related liver disease will require a liver graft typically part of a multivisceral transplant. Isolated intestinal transplants are more commonly performed in adults while multivisceral transplants are most commonly performed in infants. Isolated intestinal transplants have the best short-term outcome, with over 80 % survival at 1 year. Patients requiring multivisceral transplants have a high rate of attrition with a 1 year survival less than 70 %. Prognostic factors for a poor outcome include patient hospitalization at the time of transplant and donor age greater than 40 years while systemic sepsis and acute rejection are the major determinant of early postoperative outcome. For patients surviving the first year the outcome of transplantation of the liver in addition to intestine affords some survival advantage though long-term outcome does not yet match other abdominal organs. Outcomes for intestinal retransplantation are poor as a result of immunology and patient debility. Overall intestinal transplantation continues to develop and is a clear indication with cost and quality of life advantages in patients with intestinal failure that do not remain stable on parenteral nutrition.

  5. Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Necroptosis in the Gut and Intestinal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Negroni, Anna; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) form a physiochemical barrier that separates the intestinal lumen from the host's internal milieu and is critical for electrolyte passage, nutrient absorption, and interaction with commensal microbiota. Moreover, IECs are strongly involved in the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response as well as in mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. Cell death in the intestinal barrier is finely controlled, since alterations may lead to severe disorders, including inflammatory diseases. The emerging picture indicates that intestinal epithelial cell death is strictly related to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review is focused on previous reports on different forms of cell death in intestinal epithelium. PMID:26483605

  6. Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Necroptosis in the Gut and Intestinal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Anna; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) form a physiochemical barrier that separates the intestinal lumen from the host's internal milieu and is critical for electrolyte passage, nutrient absorption, and interaction with commensal microbiota. Moreover, IECs are strongly involved in the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response as well as in mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. Cell death in the intestinal barrier is finely controlled, since alterations may lead to severe disorders, including inflammatory diseases. The emerging picture indicates that intestinal epithelial cell death is strictly related to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review is focused on previous reports on different forms of cell death in intestinal epithelium.

  7. Biochemistry of intestinal development.

    PubMed Central

    Henning, S J

    1979-01-01

    In biochemical terms, the rat small intestine is relatively immature at birth and for the first two postnatal weeks. Then during the third week a dramatic array of enzymic changes begins, and by the end of the fourth week the intestine has the digestive and absorptive properties of the adult. Selective examples of these changes are discussed with emphasis on their implications for toxicological studies. The review also includes a detailed consideration of the roles of the dietary change of weaning and of glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones in the regulation of intestinal development. PMID:575507

  8. Protective effect of hesperidin against lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in adult albino rats: histological, immunohistochemical and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Bayomy, Naglaa A; Elshafhey, Saad H; ElBakary, Reda H; Abdelaziz, Eman Z

    2014-10-01

    Hesperidin is a naturally common flavonoid. It is an abundant and cheap by-product of citrus cultivation. It is reported to have antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. This work was performed to investigate the possible protective role of hesperidin in ameliorating the effect of experimentally induced intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R) on lung tissue, histologically, immunohistochemically and biochemically. Thirty male Wistar adult albino rats were randomized into three groups named: group I (control group); group II (I/R); and group III (I/R with hesperidin). Intestinal I/R was induced by occluding the superior mesenteric artery for 60 min, followed by 120 min of reperfusion period. Animals were given hesperidin orally 1h before the onset of ischemia. At the end of the reperfusion period the lung tissues were extracted for histopathological examination and immunohistochemical detection of the distribution of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Pulmonary edema was evaluated by lung tissue wet/dry weight ratios. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, a biomarker of oxidative damage), myeloperoxidase (MPO, an index of the degree of neutrophil accumulation) and glutathione (GSH, a biomarker of protective oxidative injury) were also determined in all dissected tissues. Pretreatment with hesperidin (in group III) alleviated lung morphological changes noticed in I/R group and the levels of MDA and MPO were significantly decreased whereas those of GSH were significantly increased. Immunohistochemical study revealed a significant decrease in the iNOS. Hesperidin also significantly alleviated the formation of pulmonary edema as evidenced by the decreased organ wet/dry weight ratios. Hesperidin exerts a protective effect against lung damage induced by intestinal I/R injury in rats by reducing oxidative stress.

  9. The influence of whole grain products and red meat on intestinal microbiota composition in normal weight adults: a randomized crossover intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Jana; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Reichardt, Nicole; Tett, Adrian; Narbad, Arjan; Blaut, Michael; Boeing, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota is related to obesity and serum lipid levels, both risk factors for chronic diseases constituting a challenge for public health. We investigated how a diet rich in whole grain (WG) products and red meat (RM) influences microbiota. During a 10-week crossover intervention study, 20 healthy adults consumed two isocaloric diets, one rich in WG products and one high in RM. Repeatedly data on microbiota were assessed by 16S rRNA based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A blood sample and anthropometric data were collected. Mixed models and logistic regression were used to investigate effects. Microbiota showed interindividual variability. However, dietary interventions modified microbiota appearance: 8 bands changed in at least 4 participants during the interventions. One of the bands appearing after WG and one increasing after RM remained significant in regression models and were identified as Collinsella aerofaciens and Clostridium sp. The WG intervention lowered obesity parameters, while the RM diet increased serum levels of uric acid and creatinine. The study showed that diet is a component of major relevance regarding its influence on intestinal microbiota and that WG has an important role for health. The results could guide investigations of diet and microbiota in observational prospective cohort studies. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01449383.

  10. The Influence of Whole Grain Products and Red Meat on Intestinal Microbiota Composition in Normal Weight Adults: A Randomized Crossover Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Jana; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Reichardt, Nicole; Tett, Adrian; Narbad, Arjan; Blaut, Michael; Boeing, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota is related to obesity and serum lipid levels, both risk factors for chronic diseases constituting a challenge for public health. We investigated how a diet rich in whole grain (WG) products and red meat (RM) influences microbiota. During a 10-week crossover intervention study, 20 healthy adults consumed two isocaloric diets, one rich in WG products and one high in RM. Repeatedly data on microbiota were assessed by 16S rRNA based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A blood sample and anthropometric data were collected. Mixed models and logistic regression were used to investigate effects. Microbiota showed interindividual variability. However, dietary interventions modified microbiota appearance: 8 bands changed in at least 4 participants during the interventions. One of the bands appearing after WG and one increasing after RM remained significant in regression models and were identified as Collinsella aerofaciens and Clostridium sp. The WG intervention lowered obesity parameters, while the RM diet increased serum levels of uric acid and creatinine. The study showed that diet is a component of major relevance regarding its influence on intestinal microbiota and that WG has an important role for health. The results could guide investigations of diet and microbiota in observational prospective cohort studies. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01449383 PMID:25299601

  11. Microvascular anatomy of the large intestine in adult Xenopus laevis: scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts and correlative light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lametschwandtner, A; Bartel, H; Lametschwandtner, U; Tholo, S; Minnich, B

    2010-01-01

    The microvascular anatomy of the large intestine of the adult South African Clawed Toad, Xenopus laevis (Daudin), was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of vascular corrosion casts (VCCs) and correlative light microscopy. Observations showed the large intestine to be supplied by the haemorrhoidal artery and the posterior mesenteric artery and drain via the posterior haemorrhoidal vein into either the left or right posterior abdominal vein. Both arteries and veins showed a bipinnate supply/draining pattern with branches running circumferentially. Vessels embraced the gut wall while arteries and veins in most cases alternated along the gut length. Many short terminal arterioles arose from the circumferential arteries at almost acute angles and capillarized after a short distance. Capillary lengths were short and continued into numerous postcapillary venules which merged either in a leaf vein-like formation or in a rosette-like formation with up to four draining sites per supplying arteriole. The microvasculature was found to be well adapted 1) to sustain blood flow under different amounts of feces in the gut and 2) to provide optimal conditions for the resorption of water and salts from the gut lumen into the blood vascular system by the high number of venules and their conspiciouos rosette-like and leaf vein-like patterns.

  12. The effect of soymilk intake on the fecal microbiota, particularly Bifidobacterium species, and intestinal environment of healthy adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Tomohiko; Ohashi, Yuji; Shin, Ryoichi; Narai-Kanayama, Asako; Nakagaki, Takenori

    2017-01-01

    The influence of soymilk on the fecal microbiota, particularly Bifidobacterium species, and metabolic activities were investigated in eight healthy adult humans. During the soymilk intake period, the number of bifidobacteria in feces was significantly higher (p<0.05) on day 14 of the soymilk intake period than before the intake period, whereas that of Enterobacteriaceae was significantly lower (p<0.05) on days 7 and 14 of the soymilk intake period than before the intake period. In an investigation of Bifidobacterium at the species or group level, the numbers of all species and groups studied slightly increased during the soymilk intake period. These results show that the intake of soymilk may contribute to improving the intestinal environment.

  13. The effect of soymilk intake on the fecal microbiota, particularly Bifidobacterium species, and intestinal environment of healthy adults: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    FUJISAWA, Tomohiko; OHASHI, Yuji; SHIN, Ryoichi; NARAI-KANAYAMA, Asako; NAKAGAKI, Takenori

    2016-01-01

    The influence of soymilk on the fecal microbiota, particularly Bifidobacterium species, and metabolic activities were investigated in eight healthy adult humans. During the soymilk intake period, the number of bifidobacteria in feces was significantly higher (p<0.05) on day 14 of the soymilk intake period than before the intake period, whereas that of Enterobacteriaceae was significantly lower (p<0.05) on days 7 and 14 of the soymilk intake period than before the intake period. In an investigation of Bifidobacterium at the species or group level, the numbers of all species and groups studied slightly increased during the soymilk intake period. These results show that the intake of soymilk may contribute to improving the intestinal environment. PMID:28243549

  14. Loss of sigma factor RpoN increases intestinal colonization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in an adult mouse model.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, W Brian; Richards, Gary P; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2014-02-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagellar synthesis, as well as a wide range of nonflagellar genes. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in rpoN (VP2670) in V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633, a clinical serogroup O3:K6 isolate, and examined the effects in vivo using a streptomycin-treated mouse model of colonization. We confirmed that deletion of rpoN rendered V. parahaemolyticus nonmotile, and it caused reduced biofilm formation and an apparent defect in glutamine synthetase production. In in vivo competition assays between the rpoN mutant and a wild-type RIMD2210633 strain marked with the β-galactosidase gene lacZ (WBWlacZ), the mutant colonized significantly more proficiently. Intestinal persistence competition assays also demonstrated that the rpoN mutant had enhanced fitness and outcompeted WBWlacZ. Mutants defective in the polar flagellum biosynthesis FliAP sigma factor also outcompeted WBWlacZ but not to the same level as the rpoN mutant, which suggested that lack of motility is not the sole cause of the fitness effect. In an in vitro growth competition assay in mouse intestinal mucus, the rpoN mutant also outcompeted the wild type and exhibited faster doubling times when grown in mucus and on individual components of mucus. Genes in the pathways for the catabolism of mucus sugars also had significantly higher expression levels in a ΔrpoN mutant than in the wild type. These data suggest that in V. parahaemolyticus, RpoN plays an important role in carbon utilization regulation, which may significantly affect host colonization.

  15. Signature microRNAs in human cornea limbal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yufei; Wong, Hoi Kin; Jhanji, Vishal; Chen, Jian Huan; Young, Alvin Lerrmann; Zhang, Mingzhi; Choy, Kwong Wai; Mehta, Jodhbir Singh; Pang, Chi Pui; Yam, Gary Hin-Fai

    2015-05-01

    This study was aimed to identify the signature microRNAs, which regulate the biological processes of corneal epithelial progenitor cell (CEPC) homeostasis and regulation through characterizing the differential expression profile of microRNAs in human limbal epithelium containing adult CEPC versus central corneal epithelium without CEPC. MicroRNA microarray had identified 37 microRNAs enriched in human corneal epithelium. Among them, nine were significantly upregulated in limbal epithelium and one in central corneal epithelium after validation by TaqMan® real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition to our previous finding of miR-143 and 145, the expression of miR-10b, 126, and 155 was localized in limbal epithelium (LE) (predominantly basal layers) by using locked nucleic acid-based in situ hybridization. Potential target genes were predicted by TargetScan Human v6.0 and compared to the reported human cornea epithelial gene profile GSE5543. Analyzed by web-based Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway and DAVID Functional Annotation Bioinformatics Resources v6.7, the downregulated genes were involved in pathways of immune response and cellular protection, apoptosis, and cell movement whereas upregulated genes with cell survival, cell-matrix interaction, and cell-cell adhesion. We found a constant occurrence of miR-143, 145, and 155 in all KEGG pathways regulating limbal epithelial events. By Ingenuity Systems (IPA®) analysis, these microRNAs could cooperatively regulate cell growth and apoptosis via tumor necrosis factor activation and MYC repression. Our findings thus suggest a unique microRNA signature existing in human limbal epithelium and participating in CEPC homeostasis.

  16. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  17. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  18. Intestinal adaptation following resection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.

  19. Dietary protein concentration affects intestinal microbiota of adult cats: a study using DGGE and qPCR to evaluate differences in microbial populations in the feline gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lubbs, D C; Vester, B M; Fastinger, N D; Swanson, K S

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify qualitative and quantitative differences in microbial populations of adult cats fed diets containing different protein concentrations. Following a 4 week baseline period, eight healthy adult domestic short-hair queens (>1-year-old) were randomly allotted to a moderate-protein (MP; n = 4) or high-protein (HP; n = 4) diet for 8 weeks. Fresh faecal samples were collected after baseline and 8 weeks on treatment and stored at -80 degrees C. Following DNA extraction, samples were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to distinguish qualitative changes between diets. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure E. coli, Bifidobacterium, Clostridium perfringens, and Lactobacillus populations. Compared to baseline, cats fed MP had a bacterial similarity index of 66.7% as opposed to 40.6% similarity for those fed HP, exhibiting marked changes in intestinal bacteria of cats fed HP. Bifidobacterium populations were greater (p < 0.05) in cats fed MP versus HP (9.44 vs. 5.63 CFU/g). Clostridium perfringens populations were greater (p < 0.05) in cats fed HP than MP (12.39 vs. 10.83 CFU/g). In this experiment, a high-protein diet resulted in a dramatic shift in microbial populations. Decreased Bifidobacterium population in cats fed HP may justify prebiotic supplementation for such diets.

  20. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ...

  1. Inducible gene modification in the gastric epithelium of Tff1-CreERT2, Tff2-rtTA, Tff3-luc mice.

    PubMed

    Thiem, Stefan; Eissmann, Moritz F; Stuart, Emma; Elzer, Joachim; Jonas, Anna; Buchert, Michael; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Temporal and spatial regulation of genes mediated by tissue-specific promoters and conditional gene expression systems provide a powerful tool to study gene function in health, disease, and during development. Although transgenic mice expressing the Cre recombinase in the gastric epithelium have been reported, there is a lack of models that allow inducible and reversible gene modification in the stomach. Here, we exploited the gastrointestinal epithelium-specific expression pattern of the three trefoil factor (Tff) genes and bacterial artificial chromosome transgenesis to generate a novel mouse strain that expresses the CreERT2 recombinase and the reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA). The Tg(Tff1-CreERT2;Tff2-rtTA;Tff3-Luc) strain confers tamoxifen-inducible irreversible somatic recombination and allows simultaneous doxycycline-dependent reversible gene activation in the gastric epithelium of developing and adult mice. This strain also confers luciferase activity to the intestinal epithelium to enable in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Using fluorescent reporters as conditional alleles, we show Tff1-CreERT2 and Tff2-rtTA transgene activity in a partially overlapping subset of long-term regenerating gastric stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, the Tg(Tff1-CreERT2;Tff2-rtTA;Tff3-Luc) strain can confer intermittent transgene expression to gastric epithelial cells that have undergone previous gene modification, and may be suitable to genetically model therapeutic intervention during development, tumorigenesis, and other genetically tractable diseases. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:626-635, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Blutt, Sarah E; de Jonge, Hugo R; Estes, Mary K; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-02-19

    Identification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate "indefinite" ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed "mini-intestines." Primary cultures developed from isolated intestinal crypts or stem cells (termed enteroids/colonoids) and from inducible pluripotent stem cells (termed intestinal organoids) are being applied to study human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology with great expectations for translational applications, including regenerative medicine. Here we discuss the physiologic properties of these cultures, their current use in understanding diarrhea-causing host-pathogen interactions, and potential future applications.

  3. Intestinal bile acid physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) have a long established role in fat digestion in the intestine by acting as tensioactives, due to their amphipathic characteristics. BAs are reabsorbed very efficiently by the intestinal epithelium and recycled back to the liver via transport mechanisms that have been largely elucidated. The transport and synthesis of BAs are tightly regulated in part by specific plasma membrane receptors and nuclear receptors. In addition to their primary effect, BAs have been claimed to play a role in gastrointestinal cancer, intestinal inflammation and intestinal ionic transport. BAs are not equivalent in any of these biological activities, and structural requirements have been generally identified. In particular, some BAs may be useful for cancer chemoprevention and perhaps in inflammatory bowel disease, although further research is necessary in this field. This review covers the most recent developments in these aspects of BA intestinal biology. PMID:18837078

  4. Loss of intestinal core 1–derived O-glycans causes spontaneous colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jianxin; Wei, Bo; Wen, Tao; Johansson, Malin E.V.; Liu, Xiaowei; Bradford, Emily; Thomsson, Kristina A.; McGee, Samuel; Mansour, Lilah; Tong, Maomeng; McDaniel, J. Michael; Sferra, Thomas J.; Turner, Jerrold R.; Chen, Hong; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Braun, Jonathan; Xia, Lijun

    2011-01-01

    Mucin-type O-linked oligosaccharides (O-glycans) are primary components of the intestinal mucins that form the mucus gel layer overlying the gut epithelium. Impaired expression of intestinal O-glycans has been observed in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), but its role in the etiology of this disease is unknown. Here, we report that mice with intestinal epithelial cell–specific deficiency of core 1–derived O-glycans, the predominant form of O-glycans, developed spontaneous colitis that resembled human UC, including massive myeloid infiltrates and crypt abscesses. The colitis manifested in these mice was also characterized by TNF-producing myeloid infiltrates in colon mucosa in the absence of lymphocytes, supporting an essential role for myeloid cells in colitis initiation. Furthermore, induced deletion of intestinal core 1–derived O-glycans caused spontaneous colitis in adult mice. These data indicate a causal role for the loss of core 1–derived O-glycans in colitis. Finally, we detected a biosynthetic intermediate typically exposed in the absence of core 1 O-glycan, Tn antigen, in the colon epithelium of a subset of UC patients. Somatic mutations in the X-linked gene that encodes core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase–specific chaperone 1 (C1GALT1C1, also known as Cosmc), which is essential for core 1 O-glycosylation, were found in Tn-positive epithelia. These data suggest what we believe to be a new molecular mechanism for the pathogenesis of UC. PMID:21383503

  5. Sox9 plays multiple roles in the lung epithelium during branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rockich, Briana E; Hrycaj, Steven M; Shih, Hung Ping; Nagy, Melinda S; Ferguson, Michael A H; Kopp, Janel L; Sander, Maike; Wellik, Deneen M; Spence, Jason R

    2013-11-19

    Lung branching morphogenesis is a highly orchestrated process that gives rise to the complex network of gas-exchanging units in the adult lung. Intricate regulation of signaling pathways, transcription factors, and epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk are critical to ensuring branching morphogenesis occurs properly. Here, we describe a role for the transcription factor Sox9 during lung branching morphogenesis. Sox9 is expressed at the distal tips of the branching epithelium in a highly dynamic manner as branching occurs and is down-regulated starting at embryonic day 16.5, concurrent with the onset of terminal differentiation of type 1 and type 2 alveolar cells. Using epithelial-specific genetic loss- and gain-of-function approaches, our results demonstrate that Sox9 controls multiple aspects of lung branching. Fine regulation of Sox9 levels is required to balance proliferation and differentiation of epithelial tip progenitor cells, and loss of Sox9 leads to direct and indirect cellular defects including extracellular matrix defects, cytoskeletal disorganization, and aberrant epithelial movement. Our evidence shows that unlike other endoderm-derived epithelial tissues, such as the intestine, Wnt/β-catenin signaling does not regulate Sox9 expression in the lung. We conclude that Sox9 collectively promotes proper branching morphogenesis by controlling the balance between proliferation and differentiation and regulating the extracellular matrix.

  6. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies networks involved in intestinal stem cell regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiankun; Han, Lili; Singh, Shree Ram; Liu, Hanhan; Neumüller, Ralph A; Yan, Dong; Hu, Yanhui; Liu, Ying; Liu, Wei; Lin, Xinhua; Hou, Steven X

    2015-02-24

    The intestinal epithelium is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in adult animals and maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in both Drosophila and mammals. To comprehensively identify genes and pathways that regulate ISC fates, we performed a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen in adult Drosophila intestine and identified 405 genes that regulate ISC maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation. By integrating these genes into publicly available interaction databases, we further developed functional networks that regulate ISC self-renewal, ISC proliferation, ISC maintenance of diploid status, ISC survival, ISC-to-enterocyte (EC) lineage differentiation, and ISC-to-enteroendocrine (EE) lineage differentiation. By comparing regulators among ISCs, female germline stem cells, and neural stem cells, we found that factors related to basic stem cell cellular processes are commonly required in all stem cells, and stem-cell-specific, niche-related signals are required only in the unique stem cell type. Our findings provide valuable insights into stem cell maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation.

  7. Development of lntraepithelial Cells in the Porcine Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Contreras, G.; Bailey, M.; González-Pozos, S.; Stokes, C. R.; Ortega, M. G.; Mondragón-Flores, R.

    2001-01-01

    The number, phenotype, localisation and development of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) from duodenum (Du) and ileum (Il) were studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and light and electron microscopy in unweaned (0–7 weeks old) and six months-old pigs. Developmental changes at birth showed that 38% of the total lymphocytes in the villi were IEL, mainly of the CD2+CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) phenotype. That proportion rose to over 50% at week 5 after birth, resembling adult proportion, although still with fewer cells than in adult pigs. CD4+ cells appeared relatively early in life although they were confined to the lamina propria (LP) and CD8+ cells were found only in low numbers. In the villi of adult animals, almost half of the total number of lymphocytes were IEL (49% Du, 52% Il). Over half of these IEL (52% Du, 53% Il) showed the CD2+CD4-CD8+ phenotype and were localized at the epithelium's basement membrane. Numerous (43% Du, 42% Il) DN IEL were found grouped at the enterocyte nucleus level and relatively few (5% in Du and Il) granular IEL were found apically in the epithelium. These proportions were homogeneously maintained along the villi's tip, middle and bottom, suggesting that the IEL may have their origin in the LP. Therefore, the IEL compartment in the porcine intestine develops slowly with age and is actually composed by a heterogeneous population of cells (null, DN and CD8+). These results may explain the increased susceptibility of young animals to disease during the lactation period and should be taken into account when functional studies are carried out with IEL. The quantitative results of this paper established a model for studies on the effect of age, diet, normal flora, infection and oral immunization on the IEL of the gut. PMID:11589310

  8. Quantum Dot Distribution in the Olfactory Epithelium After Nasal Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzotto, D.; De Marchis, S.

    2010-10-01

    Nanoparticles are used in a wide range of human applications from industrial to bio-medical fields. However, the unique characteristics of nanoparticles, such as the small size, large surface area per mass and high reactivity raises great concern on the adverse effects of these particles on ecological systems and human health. There are several pioneer studies reporting translocation of inhaled particulates to the brain through a potential neuronal uptake mediated by the olfactory nerve (1, 2, 3). However, no direct evidences have been presented up to now on the pathway followed by the nanoparticles from the nose to the brain. In addition to a neuronal pathway, nanoparticles could gain access to the central nervous system through extracellular pathways (perineuronal, perivascular and cerebrospinal fluid paths). In the present study we investigate the localization of intranasally delivered fluorescent nanoparticles in the olfactory epithelium. To this purpose we used quantum dots (QDs), a model of innovative fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals commonly used in cell and animal biology (4). Intranasal treatments with QDs were performed acutely on adult CD1 mice. The olfactory epithelium was collected and analysed by confocal microscopy at different survival time after treatment. Data obtained indicate that the neuronal components of the olfactory epithelium are not preferentially involved in QDs uptake, thus suggesting nanoparticles can cross the olfactory epithelium through extracellular pathways.

  9. Structural and mechanical architecture of the intestinal villi and crypts in the rat intestine: integrative reevaluation from ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Hosoyamada, Yasue; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2005-08-01

    The ultrastructure of the rat intestinal interstitium was analyzed from the viewpoint of mechanical dynamics to stabilize the intestinal villi, crypts and mucosal folds. In the rat, the small intestine lacks circular folds, but the large intestine possesses spiral folds. The intestinal villi, the largest in the duodenum, decreased in size in the jejunum and ileum successively, and were absent in the large intestine. The intestinal interstitium consisted of lamina propria mucosae (LPM) and tela submucosa (TSM) separated by muscularis mucosae (MM), the LPM was subdivided into an upper part within the villi and a lower part among the crypts in the small intestine. The light microscopic density of interstitium in the intestinal wall was lowest in the upper LPM, moderately dense in the lower LPM and highest in the TSM, and that among the intestinal region was highest in the duodenum and decreased successively in the jejunum and ileum. In the large intestine, the TSM bulged to form spiral folds with very low density. The intestinal epithelium in the villi possessed wide intercellular spaces and that in the crypts had closed intercellular spaces. At electron microscopic level, the upper and lower LPM contained subepithelial supportive meshwork that consisted of collagen fibrils and myofibroblast processes. The lower LPM and TSM contained conspicuous bundles of collagen fibrils and, in addition, TSM contained minor populations of scattered collagen fibrils near the smooth muscle layer (SML). The diameter of collagen fibrils was the largest in the bundles of TSM, and decreased from the duodenum through the jejunum and ileum to the large intestine. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that the intestinal villi are mechanically stabilized by the balance between the expansive interstitial pressure and inward pull by the subepithelial supportive meshwork. This hypothesis explains the hitherto neglected fact that the intestinal epithelium possesses wide

  10. Investigations of peritoneal and intestinal infections of adult hookworms (Uncinaria spp.) in northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) and California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) pups on San Miguel Island, California (2003).

    PubMed

    Lyons, Eugene T; Delong, R L; Nadler, S A; Laake, J L; Orr, A J; Delong, B L; Pagan, C

    2011-09-01

    The peritoneal cavity (PNC) and intestine of northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) pups and California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) pups that died in late July and early August, 2003, on San Miguel Island, California, were examined for hookworms. Prevalence and morphometric studies were done with the hookworms in addition to molecular characterization. Based on this and previous molecular studies, hookworms from fur seals are designated as Uncinaria lucasi and the species from sea lions as Uncinaria species A. Adult hookworms were found in the PNC of 35 of 57 (61.4%) fur seal pups and of 13 of 104 (12.5%) sea lion pups. The number of hookworms located in the PNC ranged from 1 to 33 (median = 3) for the infected fur seal pups and 1 to 16 (median = 2) for the infected sea lion pups. In addition to the PNC, intestines of 43 fur seal and 32 sea lion pups were examined. All of these pups were positive for adult hookworms. The worms were counted from all but one of the sea lion pups. Numbers of these parasites in the intestine varied from 3 to 2,344 (median = 931) for the fur seal pups and 39 to 2,766 (median = 643) for the sea lion pups. Sea lion pups with peritoneal infections had higher intensity infections in the intestines than did pups without peritoneal infections, lending some support for the hypothesis that peritoneal infections result from high-intensity infections of adult worms. There was no difference in intestinal infection intensities between fur seal pups with and without peritoneal infections. Female adult hookworms in the intestines of both host species were significantly larger than males, and sea lion hookworms were larger than those in fur seals. Worms in the intestine also were larger than worms found in the PNC. Gene sequencing and (RFLP) analysis of (PCR) amplified (ITS) ribosomal DNA were used to diagnose the species of 172 hookworms recovered from the PNC and intestine of 18 C. ursinus and seven Z. californianus hosts

  11. Current understanding concerning intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shuang; Chang, Peng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the intestinal epithelium is a tissue that contains two distinct pools of stem cells: active intestinal stem cells and reserve intestinal stem cells. The former are located in the crypt basement membrane and are responsible for maintaining epithelial homeostasis under intact conditions, whereas the latter exhibit the capacity to facilitate epithelial regeneration after injury. These two pools of cells can convert into each other, maintaining their quantitative balance. In terms of the active intestinal stem cells, their development into functional epithelium is precisely controlled by the following signaling pathways: Wnt/β-catenin, Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk/MAPK, Notch and BMP/Smad. However, mutations in some of the key regulator genes associated with these signaling pathways, such as APC, Kras and Smad4, are also highly associated with gut malformations. At this point, clarifying the biological characteristics of intestinal stem cells will increase the feasibility of preventing or treating some intestinal diseases, such as colorectal cancer. Moreover, as preclinical data demonstrate the therapeutic effects of colon stem cells on murine models of experimental colitis, the prospects of stem cell-based regenerative treatments for ulcerous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract will be improved all the same. PMID:27610020

  12. Intestinal permeability defects: is it time to treat?

    PubMed

    Odenwald, Matthew A; Turner, Jerrold R

    2013-09-01

    An essential role of the intestinal epithelium is to separate luminal contents from the interstitium, a function primarily determined by the integrity of the epithelium and the tight junction that seals the paracellular space. Intestinal tight junctions are selectively permeable, and intestinal permeability can be increased physiologically in response to luminal nutrients or pathologically by mucosal immune cells and cytokines, the enteric nervous system, and pathogens. Compromised intestinal barrier function is associated with an array of clinical conditions, both intestinal and systemic. Although most available data are correlative, some studies support a model where cycles of increased intestinal permeability, intestinal immune activation, and subsequent immune-mediated barrier loss contribute to disease progression. This model is applicable to intestinal and systemic diseases. However, it has not been proven, and both mechanistic and therapeutic studies are ongoing. Nevertheless, the correlation between increased intestinal permeability and disease has caught the attention of the public, leading to a rise in popularity of the diagnosis of "leaky gut syndrome," which encompasses a range of systemic disorders. Proponents claim that barrier restoration will cure underlying disease, but this has not been demonstrated in clinical trials. Moreover, human and mouse studies show that intestinal barrier loss alone is insufficient to initiate disease. It is therefore uncertain whether increased permeability in these patients is a cause or effect of the underlying disorder. Although drug targets that may mediate barrier restoration have been proposed, none have been proven effective. As such, current treatments for barrier dysfunction should target the underlying disease.

  13. Development of intestinal transport function in mammals.

    PubMed

    Pácha, J

    2000-10-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the last decade in the understanding of mechanisms responsible for the ontogenetic changes of mammalian intestine. This review presents the current knowledge about the development of intestinal transport function in the context of intestinal mucosa ontogeny. The review predominantly focuses on signals that trigger and/or modulate the developmental changes of intestinal transport. After an overview of the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal mucosa, data about the bidirectional traffic (absorption and secretion) across the developing intestinal epithelium are presented. The largest part of the review is devoted to the description of developmental patterns concerning the absorption of nutrients, ions, water, vitamins, trace elements, and milk-borne biologically active substances. Furthermore, the review examines the development of intestinal secretion that has a variety of functions including maintenance of the fluidity of the intestinal content, lubrication of mucosal surface, and mucosal protection. The age-dependent shifts of absorption and secretion are the subject of integrated regulatory mechanisms, and hence, the input of hormonal, nervous, immune, and dietary signals is reviewed. Finally, the utilization of energy for transport processes in the developing intestine is highlighted, and the interactions between various sources of energy are discussed. The review ends with suggestions concerning possible directions of future research.

  14. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Alice; Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute to body weight regulation. Adult mice were fed either a normal fat (NF, 12% kJ content as fat) or a high-fat (HF, 43% kJ content as fat) diet. In the latter case, half of the animals received daily oral supplementation of CLA. Expression and content of stomach proteins and specific bacterial populations from caecum were analysed. CLA supplementation was associated with an increase in stomach protein expression, and exerted a prebiotic action on both Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and Akkermansia muciniphila. However, CLA supplementation was not able to override the negative effects of HF diet on Bifidobacterium spp., which was decreased in both HF and HF+CLA groups. Our data show that CLA are able to modulate stomach protein expression and exert a prebiotic effect on specific gut bacterial species.

  15. Pyrosequencing Analysis Reveals Changes in Intestinal Microbiota of Healthy Adults Who Received a Daily Dose of Immunomodulatory Probiotic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; García, Federico; Gómez-Llorente, Carolina; Sáez-Lara, María José; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035). The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota. PMID:26016655

  16. Pyrosequencing analysis reveals changes in intestinal microbiota of healthy adults who received a daily dose of immunomodulatory probiotic strains.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; García, Federico; Gómez-Llorente, Carolina; Sáez-Lara, María José; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Ángel

    2015-05-26

    The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035). The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota.

  17. Cestodiasis with intestinal diverticulosis in a lesser flamingo (Phoeniconaias minor).

    PubMed

    Poynton, S L; Mukherjee, G; Strandberg, J D

    2000-03-01

    An adult female lesser flamingo (Phoeniconaias minor), caught in the African Rift Valley in 1991 and subsequently housed at the Baltimore Zoo, died of severe visceral gout in 1996. Necropsy revealed a white, moderately firm, nodular lesion, 1 cm in diameter, in the serosal wall of the small intestine. Although it was initially thought to be a tumor or focal granuloma, histologic examination revealed multiple cestodes deeply embedded at the base of the crypts between the intestinal villi, with their massive scolices (up to 3.4 mm in diameter) distending these spaces into multiple diverticulae. The mucosal epithelium surrounding the scolices was severely attenuated. Around the diverticulae, in the submucosa and muscularis, was a mild to moderate lymphocytic reaction and mild fibrosis. The proximity of multiple scolices and extensive invasion of host tissue suggested that the infection occupied a preexisting lesion. The cestodes were cyclophyllids but were distinct from any species previously reported from flamingos. Helminths should be included in differential diagnoses for gastrointestinal nodules in flamingos.

  18. Cysteine protease activity of feline Tritrichomonas foetus promotes adhesion-dependent cytotoxicity to intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, M K; Stauffer, S H; Brand, M D; Gookin, J L

    2014-07-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis.

  19. Histochemical analyses of digestive enzymes in the intestine of adult large-scaled gurnard (lepidotrigla cavillone, lacepède, 1801).

    PubMed

    Kozarić, Z; Petrinec, Z; Kužir, S; Gjurčević, E; Baždarić, B

    2011-08-01

    Localization and activity levels of the following digestive enzymes in the intestine of free-living large-scaled gurnard were determined: non-specific esterase, alkaline and acid phosphatase as well as aminopeptidase. Enzymatic activity of the four enzymes was confirmed in all intestine parts but with different distribution through the enterocytes and varying in diverse intensity according to intestine part. This research is part of a broader research project on the biology of economically important fish from the Adriatic Sea. Our study reveals that in the large-scaled gurnard, the middle and posterior intestinal segments play the major role in digestion and absorption of proteins, whereas all parts of the intestine participate in lipid absorption and intracellular digestion. The high protein and lipid content in the diet of the large-scaled gurnard is most likely responsible for high activities of esterase, alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase, as they are involved in digestion and absorption of proteins and lipids.

  20. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  1. Analysis of the morphology and distribution of argentaffin, argyrophil and insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells in the small intestine of the adult opossum Didelphis aurita (Wied-Neuwied, 1826).

    PubMed

    Basile, D R S; Novaes, R D; Marques, D C S; Fialho, M C Q; Neves, C A; Fonseca, C C

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify the argyrophil, argentaffin and insulin-immunoreactive cells (IIC) in the small intestine of the opossum Didelphis aurita. Seven adult male specimens of opossums were investigated. The animals were captured, and their blood insulin levels were determined. After euthanasia, fragments of the small intestine were processed for light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and submitted to histochemistry and immunohistochemistry for identification of argyrophil and argentaffin endocrine cells, and IIC. Argyrophil and argentaffin cells were identified in the intestinal villi and Liberkühn crypts, whereas IIC were present exclusively in the crypts. Ultrastructure of the IIC revealed cytoplasmic granules of different sizes and electron densities. The numbers of IIC per mm(2) in the duodenum and jejunum were higher than in the ileum (p<0.05). The animals had low levels of blood insulin (2.8 ± 0.78 μIU/ml). There was no correlation between insulin levels and the number of IIC in the small intestine. The IIC presented secretory granules, elongated and variable morphology. It is believed that insulin secretion by the IIC may influence the proliferation of cells in the Liberkühn crypts, and local glucose homeostasis, primarily in animals with low serum insulin levels, such as the opossum.

  2. Influence of high-calorie (cafeteria) diets on the population of Paneth cells in the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Adriana; Castillo-Robles, Guadalupe; González-Hernández, Margarita; Villanueva, Iván

    2005-01-01

    A high-calorie (cafeteria) diet is known to cause changes in the intestinal morphology and functioning that seem to be related to calorie overfeeding. Among the cell lineages found in the small intestine epithelium, the Paneth cell (PC) population is known to be influenced by factors related mainly to the intestinal microbiota. The role of PCs in the intestinal cell concert remains unclear, because experimental evidence suggests PC involvement in local processes other than protection against pathogens. Participation of PC in digestive mechanisms has been proposed on this basis. We have analyzed the effect of high-carbohydrate (HC) and high-fat (HF) cafeteria diets on the PC population in the small intestine of the adult rat. For 8 weeks, both HC and HF diets caused a gain in body weight, but whereas the HC-fed rats showed reduced counts of intestinal crypts per 5-mum section, the HF-fed group showed the opposite. In control rats, the number of crypts per section showed a slight tendency to decrease along the duodenum - ileum axis, whereas the number of PCs per crypt was increased towards the ileum. As a result, the number of PCs per section (calculated from these data) remained constant along the three segments of the intestine. The hypercaloric diets did not modify the general tendencies seen in the crypt and PC counts, but reduced the number of PCs per section in the duodenum by 50%. HC-fed, but not HF-fed, rats showed a similar reduction in jejunum also. These changes do not correlate particularly with any of the predictable effects of diet composition, so that a multifactorial control of PC density is proposed.

  3. Biochemical investigation and gene expression analysis of the immunostimulatory functions of an edible Salacia extract in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Kamei, Asuka; Kakinuma, Chihaya; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Roots and bark from plants belonging to genus Salacia of the family Hippocrateaceae (Salacia reticulata, Salacia oblonga, etc.) have been used for traditional Ayurvedic medicine, particularly for the treatment of diabetes. In our study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles in the small intestinal epithelium of rats that were given a Salacia plant extract to gain insight into its effects on the small intestine. In detail, DNA microarray analysis was performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles in the rat ileal epithelium. The intestinal bacterial flora was also studied using T-RFLP (Nagashima method) in these rats. Expressions of many immune-related genes, especially Th1-related genes associated with cell-mediated immunity, were found to increase in the small intestinal epithelium and the intestinal bacterial flora became similar to those in the case with Salacia plant extract administration. Our study thus revealed that Salacia plant extract exerts bioregulatory functions by boosting intestinal immunity.

  4. Luminal Microbes Promote Monocyte–Stem Cell Interactions Across a Healthy Colonic Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Skoczek, Dagmara A.; Walczysko, Petr; Horn, Nikki; Parris, Alyson; Clare, Simon; Williams, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms a vital barrier between luminal microbes and the underlying mucosal immune system. Epithelial barrier function is maintained by continuous renewal of the epithelium and is pivotal for gut homeostasis. Breaching of the barrier causes mobilization of immune cells to promote epithelial restitution. However, it is not known whether microbes at the luminal surface of a healthy epithelial barrier influence immune cell mobilization to modulate tissue homeostasis. Using a mouse colonic mucosal explant model, we demonstrate that close proximity of luminal microbes to a healthy, intact epithelium results in rapid mucus secretion and movement of Ly6C+7/4+ monocytes closer to epithelial stem cells. These early events are driven by the epithelial MyD88-signaling pathway and result in increased crypt cell proliferation and intestinal stem cell number. Over time, stem cell number and monocyte–crypt stem cell juxtapositioning return to homeostatic levels observed in vivo. We also demonstrate that reduced numbers of tissue Ly6C+ monocytes can suppress Lgr5EGFP+ stem cell expression in vivo and abrogate the response to luminal microbes ex vivo. The functional link between monocyte recruitment and increased crypt cell proliferation was further confirmed using a crypt–monocyte coculture model. This work demonstrates that the healthy gut epithelium mediates communication between luminal bacteria and monocytes, and monocytes can modulate crypt stem cell number and promote crypt cell proliferation to help maintain gut homeostasis. PMID:24907348

  5. Ductal barriers in mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Mark B; Hill, Arnold DK; Hopkins, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Tissue barriers play an integral role in the biology and pathobiology of mammary ductal epithelium. In normal breast physiology, tight and adherens junctions undergo dynamic changes in permeability in response to hormonal and other stimuli, while several of their proteins are directly involved in mammary tumorigenesis. This review describes first the structure of mammary ductal epithelial barriers and their role in normal mammary development, examining the cyclical changes in response to puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. It then examines the role of adherens and tight junctions and the participation of their constituent proteins in mammary tumorigenic functions such as migration, invasion and metastasis. Finally, it discusses the potential of these adhesion proteins as both prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:24665412

  6. Age, caste, and behavior determine the replicative activity of intestinal stem cells in honeybees (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Ward, Kristen N; Coleman, Jennifer L; Clinnin, Kaitlin; Fahrbach, Susan; Rueppell, Olav

    2008-06-01

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) display a pronounced natural aging plasticity. The differences in aging rates between the alternative phenotypes and behavioral classes could reflect differences in protection against damage or in the ability to repair vulnerable tissues. As in other animals, including humans, the gut is continually exposed to environmental insults and harbors a large population of replicating stem cells that maintain the intestinal epithelium. Through studies of the major internal organs using incorporation and immunodetection of the mitotic marker bromo-deoxyuridine, the intestine was determined to be the main site of tissue renewal in adult honeybees. Proliferative activity of the intestinal stem cells was compared among queens, workers, and males of different ages. Simultaneous attempts to assess intestinal cell loss via apoptosis yielded inconclusive results. The relationship between intestinal cell proliferation and worker life-history was evaluated in greater depth by studying diutinus winter workers, reproductive workers, and by decoupling worker behavioral status from chronological age in a single-cohort colony. Intestinal cell proliferation was abundant in all groups and showed an age-related decline in workers, queens, and males. At young ages, workers exhibited relatively more intestinal cell proliferation than did queens and queens more than drones, but the caste and sex differences decreased with age. Cell proliferation did not decrease beyond 6 weeks of age in older queens and in diutinus workers. Ovary activation did not correlate with the amount of intestinal stem cell proliferation in workers, although the queenless hive condition was associated with lower overall counts. In the single-cohort colony, nurse bees exhibited more cell proliferation than foragers, regardless of age. The overall results do not support our hypothesis that longer-lived phenotypes exhibit increased somatic repair in the form of higher replicative activity of

  7. New Ways of Thinking about (and Teaching about) Intestinal Epithelial Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Kim E.

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes a presentation made at the Teaching Refresher Course of the American Physiological Society, which was held at the Experimental Biology meeting in 2007. The intestinal epithelium has important ion transport and barrier functions that contribute pivotally to normal physiological functioning of the intestine and other body…

  8. OPTN/SRTR 2015 Annual Data Report: Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2017-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant remains important in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2015, 196 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list, with equal numbers waiting for intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2015, 63.3% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 36.7% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was notably higher for intestine-liver than for intestine transplant candidates (respectively, 19.9 vs. 2.8 deaths per 100 waitlist years in 2014-2015). By age, pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 19.6 per 100 waitlist years, and lowest for children aged younger than 6 years, at 3.6 per 100 waitlist years. Pretransplant mortality by etiology was highest for candidates with non-congenital types of short-gut syndrome. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 70 in 2015. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 71 in 2015. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and non-congenital) was the main cause of disease leading to intestine and to intestine-liver transplant. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  9. Intestinal Capillariasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    bhIll inenais, the tiny nematode causing Intestinal capillariasis In humans, Is a Iunique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been...Capillariaphilippinensis, the tiny nematode causing intestinal capillariasis in humans, is a unique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been shown to...stichocytes surrounding the oesophagus. The posterior half of the nematode is wider than the anterior half and contains the digestive tract and the

  10. Survivin is a guardian of the intestinal stem cell niche and its expression is regulated by TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Martini, Eva; Schneider, Evelyn; Neufert, Clemens; Neurath, Markus F; Becker, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    As an inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family member, Survivin is known for its role during regulation of apoptosis. More recently its function as a cell cycle regulator has become evident. Survivin was shown to play a pivotal role during embryonic development and is highly expressed in regenerative tissue as well as in many cancer types. We examined the function of Survivin during mouse intestinal organogenesis and in gut pathophysiology. We found high expression of Survivin in experimentally induced colon cancer in mice but also in colon tumors of humans. Moreover, Survivin was regulated by TGF-β and was found to be highly expressed during mucosal healing following intestinal inflammation. We identified that expression of Survivin is essential early on in life, as specific deletion of Survivin in Villin expressing cells led to embryonic death around day 12 post coitum. Together with our recent study on the role of Survivin in the gut of adult mice our data demonstrate that Survivin is an essential guardian of embryonic gut development and adult gut homeostasis protecting the epithelium from cell death promoting the proliferation of intestinal stem and progenitor cells.

  11. Iron regulatory proteins control a mucosal block to intestinal iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Galy, Bruno; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Becker, Christiane; Gretz, Norbert; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schümann, Klaus; Hentze, Matthias W

    2013-03-28

    Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated "mucosal block." We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin "mucosal block" and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  12. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells.

  13. Escherichia albertii, a novel human enteropathogen, colonizes rat enterocytes and translocates to extra-intestinal sites

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Denise; Hernandes, Rodrigo T.; Liberatore, Ana Maria A.; Abe, Cecilia M.; de Souza, Rodrigo B.; Romão, Fabiano T.; Sperandio, Vanessa; Koh, Ivan H.

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death of children up to five years old in the developing countries. Among the etiological diarrheal agents are atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC), one of the diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes that affects children and adults, even in developed countries. Currently, genotypic and biochemical approaches have helped to demonstrate that some strains classified as aEPEC are actually E. albertii, a recently recognized human enteropathogen. Studies on particular strains are necessary to explore their virulence potential in order to further understand the underlying mechanisms of E. albertii infections. Here we demonstrated for the first time that infection of fragments of rat intestinal mucosa is a useful tool to study the initial steps of E. albertii colonization. We also observed that an E. albertii strain can translocate from the intestinal lumen to Mesenteric Lymph Nodes and liver in a rat model. Based on our finding of bacterial translocation, we investigated how E. albertii might cross the intestinal epithelium by performing infections of M-like cells in vitro to identify the potential in vivo translocation route. Altogether, our approaches allowed us to draft a general E. albertii infection route from the colonization till the bacterial spreading in vivo. PMID:28178312

  14. Escherichia albertii, a novel human enteropathogen, colonizes rat enterocytes and translocates to extra-intestinal sites.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Denise; Hernandes, Rodrigo T; Liberatore, Ana Maria A; Abe, Cecilia M; Souza, Rodrigo B de; Romão, Fabiano T; Sperandio, Vanessa; Koh, Ivan H; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death of children up to five years old in the developing countries. Among the etiological diarrheal agents are atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC), one of the diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes that affects children and adults, even in developed countries. Currently, genotypic and biochemical approaches have helped to demonstrate that some strains classified as aEPEC are actually E. albertii, a recently recognized human enteropathogen. Studies on particular strains are necessary to explore their virulence potential in order to further understand the underlying mechanisms of E. albertii infections. Here we demonstrated for the first time that infection of fragments of rat intestinal mucosa is a useful tool to study the initial steps of E. albertii colonization. We also observed that an E. albertii strain can translocate from the intestinal lumen to Mesenteric Lymph Nodes and liver in a rat model. Based on our finding of bacterial translocation, we investigated how E. albertii might cross the intestinal epithelium by performing infections of M-like cells in vitro to identify the potential in vivo translocation route. Altogether, our approaches allowed us to draft a general E. albertii infection route from the colonization till the bacterial spreading in vivo.

  15. Activin Potentiates Proliferation in Mature Avian Auditory Sensory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    McCullar, Jennifer S.; Ty, Sidya; Campbell, Sean; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and other mammals are highly susceptible to permanent hearing and balance deficits due to an inability to regenerate sensory hair cells lost to inner ear trauma. In contrast, nonmammalian vertebrates, such as birds, robustly regenerate replacement hair cells and restore hearing and balance functions to near-normal levels. There is considerable interest in understanding the cellular mechanisms responsible for this difference in regenerative capacity. Here we report on involvement of the TGFβ superfamily type II activin receptors, Acvr2a and Acvr2b, in regulating proliferation in mature avian auditory sensory epithelium. Cultured, posthatch avian auditory sensory epithelium treated with Acvr2a and Acvr2b inhibitors shows decreased proliferation of support cells, the cell type that gives rise to new hair cells. Conversely, addition of activin A, an Acvr2a/b ligand, potentiates support cell proliferation. Neither treatment (inhibitor or ligand) affected hair cell survival, suggesting a specific effect of Acvr2a/b signaling on support cell mitogenicity. Using immunocytochemistry, Acvr2a, Acvr2b, and downstream Smad effector proteins were differentially localized in avian and mammalian auditory sensory epithelia. Collectively, these data suggest that signaling through Acvr2a/b promotes support cell proliferation in mature avian auditory sensory epithelium and that this signaling pathway may be incomplete, or actively blocked, in the adult mammalian ear. PMID:20071511

  16. Deletion of intestinal epithelial insulin receptor attenuates high-fat diet-induced elevations in cholesterol and stem, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cell mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Andres, Sarah F; Santoro, M Agostina; Mah, Amanda T; Keku, J Adeola; Bortvedt, Amy E; Blue, R Eric; Lund, P Kay

    2015-01-15

    The insulin receptor (IR) regulates nutrient uptake and utilization in multiple organs, but its role in the intestinal epithelium is not defined. This study developed a mouse model with villin-Cre (VC) recombinase-mediated intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific IR deletion (VC-IR(Δ/Δ)) and littermate controls with floxed, but intact, IR (IR(fl/fl)) to define in vivo roles of IEC-IR in mice fed chow or high-fat diet (HFD). We hypothesized that loss of IEC-IR would alter intestinal growth, biomarkers of intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESC) or other lineages, body weight, adiposity, and glucose or lipid handling. In lean, chow-fed mice, IEC-IR deletion did not affect body or fat mass, plasma glucose, or IEC proliferation. In chow-fed VC-IR(Δ/Δ) mice, mRNA levels of the Paneth cell marker lysozyme (Lyz) were decreased, but markers of other differentiated lineages were unchanged. During HFD-induced obesity, IR(fl/fl) and VC-IR(Δ/Δ) mice exhibited similar increases in body and fat mass, plasma insulin, mRNAs encoding several lipid-handling proteins, a decrease in Paneth cell number, and impaired glucose tolerance. In IR(fl/fl) mice, HFD-induced obesity increased circulating cholesterol; numbers of chromogranin A (CHGA)-positive enteroendocrine cells (EEC); and mRNAs encoding Chga, glucose-dependent insulinotrophic peptide (Gip), glucagon (Gcg), Lyz, IESC biomarkers, and the enterocyte cholesterol transporter Scarb1. All these effects were attenuated or lost in VC-IR(Δ/Δ) mice. These results demonstrate that IEC-IR is not required for normal growth of the intestinal epithelium in lean adult mice. However, our findings provide novel evidence that, during HFD-induced obesity, IEC-IR contributes to increases in EEC, plasma cholesterol, and increased expression of Scarb1 or IESC-, EEC-, and Paneth cell-derived mRNAs.

  17. Deletion of intestinal epithelial insulin receptor attenuates high-fat diet-induced elevations in cholesterol and stem, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cell mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Sarah F.; Santoro, M. Agostina; Mah, Amanda T.; Keku, J. Adeola; Bortvedt, Amy E.; Blue, R. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) regulates nutrient uptake and utilization in multiple organs, but its role in the intestinal epithelium is not defined. This study developed a mouse model with villin-Cre (VC) recombinase-mediated intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific IR deletion (VC-IRΔ/Δ) and littermate controls with floxed, but intact, IR (IRfl/fl) to define in vivo roles of IEC-IR in mice fed chow or high-fat diet (HFD). We hypothesized that loss of IEC-IR would alter intestinal growth, biomarkers of intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESC) or other lineages, body weight, adiposity, and glucose or lipid handling. In lean, chow-fed mice, IEC-IR deletion did not affect body or fat mass, plasma glucose, or IEC proliferation. In chow-fed VC-IRΔ/Δ mice, mRNA levels of the Paneth cell marker lysozyme (Lyz) were decreased, but markers of other differentiated lineages were unchanged. During HFD-induced obesity, IRfl/fl and VC-IRΔ/Δ mice exhibited similar increases in body and fat mass, plasma insulin, mRNAs encoding several lipid-handling proteins, a decrease in Paneth cell number, and impaired glucose tolerance. In IRfl/fl mice, HFD-induced obesity increased circulating cholesterol; numbers of chromogranin A (CHGA)-positive enteroendocrine cells (EEC); and mRNAs encoding Chga, glucose-dependent insulinotrophic peptide (Gip), glucagon (Gcg), Lyz, IESC biomarkers, and the enterocyte cholesterol transporter Scarb1. All these effects were attenuated or lost in VC-IRΔ/Δ mice. These results demonstrate that IEC-IR is not required for normal growth of the intestinal epithelium in lean adult mice. However, our findings provide novel evidence that, during HFD-induced obesity, IEC-IR contributes to increases in EEC, plasma cholesterol, and increased expression of Scarb1 or IESC-, EEC-, and Paneth cell-derived mRNAs. PMID:25394660

  18. Spatial pattern of receptor expression in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Nef, P; Hermans-Borgmeyer, I; Artières-Pin, H; Beasley, L; Dionne, V E; Heinemann, S F

    1992-01-01

    A PCR-based strategy for amplifying putative receptors involved in murine olfaction was employed to isolate a member (OR3) of the seven-transmembrane-domain receptor superfamily. During development, the first cells that express OR3 appear adjacent to the wall of the telencephalic vesicle at embryonic day 10. The OR3 receptor is uniquely expressed in a subset of olfactory cells that have a characteristic bilateral symmetry in the adult olfactory epithelium. This receptor and its specific pattern of expression may serve a functional role in odor coding or, alternatively, may play a role in the development of the olfactory system. Images PMID:1384038

  19. Are pheromones detected through the main olfactory epithelium?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenshan; Nudelman, Aaron; Storm, Daniel R

    2007-06-01

    A major sensory organ for the detection of pheromones by animals is the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Although pheromones control the behaviors of various species, the effect of pheromones on human behavior has been controversial because the VNO is not functional in adults. However, recent genetic, biochemical, and electrophysiological data suggest that some pheromone-based behaviors, including male sexual behavior in mice, are mediated through the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and are coupled to the type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) and a cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channel. These recent discoveries suggest the provocative hypothesis that human pheromones may signal through the MOE.

  20. Study Bacteria-Host Interactions Using Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Guo; Sun, Jun

    2016-08-19

    The intestinal epithelial cells function to gain nutrients, retain water and electrolytes, and form an efficient barrier against foreign microbes and antigens. Researchers employed cell culture lines derived from human or animal cancer cells as experimental models in vitro for understanding of intestinal infections. However, most in vitro models used to investigate interactions between bacteria and intestinal epithelial cells fail to recreate the differentiated tissue components and structure observed in the normal intestine. The in vitro analysis of host-bacteria interactions in the intestine has been hampered by a lack of suitable intestinal epithelium culture systems. Here, we present a new experimental model using an organoid culture system to study bacterial infection.

  1. Activation of epithelial STAT3 regulates intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Neufert, Clemens; Pickert, Geethanjali; Zheng, Yan; Wittkopf, Nadine; Warntjen, Moritz; Nikolaev, Alexei; Ouyang, Wenjun; Neurath, Markus F; Becker, Christoph

    2010-02-15

    The intestinal epithelium that lines the mucosal surface along the GI-tract is a key player for the intestinal homeostasis of the healthy individual. In case of a mucosal damage or a barrier defect as seen in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the balance is disturbed, and translocation of intestinal microbes to the submucosa is facilitated. We recently demonstrated a pivotal role of STAT3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) for the restoration of the balance at the mucosal surface of the gut in an experimental colitis model. STAT3 was rapidly induced in intestinal epithelial cells upon challenge of mice in both experimental colitis and intestinal wound healing models. STAT3 activation was found to be dispensable in the steady-state conditions but was important for efficient regeneration of the epithelium in response to injury. Here, we extend our previous findings by showing epithelial STAT3 activation in human patients suffering from IBD and provide additional insights how the activation of epithelial STAT3 by IL-22 regulates intestinal homeostasis and mucosal wound healing. We also demonstrate that antibody-mediated neutralization of IL-22 has little impact on the development of experimental colitis in mice, but significantly delays recovery from colitis. Thus, our data suggest that targeting the STAT3 signaling pathway in IEC is a promising therapeutic approach in situations when the intestinal homeostasis is disturbed, e.g., as seen in Crohn's disease or Ulcerative colitis.

  2. A Novel Model of P-Glycoprotein Inhibitor Screening Using Human Small Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfang; Zeng, Zhiyang; Sun, Jialiang; Zhang, Yuanjin; Li, Dali; Zhang, Xueli; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an important efflux transporter in intestine, regulates the bioavailability of orally taken drugs. To develop an in vitro model that preferably mimics the physiological microenvironment of human intestine, we employed the three-dimensionally (3D) cultured organoids from human normal small intestinal epithelium. It was observed that the intestinal crypts could efficiently form cystic organoid structure with the extension of culture time. Furthermore, the physiological expression of ABCB1 was detected at both mRNA and protein levels in cultured organoids. Rhodamine 123 (Rh123), a typical substrate of P-gp, was actively transported across 3D organoids and accumulated in the luminal space. This transport process was also inhibited by verapamil and mitotane. In summary, the above-mentioned model based on human small intestinal 3D organoids is suitable to imitate the small intestinal epithelium and could be used as a novel in vitro model especially for P-gp inhibitor screening.

  3. Infradian biorhythms of mitotic activity esophageal epithelium in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Diatroptov, M E; Makarova, O V

    2015-01-01

    Infradian rhythms of esophageal epithelium mitotic activity were studied in male Wistar rats of two age groups: 35-45 days (prepubertal) and 3-4 months (adults). Studies of the time course of esophageal epithelium mitotic indexes in adult males showed 4- and 12-day biorhythms, while prepubertal rats exhibited only 4-day infradian biorhythms of this parameter. Studies of the mitotic activity over long periods (3 years) showed 4.058- and 12.175-day periodicity of infradian biorhythms for this parameter, presumably due to external exposures synchronizing the biorhythms. Studies of the mean daily values of the Bz component of interplanetary magnetic field during the period of our research (2012-2013) showed rhythmicities analogous to changes in the mitotic activity of the epithelium. The minimum mitotic indexes were detected on the days of the most pronounced negative values of the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component.

  4. [Adult].

    PubMed

    Milke-García, María Del Pilar

    2016-09-01

    Adulthood starts after youth and is characterized by the completion of growth and the achievement of organic and psychological maturity. Obesity and other preventable diseases related to lifestyle are common at this age. A complete, balanced and sufficient diet, together with exercise are important in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Several studies have brought about the mechanisms by which the incorporation of milk and dairy products to diet is beneficial in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Milk also contributes to the improvement of dental, bone and intestinal health, theoretically helps in body weight control, has a definite role on the muscular and bone mass maintenance and is an option for hydration during exercise, this being as important as diet for overweight, obesity, diabetes, dislipidemias and hypertension control.

  5. Stages and duration of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium in oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus, Schreber, 1775).

    PubMed

    Balarini, Maytê Koch; de Paula, Tarcízio Antônio Rego; da Matta, S L Pinto; Peixoto, J Vogas; Guião-Leite, F Lima; Rossi Júnior, J L; Czermak Junior, A C; Walker, N J

    2012-03-15

    Six adult Leopardus tigrinus (oncilla) were studied to characterize stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle and its relative frequency and duration, as well as morphometric parameters of the testes. Testicular fragments were obtained (incisional biopsy), embedded (glycol methacrylate), and histologic sections examined with light microscopy. The cycle of the seminiferous epithelium was categorized into eight stages (based on the tubular morphology method). The duration of one seminiferous epithelium cycle was 9.19 d, and approximately 41.37 d were required for development of sperm from spermatogonia. On average, diameter of the seminiferous tubules was 228.29 μm, epithelium height was 78.86 μm, and there were 16.99 m of testicular tubules per gram of testis. Body weight averaged 2.589 kg, of which 0.06 and 0.04% were attributed to the testis and seminiferous tubules, respectively. In conclusion, there were eight distinct stages in the seminiferous epithelium, the length of the seminiferous epithelium cycle was close to that in domestic cats and cougars, and testicular and somatic indexes were similar to those of other carnivores of similar size.

  6. Derivation of Intestinal Organoids from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Use as an Infection System.

    PubMed

    Forbester, Jessica L; Hannan, Nicholas; Vallier, Ludovic; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-08-31

    Intestinal human organoids (iHOs) provide an effective system for studying the intestinal epithelium and its interaction with various stimuli. By using combinations of different signaling factors, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) can be driven to differentiate down the intestinal lineage. Here, we describe the process for this differentiation, including the derivation of hindgut from hIPSCs, embedding hindgut into a pro-intestinal culture system and passaging the resulting iHOs. We then describe how to carry out microinjections to introduce bacteria to the apical side of the intestinal epithelial cells (IECs).

  7. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth.

    PubMed

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-05-02

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period.

  8. Changes of the lingual epithelium in Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Wistuba, J; Clemen, G

    1998-12-01

    Changes in the lingual epithelium during ontogenesis and after induced metamorphosis in Ambystoma mexicanum are described as observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The epithelium of the tongue is always multilayered in the larva as well as in the adult. It consists of a stratum germinativum with little differentiated basal cells and a stratum superficiale (superficial layer) with specialized superficial cells and goblet cells. Usually, there are more than two layers because of a stratum intermedium consisting of replacement cells. The apical cell membrane of the superficial cells is perforated by fine pores. Its most typical feature are microridges. Maturing superficial cells possess microvilli. Goblet cells occur in early larvae primarily in the centre of the tongue. They spread throughout the dorsal face of the tongue as their numbers increase during ontogenesis. The small apices of the goblet cells are intercalated in the wedges between the superficial cells. Leydig cells are not found on the larval tongue but on that of adults. Due to metamorphosis, the epithelium of the tongue changes. It is furrowed in its anterior part. The furrows house the openings of the lingual glands. The surface is further modulated by ridges which are densely coated by microvilli and which bear the taste buds. The villi of the tongue which lack extrusion pores show cilia and microvilli but lack microridges. The Leydig cells disappear during metamorphosis. In addition to the two types of goblet cells found in different regions of the glandular tubules, goblet cells occur in the caudal part. They secrete directly into the cavity of the mouth. The posterior part is characterised by a dense coat of cilia.

  9. Cell cycle of globose basal cells in rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huard, J M; Schwob, J E

    1995-05-01

    The olfactory epithelium of adult mammals has the unique property of generating olfactory sensory neurons throughout life. Cells of the basal compartment, which include horizontal and globose basal cells, are responsible for the ongoing process of neurogenesis in this system. We report here that the globose basal cells in olfactory epithelium of rats, as in mice, are the predominant type of proliferating cell, and account for 97.6% of the actively dividing cells in the basal compartment of the normal epithelium. Globose basal cells have not been fully characterized in terms of their proliferative properties, and the dynamic aspects of neurogenesis are not well understood. As a consequence, it is uncertain whether cell kinetic properties are under any regulation that could affect the rate of neurogenesis. To address this gap in our knowledge, we have determined the duration of both the synthesis phase (S-phase) and the full cell cycle of globose basal cells in adult rats. The duration of the S-phase was found to be 9 hr in experiments utilizing sequential injections of either IdU followed by BrdU or 3H-thy followed by BrdU. The duration of the cell cycle was determined by varying the time interval between the injections of 3H-thy and BrdU and tracking the set of cells that exit S shortly after the first injection. With this paradigm, the interval required for these cells to traverse G2, M, G1, and a second S-phase, is equivalent to the duration of one mitotic cycle and equals 17 hr. These observations serve as the foundation to assess whether the cell cycle duration is subject to regulation in response to experimental injury, and whether such regulation is partly responsible for changes in the rate of neurogenesis in such settings.

  10. Comparative cytokeratin distribution patterns in cholesteatoma epithelium.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, E; Sudhoff, H

    2007-01-01

    Cytokeratins (CKs) are known as the intermediate filament proteins of epithelial origin. Their distribution in human epithelia is different according to the type of epithelium, state of growth and differentiation. We used monoclonal mouse antibodies against cytokeratins to study CK expression in the following human tissues: cholesteatoma, middle ear mucosa, glandular epithelium, and meatal ear canal epithelium. Immunohistochemical processing was performed using the labeled steptavidin peroxidase method to demonstrate the presence of CKs in cells of human epidermis. Positive reaction was obtained for CK4, CK34betaE12, CK10, CK14 in skin and cholesteatoma epithelium. However, a more extensive positive reaction with those CKs was observed in cholesteatoma epithelium. Positive immunoreactivity was seen with anti- CK19 in the glandular epithelium. Middle ear mucosa specimens revealed positive immunoreactivity with the antibodies against CK4. The expression of CK4 was definitely positive within the basal layers of the epidermis. The glandular epithelium showed no positive reaction with anti- CK4, anti- CK34betaE12, anti- CK14 and anti-CK10. Immunohistochemistry for CK18 showed no reaction in all examined tissues. Cholesteatoma is known as a proliferative disease in the middle ear which pathogenesis is not completely understood. Keratinocytes express hyperproliferation- associated CKs and after reaching the suprabasal layers they finally undergo apoptosis creating keratinous debris. Cytokeratin expression observed in the epithelium explains proliferative behavior of cholesteatoma which is associated with increased keratinocyte migration. Cytokeratins can be used as potential proliferative markers. It can also allow for searching the usefulness of inhibiting regulators in the treatment of hyperproliferative diseases.

  11. Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor effects on epithelia. Regulation of intercellular junctions in transformed and nontransformed cell lines, basolateral polarization of c-met receptor in transformed and natural intestinal epithelia, and induction of rapid wound repair in a transformed model epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, A; Parkos, C A; Bacarra, A E; Godowski, P J; Delp-Archer, C; Rosen, E M; Madara, J L

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells rest on a fibroblast sheath. Thus, factors produced by these fibroblasts may influence epithelial function in a paracrine fashion. We examined modulation of intestinal epithelial function by one such fibroblast product, scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/SF). This effect was studied in vitro by using model T84 intestinal epithelial cells. When applied to confluent T84 monolayers, HGF/SF attenuates transepithelial resistance to passive ion flow in a dose-dependent manner (maximum fall at 300 ng/ml, 28% control monolayer resistance, P < 0.001, ED50 of 1.2 nM), t1/2 of 20 h. This functional effect of HGF/SF and distribution of its receptor, c-met, are polarized to the basolateral membranes of T84 intestinal epithelial cells. HGF/SF effects on resistance are not attributable to altered transcellular resistance (opening of Cl- and/or basolateral K+ channels), cytotoxicity, or enhanced cell proliferation; they therefore represent specific regulation of paracellular tight junction resistance. Analysis with biochemically purified rodent HGF/SF and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells reveals that effects on paracellular tight junctions also occur in other nontransformed epithelia. Binding of HGF/SF to its receptor in T84 intestinal epithelial cells is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor. Because loosening of intercellular junctions between cells could facilitate separation, spreading, and migration of epithelial cells during physiologic processes such as wound resealing, we determined the effects of HGF/SF on intestinal epithelial wound resealing using our previously published in vitro model (Nusrat, A., C. Delp, and J. L. Madara. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 89:1501-1511). HGF/SF markedly enhanced wound closure (> 450% increase in rate, P < 0.001) by influencing the migratory and spreading response in not only cells adjoining the wound but also cells many positions removed from the wound. We thus speculate that HGF/SF may

  12. Osmotic regulation of airway reactivity by epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fedan, J S; Yuan, L X; Chang, V C; Viola, J O; Cutler, D; Pettit, L L

    1999-05-01

    Inhalation of nonisotonic solutions can elicit pulmonary obstruction in asthmatic airways. We evaluated the hypothesis that the respiratory epithelium is involved in responses of the airways to nonisotonic solutions using the guinea pig isolated, perfused trachea preparation to restrict applied agents to the mucosal (intraluminal) or serosal (extraluminal) surface of the airway. In methacholine-contracted tracheae, intraluminally applied NaCl or KCl equipotently caused relaxation that was unaffected by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, but was attenuated by removal of the epithelium and Na+ and Cl- channel blockers. Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter and nitric oxide synthase blockers caused a slight inhibition of relaxation, whereas Na+,K+-pump inhibition produced a small potentiation. Intraluminal hyperosmolar KCl and NaCl inhibited contractions in response to intra- or extraluminally applied methacholine, as well as neurogenic cholinergic contractions elicited with electric field stimulation (+/- indomethacin). Extraluminally applied NaCl and KCl elicited epithelium-dependent relaxation (which for KCl was followed by contraction). In contrast to the effects of hyperosmolarity, intraluminal hypo-osmolarity caused papaverine-inhibitable contractions (+/- epithelium). These findings suggest that the epithelium is an osmotic sensor which, through the release of epithelium-derived relaxing factor, can regulate airway diameter by modulating smooth muscle responsiveness and excitatory neurotransmission.

  13. Lung histopathology, radiography, high-resolution computed tomography, and bronchio-alveolar lavage cytology are altered by Toxocara cati infection in cats and is independent of development of adult intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    Dillon, A Ray; Tillson, D M; Hathcock, J; Brawner, B; Wooldridge, A; Cattley, R; Welles, B; Barney, S; Lee-Fowler, T; Botzman, L; Sermersheim, M; Garbarino, R

    2013-04-15

    . Pulmonary arterial, bronchial, and interstitial disease were prominent histological findings. Infected treated cats had a subtle attenuation but not prevention of lung disease compared to infected cats. Significant lung disease in kittens and adult cats is associated with the early arrival of T. cati larvae in the lungs and is independent of the development of adult worms in the intestine. These data suggest that while the medical prevention of the development of adult parasites after oral exposure to T. cati is obviously beneficial, this practice even with good client compliance will not prevent the development of lung disease which can alter clinical diagnostic methods.

  14. CD44 and TLR4 mediate hyaluronic acid regulation of Lgr5+ stem cell proliferation, crypt fission, and intestinal growth in postnatal and adult mice.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Terrence E; Santhanam, Srikanth; Foster, Lynne; Ciorba, Matthew; Stenson, William F

    2015-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid, a glycosaminoglycan in the extracellular matrix, binds to CD44 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We previously addressed the role of hyaluronic acid in small intestinal and colonic growth in mice. We addressed the role of exogenous hyaluronic acid by giving hyaluronic acid intraperitoneally and the role of endogenous hyaluronic acid by giving PEP-1, a peptide that blocks hyaluronic acid binding to its receptors. Exogenous hyaluronic acid increased epithelial proliferation but had no effect on intestinal length. PEP-1 resulted in a shortened small intestine and colon and diminished epithelial proliferation. In the current study, we sought to determine whether the effects of hyaluronic acid on growth were mediated by signaling through CD44 or TLR4 by giving exogenous hyaluronic acid or PEP-1 twice a week from 3-8 wk of age to wild-type, CD44(-/-), and TLR4(-/-) mice. These studies demonstrated that signaling through both CD44 and TLR4 were important in mediating the effects of hyaluronic acid on growth in the small intestine and colon. Extending our studies to early postnatal life, we assessed the effects of exogenous hyaluronic acid and PEP-1 on Lgr5(+) stem cell proliferation and crypt fission. Administration of PEP-1 to Lgr5(+) reporter mice from postnatal day 7 to day 14 decreased Lgr5(+) cell proliferation and decreased crypt fission. These studies indicate that endogenous hyaluronic acid increases Lgr5(+) stem cell proliferation, crypt fission, and intestinal lengthening and that these effects are dependent on signaling through CD44 and TLR4.

  15. Role of fucosyltransferases in the association between apomucin and Lewis antigen expression in normal and malignant gastric epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ferrer, A; de Bolos, C; Barranco, C; Garrido, M; Isern, J; Carlstedt, I; Reis, C; Torrado, J; Real, F

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In normal gastric epithelium, MUC5AC is detected in superficial epithelium associated with Lewis type 1 antigens and MUC6 is detected in antral glands with Lewis type 2. Therefore, the stomach constitutes an excellent model to examine the role of glycosyltransferases in determining the specificity of apomucin glycosylation.
AIMS—To determine the molecular basis of this association and to examine changes in expression of gastric and intestinal apomucins and their association with Lewis antigens during the gastric carcinogenesis process.
METHODS—Fucosyltransferase (FUT1, FUT2, FUT3) and mucin (MUC5AC, MUC6) transcripts were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Apomucin (MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6) and Lewis antigen (types 1 and 2) expression were analysed using single and double immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation.
RESULTS—In the normal stomach, FUT1 is exclusively detected associated with MUC6; FUT2 is only detected when MUC5AC is present. This co-regulation is lost in gastric tumours, as is differential expression of MUC5AC and MUC6 in normal gastric epithelial cells. In gastric tumours, especially those with the intestinal phenotype, MUC2 and MUC4 genes are upregulated, and gastric-type and intestinal-type mucins are coexpressed. These changes are early events in the gastric carcinogenesis process, as they are detected in intestinal metaplasia.
CONCLUSIONS—The glycosylation pattern found in normal gastric epithelium is dictated by the specific set of fucosyltranferases expressed by the cells rather than by the apomucin sequence. The development of intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer is associated with the appearance of cellular phenotypes that are absent from normal epithelium.


Keywords: fucosyltransferases; gastric carcinogenesis; gastric mucins; Lewis antigens PMID:10940270

  16. New approaches to increase intestinal length: Methods used for intestinal regeneration and bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Shirafkan, Ali; Montalbano, Mauro; McGuire, Joshua; Rastellini, Cristiana; Cicalese, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate absorptive surface area poses a great challenge to the patients suffering a variety of intestinal diseases causing short bowel syndrome. To date, these patients are managed with total parenteral nutrition or intestinal transplantation. However, these carry significant morbidity and mortality. Currently, by emergence of tissue engineering, anticipations to utilize an alternative method to increase the intestinal absorptive surface area are increasing. In this paper, we will review the improvements made over time in attempting elongating the intestine with surgical techniques as well as using intestinal bioengineering. Performing sequential intestinal lengthening was the preliminary method applied in humans. However, these methods did not reach widespread use and has limited outcome. Subsequent experimental methods were developed utilizing scaffolds to regenerate intestinal tissue and organoids unit from the intestinal epithelium. Stem cells also have been studied and applied in all types of tissue engineering. Biomaterials were utilized as a structural support for naive cells to produce bio-engineered tissue that can achieve a near-normal anatomical structure. A promising novel approach is the elongation of the intestine with an acellular biologic scaffold to generate a neo-formed intestinal tissue that showed, for the first time, evidence of absorption in vivo. In the large intestine, studies are more focused on regeneration and engineering of sphincters and will be briefly reviewed. From the review of the existing literature, it can be concluded that significant progress has been achieved in these experimental methods but that these now need to be fully translated into a pre-clinical and clinical experimentation to become a future viable therapeutic option. PMID:27011901

  17. Listeria monocytogenes Inhibits Serotonin Transporter in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Latorre, E; Pradilla, A; Chueca, B; Pagán, R; Layunta, E; Alcalde, A I; Mesonero, J E

    2016-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that can cause a serious infection. Intestinal microorganisms have been demonstrated to contribute to intestinal physiology not only through immunological responses but also by modulating the intestinal serotonergic system. Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator that is synthesized in the intestinal epithelium and regulates the whole intestinal physiology. The serotonin transporter (SERT), located in enterocytes, controls intestinal 5-HT availability and therefore serotonin's effects. Infections caused by L. monocytogenes are well described as being due to the invasion of intestinal epithelial cells; however, the effect of L. monocytogenes on the intestinal epithelium remains unknown. The main aim of this work, therefore, was to study the effect of L. monocytogenes on SERT. Caco2/TC7 cell line was used as an enterocyte-like in vitro model, and SERT functional and molecular expression assays were performed. Our results demonstrate that living L. monocytogenes inhibits serotonin uptake by reducing SERT expression at the brush border membrane. However, neither inactivated L. monocytogenes nor soluble metabolites were able to affect SERT. The results also demonstrate that L. monocytogenes yields TLR2 and TLR10 transcriptional changes in intestinal epithelial cells and suggest that TLR10 is potentially involved in the inhibitory effect observed on SERT. Therefore, L. monocytogenes, through TLR10-mediated SERT inhibition, may induce increased intestinal serotonin availability and potentially contributing to intestinal physiological changes and the initiation of the inflammatory response.

  18. The intestinal fatty acid propionate inhibits Salmonella invasion through the post-translational control of HilD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For Salmonella to cause disease, it must first invade the intestinal epithelium using genes encoded within Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1). Previous work has shown that propionate, a short chain fatty acid abundant in the intestine of animal hosts, negatively regulates SPI1 in vitro. Here...

  19. Defining hierarchies of stemness in the intestine: evidence from biomarkers and regulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gracz, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, the rapid proliferation and well-defined cellular lineages of the small intestinal epithelium have driven an interest in the biology of the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and progenitors that produce the functional cells of the epithelium. Recent and significant advances in ISC biomarker discovery have established the small intestinal epithelium as a powerful model system for studying general paradigms in somatic stem cell biology and facilitated elegant genetic and functional studies of stemness in the intestine. However, this newfound wealth of ISC biomarkers raises important questions of marker specificity. Furthermore, the ISC field must now begin to reconcile biomarker status with functional stemness, a challenge that is made more complex by emerging evidence that cellular hierarchies in the intestinal epithelium are more plastic than previously imagined, with some progenitor populations capable of dedifferentiating and functioning as ISCs following damage. In this review, we discuss the state of the ISC field in terms of biomarkers, tissue dynamics, and cellular hierarchies, and how these processes might be informed by earlier studies into signaling networks in the small intestine. PMID:24924746

  20. Identification by in situ hybridization of segmented filamentous bacteria in the intestine of diarrheic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Urdaci, M C; Regnault, B; Grimont, P A

    2001-01-01

    Nonculturable segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) have been described in the gut of rats, mice and chickens, and 16S rRNA sequences for these organisms are available. These organisms, peripherically related to Clostridium phylogenetic group I, have been provisionally named 'Candidatus Arthromitus'. This work reports the observation of similar bacteria in the intestinal content of the distal intestine, preferentially, in the adult rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that exhibited episodic acute diarrhea, usually during the summer. Abdominal distension, intestinal fluid-mucus content and epithelium detachment were observed in trout. The demonstration that the observed microorganisms are bacteria and belong in the 'Candidatus Arthromitus' group was achieved by in situ hybridization with, respectively, a eubacterial probe and an oligonucleotide probe designed to react specifically with SFB 16S rRNA (encoded by the rrs gene) sequences. The sequenced rrs gene was compared with published sequences and found to be closely related to (although distinct from) other SFB sequences. Implication of these bacteria in trout diarrheic illness remains hypothetical.

  1. [Intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Debré, Patrice; Le Gall, Jean-Yves

    2014-12-01

    The human body normally lives in symbiosis with a considerable microscopic environment present on all interfaces with the external environment; it hosts ten times more microbes (microbiota) that it has somatic or germ cells, representing a gene diversity (microbiome) 100-150 times higher than the human genome. These germs are located mainly in the gut, where they represent a mass of about one kilogram. The primary colonization of the gastrointestinal tract depends on the delivery route, the bacterial flora rewarding then depending on the environment, food hygiene, medical treatments. The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the maturation of the immune system and in different physiological functions: digestion of polysaccharides, glycosaminoglycans and glycoproteins, vitamins biosynthesis, bile salt metabolism of some amino acids and xenobiotics. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the microbiota are observed in a wide range of diseases: obesity, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune diseases, allergies... pharmacobiotics aim to modify the intestinal microbiota in a therapeutic goal and this by various means: prebiotics, probiotics, antibiotics or fecal transplants. Intestinal flora also plays a direct role in the metabolism of certain drugs and the microbiota should be considered as a predictive parameter of response to some chemotherapies.

  2. The behaviour of Drosophila adult hindgut stem cells is controlled by Wnt and Hh signalling.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shigeo; Mkrtchyan, Marianna; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Merriam, John R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2008-07-31

    The intestinal tract maintains proper function by replacing aged cells with freshly produced cells that arise from a population of self-renewing intestinal stem cells (ISCs). In the mammalian intestine, ISC self renewal, amplification and differentiation take place along the crypt-villus axis, and are controlled by the Wnt and hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathways. However, little is known about the mechanisms that specify ISCs within the developing intestinal epithelium, or about the signalling centres that help maintain them in their self-renewing stem cell state. Here we show that in adult Drosophila melanogaster, ISCs of the posterior intestine (hindgut) are confined to an anterior narrow segment, which we name the hindgut proliferation zone (HPZ). Within the HPZ, self renewal of ISCs, as well as subsequent proliferation and differentiation of ISC descendants, are controlled by locally emanating Wingless (Wg, a Drosophila Wnt homologue) and Hh signals. The anteriorly restricted expression of Wg in the HPZ acts as a niche signal that maintains cells in a slow-cycling, self-renewing mode. As cells divide and move posteriorly away from the Wg source, they enter a phase of rapid proliferation. During this phase, Hh signal is required for exiting the cell cycle and the onset of differentiation. The HPZ, with its characteristic proliferation dynamics and signalling properties, is set up during the embryonic phase and becomes active in the larva, where it generates all adult hindgut cells including ISCs. The mechanism and genetic control of cell renewal in the Drosophila HPZ exhibits a large degree of similarity with what is seen in the mammalian intestine. Our analysis of the Drosophila HPZ provides an insight into the specification and control of stem cells, highlighting the way in which the spatial pattern of signals that promote self renewal, growth and differentiation is set up within a genetically tractable model system.

  3. Morphologic changes in basal cells during repair of tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. Z.; Evans, M. J.; Cox, R. A.; Burke, A. S.; Zhu, Q.; Herndon, D. N.; Barrow, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Basal cells are differentiated with respect to junctional adhesion mechanisms and play a role in attachment of columnar epithelium to the basal lamina. Although much is known about nonciliated and ciliated cell differentiation during the repair process after injury, little is known about the basal cell. We studied the morphology of basal cells and quantitated junctional adhesion structures during repair of tracheal epithelium exposed to toxic cotton smoke. Ten adult ewes were given a smoke injury to a portion of the upper cervical trachea and were killed at 4, 6, 8, 10, and 18 days after injury for morphometric studies. At 4 days, there was a stratified reparative epithelium over the basal lamina, which was two to four cells in depth. The basal cells were identified by their hemidesmosome (HD) attachment to the basal lamina. Basal cells were about 69% larger than controls and flattened rather than columnar. The amount of HD attachment was 192% greater than controls. In contrast, volume density of cytokeratin filaments had decreased about 47%. Basal cells had returned to normal numbers and size and a columnar shape by day 18. The amount of desmosome (D) and HD attachment and volume density of cytokeratins had also reached control levels by day 18. These data indicate that morphology of basal cells changes during the initial stages of reparative regeneration but returns to normal by 18 days. Morphologic changes appear to reflect changes in size of the cell associated with cell division rather than differentiation of recently divided basal cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1381564

  4. Megalin and cubilin in the human gallbladder epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tsaroucha, Alexandra K; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Lambropoulou, Maria; Despoudi, Kaliopi; Laftsidis, Prodromos; Charsou, Chara; Polychronidis, Alexandros; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos; Simopoulos, Constantinos E

    2008-09-01

    Although the role of cholesterol absorption by the gallbladder epithelium in gallstone formation is well established, the exact process is poorly understood. Potential candidates for regulation of transepithelial cholesterol transport are suggested to be two large membrane multiple ligand receptors, megalin and cubilin. We studied the expression of these two proteins in both acalculous and calculous human gallbladder epithelia. Adult human gallbladder tissues were received from 21 patients (9 men, 12 women) who had undergone cholecystectomy. The patients were divided into two groups: group A (calculous gallbladder group; 5 men, 6 women; mean age 64.4 +/- 11.1 years) with cholelithiasis, and group B (acalculous gallbladder group; 4 men, 6 women; mean age 55.3 +/- 16.1 years). In the gallbladder tissues megalin and cubilin expression was studied by immunohistochemistry and conventional RT-PCR, and gene expression levels were estimated by real-time RT-PCR. Both megalin and cubilin gene transcripts were found in total RNA preparations from acalculous gallbladder. In contrast, in preparations from calculous gallbladder, none or only one of the proteins was detected. Immunoreactive proteins were detected in the simple columnar acalculous gallbladder epithelium but not in the calculous gallbladder epithelium. Our results show different expression patterns of the two proteins in calculous gallbladders and acalculous gallbladders. In the latter both proteins are expressed, suggesting an association with gallstone formation and implying a putative role of the two proteins in cholesterol endocytosis. In other words, the presence of both proteins may be essential for the prevention of stone formation.

  5. THE ENDOCRINE CELLS IN THE EPITHELIUM OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL MUCOSA OF THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Forssmann, W. G.; Orci, L.; Pictet, R.; Renold, A. E.; Rouiller, C.

    1969-01-01

    The authors of this study examine the question of whether the so-called enterochromaffin or argentaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract should be considered as a single cell type. The systematic application of purely morphologic methods has led to the conclusion that the epithelium of the gastrointestinal mucosa comprises endocrine cells of several types. This conclusion is primarily based on the uneven and characteristic distribution of the various cell types along the intestinal tract, an observation precluding the interpretation that the different types correspond to diverse functional stages of the same cell. A specific endocrine function may be attributed to each of the given cell types recognized so far on account of their appearance and their localization in characteristic areas of the gastrointestinal tract. It is acknowledged, however, that a purely morphological study leaves room for doubt. The first cell type is probably responsible for the formation of 5-hydroxytryptamine. Cells of type II are morphologically comparable to the pancreatic A cells and may, therefore, be called intestinal A cells. Cell type III comprises intestinal D cells since their appearance corresponds to that of pancreatic D cells. Cell type IV might well be responsible for catecholamine production, whereas gastrin is in all probability produced in endocrine cell type V. As yet, the thorough morphological study of the gastrointestinal epithelium does not provide information as to additional distinct cellular sites of production of the several other hormones isolated from different parts of the gut. PMID:5765761

  6. Clr-a: A Novel Immune-Related C-Type Lectin-like Molecule Exclusively Expressed by Mouse Gut Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Emilia; Leibelt, Stefan; Born, Christina; Friede, Miriam E; Bauer, Stefan; Weil, Sandra; Koch, Joachim; Steinle, Alexander

    2017-01-15

    The mouse gut epithelium represents a constitutively challenged environment keeping intestinal commensal microbiota at bay and defending against invading enteric pathogens. The complex immunoregulatory network of the epithelial barrier surveillance also involves NK gene complex (NKC)-encoded C-type lectin-like molecules such as NKG2D and Nkrp1 receptors. To our knowledge, in this study, we report the first characterization of the orphan C-type lectin-like molecule Clr-a encoded by the Clec2e gene in the mouse NKC. Screening of a panel of mouse tissues revealed that Clec2e transcripts are restricted to the gastrointestinal tract. Using Clr-a-specific mAb, we characterize Clr-a as a disulfide-linked homodimeric cell surface glycoprotein. Of note, a substantial fraction of Clr-a molecules are retained intracellularly, and analyses of Clr-a/Clr-f hybrids attribute intracellular retention to both the stalk region and parts of the cytoplasmic domain. Combining quantitative PCR analyses with immunofluorescence studies revealed exclusive expression of Clr-a by intestinal epithelial cells and crypt cells throughout the gut. Challenge with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid results in a rapid and strong downregulation of intestinal Clr-a expression in contrast to the upregulation of Clr-f, a close relative of Clr-a, that also is specifically expressed by the intestinal epithelium and acts as a ligand of the inhibitory Nkrp1g receptor. Collectively, we characterize expression of the mouse NKC-encoded glycoprotein Clr-a as strictly associated with mouse intestinal epithelium. Downregulation upon polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid challenge and expression by crypt cells clearly distinguish Clr-a from the likewise intestinal epithelium-restricted Clr-f, pointing to a nonredundant function of these highly related C-type lectin-like molecules in the context of intestinal immunosurveillance.

  7. Sox9 drives columnar differentiation of esophageal squamous epithelium: a possible role in the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Nicholas J; Wang, David H; Croagh, Daniel; Tikoo, Anjali; Fennell, Christina M; Murone, Carmel; Scott, Andrew M; Watkins, D Neil; Phillips, Wayne A

    2012-12-15

    The molecular mechanism underlying the development of Barrett's esophagus (BE), the precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma, remains unknown. Our previous work implicated sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling as a possible driver of BE and suggested that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) and Sox9 were downstream mediators. We have utilized a novel in vivo tissue reconstitution model to investigate the relative roles of Bmp4 and Sox9 in driving metaplasia. Epithelia reconstituted from squamous epithelial cells or empty vector-transduced cells had a stratified squamous phenotype, reminiscent of normal esophagus. Expression of Bmp4 in the stromal compartment activated signaling in the epithelium but did not alter the squamous phenotype. In contrast, expression of Sox9 in squamous epithelial cells induced formation of columnar-like epithelium with expression of the columnar differentiation marker cytokeratin 8 and the intestinal-specific glycoprotein A33. In patient tissue, A33 protein was expressed specifically in BE, but not in normal esophagus. Expression of Cdx2, another putative driver of BE, alone had no effect on reconstitution of a squamous epithelium. Furthermore, epithelium coexpressing Cdx2 and Sox9 had a phenotype similar to epithelium expressing Sox9 alone. Our results demonstrate that Sox9 is sufficient to drive columnar differentiation of squamous epithelium and expression of an intestinal differentiation marker, reminiscent of BE. These data suggest that Shh-mediated expression of Sox9 may be an important early event in the development of BE and that the potential for inhibitors of the hedgehog pathway to be used in the treatment of BE and/or esophageal adenocarcinoma could be tested in the near future.

  8. The impact of an antireflux procedure on intestinal metaplasia of the cardia.

    PubMed Central

    DeMeester, S R; Campos, G M; DeMeester, T R; Bremner, C G; Hagen, J A; Peters, J H; Crookes, P F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether antireflux surgery is more effective in producing loss of intestinal metaplasia located only at the gastroesophageal junction than it has been in patients with intestinal metaplasia extending up into the distal esophagus. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Biopsies of a normal appearing gastroesophageal junction will demonstrate cardiac mucosa containing goblet cells--the hallmark of intestinal metaplasia--in 10% to 15% of patients who are evaluated for symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and cardia is rising faster than any other cancer in America, and most of these cancers are found adjacent to areas of intestinal metaplasia. Antireflux surgery in patients with Barrett's esophagus may provide protection from progression to dysplasia and cancer; however, it does not reliably cause regression of the intestinal metaplasia. Less is known about the potential for intestinal metaplasia limited to the cardia (CIM) to regress. METHODS: Sixty patients with intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus or cardia had antireflux surgery. Patients in the intestinal (CIM) group (n = 15) had no endoscopically visible segment of columnar epithelium. Patients in the Barrett's group (n = 45) had columnar epithelium visible within the esophagus. Median follow-up was 25 months in each group. RESULTS: Postoperative biopsies showed complete loss of intestinal metaplasia in 73% of the patients with CIM compared with 4.4% of the patients with Barrett's. Low-grade dysplasia, present in 10 patients preoperatively, regressed in 7 patients (70%). No patient progressed to high-grade dysplasia or cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Loss of intestinal metaplasia after antireflux surgery is rare in patients with Barrett's, but occurred in most patients with CIM. This suggests that cardiac epithelium is dynamic and that microscopic areas of intestinal metaplasia are able to regress much more frequently than longer

  9. Effect of nitrogen dioxide on human nasal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.L.; Collier, A.M.; Hu, S.C.; Delvin, R.B. )

    1993-09-01

    The nasal epithelium of young adult white men in good health was evaluated by electron microscopy in a condition blind fashion relative to exposures of 2 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2) or clean air for 4 h. The exposure protocol involved two separate exposures of the same individuals to NO2 or clean air approximately 3 wk apart. We found qualitative and quantitative evidence that luminal border membranes of ciliated cells were ultrastructurally altered in six of seven samples of nasal epithelium obtained following NO2 exposures, although subsequent morphometric statistical analyses were not significant. This alteration was characterized by cilia containing excess matrix in which individual or, more commonly, multiple ciliary axonemes were embedded, and by vesiculations of luminal border ciliary membranes, a pattern less common in clean air-exposed control specimens. Although these patterns were not widespread, their morphology was consistent with findings of previous animal studies involving acute and chronic exposure to NO2. Our findings suggest that adverse effects on mucociliary function in normal humans due to acute exposure to low levels of NO2 are most likely minimal. However, in view of other reports of NO2 exposure in laboratory animals documenting ciliary injury, our observations support a view that similar patterns might appear more prominently with higher NO2 levels and/or more extended exposure intervals.

  10. [Regeneration of the gastric and intestinal mucosas].

    PubMed

    Castrup, H J

    1979-05-10

    The physiological cell renewal of gastrointestinal mucosa is regulated in man as in animal through certain mechanisms with measurable kinetic data. Pathologic mucosal alterations, metabolic disorders, pharmacological agents etc. clearly affect the regenerative processes of the gastrointestinal epithelium. Gastrin and pentagastrin stimulate the growth not only of the parietal cells, but also of the superficial epithelium of the gastric mucosa, whereas secretin does not change cell growth. Glucocorticoid steroids inhibit epithelial regeneration in all parts of the gastrointestinal tract. 5-fluorouracil has a similar effect but acts at a different site in the regeneration cycle. Epithelial cell proliferation of the gastric and intestinal mucosa is likewise inhibited in an uremic condition. In inflammatory changes in the human gastric mucosa epithelial cell hyperproliferation relative to the severity of gastritis and anomalous proliferation within regions of dysplasia can be demonstrated. Foveolary hyperplasia in Ménétrier's disease occurs on the basis of excessive hyperproliferation with displacement of regeneration zones.

  11. Intake of whole-grain and fiber-rich rye bread versus refined wheat bread does not differentiate intestinal microbiota composition in Finnish adults with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lappi, Jenni; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Mykkänen, Hannu; Poutanen, Kaisa; de Vos, Willem M; Salonen, Anne

    2013-05-01

    Whole-grain (WG) foods rich in indigestible carbohydrates are thought to modulate the composition of the intestinal microbiota. We investigated in a randomized, parallel, 2-arm 12-wk intervention whether consumption of WG and fiber-rich rye breads compared with refined wheat breads affected the microbiota composition in Finnish individuals aged 60 ± 6 y with metabolic syndrome. Fecal samples from 51 participants (25 males, 26 females) before and after the intervention were processed for the microbiota analysis using a phylogenetic microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reactions targeting the 16S rRNA gene. The intake of whole grains calculated from food records was higher in the group consuming rye breads (75 g) than in that consuming refined wheat breads (4 g; P < 0.001), confirmed by fasting plasma alkylrecorsinol concentrations, a biomarker of whole grain intake. The intestinal microbiota composition did not significantly differ between the groups after the intervention. However, we detected a 37% decrease of Bacteroidetes (P < 0.05) in parallel to a 53% decrease in the alkylrecorsinol concentration (P < 0.001) in the group consuming refined wheat breads. In this group, the abundance of bacteria related to Bacteroides vulgatus, B. plebeius, and Prevotella tannerae decreased, whereas that of bacteria related to Collinsella and members of the Clostridium clusters IV and XI increased. In a multivariate regression analysis, the abundance of Bacteroides spp. was best explained by different fat compounds among dietary variables, whereas the main sugar-converting butyrate-producers were mostly associated with the intake of whole- and refined-grain bread and fiber. Our results indicate that the quality of grains has a minor effect on the intestinal microbiota composition in participants with metabolic syndrome and suggest that the dietary influence on the microbiota involves other dietary components such as fat.

  12. Wnt Signaling Inhibition Deprives Small Intestinal Stem Cells of Clonogenic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Janeckova, Lucie; Fafilek, Bohumil; Krausova, Michaela; Horazna, Monika; Vojtechova, Martina; Alberich‐Jorda, Meritxell; Sloncova, Eva; Galuskova, Katerina; Sedlacek, Radislav; Anderova, Miroslava

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Wnt pathway plays a crucial role in self‐renewal and differentiation of cells in the adult gut. In the present study, we revealed the functional consequences of inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling in the intestinal epithelium. The study was based on generation of a novel transgenic mouse strain enabling inducible expression of an N‐terminally truncated variant of nuclear Wnt effector T cell factor 4 (TCF4). The TCF4 variant acting as a dominant negative (dn) version of wild‐type (wt) TCF4 protein decreased transcription of β‐catenin‐TCF4‐responsive genes. Interestingly, suppression of Wnt/β‐catenin signaling affected asymmetric division of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) rather than proliferation. ISCs expressing the transgene underwent several rounds of division but lost their clonogenic potential and migrated out of the crypt. Expression profiling of crypt cells revealed that besides ISC‐specific markers, the dnTCF4 production downregulated expression levels of epithelial genes produced in other crypt cells including markers of Paneth cells. Additionally, in Apc conditional knockout mice, dnTCF activation efficiently suppressed growth of Apc‐deficient tumors. In summary, the generated mouse strain represents a convenient tool to study cell‐autonomous inhibition of β‐catenin‐Tcf‐mediated transcription. genesis 54:101–114, 2016. © 2016 The Authors genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864984

  13. Increased Abundance of M Cells in the Gut Epithelium Dramatically Enhances Oral Prion Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, David S; Sehgal, Anuj; Rios, Daniel; Williams, Ifor R; Mabbott, Neil A

    2016-12-01

    Many natural prion diseases of humans and animals are considered to be acquired through oral consumption of contaminated food or pasture. Determining the route by which prions establish host infection will identify the important factors that influence oral prion disease susceptibility and to which intervention strategies can be developed. After exposure, the early accumulation and replication of prions within small intestinal Peyer's patches is essential for the efficient spread of disease to the brain. To replicate within Peyer's patches, the prions must first cross the gut epithelium. M cells are specialised epithelial cells within the epithelia covering Peyer's patches that transcytose particulate antigens and microorganisms. M cell-development is dependent upon RANKL-RANK-signalling, and mice in which RANK is deleted only in the gut epithelium completely lack M cells. In the specific absence of M cells in these mice, the accumulation of prions within Peyer's patches and the spread of disease to the brain was blocked, demonstrating a critical role for M cells in the initial transfer of prions across the gut epithelium in order to establish host infection. Since pathogens, inflammatory stimuli and aging can modify M cell-density in the gut, these factors may also influence oral prion disease susceptibility. Mice were therefore treated with RANKL to enhance M cell density in the gut. We show that prion uptake from the gut lumen was enhanced in RANKL-treated mice, resulting in shortened survival times and increased disease susceptibility, equivalent to a 10-fold higher infectious titre of prions. Together these data demonstrate that M cells are the critical gatekeepers of oral prion infection, whose density in the gut epithelium directly limits or enhances disease susceptibility. Our data suggest that factors which alter M cell-density in the gut epithelium may be important risk factors which influence host susceptibility to orally acquired prion diseases.

  14. Increased Abundance of M Cells in the Gut Epithelium Dramatically Enhances Oral Prion Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Anuj; Rios, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Many natural prion diseases of humans and animals are considered to be acquired through oral consumption of contaminated food or pasture. Determining the route by which prions establish host infection will identify the important factors that influence oral prion disease susceptibility and to which intervention strategies can be developed. After exposure, the early accumulation and replication of prions within small intestinal Peyer’s patches is essential for the efficient spread of disease to the brain. To replicate within Peyer’s patches, the prions must first cross the gut epithelium. M cells are specialised epithelial cells within the epithelia covering Peyer’s patches that transcytose particulate antigens and microorganisms. M cell-development is dependent upon RANKL-RANK-signalling, and mice in which RANK is deleted only in the gut epithelium completely lack M cells. In the specific absence of M cells in these mice, the accumulation of prions within Peyer’s patches and the spread of disease to the brain was blocked, demonstrating a critical role for M cells in the initial transfer of prions across the gut epithelium in order to establish host infection. Since pathogens, inflammatory stimuli and aging can modify M cell-density in the gut, these factors may also influence oral prion disease susceptibility. Mice were therefore treated with RANKL to enhance M cell density in the gut. We show that prion uptake from the gut lumen was enhanced in RANKL-treated mice, resulting in shortened survival times and increased disease susceptibility, equivalent to a 10-fold higher infectious titre of prions. Together these data demonstrate that M cells are the critical gatekeepers of oral prion infection, whose density in the gut epithelium directly limits or enhances disease susceptibility. Our data suggest that factors which alter M cell-density in the gut epithelium may be important risk factors which influence host susceptibility to orally acquired prion diseases

  15. Generating intestinal tissue from stem cells: potential for research and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Jonathan C; Wells, James M

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal resection and malformations in adult and pediatric patients result in devastating consequences. Unfortunately, allogeneic transplantation of intestinal tissue into patients has not been met with the same measure of success as the transplantation of other organs. Attempts to engineer intestinal tissue in vitro include disaggregation of adult rat intestine into subunits called organoids, harvesting native adult stem cells from mouse intestine and spontaneous generation of intestinal tissue from embryoid bodies. Recently, by utilizing principles gained from the study of developmental biology, human pluripotent stem cells have been demonstrated to be capable of directed differentiation into intestinal tissue in vitro. Pluripotent stem cells offer a unique and promising means to generate intestinal tissue for the purposes of modeling intestinal disease, understanding embryonic development and providing a source of material for therapeutic transplantation. PMID:22050526

  16. Improving access to intestinal stem cells as a step toward intestinal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, J W; Lau, C; Jacomino, M; Finegold, M; Henning, S J

    1994-03-01

    In previous studies exploring the intestinal epithelium as a potential site for somatic gene therapy, we concluded that the mucus lining the intestine constitutes a significant barrier to any attempts at gene transfer via the lumenal route. The mucus problem is aggravated by the fact that the epithelial stem cells, which are the logical target for gene transfer, are located deep in the intestinal crypts. The goals of the current study were to develop procedures that would improve accessibility to the intestinal stem cells and which would effect in vivo mucus removal without damaging the underlying epithelium. Initial experiments involved evaluation of the use of distension to improve accessibility to the intestinal crypts and the use of the mucolytic agents dithiothreitol (DTT) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) versus a control solution of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for mucus removal. Catheters were inserted in each end of 3-cm terminal ileal segments in anesthetized rats. Two milliliters of agent was instilled into the clamped segment for 2 min, removed, and repeated. Lumenal distension resulted in shortened villi with wider intervillus spacing, thereby improving crypt access. Both NAC and DTT washes removed significant mucus between the villi but failed to reach the crypt lumen. To enhance mucus release from the crypt lumen, pilocarpine was selected due to its cholinergic properties and preferential binding to muscarinic receptors on crypt goblet cells. Pilocarpine given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to the mucolytic or PBS wash resulted in significant eradication of mucus down into the crypt lumen. This effect was still evident 3-4 hr later provided the intestine remained undisturbed.

  17. Permeability Profiles and Intestinal Toxicity Assessment of Hydrochlorothiazide and Its Inclusion Complex with β-Cyclodextrin Loaded into Chitosan Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Onnainty, R; Schenfeld, E M; Petiti, J P; Longhi, M R; Torres, A; Quevedo, M A; Granero, G E

    2016-11-07

    Here, a novel drug delivery system was developed for the hydrochlorothiazide (HCT):β-cyclodextrin (βCD) inclusion complex loaded into chitosan (CS) nanoparticles (NPs) [CS/HCT:βCD NPs]. It was found, for the first time, that exposure of the intestinal mucosa to free HCT resulted in an increased and abnormal intestinal permeability associated with several injuries to the intestinal epithelium. Nevertheless, the HCT delivery system obtained ameliorated the damage of the intestinal epithelium induced by HCT. Furthermore, we found that the corresponding permeability profiles for both the free HCT and the CS/HCT:βCD NPs were exponential and lineal, respectively. We propose that the increased intestinal uptake and severe tissue injury of HCT to the intestinal epithelium could be directly related to possible effects of this drug on the ionoregulatory Na(+/)K(+)-ATPase channel. Thus, it is postulated that the CS/HCT:βCD NPs may increase the gastrointestinal retention of the HCT, which would provide increased adherence to the mucus barrier that lines the intestinal epithelium; consequently, this would act as a slow HCT release delivery system and maintain lower drug levels of luminal gut in comparison with the administration of free HCT, leading to less severe local injury.

  18. Effect of Deoxynivalenol and Other Type B Trichothecenes on the Intestine: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Philippe; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2014-01-01

    The natural food contaminants, mycotoxins, are regarded as an important risk factor for human and animal health, as up to 25% of the world’s crop production may be contaminated. The Fusarium genus produces large quantities of fusariotoxins, among which the trichothecenes are considered as a ubiquitous problem worldwide. The gastrointestinal tract is the first physiological barrier against food contaminants, as well as the first target for these toxicants. An increasing number of studies suggest that intestinal epithelial cells are targets for deoxynivalenol (DON) and other Type B trichothecenes (TCTB). In humans, various adverse digestive symptoms are observed on acute exposure, and in animals, these toxins induce pathological lesions, including necrosis of the intestinal epithelium. They affect the integrity of the intestinal epithelium through alterations in cell morphology and differentiation and in the barrier function. Moreover, DON and TCTB modulate the activity of intestinal epithelium in its role in immune responsiveness. TCTB affect cytokine production by intestinal or immune cells and are supposed to interfere with the cross-talk between epithelial cells and other intestinal immune cells. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the effects of DON and other TCTB on the intestine. PMID:24859243

  19. Ion channel TRPV1-dependent activation of PTP1B suppresses EGFR-associated intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Petrus R.; Takahashi, Naoki; Harris, Alexandra R.; Lee, Jihyung; Bertin, Samuel; Jeffries, James; Jung, Michael; Duong, Jen; Triano, Amy I.; Lee, Jongdae; Niv, Yaron; Herdman, David S.; Taniguchi, Koji; Kim, Chang-Whan; Dong, Hui; Eckmann, Lars; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Bottini, Nunzio; Corr, Maripat; Raz, Eyal

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a high rate of turnover, and dysregulation of pathways that regulate regeneration can lead to tumor development; however, the negative regulators of oncogenic events in the intestinal epithelium are not fully understood. Here we identified a feedback loop between the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a known mediator of proliferation, and the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We found that TRPV1 was expressed by IECs and was intrinsically activated upon EGFR stimulation. Subsequently, TRPV1 activation inhibited EGFR-induced epithelial cell proliferation via activation of Ca2+/calpain and resulting activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). In a murine model of multiple intestinal neoplasia (ApcMin/+ mice), TRPV1 deficiency increased adenoma formation, and treatment of these animals with an EGFR kinase inhibitor reversed protumorigenic phenotypes, supporting a functional association between TRPV1 and EGFR signaling in IECs. Administration of a TRPV1 agonist suppressed intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice, similar to — as well as in conjunction with — a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, which suggests that targeting both TRPV1 and COX-2 has potential as a therapeutic approach for tumor prevention. Our findings implicate TRPV1 as a regulator of growth factor signaling in the intestinal epithelium through activation of PTP1B and subsequent suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:25083990

  20. Role of intestinal cytochrome p450 enzymes in diclofenac-induced toxicity in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Qing-Yu

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of small intestinal (SI) cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes in the metabolic activation of diclofenac (DCF), a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and DCF-induced intestinal toxicity. DCF induces intestinal ulcers in humans and mice, but the underlying mechanisms, including the necessity for drug bioactivation in the target tissues and the sources and identities of reactive intermediates, are not fully understood. We found that the number of DCF-induced (at 50 mg/kg p.o.) intestinal ulcers was significantly smaller in an intestinal epithelium (IE)-specific P450 reductase (CPR) knockout (IE-Cpr-null) mouse model, which has little P450 activity in the IE, than in wild-type (WT) mice, determined at 14 h after DCF administration. The involvement of intestinal P450 enzymes was confirmed by large reductions (>80-90%) in the rates of in vitro formation, in SI microsomal reactions, of hydroxylated DCF metabolites and reactive intermediates, trapped as DCF-glutathione (GSH) conjugates, in the IE-Cpr-null, compared with WT mice. The SI levels of DCF-GSH conjugates (at 4 h after dosing) and DCF-protein adducts (at 14 h after dosing) were significantly lower in IE-Cpr-null than in WT mice. In additional experiments, we found that pretreatment of mice with grapefruit juice, which is known to inhibit SI P450 activity, ameliorated DCF-induced intestinal toxicity in WT mice. Our results not only strongly support the notion that SI P450 enzymes play an important role in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, but also illustrate the possibility of preventing DCF-induced intestinal toxicity through dietary intervention.

  1. Expression of semaphorin 3A in the rat corneal epithelium during wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Morishige, Naoyuki; Ko, Ji-Ae; Morita, Yukiko; Nishida, Teruo

    2010-05-14

    The neural guidance protein semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is expressed in corneal epithelial cells of the adult rat. We have now further investigated the localization of Sema3A in the normal rat corneal epithelium as well as changes in its expression pattern during wound healing after central corneal epithelial debridement. The expression pattern of Sema3A was compared with that of the tight-junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), the gap-junction protein connexin43 (Cx43), or the cell proliferation marker Ki67. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Sema3A was present predominantly in the membrane of basal and wing cells of the intact corneal epithelium. The expression of Sema3A at the basal side of basal cells was increased in the peripheral epithelium compared with that in the central region. Sema3A was detected in all layers at the leading edge of the migrating corneal epithelium at 6 h after central epithelial debridement. The expression of Sema3A was markedly up-regulated in the basal and lateral membranes of columnar basal cells apparent in the thickened, newly healed epithelium at 1 day after debridement, but it had largely returned to the normal pattern at 3 days after debridement. The expression of ZO-1 was restricted to superficial epithelial cells and remained mostly unchanged during the wound healing process. The expression of Cx43 in basal cells was down-regulated at the leading edge of the migrating epithelium but was stable in the remaining portion of the epithelium. Ki67 was not detected in basal cells of the central epithelium at 1 day after epithelial debridement, when Sema3A was prominently expressed. Immunoblot analysis showed that the abundance of Sema3A in the central cornea was increased 1 day after epithelial debridement, whereas that of ZO-1 or Cx43 remained largely unchanged. This increase in Sema3A expression was accompanied by up-regulation of the Sema3A coreceptor neuropilin-1. Our observations have thus shown that the expression of

  2. Glutamine-Induced Secretion of Intestinal Secretory Immunoglobulin A: A Mechanistic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Wang, Kai; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W.; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) is one important line of defense in the intestinal mucosal surface to protect the intestinal epithelium from enteric toxins and pathogenic microorganisms. Multiple factors, such as intestinal microbiota, intestinal cytokines, and nutrients are highly involved in production of SIgA in the intestine. Recently, glutamine has been shown to affect intestinal SIgA production; however, the underlying mechanism by which glutamine stimulates secretion of intestinal SIgA is unknown. Here, we review current knowledge regarding glutamine in intestinal immunity and show that glutamine-enhanced secretion of SIgA in the intestine may involve intestinal microbiota, intestinal antigen sampling and presentation, induction pathways for SIgA production by plasma cells (both T-dependent and T-independent pathway), and even transport of SIgA. Altogether, the glutamine-intestinal SIgA axis has broad therapeutic implications for intestinal SIgA-associated diseases, such as celiac disease, allergies, and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27933057

  3. Accessory Olfactory Bulb Function is Modulated by Input from the Main Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Slotnick, Burton; Restrepo, Diego; Schellinck, Heather; Archbold, Georgina; Price, Stephen; Lin, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    While it is now established that sensory neurons in both the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ may be activated by both general and pheromonal odorants, it remains unclear what initiates sampling by the VNO. Anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase was used to determine that adequate intranasal syringing with zinc sulfate interrupted all inputs to the main olfactory bulb but left intact those to the accessory olfactory bulb. Adult male treated mice were frankly anosmic when tested with pheromonal and non-pheromonal odors and failed to engage in aggressive behavior. Treated juvenile females failed to show puberty acceleration subsequent to exposure to bedding from adult males. Activation of the immediate early gene c-Fos and electro-vomeronasogram recording confirmed the integrity of the vomeronasal system in zinc sulfate treated mice. These results support the hypothesis that odor detection by the main olfactory epithelium is required to initiate sampling by the vomeronasal system. PMID:20377623

  4. Accessory olfactory bulb function is modulated by input from the main olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, Burton; Restrepo, Diego; Schellinck, Heather; Archbold, Georgina; Price, Stephen; Lin, Weihong

    2010-03-01

    Although it is now established that sensory neurons in both the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ may be activated by both general and pheromonal odorants, it remains unclear what initiates sampling by the vomeronasal organ. Anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase was used to determine that adequate intranasal syringing with zinc sulfate interrupted all inputs to the main olfactory bulb but left intact those to the accessory olfactory bulb. Adult male treated mice were frankly anosmic when tested with pheromonal and non-pheromonal odors and failed to engage in aggressive behavior. Treated juvenile females failed to show puberty acceleration subsequent to exposure to bedding from adult males. Activation of the immediate early gene c-Fos and electrovomeronasogram recording confirmed the integrity of the vomeronasal system in zinc sulfate-treated mice. These results support the hypothesis that odor detection by the main olfactory epithelium is required to initiate sampling by the vomeronasal system.

  5. An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Carey L; Mahe, Maxime M; Múnera, Jorge; Howell, Jonathan C; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Poling, Holly M; Schweitzer, Jamie I; Vallance, Jefferson E; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Spence, Jason R; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M; Helmrath, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant. To date, limited in vivo models exist for human intestine, all of which are dependent upon primary epithelial cultures or digested tissue from surgical biopsies that include mesenchymal cells transplanted on biodegradable scaffolds. Here, we generated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) produced in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can engraft in vivo. These HIOs form mature human intestinal epithelium with intestinal stem cells contributing to the crypt-villus architecture and a laminated human mesenchyme, both supported by mouse vasculature ingrowth. In vivo transplantation resulted in marked expansion and maturation of the epithelium and mesenchyme, as demonstrated by differentiated intestinal cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells), presence of functional brush-border enzymes (lactase, sucrase-isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase 4) and visible subepithelial and smooth muscle layers when compared with HIOs in vitro. Transplanted intestinal tissues demonstrated digestive functions as shown by permeability and peptide uptake studies. Furthermore, transplanted HIO-derived tissue was responsive to systemic signals from the host mouse following ileocecal resection, suggesting a role for circulating factors in the intestinal adaptive response. This model of the human small intestine may pave the way for studies of intestinal physiology, disease and translational studies.

  6. Intestinal Autophagy and Its Pharmacological Control in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ping; Shao, Bo-Zong; Xu, Zhe-Qi; Chen, Xiong-Wen; Liu, Chong

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal mucosal barrier, mainly composed of the intestinal mucus layer and the epithelium, plays a critical role in nutrient absorption as well as protection from pathogenic microorganisms. It is widely acknowledged that the damage of intestinal mucosal barrier or the disturbance of microorganism balance in the intestinal tract contributes greatly to the pathogenesis and progression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which mainly includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process that involves degradation of protein aggregates and damaged organelles for recycling. The roles of autophagy in the pathogenesis and progression of IBD have been increasingly studied. This present review mainly describes the roles of autophagy of Paneth cells, macrophages, and goblet cells in IBD, and finally, several potential therapeutic strategies for IBD taking advantage of autophagy. PMID:28119697

  7. Microbiota-Dependent Priming of Antiviral Intestinal Immunity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Christine L; Cohen, Jonathan; Yasunaga, Ari; Xu, Jie; Osborn, Greg; Subramanian, Harry; Gold, Beth; Buchon, Nicolas; Cherry, Sara

    2015-11-11

    Enteric pathogens must overcome intestinal defenses to establish infection. In Drosophila, the ERK signaling pathway inhibits enteric virus infection. The intestinal microflora also impacts immunity but its role in enteric viral infection is unknown. Here we show that two signals are required to activate antiviral ERK signaling in the intestinal epithelium. One signal depends on recognition of peptidoglycan from the microbiota, particularly from the commensal Acetobacter pomorum, which primes the NF-kB-dependent induction of a secreted factor, Pvf2. However, the microbiota is not sufficient to induce this pathway; a second virus-initiated signaling event involving release of transcriptional paused genes mediated by the kinase Cdk9 is also required for Pvf2 production. Pvf2 stimulates antiviral immunity by binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase PVR, which is necessary and sufficient for intestinal ERK responses. These findings demonstrate that sensing of specific commensals primes inflammatory signaling required for epithelial responses that restrict enteric viral infections.

  8. Intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    Juckett, G

    1996-06-01

    Giardia is the best known cause of protozoal gastrointestinal disease in North America, producing significant but not life-threatening gastrointestinal distress and diarrhea. Although diagnosis of giardiasis may be challenging, treatment is usually successful. Entamoeba histolytica poses a rarer but far more difficult clinical challenge. Dysentery caused by E. histolytica may be the most feared intestinal protozoal infection, although Cryptosporidium parvum, Balantidium coli, Isospora belli, Sarcocystis species and other newly described protozoa also may cause diarrhea in healthy individuals and may result in intractable, life-threatening illness in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or other immunosuppressive diseases. Certain protozoa once considered relatively unimportant, such as Cryptosporidium, are now recognized as significant causes of morbidity even in the United States, since transmission readily occurs through contaminated water.

  9. Role of Intestinal HIF-2α in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K.; Shah, Yatrik M.

    2016-01-01

    The intestine is supported by a complex vascular system that undergoes dynamic and transient daily shifts in blood perfusion, depending on the metabolic state. Moreover, the intestinal villi have a steep oxygen gradient from the hypoxic epithelium adjacent to the anoxic lumen to the relative higher tissue oxygenation at the base of villi. Due to the daily changes in tissue oxygen levels in the intestine, the hypoxic transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α are essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. HIF-2α is essential in maintaining proper micronutrient balance, the inflammatory response, and the regenerative and proliferative capacity of the intestine following an acute injury. However, chronic activation of HIF-2α leads to enhanced proinflammatory response, intestinal injury, and colorectal cancer. In this review, we detail the major mechanisms by which HIF-2α contributes to health and disease of the intestine and the therapeutic implications of targeting HIF-2α in intestinal diseases. PMID:26667076

  10. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Coyne G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and

  11. Lung alveolar epithelium and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Flamein, Florence; Epaud, Ralph; Clement, Annick; Guillot, Loic

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) comprise a group of lung disorders characterized by various levels of inflammation and fibrosis. The current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of ILD strongly suggests a central role of the alveolar epithelium. Following injury, alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may actively participate in the restoration of a normal alveolar architecture through a coordinated process of re-epithelialization, or in the development of fibrosis through a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Complex networks orchestrate EMT leading to changes in cell architecture and behaviour, loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal properties. In the lung, AECs themselves may serve as a source of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by acquiring a mesenchymal phenotype. This review covers recent knowledge on the role of alveolar epithelium in the pathogenesis of ILD. The mechanisms underlying disease progression are discussed, with a main focus on the apoptotic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and the developmental pathway.

  12. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Varner, Victor D; Gleghorn, Jason P; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C; Nelson, Celeste M

    2015-07-28

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo.

  13. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  14. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  15. FOXA1 deletion in luminal epithelium causes prostatic hyperplasia and alteration of differentiated phenotype.

    PubMed

    DeGraff, David J; Grabowska, Magdalena M; Case, Tom C; Yu, Xiuping; Herrick, Mary K; Hayward, William J; Strand, Douglas W; Cates, Justin M; Hayward, Simon W; Gao, Nan; Walter, Michael A; Buttyan, Ralph; Yi, Yajun; Kaestner, Klaus H; Matusik, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    The forkhead box (Fox) superfamily of transcription factors has essential roles in organogenesis and tissue differentiation. Foxa1 and Foxa2 are expressed during prostate budding and ductal morphogenesis, whereas Foxa1 expression is retained in adult prostate epithelium. Previous characterization of prostatic tissue rescued from embryonic Foxa1 knockout mice revealed Foxa1 to be essential for ductal morphogenesis and epithelial maturation. However, it is unknown whether Foxa1 is required to maintain the differentiated status in adult prostate epithelium. Here, we employed the PBCre4 transgenic system and determined the impact of prostate-specific Foxa1 deletion in adult murine epithelium. PBCre4/Foxa1(loxp/loxp) mouse prostates showed progressive florid hyperplasia with extensive cribriform patterning, with the anterior prostate being most affected. Immunohistochemistry studies show mosaic Foxa1 KO consistent with PBCre4 activity, with Foxa1 KO epithelial cells specifically exhibiting altered cell morphology, increased proliferation, and elevated expression of basal cell markers. Castration studies showed that, while PBCre4/Foxa1(loxp/loxp) prostates did not exhibit altered sensitivity in response to hormone ablation compared with control prostates, the number of Foxa1-positive cells in mosaic Foxa1 KO prostates was significantly reduced compared with Foxa1-negative cells following castration. Unexpectedly, gene expression profile analyses revealed that Foxa1 deletion caused abnormal expression of seminal vesicle-associated genes in KO prostates. In summary, these results indicate Foxa1 expression is required for the maintenance of prostatic cellular differentiation.

  16. Airway epithelium stimulates smooth muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Malavia, Nikita K; Raub, Christopher B; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Panettieri, Reynold A; George, Steven C

    2009-09-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air-liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM) using commercially available Transwells. In some co-cultures, the NHBE were repeatedly (x4) scrape-injured. An in vivo model of tracheal injury consisted of gently denuding the tracheal epithelium (x3) of a rabbit over 5 days and then examining the trachea by histology 3 days after the last injury. Our results show that HASM cell number increases 2.5-fold in the presence of NHBE, and 4.3-fold in the presence of injured NHBE compared with HASM alone after 8 days of in vitro co-culture. In addition, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and, more markedly, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration increased in co-culture correlating with enhanced HASM growth. Inhibiting MMP-9 release significantly attenuated the NHBE-dependent HASM proliferation in co-culture. In vivo, the injured rabbit trachea demonstrated proliferation in the smooth muscle (trachealis) region and significant MMP-9 staining, which was absent in the uninjured control. The airway epithelium modulates smooth muscle cell proliferation via a mechanism that involves secretion of soluble mediators including potential smooth muscle mitogens such as IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, but also through a novel MMP-9-dependent mechanism.

  17. Schlafen 3 changes during rat intestinal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Mary F.; Hermann, Rebecca; Sun, Kelian; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding gut development may illuminate the adaptive response to massive small-bowel resection and facilitate enteral nutrition. We reported that Schlafen-3 (Slfn3) mediates differentiation in vitro in rat intestinal epithelial. We hypothesized that Slfn3 is involved in intestinal development in vivo. METHODS We removed fetal intestines, liver, and lungs on day 20 of gestation, at birth, and on postnatal days 1 and 5. Expression of Slfn3, markers of intestinal differentiation, and Slfn5, to address specificity, were determined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS Villin expression increased on days 1 and 5 (8.7 ± .6 and 5.4 ± .4, respectively; P < .01). Intestinal Slfn3 expression was increased substantially after birth (2.1- ± .5-fold) and on days 1 and 5 (P < .02). Slfn3 was higher after birth in liver and lung but decreased sharply thereafter. Slfn5 expression was mostly unchanged. CONCLUSIONS The data suggest that the developmental/maturation effects we observed correlate with Slfn3 but not Slfn5 and are more relevant to the intestines. A better understanding of how Slfn3 promotes intestinal differentiation could help promote intestinal maturation, improving outcomes in children or adults with short-gut syndrome. PMID:22906252

  18. The midgut epithelium of aquatic arthropods: a critical target organ in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Barry J; Mackie, Ryan S; Mattingly, Kimberly S; Carlson, Jonathan O; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of aquatic arthropods is emerging as an important and toxicologically relevant organ system for monitoring environmental pollution. The peritrophic matrix of aquatic arthropods, which is secreted by the midgut epithelium cells, is perturbed by copper or cadmium. Molecular biological studies have identified and characterized two midgut genes induced by heavy metals in the midgut epithelium. Many other metal-responsive genes (MRGs) await characterization. One of the MRGs codes for an intestinal mucin, which is critical for protecting the midgut from toxins and pathogens. Another codes for a tubulin gene, which is critical for structure and function of the midgut epithelial cells. Perturbation of expression of either gene could condition aquatic arthropod survivorship. Induction of these MRGs is a more sensitive and rapid indicator of heavy-metal pollution than biological assays. Characterization of genes induced by pollutants could provide mechanistic understanding of fundamental cellular responses to pollutants and insight into determinants of aquatic arthropod population genetic structure and survivorship in nature. PMID:12634118

  19. Midgut epithelium in molting silkworm: A fine balance among cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Casartelli, Morena; D'Antona, Paola; Montali, Aurora; Romanelli, Davide; Cappellozza, Silvia; Caccia, Silvia; Grimaldi, Annalisa; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-07-01

    The midgut of insects has attracted great attention as a system for studying intestinal stem cells (ISCs) as well as cell death-related processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Among insects, Lepidoptera represent a good model to analyze these cells and processes. In particular, larva-larva molting is an interesting developmental phase since the larva must deal with nutrient starvation and its organs are subjected to rearrangements due to proliferation and differentiation events. Several studies have analyzed ISCs in vitro and characterized key factors involved in their division and differentiation during molt. However, in vivo studies performed during larva-larva transition on these cells, and on the whole midgut epithelium, are fragmentary. In the present study, we analyzed the larval midgut epithelium of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, during larva-larva molting, focusing our attention on ISCs. Moreover, we investigated the metabolic changes that occur in the epithelium and evaluated the intervention of autophagy. Our data on ISCs proliferation and differentiation, autophagy activation, and metabolic and functional activities of the midgut cells shed light on the complexity of this organ during the molting phase.

  20. Effects of new dietary fiber from Japanese Apricot (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.) on gut function and intestinal microflora in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motoi; Ohnishi, Yuriko; Kotani, Tatsuya; Gato, Nobuki

    2011-01-01

    Much attention has been focused recently on functional foods. Ume, the Japanese name for the apricot of Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc., is an example of a Japanese traditional functional food. There are, however, few reports on the effects of fiber from this fruit on bowel function. With this objective, we prepared ume fiber to test the hypothesis that it can change gut function and intestinal flora in mice. Mice were fed an ume fiber (UF) or cellulose (CF) diet (control) for 40 days. The fecal weight, fecal lipids, plasma lipids and cecal composition of the microflora were analyzed. The amount of feces was significantly greater in the UF group than in the CF group (p < 0.01). The fecal lipids content (% DW) of the feces sampled on the final day of the experiment were significantly greater in the UF group than in the CF group (p < 0.01). Plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations tended to be lower in the UF compared to the CF group (p = 0.058). Occupation ratios of Bacteroides and Clostridium cluster IV were significantly greater in the cecal flora of the UF group. Our results suggest that ume fiber possesses the fecal lipid excretion effects and feces bulking effects.

  1. Gut-trophic feed additives and their effects upon the gut structure and intestinal metabolism. State of the art in the pig, and perspectives towards humans.

    PubMed

    Domeneghini, C; Di Giancamillo, A; Arrighi, S; Bosi, G

    2006-03-01

    The correct functional development of the gastrointestinal tract is of special importance during the neonatal and weaning phases of reared piglets. Nutrition is obviously a critical determinant in the growth of the gut in the young swine. The mucosal epithelium of the small intestine is reputed anatomically and functionally immature in neonatal pigs, a feature that appears to be exacerbated at weaning, when a colonization of the gut occurs by "new" microorganisms entering the alimentary canal with the solid feed. This frequently exposes piglets to diarrhoeic syndromes and other intestinal disturbances. Functional feed additives, also called nutraceuticals, appear as promising alternative substances to the use of chemotherapeutics as growth promoters in the rearing farm, above all considering the near banning of them by the European Parliament in the view of reducing antibiotic resistance phenomena in human therapies. Several feed additives are available that may play a role in the pig nutritional plan because of their trophic and cyto-protective effects on the gastrointestinal apparatus. Paying special attention to the quantitative consequences (histometry) upon the gut of the examined dietary supplements, this review, even if not fully exhaustive, will focus on the function (and possibly the mechanism/s of action) of certain gut-trophic nutrient substrates. This in turn will sustain the potential use of these substances in human therapy, especially the one directed at resolving intestinal diseases, both in adult and infant ages. In nutritional studies as well as in other biomedical research fields, the swine is an excellent animal model.

  2. Characterization of moose intestinal glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Miralda Madar; Dedic, Benjamin; Lundholm, Klara; Branzell, Filip Berner; Barone, Angela; Benktander, John; Teneberg, Susann

    2015-08-01

    As a part of a systematic investigation of the species-specific expression of glycosphingolipids, acid and non-acid glycosphingolipids were isolated from three small intestines and one large intestine of the moose (Alces alces). The glycosphingolipids were characterized by binding of monoclonal antibodies, lectins and bacteria in chromatogram binding assays, and by mass spectrometry. The non-acid fractions were complex mixtures, and all had glycosphingolipids belonging to the lacto- and neolactoseries (lactotriaosylceramide, lactotetraosylceramide, neolactotetraosylceramide, Galα3-Le(x) hexaosylceramide, and lacto-neolactohexaosylceramide), globo-series (globotriaosylceramide and globotetraosylceramide), and isogloboseries (isoglobotriaosylceramide). Penta- and heptaglycosylceramides with terminal Galili determinants were also characterized. Furthermore, glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group O determinants (H triaosylceramide, H type 2 pentaosylceramide, H type 1 penta- and heptaosylceramide) were characterized in two of the moose small intestines, and in the one large intestine, while the third small intestine had glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group A determinants (A tetraosylceramide, A type 1 hexa- and octaosylceramide, A dodecaosylceramide). The acid glycosphingolipid fractions of moose small and large intestine contained sulfatide, and the gangliosides GM3, GD3, GD1a, GD1b, and also NeuGc and NeuAc variants of the Sd(a) ganglioside and the sialyl-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside. In humans, the NeuAc-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside is a marker of embryonic and adult stem cells, and is also expressed in several human cancers. This is the first time sialyl-globopentaosylceramide/SSEA-4 has been characterized in a fully differentiated normal tissue, and also the first time NeuGc-globopentaosylceramide has been characterized.

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in normal and regenerating olfactory epithelium of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jimena Laura; Cervino, Ailen Soledad; Jungblut, Lucas David; Paz, Dante Agustín

    2015-03-01

    Olfactory epithelium has the capability to continuously regenerate olfactory receptor neurons throughout life. Adult neurogenesis results from proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells, and consequently, olfactory neuroepithelium offers an excellent opportunity to study neural regeneration and the factors involved in the maintenance and regeneration of all their cell types. We analyzed the expression of BDNF in the olfactory system under normal physiological conditions as well as during a massive regeneration induced by chemical destruction of the olfactory epithelium in Xenopus laevis larvae. We described the expression and presence of BDNF in the olfactory epithelium and bulb. In normal physiological conditions, sustentacular (glial) cells and a few scattered basal (stem) cells express BDNF in the olfactory epithelium as well as the granular cells in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, during massive regeneration, we demonstrated a drastic increase in basal cells expressing BDNF as well as an increase in BDNF in the olfactory bulb and nerve. Together these results suggest an important role of BDNF in the maintenance and regeneration of the olfactory system.

  4. Morphological and Functional Features of Hepatic Cyst Epithelium in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Domenico; Onori, Paolo; Alpini, Gianfranco; Franchitto, Antonio; Jefferson, Douglas M.; Torrice, Alessia; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Stefanelli, Fabrizio; Mancino, Maria Grazia; Strazzabosco, Mario; Angelico, Mario; Attili, Adolfo; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the morphological and functional features of hepatic cyst epithelium in adult autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In six ADPKD patients, we investigated the morphology of cyst epithelium apical surface by scanning electron microscopy and the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), IGF1 receptors (IGF1-R), growth hormone receptor, the proliferation marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and pAKT by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Proliferation of liver cyst-derived epithelial cells was evaluated by both MTS proliferation assay and [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA. The hepatic cyst epithelium displayed heterogeneous features, being normal in small cysts (<1 cm), characterized by rare or shortened cilia in 1- to 3-cm cysts, and exhibiting the absence of both primary cilia and microvilli in large cysts (>3 cm). Cyst epithelium showed marked immunohistochemical expression of ER, growth hormone receptor, IGF1, IGF1-R, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and pAKT. IGF1 was 10-fold more enriched in the hepatic cyst fluid than in serum. Serum-deprived liver cyst-derived epithelial cells proliferated when exposed to 17β-estradiol and IGF1 and when exposed to human cyst fluid. ER or IGF1-R antagonists inhibited the proliferative effect of serum readmission, cyst fluid, 17β-estradiol, and IGF1. Our findings could explain the role of estrogens in accelerating the progression of ADPKD and may suggest a potential benefit of therapeutic strategies based on estrogen antagonism. PMID:18202196

  5. Cycle and duration of the seminiferous epithelium in puma (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Leite, Flaviana Lima Guião; de Paula, Tarcízio Antônio Rego; da Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto; Fonseca, Cláudio Cesar; das Neves, Marco Túlio David; de Barros, João Bosco Gonçalves

    2006-02-01

    Puma or sussuarana (Puma concolor) is the second largest feline in the American continent and has an ample latitudinal distribution in very diverse habitats. In relation to its conservation status, the puma is considered an extinction-threatened species. The study of the testis morphology and the spermatogenic process in a species is fundamental for establishing the physiologic patterns that will make possible the selection of the protocols for assisted reproduction. A number of peculiarities associated with the reproductive biology of specific species such as the duration of spermatogenic process can be used to determine the frequency of sperm collection. Nine adult male pumas maintained in captivity were used to determine the relative frequency of stages in the seminiferous epithelium cycle. Three of them received intra-testicular injections of 0.1ml tritiated thymidine to determine the duration of the seminiferous epithelium cycle, and were subjected to biopsy 7 days later. The cycle of the seminiferous epithelium in puma was didactically described into eight stages by the tubular morphology method. The total duration of one seminiferous epithelium cycle in puma was calculated to be 9.89 days, and approximately 44.5 days are required for development of spermatozoon from spermatogonia. The duration of spermiogenesis, prophase and other events of meiosis were 14.08, 15.20 and 1.79 days, respectively. The relative frequency of the pre-meiotic, meiotic and post-meiotic phases were 3.98, 1.79 and 4.12 days, respectively.

  6. Anisotropic growth shapes intestinal tissues during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, Martine; Jia, Fei

    2013-06-25

    Embryogenesis offers a real laboratory for pattern formation, buckling, and postbuckling induced by growth of soft tissues. Each part of our body is structured in multiple adjacent layers: the skin, the brain, and the interior of organs. Each layer has a complex biological composition presenting different elasticity. Generated during fetal life, these layers will experience growth and remodeling in the early postfertilization stages. Here, we focus on a herringbone pattern occurring in fetal intestinal tissues. Common to many mammalians, this instability is a precursor of the villi, finger-like projections into the lumen. For avians (chicks' and turkeys' embryos), it has been shown that, a few days after fertilization, the mucosal epithelium of the duodenum is smooth, and then folds emerge, which present 2 d later a pronounced zigzag instability. Many debates and biological studies are devoted to this specific morphology, which regulates the cell renewal in the intestine. After reviewing experimental results about duodenum morphogenesis, we show that a model based on simplified hypothesis for the growth of the mesenchyme can explain buckling and postbuckling instabilities. Being completely analytical, it is based on biaxial compressive stresses due to differential growth between layers and it predicts quantitatively the morphological changes. The growth anisotropy increasing with time, the competition between folds and zigzags, is proved to occur as a secondary instability. The model is compared with available experimental data on chick's duodenum and can be applied to other intestinal tissues, the zigzag being a common and spectacular microstructural pattern of intestine embryogenesis.

  7. Effects of chronic 137Cs ingestion on barrier properties of jejunal epithelium in rats.

    PubMed

    Dublineau, I; Grison, S; Grandcolas, L; Baudelin, C; Paquet, F; Voisin, P; Aigueperse, J; Gourmelon, P

    2007-05-15

    Environmental contamination by 137Cs is of particular public health interest because of the various sources of fallout originating from nuclear weapons, radiological source disruptions, and the Chernobyl disaster. This dispersion may lead to a chronic ecosystem contamination and subsequent ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. The aim of this study was to thus determine the impact of a chronic ingestion of low-dose 137Cs on small intestine functions in rats. The animals received 150 Bq per day in drinking water over 3 mo. At these environmental doses, 137Cs contamination did not modify the crypt and villus architecture. In addition, epithelial integrity was maintained following the chronic ingestion of 137Cs, as demonstrated by histological analyses (no breakdown of the surface mucosa) and electrical transepithelial parameters (no change in potential difference and tissue conductance). Furthermore, cesium contamination seemed to induce contradictory effects on the apoptosis pathway, with an increase in the gene expression of Fas/FasL and a decrease in the apoptotic cell number present in intestinal mucosa. No marked inflammation was observed following chronic ingestion of 137Cs, as indicated by neutrophil infiltration and gene expression of cytokines and chemokines. Results indicated no imbalance in the Th1/Th2 response induced by cesium at low doses. Finally, evaluation of the functionality of the jejunal epithelium in rats contaminated chronically with 137Cs did not demonstrate changes in the maximal response to carbachol, nor in the cholinergic sensitivity of rat jejunal epithelium. In conclusion, this study shows that chronic ingestion of 137Cs over 3 mo at postaccidental doses exerts few biological effects on the epithelium of rat jejunum with regard to morphology, inflammation status, apoptosis/proliferation processes, and secretory functions.

  8. [Intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Perez, Horacio Joaquín; Menezes, Maria Elisabeth; d'Acâmpora, Armando José

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulative evidence on the multiple functions of the intestinal microflora in relation to the homeostasis of the host. At first considered as a simple mutualism, today this relationship proves to be essential to the health and to pathologic processes, particularly metabolic (eg, obesity) and gastrointestinal (eg, inflammatory bowel disease and functional disorders). The first studies were conducted on the microbiota from fecal material cultured anaerobically. With the advent of molecular biology, it has become possible to determine qualitative and quantitatively the dominant, subdominant and transients species. In recent years, there were advances in the understanding of the relationship betwen the microbiota and the host, as well as among the microorganisms in their respective niches. These advances result from translational integration of microbiology with specialities such as molecular biology, cell phisiology, immunology and ecology. There are few studies on the spatial distribution of the microflora in the gut. Unravelling the topography of the microflora in mammals is a way to validate new animal models for the study of microflora.

  9. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  10. Waterpipe smoking induces epigenetic changes in the small airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Walters, Matthew S; Salit, Jacqueline; Ju, Jin Hyun; Staudt, Michelle R; Kaner, Robert J; Rogalski, Allison M; Sodeinde, Teniola B; Rahim, Riyaad; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Mezey, Jason G; Almulla, Ahmad M; Sattar, Hisham; Mahmoud, Mai; Crystal, Ronald G

    2017-01-01

    Waterpipe (also called hookah, shisha, or narghile) smoking is a common form of tobacco use in the Middle East. Its use is becoming more prevalent in Western societies, especially among young adults as an alternative form of tobacco use to traditional cigarettes. While the risk to cigarette smoking is well documented, the risk to waterpipe smoking is not well defined with limited information on its health impact at the epidemiologic, clinical and biologic levels with respect to lung disease. Based on the knowledge that airway epithelial cell DNA methylation is modified in response to cigarette smoke and in cigarette smoking-related lung diseases, we assessed the impact of light-use waterpipe smoking on DNA methylation of the small airway epithelium (SAE) and whether changes in methylation were linked to the transcriptional output of the cells. Small airway epithelium was obtained from 7 nonsmokers and 7 light-use (2.6 ± 1.7 sessions/wk) waterpipe-only smokers. Genome-wide comparison of SAE DNA methylation of waterpipe smokers to nonsmokers identified 727 probesets differentially methylated (fold-change >1.5, p<0.05) representing 673 unique genes. Dominant pathways associated with these epigenetic changes include those linked to G-protein coupled receptor signaling, aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and xenobiotic metabolism signaling, all of which have been associated with cigarette smoking and lung disease. Of the genes differentially methylated, 11.3% exhibited a corresponding significant (p<0.05) change in gene expression with enrichment in pathways related to regulation of mRNA translation and protein synthesis (eIF2 signaling and regulation of eIF4 and p70S6K signaling). Overall, these data demonstrate that light-use waterpipe smoking is associated with epigenetic changes and related transcriptional modifications in the SAE, the cell population demonstrating the earliest pathologic abnormalities associated with chronic cigarette smoking.

  11. Waterpipe smoking induces epigenetic changes in the small airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jin Hyun; Staudt, Michelle R.; Kaner, Robert J.; Rogalski, Allison M.; Sodeinde, Teniola B.; Rahim, Riyaad; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Mezey, Jason G.; Almulla, Ahmad M.; Sattar, Hisham; Mahmoud, Mai; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2017-01-01

    Waterpipe (also called hookah, shisha, or narghile) smoking is a common form of tobacco use in the Middle East. Its use is becoming more prevalent in Western societies, especially among young adults as an alternative form of tobacco use to traditional cigarettes. While the risk to cigarette smoking is well documented, the risk to waterpipe smoking is not well defined with limited information on its health impact at the epidemiologic, clinical and biologic levels with respect to lung disease. Based on the knowledge that airway epithelial cell DNA methylation is modified in response to cigarette smoke and in cigarette smoking-related lung diseases, we assessed the impact of light-use waterpipe smoking on DNA methylation of the small airway epithelium (SAE) and whether changes in methylation were linked to the transcriptional output of the cells. Small airway epithelium was obtained from 7 nonsmokers and 7 light-use (2.6 ± 1.7 sessions/wk) waterpipe-only smokers. Genome-wide comparison of SAE DNA methylation of waterpipe smokers to nonsmokers identified 727 probesets differentially methylated (fold-change >1.5, p<0.05) representing 673 unique genes. Dominant pathways associated with these epigenetic changes include those linked to G-protein coupled receptor signaling, aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and xenobiotic metabolism signaling, all of which have been associated with cigarette smoking and lung disease. Of the genes differentially methylated, 11.3% exhibited a corresponding significant (p<0.05) change in gene expression with enrichment in pathways related to regulation of mRNA translation and protein synthesis (eIF2 signaling and regulation of eIF4 and p70S6K signaling). Overall, these data demonstrate that light-use waterpipe smoking is associated with epigenetic changes and related transcriptional modifications in the SAE, the cell population demonstrating the earliest pathologic abnormalities associated with chronic cigarette smoking. PMID:28273093

  12. OPTN/SRTR 2013 Annual Data Report: intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in medical and surgical treatment of intestinal failure over the past decade, intestine transplant continues to play an important role. Of 171 new patients added to the intestine transplant waiting list in 2013, 49% were listed for intestine-liver transplant and 51% for intestine transplant alone or with an organ other than liver. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups, from 30.3 per 100 waitlist years in 2002-2003 to 6.9 for patients listed in 2012-2013. The number of intestine transplants decreased from 91 in 2009 to 51 in 2013; intestine-liver transplants decreased from 135 in 2007 to a low of 44 in 2012, but increased slightly to 58 in 2013. Ages of intestine and intestineliver transplant recipients have changed substantially; the number of adult recipients was double the number of pediatric recipients in 2013. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Graft failure in the first 90 days posttransplant occurred in 14.1% of intestine recipients and in 11.2% of intestine-liver recipients in 2013. The number of recipients alive with a functioning intestine graft has steadily increased since 2002, to 1012 in 2013; almost half were pediatric intestine-liver transplant recipients.

  13. Compensatory plasticity in the olfactory epithelium: age, timing, and reversibility

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Casey N.

    2015-01-01

    Like other biological systems, olfaction responds “homeostatically” to enduring change in the stimulus environment. This adaptive mechanism, referred to as compensatory plasticity, has been studied almost exclusively in developing animals. Thus it is unknown if this phenomenon is limited to ontogenesis and irreversible, characteristics common to some other forms of plasticity. Here we explore the effects of odor deprivation on the adult mouse olfactory epithelium (OE) using nasal plugs to eliminate nasal airflow unilaterally. Plugs were in place for 2–6 wk after which electroolfactograms (EOGs) were recorded from the occluded and open sides of the nasal cavity. Mean EOG amplitudes were significantly greater on the occluded than on the open side. The duration of plugging did not affect the results, suggesting that maximal compensation occurs within 2 wk or less. The magnitude of the EOG difference between the open and occluded side in plugged mice was comparable to adults that had undergone surgical naris occlusion as neonates. When plugs were removed after 4 wk followed by 2 wk of recovery, mean EOG amplitudes were not significantly different between the always-open and previously plugged sides of the nasal cavity suggesting that this form of plasticity is reversible. Taken together, these results suggest that compensatory plasticity is a constitutive mechanism of olfactory receptor neurons that allows these cells to recalibrate their stimulus-response relationship to fit the statistics of their current odor environment. PMID:26269548

  14. Choline acetyltransferase and organic cation transporters are responsible for synthesis and propionate-induced release of acetylcholine in colon epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bader, Sandra; Klein, Jochen; Diener, Martin

    2014-06-15

    Acetylcholine is not only a neurotransmitter, but is found in a variety of non-neuronal cells. For example, the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), catalyzing acetylcholine synthesis, is expressed by the colonic epithelium of different species. These cells release acetylcholine across the basolateral membrane after luminal exposure to propionate, a short-chain fatty acid. The functional consequence is the induction of chloride secretion, measurable as increase in short-circuit current (Isc) in Ussing chamber experiments. It is unclear how acetylcholine is produced and released by colonic epithelium. Therefore, the aim of the present study was the identification (on mRNA and protein level) and functional characterization (in Ussing chamber experiments combined with HPLC detection of acetylcholine) of transporters/enzymes in the cholinergic system of rat colonic epithelium. Immunohistochemical staining as well as RT-PCR revealed the expression of high-affinity choline transporter, ChAT, carnitine acetyltransferase (CarAT), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), and organic cation transporters (OCT 1, 2, 3) in colonic epithelium. In contrast to blockade of ChAT with bromoacetylcholine, inhibition of CarAT with mildronate did not inhibit the propionate-induced increase in Isc, suggesting a predominant synthesis of epithelial acetylcholine by ChAT. Although being expressed, blockade of VAChT with vesamicol was ineffective, whereas inhibition of OCTs with omeprazole and corticosterone inhibited propionate-induced Isc and the release of acetylcholine into the basolateral compartment. In summary, OCTs seem to be involved in regulated acetylcholine release by colonic epithelium, which is assumed to be involved in chemosensing of luminal short-chain fatty acids by the intestinal epithelium.

  15. Peptidases Compartmentalized to the Ascaris suum Intestinal Lumen and Apical Intestinal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The nematode intestine is a tissue of interest for developing new methods of therapy and control of parasitic nematodes. However, biological details of intestinal cell functions remain obscure, as do the proteins and molecular functions located on the apical intestinal membrane (AIM), and within the intestinal lumen (IL) of nematodes. Accordingly, methods were developed to gain a comprehensive identification of peptidases that function in the intestinal tract of adult female Ascaris suum. Peptidase activity was detected in multiple fractions of the A. suum intestine under pH conditions ranging from 5.0 to 8.0. Peptidase class inhibitors were used to characterize these activities. The fractions included whole lysates, membrane enriched fractions, and physiological- and 4 molar urea-perfusates of the intestinal lumen. Concanavalin A (ConA) was confirmed to bind to the AIM, and intestinal proteins affinity isolated on ConA-beads were compared to proteins from membrane and perfusate fractions by mass spectrometry. Twenty-nine predicted peptidases were identified including aspartic, cysteine, and serine peptidases, and an unexpectedly high number (16) of metallopeptidases. Many of these proteins co-localized to multiple fractions, providing independent support for localization to specific intestinal compartments, including the IL and AIM. This unique perfusion model produced the most comprehensive view of likely digestive peptidases that function in these intestinal compartments of A. suum, or any nematode. This model offers a means to directly determine functions of these proteins in the A. suum intestine and, more generally, deduce the wide array functions that exist in these cellular compartments of the nematode intestine. PMID:25569475

  16. Paracrine Hedgehog signaling in stomach and intestine: new roles for Hedgehog in gastrointestinal patterning

    PubMed Central

    Kolterud, Åsa; Grosse, Ann S.; Zacharias, William J.; Walton, Katherine D.; Kretovich, Katherine E.; Madison, Blair; Waghray, Meghna; Ferris, Jennifer E.; Hu, Chunbo; Merchant, Juanita L.; Dlugosz, Andrzej; Kottmann, Andreas H.; Gumucio, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Hedgehog signaling is critical in gastrointestinal patterning. Mice deficient in Hedgehog signaling exhibit abnormalities that mirror deformities seen in the human VACTERL (vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheal, esophageal, renal, limb) association. However, the direction of Hedgehog signal flow is controversial and the cellular targets of Hedgehog signaling change with time during development. We profiled cellular Hedgehog response patterns from embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) to adult in murine antrum, pyloric region, small intestine and colon. Methods Hedgehog signaling was profiled using Hedgehog pathway reporter mice and in situ hybridization. Cellular targets were identified by immunostaining. Ihh-overexpressing transgenic animals were generated and analyzed. Results Hedgehog signaling is strictly paracrine from antrum to colon throughout embryonic and adult life. Novel findings include: mesothelial cells of the serosa transduce Hedgehog signals in fetal life; the hindgut epithelium expresses Ptch but not Gli1 at E10.5; the two layers of the muscularis externa respond differently to Hedgehog signals; organogenesis of the pyloric sphincter is associated with robust Hedgehog signaling; dramatically different Hedgehog responses characterize stomach and intestine at E16; after birth, the muscularis mucosa and villus smooth muscle (SM) consist primarily of Hedgehog responsive cells and Hh levels actively modulate villus core SM. Conclusions These studies reveal a previously unrecognized association of paracrine Hedgehog signaling with several gastrointestinal patterning events involving the serosa, pylorus and villus smooth muscle. The results may have implications for several human anomalies and could potentially expand the spectrum of the human VACTERL association. PMID:19445942

  17. Interleukin-22 promotes intestinal-stem-cell-mediated epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lindemans, Caroline A; Calafiore, Marco; Mertelsmann, Anna M; O'Connor, Margaret H; Dudakov, Jarrod A; Jenq, Robert R; Velardi, Enrico; Young, Lauren F; Smith, Odette M; Lawrence, Gillian; Ivanov, Juliet A; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Takashima, Shuichiro; Hua, Guoqiang; Martin, Maria L; O'Rourke, Kevin P; Lo, Yuan-Hung; Mokry, Michal; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Cupedo, Tom; Dow, Lukas E; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E; Shroyer, Noah F; Liu, Chen; Kolesnick, Richard; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Hanash, Alan M

    2015-12-24

    Epithelial regeneration is critical for barrier maintenance and organ function after intestinal injury. The intestinal stem cell (ISC) niche provides Wnt, Notch and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signals supporting Lgr5(+) crypt base columnar ISCs for normal epithelial maintenance. However, little is known about the regulation of the ISC compartment after tissue damage. Using ex vivo organoid cultures, here we show that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), potent producers of interleukin-22 (IL-22) after intestinal injury, increase the growth of mouse small intestine organoids in an IL-22-dependent fashion. Recombinant IL-22 directly targeted ISCs, augmenting the growth of both mouse and human intestinal organoids, increasing proliferation and promoting ISC expansion. IL-22 induced STAT3 phosphorylation in Lgr5(+) ISCs, and STAT3 was crucial for both organoid formation and IL-22-mediated regeneration. Treatment with IL-22 in vivo after mouse allogeneic bone marrow transplantation enhanced the recovery of ISCs, increased epithelial regeneration and reduced intestinal pathology and mortality from graft-versus-host disease. ATOH1-deficient organoid culture demonstrated that IL-22 induced epithelial regeneration independently of the Paneth cell niche. Our findings reveal a fundamental mechanism by which the immune system is able to support the intestinal epithelium, activating ISCs to promote regeneration.

  18. Chemoprevention of intestinal tumorigenesis by nabumetone: induction of apoptosis and Bcl-2 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Roy, H K; Karoski, W J; Ratashak, A; Smyrk, T C

    2001-05-18

    Treatment of MIN mice with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, nabumetone, resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis. In both the uninvolved MIN mouse colonic epithelium and HT-29 colon cancer cells, nabumetone downregulated the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, with concomitant induction of apoptosis, suggesting a potential mechanism for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  19. Mouse fetal whole intestine culture system for ex vivo manipulation of signaling pathways and three-dimensional live imaging of villus development.

    PubMed

    Walton, Katherine D; Kolterud, Asa

    2014-09-04

    Most morphogenetic processes in the fetal intestine have been inferred from thin sections of fixed tissues, providing snapshots of changes over developmental stages. Three-dimensional information from thin serial sections can be challenging to interpret because of the difficulty of reconstructing serial sections perfectly and maintaining proper orientation of the tissue over serial sections. Recent findings by Grosse et al., 2011 highlight the importance of three- dimensional information in understanding morphogenesis of the developing villi of the intestine(1). Three-dimensional reconstruction of singly labeled intestinal cells demonstrated that the majority of the intestinal epithelial cells contact both the apical and basal surfaces. Furthermore, three-dimensional reconstruction of the actin cytoskeleton at the apical surface of the epithelium demonstrated that the intestinal lumen is continuous and that secondary lumens are an artifact of sectioning. Those two points, along with the demonstration of interkinetic nuclear migration in the intestinal epithelium, defined the developing intestinal epithelium as a pseudostratified epithelium and not stratified as previously thought(1). The ability to observe the epithelium three-dimensionally was seminal to demonstrating this point and redefining epithelial morphogenesis in the fetal intestine. With the evolution of multi-photon imaging technology and three-dimensional reconstruction software, the ability to visualize intact, developing organs is rapidly improving. Two-photon excitation allows less damaging penetration deeper into tissues with high resolution. Two-photon imaging and 3D reconstruction of the whole fetal mouse intestines in Walton et al., 2012 helped to define the pattern of villus outgrowth(2). Here we describe a whole organ culture system that allows ex vivo development of villi and extensions of that culture system to allow the intestines to be three-dimensionally imaged during their development.

  20. High-fat Diet Accelerates Intestinal Tumorigenesis Through Disrupting Intestinal Cell Membrane Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Min Young; Seo, Young Rok; Kim, Jong-Sang; Sung, Mi-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Excess energy supply induces chronic low-grade inflammation in association with oxidative stress in various tissues including intestinal epithelium. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on intestinal cell membrane integrity and intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. Methods: Mice were fed with either normal diet (ND) or HFD for 12 weeks. The number of intestinal tumors were counted and biomarkers of endotoxemia, oxidative stress, and inflammation were determined. Changes in intestinal integrity was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran penetration and membrane gap junction protein expression. Results: HFD group had significantly higher number of tumors compared to ND group (P < 0.05). Blood total antioxidant capacity was lower in HFD group, while colonic 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine level, a marker of oxidative damage, was higher in HFD group compared to that of ND group (P < 0.05). The penetration of FITC-dextran was substantially increased in HFD group (P < 0.05) while the expressions of membrane gap junction proteins including zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and occludin were lower in HFD group (P < 0.05) compared to those in ND group. Serum concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor (CD14) and colonic toll-like receptor 4 (a LPS receptor) mRNA expression were significantly higher in HFD group than in ND group (P < 0.05), suggesting that significant endotoxemia may occur in HFD group due to the increased membrane permeability. Serum interleukin-6 concentration and myeloperoxidase activity were also higher in HFD group compared to those of ND group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: HFD increases oxidative stress disrupting intestinal gap junction proteins, thereby accelerating membrane permeability endotoxemia, inflammation, and intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:27390738

  1. Arp2/3 promotes junction formation and maintenance in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestine by regulating membrane association of apical proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bernadskaya, Yelena Y.; Patel, Falshruti B.; Hsu, Hsiao-Ting; Soto, Martha C.

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that Arp2/3, which promotes nucleation of branched actin, is needed for epithelial junction initiation but is less important as junctions mature. We focus here on how Arp2/3 contributes to the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium and find important roles for Arp2/3 in the maturation and maintenance of junctions in embryos and adults. Electron microscope studies show that embryos depleted of Arp2/3 form apical actin-rich microvilli and electron-dense apical junctions. However, whereas apical/basal polarity initiates, apical maturation is defective, including decreased apical F-actin enrichment, aberrant lumen morphology, and reduced accumulation of some apical junctional proteins, including DLG-1. Depletion of Arp2/3 in adult animals leads to similar intestinal defects. The DLG-1/AJM-1 apical junction proteins, and the ezrin–radixin–moesin homologue ERM-1, a protein that connects F-actin to membranes, are required along with Arp2/3 for apical F-actin enrichment in embryos, whereas cadherin junction proteins are not. Arp2/3 affects the subcellular distribution of DLG-1 and ERM-1. Loss of Arp2/3 shifts both ERM-1 and DLG-1 from pellet fractions to supernatant fractions, suggesting a role for Arp2/3 in the distribution of membrane-associated proteins. Thus, Arp2/3 is required as junctions mature to maintain apical proteins associated with the correct membranes. PMID:21697505

  2. Ttk69 acts as a master repressor of enteroendocrine cell specification in Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Dou, Kun; Chen, Hongyan; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-10-01

    In adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) periodically produce progenitor cells that undergo a binary fate choice determined primarily by the levels of Notch activity that they receive, before terminally differentiating into enterocytes (ECs) or enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Here we identified Ttk69, a BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor, as a master repressor of EE cell specification in the ISC lineages. Depletion of ttk69 in progenitor cells induced ISC proliferation and caused all committed progenitor cells to adopt EE fate, leading to the production of supernumerary EE cells in the intestinal epithelium. Conversely, forced expression of Ttk69 in progenitor cells was sufficient to prevent EE cell specification. The expression of Ttk69 was not regulated by Notch signaling, and forced activation of Notch, which is sufficient to induce EC specification of normal progenitor cells, failed to prevent EE cell specification of Ttk69-depleted progenitors. Loss of Ttk69 led to derepression of the acheate-scute complex (AS-C) genes scute and asense, which then induced prospero expression to promote EE cell specification. These studies suggest that Ttk69 functions in parallel with Notch signaling and acts as a master repressor of EE cell specification in Drosophila ISC lineages primarily by suppressing AS-C genes.

  3. Proteomic profiling of fetal esophageal epithelium, esophageal cancer, and tumor-adjacent esophageal epithelium and immunohistochemical characterization of a representative differential protein, PRX6

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun-Hui; Xing, Guo-Lan; Fang, Xin-Hui; Wu, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Jin-Zhong; Fan, Zong-Min; Wang, Li-Dong

    2017-01-01

    AIM To understand the molecular mechanism of esophageal cancer development and provide molecular markers for screening high-risk populations and early diagnosis. METHODS Two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry were adopted to screen differentially expressed proteins in nine cases of fetal esophageal epithelium, eight cases of esophageal cancer, and eight cases of tumor-adjacent normal esophageal epithelium collected from fetuses of different gestational age, or esophageal cancer patients from a high-risk area of esophageal cancer in China. Immunohistochemistry (avidin-biotin-horseradish peroxidase complex method) was used to detect the expression of peroxiredoxin (PRX)6 in 91 cases of esophageal cancer, tumor-adjacent normal esophageal tissue, basal cell hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ, as well as 65 cases of esophageal epithelium from fetuses at a gestational age of 3-9 mo. RESULTS After peptide mass fingerprint analysis and search of protein databases, 21 differential proteins were identified; some of which represent a protein isoform. Varying degrees of expression of PRX6 protein, which was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, were detected in adult and fetal normal esophageal tissues, precancerous lesions, and esophageal cancer. With the progression of esophageal lesions, PRX6 protein expression showed a declining trend (P < 0.05). In fetal epithelium from fetuses at gestational age 3-6 mo, PRX6 protein expression showed a declining trend with age (P < 0.05). PRX6 protein expression was significantly higher in well-differentiated esophageal cancer tissues than in poorly differentiated esophageal cancer tissues (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Development and progression of esophageal cancer result from interactions of genetic changes (accumulation or superposition). PRX6 protein is associated with fetal esophageal development and cancer differentiation. PMID:28293090

  4. Caecal volvulus in a patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Tatterton, M; El-Khatib, C

    2011-10-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare disorder characterised by recurrent symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction without an underlying mechanical cause. Caecal volvulus remains a rare cause of intestinal obstruction that often requires operative intervention. We describe the previously unreported case of caecal volvulus occurring in an adult patient with CIPO, together with his subsequent management.

  5. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  6. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the ... the duodenum. This short first portion of the small intestine is followed by the jejunum and the ileum. ...

  7. Effluxing ABC Transporters in Human Corneal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Mannermaa, Eliisa; Turner, Helen; Häkli, Marika; Wolosin, J. Mario; Tervo, Timo; Honkakoski, Paavo; Urtti, Arto

    2010-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are able to efflux their substrate drugs from the cells. We compared expression of efflux proteins in normal human corneal epithelial tissue, primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCEpiC), and corneal epithelial cell culture model (HCE model) based on human immortal cell line. Expression of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1–6 (MRP1–6) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) was studied using quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Only MRP1, MRP5, and BCRP were expressed in the freshly excised human corneal epithelial tissue. Expression of MRP1 and MRP5 was localized predominantly in the basal cells of the central cornea and limbus. Functional efflux activity was shown in the cell models, but they showed over-expression of most efflux transporters compared to that of normal corneal epithelium. In conclusion, MRP1, MRP5, and BCRP are expressed in the corneal epithelium, but MDR1, MRP2, MRP3, MRP4, and MRP6 are not significantly expressed. HCE cell model and commercially available primary cells deviate from this expression profile. PMID:19623615

  8. Actin capping protein alpha maintains vestigial-expressing cells within the Drosophila wing disc epithelium.

    PubMed

    Janody, Florence; Treisman, Jessica E

    2006-09-01

    Tissue patterning must be translated into morphogenesis through cell shape changes mediated by remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. We have found that Capping protein alpha (Cpa) and Capping protein beta (Cpb), which prevent extension of the barbed ends of actin filaments, are specifically required in the wing blade primordium of the Drosophila wing disc. cpa or cpb mutant cells in this region, but not in the remainder of the wing disc, are extruded from the epithelium and undergo apoptosis. Excessive actin filament polymerization is not sufficient to explain this phenotype, as loss of Cofilin or Cyclase-associated protein does not cause cell extrusion or death. Misexpression of Vestigial, the transcription factor that specifies the wing blade, both increases cpa transcription and makes cells dependent on cpa for their maintenance in the epithelium. Our results suggest that Vestigial specifies the cytoskeletal changes that lead to morphogenesis of the adult wing.

  9. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, A R; Thampi, P; Yadav, S; Rawal, U M

    1993-12-01

    The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  10. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Hidenori; Inoh, Yumi; Fuyuki, Akiko; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction(CIPO) is a rare severe digestive disease in which clinical symptoms of intestinal obstruction appear without any mechanical cause. Pathophysiologically, CIPO shows ineffective intestinal propulsion due to an impairment of intestinal smooth muscle, enteric nervous system, and interstitial cells of Cajal(ICC). Sustained increased intra-bowel pressure often causes small intestinal malabsorption and bacterial translocation, and leads to malnutrition and blood stream infection (sepsis). Key points of the medical approach for CIPO are to improve nutritional status and reduce abdominal symptoms. Dietary cure and defecation control are the main options in mild cases, whereas home-parenteral-nutrition(HPN) and decompression therapy are often needed in severe cases. Stimulant laxatives, prokinetics and herbal medicine are usually used but often in fail. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy(PEG-J) tube may be burdenless compared to conventional ileus tube. Most important points in the management of this disease are to make a correct diagnosis as early as possible and avoid unnecessary surgery. However, no clear diagnostic criteria have been established so far. Manometry, scintigraphy, and full-thickness biopsy are the major examination for the CIPO diagnosis in the Western countries; however these specialized examinations are not popular in Japan. Therefore the Research Group(chief investigator, Atsushi Nakajima) proposed Japanese diagnostic criteria in 2009 to facilitate the diagnosis of this rare disease by the general physician. In 2013, we have reported that cine-MRI is a non-invasive diagnostic method for CIPO. Although further data are eagerly awaited, it can become a promising diagnostic tool in CIPO patients. Furthermore the Japanese criteria have been revised, and in 2014, the comprehensive criteria from a child to an adult have been devised. In 2015, CIPO is newly certified as Specified Rare and Intractable Disease which is

  11. Goblet cells and intestinal Alkaline phosphatase expression (IAP) during the development of the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gomes, José Rosa; Ayub, Laís Costa; Dos Reis, Camila Audrey; Machado, Miriam Joice; da Silva, Jéssica; Omar, Nádia Fayez; de Miranda Soares, Maria Albertina

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the temporal and spacial distribution of the mucins produced by goblet cells and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) expression during the development of the small intestine of the rat. Intestines were removed from rats on the 15th, 17th and 18th days of intratuterine life (i.u.) and on the 3rd, 10th, 17th and 25th days after birth (a.b.). Intestines were processed for routine histological procedures and sections were submitted to histochemistry using PAS to stain neutral glycoproteins and Alcian blue for acidic glycoproteins, as well as immunohistochemistry to detect IAP. In rats, glycoprotein production was seen to begin in the intestinal epithelium cell at around the 17th day of i.u. life; however, this production was not accompanied by morphological indications of the presence of goblet cells. By the 18th i.u. day, the villus epithelium was undergoing differentiation and the first goblet cells could be identified from this time. At around the 10th day a.b., both compartments of the small intestine were detected; i.e. the villi and the crypts. At this timepoint, goblet cells were present in the villi, and also in the upper regions of the crypts. On the 3rd, 10th 17th and 25th days a.b., the presence of the goblet cells increased and presented regional differences in the sections evaluated. IAP was not detected during i.u. life, but was weakly detected in the cells of the villi from the 3rd day a.b., along the entire extension of the villi. On the 10th day, IAP was detected at the tip of the villi, while on the 25th day, it was detected along the extension of the villi, but with a weaker intensity. In conclusion, a temporal and spacial distribution of goblet cells and IAP activity occurs during the development of the small intestine, suggesting a possible regulatory control in accordance with the suckling and weaning phases of food intake in the rat's life.

  12. Food Additive P-80 Impacts Mouse Gut Microbiota Promoting Intestinal Inflammation, Obesity and Liver Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ratnesh Kumar; Ishikawa, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity has emerged as one of the most important global public health issue. The change to the human microbiome as a result of changes in the quality and quantity of food intake over the past several decades has been implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We administered polysorbate-80 to mice via gavage. The researchers monitor liver noninvasively using a bioluminescence imaging. For the liver dysfunction we measure the liver enzymes and PAS stain on liver, electron microscopy liver mitochondria. For the assessment of intestinal inflammation we measured fecal LCN2, LPS, MPO and flagellin by ELISA and qPCR. We use confocal microscopy to detect closet bacteria near the epithelium. 16S sequence was used for the composition of microbiota. Compared with control mice, those receiving emulsifier, showed impaired glycemic tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, altered liver enzymes, larger mitochondria and increased gall bladder size. Additionally, mice in the experimental group showed higher levels of DCA, reduced Muc2 RNA expression, reduced mucus thickness in the intestinal epithelium and increased gut permeability. Intestinal bacteria of mice receiving P-80 were found deeper in the mucus and closer to the intestinal epithelium and had increased level of bioactive LPS, flagellin and LCN2 expression. The result of the study are supportive of evidence that emulsifier agents such as polysorbate-80, may be contributing to obesity related intestinal inflammation and progression of liver dysfunction and alternation of gut microbiota. PMID:27430014

  13. The octopamine receptor OAMB mediates ovulation via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila oviduct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  14. The Octopamine Receptor OAMB Mediates Ovulation via Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in the Drosophila Oviduct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  15. The epithelium of the tongue of Ambystoma mexicanum. Ultrastructural and histochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Wistuba, J; Opolka, A; Clemen, G

    1999-12-01

    The distribution pattern of taste buds and goblet cells and histochemical and ultrastructural aspects of the tongue epithelium of Ambystoma mexicanum are here described. This study is also concerned with the developmental stages and origins of the epithelial cells. Pavement cells and goblet cells of the stratum superficiale are replaced by basal cells of the stratum germinativum in larvae and neotenous adults. The pavement cells of the larvae are characterized by a marginal layer of mucin grana. Decompaction of the mucins occurs immediately before extrusion in the adult. The larval goblet cell type (type I), which is also present in the adult, contains unfused grana of irregular shape. At the tip of the tongue, a further type (type II) of goblet cells is found. In the type II cells the intracellular secretory grana fuse to a single homogeneous mass. Leydig cells of the tongue epithelium are discerned by light microscopy first in the semi-adult, apparently correlated with partial metamorphosis. In the course of ontogenesis and induced metamorphosis the secretion changes to neutral glycoconjugates. The mucins of the pavement cells change first followed by those of the goblet cells. The glands of the secondary tongue show a dorso-ventral pattern of varying secretory qualities. Taste buds are found at the anterior margin of the tongue and along the base of the gill clasps in the early larva. They are already distributed all over the tongue at the end of the early larval phase.

  16. Cryptosporidium, chronic diarrhoea and the proximal small intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, A D; Thomas, A G; Walker-Smith, J A

    1992-01-01

    The association between Cryptosporidium, chronic diarrhoea and a proximal small intestinal mucosal enteropathy was reviewed over a six and a half year period. One hundred and twenty three children with cryptosporidiosis and no clinical evidence of immune deficiency were identified. 50% of children excreting only Cryptosporidium had chronic diarrhoea. Most cases (63%) of chronic diarrhoea occurred in the first two years of life. A mild to moderate enteropathy was present in all nine children undergoing a small intestinal biopsy and seven showed the presence of Cryptosporidium adhering to villous epithelium. All patients eventually recovered spontaneously. Cryptosporidium is a cause of chronic diarrhoea and a proximal small intestinal mucosal enteropathy in children without immune deficiency. Screening for the parasite should be part of the investigative procedures in children with chronic diarrhoea. Images Figure 4 PMID:1398230

  17. Immune and genetic gardening of the intestinal microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jonathan P.; Braun, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system – consisting of adaptive and innate immune cells as well as the epithelium – is profoundly influenced by its microbial environment. There is now growing evidence that the converse is also true, that the immune system shapes the composition of the intestinal microbiome. During conditions of health, this bidirectional interaction achieves a homeostasis in which inappropriate immune responses to nonpathogenic microbes are averted and immune activity suppresses blooms of potentially pathogenic microbes (pathobionts). Genetic alteration in immune/epithelial function can affect host gardening of the intestinal microbiome, contributing to the diversity of intestinal microbiota within a population and in some cases allowing for unfavorable microbial ecologies (dysbiosis) that confer disease susceptibility. PMID:24613921

  18. Intestinal lymphangiectasia and thymic hypoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, R U; Halpin, T C; Abramowsky, C R; Hornick, D L; Miller, K M; Naylor, P; Incefy, G S

    1985-01-01

    We have evaluated the immunological abnormalities present in a 6 year old patient with primary intestinal and generalized lymphangiectasia confirmed by intestinal, lung and lymph node biopsies. Lymphocyte loss through the gut was confirmed by the detection of lymphocytes in her stool. An increased enteric protein loss was suggested by hypoproteinaemia, peripheral oedema, and a very short half-life for i.v. immune serum globulin (3 days). Lymphocyte subpopulation analysis revealed a selective loss of T lymphocytes, with a proportionally increased loss of the OKT4 positive helper/inducer subpopulation. Functionally, there was a decrease in proliferative responses to some mitogens and to allogeneic cells, and a lack of T cell help for in vitro B lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting cells. Natural killer function was normal. In this patient, a concomitant thymic deficiency was documented by failure to identify thymic tissue on a thymus biopsy and by an absence or decrease of the serum thymic factor (thymulin) and thymosin alpha 1. No compensatory lymphopoiesis was detected in the bone marrow. In an attempt to increase T lymphocyte development, the patient was treated with thymosin fraction 5. Daily treatment with this preparation resulted in a transient clinical improvement which could not be sustained on a weekly thymosin treatment schedule. However, lymphocyte numbers did not increase during this treatment. The findings in this patient support the notion that T lymphocytes are needed to stimulate thymic epithelium. In situations of excessive loss of long lived T lymphocytes a secondary thymic atrophy may occur and further contribute to the development of a deficiency in cell-mediated immunity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3971596

  19. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium with Intestinal Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Forbester, Jessica L; Goulding, David; Vallier, Ludovic; Hannan, Nicholas; Hale, Christine; Pickard, Derek; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-07-01

    The intestinal mucosa forms the first line of defense against infections mediated by enteric pathogens such as salmonellae. Here we exploited intestinal "organoids" (iHOs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) to explore the interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with iHOs. Imaging and RNA sequencing were used to analyze these interactions, and clear changes in transcriptional signatures were detected, including altered patterns of cytokine expression after the exposure of iHOs to bacteria. S. Typhimurium microinjected into the lumen of iHOs was able to invade the epithelial barrier, with many bacteria residing within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. An S. Typhimurium invA mutant defective in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 invasion apparatus was less capable of invading the iHO epithelium. Hence, we provide evidence that hIPSC-derived organoids are a promising model of the intestinal epithelium for assessing interactions with enteric pathogens.

  20. The Homeodomain Transcription Factor Cdx1 Does Not Behave as an Oncogene in Normal Mouse Intestine1

    PubMed Central

    Crissey, Mary Ann S; Guo, Rong-Jun; Fogt, Franz; Li, Hong; Katz, Jonathan P; Silberg, Debra G; Suh, Eun Ran; Lynch, John P

    2008-01-01

    The Caudal-related homeobox genes Cdx1 and Cdx2 are intestine-specific transcription factors that regulate differentiation of intestinal cell types. Previously, we have shown Cdx1 to be antiproliferative and to promote cell differentiation. However, other studies have suggested that Cdx1 may be an oncogene. To test for oncogenic behavior, we used the murine villin promoter to ectopically express Cdx1 in the small intestinal villi and colonic surface epithelium. No changes in intestinal architecture, cell differentiation, or lineage selection were observed with expression of the transgene. Classic oncogenes enhance proliferation and induce tumors when ectopically expressed. However, the Cdx1 transgene neither altered intestinal proliferation nor induced spontaneous intestinal tumors. In a murine model for colitis-associated cancer, the Cdx1 transgene decreased, rather than increased, the number of adenomas that developed. In the polyps, the expression of the endogenous and the transgenic Cdx1 proteins was largely absent, whereas endogenous Villin expression was retained. This suggests that transgene silencing was specific and not due to a general Villin inactivation. In conclusion, neither the ectopic expression of Cdx1 was associated with changes in intestinal cell proliferation or differentiation nor was there increased intestinal cancer susceptibility. Our results therefore suggest that Cdx1 is not an oncogene in normal intestinal epithelium. PMID:18231635

  1. Sequential development of intraepithelial gamma delta and alpha beta T lymphocytes expressing CD8 alpha beta in neonatal rat intestine: requirement for the thymus.

    PubMed

    Helgeland, L; Brandtzaeg, P; Rolstad, B; Vaage, J T

    1997-12-01

    Previous studies in congenitally athymic nude rats have suggested that the thymus is important for the development of intestinal T cells. Here we have examined the effect of the nude mutation on intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) development from the perinatal period. By immunohistochemistry it was shown that CD3(-)CD8 alpha alpha + putative IEL precursors colonized the epithelium of both normal and athymic neonatal rats. Mature T cells, however, did not develop in athymic neonates. In normal rats, gamma delta T cells were present at birth and alpha beta T cells appeared within 8 days of postnatal life. At this age, the composition and relative number of intraepithelial T cells were similar to that in normal adult rats, with the exception that most neonatal T-cell receptor-gamma delta + and -alpha beta + IEL expressed CD8 beta. By contrast, extrathymic T-cell maturation in the gut of congenitally athymic rats occurred slowly, as CD3+ IEL did not appear until 4-6 months of age. These intraepithelial T cells displayed variable phenotypes and appeared to be induced by environmental antigens as they were not found in isolator-kept old nudes. In conclusion, the present results indicate that the major colonization of the gut epithelium with gamma delta and alpha beta T cells expressing CD8 alpha beta takes place perinatally and requires the presence of the thymus. The developmental relationship between these neonatal T cells and more immature CD3- CD8 alpha alpha +/- IEL remains elusive.

  2. Ex vivo culture of intestinal crypt organoids as a model system for assessing cell death induction in intestinal epithelial cells and enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Grabinger, T; Luks, L; Kostadinova, F; Zimberlin, C; Medema, J P; Leist, M; Brunner, T

    2014-05-15

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) not only have a critical function in the absorption of nutrients, but also act as a physical barrier between our body and the outside world. Damage and death of the epithelial cells lead to the breakdown of this barrier function and inflammation due to access of the immune system to compounds of the intestinal flora. Intestinal epithelial damage is frequently associated with various inflammatory disorders, chemo- and radiotherapy as well as drug-mediated toxicity. Until recently, intestinal epithelial-damaging activities of drugs and treatments could be tested only in vivo in animal models because of the poor survival rate of primary IECs ex vivo. The three-dimensional culture and outgrowth of intestinal crypt stem cells into organoids have offered new possibilities to culture and study IECs ex vivo. Here we demonstrate that intestinal organoids are a useful and physiologically relevant model system to study cell death and survival in IECs. We further describe a number of microscopy-based as well as colorimetric methods to monitor and score survival and death of intestinal organoids. Finally, the comparison of organoids isolated from gene-deficient mice and wild-type mice allows investigating the role of specific genes in the regulation of IEC death. Owing to their comparable structure and behavior, intestinal organoids may serve as an interesting and physiologically relevant surrogate system for large- and mid-scale in vitro testing of intestinal epithelium-damaging drugs and toxins, and for the investigation of cell death pathways.

  3. Models to predict intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Filipa; Andrade, Fernanda; Ferreira, Domingos; Nielsen, Hanne Morck; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of human intestinal absorption is a major goal in the design, optimization, and selection of drugs intended for oral delivery, in particular proteins, which possess intrinsic poor transport across intestinal epithelium. There are various techniques currently employed to evaluate the extension of protein absorption in the different phases of drug discovery and development. Screening protocols to evaluate protein absorption include a range of preclinical methodologies like in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo. It is the careful and critical use of these techniques that can help to identify drug candidates, which most probably will be well absorbed from the human intestinal tract. It is well recognized that the human intestinal permeability cannot be accurately predicted based on a single preclinical method. However, the present social and scientific concerns about the animal well care as well as the pharmaceutical industries need for rapid, cheap and reliable models predicting bioavailability give reasons for using methods providing an appropriate correlation between results of in vivo and in vitro drug absorption. The aim of this review is to describe and compare in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo methods used to predict human intestinal absorption, giving a special attention to the intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

  4. Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Defense Responses by Probiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wan, L Y M; Chen, Z J; Shah, N P; El-Nezami, H

    2016-12-09

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, which when administered in food confer numerous health benefits. In previous studies about beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to health, particularly in the fields of intestinal mucosa defense responses, specific probiotics, in a strain-dependent manner, show certain degree of potential to reinforce the integrity of intestinal epithelium and/or regulate some immune components. The mechanism of probiotic action is an area of interest. Among all possible routes of modulation by probiotics of intestinal epithelial cell-mediated defense responses, modulations of intestinal barrier function, innate, and adaptive mucosal immune responses, as well as signaling pathways are considered to play important role in the intestinal defense responses against pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to intestinal health together with the mechanisms affected by probiotic bacteria: barrier function, innate, and adaptive defense responses such as secretion of mucins, defensins, trefoil factors, immunoglobulin A (IgA), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines, gut associated lymphoid tissues, and signaling pathways.

  5. Interplay between intestinal alkaline phosphatase, diet, gut microbes and immunity.

    PubMed

    Estaki, Mehrbod; DeCoffe, Daniella; Gibson, Deanna L

    2014-11-14

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) plays an essential role in intestinal homeostasis and health through interactions with the resident microbiota, diet and the gut. IAP's role in the intestine is to dephosphorylate toxic microbial ligands such as lipopolysaccharides, unmethylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides and flagellin as well as extracellular nucleotides such as uridine diphosphate. IAP's ability to detoxify these ligands is essential in protecting the host from sepsis during acute inflammation and chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. Also important in these complications is IAP's ability to regulate the microbial ecosystem by forming a complex relationship between microbiota, diet and the intestinal mucosal surface. Evidence reveals that diet alters IAP expression and activity and this in turn can influence the gut microbiota and homeostasis. IAP's ability to maintain a healthy gastrointestinal tract has accelerated research on its potential use as a therapeutic agent against a multitude of diseases. Exogenous IAP has been shown to have beneficial effects when administered during ulcerative colitis, coronary bypass surgery and sepsis. There are currently a handful of human clinical trials underway investigating the effects of exogenous IAP during sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis and heart surgery. In light of these findings IAP has been marked as a novel agent to help treat a variety of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. The purpose of this review is to highlight the essential characteristics of IAP in protection and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis while addressing the intricate interplay between IAP, diet, microbiota and the intestinal epithelium.

  6. Kinetics of Lipofuscin Formation in Aging Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2010-03-01

    Lipofuscin is a deposit that is formed over time by aggregation and clustering of incompletely degraded membrane material in various types of cells. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat and is known to be present in age- related macular dgeneration (AMD), Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in adults. The degradation of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE) through accumulation of lipsofuscin is considered a significant pathogenic factor in the development of AMD. We will present the results of a study of the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in RPE cells using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and scaling theory on a cluster aggregation model. The model captures the essential physics of lipofuscin growth in the cells. A remarkable feature is that small particles may be removed from the cells while the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation. We compare our results with the number of lipofuscin granules in eyes with early age-related degeneration.

  7. Intestinal Subepithelial Myofibroblasts Support the Growth of Intestinal Epithelial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Nan Ye; Jabaji, Ziyad; Wang, Jiafang; Joshi, Vaidehi S.; Brinkley, Garrett J.; Khalil, Hassan; Wang, Fengchao; Jaroszewicz, Artur; Pellegrini, Matteo; Li, Linheng; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Dunn, James C. Y.; Martín, Martín G.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells (ISCs) are the focus of recent intense study. Current in vitro models rely on supplementation with the Wnt agonist R-spondin1 to support robust growth, ISC self-renewal, and differentiation. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs) are important supportive cells within the ISC niche. We hypothesized that co-culture with ISEMF enhances the growth of ISCs in vitro and allows for their successful in vivo implantation and engraftment. ISC-containing small intestinal crypts, FACS-sorted single ISCs, and ISEMFs were procured from C57BL/6 mice. Crypts and single ISCs were grown in vitro into enteroids, in the presence or absence of ISEMFs. ISEMFs enhanced the growth of intestinal epithelium in vitro in a proximity-dependent fashion, with co-cultures giving rise to larger enteroids than monocultures. Co-culture of ISCs with supportive ISEMFs relinquished the requirement of exogenous R-spondin1 to sustain long-term growth and differentiation of ISCs. Mono- and co-cultures were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic mice. Co-culture with ISEMFs proved necessary for successful in vivo engraftment and proliferation of enteroids; implants without ISEMFs did not survive. ISEMF whole transcriptome sequencing and qPCR demonstrated high expression of specific R-spondins, well-described Wnt agonists that supports ISC growth. Specific non-supportive ISEMF populations had reduced expression of R-spondins. The addition of ISEMFs in intestinal epithelial culture therefore recapitulates a critical element of the intestinal stem cell niche and allows for its experimental interrogation and biodesign-driven manipulation. PMID:24400106

  8. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the intestinl microbiota in health and disease. Moreover, using germfree animals, it was proven that the intestinal microbiota has a role in carcinogenesis and aging in the host. Thus, a new interdisciplinary field, “intestinal bacteriology” was established. PMID:25032084

  9. Persistent disruption of ciliated epithelium following paediatric lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Biju; Aurora, Paul; Spencer, Helen; Elliott, Martin; Rutman, Andrew; Hirst, Robert A; O'Callaghan, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    It is unclear whether ciliary function following lung transplantation is normal or not. Our aim was to study the ciliary function and ultrastructure of epithelium above and below the airway anastomosis and the peripheral airway of children following lung transplantation. We studied the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and beat pattern, using high speed digital video imaging and ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy, of bronchial epithelium from above and below the airway anastomosis and the peripheral airway of 10 cystic fibrosis (CF) and 10 non-suppurative lung disease (NSLD) paediatric lung transplant recipients. Compared to epithelium below the anastomosis, the epithelium above the anastomosis in the CF group showed reduced CBF (median (interquartile range): 10.5 (9.0-11.4) Hz versus 7.4 (6.4-9.2) Hz; p<0.01) and increased dyskinesia (median (IQR): 16.5 (12.9-28.2)% versus 42.2 (32.6-56.4)%; p<0.01). In both CF and NSLD groups, compared with epithelium above the anastomosis, the epithelium below the anastomosis showed marked ultrastructural abnormalities (median duration post-transplant 7-12 months). Ciliary dysfunction is a feature of native airway epithelium in paediatric CF lung transplant recipients. The epithelium below the airway anastomosis shows profound ultrastructural abnormalities in both CF and NSLD lung transplant recipients, many months after transplantation.

  10. Challenges and opportunities for tissue-engineering polarized epithelium.

    PubMed

    Paz, Ana C; Soleas, John; Poon, James C H; Trieu, Dennis; Waddell, Thomas K; McGuigan, Alison P

    2014-02-01

    The epithelium is one of the most important tissue types in the body and the specific organization of the epithelial cells in these tissues is important for achieving appropriate function. Since many tissues contain an epithelial component, engineering functional epithelium and understanding the factors that control epithelial maturation and organization are important for generating whole artificial organ replacements. Furthermore, disruption of the cellular organization leads to tissue malfunction and disease; therefore, engineered epithelium could provide a valuable in vitro model to study disease phenotypes. Despite the importance of epithelial tissues, a surprisingly limited amount of effort has been focused on organizing epithelial cells into artificial polarized epithelium with an appropriate structure that resembles that seen in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of epithelial tissue organization and highlight the importance of cell polarization to achieve appropriate epithelium function. We next describe the in vitro models that exist to create polarized epithelium and summarize attempts to engineer artificial epithelium for clinical use. Finally, we highlight the opportunities that exist to translate strategies from tissue engineering other tissues to generate polarized epithelium with a functional structure.

  11. Intestinal ferritin H is required for an accurate control of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Vanoaica, Liviu; Darshan, Deepak; Richman, Larry; Schümann, Klaus; Kühn, Lukas C

    2010-09-08

    To maintain appropriate body iron levels, iron absorption by the proximal duodenum is thought to be controlled by hepcidin, a polypeptide secreted by hepatocytes in response to high serum iron. Hepcidin limits basolateral iron efflux from the duodenal epithelium by binding and downregulating the intestinal iron exporter ferroportin. Here, we found that mice with an intestinal ferritin H gene deletion show increased body iron stores and transferrin saturation. As expected for iron-loaded animals, the ferritin H-deleted mice showed induced liver hepcidin mRNA levels and reduced duodenal expression of DMT1 and DcytB mRNA. In spite of these feedback controls, intestinal ferroportin protein and (59)Fe absorption were increased more than 2-fold in the deleted mice. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin-mediated regulation alone is insufficient to restrict iron absorption and that intestinal ferritin H is also required to limit iron efflux from intestinal cells.

  12. Reduction in intestinal cholesterol absorption by various food components: mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey S; Kamili, Alvin; Wat, Elaine; Chung, Rosanna W S; Tandy, Sally

    2010-06-01

    A number of different food components are known to reduce plasma and LDL-cholesterol levels by affecting intestinal cholesterol absorption. They include: soluble fibers, phytosterols, saponins, phospholipids, soy protein and stearic acid. These compounds inhibit cholesterol absorption by affecting cholesterol solubilization in the intestinal lumen, interfering with diffusion of luminal cholesterol to the gut epithelium and/or inhibiting molecular mechanisms responsible for cholesterol uptake by the enterocyte. Cholesterol content of intestinal chylomicrons is subsequently reduced, less cholesterol is transported to the liver within chylomicron remnants, hepatic LDL-receptor activity is increased and plasma levels of LDL-cholesterol are decreased. Reduced hepatic VLDL production and less conversion of VLDL to LDL also contribute to lower LDL levels. Certain food components may also affect intestinal bile acid metabolism. Further investigation of the way in which these functional ingredients affect intestinal lipid metabolism will facilitate their use and application as cardiovascular nutraceuticals.

  13. Goblet Cells and Mucus Types in the Digestive Intestine and Respiratory Intestine in Bronze Corydoras (Callichthyidae: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Leknes, I L

    2015-10-01

    The structure and histochemical properties of the intestine in bronze corydoras (Corydoras aeneus), a stomach-containing teleost, are described, with emphasis on goblet cells and mucin types. The proximal intestine displayed a normal structure for teleosts, whereas the distal intestine was wide, translucent, thin-walled, richly vascularized and constantly filled with air, suggesting an important respiratory role. Goblet cells were common throughout the entire intestine and displayed a variable, but mainly faint metachromatic colour after toluidine blue. They were moderately coloured by alcian blue at both pH 2.5 and 0.2 and displayed no colour after periodic acid followed by Schiff's solution (PAS), but a distinct purple-brown colour after high iron diamine followed by alcian blue (pH 2.5). Together, these results suggest that the mucin in the intestine goblet cells consists mainly of sulphated proteoglycans. Further, the results from the present lectin and neuraminidase tests suggest that these mucins contain much N-acetylglucoseamines and some N-acetylgalactosamines and sialic acid, but seem to lack glucose and mannose. They also contain some galactose-N-acetylgalactosamines sequences, normally hidden by sialic acid. The distinct brush border and mucus layer on the epithelial cells in the respiratory intestine may indicate some digestive roles, such as absorption of water, ions and simple carbohydrates. As sulphated proteoglycans are tough and attract much water, this mucus may play important roles in the protection against mechanical and chemical damages and in the defence against micro-organisms throughout the entire intestine, but in the respiratory intestine it may impede significantly the oxygen uptake. However, as this part of the intestine usually contains no digesta, but is completely filled with air, frequently renewed by dry air from the atmosphere, and the main function of the mucus may be to protect the respiratory epithelium against a destroying and

  14. KLF4 regulation in intestinal epithelial cell maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Flandez, M. Guilmeau, S.; Blache, P.; Augenlicht, L.H.

    2008-12-10

    The Krueppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) transcription factor suppresses tumorigenesis in gastrointestinal epithelium. Thus, its expression is decreased in gastric and colon cancers. Moreover, KLF4 regulates both differentiation and growth that is likely fundamental to its tumor suppressor activity. We dissected the expression of Klf4 in the normal mouse intestinal epithelium along the crypt-villus and cephalo-caudal axes. Klf4 reached its highest level in differentiated cells of the villus, with levels in the duodenum > jejunum > ileum, in inverse relation to the representation of goblet cells in these regions, the lineage previously linked to KLF4. In parallel, in vitro studies using HT29cl.16E and Caco2 colon cancer cell lines clarified that KLF4 increased coincident with differentiation along both the goblet and absorptive cell lineages, respectively, and that KLF4 levels also increased during differentiation induced by the short chain fatty acid butyrate, independently of cell fate. Moreover, we determined that lower levels of KLF4 expression in the proliferative compartment of the intestinal epithelium are regulated by the transcription factors TCF4 and SOX9, an effector and a target, respectively, of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling, and independently of CDX2. Thus, reduced levels of KLF4 tumor suppressor activity in colon tumors may be driven by elevated {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling.

  15. Bronchial epithelium in children: a key player in asthma.

    PubMed

    Carsin, Ania; Mazenq, Julie; Ilstad, Alexandra; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Chanez, Pascal; Gras, Delphine

    2016-06-01

    Bronchial epithelium is a key element of the respiratory airways. It constitutes the interface between the environment and the host. It is a physical barrier with many chemical and immunological properties. The bronchial epithelium is abnormal in asthma, even in children. It represents a key component promoting airway inflammation and remodelling that can lead to chronic symptoms. In this review, we present an overview of bronchial epithelium and how to study it, with a specific focus on children. We report physical, chemical and immunological properties from ex vivo and in vitro studies. The responses to various deleterious agents, such as viruses or allergens, may lead to persistent abnormalities orchestrated by bronchial epithelial cells. As epithelium dysfunctions occur early in asthma, reprogramming the epithelium may represent an ambitious goal to induce asthma remission in children.

  16. [The new era of epithelium-targeted drug development].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoshimi; Nagase, Shotaro; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2014-01-01

    Epithelium plays pivotal roles in biological barrier separating the inside of body and the outside environment. Ninety percent of malignant tumors are derived from epithelium. Most pathological microorganisms invade into the body from mucosal epithelium. Thus, epithelium is potential targets for drug development. Claudins (CLs), a family of tetra-transmembrane protein consisting of over 20 members, are structural and functional components of tight junction-seals in epithelium. Modulation of CL-seals enhanced mucosal absorption of drugs. CLs are often over-expressed in malignant tumors. CL-4 expression is increased in the epithelial cells covering the mucosal immune tissues. Very recently, CLs are also expected to be targets for traumatic brain injury and regenerative therapy. In this review, we overview the past, the present and the future of CLs-targeted drug development.

  17. [Responses of peptide hydrolases of the small and large intestines in rats on the administration of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Borshchëv, Iu Iu; Gromova, L V; Ermolenko, E I; Grefner, N M; Borshchëva, I Iu; Gruzdkov, A A

    2012-06-01

    Effects of antibiotics on the structure and functional state of the intestine are not clear. We investigated some structural parameters of the small and large intestine, and activities of two intestinal peptide hydrolases in rats after administration of ampicillin and metronidazole during 3 and 5 days. After 3 days of antibiotic administration a decrease in the weight of mucosa in the small intestine, accompanied with a reduction in the villous height and width in this part of the intestine, and in the weight ofmucosa in the colon occured. At the same time the number of goblet cells in the small intestinal epithelium was increased. Specific activities of aminopeptidase M, and glycyl-L-leucine dipeptidase (micromol/min per g) in the mucosa of the small intestine were increased, and the total activities (micromol/min calculated per a part of the intestine) of the same enzymes did not change. The administration of antibiotics for 5 days resulted in increase of specific activity ofaminopeptidase M in the mucosa of the proximal part of the small intestine. In the chyme of the small intestine and colon, activities of the same enzymes (micromol/min calculated per a part of the intestine) were increased on the third and fifth days of the antibiotic administration. Thus, the application ofampicillin and metronidazole within 3-5 days causes a disturbance of the structural and functional parameters in the small and large intestines, which is most pronounced on the third day of the drug administration.

  18. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Freeman, Jennifer J.; Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Spence, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  19. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  20. OPTN/SRTR 2012 Annual Data Report: intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyderf, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the medical and surgical treatments of intestinal failure have led to a decrease in the number of transplants over the past decade. In 2012, 152 candidates were added to the intestinal transplant waiting list, a new low. Of these, 64 were listed for intestine-liver transplant and 88 for intestinal transplant alone or with an organ other than liver. Historically, the most common organ transplanted with the intestine was the liver; this practice decreased substantially from a peak of 52.9% in 2007 to 30.0% in 2012. Short-gut syndrome, which encompasses a large group of diagnoses, is the most common etiology of intestinal failure. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups, from 51.0 per 100 wait-list years in 1998-1999 to 6.7 for patients listed in 2010-2012. Numbers of intestinal and intestine-liver transplants steadily decreased from 198 in 2007 to 106 in 2012. By age, intestinal transplant recipients have changed substantially; the number of adult recipients now approximately equals the number of pediatric recipients. Graft survival has improved over the past decade. Graft failure in the first 90 days after transplant occurred in 15.7% of 2011-2012 intestinal transplant recipients, compared with 21% in 2001-2002.

  1. Intranasal Location and Immunohistochemical Characterization of the Equine Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kupke, Alexandra; Wenisch, Sabine; Failing, Klaus; Herden, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) is the only body site where neurons contact directly the environment and are therefo