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Sample records for adult langerhans cell

  1. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults].

    PubMed

    Néel, A; Artifoni, M; Donadieu, J; Lorillon, G; Hamidou, M; Tazi, A

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease characterized by the infiltration of one or more organs by Langerhans cell-like dendritic cells, most often organized in granulomas. The disease has been initially described in children. The clinical picture of LCH is highly variable. Bone, skin, pituitary gland, lung, central nervous system, lymphoid organs are the main organs involved whereas liver and intestinal tract localizations are less frequently encountered. LCH course ranges from a fulminant multisystem disease to spontaneous resolution. Several randomized controlled trials have enable pediatricians to refine the management of children with LCH. Adult LCH has some specific features and poses distinct therapeutic challenges, knowing that data on these patients are limited. Herein, we will provide an overview of current knowledge regarding adult LCH and its management. We will also discuss recent advances in the understanding of the disease, (i.e. the role of BRAF oncogene) that opens the way toward targeted therapies.

  2. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults].

    PubMed

    Néel, A; Artifoni, M; Donadieu, J; Lorillon, G; Hamidou, M; Tazi, A

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease characterized by the infiltration of one or more organs by Langerhans cell-like dendritic cells, most often organized in granulomas. The disease has been initially described in children. The clinical picture of LCH is highly variable. Bone, skin, pituitary gland, lung, central nervous system, lymphoid organs are the main organs involved whereas liver and intestinal tract localizations are less frequently encountered. LCH course ranges from a fulminant multisystem disease to spontaneous resolution. Several randomized controlled trials have enable pediatricians to refine the management of children with LCH. Adult LCH has some specific features and poses distinct therapeutic challenges, knowing that data on these patients are limited. Herein, we will provide an overview of current knowledge regarding adult LCH and its management. We will also discuss recent advances in the understanding of the disease, (i.e. the role of BRAF oncogene) that opens the way toward targeted therapies. PMID:26150351

  3. Langerhans cells increase in the dermal lesions of adult T cell leukaemia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shamoto, M

    1983-01-01

    In cases of adult T cell leukaemia neoplastic T cell infiltration in the skin was accompanied by an increase in Langerhans cells. This is in keeping with the view that Langerhans cells may induce antigen-specific and allogenic T cell activation. Images PMID:6600750

  4. Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Hepatic and Pulmonary Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Bruno; Costa, Francisco; Lopes, Joanne; Castro, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells of unknown etiology. It can involve multiple organ systems with different clinical presentation, which complicates the diagnosis. It can range from isolated to multisystem disease with different prognosis. Although common among children, liver involvement is relatively rare in adults and frequently overlooked. Natural history of liver LCH fits into two stages: an early stage with infiltration by histiocytes and a late stage with sclerosis of the biliary tree. Pulmonary findings are more common and include multiple nodules in different stages of cavitation, predominantly in the upper lobes. We present a case of adult LCH with pulmonary and biopsy proven liver involvement with resolution of the hepatic findings after treatment. PMID:25977828

  5. Otic Langerhans' Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gungadeen, Anil; Kullar, Peter; Yates, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To present a case of otic Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in an adult. Also included the diagnosis and management of the condition and a review of the relevant literature. Case Report. We report a case of a 41-year-old man with a history of persistent unilateral ear discharge associated with an aural polyp. Radiological imaging showed bony lesions of the skull and a soft-tissue mass within the middle ear. Histological analysis of the polyp demonstrated Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. His otological symptoms were completely resolved with the systemic therapy. Conclusions. Otic Langerhans' cell histiocytosis can present in adults. Persistent ear symptoms along with evidence of soft-tissue masses within the ear and bony lesions of the skull or elsewhere should prompt the otolaryngologists to include Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in their differential diagnosis. Management should be with systemic therapy rather than local surgical treatment. PMID:23762704

  6. Multisystem Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in Adults Revealed by Skin Lesions.

    PubMed

    Atarguine, Hanane; Hocar, Ouafa; Oussmane, Samia; Mouafik, Sara Batoul; Hamdaoui, Abderrachid; Hafiane, Hanan; Belbaraka, Rhizlane; Akhdari, Nadia; Amal, Said

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman with no remarkable medical or family history presented with papules and vesicles on an erythematous background involving the neck, sacrum, and folds (postauricular, axillary, inguinal, and under the breasts) (Figure 1). During the previous year, she was treated with local and systemic antifungals without improvement. Her history included a secondary amenorrhea, polydipsia, and polyuria (6 L/d) that started 2 years prior. Physical examination revealed chronic bilateral purulent otorrhea with thick eardrums. Histologic examination of skin biopsy revealed a highly suggestive appearance of multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) with immunohistochemistry (anti-PS100 and anti-CD1a), which were positive (Figure 2A and 2B). Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging showed a thickening of the pituitary stalk in relation to a location histiocytic (Figure 3). Bone gaps were objectified on two radiographic tibial diaphyseal. Results from computed tomography (CT) scan showed a magma coelio mesenteric, axillary, and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:27319965

  7. An unusual case of adult disseminated cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Moravvej, Hamideh; Yousefi, Maryam; Barikbin, Behrooz

    2006-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) represents a group of rare histiocytic syndromes characterized by tissue infiltration with dendritic cells. The management of LCH is difficult because these disorders respond inconsistently to immunosuppressive and chemotherapeutic strategies. We describe a refractory and relapsing case of skin and nail limited LCH in a 27-year-old man. He presented with a 7-year history of an erythematous papular eruption of the scalp, ears, face, trunk, axillae, groins, fingernails, feet, and toenails. Diagnosis of LCH was made based on skin histopathology and immunohistochemical staining. Histological studies of biopsy specimens revealed a dense infiltrate of histiocytic mononuclear cells beneath the epidermis; these cells reacted strongly with anti-S-100 antibodies. In addition, CD1a was positive in most of the infiltrating cells. Extensive investigations failed to detect systemic involvement. The patient's cutaneous eruption did not respond to various therapeutic interventions, including phototherapy with oral psoralen with long-wave UV radiation in the A range (PUVA) and cyclosporine. Marked but temporary clinical improvement was achieved with thalidomide, etoposide with systemic steroid, and total body electron beam radiotherapy. Now the patient is on maintenance therapy with thalidomide and is under acceptable control. PMID:17083893

  8. A rare occurrence of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Shevale, Vruturaj V; Ekta, K; Snehal, T; Geetanjal, M

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease process characterized by accumulation and infiltration of cells, showing ultrastructural and immunohistochemical similarities to Langerhans’ cell, in the affected tissues. It exhibits extreme clinical heterogeneity. LCH was historically divided into 3 clinical entities based on extent of tissue involvement and severity of presentation. These 3 entities were eosinophilic granuloma, Hand-Schuler-Christian disease, Letterer-Siwe disease. Owing to similarities of their histologic appearance, they were grouped together under the term histiocytosis X. It was recently changed to LCH, emphasizing the primary cell involved in the disease process. LCH is a rare disease with an incidenceestimated to be 4.0 to 5.4 per million population. Males are affected twice as frequently as females. The disease may occur at any age with peak incidence in children aged 1 to 3 years. We describe an unusual case of a 65-year-old man who presented with painless swelling in anterior region of mandible. PMID:25948998

  9. Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a proliferative disease of histiocyte-like cells that generally affects children. Immunohistochemistry is essential to obtain the correct diagnosis, and treatment protocols are controversial. Objective Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is easy to be misdiagnosed because of its various clinic features and laboratory results. This research focused on the clinicopathological, histopathological, immunohistochemical and other features of LCH and aimed to analyze LCH clinical features for improving diagnosis and decreasing misdiagnosis rate. Case report A case of rare adult LCH was reported and the clinicopathological features were summarized by literature review. The multifocal form of this case includes diabetes insipidus, exophthalmos and mucocutaneous lesions in axillae and anogenital regions, such as infiltrated nodules, extensive coalescing, scaling, crusted papules and ulcerated plaques. The Langerhans cells diffusely infiltrated in the dermis and the tumor cells were positive for CD1a and S-100 expression. The diagnosis was Langerhans cell histiocytosis based on the pathological and immunohistochemical changes. Conclusion LCH has high rate of misdiagnosis and definitive diagnosis depends on pathological biopsy and X-ray examination. The prognosis is related to the onset age and the quantity of affected organs. Although specific therapeutic approach hasn't been well established, combined chemotherapy for multisystem lesions and surgical operation or radiotherapy for unifocal lesions may improve the therapy. PMID:26942568

  10. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Lytic Bone Involvement in an Adult Smoker: Regression following Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Routy, B.; Hoang, J.; Gruber, J.

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare myeloid neoplasm characterized by the proliferation and dissemination of histiocytes. These in turn may cause symptoms ranging from isolated, infiltrative lesions to severe multisystem disease. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) presents as a localized polyclonal proliferation of Langerhans cells in the lungs causing bilateral cysts and fibrosis. In adults, this rare condition is considered a reactive process associated with cigarette smoking. Recently, clonal proliferation has been reported with the presence of BRAF V600E oncogenic mutation in a subset of PLCH patients. Spontaneous resolution was described; however, based on case series, smoking cessation remains the most effective way to achieve complete remission and prevent long term complications related to tobacco. Herein, we report the case of an adult woman with biopsy-proven PLCH presenting with thoracic (T8) vertebral bone destruction. Both the lung and the bone diseases regressed following smoking cessation, representing a rare case of synchronous disseminated PCLH with bone localization. This observation underscores the contribution of cigarette smoking as a systemic trigger of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary bone lesions. A review of similar cases in the literature is also presented. PMID:25789184

  11. Presence of circulating abnormal CD34+ progenitors in adult Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    MISERY, L; ROUGIER, N; CRESTANI, B; FAURE, M; CLAUDY, A; SCHMITT, D; VINCENT, C

    1999-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is related to the proliferation of cells, which are similar to Langerhans cells (LC) but possess many abnormal characteristics. Lesions are widespread and this fact suggests that LCH cells or their precursors are present in the blood of patients. In five adult patients, we have isolated and cultured CD34+ blood progenitors of dendritic cells. We studied their phenotype by flow cytometry and their functional properties in mixed culture with heterologous lymphocytes and with autologous lymphocytes in the presence of tri-nitro-phenyl antigen (TNP). The amount of CD34+ precursors was dramatically higher than controls but a high mortality occurred during the in vitro differentiation. The phenotype of surviving cells was similar to LC phenotype (CD1a+, CD83+, Lag+) but some of them expressed CD2. These cells were able to induce T cell proliferation in mixed culture. They could not initiate primary response to TNP, except in a patient treated with thalidomide. In our hands, these CD34+ cells may be precursors of LCH cells. PMID:10403933

  12. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Rib in an Adult: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Choi, Moon Young

    2016-01-01

    Single-site, single-system Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the rib is one of the rarest causes of bone tumor in adults. Herein, we report a case of a healthy 35-year-old male who presented with upper back pain that was attributed to a solitary osteolytic lesion at the posterolateral aspect of his sixth rib. For diagnostic confirmation and treatment, partial resection of the sixth rib was performed and pathologic finding was consistent with LCH. At the final follow-up after 2 years, no local recurrence or metastasis was observed. PMID:26933424

  13. [Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis].

    PubMed

    Popper, H H

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is regarded as a reactive proliferation of the dendritic Langerhans cell population stimulated by chronic tobacco-derived plant proteins due to incomplete combustion but can also occur in childhood as a tumor-like systemic disease. Currently, both these forms cannot be morphologically distinguished. In the lungs a nodular proliferation of Langerhans cells occurs in the bronchial mucosa and also peripherally in the alveolar septa with an accompanying infiltration by eosinophilic granulocytes and destruction of the bronchial wall. Langerhans cells can be selectively detected with antibodies against CD1a and langerin. In the reactive isolated pulmonary form, abstinence from tobacco smoking in most patients leads to regression of infiltration and improvement of symptoms. In high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) the small star-like scars can still be detected even after complete cessation of tobacco smoking.

  14. Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Aruna, D. R.; Pushpalatha, G.; Galgali, Sushma; Prashanthy

    2011-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a group of rare disorders histologically characterized by the proliferation of Langerhans cells. Multiple organs and systems may be involved by the disease. Typically, there is bone involvement and, less frequently, lesions may be found in the lungs, liver, lymph nodes, skin, and mucosa. Oral soft tissue lesions without bone involvement are rare. We present a case of oral lesions associated with LCH in a young woman. PMID:22028518

  15. Isolated Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the sublingual gland in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaodong; Chen, Xinming; Zhang, Jiali; Fang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by the proliferation of pathologic Langerhans cells. Its clinical presentation is highly variable, that range from single-system, limited disease to severe, multi-organ disease with high mortality. LCH usually affects children and young adults. The most frequent sites for LCH are the bone, skin, lung, pituitary gland, and lymph nodes. Salivary gland involvement by LCH is extremely rare, and only a few cases of LHC involving the parotid glands have been reported in the English literature. To our knowledge, the involvement of the sublingual gland as a part of single or multisystem LCH has not been previously described. Herein we reported the first case of primary LCH of the sublingual gland. A 40-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of a painless mass on the right sublingual area. Excision of the lesion including the right sublingual gland was performed. Histopathological diagnosis of LCH was rendered. The patient remains free of symptoms 17 months after surgery. PMID:26722591

  16. The Langerhans cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, K.; Stingl, G.

    1983-06-01

    Langerhans cells are the bone-marrow-derived immune cells of the epidermis; they express Ia antigens and receptors for the Fc portion of IgG and complement components and are required for epidermal-cell-induced antigen-specific, syngeneic and allogeneic T-cell activitation and the generation of epidermal-cell-induced cytotoxic T cells. Their presence within the epidermis and functional integrity determine whether topical application of haptens leads to specific sensitization or unresponsiveness, and in skin grafts of only I region disparate donors, they represent the cells responsible for the critical allosensitizing signal. UV radiation abrogates most of Langerhans cell functions in vitro; under certain conditions in vivo, it prevents contact sensitization favoring the development of specific unresponsiveness. UV radiation abrogates antigen-presenting capacities of epidermal cells by interfering both with the processing of antigen by Langerhans cells and the production of the epidermal-cell-derived thymocyte activating factor required for optimal T-cell responses.

  17. Langerhans cell histiocytosis in Chinese adults: absence of BRAF mutations and increased FOXP3+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chunguang; Jia, Xingyuan; Jia, Yanjun; He, Yanling

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by the proliferation of abnormal Langerhans cells. Previous studies mainly focused on children with LCH. However, there is limited information on the clinical and pathological aspects of LCH in adults. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the clinical and pathological aspects of LCH in Chinese adults. The results showed that the average age of 18 LCH patients was 35.22 ± 16.57 years old. The ratio of male to female was 3.5:1.14 patients (77.8%) had single-system involvement and 4 patients (22.2%) had multi-system diseases. The skin (38.9%) and lungs (44.4%) were the mainly affected organs. No BRAF mutations were detected in the lesions of 18 cases. The number of FOXP3+ Tregs was significantly increased in LCH. In conclusion, clinical features of LCH in adults are distinct from those in children. Adult LCH has a relatively good prognosis and presents as a benign disease. Immune regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of adult LCH. PMID:25031736

  18. Adult Multisystem Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus Successfully Treated with Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Eun; Lee, Hae Ri; Ohn, Jung Hun; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Juri; Lee, Seong Jin; Choi, Moon-Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Kim, Jung Han

    2014-01-01

    We report the rare case of an adult who was diagnosed with recurrent multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) involving the pituitary stalk and lung who present with central diabetes insipidus and was successfully treated with systemic steroids and chemotherapy. A 49-year-old man visited our hospital due to symptoms of polydipsia and polyuria that started 1 month prior. Two years prior to presentation, he underwent excision of right 6th and 7th rib lesions for the osteolytic lesion and chest pain, which were later confirmed to be LCH on pathology. After admission, the water deprivation test was done and the result indicated that he had central diabetes insipidus. Sella magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass on the pituitary stalk with loss of normal bright spot at the posterior lobe of the pituitary. Multiple patchy infiltrations were detected in both lung fields by computed tomography (CT). He was diagnosed with recurrent LCH and was subsequently treated with inhaled desmopressin, systemic steroids, vinblastine, and mercaptopurine. The pituitary mass disappeared after two months and both lungs were clear on chest CT after 11 months. Although clinical remission in multisystem LCH in adults is reportedly rare, our case of adult-onset multisystem LCH was treated successfully with systemic chemotherapy using prednisolone, vinblastine, and 6-mercaptopurine, which was well tolerated. PMID:25309800

  19. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Clavicle in an Adult: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Udaka, Toru; Susa, Michiro; Kikuta, Kazutaka; Nishimoto, Kazumasa; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Sasaki, Aya; Kameyama, Kaori; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Morioka, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) usually occurs in children under the age of 10 years with a predilection for the skull, spine, rib and humerus. Solitary LCH occurring in an adult clavicle is uncommon with limited reports to date. The lesion in our patient was curetted with the intent to make a diagnosis, which subsequently lead to the remission of the symptom and the disease. At the final follow-up after 1 year, no local recurrence or metastasis is observed. PMID:26600774

  20. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis involving posterior elements of the dorsal spine: An unusual cause of extradural spinal mass in an adult.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Devendra K; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Savant, Hemant V

    2011-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells occurring as an isolated lesion or as part of a systemic proliferation. It is commoner in children younger than 10 years of age with sparing of the posterior elements in more than 95% of cases. We describe a case of LCH in an adult female presenting with paraplegia. MRI revealed a well-defined extradural contrast enhancing mass at D2-D4 vertebral level involving the posterior elements of spine. D2-5 laminectomy with excision of lesion was performed which lead to marked improvement of patients neurological status. Histopathology was suggestive of eosinophilic granuloma. We describe the case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare tumor presentation.

  1. Adult Onset of BRAFV600E-Mutated Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Cutaneous Involvement Successfully Diagnosed by Immunohistochemical Staining

    PubMed Central

    Tono, Hisayuki; Fujimura, Taku; Kakizaki, Aya; Furudate, Sadanori; Ishibashi, Masaya; Aiba, Setsuya

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is characterized by the clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells; it is categorized as a single-system disease with single or multifocal lesions, and as a multi-system disease with or without the risk of organ involvement. Although the skin is not categorized as a risk organ, the precise diagnosis of skin lesions is necessary to determine the protocol for the treatment of LCH. In this report, we describe a 28-year-old Japanese man with adult onset of BRAFV600E-mutated LCH with cutaneous involvement successfully diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining. Our report suggests that immunohistochemical staining for the BRAFV600E gene could be a diagnostic tool to determine the clinical type of LCH. PMID:26500535

  2. Laryngeal Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Neck Mass in an Adult Woman

    PubMed Central

    Jahandideh, Hesam; Nasoori, Yasser; Rostami, Sara; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a very rare condition that commonly affects the head and neck region. There are very few cases of isolated laryngeal involvement by LCH, mostly reported in pediatric patients. Here, we report a case of laryngeal LCH in a 62-year-old woman presenting with a neck mass several weeks ago. The clinical and histopathological findings are reported with a brief discussion about the disease. PMID:27127670

  3. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26508947

  4. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae; Kim, Sang-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus.

  5. Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults. Report from the International Registry of the Histiocyte Society.

    PubMed

    Aricò, M; Girschikofsky, M; Généreau, T; Klersy, C; McClain, K; Grois, N; Emile, J-F; Lukina, E; De Juli, E; Danesino, C

    2003-11-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), characterised by the infiltration of one or more organs by large mononuclear cells, can develop in persons of any age. Although the features of this disease are well described in children, they remain poorly defined in adults. From January 2000 to June 2001, 274 adults from 13 countries, with biopsy-proven adult LCH, were registered with the International Histiocyte Society Registry. Information was collected about clinical presentation, family history, associated conditions, cigarette smoking and treatment, to assist in future management decisions in patients aged 18 years and older. There were slightly more males than females (143:126), and the mean ages at the onset and diagnosis of disease were 33 years (standard deviation (S.D.) 15 years) and 35 years (S.D. 14 years), respectively. 2 patients had consanguineous parents, and 1 had a family history of LCH; 129 reported smoking (47.1%); 17 (6.2%) had been diagnosed with different types of cancer. Single-system LCH, found in 86 patients (31.4%), included isolated pulmonary involvement in 44 cases; 188 patients (68.6%) had multisystem disease; 81 (29.6%) had diabetes insipidus. Initial treatment consisted of vinblastine administered with or without steroids, to 82 patients (29.9%), including 9 who had received it with etoposide, which was the sole agent given to 19 patients. 236 patients were considered evaluable for survival. At a median follow-up of 28 months from diagnosis, 15 patients (6.4%) had died (death rate, 1.5/100 person years, 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) 0.9-2.4). The probability of survival at 5 years postdiagnosis was 92.3% (95% CI 85.6-95.9) overall, 100% for patients with single-system disease (n=37), 87.8% (95% CI 54.9-97.2) for isolated pulmonary disease (n=34), and 91.7% (95% CI 83.6-95.9) for multisystem disease (n=163). Survival did not differ significantly among patients with multisystem disease, with or without liver or lung involvement) 5-year

  6. A Rare Case of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Skull in an Adult: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chiong, Corinna; Jayachandra, Shruti; D. Eslick, Guy; Al-Khawaja, Darweesh; Casikar, Vidyasagar

    2013-01-01

    We report a 41-year old male who presented to the Emergency Department after falling while water-skiing. He had a previous medical history included chronic headaches, which had persisted for the last 2-3 months prior to presentation. Computed tomography of the head showed a small hypersensitivity with a small extra axial collection with a maximum thickness of 1mm. Differential diagnoses included an arachnoid cyst, haemangioma, meningioma or a secondary lesion. A diagnosis of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis was made based on the histopathology examination and the immunoperoxidase staining. PMID:24179650

  7. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: An Illusion of Hope

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Vela D; Varma, Beena; Sharma, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare atypical cellular disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells leading to myriad clinical presentations and variable outcomes. It usually occurs in children and young adults. It can be present with local and systemic manifestation involving skin, bone, mucosal tissues and internal organs. Aims and objectives: The stomatologist plays an important role in management of the disease by keeping in mind the various oral manifestations of the disease. Case report: Of a child with disseminated LCH with multiorgan involvement who presented with failure to thrive, osteolytic bony lesions and extensive cutaneous eruptions. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and awareness is necessary to treat the patients. How to cite this article: Desai VD, Priyadarshinni SR, Varma B, Sharma R. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: An Illusion of Hope. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(1):66-70. PMID:25206193

  8. Multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis in an adult with a pathological fracture of the mandible and spontaneous malunion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SHI, SAILANG; LIU, YANMING; FU, TAO; LI, XIUZHEN; ZHAO, SHIFANG

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is rare in the adult population and even rarer with jaw involvement. The current study presents the case of a 39-year-old male who complained of recurrent pain, swelling of the gingiva and an occasional pus-like discharge in the right mandible for one year. The patient was previously prescribed antibiotics, but this did not resolve the problem. An initial panoramic radiograph showed an osteolytic lesion and bone fracture in the right mandible. Eight months later, a new radiograph showed the spontaneous malunion of the fractured mandible. The patient was eventually diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Further lesions were found in the ribs and ilium by nuclear bone scanning. The patient was subsequently treated with systemic chemotherapy, and the lesions are currently effectively being controlled. This study is the first to show that spontaneous intralesional bone regeneration may lead to reunification of the mandible fracture caused by LCH in an adult. PMID:25120660

  9. General Information about Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. Management of adult patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: recommendations from an expert panel on behalf of Euro-Histio-Net.

    PubMed

    Girschikofsky, Michael; Arico, Maurizio; Castillo, Diego; Chu, Anthony; Doberauer, Claus; Fichter, Joachim; Haroche, Julien; Kaltsas, Gregory A; Makras, Polyzois; Marzano, Angelo V; de Menthon, Mathilde; Micke, Oliver; Passoni, Emanuela; Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich M; Tazi, Abdellatif; McClain, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) is an orphan disease of clonal dendritic cells which may affect any organ of the body. Most of the knowledge about the diagnosis and therapy is based on pedriatic studies. Adult LCH patients are often evaluated by physicians who focus on only the most obviously affected organ without sufficient evaluation of other systems, resulting in patients being underdiagnosed and/or incompletely staged. Furthermore they may be treated with pediatric-based therapies which are less effective and sometimes more toxic for adults. The published literature on adult LCH cases lacks a comprehensive discussion on the differences between pediatric and adult patients and there are no recommendations for evaluation and comparative therapies. In order to fill this void, a number of experts in this field cooperated to develop the first recommendations for management of adult patients with LCH. Key questions were selected according to the clinical relevance focusing on diagnostic work up, therapy, and follow up. Based on the available literature up to December 2012, recommendations were established, drafts were commented by the entire group, and redrafted by the executive editor. The quality of evidence of the recommendations is predominantly attributed to the level of expert opinion. Final agreement was by consensus. PMID:23672541

  11. Management of adult patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: recommendations from an expert panel on behalf of Euro-Histio-Net

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) is an orphan disease of clonal dendritic cells which may affect any organ of the body. Most of the knowledge about the diagnosis and therapy is based on pedriatic studies. Adult LCH patients are often evaluated by physicians who focus on only the most obviously affected organ without sufficient evaluation of other systems, resulting in patients being underdiagnosed and/or incompletely staged. Furthermore they may be treated with pediatric-based therapies which are less effective and sometimes more toxic for adults. The published literature on adult LCH cases lacks a comprehensive discussion on the differences between pediatric and adult patients and there are no recommendations for evaluation and comparative therapies. In order to fill this void, a number of experts in this field cooperated to develop the first recommendations for management of adult patients with LCH. Key questions were selected according to the clinical relevance focusing on diagnostic work up, therapy, and follow up. Based on the available literature up to December 2012, recommendations were established, drafts were commented by the entire group, and redrafted by the executive editor. The quality of evidence of the recommendations is predominantly attributed to the level of expert opinion. Final agreement was by consensus. PMID:23672541

  12. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Atypical Intervertebral Disc and Sacroiliac Joint Involvement Mimicking Osteoarticular Tuberculosis in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Zeynep Maraş; Kahraman, Ayşegül Sağır; Görmeli, Cemile Ayşe; Sevimli, Reşit; Akpolat, Nusret

    2016-01-01

    Background: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), typically found in children, is a rare single or multisystem disorder with a wide range of clinical and radiological manifestations. Unusual presentations of LCH are occasionally encountered and it may be difficult to distinguish LCH from an infection or a benign or malignant tumor. Results: A 35-year-old female presented with pain in her back and left buttock, malaise, and weight loss, with a duration of several months. Her laboratory test results were within the normal ranges except for the levels of acute phase reactants, which were elevated. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed a unilateral destructive sacroiliac lesion, and multiple vertebral lesions with adjacent discal involvement and extensive soft tissue extensions. She was initially misdiagnosed with multifocal osteoarticular tuberculosis. An open biopsy and joint curettage was performed. Histopathological examination showed that she had LCH. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of LCH associated with a destructive unilateral sacroiliac lesion, discal involvement, and involvement of the adjacent vertebrae, in an adult patient; the LCH mimicked osteoarticular tuberculosis. Disease onset in adulthood is rare, and this can potentially delay diagnosis. Familiarity with the imaging features of unusual LCH manifestations is necessary to ensure accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:27761291

  13. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Clavicle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaowu; Zhang, Weisheng; Na, Shengbo; Zhang, Lina; Lang, Zhijin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We report a rare case of solitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) involving the clavicle of an adult female. The patient was a 32-year-old female presenting with 1 month history of progressive pain, swelling, and tenderness in the region near the left sternoclavicular joint. Radiograph, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging showed an osteolytic lesion in the clavicle with tumor extension and soft tissue edema. Surgical curettage of the lesion was performed, and the histopathologic diagnosis was LCH. Because of its rarity and possibly variable presentation, LCH should be included and considered in the differential diagnosis when we encounter a clavicle lesion. PMID:25365405

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell histiocytosis affects the lungs, liver, or blood-forming (hematopoietic) system; damage to these organs and tissues ... occurs when the Langerhans cells crowd out blood-forming cells in the bone marrow, leads to a ...

  15. Nail changes in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Sehgal, V N; Bajaj, P

    2000-05-01

    Nail changes in Langerhans cell histiocytosis are distinctly uncommon. Paronychial erythema, swelling and subungual pustules of the fingernails and toenails were cardinal, and were supported by diffuse as well as dense collections of mononuclear Langerhans cells evidenced by microscopic investigation. Oral administration of co-trimoxazole (800 mg sulphamethoxazole + 160 mg trimethoprim) every 12 h, 50 mg/d cyclophosphamide and 80 mg/d predinisolone were the mainstay of treatment, supported by scalp tar shampoo and local betamethasone lotion application.

  16. The histopathology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Favara, B. E.; Jaffe, R.

    1994-01-01

    Selected aspects of the histopathology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis representing diagnostic difficulty and/or controversy are presented with emphasis on the composition of pathological lesions. Lesional cell phenotypes and the factors influencing variations are noted. Features of several skin-based histiocytic disorders, dermatopathic lymphadenopathy and Rosai-Dorfman disease are compared. Associations between Langerhans cell histiocytosis and juvenile xanthogranuloma and malignant disorders are considered. Observations of potential significance in the eventual elucidation of the pathogenesis of these enigmatic diseases are presented. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7521200

  17. A case of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis following Hodgkin's disease

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIN; DENG, QI; LI, YU-MING

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a group of disorders in various tissues characterized by the proliferation of Langerhans cells. It is rarely observed in adults. Langerhans cells are dendritic cells that express cluster of differentiation 1a (CD1a) and S100 protein, and contain Birbeck granules. Its etiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated. One possible etiological cause is a reactive proliferation of Langerhans cells following chemotherapy or radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease (HD). A number of cases of LCH associated with malignant lymphoma have been reported previously. It may follow after the malignant lymphoma, or occur with it. However, fewer cases have been reported where the LCH followed after HD. In the present case report, a patient was diagnosed with HD following chemotherapy for LCH. As LCH was diagnosed, the patient was treated with a combination of various chemotherapeutic agents in two cycles of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone (COP), and eight cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP). The patient went into a successful clinical remission. One year later, computed tomographic (CT) scans of the thorax and abdomen revealed augmentation of the tumor mass in the mediastinum. An excisional biopsy of the right inguinal lymph node was performed. The patient was diagnosed with nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's disease. Following four cycles of doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy, a whole-body positron emission tomographic CT scan revealed a decrease in tumor mass in the mediastinum. At present, the patient remains in treatment, and the prognosis has yet to be fully determined. PMID:27330759

  18. The normal Langerhans cell and the LCH cell.

    PubMed

    Chu, T; Jaffe, R

    1994-09-01

    The epidermal Langerhans cell is the bone marrow-derived dendritic, antigen-presenting cell of the skin. It is characterised by a unique intracytoplasmic organelle--the Birbeck granule--and constitutively expresses class II MHC molecules and the CD1a glycoprotein. The Langerhans cell represents one of the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the body, and fulfils an important role in detecting foreign antigen entering the body through the skin and in immune surveillance. The distribution of Langerhans cells is restricted to the skin, lymph nodes, bronchial mucosa and thymus. The discovery by Nézelof in 1973 that the lesional cells in the disease then called 'Histiocytosis X' contained Birbeck granules established the close relationship between the Langerhans cell and this disease and led ultimately to the adoption of the name Langerhans cell histiocytosis to replace the older term. The LCH cell expresses the phenotype of a Langerhans cell apparently 'fixed' at an early stage of cell activation. The LCH cell is, however, functionally defective in antigen presentation, and the tissue distribution of the disease--affecting bone, skin, lymph node, lung, liver, spleen, CNS, gastro-intestinal tract and bone marrow--is quite different from the normal distribution of the Langerhans cell. Studies are now under way throughout the world to investigate the relationship between the normal Langerhans cell and the LCH cell. Specifically we need to identify whether the LCH cell is a cell arrested at a specific time in normal Langerhans cell ontogeny or if it represents a response to a biological insult to the mature Langerhans cell or its precursors. PMID:7521202

  19. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the sacrum

    PubMed Central

    Hatem, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. It is a multisystemic disease with organ system involvement ranging from simple—where it involves only one organ—to widespread progressive disease. Although it can affect any age group, the peak incidence is between 1 and 3 years of age. PMID:27186251

  20. Langerhans cell histiocytosis revisited: Case report with review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Y. Pavan; Agrawal, Jayshree; Mohanlakshmi, J.; Kumar, P. Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by proliferation of bone marrow derived Langerhans cells and mature eosinophils. Their clinical features simulate common oral findings such as gingival enlargement, oral ulcers, and mobility of teeth, along with nonspecific radiographic features; hence, diagnosing such lesions becomes difficult for the oral physicians. These lesions are commonly seen in childhood; however, we are reporting a case of LCH in 29-year-old adult male. A provisional diagnosis of giant cell granuloma was considered based on history and examination, although the lesion was histologically proven to be LCH and was confirmed with immunohistochemical staining of S100 protein and CD1a antigen. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of diverse, nonpathognomical oral presentation of LCH that is easily misdiagnosed and overlooked by dentist. PMID:26321851

  1. Langerhans cell histiocytosis in monozygotic twins with central diabetes insipidus and hypophyseal masses

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sung-Tai; Chen, Der-Cherng; Cho, Der-Yang; Lin, Hung-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a systemic disease mainly affecting children and young adults. It can manifest as single system disorder or multi-system involvement. When the central nervous system is involved, the hypothalamic–pituitary axis is the most common location affected. Herein we report a rare case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in monozygotic twins both with central diabetes and hypophyseal masses. This is the first report about LCH in monozygotic twins with hypophyseal lesions. PMID:25972939

  2. Pericardial Effusion in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a proliferative disorder of histiocytes in multiple organs. Langerhans cell histiocytosis involves bones, skin, lung and other organs. Case Presentation This study describes a seven-month-old Iranian girl who presented with skin rash and cervical lymphadenopathy. Langerhans cell histiocytosis was suspected when it was associated with anemia, splenomegaly and lytic bone lesions. A skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. During hospitalization, the patient looked ill with respiratory distress. A chest X-ray showed a ground glass view, and echocardiography showed moderate pericardial effusion. Conclusions Pericardial effusion was a rare finding in this case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Pericardial effusion in Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which is an unusual presentation, should be considered when the patient experiences respiratory distress.

  3. Pericardial Effusion in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a proliferative disorder of histiocytes in multiple organs. Langerhans cell histiocytosis involves bones, skin, lung and other organs. Case Presentation This study describes a seven-month-old Iranian girl who presented with skin rash and cervical lymphadenopathy. Langerhans cell histiocytosis was suspected when it was associated with anemia, splenomegaly and lytic bone lesions. A skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. During hospitalization, the patient looked ill with respiratory distress. A chest X-ray showed a ground glass view, and echocardiography showed moderate pericardial effusion. Conclusions Pericardial effusion was a rare finding in this case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Pericardial effusion in Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which is an unusual presentation, should be considered when the patient experiences respiratory distress. PMID:27621925

  4. Langerhans cell hyperplasia from molluscum contagiosum

    PubMed Central

    Hatter, Alyn D.; Zhou, Xin; Honda, Kord; Popkin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) carries a prognosis which ranges from benign to potentially fatal. There is currently little framework to decipher metrics which predict the benign versus aggressive nature of LCH. We wanted to determine if molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) DNA could be isolated from a cutaneous lesion demonstrating Langerhans cell hyperplasia resembling LCH in a patient with both. We performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on biopsy proven MCV and the hyperplastic lesion. Two specific regions within the MCV genome were detected from both biopsies. We report our findings and suggest that some MCV can produce histologic lesions resembling LCH, similar to the literature on scabies mimicking LCH. Efforts to find a reactive “driver” in LCH may significantly inform the clinical scenario. PMID:25140667

  5. Langerhans Cell Hyperplasia From Molluscum Contagiosum.

    PubMed

    Hatter, Alyn D; Zhou, Xin; Honda, Kord; Popkin, Daniel L

    2015-08-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) carries a prognosis, which ranges from benign to potentially fatal. There is currently little framework to decipher metrics, which predict the benign versus aggressive nature of LCH. We wanted to determine whether molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) DNA could be isolated from a cutaneous lesion, demonstrating Langerhans cell hyperplasia resembling LCH in a patient with both. Polymerase chain reaction on biopsy-proven MCV and the hyperplastic lesion has been performed. Two specific regions within the MCV genome were detected from both biopsies. The authors report our findings and suggest that some MCV can produce histological lesions resembling LCH, similar to the literature on scabies mimicking LCH. Efforts to find a reactive "driver" in LCH may significantly inform the clinical scenario. PMID:25140667

  6. Vulvar Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Khoummane, Nadia; Guimeya, Cyriane; Lipombi, Dominique; Gielen, François

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytoses (LCH) are a rare group of disorders that comprise a large spectrum of diseases initially known as histiocytosis X. In this case report, we relate a case of LCH affecting the vulva of a 47-year-old female. The patient presented since 3 years with a vulvar lesion characterized by non-healing ulcers and a perineal granuloma on which she underwent surgery. Professionals should keep in mind not to treat straightforwardly lesions of the genital tract as simple sexually transmitted diseases. Chronic, atypical genital lesions seen in women need to be worked up and dealt with accordingly. PMID:25404979

  7. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of bone: MR imaging.

    PubMed

    George, J C; Buckwalter, K A; Cohen, M D; Edwards, M K; Smith, R R

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 12 pathologically proven lesions of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of bone were reviewed retrospectively. MR identified all lesions, three of which were not identified on plain radiographs. In all cases, MR showed greater abnormality than did plain radiographs. With one exception, all lesions were hypointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. The lesions and associated soft tissue abnormalities were very conspicuous on short TI inversion sequences and T1-weighted post-contrast images. Follow-up MR studies in two patients after chemotherapy showed decreased size and enhancement of lesions compared with baseline studies.

  8. Squash smear cytology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Ji Hae; Yoon, Gun; Do, Sung-Im; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Squash smear cytology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) has rarely been reported. We described squash cytological findings of cranial LCH. Additionally, based on recent data that suggests an association of LCH with either viral infection or genetic alteration, we investigated the presence of several viruses or mutation of TP53 and BRAF in LCH tissue samples. Intraoperative squash smears of a small tissue fragment excised from the lesion demonstrated a mixed population of eosinophils, neutrophils, small lymphocytes and a high content of histiocytes. The histiocytes possessed abundant dense cytoplasm with round cell shape and eccentrically located nuclei with fine chromatin, delicate nuclear membranes and prominent nuclear grooves, indentations and pseudoinclusions. The cytologic features were consistent with Langerhans cells (LCs). Subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of LCH. Immunohistochemically, the LCs were positive for S-100, CD1a and langerin, but negative for adenovirus, CMV, EBV, HHV-8, HPV, HSV, SV 40 and p53. BRAF V600E mutation was absent. Our findings did not support the role of viruses and genetic abnormalities in the pathogenesis of LCH. In summary, the presence of a mixed population of inflammatory cells and a high content of histiocytes with characteristic cytomorphology, along with radiologic evidence and appropriate clinical findings, is highly suggestive of LCH on the intraoperative squash smears. Awareness of characteristic cytological features of LCH is necessary for rapid and accurate diagnosis. Squash smear cytology is a potentially useful tool in the intraoperative diagnosis of LCH. PMID:26339366

  9. Establishing and maintaining the Langerhans cell network.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Michaël; Nutt, Stephen L

    2015-05-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the unique antigen-presenting cell of the epidermis. LCs have long been depicted in textbooks as the archetypical dendritic cell that alerts the immune system upon pathogen induced skin barrier breakage, however recent findings argue instead for a more tolerogenic function. While the LCs that populate the epidermis in steady-state arise from progenitors that seed the skin during embryogenesis, it is now apparent that a second pathway generating LCs from a bone marrow derived progenitor is active in inflammatory settings. This review emphasizes the determinants underpinning the establishment of the LC network in steady-state and under inflammatory conditions, as well as the transcriptional machinery governing their differentiation. The dual origin of LCs raises important questions about the functional differences between these subsets in balancing the epidermal immune response between immunity and tolerance.

  10. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult with Involvement of the Calvarium, Cerebral Cortex and Brainstem: Discussion of Pathophysiology and Rationale for the Use of Intravenous Immune Globulin

    PubMed Central

    Dardis, Christopher; Aung, Thandar; Shapiro, William; Fortune, John; Coons, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in a 64-year-old male who presented with symptoms and signs of brain involvement, including seizures and hypopituitarism. The diagnosis was confirmed with a biopsy of a lytic skull lesion. The disease affecting the bone showed no sign of progression following a short course of cladribine. Signs of temporal lobe involvement led to an additional biopsy, which showed signs of nonspecific neurodegeneration and which triggered status epilepticus. Lesions noted in the brainstem were typical for the paraneoplastic inflammation reported in this condition. These lesions improved after treatment with cladribine. They remained stable while on treatment with intravenous immune globulin. PMID:25873887

  11. Langerhans cell sarcoma: an unusual microscopic presentation.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, A L; Daniel, S; Greer, K; Patterson, J W; Tchernev, G; Chokoeva, A A; Wollina, U; Lotti, T; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G; Guarneri, C; Aguilera, N

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old Caucasian male presented to our clinic for a pruritic eruption progressing over several months. He complained of fatigue with a 20-pound weight loss over the past year. On presentation, the patient had browny-yellow to violaceous, purpuric, macular and papular lesions on the legs, arms, lower abdomen and back. Initial biopsy showed an angiocentric infiltrate with a suggestion of intraluminal proliferation; CD31 and Fli-1 positivity suggested either reactive angioendotheliomatosis or an unusual intravascular histiocytosis. Further excisional biopsies demonstrated perivascular collections of cells with ample cytoplasm, prominent nuclear pleomorphism and mitotic activity. The nuclei demonstrated nuclear folding, grooves and indentations. The atypical cells were S100, CD1a and CD56 positive with immunohistochemistry. A diagnosis of Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) was made. LCS is a rare, aggressive malignancy that can involve multiple organs including the skin, lymph nodes, lung, bone marrow, spleen, heart, and brain. The skin and lymph nodes are commonly involved, and the cutaneous presentation varies greatly. Immunohistochemistry characteristically shows CD1a and S100 positivity. CD56 expression is uncommon and often portends a poor prognosis. There is no established treatment of LCS due to its rarity. Surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy have been used with varied outcomes. Our patient was treated with prednisone with improvement of cutaneous disease. He did not develop systemic involvement, but died 1.5 years later from complications associated with heart failure. Langerhans cell sarcoma should be considered when faced with an unusual angiocentric infiltrate in which initial immunohistochemical staining results may be misleading. PMID:27373133

  12. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: Emerging Insights and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Daniel J; Chakraborty, Rikhia; Allen, Carl E

    2016-02-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a disorder characterized by lesions that include CD207+ dendritic cells along with an inflammatory infiltrate. Langerhans cell histiocytosis has a highly variable clinical presentation, ranging from a single lesion to potentially fatal disseminated disease. The uncertainty as to whether Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a reactive or a neoplastic disease has resulted in a long-standing debate on this question, and the limited understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease has impeded clinical improvement for patients. The current standard of care for multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis, empirically derived chemotherapy with vinblastine and prednisone, cures fewer than 50% of patients, and optimal therapies for relapse and neurodegenerative disease remain uncertain. Recent research advances support a model in which Langerhans cell histiocytosis arises due to pathologic activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in myeloid precursors. Redefinition of Langerhans cell histiocytosis as a myeloid neoplastic disorder driven by hyperactive ERK supports the potential of chemotherapy with efficacy against immature myeloid cells, as well as mutation-specific targeted therapy. PMID:26888790

  13. An unusual presentation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Palak; Kaushal, Manju

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a relatively rare and unique disease. An incidence of 7.9% in the jaws is reported. We report a case of 9-year-old male child referred to us from dental outpatient department, who presented with a firm swelling in right lower jaw along with bilateral submandibular lymphadenopathy for 1-month. Fine-needle aspiration was done from lytic lesion in the body of mandible and multiple smears were prepared. On the basis of the clinical and cytomorphological findings, a diagnosis of LCH was suggested. The diagnosis was confirmed on histology. Thus, a high possibility of LCH should be considered in children presenting with lytic lesions in head and neck region. PMID:25745295

  14. Integrity of the permeability barrier regulates epidermal Langerhans cell density.

    PubMed

    Proksch, E; Brasch, J; Sterry, W

    1996-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that barrier requirements regulate epidermal liquid and DNA synthesis. In the present study, we examined the possibility that the integrity of the permeability barrier influences epidermal Langerhans cells involved with the immune response. Barrier disruption was achieved by treatment of human skin with acetone, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS), or tape stripping, until a 10-20-fold increase in transepidermal water loss was achieved. Serial biopsies were performed 6-168 h after treatment, and Langerhans cells were complexed with anti-CD1a (Leu6) or S-100 antibodies, and visualized with an immunoperoxidase technique. Acetone treatment resulted in an increase in epidermal Langerhans cell density, reaching a maximum of 94% over control (P < 0.01) by 24 and 48 h post-treatment. Following SDS treatment or tape stripping, epidermal Langerhans cell density was increased by 100 and 175% (P < 0.01), respectively. There was a linear correlation between the degree of barrier disruption and the increase in epidermal Langerhans cell density. Studies with the Ki-S3 proliferation-associated nuclear antigen revealed a two- to threefold increase in epidermal proliferation after barrier disruption. The time curves of the increase in Langerhans cell density and the increase in epidermal proliferation were similar, suggesting that there was a coordinate regulation. In contrast with our previous studies employing patch test reactions to allergens or irritants, disruption of barrier function neither resulted in an increased dermal Langerhans cell density, nor influenced T lymphocytes (CD3+, Leu4+), macrophages (KiM8+), ICAM-1 or ELAM-1 expression in the skin. In addition, barrier disruption did not result in either dermal inflammation or epidermal spongiosis. In summary, these findings support our hypothesis that the permeability barrier influences epidermal Langerhans cell density, which is involved in maintaining an immunological barrier.

  15. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and diabetes insipidus in pregnant women: our experience.

    PubMed

    Fuks, Leonardo; Kramer, Mordechai R; Shitrit, David; Raviv, Yael

    2014-04-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) occurs predominantly in young adult smokers. Diabetes insipidus occurs in up to 15 % patients with PLCH. Information on PLCH in pregnancy is sparse, especially associated with diabetes insipidus. We report three patients with these conditions and describe the disease history and pregnancy outcomes.

  16. Cytomegalovirus and Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: Is There a Link?

    PubMed Central

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Nadji, Seyed-Alireza; Dehghanian, Paria; Vahdatinia, Mahsa; Shamshiri, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare proliferative histiocytic disease of unknown etiology. Histologically, it is characterized by granuloma-like proliferation of Langerhans-type dendritic cells derived from bone marrow. Many investigators have suggested the possible role of viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus, human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and Cytomegalovirus in the pathogenesis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Objectives: In this study, we have investigated the presence of Cytomegalovirus in Langerhans cell histiocytosis in Iranian children. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, we have investigated the presence of Cytomegalovirus DNA expression, using paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 30 patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis and 30 age and site-matched controls by qualitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. Results: No significant difference in prevalence of Cytomegalovirus presence between patients and controls was found. Cytomegalovirus was found by qualitative PCR in only 2 (6.66%) out of 30 patients and in 1 (3.3%) of 30 control samples with a P value of 1 (1.00 > 0.05) using chi-square test with OR: 2.07; 95% CI of OR: 0.18 - 24.15. Conclusions: Our findings do not support the hypothesis of a possible role for Cytomegalovirus in the pathogenesis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:27307972

  17. Langerhans cells and their role in oral mucosal diseases.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Juhi; Upadhyay, Ram B; Agrawal, Pankaj; Jaitley, Shweta; Shekhar, Rhitu

    2013-09-01

    Dendritic cells are arguably the most potent antigen-presenting cells and may be the only cells capable of initiating the adaptive immune response. The epithelial residents of dendritic cells are Langerhans cells, which serve as the "sentinels" of the mucosa, altering the immune system not only to pathogen entry but also of tolerance to self antigen and commensal microbes. Oral mucosal Langerhans cells are capable of engaging and internalizing a wide variety of pathogens and have been found responsive to nickel in patients with nickel allergies, oral Candida species, oral lichen planus, lichenoid drug eruptions, graft versus host diseases, periodontal diseases median rhomboid glossitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, hairy leukoplakia of the tongue, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Review focuses on the role of antigen-presenting cells in particular Langerhans cells to better understand the mechanisms underlying immune responses. In this review, comprehensive detail about mucosal diseases has been compiled using the PubMed database and through textbooks. PMID:24251267

  18. Cell(s) of Origin of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Collin, Matthew; Bigley, Venetia; McClain, Kenneth L; Allen, Carl E

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is heterogeneous disease characterized by common histology of inflammatory lesions containing Langerin(+) (CD207) histiocytes. Emerging data support a model in which MAPK activation in self-renewing hematopoietic progenitors may drive disseminated high-risk disease, whereas MAPK activation in more differentiated committed myeloid populations may induce low-risk LCH. The heterogeneous clinical manifestations with shared histology may represent the final common pathway of an acquired defect of differentiation, initiated at more than one point. Implications of this model include re-definition of LCH as a myeloid neoplasia and re-focusing therapeutic strategies on the cells and lineages of origin. PMID:26461145

  19. Cell(s) of Origin of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Collin, Matthew; Bigley, Venetia; McClain, Kenneth L; Allen, Carl E

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is heterogeneous disease characterized by common histology of inflammatory lesions containing Langerin(+) (CD207) histiocytes. Emerging data support a model in which MAPK activation in self-renewing hematopoietic progenitors may drive disseminated high-risk disease, whereas MAPK activation in more differentiated committed myeloid populations may induce low-risk LCH. The heterogeneous clinical manifestations with shared histology may represent the final common pathway of an acquired defect of differentiation, initiated at more than one point. Implications of this model include re-definition of LCH as a myeloid neoplasia and re-focusing therapeutic strategies on the cells and lineages of origin.

  20. Langerhans cell histiocytosis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Jeunon, Thiago; Sousa, Maria Auxiliadora Jeunon; Santos-Rodrigues, Nilton; Lopes, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    A 17-year-old male presented for dermatologic consultation with slightly elevated reddish papules covered by yellowish scales in the scalp for the last two years and reddish and indurated ulcers in the perineum lasting six months. Additional complaints included polyuria, polydipsia, delay in the development of secondary sexual characteristics and hearing loss of the right ear secondary to a medium otitis. Lesions from scalp and perineum were sampled for histopathologic examination and revealed a dense cellular infiltrate made up of mononuclear cells with conspicuous eosinophilic cytoplasm and large cleaved vesicular nucleus, some of them with shapes resembling the format of a kidney and others reminiscent of coffee beans. Numerous intermingling eosinophils were present. The diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis was then rendered and confirmed by positive immunostaining of neo-plastic cells for anti-CD1a and anti-S100 protein antibodies. The work-up revealed diabetes insipidus, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hiperprolactenemia, growing-hormone deficiency and thickness of the pituitary stalk. The patient was treated with prednisone and vinblastin based chemotherapy regimen for six months with complete remission, but presented recurrence of some lesions in the scalp, which were handled with topical mustard and corticosteroids. After chemotherapy, the endocrinologic disturbances were corrected with hormonal replacement therapy. The patient is currently in good health with a follow-up of five years. PMID:24765546

  1. Solitary Extragnathic Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis – A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Eppalapally Sharath Kumar; Bhavani, Sangala Naga; A, Krishna; Sekhar, Mane Srinivas Muni

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), mainly affects the skull, vertebrae, ribs and mandible in children and the long bones of adults. Symptoms range from none to pain, swelling and tenderness over the site of the lesion. This disease presents oral manifestations which can sometimes be the first expression of the condition. It occurs in three forms namely eosinophilic granuloma in which isolated or multiple bones are involved, But has a good prognosis whereas other variants Hand-Shuller-Christian disease (chronic dessiminated variant) and Letterer-Siwe disease (acute dessiminated form) have poor prognosis. Occasionally only soft tissues are affected without bony involvement. Males are more commonly affected than females. This article describes a rare variant of eosinophilic granuloma of labial mucosa without bony involvement. PMID:25954715

  2. How I treat Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Carl E.; Ladisch, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis” (LCH) describes a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from a single bone lesion or trivial skin rash to an explosive disseminated disease. Regardless of clinical severity, LCH lesions share the common histology of CD1a+/CD207+ dendritic cells with characteristic morphology among an inflammatory infiltrate. Despite historical uncertainty defining LCH as inflammatory vs neoplastic and incomplete understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis, clinical outcomes have improved markedly over the past decades through cooperative randomized clinical trials based on empiric therapeutic strategies. Significant advances include recognition of high- and low-risk clinical groups defined by hematopoietic and/or hepatic involvement, and of the importance of optimal intensity and of duration of chemotherapy. Nevertheless, mortality of high-risk patients, disease recurrence, lack of robustly tested salvage strategies, and significant disease morbidity of both high- and low-risk patients remain challenges. Recent discovery of recurrent somatic mutations in mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway genes at critical stages of myeloid hematopoietic differentiation in LCH patients supports redefinition of the disease as a myeloproliferative disorder and provides opportunities to develop novel approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25827831

  3. Epidermal Viral Immunity Induced by CD8α+ Dendritic Cells But Not by Langerhans Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Rhys S.; Smith, Chris M.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; van Lint, Allison L.; Wakim, Linda M.; Heath, William R.; Carbone, Francis R.

    2003-09-01

    The classical paradigm for dendritic cell function derives from the study of Langerhans cells, which predominate within skin epidermis. After an encounter with foreign agents, Langerhans cells are thought to migrate to draining lymph nodes, where they initiate T cell priming. Contrary to this, we show here that infection of murine epidermis by herpes simplex virus did not result in the priming of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by Langerhans cells. Rather, the priming response required a distinct CD8α+ dendritic cell subset. Thus, the traditional view of Langerhans cells in epidermal immunity needs to be revisited to accommodate a requirement for other dendritic cells in this response.

  4. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis with atypical and early neonatal debut].

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Esther; Bernabeu-Wittel, José; Calderón-López, Gemma; Pavón-Delgado, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a systemic disease associated with the proliferation of this type of cells in tissues. Its prevalence is estimated at 1-9/100 000. Bone is the most frequently affected organ, followed by the skin, lymph nodes, haematopoietic system, pituitary gland, lungs and liver. In the majority of cases, onset occurs during childhood, with peak between one and three years of age, and poor prognosis before two years of age. The haematological forms (pancytopenia) are usually aggressive in infants. We report a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis with neonatal onset and complex diagnosis: maintained and significant leukocytosis was the predominant data for the first two months of life, so some type of leukemia was considered. However, the most common blood disorder in Langerhans cell histiocytosis is pancytopenia rather than leukocytosis, so that the diagnosis was delayed.

  5. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: Current concepts in dentistry and case report

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Gutiérrez, Efraín; Alejo-González, Francisco; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, José-Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), which is a rare granulomatous pediatric disease of unknown etiology, is characterized by the idiopathic proliferation and accumulation of abnormal and clonal Langerhans cells or their marrow precursors, resulting in localized, solitary or multiple destructive lesions. These lesions are most commonly eosinophilic granuloma, which are found in craniofacial bone structures such as the skull and mandible, skin and other organs. In children, the disease has a variable initial presentation, and the clinical course, prognosis and survival are unpredictable. The aims of this report were to present an LCH case in a girl aged 2 years, 8 months and her clinicopathological features, to describe the bucodental management provided, and to discuss special dental considerations of this disease. Key words:Children, dental management, histiocytosis, Langerhans cells. PMID:26855698

  6. Human embryonic epidermis contains a diverse Langerhans cell precursor pool.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Mairhofer, Mario; Bauer, Wolfgang; Fiala, Christian; Prior, Marion; Eppel, Wolfgang; Kolbus, Andrea; Tschachler, Erwin; Stingl, Georg; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2014-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the exact phenotype of the epidermal Langerhans cell (LC) precursors during human ontogeny has not been determined yet. These elusive precursors are believed to migrate into the embryonic skin and to express primitive surface markers, including CD36, but not typical LC markers such as CD1a, CD1c and CD207. The aim of this study was to further characterize the phenotype of LC precursors in human embryonic epidermis and to compare it with that of LCs in healthy adult skin. We found that epidermal leukocytes in first trimester human skin are negative for CD34 and heterogeneous with regard to the expression of CD1c, CD14 and CD36, thus contrasting the phenotypic uniformity of epidermal LCs in adult skin. These data indicate that LC precursors colonize the developing epidermis in an undifferentiated state, where they acquire the definitive LC marker profile with time. Using a human three-dimensional full-thickness skin model to mimic in vivo LC development, we found that FACS-sorted, CD207(-) cord blood-derived haematopoietic precursor cells resembling foetal LC precursors but not CD14(+)CD16(-) blood monocytes integrate into skin equivalents, and without additional exogenous cytokines give rise to cells that morphologically and phenotypically resemble LCs. Overall, it appears that CD14(-) haematopoietic precursors possess a much higher differentiation potential than CD14(+) precursor cells.

  7. Effects of epidermal Langerhans cell's conditioned medium on keratinocytes: a role of Langerhans cells in cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Kamide, Y; Sasaki, H; Abramson, M; Huang, C C

    1991-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are known to play an important role in the immunosurveillance system. In this study, as in others, numerous LCs were detected in the epithelial layer of acquired cholesteatoma by immunohistochemical staining. This finding suggests that cell-mediated immune responses are initiated by LCs in cholesteatoma; however, documentation concerning the microenvironment of LCs-keratinocytes in cholesteatoma is limited. Therefore, we investigated the effects of LCs on keratinocytes in vitro. To study these effects it was necessary to isolate and purify LCs. Our present study revealed that good enrichment and a high degree of purity (95%) of LCs could be obtained from neonatal rat skin using the immunomagnetic beads (Dynabeads M-450) sorting technique. These isolated LCs have the biologic activity of LCs, and Langerhans cells' conditioned medium (LCCM) stimulates DNA synthesis in thymocytes. The effect of LCCM on keratinocytes was then studied. We found that (1) LCCM stimulated DNA synthesis in keratinocytes was then studied. We found that (1) LCCM stimulated DNA synthesis in keratinocytes, but not protein synthesis, and (2) LCCM stimulated the incorporation of 3H-putrescine into keratinocytes by the activation of transglutaminase. Transglutaminase is a known marker of terminal differentiation in keratinocytes. By Western blot analysis, we identified a 17-kd immunoreactive mouse interleukin-1 alpha in LCCM. Our results imply that LCs found in cholesteatoma tissue may play an important role in stimulating both hyper-proliferation and cornification of keratinocytes; two characteristic features of cholesteatoma formation. These stimulatory effects may be due to the release of interleukin-1 or other factors by LCs.

  8. Functional CD86 (B7-2/B70) on cultured human Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Yokozeki, H; Katayama, I; Ohki, O; Matsunaga, T; Watanabe, K; Satoh, T; Azuma, M; Okumura, K; Nishioka, K

    1996-01-01

    CD86 (B70/B7-2) has recently been identified as an alternative CD28/CTLA-4 ligand on activated B cells. CD86 has also been demonstrated as possibly serving as a primary costimulatory molecule in the initial immune response. Since the human Langerhans cell is one of the most potent antigen-presenting cells, we examined whether CD86 expression and function are found on organ-cultured skin, freshly isolated Langerhans cells, and cultured Langerhans cells in normal human epidermis. Immunohistochemical study in situ revealed that CD86 was expressed on dendritic cells with CD1a antigen in organ-cultured but not fresh skin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis revealed that no staining for either CD80 or CD86 was observed in freshly isolated Langerhans cells but that both CD80 and CD86 were expressed on cultured Langerhans cells. The actual expression of CD86 on cultured Langerhans cells was further confirmed by the detection of 70-kDa glycoprotein on Western blot analysis. Analysis of polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that both CD80 and CD86 were specifically amplified from purified cultured and freshly isolated Langerhans cells but not from Langerhans cell-depleted epidermal cells, indicating that both CD80 and CD86 genes were expressed by Langerhans cells. The functional importance of CD86 on Langerhans cells was confirmed by the allogeneic CD4 T cell proliferative responses with enriched Langerhans cells. A monoclonal antibody against CD86 caused 81% inhibition in contrast with 29% inhibition produced by anti-CD80 monoclonal antibody. This inhibitory effect was enhanced to 85.3% inhibition when a combination of anti-CD86 and anti-CD80 was administered. These results indicate that CD86 is predominantly expressed on the surface of cultured Langerhans cells and may transduce a primordial costimulatory signal in the interaction of Langerhans cells and T cells.

  9. Photodynamic therapy for multi-resistant cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Failla, Valérie; Wauters, Odile; Caucanas, Marie; Nikkels-Tassoudji, Nazli; Nikkels, Arjen F

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare group of proliferative disorders. Beside cutaneous involvement, other internal organs can be affected. The treatment of cutaneous lesions is difficult and relies on topical corticosteroids, carmustine, nitrogen mustard, and photochemotherapy. Systemic steroids and vinblastine are used for recalcitrant skin lesions. However, some cases fail to respond. An 18-month old boy presented a CD1a+, S100a+ Langerhans cell histocytosis with cutaneous and severe scalp involvement. Topical corticosteroids and nitrogen mustard failed to improve the skin lesions. Systemic corticosteroids and vinblastine improved the truncal involvement but had no effect on the scalp lesions. Methylaminolevulinate (MAL) based photodynamic therapy (PDT) resulted in a significant regression of the scalp lesions. Control histology revealed an almost complete clearance of the tumor infiltrate. Clinical follow-up after six months showed no recurrence. Although spontaneous regression of cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis is observed, the rapid effect of photodynamic therapy after several failures of other treatment suggests that photodynamic therapy was successful. As far as we know this is the first report of photodynamic therapy for refractory skin lesions. Larger series are needed to determine whether photodynamic therapy deserves a place in the treatment of multiresistant cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:21139836

  10. Radiotherapy for Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of Bilateral Eyelids

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, Jean-Marc; Lukovic, Jelena; Dar, A. Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder with numerous clinicopathological variants with differing clinical courses, treatment methods, and prognoses. We report one patient with atypical LCH of the bilateral lower eyelids and subsequent successful treatment with local radiation therapy. PMID:27004151

  11. Congenital cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis and cutaneous mastocytoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Lozano Masdemont, B; Campos Dominguez, M; Gomez-Recuero Munoz, L; Moreno Garcia, B; Parra Blanco, V; Suarez Fernandez, R

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis and mastocytoma are clonal disorders of bone-marrow-derived cells, most commonly seen in the pediatric age. Infiltration of mast cells and Langerhans cells in the same lesion has been published before, but, to our knowledge, this is the first time that the occurrence of two mastocytomas and Langerhans cell histiocytosis is reported. It could be hypothesized that both clonal disorders of bone-marrow-derived cells could have a common origin. PMID:27617456

  12. Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-05

    Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Childhood Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

  13. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Followed by Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Akbar; Bagheri, Mandana; Shahryari, Jahanbanoo; Noori, Sadat; Esmailzade, Elmira

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare neoplasm defined as the proliferation of bone marrow langerhans cells, which is a kind of dendritic cells. The major pathological features of LCH are expression of CD1a and S100 as well as Birbeck granules. Its presentation can differ from a mild bone lesion to a multi-systemic evolved malignant neoplasm; however, the latter outcome is almost rare. Thus, LCH is mostly known as a benign neoplasm. In this study, we present a case of LCH followed by Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Accompaniment of this disease with malignant lymphoma is rare and considered as case report. Several cases in which malignant lymphoma occurred prior to LCH are reported; however, few cases can be found with LCH followed by malignant lymphomas. PMID:25999631

  14. Staining of Langerhans Cells with Monoclonal Antibodies to Macrophages and Lymphoid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Kathleen A.; Flotte, Thomas J.; Springer, Timothy A.; Gigli, Irma; Thorbecke, G. Jeanette

    1983-06-01

    Langerhans cells are Ia-bearing antigen-presenting cells in the epidermis that share many functions with macrophages. We have used monoclonal antibodies to the macrophage antigens, Mac-2 and -3, Ia antigen, Fc fragment receptor, and the common leukocyte antigen CLA to compare the cell surface antigens of these cells with those of interdigitating and follicular dendritic cells and of macrophages in lymphoid tissues. Immunoperoxidase staining was carried out with epidermal sheets from BALB/c mice and epidermal cell suspensions enriched for Langerhans cells by Fc rosetting. Langerhans cells stained for all of these antigens. Comparison with the staining properties of other dendritic cells and macrophages, in combination with previous observations, indicates a close relationship of Langerhans cells to the interdigitating cells of lymphoid tissues.

  15. Juvenile xanthogranuloma developing after treatment of Langerhans cell histiocytosis: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Strehl, Johanna D; Stachel, Klaus-Daniel; Hartmann, Arndt; Agaimy, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    The synchronous or metachronous development of Langerhans cell histiocytosis and non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the same patient is rare. To date, only seven cases of xanthogranulomas developing in young patients with a history of Langerhans cell histiocytosis and systemic therapy have been reported in the literature. As of yet, the pathogenesis and the clinical significance of this phenomenon are unclear. We report the case of a 3 year old boy who developed juvenile Xanthogranulomas on the forehead and right upper eye lid 1.5 years after systemic therapy for monosystemic Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the bone and complete disease remission. PMID:22977671

  16. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with presentation as orbital disease.

    PubMed

    Bhanage, Ashok B; Katkar, Anand D; Ghate, Prajakta S

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an uncommon multisystem disease with an abnormal polyclonal proliferation of Langerhans cells that invade various organs. In rare instances, the affection of the orbit is the only and the first symptom. We report an unusual case of an 18-month-old male who presented with orbital disease as the first symptom, in the form of chronic presentation of periorbital swelling (2 months duration) with acute inflammation (1-week duration) giving a suspicion of orbital cellulitis. Histopathology after radical excision confirmed the diagnosis of LCH and was advised initial therapy as per Histiocyte Society Evaluation and Treatment Guidelines (2009) but was lost to follow-up only reappearing with progression (multisystem LCH with risk organ involvement) and developed progressive active disease on treatment after 5 weeks. He was treated with salvage therapy for risk patients achieving complete remission. PMID:26167225

  17. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with presentation as orbital disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhanage, Ashok B.; Katkar, Anand D.; Ghate, Prajakta S.

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an uncommon multisystem disease with an abnormal polyclonal proliferation of Langerhans cells that invade various organs. In rare instances, the affection of the orbit is the only and the first symptom. We report an unusual case of an 18-month-old male who presented with orbital disease as the first symptom, in the form of chronic presentation of periorbital swelling (2 months duration) with acute inflammation (1-week duration) giving a suspicion of orbital cellulitis. Histopathology after radical excision confirmed the diagnosis of LCH and was advised initial therapy as per Histiocyte Society Evaluation and Treatment Guidelines (2009) but was lost to follow-up only reappearing with progression (multisystem LCH with risk organ involvement) and developed progressive active disease on treatment after 5 weeks. He was treated with salvage therapy for risk patients achieving complete remission. PMID:26167225

  18. Disseminated Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting as Cholestatic Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Loizides, Anthony M.; Sachdeva, Soumya; Paul, Premila

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disorder associated with proliferation of Langerhans cells in various organs. LCH secondary to multisystem involvement can present in a variety of ways. Because of its infiltrative nature, LCH can involve the skin, lymph nodes, the lung or the liver. Jaundice in LCH is a manifestation of liver disease; biliary dilatation secondary to lithiasis or may be due to coexistent Niemann-Pick disease. However, a case of cholestasis has been very rarely described. Cholestasis may result from lymph nodes obstructing the porta hepatis. In this report, we describe a case of type II histiocytosis X with obstructive cholestasis and pulmonary involvement in the form of cysts without significant lymphadenopathy at the porta. PMID:25859497

  19. A case of langerhans cell histiocytosis with anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Akbayram, Sinan; Akgun, Cihangir; Ozen, Suleyman; Kaya, Avni; Tuncer, Oguz; Yuca, Sevil Ari; Caksen, Huseyin; Oner, Ahmet Faik

    2009-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an uncommon clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by the proliferation and accumulation of Langerhans cells with local infiltration of tissues and organ destruction. LCH takes many clinical forms, affecting different systems and different sites in the same system with variable outcomes. Bone, skin, lymph node, pituitary, liver, lung, bone marrow and spleen involvement can be seen in patients with LCH. Involvement of the perianal site is rare. In this article, a 16-month-old boy with multiple organ involvement including skin, liver, lung, and bone is presented. Aside from these systemic involvements, he also had a simple anal fistula. According to our best knowledge, this case of LCH with anal fistula is only the second to be reported in childhood. We would like to emphasize that LCH may be associated with anal fistula; therefore, we suggest that patients with LCH should be examined for this condition. PMID:20505285

  20. The cognitive spectrum in neurodegenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Le Guennec, Loïc; Decaix, Caroline; Donadieu, Jean; Santiago-Ribeiro, Maria; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Levy, Richard; Delgadillo, Daniel; Kas, Aurélie; Drier, Aurélie; Magy, Laurent; Bayen, Eleonore; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2014-08-01

    Clinical spectrum of cognitive troubles complicating neurodegenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis (ND-LCH) is poorly known. The aim of this study is to evaluate cognitive functions in ND-LCH. The cognitive functions of a series of eight adult patients (7 males and 1 female; mean age 26 years IQ 25-75; range 20-33) suffering from clinical and/or radiological ND-LCH were evaluated using the following tests: (1) forward/backward digit and spatial span tasks of the WAIS-R scale and the Corsi block task, (2) the French version of the free and cued selective reminding test, (3) verbal fluency tests, (4) the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), (5) backward measurement of the verbal and visuospatial memories of the WAIS-R scale, (6) the Rey complex figure test, (7) the trail making tests A and B, (8) digit symbol and symbol search of the WAIS-IV scale, and (9) the Stroop test. Episodic (i.e. autobiographical or personal) memory free recall, categorical verbal fluency, phonological verbal fluency, visuospatial processing skills, attention, speed of processing, and sensitivity to interference were impaired in ND-LCH patients. In contrast, verbal and visuospatial short-term memories (i.e. immediate memories or forward span tasks) were preserved in all patients. Adult ND-LCH patients suffer from a severe but dissociated dysexecutive syndrome, mostly affecting executive strategies and relatively sparing short-term memory. Our study supports the need of assessing executive functions using comprehensive cognitive evaluation in ND-LCH patients for early diagnosis. PMID:24848633

  1. The cognitive spectrum in neurodegenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Le Guennec, Loïc; Decaix, Caroline; Donadieu, Jean; Santiago-Ribeiro, Maria; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Levy, Richard; Delgadillo, Daniel; Kas, Aurélie; Drier, Aurélie; Magy, Laurent; Bayen, Eleonore; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2014-08-01

    Clinical spectrum of cognitive troubles complicating neurodegenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis (ND-LCH) is poorly known. The aim of this study is to evaluate cognitive functions in ND-LCH. The cognitive functions of a series of eight adult patients (7 males and 1 female; mean age 26 years IQ 25-75; range 20-33) suffering from clinical and/or radiological ND-LCH were evaluated using the following tests: (1) forward/backward digit and spatial span tasks of the WAIS-R scale and the Corsi block task, (2) the French version of the free and cued selective reminding test, (3) verbal fluency tests, (4) the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), (5) backward measurement of the verbal and visuospatial memories of the WAIS-R scale, (6) the Rey complex figure test, (7) the trail making tests A and B, (8) digit symbol and symbol search of the WAIS-IV scale, and (9) the Stroop test. Episodic (i.e. autobiographical or personal) memory free recall, categorical verbal fluency, phonological verbal fluency, visuospatial processing skills, attention, speed of processing, and sensitivity to interference were impaired in ND-LCH patients. In contrast, verbal and visuospatial short-term memories (i.e. immediate memories or forward span tasks) were preserved in all patients. Adult ND-LCH patients suffer from a severe but dissociated dysexecutive syndrome, mostly affecting executive strategies and relatively sparing short-term memory. Our study supports the need of assessing executive functions using comprehensive cognitive evaluation in ND-LCH patients for early diagnosis.

  2. Coincident expression of the chemokine receptors CCR6 and CCR7 by pathologic Langerhans cells in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Mark D; Pinkus, Jack L; Fournier, Marcia V; Alexander, Sarah W; Tam, Carmen; Loda, Massimo; Sallan, Stephen E; Nichols, Kim E; Carpentieri, David F; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Rollins, Barrett J

    2003-04-01

    It has been suggested that a switch in chemokine receptor expression underlies Langerhans cell migration from skin to lymphoid tissue. Activated cells are thought to down-regulate CCR6, whose ligand macrophage inflammatory protein-3 alpha (MIP-3 alpha)/CCL20 is expressed in skin, and up-regulate CCR7, whose ligands are in lymphoid tissues. In Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), pathologic Langerhans cells (LCs) accumulate in several tissues, including skin, bone, and lymphoid organs. We have examined 24 LCH cases and find that pathologic LCs expressed CCR6 and CCR7 coincidentally in all cases. Furthermore, MIP-3 alpha/CCL20 is expressed by keratinocytes in involved skin and by macrophages and osteoblasts in involved bone. Expression of CCR6 by pathologic LCs may contribute to their accumulation in nonlymphoid organs such as skin and bone, whereas CCR7 expression may direct them to lymphoid tissue. Histiocytes in Rosai-Dorfman disease and hemophagocytic syndrome also coexpressed CCR6 and CCR7, suggesting that this may be a general attribute of abnormal histiocytes.

  3. Dose response of Langerhans cells in mouse footpad epidermis after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, S.; Townsend, K.M.S.

    1985-08-01

    Effects of a range (2-50 Gy) of single doses of 250 kV X rays on epidermal Langerhans cells in vivo were quantified in groups of CBA/CaH mice. Animals were sacrificed and compared with controls on the 10th day after local irradiation of their hind feet, when Langerhans cell numbers were at a minimum. ATPase-positive Langerhans cells in sheets of footpad epidermis were counted by light microscopy and cells with Birbeck granules were enumerated by electron microscopy. Both methods revealed a dose-dependent loss of Langerhans cells after ionizing radiation. Loss of equivalent proportions of ATPase-positive and ultrastructurally indentifiable cells after a range of doses indicates that X rays do not merely alter Langerhans cell surface markers but actually deplete the epidermal population of these cells.

  4. Early Diagnosis and Monitoring of Neurodegenerative Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Mortilla, Marzia; Savelli, Sara; Grisotto, Laura; Di Giacomo, Gianpiero; Romano, Katiuscia; Fonda, Claudio; Biggeri, Annibale; Guerrini, Renzo; Aricò, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurodegenerative Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (ND-LCH) is a rare, unpredictable consequence that may devastate the quality of life of patients cured from LCH. We prospectively applied a multidisciplinary diagnostic work-up to early identify and follow-up patients with ND-LCH, with the ultimate goal of better determining the appropriate time for starting therapy. Methods We studied 27 children and young adults with either ND-LCH verified by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (group 1) or specific risk factors for (diabetes insipidus, craniofacial bone lesions), but no evidence of, neurodegenerative MRI changes (group 2). All patients underwent clinical, neurophysiological and MRI studies. Results Seventeen patients had MRI alterations typical for ND-LCH. Nine showed neurological impairment but only three were symptomatic; 11 had abnormal somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), and five had abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs). MR spectroscopy (MRS) showed reduced cerebellar NAA/Cr ratio in nine patients. SEPs showed sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for predicting ND-LCH of 70.6% (95%CI, 44.0%-89.7%), 100% (69.2%-100%), 100% (73.5%-100%), and 66.7% (38.4%-88.2%), respectively. Repeated investigations in group 1 revealed increasingly abnormal EP parameters, or neurological examination, or both, in nine of fifteen patients while MRI remained unchanged in all but one patient. Conclusion A targeted MRI study should be performed in all patients with risk factors for ND-LCH for early identification of demyelination. The combined use of SEPs and careful neurological evaluation may represent a valuable, low-cost, well-tolerated and easily available methodology to monitor patients from pre-symptomatic to symptomatic stages. We suggest a multidisciplinary protocol including clinical, MRS, and neurophysiological investigations to identify a population target for future

  5. Cutaneous histiocytosis with Langerhans cell features induced by scabies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Talanin, N Y; Smith, S S; Shelley, E D; Moores, W B

    1994-12-01

    An infant with biopsy-proven scabies developed nodular lesions. Histopathology revealed atypical histiocytes with Langerhans cell features. Within six months after treatment all skin lesions gradually disappeared. We suggest that the nodules in scabies can be due to Langerhans cell proliferation.

  6. Growth hormone replacement in patients with Langerhan's cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Howell, S; Wilton, P; Shalet, S

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the impact of growth hormone on growth and the underlying disease in children with growth hormone deficiency as a result of Langerhan's cell histiocytosis.
STUDY DESIGN—Retrospective analysis of data from the Kabi (Pharmacia & Upjohn) international growth database (KIGS) for 82 children with Langerhan's cell histiocytosis treated with recombinant growth hormone.
RESULTS—At the start of treatment the median (10-90th centile) age was 9.0 (5.2 to 14.7) years, with a median height standard deviation score (SDS) of −2.0 (−3.5 to −0.9). The median pretreatment height velocity (measured in cm/year) was 3.6 (0.9 to 6.4); this increased to 8.8 (3.8 to 12.0) in the first year of treatment with growth hormone, and then remained significantly greater than the pretreatment height velocity at 7.3 (4.4 to 9.7) and 7.1 (4.1 to 9.3) cm/year in the second and third years, respectively. The median height SDS increased from −2.0 to −0.8 (−2.3 to 0.6) by the end of three years of treatment. There was no increase in the recurrence rate of the underlying disease and no adverse event could be directly attributed to growth hormone treatment, apart from one case of benign intracranial hypertension that resolved on stopping treatment with growth hormone.
CONCLUSIONS—Growth hormone replacement treatment for patients with Langerhan's cell histiocytosis with growth hormone deficiency is beneficial and safe.

 PMID:9659097

  7. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis masquerading as tuberculosis in an infant.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, M P; Mettananda, S; De Silva, M V C

    2011-01-01

    A 4-month-old infant presented with continued fever, unresolving bronchopneumonia and household contact with sputum-smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) and showed marginal improvement on anti-TB chemotherapy. Recurrent pneumothorax prompted the clinical diagnosis of TB to be revised. High-resolution CT scan of the chest and open lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Treatment with prednisolone and vinblastin resulted in settling of fever and resolution of respiratory symptoms and signs. In communities where the prevalence of TB is high, unusual presentations should prompt consideration of alternative diagnoses. PMID:22041471

  8. A Retrospective Analysis of Oral Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Iranian Population: a 20-year Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Atarbashi Moghadam, Saede; Lotfi, Ali; Piroozhashemi, Batool; Mokhtari, Sepideh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease with unknown pathogenesis and is characterized by local or disseminated proliferation of Langerhans cells. There is no previous investigation on prevalence of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis in Iranian population. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis in an Iranian population and to compare the data with previous reports. Materials and Method Pathology files of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Department of Dental School of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from 1992 to 2012 were searched for cases recorded as oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis. A total number of 20 cases were found and the clinical information of patients was recorded. Results The relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis was 0.34% and the most common location was the posterior mandible. In addition, the mean age of patients was 27 years and there was a definite male predominance. Most lesions were localized and tooth mobility was the most common oral presentation. Conclusion In Iranian population as in many other countries, the relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis is low. Moreover, tooth mobility and periodontal lesions are the frequent early signs of disease. Therefore, in patients with periodontal problems, good oral health, and no response to the treatment; Langerhans cell histiocytosis must be considered. Additionally, although most cases of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis are localized, systemic involvement must also be considered and dental professionals have an important role in early detection of the disease. PMID:26535408

  9. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting as isolated adenitis in an infant: case report].

    PubMed

    Soriano-Ramos, María; Salcedo Lobato, Enrique; Baro Fernández, María; Blázquez-Gamero, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis in infants is a rare condition, and presentation as an isolated cervical adenitis is exceptional at this age. We describe the case of a 3-month-old female infant presenting with a neck mass in the right mandibular angle with poor response to antibiotic treatment. Fine needle aspiration was performed and confirmed the diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis with complementary tests showing no features of systemic involvement. Langerhans cell histiocytosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subacute neck masses with poor outcome in infants and physicians should consider performing a fine needle aspiration to establish the diagnosis. PMID:27399030

  10. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting as isolated adenitis in an infant: case report].

    PubMed

    Soriano-Ramos, María; Salcedo Lobato, Enrique; Baro Fernández, María; Blázquez-Gamero, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis in infants is a rare condition, and presentation as an isolated cervical adenitis is exceptional at this age. We describe the case of a 3-month-old female infant presenting with a neck mass in the right mandibular angle with poor response to antibiotic treatment. Fine needle aspiration was performed and confirmed the diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis with complementary tests showing no features of systemic involvement. Langerhans cell histiocytosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subacute neck masses with poor outcome in infants and physicians should consider performing a fine needle aspiration to establish the diagnosis.

  11. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with nail changes and multisystem disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Jesus Semblano Bittencourt, Maraya; Moraes Dias, Carolina; Lima Lage, Thaiane; Magno Parijós, Amanda; Brito Mesquita, Letícia; Haber Carvalho, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Nail involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis is uncommon and is said to indicate a poor prognosis. We describe a 2-year-old boy with onycholysis, subungual hyperkeratosis, and hemorrhages on his fingernails. He also had hepatosplenomegaly and pulmonary involvement. The diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis was made by histopathologic examination of skin and liver.The role of nail involvement as an unfavorable prognostic sign is still unclear and this paper concludes that nail involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a possible sign of multisystemic involvement. PMID:27617727

  12. A case of invasive Langerhans cell histiocytosis localizing only in the lung and diagnosed as pneumothorax in an adolescent female

    PubMed Central

    Dejima, Hitoshi; Morita, Shigeki; Takahashi, Yusuke; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Iinuma, Hisae; Kondo, Fukuo; Kawamura, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    In infants, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is associated with poor clinical outcomes as Langerhans cells invade and damage multiple organs, a presentation that is different from that in adults. Here, we present a case of a 15-year-old female who visited ourclinic complaining of right chest pain and dyspnea. She was diagnosed with right pneumothorax by chest X-ray. Chest computed tomography showed multiple cystic changes in the bilateral lung. Additionally, bullous lesions occupying the upper lobe and multiple white tiny nodules on the surface of the lung were observed by thoracoscopy. These nodules comprised proliferating atypical CD1a/S-100-positive cells invading the pulmonary parenchyma, leading to the diagnosis of LCH. Because of the extensive invasion into the pulmonary parenchyma, chemotherapy was administered. This case of LCH was unique in that the age of onset was atypical and the tumor cells occupied a single organ, despite their malignant behavior. PMID:26045867

  13. Age alters ADPase positive dendritic (Langerhans) cell response to P. aeruginosa ocular challenge.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, L D; Moon, M M; Dawisha, S; Berk, R S

    1986-05-01

    The morphology, distribution and quantitation of dendritic (Langerhans) cells (LC) was determined by analysis of ADPase stained epithelial flat mounts from 6-8 week young adult (resistant) and 24 month old (susceptible) aged mice before and after experimental infection with P. aeruginosa topically applied to the scarified cornea. The contralateral eye (controls) was also scarified and phosphate buffered saline applied similarly. This study has examined the changes in ADPase positive cell populations of the conjunctival limbal epithelium and corneal epithelium of naturally resistant mice (Swiss-Webster and CD2F1) following corneal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa at two different ages, young adult (8 week old) and aged (24 month old). The young adult mice recover from their infection and restore corneal clarity while the aged mice have extensive ocular destruction and corneal scarring. Conjunctival limbal dendritic cell numbers in young adult mice were found to be significantly increased at day seven post infection and then returned to baseline levels. In contrast, conjunctival limbal dendritic cell numbers in aged mice were found to increase slowly and to peak at fourteen days after infection. Other differences between the two ages (young adult and aged) included an initial increase in dendritic cells five hours post infection in the young adult groups and an initial decrease at five hours in the aged groups of mice.

  14. In vitro suppression of the epidermal Langerhans' cells in necro split skin.

    PubMed

    Alsbjörn, B F; Nielsen, S L; Jensen, M G

    1987-01-01

    The effect of ultraviolet light B irradiation and glucocorticosteroid incubation on the epidermal Langerhans' cell density and tissue viability was investigated, in vitro, on human thin necro split skin.

  15. Severe Langerhans cell histiocytosis in an infant: haemophagocytic syndrome association

    PubMed Central

    Póvoas, Marta Isabel; Luís, Pedro Pereira; Esteves, Isabel; Ferrão, Anabela

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease of unknown origin with a heterogeneous clinical presentation, varying from benign and self-limited to lethal. It is classified as single or multisystemic, according to the number of organs involved (one or at least two, respectively). Diagnosis can be challenging and is based on the histological and immunophenotypic examination of affected tissues. Secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is rarely reported in association with LCH and may impair its diagnosis. Some authors suggest that the coexistence of the two disorders is more than coincidental. We present a case of multisystem LCH in a 5-month-old infant, with all risk organs involved, in which severity and rapid progression reflect an association with haemophagocytic syndrome. PMID:25336558

  16. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis of the temporal fossa: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, CHEN; LIANG, QIANLEI; DU, CHANGWANG; ZHANG, XIAODONG; GUO, SHIWEN

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, varying from an isolated lesion to systemic involvement. The etiology of this disease remains to be elucidated. The present study reports a case of LCH with temporal fossa localization in an 8-year-old male patient, who had exhibited left temporal pain and headache for 1 month. Physical examination revealed slight exophthalmos and conjunctival hemorrhage in the patient's left eye, and non-contrast computed tomography imaging of the head revealed a soft tissue mass with unclear margins located in the left temporal fossa, as well as a wide bony defect. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogeneously contrast-enhanced mass near the left temporal pole, which eroded into the patient's left orbit and maxillary sinus. The lesion was totally excised and confirmed to be LCH through biopsy. PMID:27073529

  17. Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying B | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying Biomarkers for Early Detection and Risk Assessment. This application addresses Program Announcement PA-09-197: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Hematopoietic Malignancies (R01). The overall aim of this project is to identify novel biomarkers that may be used to diagnose and treat patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH). LCH occurs with similar frequency as other rare malignancies including Hodgkin's lymphoma and AML. |

  18. Role of multidisciplinary approach in a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis with initial periodontal manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Cisternino, Angelo; Asa’ad, Farah; Fusco, Nicola; Ferrero, Stefano; Rasperini, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare inflammatory myeloid neoplasia of unknown etiology occurring in both children and adults. This condition is characterized by an abnormal proliferation of Langerhans cells that may virtually affect all sites in the human body. Oral manifestations of LCH could be the first clinical sign of disease and its periodontal localization could be easily mistaken for other more common entities, such as chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis. Case presentation: A 32-years old female visited a private dental practice with a chief complaint of sensitivity in the mandibular left first molar. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed deep periodontal pocket, recession, furcation involvement, mobility, severe alveolar bone destruction and a diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis was rendered. Multiple tooth extractions were carried out due to progressive periodontal destruction with impaired healing and development of ulcerative lesions. Multidisciplinary investigation demonstrated that the periodontal involvement was a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease. A biopsy of a bone lesion was therefore performed, revealing the presence of multifocal single system LCH. Conclusion: The identification of periodontal LCH is not trivial given that it may clinically resemble other periodontal disease entities. The dentist can be the first health care personnel to unravel the presence of an underlying systemic LCH. PMID:26722570

  19. Solitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the hard palate: a diagnostic pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Varsha, Dalal; Kaur, Manveen; Chaudhary, Neena; Siraj, Fouzia

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a relatively rare and unique disease characterized by an abnormal proliferation of immature dendritic cells. It is predominantly seen in children with adults showing less than ten times the incidence compared to childhood. The clinical presentation and organ involvement is highly variable. Oral manifestations generally consist of mucosal ulceration associated with lesions of the underlying bone. Lesions limited to the oral mucosa are rare. We present a case of a 45-year-old male who presented with an ulcer on the hard palate showing histopathologic features of LCH. The present case is a reminder of the possibility of occurrence of this unusual entity in the oral cavity. Appropriate use of immunohistochemistry is advocated to avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:27703428

  20. Langerhans Cells Facilitate UVB-induced Epidermal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Julia M.; Bürgler, Christina D.; Freudzon, Marianna; Golubets, Kseniya; Gibson, Juliet F.; Filler, Renata B.; Girardi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) light is considered the major environmental inducer of human keratinocyte DNA mutations, including within the tumor-suppressor gene p53, and chronic exposure is associated with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) formation. Langerhans cells (LC) comprise a dendritic network within the suprabasilar epidermis, yet the role of LC in UVB-induced carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Herein, we show that LC-intact epidermis develops UVB-induced tumors more readily than LC-deficient epidermis. While levels of epidermal cyclopyrimidine dimers (CPD) following acute UVB exposure are equivalent in the presence or absence of LC, chronic UVB-induced p53 mutant clonal islands expand more readily in association with LC which remain largely intact and are preferentially found in proximity to the expanding mutant keratinocyte populations. The observed LC facilitation of mutant p53 clonal expansion is completely αβ and γδ T-cell independent, and is associated with increased intraepidermal expression of interleukin (IL)-22 and the presence of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3). These data demonstrate that LC play a key role in UVB-induced cutaneous carcinogenesis, and suggest that LC locally stimulate keratinocyte proliferation and innate immune cells that provoke tumor outgrowth. PMID:26053049

  1. Langerhans cell precursors acquire RANK/CD265 in prenatal human skin.

    PubMed

    Schöppl, Alice; Botta, Albert; Prior, Marion; Akgün, Johnnie; Schuster, Christopher; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the first barrier against foreign pathogens and the prenatal formation of a strong network of various innate and adaptive cells is required to protect the newborn from perinatal infections. While many studies about the immune system in healthy and diseased adult human skin exist, our knowledge about the cutaneous prenatal/developing immune system and especially about the phenotype and function of antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) in human skin is still scarce. It has been shown previously that LCs in healthy adult human skin express receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), an important molecule prolonging their survival. In this study, we investigated at which developmental stage LCs acquire this important molecule. Immunofluorescence double-labeling of cryostat sections revealed that LC precursors in prenatal human skin either do not yet [10-11 weeks of estimated gestational age (EGA)] or only faintly (13-15 weeks EGA) express RANK. LCs express RANK at levels comparable to adult LCs by the end of the second trimester. Comparable with adult skin, dermal antigen-presenting cells at no gestational age express this marker. These findings indicate that epidermal leukocytes gradually acquire RANK during gestation - a phenomenon previously observed also for other markers on LCs in prenatal human skin.

  2. Langerhans cell precursors acquire RANK/CD265 in prenatal human skin

    PubMed Central

    Schöppl, Alice; Botta, Albert; Prior, Marion; Akgün, Johnnie; Schuster, Christopher; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the first barrier against foreign pathogens and the prenatal formation of a strong network of various innate and adaptive cells is required to protect the newborn from perinatal infections. While many studies about the immune system in healthy and diseased adult human skin exist, our knowledge about the cutaneous prenatal/developing immune system and especially about the phenotype and function of antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) in human skin is still scarce. It has been shown previously that LCs in healthy adult human skin express receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), an important molecule prolonging their survival. In this study, we investigated at which developmental stage LCs acquire this important molecule. Immunofluorescence double-labeling of cryostat sections revealed that LC precursors in prenatal human skin either do not yet [10–11 weeks of estimated gestational age (EGA)] or only faintly (13–15 weeks EGA) express RANK. LCs express RANK at levels comparable to adult LCs by the end of the second trimester. Comparable with adult skin, dermal antigen-presenting cells at no gestational age express this marker. These findings indicate that epidermal leukocytes gradually acquire RANK during gestation – a phenomenon previously observed also for other markers on LCs in prenatal human skin. PMID:25722033

  3. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis and Diabetes Insipidus in a Young Smoker

    PubMed Central

    Earlam, K.; Souza, C. A.; Glikstein, R.; Gomes, M. M.; Pakhalé, S.

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is characterized by the abnormal nodular proliferation of histiocytes in various organ systems. Pulmonary involvement seen in young adults is nearly always seen in the context of past or current cigarette smoking. Although it tends to be a single-system disease, extrapulmonary manifestations involving the skin, bone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-axis are possible. High resolution CT (HRCT) of the thorax findings includes centrilobular nodules and cysts that are bizarre in shape, variable in size, and thin-walled. Often the diagnosis can be made based on the appropriate clinical presentation and typical imaging findings. Treatment includes smoking cessation and the potential use of glucocorticoids or cytotoxic agents depending on the severity of disease and multisystem involvement. PMID:27445532

  4. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis and Diabetes Insipidus in a Young Smoker.

    PubMed

    Earlam, K; Souza, C A; Glikstein, R; Gomes, M M; Pakhalé, S

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is characterized by the abnormal nodular proliferation of histiocytes in various organ systems. Pulmonary involvement seen in young adults is nearly always seen in the context of past or current cigarette smoking. Although it tends to be a single-system disease, extrapulmonary manifestations involving the skin, bone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-axis are possible. High resolution CT (HRCT) of the thorax findings includes centrilobular nodules and cysts that are bizarre in shape, variable in size, and thin-walled. Often the diagnosis can be made based on the appropriate clinical presentation and typical imaging findings. Treatment includes smoking cessation and the potential use of glucocorticoids or cytotoxic agents depending on the severity of disease and multisystem involvement. PMID:27445532

  5. Polyclonal T-Cells Express CD1a in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) Lesions

    PubMed Central

    West, Jennifer A.; Olsen, Sharon L.; Mitchell, Jenée M.; Priddle, Ross E.; Luke, Jennifer M.; Åkefeldt, Selma Olsson; Henter, Jan-Inge; Turville, Christopher; Kannourakis, George

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a complex and poorly understood disorder that has characteristics of both inflammatory and neoplastic disease. By using eight-colour flow cytometry, we have identified a previously unreported population of CD1a+/CD3+ T-cells in LCH lesions. The expression of CD1a is regarded as a hallmark of this disease; however, it has always been presumed that it was only expressed by pathogenic Langerhans cells (LCs). We have now detected CD1a expression by a range of T-cell subsets within all of the LCH lesions that were examined, establishing that CD1a expression in these lesions is no longer restricted to pathogenic LCs. The presence of CD1a+ T-cells in all of the LCH lesions that we have studied to date warrants further investigation into their biological function to determine whether these cells are important in the pathogenesis of LCH. PMID:25343480

  6. Purely cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting as an ulcer on the chin in an elderly man successfully treated with thalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniyan, Radhakrishnan; Ramachandran, Rajagopal; Rajangam, Gnanasekaran; Donaparthi, Navya

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare, clonal proliferative disorder of Langerhans’ cells of unknown etiology. Although the clinical presentation and therapeutic approach to the disease in children have been well established; limited data is available about the disease in adults. Purely cutaneous involvement of LCH in a man older than 70 years has rarely been described. Herein we report the case of a 71-year-old man with cutaneous LCH confined to the perioral region, scalp, and flexures successfully treated with thalidomide. PMID:26753141

  7. Langerhans cells in human chronic gingivitis and phenytoin-induced gingival hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kinane, D F; Drummond, J R; Chisholm, D M

    1990-01-01

    Langerhans cell numbers in oral epithelium increase as dental plaque accumulates. The anti-convulsant drug phenytoin predisposes to gingival hyperplasia in certain patients who take this medication for epilepsy and who also have poor oral hygiene. In this study 7 patients with phenytoin-induced gingival hyperplasia were compared with 5 subjects with chronic marginal gingivitis. On initial examination and on completion of the hygiene phase of periodontal therapy (a period ranging from 3.0 to 4.25 months), clinical indices of plaque and gingivitis were recorded and biopsies were taken from the lower anterior labial gingiva. Frozen sections were stained by an immunoperoxidase technique using the monoclonal antibody OKT6, and the number of Langerhans cells in a defined cross-sectional area was counted. In phenytoin-induced gingival hyperplasia there was a marked increase in Langerhans cells (13.8 +/- 0.45) when compared with chronic gingivitis (7.7 +/- 0.31; p less than 0.05). Both groups showed marked reductions in their plaque and gingival indices and numbers of Langerhans cells once treatment had been completed. However, levels of Langerhans cells in the drug-induced hyperplasia remained significantly higher (3.5 +/- 0.26) than in chronic gingivitis (1.5 +/- 0.22; p less than 0.05).

  8. Bisphosphonates in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: An International Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Chellapandian, Deepak; Makras, Polyzois; Kaltsas, Gregory; van den Bos, Cor; Naccache, Lamia; Rampal, Raajit; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Weitzman, Sheila; Egeler, R. Maarten; Abla, Oussama

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone is the most common organ of involvement in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), which is often painful and associated with significant morbidity from pathological fractures. Current first-line treatments include chemotherapy and steroids that are effective but often associated with adverse effects, whereas the disease may reactivate despite an initial response to first-line agents. Bisphosphonates are osteoclast inhibitors that have shown to be helpful in treating bone lesions of LCH. To date, there are no large international studies to describe their role in treating bone lesions of LCH. Method We conducted a multicenter retrospective review of 13 patients with histologically proven LCH, who had received bisphosphonates either at diagnosis or at disease reactivation. Results Ten patients (77%) had a single system bone disease, and 3 (23%) had bone lesions as part of multisystem disease. Median follow-up time post-bisphosphonate therapy was 4.6 years (range, 0.8 to 8.2 years). Treatment with bisphosphonates was associated with significant pain relief in almost all patients. Twelve (92%) achieved resolution of active bone lesions, and 10 out of them had no active disease for a median of 3.5 years (range, 0.8 to 5 years). One patient did not respond. No major adverse effects were reported in this series. Conclusion Bisphosphonates are well-tolerated drugs that can significantly improve bone pain and induce remission in active bone LCH. Future prospective studies evaluating the role of bisphosphonates in LCH are warranted. PMID:27413525

  9. Langerhans cell histiocytosis case with dense metaphyseal band sign.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Ichiro; Aihara, Toshinori; Morimoto, Akira; Watanabe, Hideaki; Furukawa, Rieko

    2013-02-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma, a type of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, exhibits a classic vertebral collapse, which is called vertebra plana (Calve's disease) and it manifests as a solitary bony lesion. Vertebra plana can cause severe pain in patients. Bisphosphonates (clodronate, pamidronate and zoledronic acid) have been recently used to treat osteolytic bone lesions of LCH. Zoledronic acid has 100 times relative potency that of pamidronate. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl who had zoledronic acid treatment for severe back pain due to vertebra plana. X-ray photographs of the patient's body showed dense metaphyseal band sign, which can be found in lead poisoning, treated leukemia, healing rickets, recovery from scurvy, vitamin D hypervitaminosis, congenital hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism. Increased biological potent zoledronic acid deprived her of severe back pain due to vertebra plana and might cause dense metaphyseal band sign of her skeleton. Conclusion; We have cured the severe back pain of a 10-year-old girl case of eosinophilic granuloma with zoledronic acid. After that treatment, X-ray photographs of the patient's body showed dense metaphyseal band sign. There have been few such cases reported until now. PMID:23409985

  10. Differentiating skin-limited and multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Simko, Stephen J.; Garmezy, Benjamin; Abhyankar, Harshal; Lupo, Philip J.; Chakraborty, Rikhia; Lim, Karen Phaik Har; Shih, Albert; Hicks, M. John; Wright, Teresa S.; Levy, Moise L.; McClain, Kenneth L.; Allen, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify features associated with multisystem involvement and therapeutic failure in patients with skin Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Study design We reviewed medical records of 71 consecutive LCH patients with skin involvement evaluated at Texas Children’s Hospital and analyzed clinical features, laboratory results, and presence of circulating cells with the BRAF-V600E mutation, with respect to initial staging and clinical outcomes. Results Skin disease in patients older than 18 months at diagnosis was associated with presence of multisystem disease (OR 9.65, 95% CI 1.17–79.4). Forty percent of patients referred for presumed skin-limited LCH had underlying multisystem involvement, half of these with risk-organ involvement. Patients with skin-limited LCH had 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) of 89% after initial therapy, and none developed multisystem disease. Patients with skin/multisystem involvement had 3 year PFS of 44% with vinblastine/prednisone therapy, and risk-organ involvement did not correlate with failure to achieve non-active disease. Circulating cells with BRAF-V600E were detected at higher frequency in multisystem patients (8/11 skin/multisystem, 1/13 skin-limited, P=0.002). Conclusions Skin-limited LCH requires infrequent therapeutic intervention and has lower risk of progression relative to skin plus multisystem LCH. The less aggressive clinical course and lack of circulating cells with BRAF-V600E mutation in skin-limited LCH suggest a different mechanism of disease origin compared with multisystem or risk-organ disease. PMID:25441388

  11. [Neuroimaging of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the central nervous system of children].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Rebollo Polo, M; Fons Estupiña, C; Muchart López, J; Cruz Martinez, O

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation within tissues of anomalous dendritic cells similar to Langerhans cells. The clinical presentation varies, ranging from the appearance of a single bone lesion to multisystemic involvement. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement, manifesting as diabetes insipidus secondary to pituitary involvement, has been known since the original description of the disease. Two types of CNS lesions are currently differentiated. The first, pseudotumoral lesions with infiltration by Langerhans cells, most commonly manifests as pituitary infiltration. The second, described more recently, consists of neurodegenerative lesions of the CNS associated with neurologic deterioration. This second type of lesion constitutes a complication of the disease; however, there is no consensus about the cause of this complication. Our objective was to describe the radiologic manifestations of LCH in the CNS in pediatric patients.

  12. Diagnosis of pulmonary histiocytosis X by immunodetection of Langerhans cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Chollet, S.; Soler, P.; Dournovo, P.; Richard, M. S.; Ferrans, V. J.; Basset, F.

    1984-01-01

    Based on the finding that Langerhans cells and histiocytosis X cells react with the monoclonal antibody OKT6, raised against a subset of thymocytes, we used this antibody to study the cells collected by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 131 patients, including 18 with pulmonary histiocytosis X, 43 with pulmonary sarcoidosis, 67 with miscellaneous pulmonary disorders, and 3 controls. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated the presence of OKT6-reactive cells in all patients with pulmonary histiocytosis X (mean +/- SEM, 5.29% +/- 1.14% of all cells in BAL fluid). Immunoelectron microscopic studies revealed that the cells labeled in these patients (n = 13) contained Langerhans granules. The number of fluorescent cells in the other 113 patients was significantly smaller (mean +/- SEM, 0.20% +/- 0.04% of all cells; P less than 0.001). In the 3 control patients, in the 43 patients with sarcoidosis, and in 61 of the 67 patients with miscellaneous disorders unrelated to histiocytosis X, no cells or less than 1% of the total were labeled; however, in the 6 remaining patients in this miscellaneous group, 1.3 to 2.8% of all cells in BAL were labeled. In 3 of these 6 patients, immunoelectronmicroscopic examination showed that the cells labeled by OKT6 had the general characteristics of Langerhans cells but lacked Langerhans granules. OKT3, OKT4, and OKT8 monoclonal antibodies did not stain histiocytosis X cells in BAL fluid. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6372496

  13. Notch is active in Langerhans cell histiocytosis and confers pathognomonic features on dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Caroline; Kauer, Max; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Jug, Gunhild; Schwentner, Raphaela; Leitner, Judith; Bock, Peter; Steinberger, Peter; Bauer, Wolfgang; Carlesso, Nadia; Minkov, Milen; Gadner, Helmut; Stingl, Georg; Kovar, Heinrich; Kriehuber, Ernst

    2012-12-20

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an enigmatic disease defined by the accumulation of Langerhans cell-like dendritic cells (DCs). In the present study, we demonstrate that LCH cells exhibit a unique transcription profile that separates them not only from plasmacytoid and myeloid DCs, but also from epidermal Langerhans cells, indicating a distinct DC entity. Molecular analysis revealed that isolated and tissue-bound LCH cells selectively express the Notch ligand Jagged 2 (JAG2) and are the only DCs that express both Notch ligand and its receptor. We further show that JAG2 signaling induces key LCH-cell markers in monocyte-derived DCs, suggesting a functional role of Notch signaling in LCH ontogenesis. JAG2 also induced matrix-metalloproteinases 1 and 12, which are highly expressed in LCH and may account for tissue destruction in LCH lesions. This induction was selective for DCs and was not recapitulated in monocytes. The results of the present study suggest that JAG2-mediated Notch activation confers phenotypic and functional aspects of LCH to DCs; therefore, interference with Notch signaling may be an attractive strategy to combat this disease.

  14. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis: analysis of 14 patients and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Li, Man-Hui; Li, Jiang-Xiong; Tao, Ru-Jia; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is an orphan disease in respiratory medicine, which most affects adult smokers. The purpose of this article was to discuss the clinical features, especially the radiologic features of PLCH patients during their hospitalization through a retrospective analysis on clinical data. Furthermore, the current literature was also reviewed. Methods Between December 2008 and June 2012, 14 patients with PLCH were assessed at Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Among these patients, seven patients were diagnosed through tissue biopsy from the lung and one patient from enlarged cervical lymph nodes; the rest of six patients were diagnosed based on the clinical-radiological data. The data consisting of demographics, clinical presentation, smoking habits, pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and radiographic image from the medical records was analyzed retrospectively. Results The average age of patients (11 males and 3 females) was 42.79 (±13.71) years old. All male patients and one female patient had a long smoking history. The common manifestations were cough and exertional dyspnea. Spontaneous pneumothorax was found in three patients. Varieties of pulmonary shadows such as nodular, cystic, patch-like and cord-like were revealed by chest computed tomography (CT) examination. Large Langerhans cells (LCs) were discovered in biopsy tissue by immunohistochemical stains. Conclusions PLCH is still an orphan disease and maybe related to smoking. Clinical symptoms such as cough and exertional dyspnea are non-specific. We shall pay attention to recurrent pneumothorax as clinically it is associated with PLCH. The characteristic radiological manifestation is cystic or nodular shadow in the lungs, which plays crucial roles in diagnosing PLCH. PMID:27293848

  15. Atypical radiological manifestations of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Ko, S-M; Choe, B-K; Kim, H-S; Lee, H-J; Kwon, K-Y

    2008-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare pulmonary disease that typically affects cigarette smokers from 30-40 years of age onwards. It is very rare in children, especially for those under 15 years of age. We report an atypical radiological manifestation of isolated pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis in a 12-year-old girl that showed multifocal consolidation and multiple small nodules on an initial chest radiograph, and gradual fibrotic change with multiple cysts on follow-up chest radiographs and CT scans.

  16. [The Langerhans cell histiocytosis with thymic localization as initial and exclusive place].

    PubMed

    Hernández Pérez, J M; Franquet Casas, T; Rodríguez, S; Giménez, A

    2007-10-01

    The Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH), also known as Histiocitosis X it is an illness not very frequent granulomatosus etiology not clarified yet, that it can have different manifestations and localizations, however the thymic localization as initial and exclusive place gives presentation HCL it is quite unusual. The present case is presented a patient that debuted with a clinical unspecific, where the tests give image they put she gives apparent a mass in previous mediastinum and that after the pathologic and immunohistochemical analysis they evidenced a proliferation Langerhans s cells and eosinophils it being positive for CD1a and S-100 confirming the diagnosis of the LCH.

  17. Visual loss with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: multifocal central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Job, O M; Schatz, N J; Glaser, J S

    1999-03-01

    A 42-year-old woman with a 6-year history of diabetes insipidus and progressive hypersomnolence presented with visual loss. Neuroimaging showed infiltration in the hypothalamus, the optic nerve, and the chiasm, as well as multiple lesions in other areas of the brain parenchyma. Biopsy showed Langerhans cell histiocytosis. This is an unusual presentation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, involving the visual pathways without manifestations outside of the central nervous system. The differential diagnosis and the magnetic resonance imaging findings will be discussed. PMID:10098549

  18. A case of thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis with diabetes insipidus as the first presentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Huang, Xiaochun; Qiu, Yuan; Chen, Hanzhang; Fu, Yingyu; Li, Xinchun

    2013-03-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an idiopathic group of reactive proliferative diseases linked to aberrant immunity, pathologically characterized by clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells. LCH rarely involves the thymus. We report a case of thymic LCH with diabetes insipidus as the first presentation, without evidence of myasthenia gravis and without evidenced involvement of the skin, liver, spleen, bones, lungs and superficial lymph nodes. This present case may have important clinical implications. In screening for LCH lesions, attention should be attached to rarely involved sites in addition to commonly involved organs. Follow-up and imageological examination are very important to a final diagnosis.

  19. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Axiotis, C A; Merino, M J; Duray, P H

    1991-03-15

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the female genital tract is rare. Four new cases are reported, and there is a review of the 38 cases in the literature. This disease may involve the vulva, vagina, cervix, endometrium, and ovary. Four distinct patient groups, segregated on the basis of initial presentation and subsequent anatomic extent of disease, were categorized as follows: (1) "pure" genital LCH, (2) genital LCH with subsequent multi-organ involvement, (3) oral or cutaneous LCH with subsequent genital and multi-organ involvement, and (4) diabetes insipidus with subsequent genital and multi-organ disease. Although involvement of the genital tract can occur at any age, it is most common in young adulthood. Clinically, LCH may mimic either primary neoplasia or various inflammatory lesions; the major pathologic differential diagnosis is venereal and other inflammatory diseases. The pure genital form may have a distinct nosologic position in the spectrum of LCH similar to the "pure," self-limited cutaneous histiocytosis seen in infants. There is no correlation between histologic findings and the outcome of the genital lesions. There is also no correlation between clinical presentation and/or the extent of involvement and outcome of genital lesions; complete regression, partial improvement, persistent lesions, and recurrences were seen in all four groups of patients. The treatment of genital LCH is not well defined and is highly individualized. Therapy has included surgery, radiation, topical corticosteroids, topical nitrogen mustard, systemic chemotherapy, and combination therapy; mixed results were obtained with all treatment modalities. Although no modality has been shown to yield a superior outcome, complete surgical excision is advocated as initial therapy.

  20. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ping; Lu, Hai-Wen; Jiang, Sen; Fan, Li-Chao; Li, Hui-Ping; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare disease with insidious onset and nonspecific manifestations. The objective of this article was to characterize the clinical manifestations and features of PLCH by retrospectively analyzing clinical data of patients with PLCH in addition to simultaneous review of literature. A retrospective analysis was conducted on clinical data of patients with PLCH (n = 7), whose conditions were diagnosed by biopsy from pulmonary tissue (n = 6) or enlarged lymph nodes in the neck (n = 1) and confirmed by PLCH typical radiological features on computed tomography (CT) scan, between January 2001 and September 2012 at the Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. The review of published reports was made to further emphasize the clinical manifestation and radiological features of PLCH. Long history of cigarette smoking was found in 6 patients. Two patients had recurrent pneumothorax and the other 2 had pulmonary arterial hypertension (World Health Organization group 5 pulmonary hypertension), diagnosed through ultrasonic cardiogram. The nodular shadows were revealed by chest CT scan in 5 patients, cystic shadows in 5 patients, and reticular shadows in 2 patients, as major manifestations, respectively; most of the lesions were located in the middle or upper segments of the lung. The obvious shrank of lesion was found in 1 patient after completely quitting smoking. The pathogenesis of PLCH might be closely associated with smoking. The cystic or nodular lesion was the typical radiological features. Further prospective studies with large sample size are required to further validate the study results and understand the clinical characteristics of PLCH to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:25415669

  1. Contact sensitizers decrease 33D1 expression on mature Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Herouet, C; Cottin, M; Galanaud, P; Leclaire, J; Rousset, F

    1999-01-01

    Langerhans cells play a critical role in allergic contact hypersensitivity. In vivo, these cells capture xenobiotics that penetrate the skin and transport them through the lymphatic vessels into regional lymph nodes for presentation to T cells. During this migration step, Langerhans cells become mature dendritic cells according to their phenotype and their high immunostimulatory capacity. In vitro, when isolated from the skin and cultured for 3 days, Langerhans cells undergo similar phenotypic and functional maturation. In this study, the capacity of sensitizers, irritants and neutral chemicals to modulate the surface marker expression and morphology of pure mature murine Langerhans cells in vitro was examined. Contact with 4 sensitizers (2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfate, 4-ethoxymethylene-2-phenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one, p-phenylenediamine, mercaptobenzo-thiazole) resulted in a rapid, specific, marked fall in 33D1 expression, a murine specific dendritic cell marker. No effect was observed with 2 neutral chemicals (sodium chloride, methyl nicotinate) or 2 irritants (dimethyl sulfoxide, benzalkonium chloride). Nevertheless, sodium lauryl sulfate, a very irritant detergent, altered morphology and down-regulated all membrane markers. These preliminary data suggest that in vitro modulation of 33D1 expression by strong sensitizers may be an approach to the development of an in vitro model for the identification of chemicals that have the potential to cause skin sensitization and to distinguish them as far as possible from irritants.

  2. Characterization of murine lung dendritic cells: similarities to Langerhans cells and thymic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent accessory cells (AC) for the initiation of primary immune responses. Although murine lymphoid DC and Langerhans cells have been extensively characterized, DC from murine lung have been incompletely described. We isolated cells from enzyme-digested murine lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages that were potent stimulators of a primary mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). The AC had a low buoyant density, were loosely adherent and nonphagocytic. AC function was unaffected by depletion of cells expressing the splenic DC marker, 33D1. In addition, antibody and complement depletion of cells bearing the macrophage marker F4/80, or removal of phagocytic cells with silica also failed to decrease AC activity. In contrast, AC function was decreased by depletion of cells expressing the markers J11d and the low affinity interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), both present on thymic and skin DC. AC function was approximately equal in FcR+ and FcR- subpopulations, indicating there was heterogeneity within the AC population. Consistent with the functional data, a combined two-color immunofluorescence and latex bead uptake technique revealed that lung cells high in AC activity were enriched in brightly Ia+ dendritic- shaped cells that (a) were nonphagocytic, (b) lacked specific T and B lymphocyte markers and the macrophage marker F4/80, but (c) frequently expressed C3biR, low affinity IL-2R, FcRII, and the markers NLDC-145 and J11d. Taken together, the functional and phenotypic data suggest the lung cells that stimulate resting T cells in an MLR and that might be important in local pulmonary immune responses are DC that bear functional and phenotypic similarity to other tissues DC, such as Langerhans cells and thymic DC. PMID:2162904

  3. A Case of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Manifested as a Suprasellar Mass

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ju Young; Park, Byung-Kiu; Yoo, Heon; Lee, Sang Hyun; Hong, Eun Kyung; Park, Weon Seo; Kwon, Young Joo; Yoon, Jong Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) has diverse clinical manifestations, including intracranial mass lesions. We report a case of LCH that manifested as a suprasellar mass, and initially misdiagnosed as a germ cell tumor. A 29-year-old woman presented with polyuria, polydipsia and amenorrhea. Laboratory findings revealed hypopituitarism with central diabetes insipidus, and a suprasellar mass and a pineal mass were observed on magnetic resonance imaging. Under the clinical impression of a germ cell tumor, the patient was treated with germ cell tumor chemotherapy (cisplatin and etoposide) and radiation therapy without biopsy. After initial shrinkage of the lesions, further growth of the tumor was observed and a biopsy was performed. The histopathology revealed LCH. After chemotherapy according to the LCH III protocol, the tumor disappeared. She is on regular follow up for 5 years without relapse. The present findings indicate that LCH should be included in the differential diagnosis of a suprasellar mass, even in adults, especially when it manifests with diabetes insipidus. This case also underscores the importance of a histopathologic diagnosis in patients with suprasellar tumors before the initiation of a specific therapy, even if the clinical findings are highly suggestive of a specific diagnosis. PMID:27195259

  4. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: recurrent lesions affecting mandible in a 10-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Loducca, S V; Mantesso, A; Araújo, N S; Magalhães, M H

    2001-01-01

    Hand-Schuller-Christian disease is a multifocal variant of eosinophilic granuloma, characterised by the classical triad of bony lesions, exophthalmos and diabetes insipidus. This case relates recurrent Langerhans' cell histiocytosis lesions presented as destruction of periodontal support associated with diabetes in a 10-year-old patient. Medical history suggests that the case represents a case of Hand-Schuller Christian disease.

  5. [Multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis of bone: late revelation in a 76-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Lahiani, D; Hammami, B K; Maâloul, I; Frikha, M; Baklouti, S; Jlidi, R; Ben Jemaâ, M

    2008-03-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis or histiocytosis X has a variable course from a self-limited eosinophilic granuloma to an aggressive disseminated disease. It mainly affects children. We report a 76-year-old woman with multifocal bone histiocytosis X, involving the rachis, an iliac bone and the skull. The diagnosis has been established by histological exam. Outcome was favourable after chemotherapy.

  6. Immunoisolated transplantation of purified langerhans islet cells in testis cortex of male rats for treatment of streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, Ali; Norouzian, Dariush; Mehrabi, Mohammad Reza; Chiani, Mohsen; Saffari, Zahra; Farahnak, Maryam; Akbarzadeh, Azim

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to induce experimental diabetes mellitus by streptozotocin in normal adult Wistar rats via comparison of changes in body weight, consumption of food, volume of water, urine and levels of glucose, insulin and C-peptide in serum, between normal and diabetic rats. Intra-venous injection of 60 mg/kg dose of streptozotocin in 250-300 g (75-90 days) adult Wistar rats makes pancreas swell and causes degeneration in Langerhans islet β-cells and induces experimental diabetes mellitus in 2-4 days. For a microscopic study of degeneration of Langerhans islet β-cells of diabetic rats, biopsy from pancreas tissue of diabetic and normal rats, staining and comparison between them, were done. In this process, after collagenase digestion of pancreas, islets were isolated, dissociated and identified by dithizone method and then with enzymatic procedure by DNase and trypsin, the islet cells changed into single cells and β-cells were identified by immune fluorescence method and then assayed by flow-cytometer. Donor tissue in each step of work was prepared from 38 adult male Wistar rats weighted 250-300 g (75-90 days). Transplantation was performed in rats after 2-4 weeks of diabetes induction. In this study, the levels of insulin, C-peptide and glucose in diabetic rats reached to normal range as compared to un-diabetic rats in 20 days after transplantation of islet cells. Transplantation was performed under the cortex of testis as immunoisolated place for islet cells transplantation. PMID:25298622

  7. Immunohistochemical staining of Langerhans cells in HPV-positive and HPV-negative cases of oral squamous cells carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    PEREIRA, Karuza Maria Alves; SOARES, Rosilene Calazans; OLIVEIRA, Márcio Campos; PINTO, Leão Pereira; COSTA, Antônio de Lisboa Lopes

    2011-01-01

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been strongly implicated in development of some cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the immunological system somehow reacts against the presence of this virus. Among the cells involved in such mechanism of defense Langerhans cells (LC) stand out, which are responsible for processing and presenting antigens. Objectives The purposes of this study were to investigate the presence of HPV DNA and to evaluate the immunohistochemical reactivity for Langerhans cells between HPV-positive and HPV-negative OSCC. Twenty-seven cases of OSSC were evaluated. Material and Methods DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue samples and amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for the detection of HPV DNA. Viral typing was performed by dot blot hybridization. Immunohistochemistry was performed by the Streptavidin-biotin technique. Results From the 27 cases, 9 (33.3%) were HPV-positive and 18 (66.0%) HPV-negative. HPV 18 was the most prevalent viral type (100% cases) and infection with HPV-16 (co-infection) was detected in only 1 case. In the OSCC specimens examined, immunoreactivity to S-100 antibody was detected in all cases, with a mean number of 49.48±30.89 Langerhans cells positive for immunostaining. The mean number of immunostained Langerhans cells was smaller in the HPV-positive cases (38 cells/case) than in the HPV-negative cases (42.5 cells/case), but this difference was not significant (p=0.38). Conclusions The low frequency of detection of HPV DNA in OSCC indicates a possible participation of the virus in the development and progression of only a subgroup of these tumors. There was no association between the immunohistochemical labeling for Langerhans cells (S-100+) and HPV infection of in OSSC. These findings suggest that the presence of HPV in such OSCC cases could not alter the immunological system, particularly the Langerhans cells. PMID:21710097

  8. A note on langerhans cells in the oesophagus epithelium of domesticated mammals.

    PubMed

    Meyer, W; Hornickel, I; Schoennagel, B

    2010-04-01

    Using the zinc-iodide osmium tetroxide (ZIO) method, TEM and immunohistochemistry (for CD1a and langerin), the study demonstrates Langerhans cells in the oesophageal epithelium of domesticated mammals (herbivores: horse, cattle, goat; omnivores: pig, dog, laboratory rat; carnivores: cat), although with variations between the species. The ZIO method and TEM showed this cell type in the cat and, sporadically, in the horse; CD1a (+) Langerhans cells were demonstrated in the ovine, porcine and murine oesophagus. Positive staining for langerin was detected in single cells of the caprine, canine, murine and feline oesophagus and more distinct in almost all the cell layers of the equine and porcine oesophagus epithelium. The findings are discussed comparing specifically the results for CD1a and langerin, whereby the latter C-type lectin may be of importance in species with a rather thick oesophagus epithelium, such as that present in the plantivorous and most of the omnivorous animals, where antigenic pressure is reduced.

  9. Unusual cutaneous histiocytosis expressing an intermediate immunophenotype between Langerhans' cells and dermal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Berti, E; Gianotti, R; Alessi, E

    1988-08-01

    Cutaneous histiocytosis was discovered in a 40-year-old man with a slow-growing nodule located on his right arm. Histologic findings showed an epidermotropic infiltrate of histiocytes with folded, irregular nuclei. Immunologically, the cells presented an intermediate phenotype between Langerhans' cells and dermal macrophages. After surgical removal of the lesion, neither a relapse nor visceral involvement was observed during two years of follow-up.

  10. Langerhans cell migration: not necessarily always at the center of the skin sensitization universe.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Cumberbatch, Marie; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2009-08-01

    Since their discovery in 1868, the role of Langerhans cells (LCs) in skin immunity has been researched extensively. Recent data deriving from transgenic animals that are deficient in LCs have begun to challenge the dogma that there is a universal requirement for these cells in the development of skin sensitization. This Commentary addresses relationships between LC mobilization, draining lymph node activation, and skin sensitization using immunomodulators agonistic for a family of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors.

  11. Multiple skin tumors of indeterminate cells in an adult.

    PubMed

    Kolde, G; Bröcker, E B

    1986-10-01

    An adult patient with multiple unusual histiocytic tumors of the skin is described. As shown by immunohistologic study, electron microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy, the tumors represent circumscribed proliferations of the Langerhans cell-related indeterminate dendritic cells of the skin. This distinct cutaneous histiocytosis may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome.

  12. In vitro primary sensitization and restimulation of hapten-specific T cells by fresh and cultured human epidermal Langerhans' cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moulon, C; Péguet-Navarro, J; Courtellemont, P; Redziniak, G; Schmitt, D

    1993-01-01

    We examined the capacity of human Langerhans's cells (LC) to sensitize autologous T cells to the trinitrophenyl hapten (TNP) in vitro. Two-day cultured Langerhans' cells, but not freshly prepared Langerhans' cells, can induce in vitro primary proliferative reactions to the TNP hapten. Using a CD45RA+ naive T-cell subset, similar results were found, therefore making the possibility of a previous in vivo T-cell contact with the hapten unlikely. The primary in vitro response was strongly inhibited by monoclonal antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II, CD4 antigens and ICAM-1 and LFA-3 adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we found that fresh LC can prime T cells to TNP, as revealed by a significant secondary T-cell proliferation after restimulation of the recovered T lymphocytes by fresh hapten-modified autologous LC. Nevertheless, the ability of these fresh LC to stimulate in vitro secondary hapten-specific T-cell proliferation was very limited in comparison with that of 2-day incubated Langerhans' cells. After secondary stimulation with TNP-cultured LC, sensitized T cells could be non-specifically expanded without losing hapten specificity. The TNP-specific T-cell lines were mostly of the CD4+ phenotype. The present findings extend previous studies in the mouse, showing that culture LC are potent antigen-presenting cells (APC) in primary hapten-dependent proliferation assays. Furthermore, this in vitro priming assay, using cultured human Langerhans' cells as APC, might be useful to analyse the early steps of T-cell sensitization and subsequently to develop in vitro predictive tests allowing detection of sensitizing compounds. PMID:7507088

  13. Clinical Significance of Langerhans Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Francisco; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Gonzalez-Moles, Miguel Angel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Funez, Rafael; Redondo, Maximino

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) may be involved in the immunosurveillance against tumors as antigen-presenting cells. Our objective has been to determine the relevance of LC in progression of larynx squamous cell carcinomas and their relationship with different subpopulations of tumor-infiltrating cells. LCs were investigated by immunohistochemical methods using anti-CD1 antibody. LCs were detected in most of the primary tumors studied (44 out of 50) and also in metastases (6 out of 10) and recurrences (2 out of 3), but we did not find any statistical association between number of LCs and clinical-pathological parameters or survival. However, the number of LCs was increased in patients with evident infiltration of lymphocytes, mainly cytotoxic T cells. We can conclude that although LCs did not show clinical utility as prognostic marker, they may play a role in releasing an active immune response in larynx carcinomas, according to their ability to present antigens to sensitized T cells. PMID:22481933

  14. Langerhans cell function dictates induction of contact hypersensitivity or unresponsiveness to DNFB in Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Streilein, J.W.; Bergstresser, P.R.

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between distribution and function of Langerhans cells within the epidermis and the capacity of cutaneous surfaces to promote the induction of contact hypersensitivity to DNFB have been examined in inbred Syrian hamsters. In a manner very similar to previous findings in mice, the results indicate that hamster cutaneous surfaces deficient in normally functioning Langerhans cells, naturally (cheek pouch epithelium) or artificially (after perturbation with ultraviolet light), are inefficient at promoting DNFB sensitization. Instead, DNFB applied to these regions of skin results in the induction of a state of specific unresponsiveness. Viable lymphoid cells from unresponsive hamsters can transfer the unresponsiveness to naive hamsters suggesting that active suppression is at least partly responsible, probably mediated by T lymphocytes.

  15. Dramatic and sustained responsiveness of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis-associated pulmonary hypertension to vasodilator therapy

    PubMed Central

    May, Adam; Kane, Garvan; Yi, Eunhee; Frantz, Robert; Vassallo, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is an uncommon diffuse lung disease characterized by the abnormal accumulation of Langerhans' cells around small airways and other distal lung compartments. Although pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a frequent complication of PLCH, the role of advanced PH therapies for PLCH-related PH is not well-established. We describe a PLCH patient with severe, disease-related PH that responded unexpectedly well to advanced PH therapy with sustained improvement over a 10 year follow-up period. This case indicates that PLCH-associated PH may, in certain instances, be highly responsive to advanced PH therapies and emphasizes the importance of trialing these therapies among patients with PLCH-related PH. PMID:26029568

  16. Case of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis That Mimics Meningioma in CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ming; Yu, Bing-Bing; Zhai, Ji-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder histologically characterized by the proliferation of Langerhans cells. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old girl with LCH wherein CT and MRI results led us to an initially incorrect diagnosis of meningioma. The diagnosis was corrected to LCH based on pathology findings. An intracranial mass was found mainly in the dura mater, with thickening of the surrounding dura. It appeared to be growing downward from the calvaria, pressing on underlying brain tissue, and had infiltrated the inner skull, causing a bone defect. The lesion was calcified with the typical dural tail sign. The dural origin of the lesion was verified upon surgical dissection. There are no previous reports in the literature describing LCH of dural origin presenting in young patients with typical dural tail signs and meningioma-like imaging findings. The current case report underscores the need for thorough histological and immunocytochemical examinations in LCH differential diagnosis. PMID:26962425

  17. Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Uma; Kundu, Reetu; Punia, Rajpal Singh; Mohan, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare intricate pediatric neoplasm with varied clinical manifestations and multiple treatment modalities. Aim: To study the cytological features of LCH and the differential diagnoses on fine-needle aspiration (FNA). Materials and Methods: FNA was performed using a 23-gauge needle fitted to a 10 mL syringe mounted on syringe holder. LCH was diagnosed on FNA smears in seven cases confined to the head and neck region, which included three cases of lymphadenopathy, three cases of scalp swelling, and one case of orbital swelling. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 25 days to 11 years and male-to-female ratio was 1:1.3. Clinically, the diagnoses suggested were tuberculosis, inflammatory lesion, abscess, and malignancy. The cytologic findings included high cellularity, isolated Langerhans cells (LCs) with prominent nuclear indentation, grooves and abundant vacuolated cytoplasm, multinucleated giant cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes. Areas of necrosis were noted in one case. Histopathology, along with positive S-100 immunohistochemistry, confirmed the diagnosis of LCH. Conclusions: LCH is a rare disease occurring predominantly in children and can be diagnosed with ease on FNA cytology by the presence of characteristic Langerhans cells. The S-100 positivity aids in suggesting a diagnosis of LCH. PMID:26811572

  18. Dendritic and Langerhans cells respond to Aβ peptides differently: implication for AD immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiang; Lin, Xiaoyang; Morgan, David; Gordon, Marcia; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zhen-Hai; Li, Hai-Ning; He, Lan-Jie; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Cao, Chuanhai

    2015-01-01

    Both wild-type and mutated beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides can elicit an immune response when delivered subcutaneously. However, only mutated forms of Aβ can sensitize dendritic cells when administered intravenously or intraperitoneally. To understand the role of mutation and delivery routes in creating immune responses, and the function of dendritic cells as therapeutic agents, we used fluorescent-conjugated WT Aβ1-40 (WT40) and artificially mutated Aβ1-40 (22W40) peptides to treat dendritic and Langerhans cells from young and/or old mice at different time points. The cell types were analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify differences in function and antigen presentation, and Luminex and Western blots for cell activation and associated mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that the artificial mutant, 22W40, enhanced dendritic cell's phagocytosis and antigen presentation better than the WT40. Interestingly, Langerhans cells were more effective at early presentation. The artificial mutant 22W40 increased CD8α+ dendritic cells, CD8+ T-cells, and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with self-lymphocytes and dendritic cells from aged mice (30-month-old). Here, the 22W40 mutant peptide has been found to be potent enough to activate DCs, and that dendritic cell-based therapy may be a more effective treatment for age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). PMID:26473448

  19. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Thyroid with Multiple Cervical Lymph Node Involvement Accompanying Metastatic Thyroid Papillary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ceyran, A. Bahar; Şenol, Serkan; Bayraktar, Barış; Özkanlı, Şeyma; Cinel, Z. Leyla; Aydın, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old male case was admitted with goiter. Ultrasonography of thyroid showed a 5 cm cystic nodule in the left lobe with a 1.5 cm solid component. Fine needle aspiration biopsy revealed atypia of undetermined significance or follicular lesion. The patient was operated on. The pathological diagnosis was reported as papillary thyroid carcinoma. The immunohistochemical examination showed multiple foci of Langerhans cell histiocytosis involving both lobes. The patient died due to cardiac arrest with respiratory causes in the early postoperative period. Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare primary condition which involves abnormal clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells in various tissues and organs. Thyroid involvement is infrequently seen. Although the etiology is unknown, genetic components may be linked to the disease. It is also associated with a family history of thyroid disease. Papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most common malignant epithelial tumor of the thyroid gland. Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting with papillary thyroid carcinoma is rare. The privilege of our case is langerhans cell histiocytosis of the thyroid with multiple cervical lymph node involvement accompanying cervical lymph node metastatic thyroid papillary carcinoma. PMID:25349760

  20. [Lymph node eosinophilic granuloma. Apropos of 2 cases of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis with isolated lymph node involvement].

    PubMed

    Robert, M; Marty-Double, C

    1996-01-01

    The authors report two cases of isolated lymph node involvement by Langerhans' cell histiocytosis which affected two young children. The histologic aspect reveals that lymph nodes have been modified by a proliferation of large histiocyte-like cells, associated with eosinophils. An immunohistochemical study on paraffin sections and for one case on frozen sections, reveals the usual phenotype of Langerhans' cells: these cells stain positively with S 100 protein and CD1 and are negative for both lysozyme and al antichymotrypsine. After a period of two years for one child and four years for the other, these children are in total remission, one spontaneously, the other after chemotherapy. PMID:9339010

  1. Langerhans Cells Suppress CD49a+ NK Cell-Mediated Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Felix; Naik, Shruti; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2015-09-01

    Recruitment of innate immune effector cells into sites of infection is a critical component of resistance to pathogen infection. Using a model of intradermal footpad injection of Candida albicans, we observed that inflammation as measured by footpad thickness and neutrophil recruitment occurred independent of adoptive immunity but was significantly reduced in MyD88(-/-) and IL-6(-/-) mice. Unexpectedly, huLangerin-DTA mice (ΔLC) that lack Langerhans cells (LC) developed increased skin inflammation and expressed higher amounts of IL-6, suggesting a suppressive role for LC. Increased inflammation also occurred in Rag1(-/-) ΔLC mice but was reversed by Ab-mediated ablation of NK cells. CXCR6(+)CD49a(+) NK cells are a liver-resident subset that can mediate inflammatory skin responses. We found that exaggerated skin inflammation was absent in ΔLC × CXCR6(-/-) mice. Moreover, the exaggerated response in ΔLC mice could be adoptively transferred with liver CD49a(+) NK cells. Finally, CD49a(+) NK cells in ΔLC but not control mice were recruited to the skin, and inhibition of their recruitment prevented the exaggerated response. Thus, in the absence of LC, CD49a(+) liver NK cells display an inappropriately proinflammatory phenotype that results in increased local skin inflammation. These data reveal a novel function for LC in the regulation of this recently described subset of skin tropic NK cells. PMID:26209621

  2. Expansion of Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Senechal, Brigitte; Elain, Gaelle; Jeziorski, Eric; Grondin, Virginie; Patey-Mariaud de Serre, Natacha; Jaubert, Francis; Beldjord, Kheira; Lellouch, Arielle; Glorion, Christophe; Zerah, Michel; Mary, Pierre; Barkaoui, Mohammed; Emile, Jean Francois; Boccon-Gibod, Liliane; Josset, Patrice; Debré, Marianne; Fischer, Alain; Donadieu, Jean; Geissmann, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    Background Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare clonal granulomatous disease that affects mainly children. LCH can involve various tissues such as bone, skin, lung, bone marrow, lymph nodes, and the central nervous system, and is frequently responsible for functional sequelae. The pathophysiology of LCH is unclear, but the uncontrolled proliferation of Langerhans cells (LCs) is believed to be the primary event in the formation of granulomas. The present study was designed to further investigate the nature of proliferating cells and the immune mechanisms involved in the LCH granulomas. Methods and Findings Biopsies (n = 24) and/or blood samples (n = 25) from 40 patients aged 0.25 to 13 y (mean 7.8 y), were studied to identify cells that proliferate in blood and granulomas. We found that the proliferating index of LCs was low (∼1.9%), and we did not observe expansion of a monocyte or dendritic cell compartment in patients. We found that LCH lesions were a site of active inflammation, tissue remodeling, and neo-angiogenesis, and the majority of proliferating cells were endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and polyclonal T lymphocytes. Within granulomas, interleukin 10 was abundant, LCs expressed the TNF receptor family member RANK, and CD4+ CD25high FoxP3high regulatory T cells (T-regs) represented 20% of T cells, and were found in close contact with LCs. FoxP3+ T-regs were also expanded compared to controls, in the blood of LCH patients with active disease, among whom seven out of seven tested exhibited an impaired skin delayed-type hypersensitivity response. In contrast, the number of blood T-regs were normal after remission of LCH. Conclusions These findings indicate that LC accumulation in LCH results from survival rather than uncontrolled proliferation, and is associated with the expansion of T-regs. These data suggest that LCs may be involved in the expansion of T-regs in vivo, resulting in the failure of the host immune system to eliminate LCH cells. Thus

  3. Langerhans cell sarcoma arising from the root of tongue: a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Ming-Juan; Liu, Guo; Chen, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS), a rare malignant disease with markedly malignant cytological features and poor outcome, originates from Langerhans cells and most commonly affects the lymph nodes, skin, and bone. This paper presents the case of a 58-year-old female with LCS at the root of her tongue, with neither local recurrence nor distant metastasis observed during 47 months of follow up following radiotherapy for more than one month after complete tumor resection. Histological and immunophenotypic tests revealed that the malignant tumor cells were positive for S-100 protein, CD1a, and LCA, and partially positive for CD3ε. By contrast, the tumor cells were negative for langenin, CD30, HMB45, PCK, CK5/6, and P63. Their Ki-67proliferation index ranged from 30% to 40%. This neoplasm was diagnosed as LCS according to the classification of WHO2008. This work is the first report on LCS arising from the root of tongue. This rare case may serve as a reference for future clinical studies. PMID:26823886

  4. Effects of immunomodulatory drugs on TNF-α and IL-12 production by purified epidermal langerhans cells and peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Langerhans cells constitute a special subset of immature dendritic cells localized in the epidermis that play a key role in the skin's immune response. The production of cytokines is a key event in both the initiation and the regulation of immune responses, and different drugs can be used to remove or modify their production by DC and, therefore, alter immune responses in a broad spectrum of diseases, mainly in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we examined the effects of prednisone, thalidomide, cyclosporine A, and amitriptyline, drugs used in a variety of clinical conditions, on the production of TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 by purified epidermal Langerhans cells and peritoneal macrophages in BALB/c mice. Findings All drugs inhibited TNF-α production by Langerhans cells after 36 hours of treatment at two different concentrations, while prednisone and thalidomide decreased IL-12 secretion significantly, amitriptyline caused a less pronounced reduction and cyclosporine A had no effect. Additionally, TNF-α and IL-12 production by macrophages decreased, but IL-10 levels were unchanged after all treatments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that these drugs modulate the immune response by regulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production by purified epidermal Langerhans cells and peritoneal macrophages, indicating that these cells are important targets for immunosuppression in various clinical settings. PMID:21276247

  5. Migration of Langerhans cells and gammadelta dendritic cells from UV-B-irradiated sheep skin.

    PubMed

    Dandie, G W; Clydesdale, G J; Radcliff, F J; Muller, H K

    2001-02-01

    Depletion of dendritic cells from UV-B-irradiated sheep skin was investigated by monitoring migration of these cells towards regional lymph nodes. By creating and cannulating pseudoafferent lymphatic vessels draining a defined region of skin, migrating cells were collected and enumerated throughout the response to UV-B irradiation. In the present study, the effects of exposing sheep flank skin to UV-B radiation clearly demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in the migration of Langerhans cells (LC) from the UV-B-exposed area to the draining lymph node. The range of UV-B doses assessed in this study included 2.7 kJ/m2, a suberythemal dose; 8 kJ/m2, 1 minimal erythemal dose (MED); 20.1 kJ/m2; 40.2 kJ/m2; and 80.4 kJ/m2, 10 MED. The LC were the cells most sensitive to UV-B treatment, with exposure to 8 kJ/m2 or greater reproducibly causing a significant increase in migration. Migration of gammadelta+ dendritic cells (gammadelta+ DC) from irradiated skin was also triggered by exposure to UV-B radiation, but dose dependency was not evident within the range of UV-B doses examined. This, in conjunction with the lack of any consistent correlation between either the timing or magnitude of migration peaks of these two cell types, suggests that different mechanisms govern the egress of LC and gammadelta+ DC from the skin. It is concluded that the depression of normal immune function in the skin after exposure to erythemal doses of UV-B radiation is associated with changes in the migration patterns of epidermal dendritic cells to local lymph nodes. PMID:11168622

  6. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: literature review and descriptive analysis of oral manifestations.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Martínez-Pereda, Cristina; Guerrero-Rodríguez, Vanesa; Guisado-Moya, Blanca; Meniz-García, Cristina

    2009-05-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease, of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by intense and abnormal proliferation of bone marrow-derived histiocytes (Langerhans cells). It can present both local and systemic manifestations involving bone, skin and mucosal tissue, and internal organs. Three basic clinical forms develop: Letterer-Siwe disease (subacute or acute disseminated form), Hand-Schüller-Christian disease (disseminated chronic form) and eosinophilic granuloma (localized chronic form). LCH may manifest orally with single or multiple lesions of the alveolar or basal bone, ulcerated mucosal lesions accompanied by adenopathies and/or periodontal lesions, presenting gingival inflammation, bleeding, recession, necrosis, odontalgia, dental hypermobility and premature loss of teeth. The principal differential diagnoses include advanced periodontal disease or a periapical process of dental or periodontal origin. The odontologist plays a vital role in the diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment of such patients, by performing routine examinations for periodic follow-up of the disease and its possible oral manifestations, bearing in mind that these may be the first or only signs of LCH.

  7. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: literature review and descriptive analysis of oral manifestations.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Martínez-Pereda, Cristina; Guerrero-Rodríguez, Vanesa; Guisado-Moya, Blanca; Meniz-García, Cristina

    2009-05-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease, of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by intense and abnormal proliferation of bone marrow-derived histiocytes (Langerhans cells). It can present both local and systemic manifestations involving bone, skin and mucosal tissue, and internal organs. Three basic clinical forms develop: Letterer-Siwe disease (subacute or acute disseminated form), Hand-Schüller-Christian disease (disseminated chronic form) and eosinophilic granuloma (localized chronic form). LCH may manifest orally with single or multiple lesions of the alveolar or basal bone, ulcerated mucosal lesions accompanied by adenopathies and/or periodontal lesions, presenting gingival inflammation, bleeding, recession, necrosis, odontalgia, dental hypermobility and premature loss of teeth. The principal differential diagnoses include advanced periodontal disease or a periapical process of dental or periodontal origin. The odontologist plays a vital role in the diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment of such patients, by performing routine examinations for periodic follow-up of the disease and its possible oral manifestations, bearing in mind that these may be the first or only signs of LCH. PMID:19218906

  8. [Xanthomas in a patient with Langerhans cell histiocytosis and liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Calzado, Leticia; Postigo, Concepción; Prado Sánchez-Caminero, M; Sanz, Henar; Guerra, Aurora; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L

    2005-10-01

    Skin involvement in acute forms of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is in the form of erythematous papules, although rare forms of xanthomatous lesions have been described. We present the case of a boy with acute disseminated LCH who, at the age of 16 months, began to experience outbreaks of seborrheic dermatitis-like skin lesions and progressive hepatic dysfunction. The symptoms were complicated by partial central diabetes insipidus and specific pulmonary infiltration by Langerhans cells, which led to fibrosis. During the course of the disease, the patient developed liver cirrhosis, alterations in the lipid profile and disseminated xanthomatous skin lesions, concomitant with the lesions specific to the LCH. Despite successive cycles of chemotherapy, the outcome was the death of the patient after five years, due to his liver disease. Xanthomatous lesions in LCH are typical of the late stages of chronic progressive forms, such as Hand-Schüller-Christian disease. When they appear in acute disseminated forms, there is some controversy over whether they correspond to a progression of the disease towards more chronic forms, or whether they are associated independent lesions, such as in this case.

  9. Molecular analysis of human papillomavirus virus-like particle activated Langerhans cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Andrew W; Raff, Adam B; Da Silva, Diane M; Kast, W Martin

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) are the resident antigen-presenting cells in human epithelium, and are therefore responsible for initiating immune responses against human papillomaviruses (HPV) entering the epithelial and mucosal layers in vivo. Upon proper pathogenic stimulation, LC become activated causing an internal signaling cascade that results in the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and the release of inflammatory cytokines. Activated LC then migrate to lymph nodes where they interact with antigen-specific T cells and initiate an adaptive T-cell response. However, HPV manipulates LC in a suppressive manner that alters these normal maturation responses. Here, in vitro LC activation assays for the detection of phosphorylated signaling intermediates, the up-regulation of activation-associated surface markers, and the release of inflammatory cytokines in response to HPV particles are described.

  10. Langerhans cells and more: langerin-expressing dendritic cell subsets in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Nikolaus; Clausen, Björn E.; Stoitzner, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Langerhans cells (LCs) are antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) that reside in epithelia. The best studied example is the LC of the epidermis. By electron microscopy, their identifying feature is the unique rod- or tennis racket-shaped Birbeck granule. The phenotypic hallmark is their expression of the C-type lectin receptor langerin/CD207. Langerin, however, is also expressed on a recently discovered population of DC in the dermis and other tissues of the body. These ‘dermal langerin+ dendritic cells’ are unrelated to LCs. The complex field of langerin-negative dermal DCs is not dealt with here. In this article, we briefly review the history, ontogeny, and homeostasis of LCs. More emphasis is laid on the discussion of functional properties in vivo. Novel models using genetically engineered mice are contributing tremendously to our understanding of the role of LCs in eliciting adaptive immune responses against pathogens or tumors and in inducing and maintaining tolerance against self antigens and innocuous substances in vivo. Also, innate effector functions are increasingly being recognized. Current activities in this area are reviewed, and possibilities for future exploitation of LC in medicine, e.g. for the improvement of vaccines, are contemplated. PMID:20193016

  11. Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Refractory Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: Outcome by Intensity of Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Veys, Paul A.; Nanduri, Vasanta; Baker, K. Scott; He, Wensheng; Bandini, Giuseppe; Biondi, Andrea; Dalissier, Arnaud; Davis, Jeffrey H.; Eames, Gretchen M.; Egeler, R. Maarten; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Fischer, Alain; Jürgens, Herbert; Krance, Robert; Lanino, Edoardo; Leung, Wing H.; Matthes, Susanne; Michel, Gérard; Orchard, Paul J.; Pieczonka, Anna; Ringdén, Olle; Schlegel, Paul G.; Sirvent, Anne; Vettenranta, Kim; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) refractory to conventional chemotherapy have a poor outcome. There are currently two promising treatment strategies for high-risk patients: the first involves the combination of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine and cytarbine; the other approach is allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here we evaluated 87 patients with high-risk LCH who were transplanted between 1990–2013. Prior to the year 2000, most patients underwent HSCT following myeloablative conditioning (MAC): only 5 of 20 patients (25%) survived with a high rate (55%) of transplant-related mortality (TRM). After the year 2000 an increasing number of patients underwent HSCT with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC): 49/67 (73%) patients survived, however, the improved survival was not overtly achieved by the introduction of RIC regimens with similar 3-year probability of survival after MAC (77%) and RIC transplantation (71%). There was no significant difference in TRM by conditioning regimen intensity but relapse rates were higher after RIC compared to MAC regimens (28% vs. 8%, p=0.02), although most patients relapsing after RIC transplantation could be salvaged with further chemotherapy. HSCT may be a curative approach in 3 out of 4 patients with high risk LCH refractory to chemotherapy: the optimal choice of HSCT conditioning remains uncertain. PMID:25817915

  12. [Role of Langerhans cells in the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Bieber, T

    1995-12-01

    The demonstration of IgE receptors on the surface of epidermal dendritic cells and on other antigen presenting cells is a crucial element in the understanding of the pathophysiological role of these cells in the genesis of atopic disease, and especially the atopic dermatitis (AD). The sensibilisation phase to an aeroallergen at the level of nasal or bronchial mucosa and even at the skin may be mediated by dendritic cells expressing Fc epsilon RI. Distinct forms of AD may then represent the equivalent of the ellicitation phase of the classical allergic contact dermatitis. Fc epsilon RI would lead, via specific IgE, to an efficient antigen capture, to the activation of the dendritic cells and finally to an antigen presentation. Thus, AD may represent the paradigma of an IgE-mediated type IV reaction. PMID:8786892

  13. [Role of Langerhans cells in the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Bieber, T

    1995-12-01

    The demonstration of IgE receptors on the surface of epidermal dendritic cells and on other antigen presenting cells is a crucial element in the understanding of the pathophysiological role of these cells in the genesis of atopic disease, and especially the atopic dermatitis (AD). The sensibilisation phase to an aeroallergen at the level of nasal or bronchial mucosa and even at the skin may be mediated by dendritic cells expressing Fc epsilon RI. Distinct forms of AD may then represent the equivalent of the ellicitation phase of the classical allergic contact dermatitis. Fc epsilon RI would lead, via specific IgE, to an efficient antigen capture, to the activation of the dendritic cells and finally to an antigen presentation. Thus, AD may represent the paradigma of an IgE-mediated type IV reaction.

  14. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Infant Mimicking a Lymphoma at Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Madasu, Anjan; Noor Rana, Asim; Banat, Saleh; Humad, Hani; Mustafa, Rashid; AlJassmi, Abdulrahman Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by proliferation and accumulation of clonal dendritic cells with varied clinical presentation and an unpredictable course. We report a 5-month-old infant with LCH who presented with severe respiratory distress, a large mediastinal mass, significant generalized lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly. Lymphoma, especially T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, can present with superior mediastinal syndrome needing urgent empirical therapy without biopsy. However, lack of response prompted a biopsy which confirmed it to be a case of LCH and that leads to appropriate therapy and survival. There have been reports of LCH presenting with isolated mediastinal mass or with generalized lymphadenopathy, but the combined presentation of generalized lymphadenopathy with large mediastinal mass, hepatosplenomegaly, and fever in an infant has rarely been reported. Conclusion. LCH should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of an infant presenting with generalized lymphadenopathy, mediastinal mass, hepatosplenomegaly, and fever. PMID:26587301

  15. Identification of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) as an instructive factor for human epidermal Langerhans cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Nighat; Bauer, Thomas; Modak, Madhura; Wagner, Karin; Schuster, Christopher; Köffel, Rene; Seyerl, Maria; Stöckl, Johannes; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid; Graf, Daniel; Strobl, Herbert

    2013-11-18

    Human Langerhans cell (LC) precursors populate the epidermis early during prenatal development and thereafter undergo massive proliferation. The prototypic antiproliferative cytokine TGF-β1 is required for LC differentiation from human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells and blood monocytes in vitro. Similarly, TGF-β1 deficiency results in LC loss in vivo. However, immunohistology studies revealed that human LC niches in early prenatal epidermis and adult basal (germinal) keratinocyte layers lack detectable TGF-β1. Here we demonstrated that these LC niches express high levels of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) and that Bmp7-deficient mice exhibit substantially diminished LC numbers, with the remaining cells appearing less dendritic. BMP7 induces LC differentiation and proliferation by activating the BMP type-I receptor ALK3 in the absence of canonical TGF-β1-ALK5 signaling. Conversely, TGF-β1-induced in vitro LC differentiation is mediated via ALK3; however, co-induction of ALK5 diminished TGF-β1-driven LC generation. Therefore, selective ALK3 signaling by BMP7 promotes high LC yields. Within epidermis, BMP7 shows an inverse expression pattern relative to TGF-β1, the latter induced in suprabasal layers and up-regulated in outer layers. We observed that TGF-β1 inhibits microbial activation of BMP7-generated LCs. Therefore, TGF-β1 in suprabasal/outer epidermal layers might inhibit LC activation, resulting in LC network maintenance.

  16. Glucocorticosteroids modify Langerhans cells to produce TGF-β and expand regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Stary, Georg; Klein, Irene; Bauer, Wolfgang; Koszik, Frieder; Reininger, Bärbel; Kohlhofer, Sabine; Gruber, Kristina; Skvara, Hans; Jung, Thomas; Stingl, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Although glucocorticosteroids (GCSs) have been used for many decades in transplantation and (auto)inflammatory diseases, the exact mechanisms responsible for their immunosuppressive properties are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of oral GCSs on the cutaneous immune response. We analyzed, by immunofluorescence staining and quantitative RT-PCR, residual skin biopsy material from a clinical study in which we had used oral GCS as positive control for determining the effects of candidate anti-inflammatory compounds on epicutaneous patch tests of Ni-allergic patients. Expectedly, oral GCS treatment led to a reduction of clinical symptoms and infiltrating leukocytes. Notably, we observed increased numbers of dermal FOXP3(+)CD25(+) T cells and epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) that were associated with upregulated mRNA expression of TGF-β in lesions of GCS-treated Ni-allergic patients. To investigate this phenomenon further, we exposed purified LCs to GCS. They exhibited, in contrast to GCS-nonexposed LCs, 1) a more immature phenotype, 2) higher intracellular amounts of TGF-β, and 3) increased receptor activator for NF-κB expression, conditions that reportedly favor the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Indeed, we observed an enhancement of functionally suppressive FOXP3(+) T cells when CD3(+) cells were incubated with GCS-pretreated LCs. The expansion of Tregs was inhibited by TGF-β blockage alone, and their suppressive activity was neutralized by a combination of anti-TGF-β and anti-IL-10 Abs. Our data show that systemically applied GCSs endow LCs with Treg-promoting properties and thus shed new light on the mechanisms of GCS-mediated immunosuppression.

  17. Functional CD86 (B7-2/B70) is predominantly expressed on Langerhans cells in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Ohki, O; Yokozeki, H; Katayama, I; Umeda, T; Azuma, M; Okumura, K; Nishioka, K

    1997-06-01

    Recently, we reported the functional expression of CD86 on cultured human Langerhans cells derived from normal epidermis. In the present study, we investigated the expression and function of co-stimulatory molecules in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. In immunohistochemical analysis, CD80 and/or CD86 were detected on dendritic-shaped cells not only in the epidermis but also in the dermis in the inflammatory lesions of atopic dermatitis (n = 12). CD80 was expressed in only five cases (42%), while CD86 was expressed in all cases (100%). These molecules were not detected in normal control subjects (n = 8). In non-lesional skin of atopic dermatitis (n = 4), CD86 but not CD80 was detected in one case. CD86 was preferentially induced on dendritic-shaped cells in positive patch test sites to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus or house dust allergen in atopic dermatitis (n = 4). The CD80- or CD86-positive cells were confirmed as Langerhans cells by double immunostaining using anti-CD1a monoclonal antibody. Neither CD86 nor CD80 was detected on keratinocytes. Similar results of the stronger expression of CD86 over that of CD80 were obtained from psoriasis vulgaris (n = 11) and from contact dermatitis (n = 7), although CD86 was expressed only in 57% of the contact dermatitis cases. The percentage of Langerhans cells positive for CD86 was higher than for CD80, i.e. 48% compared with 9%, respectively, in the epidermis of lesional skin of atopic dermatitis (n = 8). The expression rate of these molecules on Langerhans cells increased in the dermis. To investigate the function of co-stimulatory molecules on Langerhans cells in atopic dermatitis, we conducted an inhibition test with antibodies. Anti-CD86 monoclonal antibody almost completely inhibited T-cell proliferation stimulated with crude extract of D. pteronyssinus in the presence of epidermal cells as antigen-presenting cells, whereas anti-CD80 monoclonal antibody produced less of an inhibitory effect. These data indicate

  18. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with multisystem involvement in an infant: A case report

    PubMed Central

    BI, LINTAO; SUN, BUTONG; LU, ZHENXIA; SHI, ZHANGZHEN; WANG, DAN; ZHU, ZHENXING

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a proliferative disease of histiocyte-like cells, with a wide range of clinical presentations that vary from a solitary lesion to more severe multifocal or disseminated lesions. The disease can affect any age group; however, the peak incidence rate is in infants aged between 1 and 3 years-old. Diagnosis of LCH should be based on the synthetical analysis of clinical presentations, in addition to features of imaging and histopathology. Although certain cases regress spontaneously, other patients require systemic chemotherapy together with the administration of steroids. The present study reports the case of an infant with LDH with multisystem involvement, including that of the bone, skin, orbit, spleen and lungs. The patient received chemotherapy and obtained rapid improvement in the involved systems. A total of 2.5 years after completion of the therapy, the patient still remains in follow-up and no evidence of active disease has been noted. PMID:26136948

  19. Female genital tract immunization: evaluation of candidate immunoadjuvants on epithelial cell secretion of CCL20 and dendritic/Langerhans cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Cremel, Magali; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Genin, Christian; Delézay, Olivier

    2006-07-17

    The female genital tract is an important site for numerous pathogens entry. Local immunization, generating specific mucosal IgA and systemic IgG, represents an interesting alternative immunization pathway. However, such a vaccine strategy needs mucosal adjuvants to obtain the best immune response. Considering that the immunization process is mainly dependent on the capture and on the transport of the antigen by Langerhans cells, we evaluated potential adjuvant molecules by analysing their effects on the CCL20 secretion by endocervical and exocervical/vaginal epithelial cells as well as on dendritic cell and Langerhans cell maturation. We demonstrated that DC-Chol and Zymosan are the most efficient mucosal candidate immunoadjuvants that generate a strong increase of CCL20 secretion by the two epithelial cell lines and the maturation of dendritic and Langerhans cells, respectively.

  20. The Langerhans islet cells of female rabbits are differentially affected by hypothyroidism depending on the islet size.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castelán, J; Nicolás, L; Morimoto, S; Cuevas, E

    2015-04-01

    Effects of hypothyroidism on the glucose and insulin levels are controversial, and its impact on the Langerhans islet morphology of adult subjects has been poorly addressed. In spite of hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus are more frequent in females than in males, most studies using animal models have been done in males. The effect of hypothyroidism on the immunolabeling of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) and thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) of islet cells is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of hypothyroidism on the glucose and insulin concentrations, morphometry of islets, and immunostaining of TRs α1-2 and β1 and TSHR of islet cells in female rabbits. Control and hypothyroid (0.02% of methimazole for 30 days) animals were used to quantify blood levels of glucose and insulin, density of islets, cross-sectional area (CSA) of islets, number of cells per islet, cell proliferation, and the immunolabeling of TRs α1-2, TRβ1, and TSHR. Student's t or Mann-Whitney-U tests, two-way ANOVAs, and Fischer's tests were applied. Concentrations of glucose and insulin, as well as the insulin resistance were similar between groups. Hypothyroidism did not affect the density or the CSA of islets. The analysis of islets by size showed that hypothyroidism reduced the cell number in large and medium islets, but not in small ones. In small islets, cell proliferation was increased. The immunoreactivity of TRα1-2, TRβ1, and TSHR was increased by hypothyroidism in all islet sizes. Our results show that hypothyroidism affects differentially the islet cells depending on the size of islets.

  1. Flow-cytometric DNA content of histiocytosis X (Langerhans cell histiocytosis).

    PubMed Central

    Rabkin, M. S.; Wittwer, C. T.; Kjeldsberg, C. R.; Piepkorn, M. W.

    1988-01-01

    Retrospective DNA-content analysis was performed by flow cytometry on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 36 patients with histiocytosis X (Langerhans cell histiocytosis). Included were 17 patients with solitary bone lesions, 4 patients with multiple bone lesions, 2 patients with solitary extraosseous lesions, 1 patient with congenital self-healing histiocytosis, and 12 patients with disseminated disease. The diagnosis was in each case verified by review of the clinical history and histopathologic material. None of the cases displayed significant cytologic atypia. DNA content analysis failed to reveal additional G0-G1 peaks or "shoulders" suggestive of aneuploid subpopulations in any case. Full-peak coefficients of variation ranged from 3.8 to 8.0. Our data suggest that despite a prior report of a single aneuploid case of histiocytosis X, DNA content analysis may not be useful in predicting clinical stage and outcome in this disease. Images Figure 1 PMID:3258734

  2. A Rare Case of Erdheim-Chester Disease and Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Overlap Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nabi, Shahzaib; Arshad, Adeel; Jain, Tarun; Virk, Fawad; Gulati, Rohit; Awdish, Rana

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman with a past medical history of seizures and end-stage renal disease secondary to obstructive uropathy from retroperitoneal fibrosis presented to the emergency department with seizures and altered mental status. A Glasgow Coma Scale of 4 prompted intubation, and she was subsequently admitted to the intensive care unit. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain performed to elucidate the aetiology of her seizure showed a dural-based mass within the left temporoparietal lobe as well as mass lesions within the orbits. Further imaging showed extensive retroperitoneal fibrosis extending to the mediastinum with involvement of aorta and posterior pleural space. Imaging of the long bones showed bilateral sclerosis and cortical thickening of the diaphyses. Imaging of the maxillofacial structures showed osseous destructive lesions involving the mandible. These clinical and radiological features were consistent with a diagnosis of Erdheim-Chester disease; however, the patient's skin biopsy was consistent with Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:26579323

  3. Detection of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Dehghanian, Paria; Vahdatinia, Mahsa; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare histiocytic proliferation of unknown etiology. It is characterized by granuloma-like proliferation of Langerhans-type dendritic cells and mainly affects young children. Although multiple investigators have suggested the possible role of viruses, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the pathogenesis of LCH, it remains, however, debated. Objectives: The EBV infection is reported to be associated with LCH. Nevertheless, no report could be found about involved Iranian children in English medical literature. In this study, we investigated the presence of EBV in Iranian children with LCH. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, in which we investigated the prevalence of presence of EBV DNA in LCH, using paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 30 patients with LCH and 30 age and tissue-matched controls, who were operated for reasons other than infectious diseases (between the years 2002 and 2012), by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method, in the department of pediatric pathology. No ethical issues arose in the study, because only the pathology reports were reviewed, retrospectively, and the patients were anonymous. Results: There was a significant difference in prevalence of EBV presence between patients and controls. The EBV was found by RT-PCR in 19 (63.33%) out of 30 patients and only in eight (26.7%) of 30 control samples. The P = 0.004, was calculated using chi-square test (OR: 4.75; 95% CI: 1.58 ‒ 14.25). Conclusions: Our study is the first investigation performed on patients with LCH and its possible association with EBV in Iran. Considering the P = 0.004, which is statistically significant, the findings do support the hypothesis of a possible role for EBV in the pathogenesis of LCH. These results are in accordance with several previous investigations, with positive findings. PMID:26870310

  4. Interkeukin-34, a cytokine crucial for the differentiation and maintenance of tissue resident macrophages and Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaming; Colonna, Marco

    2014-01-01

    IL-34 is a recently discovered cytokine that acts on tissue resident macrophages and Langerhans cells upon binding the receptor for CSF-1, CSF-1R. The existence of two ligands for CSF-1R, IL-34, and CSF-1, raises several intriguing questions. Are IL-34 and CSF-1 redundant or does each perform temporally and spatially distinct functions? Is IL-34 involved in human pathology? Would therapeutic strategies based on selective inhibition or administration of either IL-34 or CSF-1 be advantageous for preventing human pathology? Recent in vivo studies indicate that IL-34 promotes the development, survival, and function of microglia and Langerhans cells; therefore, this cytokine may predominately function in brain and skin biology. Here, we review the evidence for IL-34 as a key cytokine in the development and function of these two diverse cell types and discuss its potential role in pathological conditions. PMID:24737461

  5. A rare case of solitary brain Langerhans cell histiocytosis with intratumoral hemorrhage in a patient affected by Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Francesca; Morabito, Rosa; Grasso, Giovanni; Alafaci, Elisabetta; Salpietro, Francesco M.; Alafaci, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease involving clonal proliferation of cells with characteristics similar to bone marrow-derived Langerhans cells. The case of a young woman, affected by Turner syndrome and a solitary intraparenchymal LCH associated with an osteolytic lesion of the overlying skull, is presented. Case Description: The patient, with an insidious history of headache and a growing soft mass in the left frontal region, presented with a sudden generalized tonic-clonic epileptic seizure. Neuroradiological investigations showed an osteolytic lesion of the left frontal bone and an underlying brain lesion associated with recent signs of bleeding. The patient was operated on with a complete removal of the lesion. The postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusions: The clinical, neuroradiological, and intraoperative findings are presented, along with a review of the literature. Although rare, LCH should be considered in the differential diagnosis when a scalp lesion occurs with a progressive growing. PMID:27127696

  6. A mathematical model of β-cells in an islet of Langerhans sensing a glucose gradient.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Benninger, Richard K P

    2010-04-01

    Pancreatic β-cells release insulin in response to increased glucose levels. Compared to isolated β-cells, β-cells embedded within the islets of Langerhans network exhibit a coordinated and greater insulin secretion response to glucose. This coordinated activity is considered to rely on gap-junctions. We investigated the β-cell electrophysiology and the calcium dynamics in islets in response to glucose gradients. While at constant glucose the network of β-cells fires in a correlated fashion, a glucose gradient induces a sharp division into an active and an inactive part. We hypothesized that this sharp transition is mediated by the specific properties of the gap-junctions. We used a mathematical model of the β-cell electrophysiology in islets to discuss possible origins of this sharp transition in electrical activity. In silico, gap-junctions were required for such a transition. However, the small width of transition was only found when a stochastic variability of the expression of key transmembrane proteins, such as the ATP-dependent potassium channel, was included. The agreement with experimental data was further improved by assuming a delay of gap-junction currents, which points to a role of spatial constraints in the β-cell. This result clearly demonstrates the power of mathematical modeling in disentangling causal relationships in complex systems.

  7. A multicentre retrospective survey of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis: 348 cases observed between 1983 and 1993. The French Langerhans' Cell Histiocytosis Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In a retrospective study involving 32 haematology/oncology departments in France, 348 cases of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis diagnosed between 1983 and 1993 were collated. The percentage of males was 56.4%. Median age at diagnosis was 30.2 months. The median follow up was 35.5 months. Initially, 108 patients (31%) had isolated unifocal or bifocal bone involvement, 67 (19%) had isolated multifocal bone involvement, 136 (39%) had soft tissue involvement without organ dysfunction, and 37 (11%) had organ dysfunction. Two thirds of the sites of involvement diagnosed throughout the course of the disease were present at diagnosis, while the remaining one third appeared during a relapse. Treatment was tailored to the individual patient and was extremely varied, hampering any comparison of regimens. Vinblastine with or without steroids was the most common regimen when systemic chemotherapy was used for the first episode (246/348). Twenty four of the 216 patients received VP 16 as first line treatment. Two patients with progressive multiorgan relapse, despite the use of several drugs, underwent bone marrow transplantation and are alive and disease free 60 and 22 months later. Altogether 21.9% of patients had sequelae, including diabetes insipidus in 17.5% of cases. The overall survival rate is 91.7% (confidence interval 90.7 to 95%) three years after diagnosis. In the univariate analysis, age less than 1 year, ear, nose, and throat, cutaneous, lymph node, liver, spleen, lung, marrow and intestinal involvement, male sex, progressive episodes, the absence of response, and partial responses, were associated with a poor vital prognosis. In a multivariate analysis of prognostic factors, poor early outcome emerged as the most important parameter, closely linked to other poor outcome features such as young age and organ dysfunction. It identified a small number of patients with a poor initial response to treatment, for whom intensive treatment should be assessed in a phase II

  8. Long-term effects of local ionizing radiation treatment on Langerhans cells in mouse footpad epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, S.

    1986-11-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) were studied with ADPase histochemistry in sheets of hind footpad epidermis from groups of CBA/H mice. Single, local 20-Gy doses of 250-kV x-rays were administered to the right hind feet of the mice when they were 3-4 months old, and LC were counted at intervals ranging from 2 to 24 months later. In unirradiated mice, aged 5-19 months, the mean density of LC in footpad was 1521-1617 cells/mm2. It dropped to 1137 +/- 86 cells/mm2 (mean +/- SE) in untreated 28-month-old mice. At times from 2-15 months after irradiation, normal mean densities of LC were present in footpad epidermis. On average, LC numbers were subsequently reduced to 1078 +/- 65/mm2 by 19 months after irradiation (71% of the cells in age-matched controls) and to 789 +/- 53/mm2 by 24 months (59% of the cells in age-matched controls). Loss of cells was focal. Chronic radiation-induced fibrosis and damage to circulatory function in skin may have contributed to impaired replacement of LC from bone marrow precursors. The possibility that late radiation-related depletion of the LC population permits development of skin tumors as a delayed consequence of exposure to ionizing radiation is discussed.

  9. [Successful treatment with total cranial irradiation for central nervous system involvement of Langerhans cell sarcoma during chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Noriharu; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Yamashita, Takeshi; Kondo, Yukio; Nakao, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) is an extremely rare neoplasm of Langerhans cell origin characterized by systemic involvement and a poor prognosis. There are, however, few reports of LCS with central nervous system involvement. We experienced a patient with LCS recurrence in the brain that appeared during systemic chemotherapy. The brains lesions eventually responded to total cranial irradiation. A 60-year-old female presented with systemic lymphadenopathy. LCS was diagnosed based on neck lymph node biopsy findings. Two cycles of ESHAP induced marked regression of her lymphadenopathy, but FDG-PET/CT scan revealed new lesions in the central nervous system and her disorientation gradually worsened. We administered 37.5 Gy of total cranial irradiation which improved her consciousness and shrank the brain tumors as demonstrated by MRI. The patient's clinical course indicates that radiation therapy may be effective for central nervous system involvement of LCS even if the lesion is resistant to systemic chemotherapy. PMID:26861100

  10. Severe Periodontal Disease Manifested in Chronic Disseminated Type of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in a 3-Year Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vinay Kumar; Bansal, Rajesh; Gupta, Vineeta; Bansal, Manish; Patne, Shashikant

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), previously known as histio-cytosis X, is a rare idiopathic disorder of reticulo-endothelial system with abnormal proliferation of bone marrow derived Langerhans cells along with a variable number of leukocytes, such as eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Three years old male child presented with multifocal osteolytic lesions and papulosquamous skin lesions. Clinical and radio-graphic features, such as severe alveolar bone loss, mobility of teeth, precocious eruption of teeth, foating appearance of teeth in orthopantomogram (OPG), osteolytic lesion in skull and cutaneous lesions were highly suggestive of LCH disease. Skin biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of LCH. Induction chemotherapy with oral prednisolone and intravenous vinblastine was started. Child responded well to chemotherapy. The clinical significance of the presented case is to diagnose the case of LCH on the basis of the manifestation of severe periodontal disease as this can be first or only manifestation of LCH. A dentist plays a major role in the multidisciplinary treatment of LCH through routine examination and periodic follow-up. How to cite this article: Bansal M, Srivastava VK, Bansal R, Gupta V, Bansal M, Patne S. Severe Periodontal Disease Manifested in Chronic Disseminated Type of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in a 3-Year Old Child. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):217-219. PMID:25709306

  11. Successful outcome of Langerhans cell histiocytosis complicated by therapy-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid A; Alshehri, Abdulrahman; Al-Zahrani, Hazza A; Al-Mohareb, Fahad I; Maghfoor, Irfan; Ajarim, Dahish

    2008-01-01

    Background Various therapeutic options are available for the management of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. However, treatment administered to control this disease may be complicated by acute leukemia. Case presentation A 34 years old male was diagnosed to have Langerhans cell histiocytosis in March 1999. Unfortunately, the cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy given to control the repeated relapses and exacerbations of the primary disease predisposed him to therapy-induced myelodysplastic syndrome which transformed into acute myeloid leukemia. After achieving complete remission of his leukemia, the patient received an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The allograft was complicated by chronic graft versus host disease that was controlled by various immunosuppressive agents and extracorporal photophoresis. Conclusion Management of complicated cases of histiocytosis requires various therapeutic modalities and a multidisciplinary approach. Having complications of therapy eg myelodysplasia or acute leukemia make the outcome more dismal and the management options limited to aggressive forms of treatment. High dose chemotherapy followed by an allograft may be a curative option not only for therapy-related myelodysplasia/acute leukemia, but also for frequently relapsing and poorly controlled Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:18710527

  12. In vivo study of targeted nanomedicine delivery into Langerhans cells by multiphoton laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kolonics, Attila; Csiszovszki, Zsolt; Tőke, Enikő R; Lőrincz, Orsolya; Haluszka, Dóra; Szipőcs, Róbert

    2014-08-01

    Epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) function as professional antigen-presenting cells of the skin. We investigated the LC-targeting properties of a special mannose-moiety-coated pathogen-like synthetic nanomedicine DermaVir (DV), which is capable to express antigens to induce immune responses and kill HIV-infected cells. Our aim was to use multiphoton laser microscopy (MLM) in vivo in order to visualize the uptake of Alexa-labelled DV (AF546-DV) by LCs. Knock-in mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the control of the langerin gene (CD207) were used to visualize LCs. After 1 h, AF546-DV penetrated the epidermis and entered the eGFP-LCs. The AF546-DV signal was equally distributed inside the LCs. After 9 h, we observed AF546-DV signal accumulation that occurred mainly at the cell body. We demonstrated in live animals that LCs picked up and accumulated the nanoparticles in the cell body. PMID:24903756

  13. Diagnosis and Intralesional Corticotherapy in Oral Ulcers Occurring as the Sole Manifestation of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gambirazi, Liane; Libório, Tatiana; Nunes, Fábio; Sugaya, Norberto; Migliari, Dante

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a case of oral mucosa lesions as the sole manifestation in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). This is a very uncommon manifestation of LCH since this disease preferably affects the bones with frequent involvement of the jaws. LCH may also involve other organs, particularly the lungs, liver, lymph nodes, and skin. The highlights of this report are the differential diagnosis, immunohistochemical analysis and, mostly, the therapeutic approach. PMID:27398106

  14. Murine Langerin+ dermal dendritic cells prime CD8+ T cells while Langerhans cells induce cross-tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Flacher, Vincent; Tripp, Christoph H; Mairhofer, David G; Steinman, Ralph M; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Idoyaga, Juliana; Romani, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Skin dendritic cells (DCs) control the immunogenicity of cutaneously administered vaccines. Antigens targeted to DCs via the C-type lectin Langerin/CD207 are cross-presented to CD8+ T cells in vivo. We investigated the relative roles of Langerhans cells (LCs) and Langerin+ dermal DCs (dDCs) in different vaccination settings. Poly(I:C) and anti-CD40 agonist antibody promoted cytotoxic responses upon intradermal immunization with ovalbumin (OVA)-coupled anti-Langerin antibodies (Langerin/OVA). This correlated with CD70 upregulation in Langerin+ dDCs, but not LCs. In chimeric mice where Langerin targeting was restricted to dDCs, CD8+ T-cell memory was enhanced. Conversely, providing Langerin/OVA exclusively to LCs failed to prime cytotoxicity, despite initial antigen cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells. Langerin/OVA combined with imiquimod could not prime CD8+ T cells and resulted in poor cytotoxicity in subsequent responses. This tolerance induction required targeting and maturation of LCs. Altogether, Langerin+ dDCs prime long-lasting cytotoxic responses, while cross-presentation by LCs negatively influences CD8+ T-cell priming. Moreover, this highlights that DCs exposed to TLR agonists can still induce tolerance and supports the existence of qualitatively different DC maturation programs. PMID:25085878

  15. Proteins deposited in the dermis are rapidly captured and presented by epidermal Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Flacher, Vincent; Tripp, Christoph H.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Haid, Bernhard; Ebner, Susanne; Koch, Franz; Park, Chae Gyu; Steinman, Ralph M.; Idoyaga, Juliana; Romani, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells can capture antigens that are deposited in the skin, including vaccines given subcutaneously. These include different dendritic cells (DC) such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LC), dermal DC and dermal langerin+ DC. To evaluate access of dermal antigens to skin DC, we used mAb to two C-type lectin endocytic receptors, DEC-205/CD205 and langerin/CD207. When applied to murine and human skin explant cultures, these mAb were efficiently taken up by epidermal LC. Additionally, anti-DEC-205 targeted langerin+ CD103+ and langerin− CD103− mouse dermal DC. Unexpectedly, intradermal injection of either mAb, but not isotype control, resulted in strong and rapid labelling of LC in situ, implying that large molecules can diffuse through the basement membrane into the epidermis. Epidermal LC targeted in vivo by ovalbumin-coupled anti-DEC-205 potently presented antigen to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, epidermal LC play a major role in uptake of lectin-binding ligands under standard vaccination conditions. PMID:19890348

  16. Birbeck Granules Are Subdomains of Endosomal Recycling Compartment in Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells, Which Form Where Langerin Accumulates

    PubMed Central

    Mc Dermott, Ray; Ziylan, Umit; Spehner, Danièle; Bausinger, Huguette; Lipsker, Dan; Mommaas, Mieke; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Raposo, Graça; Goud, Bruno; de la Salle, Henri; Salamero, Jean; Hanau, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Birbeck granules are unusual rod-shaped structures specific to epidermal Langerhans cells, whose origin and function remain undetermined. We investigated the intracellular location and fate of Langerin, a protein implicated in Birbeck granule biogenesis, in human epidermal Langerhans cells. In the steady state, Langerin is predominantly found in the endosomal recycling compartment and in Birbeck granules. Langerin internalizes by classical receptor-mediated endocytosis and the first Birbeck granules accessible to endocytosed Langerin are those connected to recycling endosomes in the pericentriolar area, where Langerin accumulates. Drug-induced inhibition of endocytosis results in the appearance of abundant open-ended Birbeck granule-like structures appended to the plasma membrane, whereas inhibition of recycling induces Birbeck granules to merge with a tubular endosomal network. In mature Langerhans cells, Langerin traffic is abolished and the loss of internal Langerin is associated with a concomitant depletion of Birbeck granules. Our results demonstrate an exchange of Langerin between early endosomal compartments and the plasma membrane, with dynamic retention in the endosomal recycling compartment. They show that Birbeck granules are not endocytotic structures, rather they are subdomains of the endosomal recycling compartment that form where Langerin accumulates. Finally, our results implicate ADP-ribosylation factor proteins in Langerin trafficking and the exchange between Birbeck granules and other endosomal membranes. PMID:11809842

  17. An Essential Role for CD44 Variant Isoforms in Epidermal Langerhans Cell and Blood Dendritic Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Johannes M.; Sleeman, Jonathan; Renkl, Andreas C.; Dittmar, Henning; Termeer, Christian C.; Taxis, Sabine; Howells, Norma; Hofmann, Martin; Köhler, Gabriele; Schöpf, Erwin; Ponta, Helmut; Herrlich, Peter; Simon, Jan C.

    1997-01-01

    Upon antigen contact, epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) and dendritic cells (DC) leave peripheral organs and home to lymph nodes via the afferent lymphatic vessels and then assemble in the paracortical T cell zone and present antigen to T lymphocytes. Since splice variants of CD44 promote metastasis of certain tumors to lymph nodes, we explored the expression of CD44 proteins on migrating LC and DC. We show that upon antigen contact, LC and DC upregulate pan CD44 epitopes and epitopes encoded by variant exons v4, v5, v6, and v9. Antibodies against CD44 epitopes inhibit the emigration of LC from the epidermis, prevent binding of activated LC and DC to the T cell zones of lymph nodes, and severely inhibit their capacity to induce a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to a skin hapten in vivo. Our results demonstrate that CD44 splice variant expression is obligatory for the migration and function of LC and DC. PMID:9166413

  18. Leishmania major lipophosphoglycan modulates the phenotype and inhibits migration of murine Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Ponte-Sucre, Alicia; Heise, Dirk; Moll, Heidrun

    2001-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC), members of the dendritic cell family, play a central role in the initiation and regulation of the immune response against the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. LC take up antigens in the skin and transport them to the regional lymph nodes for presentation to T cells. However, it is not known whether LC functions are modulated by parasite antigens. In the present study, we examined the effect of a major parasite surface molecule, L. major lipophosphoglycan (LPG), on the maturation of LC and their migratory properties. The results show that exposure to LPG did not affect the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and B7, but induced an up-regulation of CD25, CD31 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin expression and a down-regulation of Mac-1 expression, by LC. Importantly, LPG treatment inhibited the migratory activity of LC, as it reduced their efflux from skin explants and their migration in transwell cultures. These results suggest that Leishmania LPG impairs LC migration out of the skin and thus may modulate their immunostimulatory functions, which require LC translocation from skin to lymph nodes. PMID:11899433

  19. Using pancreas tissue slices for in situ studies of islet of Langerhans and acinar cell biology.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Anja; Cohrs, Christian M; Tsata, Vasiliki; Chouinard, Julie A; Selck, Claudia; Stertmann, Julia; Reichelt, Saskia; Rose, Tobias; Ehehalt, Florian; Weitz, Jürgen; Solimena, Michele; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Speier, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Studies on the cellular function of the pancreas are typically performed in vitro on its isolated functional units, the endocrine islets of Langerhans and the exocrine acini. However, these approaches are hampered by preparation-induced changes of cell physiology and the lack of an intact surrounding. We present here a detailed protocol for the preparation of pancreas tissue slices. This procedure is less damaging to the tissue and faster than alternative approaches, and it enables the in situ study of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cell physiology in a conserved environment. Pancreas tissue slices facilitate the investigation of cellular mechanisms underlying the function, pathology and interaction of the endocrine and exocrine components of the pancreas. We provide examples for several experimental applications of pancreas tissue slices to study various aspects of pancreas cell biology. Furthermore, we describe the preparation of human and porcine pancreas tissue slices for the validation and translation of research findings obtained in the mouse model. Preparation of pancreas tissue slices according to the protocol described here takes less than 45 min from tissue preparation to receipt of the first slices.

  20. Quantitative and morphological changes of Langerhans cells in Bowen's disease from patients with chronic arsenicism.

    PubMed

    Wang, B J; Lee, Y Y; Mak, C P; Kao, H F; Hsu, M L; Hsien, J R

    1991-11-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are considered to be responsible for the immunologic presentation of tumor-associated antigens and play a role in the elimination of neoplastic clones. Ultraviolet light B can cause dysfunction and loss of LCs. Both the number and dendritic morphology of LCs are known to be diminished in squamous cell carcinomas from sun-exposed skin. The effects of arsenics on LCs are unknown. Using an OKT-6 monoclonal antibody to stain intraepithelial LCs, we compared their number and morphology in Bowen's lesions and in the perilesional skin from sun-protected sites in ten patients with chronic arsenicism. There was a significant reduction in the numbers of LCs in the Bowen's lesions as compared to the perilesional skin specimens. Loss of dendrites was observed in all Bowen's lesions and in seven of the perilesional skin specimens. Ultrastructurally, the LCs showed an absence of dendrites, but the Birbeck granules were preserved. Since the specimens were not from sun-exposed skin in our study, the findings may be related to chronic arsenic intoxication. The morphologic alteration of LCs observed in the perilesional skin further suggests an arsenic-related systemic dysfunction of the LCs, which in turn may contribute to the development of skin cancers in these patients.

  1. Langerhans cells in lichen planus and lichenoid mucositis an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Devi, M.; Saraswathi, T. R.; Ranganathan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Sreeja, C.; Fathima, S. Shabana

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to identify and evaluate Langerhans cell (LC) in lichen planus (LP), lichenoid mucositis (LM) and normal mucosa (NM) using CD1a monoclonal antibody immunohistochemically. Materials and Methods: A total of 15 cases of oral lichen planus and 15 cases of LM were selected based on clinical examination and confirmed by histopathological analysis. The biopsies from the 10 patients were taken from normal buccal mucosa as control. Paraffin blocks of tissue were made, which are used for routine hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining using biotin streptavidin methods (CD1a monoclonal antibody). Analysis of CD1a expression was performed by evaluating the labeling index (LI) for each slide. Results: The mean CD1a LI for LP was significantly higher than that of LM and NM in the basal and supra basal layer. The mean CD1a positive cells in the connective tissues for LP were higher than that of LM and NM. Conclusion: This study clearly demonstrates a statistically significant increase in number of LC in LP than in LM, indicating the possible different immunopathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25210358

  2. Langerhans cells are generated by two distinct PU.1-dependent transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Michaël; Seillet, Cyril; Chevrier, Stéphane; Wu, Li; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Belz, Gabrielle T; Nutt, Stephen L

    2013-12-16

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the unique dendritic cells found in the epidermis. While a great deal of attention has focused on defining the developmental origins of LCs, reports addressing the transcriptional network ruling their differentiation remain sparse. We addressed the function of a group of key DC transcription factors-PU.1, ID2, IRF4, and IRF8-in the establishment of the LC network. We show that although steady-state LC homeostasis depends on PU.1 and ID2, the latter is dispensable for bone marrow-derived LCs. PU.1 controls LC differentiation by regulating the expression of the critical TGF-β responsive transcription factor RUNX3. PU.1 directly binds to the Runx3 regulatory elements in a TGF-β-dependent manner, whereas ectopic expression of RUNX3 rescued LC differentiation in the absence of PU.1 and promoted LC differentiation from PU.1-sufficient progenitors. These findings highlight the dual molecular network underlying LC differentiation, and show the central role of PU.1 in these processes.

  3. Betamethasone, but Not Tacrolimus, Suppresses the Development of Th2 Cells Mediated by Langerhans Cell-Like Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Katsuhiko; Tamai, Saki; Ikeda, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that Langerhans cells (LCs) work as the primary orchestrators in the polarization of the immune milieu towards a T helper type 1 (Th1) or T helper type 2 (Th2) response. In this study, we investigated the effects of tacrolimus and betamethasone, each used as topical applications in atopic dermatitis (AD), on Th2 cell development mediated by LCs. LC-like dendritic cells (LDCs) were generated from mouse bone marrow cells and used as substitutes for LCs. Mice were primed with ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-pulsed LDCs, which had been treated with tacrolimus or betamethasone, via the hind footpad. After 5 d, the cytokine response in the popliteal lymph nodes was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of cell surface molecules on LDCs was investigated via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Administration of OVA peptide-pulsed LDCs, which had been treated with betamethasone, inhibited Th2 cell development, as represented by the down-regulation of interleukin-4 production, and also inhibited Th1 cell development, represented by the down-regulation of interferon-γ production. However, tacrolimus-treated LDCs did not induce such inhibition of the development of Th1 and Th2 cells. The inhibition of Th1 and Th2 cell development was associated with the suppression of CD40 and T-cell immunoglobulin, and mucin domain-containing protein (TIM)-4 expression, respectively, in LDCs. These results suggest that the topical application of betamethasone to skin lesions of patients with AD acts on epidermal LCs, and may inhibit the development of Th2 cells, thus being of benefit for the control of AD. PMID:27374298

  4. Circulating and in situ lymphocyte subsets and Langerhans cells in patients with compositae oleoresin dermatitis and increased ultraviolet A sensitivity during treatment with azathioprine

    SciTech Connect

    Baadsgaard, O.

    1986-04-01

    Circulating and in situ lymphocyte subsets and Langerhans cells in four patients with compositae oleoresin dermatitis and increased ultraviolet A sensitivity before and during treatment with azathioprine were estimated. It was found that the number of Leu 6+ Langerhans cells decreased during therapy. This decrease was accompanied by a reduction in the number of Leu 2a+, Leu 3a+, Leu 4+, DR+, and Leu M2+ cells in the blood and a reduction in the number of Leu 2a+, Leu 3a+, Leu 4+, and DR+ cells in the skin. Concomitantly with the changes in the number of immunocompetent cells, the eczema cleared.

  5. Effect of ultraviolet B radiation on S-100 protein antigen in epidermal Langerhans cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.A.; Fukuyama, K.; Maceira, J.; Epstein, W.L.

    1985-02-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been shown to induce significant alterations in both function and surface antigen expression of epidermal Langerhans cells (ELC). In this study the effect of UVB radiation on ELC marker S-100 protein antigen (S-100 Ag) which is present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of human ELC was investigated. A total of 34 sites on 31 volunteers were exposed to 3 MED (minimal erythema dose) of UVB and biopsied at various times up to 7 days after irradiation. Skin from 9 noninjured and 7 slice-wounded subjects served as controls. The avidin-biotin-peroxidase staining technique was used to identify S-100 Ag in sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, and the numbers of stained suprabasal dendritic cells were then counted over a 200 basal cell length of interfollicular epidermis. Noninjured skin had 3.56 +/- 3.01 cells, whereas slice-wounded skin had elevated numbers (greater than 10.0 cells) at 1, 24, and 48 h after injury. Following UVB irradiation, a significant (p less than 0.001) increase in antigen-positive cells (14 +/- 3.46) was found at 1 h; this number declined to just below normal at 12 h, but by 48 h returned to and remained at preinjury levels. In contrast to previous observations of the depletion of ELC surface markers by UVB radiation, the authors demonstrate here that the numbers of S-100 Ag-positive ELC actually increase following comparable doses of radiation. Since this increase occurs so rapidly following both UVB irradiation and slice injury, S-100 Ag may be synthesized or unmasked within the ELC as a response to wounding of the epidermis.

  6. No impairment of monocyte-derived Langerhans cell phenotype or function in early-onset psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, F L; Kimber, I; Begum, R; Cumberbatch, M; Dearman, R J; Griffiths, C E M

    2012-01-01

    Background Migration of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) in response to the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α is impaired in uninvolved skin of patients with early-onset psoriasis. Aim To investigate whether this impairment is a reflection of a systemic defect in dendritic cells (DCs), using an established model of monocyte-derived LC-like cells (mLCs). Methods CD14+ monocytes isolated from both patients with psoriasis and healthy control volunteers were cultured in a cytokine cocktail for 5 days to promote their differentiation into mLCs, then stimulated for 24 h with TNF-α, IL-1β (both 100 ng/mL) or medium alone. Cellular surface protein expression was quantified by flow cytometry, and the ability of cells to migrate to media supplemented with C-C motif ligand (CCL)19 was assessed using a Transwell migration assay. The cytokine and chemokine content of supernatants was analysed by cytokine array. Results CD14+ cells acquired an LC-like phenotype with high expression of CD1a and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II. There were no differences in the expression of activation markers or in the secretion of cytokines by mLCs isolated from patients with psoriasis and those isolated from healthy controls. Moreover, mLCs isolated from both groups displayed comparable ability to migrate in vitro. Conclusions These data suggest that the failure of LCs to migrate in response to stimulation in patients with psoriasis is not attributable to a systemic defect in DC function, but is rather a reflection of local changes in the epidermal microenvironment. PMID:21933242

  7. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a retrospective analysis in a Korean tertiary hospital from 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Choi, Jae Woo; Kim, Hyo Jin; Youn, Sang Woong

    2013-10-01

    Epidemiological study of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) has been limited due to its rarity and multisystemic involvement. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological features of LCH via the clinical data warehouse (CDW). Clinical data of 30 LCH patients from the all departments of a tertiary referral hospital between 2003 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively by searching the CDW. The male-to-female ratio was 2.8:1. The age of onset ranged 7 days to 57 years with a median of 13 years. Of the patients, 36.7% presented initial symptoms before the age of 10 years. The involved organs at diagnosis were: bone (66.7%), skin (16.7%), lungs (13.3%) and lymph node (3.3%). For all of the 30 cases, there were 31 disease sites because of a single case of multisystemic disease involving both skin and bone. Of the 96.7% of patients with single-system disease, 69.0% had bony involvement. This study elucidated the clinical features of LCH from all the departments of a tertiary hospital via the CDW, which suggests a potential role of the CDW as a new epidemiological approach for rare diseases.

  8. Occult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, a Thickened Pituitary Stalk and Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Michael S; Gordon, Murray B

    2016-01-01

    Etiologies of a thickened stalk include inflammatory, neoplastic, and idiopathic origins, and the underlying diagnosis may remain occult. We report a patient with a thickened pituitary stalk (TPS) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) whose diagnosis remained obscure until a skin lesion appeared. The patient presented with PTC, status postthyroidectomy, and I(131) therapy. PTC molecular testing revealed BRAF mutant (V600E, GTC>GAG). She had a 5-year history of polyuria/polydipsia. Overnight dehydration study confirmed diabetes insipidus (DI). MRI revealed TPS with loss of the posterior pituitary bright spot. Evaluation showed hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and low IGF-1. Chest X-ray and ACE levels were normal. Radiographs to evaluate for extrapituitary sites of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) were unremarkable. Germinoma studies were negative: normal serum and CSF beta-hCG, alpha-fetoprotein, and CEA. Three years later, the patient developed vulvar labial lesions followed by inguinal region skin lesions, biopsy of which revealed LCH. Reanalysis of thyroid pathology was consistent with concurrent LCH, PTC, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis within the thyroid. This case illustrates that one must be vigilant for extrapituitary manifestations of systemic diseases to diagnose the etiology of TPS. An activating mutation of the protooncogene BRAF is a potential unifying etiology of both PTC and LCH. PMID:27656301

  9. Occult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, a Thickened Pituitary Stalk and Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Etiologies of a thickened stalk include inflammatory, neoplastic, and idiopathic origins, and the underlying diagnosis may remain occult. We report a patient with a thickened pituitary stalk (TPS) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) whose diagnosis remained obscure until a skin lesion appeared. The patient presented with PTC, status postthyroidectomy, and I131 therapy. PTC molecular testing revealed BRAF mutant (V600E, GTC>GAG). She had a 5-year history of polyuria/polydipsia. Overnight dehydration study confirmed diabetes insipidus (DI). MRI revealed TPS with loss of the posterior pituitary bright spot. Evaluation showed hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and low IGF-1. Chest X-ray and ACE levels were normal. Radiographs to evaluate for extrapituitary sites of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) were unremarkable. Germinoma studies were negative: normal serum and CSF beta-hCG, alpha-fetoprotein, and CEA. Three years later, the patient developed vulvar labial lesions followed by inguinal region skin lesions, biopsy of which revealed LCH. Reanalysis of thyroid pathology was consistent with concurrent LCH, PTC, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis within the thyroid. This case illustrates that one must be vigilant for extrapituitary manifestations of systemic diseases to diagnose the etiology of TPS. An activating mutation of the protooncogene BRAF is a potential unifying etiology of both PTC and LCH. PMID:27656301

  10. Cladribine and cytarabine in refractory multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis: results of an international phase 2 study

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Frederic; van Noesel, Max; Barkaoui, Mohamed; Bardet, Odile; Mura, Rosella; Arico, Maurizio; Piguet, Christophe; Gandemer, Virginie; Armari Alla, Corinne; Clausen, Niels; Jeziorski, Eric; Lambilliote, Anne; Weitzman, Sheila; Henter, Jan Inge; Van Den Bos, Cor

    2015-01-01

    An international phase 2 study combining cladribine and cytarabine (Ara-C) was initiated for patients with refractory, risk-organ–positive Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in 2005. The protocol, comprising at least two 5-day courses of Ara-C (1 g/m2 per day) plus cladribine (9 mg/m2 per day) followed by maintenance therapy, was administered to 27 patients (median age at diagnosis, 0.7 years; median follow-up, 5.3 years). At inclusion, all patients were refractory after at least 1 course of vinblastine (VBL) plus corticosteroid, all had liver and spleen involvement, and 25 patients had hematologic cytopenia. After 2 courses, disease status was nonactive (n = 2), better (n = 23), or stable (n = 2), with an overall response rate of 92%. Median disease activity scores decreased from 12 at the start of therapy to 3 after 2 courses (P < .0001). During maintenance therapy, 4 patients experienced reactivation in risk organs. There were 4 deaths; 2 were related to therapy toxicity and 2 were related to reactivation. All patients experienced severe toxicity, with World Health Organization grade 4 hematologic toxicity and 6 documented severe infections. The overall 5-year survival rate was 85% (95% confidence interval, 65.2%-94.2%). Thus, the combination of cladribine/Ara-C is effective therapy for refractory multisystem LCH but is associated with high toxicity. PMID:26194764

  11. Occult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, a Thickened Pituitary Stalk and Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Etiologies of a thickened stalk include inflammatory, neoplastic, and idiopathic origins, and the underlying diagnosis may remain occult. We report a patient with a thickened pituitary stalk (TPS) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) whose diagnosis remained obscure until a skin lesion appeared. The patient presented with PTC, status postthyroidectomy, and I131 therapy. PTC molecular testing revealed BRAF mutant (V600E, GTC>GAG). She had a 5-year history of polyuria/polydipsia. Overnight dehydration study confirmed diabetes insipidus (DI). MRI revealed TPS with loss of the posterior pituitary bright spot. Evaluation showed hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and low IGF-1. Chest X-ray and ACE levels were normal. Radiographs to evaluate for extrapituitary sites of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) were unremarkable. Germinoma studies were negative: normal serum and CSF beta-hCG, alpha-fetoprotein, and CEA. Three years later, the patient developed vulvar labial lesions followed by inguinal region skin lesions, biopsy of which revealed LCH. Reanalysis of thyroid pathology was consistent with concurrent LCH, PTC, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis within the thyroid. This case illustrates that one must be vigilant for extrapituitary manifestations of systemic diseases to diagnose the etiology of TPS. An activating mutation of the protooncogene BRAF is a potential unifying etiology of both PTC and LCH.

  12. Clinicopathological pattern of cranial unifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis: A study at medical college hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Salma; Nazir, Parvez; Bashir, Humaira; Reshi, Ruby; Sheikh, Sheema; Wani, Rohi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) of bone refers to a generally benign form of Langerhans cell histiocytosis localized to the bone. Patients may present with a solitary lesion (monostotic) or multiple sites of involvement (polyostotic). Materials and Methods: This study was done to evaluate the clinicopathological pattern of 6 cases of EGs of the skull diagnosed at a tertiary care hospital. All patients of EG were included with the help of medical records over a 5-year period that is, November 2009 to November 2014. They all had been preoperatively evaluated by skull X-ray and computed tomography. To rule out a multifocal disease scintigraphy was performed in all cases preoperatively. Surgical excision was performed, and EG was diagnosed on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Results: There was a male predominance. Parietal bone was the most common affected bone. Total excision of the lesion was performed in all cases. No patient received postoperative radiotherapy. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 3 years. No tumor recurrence was noted. Conclusion: With an unknown etiology, nonspecific clinical and radiological findings with diagnosis possible only on histopathological examination, EG needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis as a skull mass, especially in children. PMID:26855527

  13. Treatment of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis in children. Experience at the Children's Hospital of Nancy.

    PubMed

    Sessa, S; Sommelet, D; Lascombes, P; Prévot, J

    1994-10-01

    Forty children who had Langerhans-cell histiocytosis were followed for an average of six years (range, excluding patients who died of the disease, two to fifteen years). The patients were divided into two diagnostic groups: those who had localized disease (involving one bone or more only) and those who had multifocal disease (an osseous lesion and a soft-tissue mass, a skin rash, diabetes insipidus, or generalized disease). Methods of treatment included curettage, bone-grafting, chemotherapy, local or systemic corticosteroids, and radiotherapy. Nineteen of the thirty patients who had localized disease had a complete response to the therapy, four had a partial response, and seven had no response. Twenty-one of these thirty patients had not had a recurrence by the time of the latest follow-up examination; nine had a local recurrence within four years after the initial therapy but had no additional recurrences after treatment of the local recurrence. No recurrence occurred more than four years after the time that the initial diagnosis had been made. Five of the ten patients who had multifocal disease had a complete response to the therapy, two had a partial response, and three had no response. Six patients had a recurrence; four did not. Two patients died of the disease. As a result of this study, we recommend the avoidance of intensive measures of treatment, if possible, and we advise long-term follow-up of these patients. PMID:7929499

  14. Efficacy of vinblastine in central nervous system Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a nationwide retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vinblastine (VBL) is the standard treatment for systemic Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), but little is known about its efficacy in central nervous system (CNS) mass lesions. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted. Twenty patients from the French LCH Study Group register met the inclusion criteria. In brief, they had CNS mass lesions, had been treated with VBL, and were evaluable for radiologic response. Results The median age at diagnosis of LCH was 11.5 years (range: 1-50). Intravenous VBL 6 mg/m2 was given in a 6-week induction treatment, followed by a maintenance treatment. The median total duration was 12 months (range: 3-30). Eleven patients received steroids concomitantly. Fifteen patients achieved an objective response; five had a complete response (CR: 25%), ten had a partial response (PR: 50%), four had stable disease (SD: 20%) and one patient progressed (PD: 5%). Of interest, four out of the six patients who received VBL without concomitant steroids achieved an objective response. With a median follow-up of 6.8 years, the 5-year event-free and overall survival was 61% and 84%, respectively. VBL was well-tolerated and there were no patient withdrawals due to adverse events. Conclusion VBL, with or without steroids, could potentially be a useful therapeutic option in LCH with CNS mass lesions, especially for those with inoperable lesions or multiple lesions. Prospective clinical trials are warranted for the evaluation of VBL in this indication. PMID:22151964

  15. Insights into the pathogenesis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis: the development of targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, Caroline; Minkov, Milen

    2016-01-01

    More than a century after its first description, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) still remains an intriguing disease. Considerable progress in understanding its biology has been achieved recently. Description of the V600E BRAF mutation in samples of LCH tissue in 2010 was followed by description of additional mutations, all leading to constitutive ERK activation. Current experimental data suggest that LCH is a myeloid neoplasia with inflammatory properties, yet the exact pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Disease management paradigms have changed over time, closely reflecting the evolving view of the nature of the disease. The international Histiocyte Society have conducted three prospective clinical studies on multisystem LCH since the early 1990s. The standard frontline therapy for patients with multisystem LCH based on the cumulative knowledge of those trials consists of 6–12 weeks of initial therapy (daily oral steroids and weekly vinblastine injections), followed by pulses of prednisolone/vinblastine every 3 weeks, for a total treatment duration of 12 months. A currently ongoing study (LCH-IV) with a complex design (five interventional and two observational strata) targets further reduction of mortality and morbidity by tailoring treatment intensity depending on expected risk, as well as by exploring treatment regimens for special locations. Current knowledge on LCH pathobiology opens opportunities for improvement in the patient outcome. The activating BRAF and MAP2K1 mutations collectively accounting for about 75% of the LCH population as well as the resulting constitutive activation of downstream ERK offer an opportunity for targeted treatment. Related issues (eg, finding most effective and less toxic drugs or combinations, appropriate dosage, and optimal treatment duration) must be addressed in controlled prospective trials. Additional mechanisms, such as the interactions of the mutated dendritic cell clone with other inflammatory cells and

  16. Quiescent Innate Response to Infective Filariae by Human Langerhans Cells Suggests a Strategy of Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alexis; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Wang, Yuanyuan; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Law, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infection is initiated by mosquito-derived third-stage larvae (L3) deposited on the skin that transit through the epidermis, which contains Langerhans cells (LC) and keratinocytes (KC), among other cells. This earliest interaction between L3 and the LC likely conditions the priming of the immune system to the parasite. To determine the nature of this interaction, human LC (langerin+ E-cadherin+ CD1a+) were generated in vitro and exposed to live L3. LC exposed to live L3 for 48 h showed no alterations in the cell surface markers CD14, CD86, CD83, CD207, E-cadherin, CD80, CD40, and HLA-DR or in mRNA expression of inflammation-associated genes, such as those for interleukin 18 (IL-18), IL-18BP, and caspase 1. In contrast to L3, live tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, induced production of CXCL9, IP-10, and IL-6 in LC. Furthermore, preexposure of LC to L3 did not alter Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)- or TLR4-mediated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-6, or IL-10. Interestingly, cocultures of KC and LC produced significantly more IL-18, IL-1α, and IL-8 than did cultures of LC alone, although exposure of the cocultures to live L3 did not result in altered cytokine production. Microarray examination of ex vivo LC from skin blisters that were exposed to live L3 also showed few significant changes in gene expression compared with unexposed blisters, further underscoring the relatively muted response of LC to L3. Our data suggest that failure by LC to initiate an inflammatory response to the invasive stage of filarial parasites may be a strategy for immune evasion by the filarial parasite. PMID:23429540

  17. Comparative analysis of CD80 and CD86 on human Langerhans cells: expression and function.

    PubMed

    Yokozeki, H; Takayama, K; Ohki, O; Satoh, T; Umeda, T; Katayama, I; Nishioka, K

    1998-10-01

    Although both CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2/B70) have been recently identified in cultured human Langerhans cells (LC), little is known of the role and regulatory properties of CD80 and CD86 on human LC. We present here the results of a study comparing the expression and function of CD80 and CD86 in human LC using the T-helper type-1 cytokines IL-2 and interferon gamma (IFN)-gamma, and the T-helper type-2 cytokines IL-10, IL-4 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Freshly isolated human LC expressed little CD80 and CD86 in vitro, but the expression of both molecules was rapidly induced during a 72-h incubation with cytokines and the expression of CD86 occurred much earlier and more strongly than that of CD80. The expression of both CD80 and CD86 was upregulated by GM-CSF and downregulated by IL-10, and the expression of CD86, but not that of CD80, was upregulated by both IL-4 and IFN-gamma. Finally, pretreatment of LC with GM-CSF and IFN-gamma, but not with IL-4, enhanced the alloreactive T-cell proliferation induced by the LC, and IL-10 pretreatment of LC decreased their capacity for alloreaction. These results indicate that the expression of both CD80 and CD86 on human LC may be regulated by these cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, GM-CSF, IFN-gamma and IL-10) secreted from helper T cells infiltrating into the inflammatory microenvironment.

  18. Increased Number of Langerhans Cells in the Epidermis of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Correlates with Healing Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie; Lehmann, Janin; Pastar, Irena; Kirsner, Robert S.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are a specialized subset of epidermal dendritic cells. They represent one of the first cells of immunological barrier and play an important role during the inflammatory phase of acute wound healing. Despite considerable progress in our understanding of the immunopathology of diabetes mellitus and its associated co-morbidities such as diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), considerable gaps in our knowledge exist. In this study, we utilized the human ex vivo wound model and confirmed the increased epidermal LCs at wound edges during early phases of wound healing. Next, we aimed to determine differences in quantity of LCs between normal human and diabetic foot skin and to learn if the presence of LCs correlates with the healing outcome in DFUs. We utilized immunofluorescence to detect CD207+ LCs in specimens from normal and diabetic foot skin and DFU wound edges. Specimens from DFUs were collected at the initial visit and 4 weeks at the time when the healing outcome was determined. DFUs that decreased in size by >50% were considered to be healing, while DFUs with a size reduction of <50% were considered non-healing. Quantitative assessment of LCs showed a higher number of LCs in healing when compared to non–healing DFU’s. Our findings provide evidence that LCs are present in higher number in diabetic feet than normal foot skin. Healing DFUs show a higher number of LCs compared to non-healing DFUs. These findings indicate that the epidermal immune barrier plays an important role in the DFU healing outcome and may offer new therapeutic avenues targeting LC in non-healing DFUs. PMID:24277309

  19. The Beta Cell in Its Cluster: Stochastic Graphs of Beta Cell Connectivity in the Islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Striegel, Deborah A.; Hara, Manami; Periwal, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic islets of Langerhans consist of endocrine cells, primarily α, β and δ cells, which secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin, respectively, to regulate plasma glucose. β cells form irregular locally connected clusters within islets that act in concert to secrete insulin upon glucose stimulation. Due to the central functional significance of this local connectivity in the placement of β cells in an islet, it is important to characterize it quantitatively. However, quantification of the seemingly stochastic cytoarchitecture of β cells in an islet requires mathematical methods that can capture topological connectivity in the entire β-cell population in an islet. Graph theory provides such a framework. Using large-scale imaging data for thousands of islets containing hundreds of thousands of cells in human organ donor pancreata, we show that quantitative graph characteristics differ between control and type 2 diabetic islets. Further insight into the processes that shape and maintain this architecture is obtained by formulating a stochastic theory of β-cell rearrangement in whole islets, just as the normal equilibrium distribution of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process can be viewed as the result of the interplay between a random walk and a linear restoring force. Requiring that rearrangements maintain the observed quantitative topological graph characteristics strongly constrained possible processes. Our results suggest that β-cell rearrangement is dependent on its connectivity in order to maintain an optimal cluster size in both normal and T2D islets. PMID:26266953

  20. Tertiary lymphoid structures are confined to patients presenting with unifocal Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Quispel, Willemijn T; Steenwijk, Eline C; van Unen, Vincent; Santos, Susy J; Koens, Lianne; Mebius, Reina; Egeler, R Maarten; van Halteren, Astrid G S

    2016-08-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplastic myeloid disorder with a thus far poorly understood immune component. Tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) are lymph node-like entities which create an immune-promoting microenvironment at tumor sites. We analyzed the presence and clinical relevance of TLS in n = 104 H&E-stained, therapy-naive LCH lesions of non-lymphoid origin and applied immunohistochemistry to a smaller series. Lymphoid-follicular aggregates were detected in 34/104 (33%) lesions. In line with the lymphocyte recruitment capacity of MECA-79(+) high endothelial venules (HEVs), MECA-79(+)-expressing-LCH lesions (37/77, 48%) contained the most CD3(+) T-lymphocytes (p = 0.003). TLS were identified in 8/15 lesions and contained T-and B-lymphocytes, Follicular Dendritic Cells (FDC), HEVs and the chemokines CXCL13 and CCL21 representing key cellular components and TLS-inducing factors in conventional lymph nodes (LN). Lymphoid-follicular aggregates were most frequently detected in patients presenting with unifocal LCH (24/70, 34%) as compared to patients with poly-ostotic or multi-system LCH (7/30, 23%, p = 0.03). In addition, patients with lymphoid-follicular aggregates-containing lesions had the lowest risk to develop new LCH lesions (p = 0.04). The identification of various stages of TLS formation within LCH lesions may indicate a key role for the immune system in controlling aberrant histiocytes which arise in peripheral tissues.

  1. Tertiary lymphoid structures are confined to patients presenting with unifocal Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Quispel, Willemijn T; Steenwijk, Eline C; van Unen, Vincent; Santos, Susy J; Koens, Lianne; Mebius, Reina; Egeler, R Maarten; van Halteren, Astrid G S

    2016-08-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplastic myeloid disorder with a thus far poorly understood immune component. Tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) are lymph node-like entities which create an immune-promoting microenvironment at tumor sites. We analyzed the presence and clinical relevance of TLS in n = 104 H&E-stained, therapy-naive LCH lesions of non-lymphoid origin and applied immunohistochemistry to a smaller series. Lymphoid-follicular aggregates were detected in 34/104 (33%) lesions. In line with the lymphocyte recruitment capacity of MECA-79(+) high endothelial venules (HEVs), MECA-79(+)-expressing-LCH lesions (37/77, 48%) contained the most CD3(+) T-lymphocytes (p = 0.003). TLS were identified in 8/15 lesions and contained T-and B-lymphocytes, Follicular Dendritic Cells (FDC), HEVs and the chemokines CXCL13 and CCL21 representing key cellular components and TLS-inducing factors in conventional lymph nodes (LN). Lymphoid-follicular aggregates were most frequently detected in patients presenting with unifocal LCH (24/70, 34%) as compared to patients with poly-ostotic or multi-system LCH (7/30, 23%, p = 0.03). In addition, patients with lymphoid-follicular aggregates-containing lesions had the lowest risk to develop new LCH lesions (p = 0.04). The identification of various stages of TLS formation within LCH lesions may indicate a key role for the immune system in controlling aberrant histiocytes which arise in peripheral tissues. PMID:27622056

  2. Langerhans cells (CD1a and CD207), dermal dendrocytes (FXIIIa) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (CD123) in skin lesions of leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Kelly Emi; Aarão, Tinara Leila de Sousa; Silva, Luciana Mota; de Sousa, Jorge Rodrigues; de Souza, Juarez; Dias, Leonidas Braga; Carneiro, Francisca Regina Oliveira; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões

    2016-02-01

    The clinical course of infection with Mycobacterium leprae varies widely and depends on the pattern of the host immune response. Dendritic cells play an important role in the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system and seem to be essential for the development of the disease. To analyze the presence of epidermal dendritic cells (CD1a and CD207), plasmacytoid dendritic cells (CD123) and dermal dendrocytes (factor XIIIa) in lesion fragments of leprosy patients, skin samples from 30 patients were studied. These samples were submitted to immunohistochemistry against CD1a, CD207, FXIIIa, and CD123. The results showed a larger number of Langerhans cells, detected with the CD1a or CD207 marker, dermal dendrocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in patients with the tuberculoid form. A positive correlation was observed between the Langerhans cell markers CD1a and CD207 in both the tuberculoid and lepromatous forms, and between Langerhans cells and dermal dendrocytes in samples with the tuberculoid form. The present results indicate the existence of a larger number of dendritic cells in patients at the resistant pole of the disease (tuberculoid) and suggest that the different dendritic cells studied play a role, favoring an efficient immune response against infection with M. leprae.

  3. Role of abnormal Langerhans cells in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Shyamsundar Vidya; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari; Balachander, Nandagopal; Malathi, Letchumana Kumar; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), although initiated by tobacco carcinogens, their progression is due to inability of Langerhans cells (LCs) to detect these abnormal cells and promote lymphocytes to destroy these cells. We assessed and quantified the tumor associated LCs and inflammation in OED and OSCC to understand their role. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five microscopic sections were assessed (27 OED and 28 OSCC). The LCs were detected using S-100 immunohistochemical marker. The number of tumor associated LCs were counted. The presence of abnormal appearing large cells and its relation to histopathologic grade and inflammation was assessed. Results: Significant increase in the LC count was observed in OSCC when compared to dysplasia. Large, abnormal appearing cells were observed in dysplasia and carcinomas however, these were more pronounced in moderate dysplasia and poorly-differentiated carcinomas. The presence of these abnormal appearing cells was associated with decrease in lymphocytic infiltrate. Conclusion: The present study indicates more LC are recruited into the carcinoma. These accumulated nonfunctional LC in the tumor tissue are indicative of aggressive tumor with potential malignant transformation. PMID:26604600

  4. Ectopic micronodular thymoma with lymphoid stroma in the cervical region: a rare case associated with Langerhans cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Meng, Yuan; Xu, Bin; Zhao, Lin; Zhang, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Micronodular thymoma (MNT) with lymphoid stroma is a rare thymic epithelial neoplasm with the characteristics of multiple nodules separated by abundant lymphoid stroma. MNTs mainly arise in the anterior mediastinum and thymus, while ectopic MNTs are extremely rarely seen. Here, we report an ectopic MNT that occurred in the neck of a 62-year-old woman. There were also scattered eosinophilic granulocytes and S100(+)/CD1a(+) Langerhans cells within the tumor. This case provides a better understanding of such rare, poorly understood cases. PMID:27486334

  5. Long-Term Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as Bridging Strategies to Lung Transplantation in Rapidly Devastating Isolated Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Oliviero; Moscatelli, Andrea; Conte, Massimo; Grasso, Chiara; Magnano, Gian Michele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Martelli, Alberto; Rossi, Giovanni A

    2016-05-01

    Isolated pulmonary involvement in pediatric Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is extremely rare. While the multisystem-LCH course varies from spontaneous remission to rapid deterioration with lethal outcome, single system involvement is generally associated with favorable prognosis. A child with isolated pulmonary LCH had an extremely rapid progression leading to respiratory failure, despite treatment with prednisone and vinblastine. Since lung hyperinflation and cystic degeneration contraindicated conventional mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was chosen for 50 days as a bridge to lung transplantation. The mechanisms involved in disease progression and the usefulness of long-term ECMO are discussed. PMID:26840616

  6. Grafting of burns with widely meshed autograft split skin and Langerhans cell-depressed allograft split skin overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Alsbjoern, B.F.S.; Sorensen, B.

    1986-12-01

    Extensively burned patients suffer from lack of sufficient autologous donor skin. Meshing and wide expansion of the obtained split skin has met the requirement to a large degree. However, the wider the expansion, the less chance of a proper take. By covering widely expanded autografts with viable cadaver split skin, the take has been improved. If the epidermal Langerhans cells in the cadaver split skin are depressed by ultraviolet B light and glucocorticosteroids before grafting, a prolonged allograft take can be achieved and the healing of the underlying autografts is ensured for an extended period. Grafting results in 6 patients with extensive burns are reported.

  7. Ectopic micronodular thymoma with lymphoid stroma in the cervical region: a rare case associated with Langerhans cells proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Meng, Yuan; Xu, Bin; Zhao, Lin; Zhang, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Micronodular thymoma (MNT) with lymphoid stroma is a rare thymic epithelial neoplasm with the characteristics of multiple nodules separated by abundant lymphoid stroma. MNTs mainly arise in the anterior mediastinum and thymus, while ectopic MNTs are extremely rarely seen. Here, we report an ectopic MNT that occurred in the neck of a 62-year-old woman. There were also scattered eosinophilic granulocytes and S100+/CD1a+ Langerhans cells within the tumor. This case provides a better understanding of such rare, poorly understood cases. PMID:27486334

  8. Topical steroid therapy induces pro-tolerogenic changes in Langerhans cells in human skin.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Alhadj; Thrower, Sally L; Hanna, Stephanie J; Coulman, Sion A; Birchall, James C; Wong, F Susan; Dayan, Colin Mark; Tatovic, Danijela

    2015-11-01

    We have investigated the efficacy of conditioning skin Langerhans cells (LCs) with agents to promote tolerance and reduce inflammation, with the goal of improving the outcomes of antigen-specific immunotherapy. Topical treatments were assessed ex vivo, using excised human breast skin maintained in organ bath cultures, and in vivo in healthy volunteers by analysing skin biopsies and epidermal blister roof samples. Following topical treatment with a corticosteroid, tumour necrosis factor-α levels were reduced in skin biopsy studies and blister fluid samples. Blister fluid concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory proteins -1α and 1β and interferon-γ inducible protein-10 were also reduced, while preserving levels of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Steroid pre-treatment of the skin reduced the ability of LCs to induce proliferation, while supernatants showed an increase in the IL-10/interferon-γ ratio. Phenotypic changes following topical steroid treatment were also observed, including reduced expression of CD83 and CD86 in blister-derived LCs, but preservation of the tolerogenic signalling molecules immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 and programmed death-1. Reduced expression of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 were also apparent in LCs derived from excised human skin. Topical therapy with a vitamin D analogue (calcipotriol) and steroid, calcipotriol alone or vitamin A elicited no significant changes in the parameters studied. These experiments suggest that pre-conditioning the skin with topical corticosteroid can modulate LCs by blunting their pro-inflammatory signals and potentially enhancing tolerance. We suggest that such modulation before antigen-specific immunotherapy might provide an inexpensive and safe adjunct to current approaches to treat autoimmune diseases.

  9. Central nervous system imaging in childhood Langerhans cell histiocytosis – a reference center analysis

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Luciana; Schöning, Stefan; Hattingen, Elke; Sörensen, Jan; Jurcoane, Alina; Lehrnbecher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was (1) to describe central nervous system (CNS) manifestations in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) based on images sent to a reference center and meeting minimum requirements and (2) to assess the inter-rater agreement of CNS-MRI results, which represents the overall reproducibility of this investigation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed brain MRI examinations in children with LCH, for which MRI minimum requirements were met. Abnormalities were rated by two experienced neuroradiologists, and the inter-rater agreement was assessed. Results Out of a total of 94 imaging studies, only 31 MRIs met the minimum criteria, which included T2w, FLAIR, T1w images before/after contrast in at least two different section planes, and thin post contrast sagittal slices T1w through the sella. The most common changes were osseous abnormalities, followed by solid enlargement of the pineal gland, thickened enhancing stalk and signal changes of the dentate nucleus. Whereas inter-rater agreement in assessing most of the CNS lesions was relatively high (κ > 0.61), the application of minimum criteria often did not allow to evaluate the posterior pituitary. Conclusions The diversity of radiological protocols from different institutions leads to difficulties in the diagnosis of CNS abnormalities in children with LCH. Although the inter-rater agreement between neuroradiologists was high, not all the LCH manifestations could be completely ruled out when using the minimum criteria. Brain MRIs should therefore follow LCH guideline protocols and include T1 pre-gadolinium sagittal images, and be centrally reviewed in order to improve the comparison of clinical trials. PMID:26401129

  10. Macrophages in Langerhans cell histiocytosis are differentiated toward M2 phenotype: their possible involvement in pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Sakashita, Naomi; Iyama, Ken-Ichi; Murayama, Toshihiko; Takeya, Motohiro

    2010-01-01

    Although numerous macrophages are found in the lesions of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), their activation phenotypes and their roles in the disease process have not been clarified. Paraffin-embedded LCH samples were examined on immunohistochemistry and it was found that CD163 can be used to distinguish infiltrated macrophages from neoplastic Langerhans cells (LC). The number of CD163-positve macrophages was positively correlated with the number of multinucleated giant cells (MGC), indicating that most MGC are derived from infiltrated macrophages. A significant number of CD163-positive macrophages were positive for interleukin (IL)-10 and phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3), an IL-10-induced signal transduction molecule. This indicates that these macrophages are polarized to anti-inflammatory macrophages of M2 phenotype. Tumor-derived macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) was considered to responsible for inducing M2 differentiation of infiltrated macrophages. The number of CD163-positive macrophages in different cases of LCH varied, and interestingly the density of CD163-positive macrophages was inversely correlated with the Ki-67-positivity of LC. Although the underlying mechanism is not fully elucidated, macrophage-derived IL-10 was considered to be involved in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation via activation of STAT3. PMID:20055949

  11. In vivo/ex vivo targeting of Langerhans cells after topical application of the immune response modifier TMX-202: confocal Raman microscopy and histology analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Thiede, Gisela; Ascencio, Saul Mujica; Schanzer, Sabine; Richter, Heike; Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Hasche, Daniel; Rösl, Frank; May, Roberto; Hazot, Yohan; Tamarkin, Dov; Lademann, Juergen

    2016-05-01

    The increased ability of TMX-202 (derivative of imiquimod) to penetrate the intact stratum corneum (SC) and the follicular orifices of porcine ear skin was shown ex vivo using confocal Raman microscopy and laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, to assess whether TMX-202 is able to reach the immune cells, Langerhans cells extracted from pretreated human skin were investigated ex vivo using confocal Raman microscopy combined with multivariate statistical methods. Tracking the Raman peak of dimethyl sulfoxide centered at 690 cm-1, the absorption of TMX-202 containing formulation by Langerhans cells was shown. To answer the question whether the TMX-202 active ingredient is able to reach Langerhans cells, the attraction of immune cells to TMX-202 containing formulation treated skin was measured in the in vivo rodent model Mastomys coucha. The results show that TMX-202 active ingredient is able to reach Langerhans cells after penetrating through the intact skin and subsequently attract immune cells. Both the intercellular/transcellular as well as the follicular pathways allow the penetration through the intact barrier of the SC.

  12. B-RAF Mutant Alleles Associated with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis, a Granulomatous Pediatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui-chun; Mian, Sophie; Trouillet, Celine; Mufti, Ghulam; Emile, Jean-Francois; Fraternali, Franca; Donadieu, Jean; Geissmann, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Background Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) features inflammatory granuloma characterised by the presence of CD1a+ dendritic cells or ‘LCH cells’. Badalian-Very et al. recently reported the presence of a canonical V600EB-RAF mutation in 57% of paraffin-embedded biopsies from LCH granuloma. Here we confirm their findings and report the identification of two novel B-RAF mutations detected in LCH patients. Methods and Results Mutations of B-RAF were observed in granuloma samples from 11 out of 16 patients using ‘next generation’ pyrosequencing. In 9 cases the mutation identified was V600EB-RAF. In 2 cases novel polymorphisms were identified. A somatic 600DLATB-RAF insertion mimicked the structural and functional consequences of the V600EB-RAF mutant. It destabilized the inactive conformation of the B-RAF kinase and resulted in increased ERK activation in 293 T cells. The 600DLATB-RAF and V600EB-RAF mutations were found enriched in DNA and mRNA from the CD1a+ fraction of granuloma. They were absent from the blood and monocytes of 58 LCH patients, with a lower threshold of sequencing sensitivity of 1%–2% relative mutation abundance. A novel germ line T599AB-RAF mutant allele was detected in one patient, at a relative mutation abundance close to 50% in the LCH granuloma, blood monocytes and lymphocytes. However, T599AB-RAF did not destabilize the inactive conformation of the B-RAF kinase, and did not induce increased ERK phosphorylation or C-RAF transactivation. Conclusions Our data confirmed presence of the V600EB-RAF mutation in LCH granuloma of some patients, and identify two novel B-RAF mutations. They indicate that V600EB-RAF and 600DLATB-RAF mutations are somatic mutants enriched in LCH CD1a+ cells and absent from the patient blood. Further studies are needed to assess the functional consequences of the germ-line T599AB-RAF allele. PMID:22506009

  13. New melanogenesis and photobiological processes in activation and proliferation of precursor melanocytes after UV-exposure: ultrastructural differentiation of precursor melanocytes from Langerhans cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbow, K.; Uesugi, T.

    1982-02-01

    Photobiological processes involving new melanogenesis after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light were experimentally studied in C57 black adult mice by histochemistry, cytochemistry, and autoradiography. The trunk and the plantar region of the foot, where no functioning melanocytes were present before exposure, were exposed to UV-A for 14 consecutive days. Both regions revealed a basically similar pattern for new melanogenesis which involved an activation of precursor melanocytes. Essentially all of ''indeterminate'' cells appeared to be precursor melanocytes, the fine structure of which could be differentiated even from poorly developed Langerhans cells. New melanogenesis was manifested by 4 stages of cellular and subcellular reactions of these cells as indicated by histochemistry of dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) and autoradiography of thymidine incorporation: (a) an initial lag in the activation of precursor melanocytes with development of Golgi cisternae and rough endoplasmic reticulum followed by formation of unmelanized melanosomes (day 0 to 2); (b) synthesis of active tyrosinase accumulated in Golgi cisternae and vesicles with subsequent formation of melanized melanosomes in these cells (day 3 to 5); (c) mitotic proliferation of many of these activated cells, followed by an exponential increase of new melanocytes (day 6 to 7); and (d) melanosome transfer with differentiation of 10 nm filaments and arborization of dendrites, but without any significant change in the melanocyte population (day 8 to 14). The melanosome transfer was, however, not obvious until after 7 days of exposure. The size of newly synthesized melanosomes was similar to that of tail skin where native melanocytes were present before exposure.

  14. ICSBP is critically involved in the normal development and trafficking of Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Schiavoni, Giovanna; Mattei, Fabrizio; Borghi, Paola; Sestili, Paola; Venditti, Massimo; Morse, Herbert C; Belardelli, Filippo; Gabriele, Lucia

    2004-03-15

    Interferon consensus sequence-binding protein (ICSBP) is a transcription factor belonging to the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family, recently shown to play a critical role in dendritic cell (DC) differentiation. Here, we analyzed the role of ICSBP in the development and trafficking of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal DCs and the implications for initiation of a competent immune response. ICSBP-/- mice exhibited a reduced frequency of LCs and a delayed mobility of DCs from skin that reflected a slower turnover rate in lymph nodes during steady-state conditions. Even under inflammatory changes, ICSBP-/- DCs displayed reduced mobility from skin to lymph nodes and, as a consequence, failed to induce a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response, suggesting that these DCs were unable to initiate a competent antigen (Ag)-specific T-cell-mediated immunity. Moreover, bone marrow (BM)-derived DCs from ICSBP-/- mice exhibited an immature phenotype and a severe reduction of interleukin 12 (IL-12) expression. These BM DCs also showed a marked defect in their migratory response to macrophage inflammatory protein 3 alpha (MIP-3 alpha), MIP-3 beta, and the CC chemokine CCL21/6Ckine, which was paralleled by an impaired expression of the CC chemokine receptors, CCR6 and CCR7. Together, these results indicate that ICSBP is critically required for the development and trafficking of skin DCs, thus playing a critical role in the DC-mediated initiation of T-cell immunity. PMID:14615368

  15. Mediated exodus of L-dopa from human epidermal Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Falck, B; Bendsoe, N; Ronquist, G

    2004-03-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) is not metabolized within human epidermal Langerhans cells (LC); yet they can take up substantial amounts of this amino acid which subsequently can be released into the extracellular space. We recently reported that human epidermal energy metabolism is predominantly anaerobic and that the influx mechanism is a unidirectional L-dopa/proton counter-transport system and now we describe conditions for the mediated transport of L-dopa out of the LC. It is demonstrated that certain amino acids and one dipeptide can effectively trigger the efflux of L-dopa taken up by the LC.Thus, alpha-methyl-dopa (alpha-m-dopa), D-dopa and the dipeptide, met-ala at the outside of the plasma membrane stimulated the efflux of L-dopa from L-dopa loaded LC. Similar effects were achieved by a variety of other amino acids in the extracellular fluid while some other amino acids were inactive. The time required for 50% D-methionine-induced exodus of L-dopa from L-dopa loaded LC was in the range of 5-7 min and a complete exodus of L-dopa was attained at about 20 min of incubation. This dislocation of L-dopa to the extracellular fluid is interpreted as an expression of trans-stimulation. In the case of alpha-m-dopa, D-dopa and met-ala, which admittedly were not able to penetrate the plasma membrane of LC, the concept of trans-stimulation was given a new purport, since none of them were able to participate in an exchange reaction. Finally, it could be concluded that L-dopa escaped by a route different from the one responsible for L-dopa uptake in LC.Thus, while the influx of L-dopa supports extrusion of protons deriving from anaerobic glycolysis in the LC, L-dopa efflux can provide the cells with useful amino acids in an energy-saving way, altogether a remarkable biological process. From this follows that L-dopa has a biological function of its own, besides being a precursor in the catecholamine and pigment syntheses.

  16. UV Radiation Induces the Epidermal Recruitment of Dendritic Cells that Compensate for the Depletion of Langerhans Cells in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Achachi, Amine; Vocanson, Marc; Bastien, Philippe; Péguet-Navarro, Josette; Grande, Sophie; Goujon, Catherine; Breton, Lionel; Castiel-Higounenc, Isabelle; Nicolas, Jean-François; Gueniche, Audrey

    2015-08-01

    UVR causes skin injury and inflammation, resulting in impaired immune function and increased skin cancer risk. Langerhans cells (LCs), the immune sentinels of the epidermis, are depleted for several days following a single UVR exposure and can be reconstituted from circulating monocytes. However, the differentiation pathways leading to the recovery of a normal pool of LCs is still unclear. To study the dynamic changes in human skin with UV injury, we exposed a cohort of 29 healthy human volunteers to a clinically relevant dose of UVR and analyzed sequential epidermal biopsies for changes in leukocyte and dendritic cell (DC) subsets. UV-induced depletion of CD1a(high) LC was compensated by sequential appearance of various epidermal leukocytes. CD14(+) monocytes were recruited as early as D1 post exposure, followed by recruitment of two inflammatory DC subsets that may represent precursors of LCs. These CD1a(low) CD207(-) and the heretofore unknown CD1a(low) CD207(+) DCs appeared at day 1 and day 4 post UVR, respectively, and were endowed with T-cell-activating properties similar to those of LCs. We conclude that recruitment of monocytes and inflammatory DCs appear as a physiological response of the epidermis in order to repair UVR-induced LC depletion associated with immune suppression. PMID:25806853

  17. Inhibition of two temporal phases of HIV-1 transfer from primary Langerhans cells to T cells: the role of langerin.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Najla; Lai, Joey; Botting, Rachel A; Mercier, Sarah K; Harman, Andrew N; Kim, Min; Turville, Stuart; Center, Rob J; Domagala, Teresa; Gorry, Paul R; Olbourne, Norman; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2014-09-01

    Epidermal Langerhans cells (eLCs) uniquely express the C-type lectin receptor langerin in addition to the HIV entry receptors CD4 and CCR5. They are among the first target cells to encounter HIV in the anogenital stratified squamous mucosa during sexual transmission. Previous reports on the mechanism of HIV transfer to T cells and the role of langerin have been contradictory. In this study, we examined HIV replication and langerin-mediated viral transfer by authentic immature eLCs and model Mutz-3 LCs. eLCs were productively infected with HIV, whereas Mutz-3 LCs were not susceptible because of a lack of CCR5 expression. Two successive phases of HIV viral transfer to T cells via cave/vesicular trafficking and de novo replication were observed with eLCs as previously described in monocyte-derived or blood dendritic cells, but only first phase transfer was observed with Mutz-3 LCs. Langerin was expressed as trimers after cross-linking on the cell surface of Mutz-3 LCs and in this form preferentially bound HIV envelope protein gp140 and whole HIV particles via the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Both phases of HIV transfer from eLCs to T cells were inhibited when eLCs were pretreated with a mAb to langerin CRD or when HIV was pretreated with a soluble langerin trimeric extracellular domain or by a CRD homolog. However, the langerin homolog did not inhibit direct HIV infection of T cells. These two novel soluble langerin inhibitors could be developed to prevent HIV uptake, infection, and subsequent transfer to T cells during early stages of infection. PMID:25070850

  18. [Progress in treating diabetes mellitus with adult stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Teng, Chunbo; An, Tiezhu

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic diseases, mainly including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Treatment for type 1 and part of type 2 often involves regular insulin injection. However, this treatment neither precisely controls the blood sugar levels, nor prevents the diabetes complications. Transplantation of islets of Langerhans offers an attractive strategy for diabetes therapies, but its wide application has been limited by donor shortage and immunological rejection after transplantation. Stem cells with strong proliferation capacity and multipotential may be potential cell sources in diabetes therapies. For this, adult stem cells are interesting because of absence of teratoma formation and ethnical problems. Adult pancreatic stem cells (PSCs) really exist and could produce insulin-secreting cells both under the condition of pancreatic injury and in vitro culture, but lack of effective markers to enrich PSCs hampers the studies of exploring the expanding and differentiating conditions in vitro. Some other adult stem cells, such as hepatic stem cells, marrow stem cells or intestine stem cells, were also suggested to transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under special culture conditions in vitro or by genetic modifications. Moreover, transplanting these adult stem cells-derived insulin-secreting cells into the diabetic mouse could cure diabetes. Thus, adult stem cells would supply the abundant beta-cell sources for cell replacement therapy of diabetes. PMID:18464596

  19. [Progress in treating diabetes mellitus with adult stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Teng, Chunbo; An, Tiezhu

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic diseases, mainly including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Treatment for type 1 and part of type 2 often involves regular insulin injection. However, this treatment neither precisely controls the blood sugar levels, nor prevents the diabetes complications. Transplantation of islets of Langerhans offers an attractive strategy for diabetes therapies, but its wide application has been limited by donor shortage and immunological rejection after transplantation. Stem cells with strong proliferation capacity and multipotential may be potential cell sources in diabetes therapies. For this, adult stem cells are interesting because of absence of teratoma formation and ethnical problems. Adult pancreatic stem cells (PSCs) really exist and could produce insulin-secreting cells both under the condition of pancreatic injury and in vitro culture, but lack of effective markers to enrich PSCs hampers the studies of exploring the expanding and differentiating conditions in vitro. Some other adult stem cells, such as hepatic stem cells, marrow stem cells or intestine stem cells, were also suggested to transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under special culture conditions in vitro or by genetic modifications. Moreover, transplanting these adult stem cells-derived insulin-secreting cells into the diabetic mouse could cure diabetes. Thus, adult stem cells would supply the abundant beta-cell sources for cell replacement therapy of diabetes.

  20. MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells in human skin equivalents show differential migration and phenotypic plasticity after allergen or irritant exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, Ilona J.; Spiekstra, Sander W.; Gruijl, Tanja D. de; Gibbs, Susan

    2015-08-15

    After allergen or irritant exposure, Langerhans cells (LC) undergo phenotypic changes and exit the epidermis. In this study we describe the unique ability of MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells (MUTZ-LC) to display similar phenotypic plasticity as their primary counterparts when incorporated into a physiologically relevant full-thickness skin equivalent model (SE-LC). We describe differences and similarities in the mechanisms regulating LC migration and plasticity upon allergen or irritant exposure. The skin equivalent consisted of a reconstructed epidermis containing primary differentiated keratinocytes and CD1a{sup +} MUTZ-LC on a primary fibroblast-populated dermis. Skin equivalents were exposed to a panel of allergens and irritants. Topical exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of allergens (nickel sulfate, resorcinol, cinnamaldehyde) and irritants (Triton X-100, SDS, Tween 80) resulted in LC migration out of the epidermis and into the dermis. Neutralizing antibody to CXCL12 blocked allergen-induced migration, whereas anti-CCL5 blocked irritant-induced migration. In contrast to allergen exposure, irritant exposure resulted in cells within the dermis becoming CD1a{sup −}/CD14{sup +}/CD68{sup +} which is characteristic of a phenotypic switch of MUTZ-LC to a macrophage-like cell in the dermis. This phenotypic switch was blocked with anti-IL-10. Mechanisms previously identified as being involved in LC activation and migration in native human skin could thus be reproduced in the in vitro constructed skin equivalent model containing functional LC. This model therefore provides a unique and relevant research tool to study human LC biology in situ under controlled in vitro conditions, and will provide a powerful tool for hazard identification, testing novel therapeutics and identifying new drug targets. - Highlights: • MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells integrated into skin equivalents are fully functional. • Anti-CXCL12 blocks allergen-induced MUTZ-LC migration.

  1. Osteopontin Is Involved in the Initiation of Cutaneous Contact Hypersensitivity by Inducing Langerhans and Dendritic Cell Migration to Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, J.M.; Renkl, A.C.; Maier, C.S.; Kimmig, M.; Liaw, L.; Ahrens, T.; Kon, S.; Maeda, M.; Hotta, H.; Uede, T.; Simon, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a chemotactic protein that attracts immune cells, to inflammatory sites. The sensitization phase of allergic cutaneous contact hypersensitivity (CHS) requires the migration of Langerhans cells/dendritic cells (LCs/DCs) from skin to draining lymph nodes. Characterizing OPN function for LC/DC migration we found upregulated OPN expression in hapten sensitized skin and draining lymph nodes. OPN induces chemotactic LC/DC migration, initiates their emigration from the epidermis, and attracts LCs/DCs to draining lymph nodes by interacting with CD44 and αv integrin. Furthermore, OPN-deficient mice have a significantly reduced CHS response that correlates with an impaired ability of OPN-deficient mice to attract LCs/DCs to draining lymph nodes. In conclusion, OPN is an important factor in the initiation of CHS by guiding LCs/DCs from skin into lymphatic organs. PMID:11696588

  2. Expression and gene transcript of Fc receptors for IgG, HLA class II antigens and Langerhans cells in human cervico-vaginal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, L A; Kelly, C G; Fellowes, R; Hecht, E M; Wilson, J; Chapman, M; Lehner, T

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism of transmission of HIV from the male to the female genital tract or in the reverse order is not clear. CD4 glycoprotein is the receptor for HIV and Langerhans cells and the related dendritic cells could play a role in the initial transmission of HIV. Fc receptors (FcR) for IgG might be involved in antibody-mediated binding of HIV. We carried out an immunohistological study of normal human cervical and vaginal epithelia for the presence of CD4 glycoprotein, Langerhans cells and FcR to IgG. CD4+ glycoprotein was not found in the vaginal or cervical epithelium, with the exception of a few endocervical epithelial cells. A small number of CD4+ mononuclear cells were found in the endocervical epithelium of a third of the specimens but a large number of CD4+ cells was found in the submucosa of most of the cervical and vaginal specimens. Langerhans cells expressing CD4, HLA class II, Fc gamma R2 and Fc gamma R3 were detected in most vaginal, ectocervical and transformation zone epithelia and in 9/14 endocervical tissues. Fc gamma R3 was detected in about two-thirds of the columnar endocervical epithelium and the transformation zone. A smaller number of specimens expressed Fc gamma R2 in these epithelia, but Fc gamma R1 was not detected. We then demonstrated mRNA for Fc gamma R3 in the columnar endocervical epithelial cells and transformation zone by in situ hybridization, using a CD16-RNA probe. Fc gamma R3 and Fc gamma R2 gene transcripts were also found in fetal cervical tissue by applying the polymerase chain reaction to amplify portions of the Fc gamma R3 and Fc gamma R2 coding sequences in cDNA prepared from fetal RNA. HLA-DR was found in the endocervical cells, transformation zone and in Langerhans cells of all specimens. The presence of Langerhans cells, Fc gamma receptors and HLA class II antigen offers three potential mechanisms for cervico-vaginal HIV transmission: (i) direct HIV infection of Langerhans cells, (ii) binding of HIV antibody complexes

  3. Differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells into insulin producing cells.

    PubMed

    Zulewski, H

    2008-03-01

    Replacement of insulin producing cells represents an almost ideal treatment for patients with diabetes mellitus type 1. Transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans is successful in experienced centers. The wider application of this therapy, however, is limited by the lack of donor organs. Insulin producing cells generated from stem cells represent an attractive alternative. Stem cells with the potential to differentiate into insulin producing cells include embryonic stem cells (ESC) as well as adult stem cells from various tissues including the pancreas, liver, bone marrow and adipose tissue. The use of human ESC is hampered by ethical concerns but research with human ESC may help us to decipher important steps in the differentiation process in vitro since almost all information available on pancreas development are based on animal studies. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the development of insulin producing cells from embryonic and adult stem cells with special emphasis on pancreatic, hepatic and human mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:18427390

  4. CD1c-Related DCs that Express CD207/Langerin, but Are Distinguishable from Langerhans Cells, Are Consistently Present in Human Tonsils

    PubMed Central

    De Monte, Anne; Olivieri, Charles-Vivien; Vitale, Sébastien; Bailleux, Sonanda; Castillo, Laurent; Giordanengo, Valérie; Maryanski, Janet L.; Segura, Elodie; Doglio, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Several subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the oropharyngeal tonsillar tissues and are thought to behave as major actors in development and regulation of immunity by acting as a first line of recognition for airborne and alimentary antigens. We previously discovered in human adult tonsils infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a subset of DCs that expressed langerin/CD207, a lectin usually recognized as a hallmark of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs). In the present study, we analyzed the content of several child and adult tonsils in order to characterize in more detail the phenotype of these tonsillar CD207-expressing DCs (tCD207 DCs) and to compare it with that of other human DC subsets. We showed that all the human tonsils studied (n = 12) contained significant proportions of tCD207 DCs among tonsillar cells expressing HLA-DR. Moreover, the presence of tCD207 DCs in tonsils from young children free of EBV infection indicated that these cells could be established early in the tonsil independently of EBV infection. We also showed that tCD207 DCs, that were found mainly located within the tonsillar lymphoid stroma, were distinguishable from LCs by the level of expression of CD1a and EpCAM, and also from human inflammatory DCs by the lack of CD1a, CD206, and CD14 expression. Detailed analysis of cell surface DC markers showed that tCD207 DCs were unrelated to CD141+ DCs or macrophages, but defined a subtype of tonsillar DCs closely related to myeloid resident CD1c DCs. Since it was established that blood CD1c myeloid DCs exhibit plasticity and are capable of expressing CD207 notably in the presence of inflammatory cytokines, it is tempting to speculate that CD207+ CD1c+ DCs may play a specific immune role. PMID:27252701

  5. Skin Treatment with Pulsed Monochromatic UVA1 355 Device and Computerized Morphometric Analysis of Histochemically Identified Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zerbinati, Nicola; Riva, Federica; Paulli, Marco; Parodi, Pier Camillo

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent or metal halide lamps are widely used in therapeutic applications in dermatological diseases, with broadband or narrow band emission UVA/UVA1 (320–400 nm) obtained with suitable passive filters. Recently, it has been possible for us to use a new machine provided with solid state source emitting pulsed monochromatic UVA1 355 nm. In order to evaluate the effects of this emission on immunocells of the skin, human skin samples were irradiated with monochromatic 355 nm UVA1 with different energetic fluences and after irradiation Langerhans cells were labeled with CD1a antibodies. The immunohistochemical identification of these cells permitted evaluating their modifications in terms of density into the skin. Obtained results are promising for therapeutical applications, also considering that a monochromatic radiation minimizes thermic load and DNA damage in the skin tissues. PMID:27525266

  6. Skin Treatment with Pulsed Monochromatic UVA1 355 Device and Computerized Morphometric Analysis of Histochemically Identified Langerhans Cells.

    PubMed

    Zerbinati, Nicola; Riva, Federica; Paulli, Marco; Parodi, Pier Camillo; Calligaro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent or metal halide lamps are widely used in therapeutic applications in dermatological diseases, with broadband or narrow band emission UVA/UVA1 (320-400 nm) obtained with suitable passive filters. Recently, it has been possible for us to use a new machine provided with solid state source emitting pulsed monochromatic UVA1 355 nm. In order to evaluate the effects of this emission on immunocells of the skin, human skin samples were irradiated with monochromatic 355 nm UVA1 with different energetic fluences and after irradiation Langerhans cells were labeled with CD1a antibodies. The immunohistochemical identification of these cells permitted evaluating their modifications in terms of density into the skin. Obtained results are promising for therapeutical applications, also considering that a monochromatic radiation minimizes thermic load and DNA damage in the skin tissues. PMID:27525266

  7. Distinct molecular signature of human skin Langerhans cells denotes critical differences in cutaneous dendritic cell immune regulation.

    PubMed

    Polak, Marta E; Thirdborough, Stephen M; Ung, Chuin Y; Elliott, Tim; Healy, Eugene; Freeman, Tom C; Ardern-Jones, Michael R

    2014-03-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) residing in the epidermis. Despite their high potential to activate T lymphocytes, current understanding of human LC biology is limited. Genome-wide comparison of the transcriptional profiles of human skin migratory CD1a+ LCs and CD11c+ dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) demonstrated significant differences between these "dendritic cell (DC)" types, including preferential expression of 625 genes (P<0.05) in LC and 914 genes (P<0.05) in DDC. Analysis of the temporal regulation of molecular networks activated after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) confirmed the unique molecular signature of LCs. Although LCs conformed to the phenotype of professional APC, inflammatory signaling activated primarily genes associated with cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activation (e.g., CYB561 and MRPS35), cell membrane re-organization, and antigen acquisition and degradation (CAV1 and PSMD14; P<0.05-P<0.0001). Conversely, TNF-α induced classical activation in DDCs with early downregulation of surface receptors (mannose receptor-1 (MRC1) and C-type lectins), and subsequent upregulation of cytokines, chemokines (IL1a, IL1b, and CCL18), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP1, MMP3, and MMP9; P<0.05-P<0.0001). Functional interference of caveolin abrogated LCs superior ability to cross-present antigens to CD8+ T lymphocytes, highlighting the importance of these networks to biological function. Taken together, these observations support the idea of distinct biological roles of cutaneous DC types.

  8. Eosinophilic granuloma of bone and biochemical demonstration of 49-kDa CD1a molecule expression by Langerhans-cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cambazard, F; Dezutter-Dambuyant, C; Staquet, M J; Schmitt, D; Thivolet, J

    1991-09-01

    Histiocytic cells infiltrating the lesions in eosinophilic granuloma of bone as well as in cutaneous histiocytosis X were studied using a murine monoclonal antibody (MA) produced with proliferating cells from an eosinophilic granuloma of bone. This MA reacts with Langerhans cells (LC) of normal human skin or mucous membranes and with proliferating cells of eosinophilic granuloma of bone and skin lesions of Letter-Siwe disease, as shown by immunohistochemistry and immunogold labelling. As other murine MA's obtained after immunization with human cortical thymocytes, this MA immunoprecipitates the 49-kDa CD1a antigen found on human LC and thymic-cell surfaces but not its breakdown product after treatment with trypsin, as demonstrated by analysis of immunoelectron labelling, cytofluorometry and gel electrophoresis. This first production of a CD1a MA from an eosinophilic granuloma supports the concept of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis.

  9. PD-1 on Immature and PD-1 Ligands on Migratory Human Langerhans Cells Regulate Antigen-Presenting Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Cruz, Victor; McDonough, Sean M.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Crum, Christopher P.; Carrasco, Ruben D.; Freeman, Gordon J.

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are known as “sentinels” of the immune system that function as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) after migration to draining lymph node. LCs are proposed to have a role in tolerance and the resolution of cutaneous immune responses. The Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, are a co-inhibitory pathway that contributes to the negative regulation of T-lymphocyte activation and peripheral tolerance. Surprisingly, we found PD-1 to be expressed on immature LCs (iLCs) in situ. PD-1 engagement on iLCs reduced IL-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α cytokine production in response to TLR2 signals but had no effect on LC maturation. PD-L1 and PD-L2 were expressed at very low levels on iLCs. Maturation of LCs upon migration from epidermis led to loss of PD-l expression and gain of high expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 as well as co-stimulatory molecules. Blockade of PD-L1 and/or PD-L2 on migratory LCs (mLCs) and DDCs enhanced T-cell activation, as has been reported for other APCs. Thus the PD-1 pathway is active in iLCs and inhibits iLC activities, but expression of receptor and ligands reverses upon maturation and PD-L1 and PD-L2 on mLC function to inhibit T-cell responses. PMID:20445553

  10. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis with vertebral involvement and soft tissue extension: clinical case].

    PubMed

    Luong, Tai C; Scrigni, Adriana; Paglia, Marcela; Garavaglia, Mariano; Aisenberg, Nuria; Rowensztein, Hernán; Sampor, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    La histiocitosis de células de Langerhans es una enfermedad heterogénea de etiología desconocida, que se caracteriza por la proliferación no controlada de histiocitos. Es poco frecuente y, si bien el compromiso óseo es común, la afectación vertebral es rara. Se presenta una niña de 4 años que consultó por dolor abdominal difuso de un mes de evolución, al que se agregó constipación y, posteriormente, debilidad en los miembros inferiores. El examen físico mostraba clonus e hiperreflexia en los miembros inferiores y la marcha era inestable. Se realizó una resonancia magnética, que mostró la vértebra dorsal 9 (D9) plana con tejido blando patológico en el espacio epidural y laterovertebral. Se realizó una cirugía descompresiva, artrodesis para fijar la columna y toma de biopsia, que confirmó el diagnóstico de histiocitosis de células de Langerhans. Recibió 6 meses de tratamiento con metilprednisona y vinblastina, de acuerdo con el protocolo LCH III, con excelente evolución y remisión completa. Conclusión: frente a una imagen radiológica de vértebra plana o colapso vertebral, debe pensarse en histiocitosis de células de Langerhans como diagnóstico diferencial.

  11. A Case Report: The Diagnosis and Therapeutic Evaluation for a Rare Disease of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Involving Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ye-Feng; Wang, Qing-Xuan; Ni, Chun-Jue; Dong, Si-Yang; Lv, Lin; Li, Quan; Chen, En-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) involving the thyroid gland is extremely rare. Currently, the diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation for LCH involving thyroid is a challenge. We reported a rare case of LCH involving thyroid, presenting as painless thyroid goiters, and successfully performed positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to make an accurate diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation for LCH. Although the histology or cytology is the golden standard for the diagnosis of LCH involving thyroid, the PET/CT should be keep in mind when LCH involving thyroid with inconclusive cytologic results. During the treatment of LCH, PET/CT can be performed to assess the therapeutic effect and select the most effective and reliable treatment for LCH. PMID:26554785

  12. Strategies for the Prevention of Central Nervous System Complications in Patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: The Problem of Neurodegenerative Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Arceci, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) are common in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Besides active LCH lesions, neurodegenerative (ND) lesions of the cerebellum and/or basal ganglia may occur as late sequelae of LCH. While the etiology of this ND disease remains unclear, biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may reflect the activity of CNS disease in these patients. However, no well-planned CSF studies have yet been performed in patients at high risk for ND-CNS-LCH. Potential parallels with other neuroinflammatory/neurodegenerative disease suggest the utility of examining these other disorders in establishing strategies for the prevention and/or treatment of ND-CNS-LCH.

  13. Total pleurectomy as the surgical treatment for recurrent secondary spontaneous pneumothorax in a child with severe pulmonary Langerhans cells histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Abdul Aziz, Dayang Anita; Abdul Rahman, Nur Afdzillah; Tang, Swee Fong; Abdul Latif, Hasniah; Zaki, Faizah Mohd; Annuar, Zulfiqar Mohd; Alias, Hamidah; Abdul Latiff, Zarina

    2011-12-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in children is more extensive and is a rare cause of spontaneous secondary pneumothorax (SSP) which tends to be recurrent and refractory to conventional treatment. Its occurrence in paediatric patients posed great challenge to the choice of surgical management. Surgery in the form of pleurodesis is only considered if SSP does not improve after chemotherapy and after considering all relevant risk and benefits of surgery to patients. Chemical pleurodesis will not give the expected effect to eradicate SSP in this patient. Therefore mechanical pleurodesis is the treatment of choice. There are various techniques to perform mechanical pleurodesis; from pleural abrasion to pleurectomy. In the authors' experience, bilateral total pleurectomy provided the best outcome for this 9-year-old patient with persistent respiratory distress from SSP due to extensive pulmonary LCH.

  14. Combined Cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman Disease and Localized Cutaneous Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Within a Single Subcutaneous Nodule

    PubMed Central

    Litzner, Brandon R.; Subtil, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a reactive multisystem histiocytosis that typically presents with cervical lymphadenopathy and systemic symptoms. Cutaneous involvement occurs in approximately 10% of cases, and 3% of cases are limited to the skin without nodal or other extranodal involvement. Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal histiocytosis with a wide spectrum of presentations ranging from isolated skin or bone disease to multisystem involvement. Rare case reports have identified concomitant presentation of RDD and LCH; however, most of these reports have involved LCH and RDD occurring concurrently but at separate sites. We present a rare case of concurrent RDD and LCH presenting within a single skin nodule. The patient did not have any evidence of systemic involvement and has remained stable without additional treatment. We also review the literature on this unusual co-presentation and suggest possible underlying mechanisms. Finally, we recommend baseline laboratory and imaging studies and discuss treatment options based on the available evidence. PMID:26588339

  15. Spontaneous extradural hemorrhage due to Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the skull in a child: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bakhaidar, Mohamad G.; Alghamdi, Fahad A.; Baeesa, Saleh S.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) represents a local form of Langerhans cell histiocytosis that occurs mostly in children. It usually presents with a gradually enlarging painless skull mass, and rarely presents a rapid clinical deterioration. This 7-year-old boy who was diagnosed with EG, based on a magnetic resonance imaging scan, after presenting with a painless right parietal swelling of 7-week duration. Three weeks prior his scheduled surgery, he presented to the emergency department with a 2-day history of sudden increased of the subcutaneous swelling associated with a headache, vomiting, and decreased the level of consciousness; there was no history of trauma. Brain computed tomography revealed a right parietal bone defect with large subgaleal and extradural hematoma. He underwent emergent surgical excision of the skull lesion and evacuation of the hematoma. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of EG. We aim to raise the awareness of physicians of this rare spontaneous hemorrhagic complication of EG and review the literature. PMID:27195034

  16. Immunostimulatory Activity of the Cytokine-Based Biologic, IRX-2, on Human Papillomavirus-Exposed Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Diane M.; Woodham, Andrew W.; Naylor, Paul H.; Egan, James E.; Berinstein, Neil L.

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the antigen-presenting cells of the epithelial layer and are responsible for initiating immune responses against skin and mucosa-invading viruses. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated suppression of LC function is a crucial mechanism of HPV immune evasion, which can lead to persistent infection and development of several human cancers, including cervical, anal, and head and neck cancers. The cell-derived cytokine-based biologic, IRX-2, consists of multiple well-defined cytokines and is broadly active on various immune cell subsets. In this study, we investigated primary human LC activation after exposure to HPV16, followed by treatment with IRX-2 in vitro, and evaluated their subsequent ability to induce HPV16-specific T cells. In contrast to its activity on dendritic cells, HPV16 alone is not sufficient to induce phenotypic and functional activation of LCs. However, IRX-2 induces a significant upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory molecules, T helper 1 (Th1)-associated cytokine release, and chemokine-directed migration of LCs pre-exposed to HPV16. Furthermore, LCs treated with IRX-2 after HPV16 exposure induced CD8+ T-cell responses against specific HLA-A*0201-binding HPV16 T-cell epitopes. The present study suggests that IRX-2 is an attractive immunomodulator for assisting the immune response in eradication of HPV-infected cells, thereby potentially preventing HPV-induced cancers. PMID:26653678

  17. Langerhans Histiocytosis in a Child – Diagnosed by Oral Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Golai, Shruti; Patil, Sandya Devi; Kakanur, Madhu; Paul, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans Histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare reactive and proliferative disease of histiocytes with unknown etiology, characterized by excessive proliferation of histiocytes called Langerhans cells. It occurs mainly in children but occurrence in adults has also been reported. It manifests as punched out lesions in the skull, maxilla, mandible, sternum and other flat bones and causes rapid resorption of the alveolar bone leading to floating teeth appearance in the radiographs. This disease manifests initially in the oral cavity in most of the cases and can be diagnosed by careful clinical and radiological examination. Here, we present a case of LCH in a child which was diagnosed by a swelling in the mandibular region. PMID:26023652

  18. Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a neoplasm and consequently its recurrence is a relapse: In memory of Bob Arceci.

    PubMed

    Egeler, R Maarten; Katewa, Satyendra; Leenen, Pieter J M; Beverley, Peter; Collin, Matthew; Ginhoux, Florent; Arceci, Robert J; Rollins, Barrett J

    2016-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) remains a poorly understood disorder with heterogeneous clinical presentations characterized by focal or disseminated lesions that contain excessive CD1a+ langerin+ cells with dendritic cell features known as "LCH cells." Two of the major questions investigated over the past century have been (i) the origin of LCH cells and (ii) whether LCH is primarily an immune dysregulatory disorder or a neoplasm. Current opinion is that LCH cells are likely to arise from hematopoietic precursor cells, although the stage of derailment and site of transformation remain unclear and may vary in patients with different extent of disease. Over the years, evidence has provided the view that LCH is a neoplasm. The demonstration of clonality of LCH cells, insufficient evidence alone for neoplasia, is now bolstered by finding driver somatic mutations in BRAF in up to 55% of patients with LCH, and activation of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK (where MEK and ERK are mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, respectively) pathway in nearly 100% of patients with LCH. Herein, we review the evidence that recurrent genetic abnormalities characterized by activating oncogenic mutations should satisfy prerequisites for LCH to be called a neoplasm. As a consequence, recurrent episodes of LCH should be considered relapsed disease rather than disease reactivation. Mapping the complete genetic landscape of this intriguing disease will provide additional support for the conclusion that LCH is a neoplasm and is likely to provide more potential opportunities for molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:27314817

  19. Regional differences in the density of Langerhans cells, CD8-positive T lymphocytes and CD68-positive macrophages: a preliminary study using elderly donated cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Omine, Yuya; Hinata, Nobuyuki; Kasahara, Masaaki; Matsunaga, Satoru; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    To provide a better understanding of the local immune system in the face and external genitalia, i.e., the oral floor, lower lip, palpebral conjunctiva, anus and penis, we examined the distribution and density of CD1a-positve Langerhans cells, CD8-positive suppressor T lymphocytes and CD68-positive macrophages using specimens from 8 male elderly cadavers. The density of Langerhans cells showed an individual difference of more than (or almost) 10-fold in the lip (oral floor). In the oral floor, Langerhans cells were often spherical. Submucosal or subcutaneous suppressor lymphocytes, especially rich in the oral floor and penile skin, migrated into the epithelium at 4 sites, except for the anus. In the conjunctiva, macrophage migration into the epithelium was seen in all 8 specimens. The density of suppressor lymphocytes showed a significant correlation between the oral floor and the lip (r=0.78). In contrast, the anal and penile skins showed no positive correlation in the density of all three types of immunoreactive cells examined. Overall, irrespective of the wide individual differences, the oral floor and conjunctiva seemed to be characterized by a rich content of all three cell types, whereas the penile skin was characterized by an abundance of suppressor lymphocytes. Based on the tables, as mean value, the relative abundance of three different cell types were as follows; CD1a-positive Langerhans cells (anus), CD8-positive lymphocytes (penis), and CD68-positive macrophages (lip). The present observations suggest that the local immune response is highly site-dependent, with a tendency for tolerance rather than rejection. PMID:26417477

  20. A Historical Perspective on the Identification of Cell Types in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans by Staining and Histochemical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Before the middle of the previous century, cell types of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans were identified primarily on the basis of their color reactions with histological dyes. At that time, the chemical basis for the staining properties of islet cells in relation to the identity, chemistry and structure of their hormones was not fully understood. Nevertheless, the definitive islet cell types that secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin (A, B, and D cells, respectively) could reliably be differentiated from each other with staining protocols that involved variations of one or more tinctorial techniques, such as the Mallory-Heidenhain azan trichrome, chromium hematoxylin and phloxine, aldehyde fuchsin, and silver impregnation methods, which were popularly used until supplanted by immunohistochemical techniques. Before antibody-based staining methods, the most bona fide histochemical techniques for the identification of islet B cells were based on the detection of sulfhydryl and disulfide groups of insulin. The application of the classical islet tinctorial staining methods for pathophysiological studies and physiological experiments was fundamental to our understanding of islet architecture and the physiological roles of A and B cells in glucose regulation and diabetes. PMID:26216133

  1. A Historical Perspective on the Identification of Cell Types in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans by Staining and Histochemical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Denis G

    2015-08-01

    Before the middle of the previous century, cell types of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans were identified primarily on the basis of their color reactions with histological dyes. At that time, the chemical basis for the staining properties of islet cells in relation to the identity, chemistry and structure of their hormones was not fully understood. Nevertheless, the definitive islet cell types that secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin (A, B, and D cells, respectively) could reliably be differentiated from each other with staining protocols that involved variations of one or more tinctorial techniques, such as the Mallory-Heidenhain azan trichrome, chromium hematoxylin and phloxine, aldehyde fuchsin, and silver impregnation methods, which were popularly used until supplanted by immunohistochemical techniques. Before antibody-based staining methods, the most bona fide histochemical techniques for the identification of islet B cells were based on the detection of sulfhydryl and disulfide groups of insulin. The application of the classical islet tinctorial staining methods for pathophysiological studies and physiological experiments was fundamental to our understanding of islet architecture and the physiological roles of A and B cells in glucose regulation and diabetes.

  2. Langerhans cells and melanocytes share similar morphologic features under in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy: a challenge for melanoma diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Pantea; Pulitzer, Melissa P.; Scope, Alon; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Halpern, Allan C.; Marghoob, Ashfaq A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Intraepidermal Langerhans cells (ILC) are difficult to differentiate from melanocytes under reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and their presence may simulate pagetoid spread of melanocytes on RCM images. Objective To correlate bright round and dendritic cells in a pagetoid pattern identified on RCM with findings of conventional histopathology and immunohistochemistry for lesions that were falsely diagnosed as melanoma by RCM. Methods This retrospective study included histopathologically proven nevi, imaged by RCM, which displayed bright cells in a pagetoid pattern (BCPP) under RCM, resulting in the incorrect RCM diagnosis of melanoma. Morphological comparisons were histopathologically proven melanomas displaying BCPP on RCM and biopsy-proven nevi without such cells on RCM. Results We identified 24 nevi that were falsely diagnosed as melanoma by RCM due to the presence of BCPP. These pagetoid cells on RCM corresponded on histopathology to ILC with a high density in 23 of the 24 nevi (95%) and to melanocytes in 7 of the 24 nevi (29%). Among 6 melanomas displaying BCPP on RCM, ILC with high density were observed histopathologically in 5 of the 6 cases (83%) and pagetoid melanocytes were seen in all 6 cases (100%). Limitations The results cannot be generalized to clinically banal-appearing nevi. Conclusions Although the finding of BCPP is a useful RCM feature for the diagnosis of melanoma it does not always imply the presence of pagetoid melanocytes but may at times, represent ILC. PMID:21798622

  3. Insufficiency of Bone Scintigraphy in Vertebral Lesions of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Compared to F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Diagnostic Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koç, Zehra Pınar; Şimşek, Selçuk; Akarsu, Saadet; Balcı, Tansel Ansal; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Kepenek, Ferat

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a benign disorder related to the histiocytes which can infiltrate bone tissue. The most effective method for demonstrating severity of this disease is PET/CT and bone scintigraphy might show bone lesions. We present a seventeen year old male patient with disseminated LCH presented with exophtalmos and having multiple vertebral lesions which were identified by F-18 FDG PET/CT scan and diagnostic CT but not in the bone scintigraphy. PMID:25800594

  4. Insufficiency of bone scintigraphy in vertebral lesions of langerhans cell histiocytosis compared to f-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and diagnostic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Koç, Zehra Pınar; Şimşek, Selçuk; Akarsu, Saadet; Balcı, Tansel Ansal; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Kepenek, Ferat

    2015-02-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a benign disorder related to the histiocytes which can infiltrate bone tissue. The most effective method for demonstrating severity of this disease is PET/CT and bone scintigraphy might show bone lesions. We present a seventeen year old male patient with disseminated LCH presented with exophtalmos and having multiple vertebral lesions which were identified by F-18 FDG PET/CT scan and diagnostic CT but not in the bone scintigraphy.

  5. Activation of Langerhans-Type Dendritic Cells Alters Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Reactivation in a Stimulus-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, Roxanne; Jesus, Desyree M.; Dalle Ore, Lucia; Mymryk, Joe S.; Hertel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal Langerhans cells (LC) are likely to play important roles in host defense against infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV). We previously showed that in vitro-differentiated immature LC (iLC) populations contain smaller amounts of infected cells but produce higher yields than mature LC (mLC) cultures, obtained by iLC stimulation with fetal bovine serum (FBS), CD40 ligand (CD40L) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we sought to determine if exposure to select stimuli can improve LC permissiveness to infection, if specific components of the mLC cocktail are responsible for lowering viral yields, if this is due to defects in progeny production or release, and if these restrictions are also effective against reactivated virus. None of the stimuli tested extended the proportion of infected cells to 100%, suggesting that the block to infection onset cannot be fully removed. While CD40L and FBS exerted positive effects on viral progeny production per cell, stimulation with LPS alone or in combination with CD40L was detrimental. Reductions in viral titers were not due to defects in progeny release, and the permissive or restrictive intracellular environment established upon exposure to each stimulus appeared to act in a somewhat similar way toward lytic and latent infections. PMID:27683575

  6. Activation of Langerhans-Type Dendritic Cells Alters Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Reactivation in a Stimulus-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Coronel, Roxanne; Jesus, Desyree M; Dalle Ore, Lucia; Mymryk, Joe S; Hertel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal Langerhans cells (LC) are likely to play important roles in host defense against infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV). We previously showed that in vitro-differentiated immature LC (iLC) populations contain smaller amounts of infected cells but produce higher yields than mature LC (mLC) cultures, obtained by iLC stimulation with fetal bovine serum (FBS), CD40 ligand (CD40L) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we sought to determine if exposure to select stimuli can improve LC permissiveness to infection, if specific components of the mLC cocktail are responsible for lowering viral yields, if this is due to defects in progeny production or release, and if these restrictions are also effective against reactivated virus. None of the stimuli tested extended the proportion of infected cells to 100%, suggesting that the block to infection onset cannot be fully removed. While CD40L and FBS exerted positive effects on viral progeny production per cell, stimulation with LPS alone or in combination with CD40L was detrimental. Reductions in viral titers were not due to defects in progeny release, and the permissive or restrictive intracellular environment established upon exposure to each stimulus appeared to act in a somewhat similar way toward lytic and latent infections. PMID:27683575

  7. Activation of Langerhans-Type Dendritic Cells Alters Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Reactivation in a Stimulus-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, Roxanne; Jesus, Desyree M.; Dalle Ore, Lucia; Mymryk, Joe S.; Hertel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal Langerhans cells (LC) are likely to play important roles in host defense against infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV). We previously showed that in vitro-differentiated immature LC (iLC) populations contain smaller amounts of infected cells but produce higher yields than mature LC (mLC) cultures, obtained by iLC stimulation with fetal bovine serum (FBS), CD40 ligand (CD40L) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we sought to determine if exposure to select stimuli can improve LC permissiveness to infection, if specific components of the mLC cocktail are responsible for lowering viral yields, if this is due to defects in progeny production or release, and if these restrictions are also effective against reactivated virus. None of the stimuli tested extended the proportion of infected cells to 100%, suggesting that the block to infection onset cannot be fully removed. While CD40L and FBS exerted positive effects on viral progeny production per cell, stimulation with LPS alone or in combination with CD40L was detrimental. Reductions in viral titers were not due to defects in progeny release, and the permissive or restrictive intracellular environment established upon exposure to each stimulus appeared to act in a somewhat similar way toward lytic and latent infections.

  8. Aging affects epidermal Langerhans cell development and function and alters their miRNA gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying-Ping; Qi, Rui-Qun; Chen, Wenbin; Shi, Yuling; Cui, Zhi-Zhong; Gao, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Duo; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng

    2012-11-01

    Immunosenescence is a result of progressive decline in immune system function with advancing age. Epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), belonging to the dendritic cell (DC) family, act as sentinels to play key roles in the skin immune responses. However, it has not been fully elucidated how aging affects development and function of LCs. Here, we systemically analyzed LC development and function during the aging process in C57BL/6J mice, and performed global microRNA (miRNA) gene expression profiles in aged and young LCs. We found that the frequency and maturation of epidermal LCs were significantly reduced in aged mice starting at 12 months of age, while the Langerin expression and ability to phagocytose Dextran in aged LCs were increased compared to LCs from < 6 month old mice. The migration of LCs to draining lymph nodes was comparable between aged and young mice. Functionally, aged LCs were impaired in their capacity to induce OVA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation. Furthermore, the expression of miRNAs in aged epidermal LCs showed a distinct profile compared to young LCs. Most interestingly, aging-regulated miRNAs potentially target TGF-β-dependent and non- TGF-β-dependent signal pathways related to LCs. Overall, our data suggests that aging affects LCs development and function, and that age-regulated miRNAs may contribute to the LC developmental and functional changes in aging.

  9. Fine structure of crystalline inclusions in B-cells of the islets of Langerhans in the alligator.

    PubMed

    Raska, I; Komrska, J; Titlbach, M; Rieder, M

    1978-03-13

    The ultrastructure of crystalline beta granules of the islets of Langerhans in the alligator has been investigated. From optical diffraction analysis and serial sectioning, the existence of four distinct types of crystalline inclusions was established in ultrathin sections. The first type is the most frequent and is interpreted as a rhombohedron with a base, the ortho-hexagonal unit-cell edges being a equal to 18.9 nm, c equal to 23.0 nm. The second type of crystal (not observed in serial sections) is found compatible with a rhomb-dodecahedron which indexes on a cubic cell with a equal to 9.6 nm. The third type of crystal was assigned to dipyramids. Dipyramids are extremely rare, and only two diffraction patterns were obtained; their crystal system could not be determined. Prisms, which are second in abundance, represent the fourth type of crystal. Spacings as well as the symmetry differ from those of the above three crystal types and indicate a tetragonal cell with a equal to 4.2 nm, c equal to 14.2 nm. The data for the prismatic crystals are strikingly similar to those of proinsulin and may represent the first case of agreement between crystals (i) formed in vitro and studied by X-ray diffraction and (ii) those investigated in situ by electron microscopy.

  10. Enhanced antigen-presenting capacity of cultured Langerhans' cells is associated with markedly increased expression of Ia antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, S.; Caughman, S.W.; Sharrow, S.O.; Stephany, D.; Katz, S.I.

    1987-10-15

    Recent studies indicate that when epidermal Langerhans' cells (LC) are cultured for 2 to 3 days they, in comparison to freshly prepared LC, exhibit markedly enhanced ability to stimulate T cell proliferative responses in oxidative mitogenesis and in the mixed epidermal-leukocyte reaction. In this study, we determined whether cultured LC enhance antigen-specific T cell responses, and whether such enhanced stimulatory capacity correlates with the level of Ia antigen expressed on LC. We used C3H/He (Iak) epidermal cells as stimulators and, as responder cells, both the trinitrophenyl-specific clones D8 and SE4, which were assayed for (/sup 3/H)dThd incorporation, and the pigeon cytochrome c specific hybridoma 2C2, which was assayed for interleukin 2 production. Cultured LC induced 10 to 100 times greater proliferation or interleukin 2 production by responder cells than did freshly prepared LC. The intensity of I-Ak and I-Ek, expressed on cultured LC as assessed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, was found to be 10 to 36 times greater on a per cell basis than that on freshly prepared LC. Depletion of LC from fresh epidermal cell suspensions by anti-Iak and complement or treatment with 50 mJ/cm/sup 2/ medium range ultraviolet light or cycloheximide before culture abrogated both the increase in Ia expression and antigen-specific clonal proliferation. The results suggest that when LC are removed from their usual epidermal milieu, they express increased amounts of Ia and become more potent stimulators of T cell responses.

  11. Relationship between the ability of sunscreens containing 2-ethylhexyl-4'-methoxycinnamate to protect against UVR-induced inflammation, depletion of epidermal Langerhans (Ia+) cells and suppression of alloactivating capacity of murine skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Walker, S L; Morris, J; Chu, A C; Young, A R

    1994-01-01

    The UVB sunscreen 2-ethylhexyl-4'-methoxycinnamate was evaluated in hairless albino mouse skin for its ability to inhibit UVR-induced (i) oedema, (ii) epidermal Langerhans cell (Ia+) depletion and (iii) suppression of the alloactivating capacity of epidermal cells (mixed epidermal cell-lymphocyte reaction, MECLR). The sunscreen, prepared at 9% in ethanol or a cosmetic lotion, was applied prior to UVB/UVA irradiation. In some experiments there was a second application halfway through the irradiation. Single applications in both vehicles gave varying degrees of protection from oedema and Langerhans cell depletion but afforded no protection from suppression of MECLR. When the sunscreens were applied twice there was improved protection from oedema and Langerhans cell depletion and complete protection was afforded from suppression of MECLR. There was a clear linear relationship between Langerhans cell numbers and oedema with and without sunscreen application. The relationship between Langerhans cell numbers and MECLR was more complex. These data confirm published discrepancies between protection from oedema (a model for human erythema) and endpoints with immunological significance, but show that 2-ethylhexyl-4'-methoxycinnamate can afford complete immunoprotection, although protection is dependent on the application rate and vehicle.

  12. Intensified and prolonged therapy comprising cytarabine, vincristine and prednisolone improves outcome in patients with multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis: results of the Japan Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Study Group-02 Protocol Study.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Akira; Shioda, Yoko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Kudo, Kazuko; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Kazuo; Yasui, Masahiro; Koga, Yuhki; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ishii, Eiichi; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Horibe, Keizo; Bessho, Fumio; Tsunematsu, Yukiko; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2016-07-01

    The JLSG-96 study reported very low mortality rates for children newly diagnosed with multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). The JLSG-02 study was performed to further improve the prognosis from 2002 to 2009. The present study compared the therapeutic results of these two studies in terms of multisystem disease. All patients were treated with 6 weeks of the Induction A regimen, comprising cytarabine, vincristine and prednisolone, followed by maintenance therapy. Poor responders to Induction A were switched to Induction B. JLSG-02 has been revised from JLSG-96 in the following respects: prednisolone dosage during Induction A increased; duration of maintenance therapy extended from 24 to 48 weeks; cyclosporine introduced to Induction B for progressive disease. One hundred forty-seven children with multisystem LCH were evaluated. Of these, 84 were positive for risk of organ involvement (RO) and 63 were RO-negative. At the 6-week point, 76.2 % of RO+ and 93.7 % of RO- patients responded to Induction A. Five-year event-free survival (EFS) was 46.2 % [95 % confidence (CI), 35.5-56.9] for RO+ and 69.7 % (58.4-81.1) for RO-, which was significantly superior to that in JLSG-96 [26.8 % (13.3-40.4) and 38.9 % (16.4-61.4), respectively]. The intensified induction and prolonged maintenance regimens in JLSG-02 improved EFS in patients with multisystem LCH. PMID:27040279

  13. Intensified and prolonged therapy comprising cytarabine, vincristine and prednisolone improves outcome in patients with multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis: results of the Japan Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Study Group-02 Protocol Study.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Akira; Shioda, Yoko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Kudo, Kazuko; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Kazuo; Yasui, Masahiro; Koga, Yuhki; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ishii, Eiichi; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Horibe, Keizo; Bessho, Fumio; Tsunematsu, Yukiko; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2016-07-01

    The JLSG-96 study reported very low mortality rates for children newly diagnosed with multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). The JLSG-02 study was performed to further improve the prognosis from 2002 to 2009. The present study compared the therapeutic results of these two studies in terms of multisystem disease. All patients were treated with 6 weeks of the Induction A regimen, comprising cytarabine, vincristine and prednisolone, followed by maintenance therapy. Poor responders to Induction A were switched to Induction B. JLSG-02 has been revised from JLSG-96 in the following respects: prednisolone dosage during Induction A increased; duration of maintenance therapy extended from 24 to 48 weeks; cyclosporine introduced to Induction B for progressive disease. One hundred forty-seven children with multisystem LCH were evaluated. Of these, 84 were positive for risk of organ involvement (RO) and 63 were RO-negative. At the 6-week point, 76.2 % of RO+ and 93.7 % of RO- patients responded to Induction A. Five-year event-free survival (EFS) was 46.2 % [95 % confidence (CI), 35.5-56.9] for RO+ and 69.7 % (58.4-81.1) for RO-, which was significantly superior to that in JLSG-96 [26.8 % (13.3-40.4) and 38.9 % (16.4-61.4), respectively]. The intensified induction and prolonged maintenance regimens in JLSG-02 improved EFS in patients with multisystem LCH.

  14. Immunophenotypic characterization of the cutaneous exanthem of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys. Apposition of degenerative Langerhans cells and cytotoxic lymphocytes during the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ringler, D. J.; Hancock, W. W.; King, N. W.; Letvin, N. L.; Daniel, M. D.; Desrosiers, R. C.; Murphy, G. F.

    1987-01-01

    A T-cell tropic retrovirus, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), has recently been isolated from immunodeficient rhesus monkeys. This virus has remarkable similarities to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the etiologic agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Subsequent studies of simian infection with SIV have shown it to be a relevant animal model for studying the pathogenesis of AIDS in man. In both HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected monkeys, a cutaneous maculopapular eruption has been described. To date, the pathogenesis and possible relationship of these exanthema to the evolution of systemic immunosuppression have remained obscure. In this study, the mononuclear cell infiltrates that characterize skin rashes of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys were found to be composed predominantly of cells with phenotypic characteristics of cytotoxic/suppressor (T8+) lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Many of these cells expressed membrane-bound interleukin-2 receptor molecules. Double labeling and immunoelectron microscopy revealed these cells in direct contact with degenerative Langerhans cells within the epidermis and dermis. These observations suggest that the cutaneous rash associated with SIV infection may be the consequence of target cell injury of Langerhans cells by effector cells with cytotoxic potential. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3030113

  15. In vivo confocal microscopic evaluation of corneal Langerhans cell density, and distribution and evaluation of dry eye in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marsovszky, László; Resch, Miklós D; Németh, János; Toldi, Gergely; Medgyesi, Erzsébet; Kovács, László; Balog, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Corneal Langerhans cells (LCs) offer the opportunity to gain insight into the activity of the innate immunity. We examined the density and the distribution of LCs and compared the results with dry-eye parameters in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Fifty-two RA patients with various degrees of disease activity and 24 healthy subjects were enrolled. Peripheral and central LC number and morphology were assessed with in vivo laser confocal microscopy. In addition, ocular surface disease index (OSDI), lid parallel conjunctival folds, Schirmer test, and tear break-up time (TBUT) were evaluated. The prevalence of central and peripheral LC, and the central LC morphology values (LCM) were higher than normal in RA. Within the RA group, LC prevalence and morphology were not affected by disease activity. However, patients on anti-TNF or glucocorticosteroid (GCS) therapy exhibited normal LCM, and normal central and peripheral LC density. OSDI was higher and TBUT was lower than normal in RA. The alteration of LC in RA suggests an active inflammatory process in the cornea, which may reflect an increased activation state of the innate immune system-even in inactive stages of RA and without ocular symptoms. The results also indicate ocular effects of GCS therapy in RA.

  16. Localized Langerhans cell histiocytosis masquerading as Brodie's abscess in a 2-year-old child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Fang; Hsu, Yi-Chih; Wu, Yi-Der; Kuo, Chun-Lang; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), formerly known as histiocytosis X, refers to a spectrum of diseases characterized by idiopathic proliferation of histiocytes that produce either focal (localized LCH) or systemic manifestations (Hand-Schüller-Christian disease and Letterer-Siwe disease). Localized LCH accounts for approximately 60-70 % of all LCH cases. Osseous involvement is the most common manifestation and typically involves the flat bones, along with lesions of the skull, pelvis, and ribs. Localized LCH in bone shows a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and radiologic features that may mimic those of infections as well as benign and malignant tumors. The diagnostic imaging findings of localized LCH are also diverse and challenging. The penumbra sign is a common and characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) feature of Brodie's abscess, but is rarely seen in localized LCH. In this report, we describe a case of localized LCH misdiagnosed as Brodie's abscess in a 2-year-old child based on clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, and pre-diagnostic MRI findings (penumbra sign). Therefore, the penumbra sign is not sufficient to clearly establish the diagnosis of Brodie's abscess, and the differential diagnosis of localized LCH should be considered when a child with an osteolytic lesion presents with a penumbra sign. PMID:27065773

  17. Long-term improvement during tadalafil therapy in a patient with pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Kenji; Oh-Ishi, Shuji; Inui, Toshihide; Nakazawa, Mariko; Hyodo, Kentaro; Nakajima, Masayuki; Kanazawa, Jun; Miura, Yukiko; Takaku, Takio; Minami, Yuko; Hayashihara, Kenji; Saito, Takefumi; Kawabata, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) secondary to pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is known to be a relatively common complication and is associated with a poor prognosis. However, the optimal therapeutic approach for these cases remains to be established. A 57-year-old man visited our hospital because of a progressive dry cough. A thoracic computed tomography examination showed a combination of diffuse thick-walled cysts and reticulonodular shadows that were predominant in bilateral upper lobes of the lungs. He was diagnosed as having PLCH based on the results of video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsies. During a 3-year clinical course, his condition deteriorated despite smoking cessation. A systemic evaluation demonstrated precapillary PAH caused by PLCH (PAH-PLCH), and treatment with tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, was started. During a 50-month period of treatment with tadalafil, improvements in his dyspnea, 6-min walking distance, and hemodynamics were maintained without either overt hypoxemia or pulmonary edema. We considered that tadalafil therapy may be a useful option in the treatment of patients with PAH-PLCH. PMID:27330952

  18. Association of both Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Erdheim-Chester disease linked to the BRAFV600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Hervier, Baptiste; Haroche, Julien; Arnaud, Laurent; Charlotte, Frédéric; Donadieu, Jean; Néel, Antoine; Lifermann, François; Villabona, Carles; Graffin, Bruno; Hermine, Olivier; Rigolet, Aude; Roubille, Camille; Hachulla, Eric; Carmoi, Thierry; Bézier, Maud; Meignin, Véronique; Conrad, Marie; Marie, Laurence; Kostrzewa, Elise; Michot, Jean-Marie; Barete, Stéphane; Taly, Valerie; Cury, Karine; Emile, Jean-François; Amoura, Zahir

    2014-08-14

    Histiocytoses are a group of heterogeneous diseases that mostly comprise Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and non-LCH. The association of LCH with non-LCH is exceptional. We report 23 patients with biopsy-proven LCH associated with Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) (mixed histiocytosis) and discuss the significance of this association. We compare the clinical phenotypes of these patients with those of 56 patients with isolated LCH and 53 patients with isolated ECD. The average age at diagnosis was 43 years. ECD followed (n = 12) or was diagnosed simultaneously with (n = 11) but never preceded LCH. Although heterogeneous, the phenotype of patients with mixed histiocytosis was closer to that of isolated ECD than to that of isolated LCH (principal component analysis). LCH and ECD improved in response to interferon alpha-2a treatment in only 50% of patients (8 of 16). We found the BRAF(V600E) mutation in 11 (69%) of 16 LCH lesions and in 9 (82%) of 11 ECD lesions. Eight patients had mutations in both ECD and LCH biopsies. Our findings indicate that the association of LCH and ECD is not fortuitous and suggest a link between these diseases involving the BRAF(V600E) mutation.

  19. Association of both Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Erdheim-Chester disease linked to the BRAFV600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Hervier, Baptiste; Haroche, Julien; Arnaud, Laurent; Charlotte, Frédéric; Donadieu, Jean; Néel, Antoine; Lifermann, François; Villabona, Carles; Graffin, Bruno; Hermine, Olivier; Rigolet, Aude; Roubille, Camille; Hachulla, Eric; Carmoi, Thierry; Bézier, Maud; Meignin, Véronique; Conrad, Marie; Marie, Laurence; Kostrzewa, Elise; Michot, Jean-Marie; Barete, Stéphane; Taly, Valerie; Cury, Karine; Emile, Jean-François; Amoura, Zahir

    2014-08-14

    Histiocytoses are a group of heterogeneous diseases that mostly comprise Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and non-LCH. The association of LCH with non-LCH is exceptional. We report 23 patients with biopsy-proven LCH associated with Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) (mixed histiocytosis) and discuss the significance of this association. We compare the clinical phenotypes of these patients with those of 56 patients with isolated LCH and 53 patients with isolated ECD. The average age at diagnosis was 43 years. ECD followed (n = 12) or was diagnosed simultaneously with (n = 11) but never preceded LCH. Although heterogeneous, the phenotype of patients with mixed histiocytosis was closer to that of isolated ECD than to that of isolated LCH (principal component analysis). LCH and ECD improved in response to interferon alpha-2a treatment in only 50% of patients (8 of 16). We found the BRAF(V600E) mutation in 11 (69%) of 16 LCH lesions and in 9 (82%) of 11 ECD lesions. Eight patients had mutations in both ECD and LCH biopsies. Our findings indicate that the association of LCH and ECD is not fortuitous and suggest a link between these diseases involving the BRAF(V600E) mutation. PMID:24894769

  20. Outcome of pediatric patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis treated with 2 chlorodeoxyadenosine: a nationwide survey in Japan.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Toshihiko; Sato, Takashi; Shiota, Yoko; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Kudo, Kazuko; Nakagawa, Shinichirou; Nakadate, Hisaya; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Kamizono, Junji; Morimoto, Akira

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of treatment with 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA) in pediatric patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in Japan. We retrospectively identified 17 pediatric LCH patients treated with 2-CdA. All patients were refractory or reactivated cases who had been initially treated according to the JLSG-02 protocol of the Japan LCH study group. At initiation of 2-CdA therapy, 4 patients had primary refractory multisystem (MS) disease with risk organ (RO) involvement (MS+), 9 patients had reactivated MS disease [5 MS+ and 4 without RO involvement (MS-)], and the remaining 4 patients had refractory/reactivated multifocal bone disease (MFB). Treatment with 2-CdA (4-9 mg/m(2)/day) was administered on 2-5 consecutive days and repeated every 3-4 weeks for a period that ranged from 2 to 12 months. Four primary refractory patients were treated with 2-CdA combined with high dose of cytarabine. In MS+ patients, response to treatment was observed in 5 of the 9 patients. In MS-/MFB patients, 5 of the 8 patients showed response to treatment. In the patients who were primary refractory or had reactivation during initial chemotherapy, 4 of 10 patients showed good response. On the other hand, in the patients having reactivation while off therapy, 6 of 7 patients showed good response. These findings suggest that 2-CdA is effective for reactivated LCH while off therapy.

  1. Localized Langerhans cell histiocytosis masquerading as Brodie's abscess in a 2-year-old child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Fang; Hsu, Yi-Chih; Wu, Yi-Der; Kuo, Chun-Lang; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), formerly known as histiocytosis X, refers to a spectrum of diseases characterized by idiopathic proliferation of histiocytes that produce either focal (localized LCH) or systemic manifestations (Hand-Schüller-Christian disease and Letterer-Siwe disease). Localized LCH accounts for approximately 60-70 % of all LCH cases. Osseous involvement is the most common manifestation and typically involves the flat bones, along with lesions of the skull, pelvis, and ribs. Localized LCH in bone shows a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and radiologic features that may mimic those of infections as well as benign and malignant tumors. The diagnostic imaging findings of localized LCH are also diverse and challenging. The penumbra sign is a common and characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) feature of Brodie's abscess, but is rarely seen in localized LCH. In this report, we describe a case of localized LCH misdiagnosed as Brodie's abscess in a 2-year-old child based on clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, and pre-diagnostic MRI findings (penumbra sign). Therefore, the penumbra sign is not sufficient to clearly establish the diagnosis of Brodie's abscess, and the differential diagnosis of localized LCH should be considered when a child with an osteolytic lesion presents with a penumbra sign.

  2. Suppression of Langerhans cell activation is conserved amongst human papillomavirus α and β genotypes, but not a µ genotype.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Diane M; Movius, Carly A; Raff, Adam B; Brand, Heike E; Skeate, Joseph G; Wong, Michael K; Kast, W Martin

    2014-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has evolved mechanisms that allow it to evade the human immune system. Studies have shown HPV-mediated suppression of activation of Langerhans cells (LC) is a key mechanism through which HPV16 evades initial immune surveillance. However, it has not been established whether high- and low-risk mucosal and cutaneous HPV genotypes share a common mechanism of immune suppression. Here, we demonstrate that LC exposed to capsids of HPV types 18, 31, 45, 11, (alpha-papillomaviruses) and HPV5 (beta-papillomavirus) similarly suppress LC activation, including lack of costimulatory molecule expression, lack of cytokine and chemokine secretion, lack of migration, and deregulated cellular signaling. In contrast, HPV1 (mu-papillomavirus) induced costimulatory molecule and cytokine upregulation, but LC migration and cellular signaling was suppressed. These results suggest that alpha and beta HPV genotypes, and partially a mu genotype, share a conserved mechanism of immune escape that enables these viruses to remain undetected in the absence of other inflammatory events.

  3. Cultured human Langerhans' cells are superior to fresh cells at presenting native HIV-1 protein antigens to specific CD4+ T-cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Girolomoni, G; Valle, M T; Zacchi, V; Costa, M G; Giannetti, A; Manca, F

    1996-01-01

    Cultured Langerhans' cells (CLC) exhibit enhanced antigen-presenting function compared to freshly isolated LC (FLC), but they are commonly believed to be inefficient at processing intact proteins. In this study, FLC and CLC from normal, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seronegative volunteers were compared for their ability to present the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 or reverse transcriptase (p66) antigens to autologous, specific CD4+ T cell lines. Epidermal cell suspensions enriched for LC were prepared from suction blister roofs. FLC stimulated T cells at lower antigen concentrations compared to unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). CLC were more potent on a per cell basis than FLC, PBMC or adherent monocytes at presenting native gp120, native p66 or immunogenic peptides. CLC were also more efficient than FLC or PBMC in terms of the amount of antigen required for T-cell activation. Chloroquine and leupeptin inhibited presentation of intact p66, but not of an immunodominant peptide, by FLC or CLC, thus indicating that both cells utilize antigen-processing mechanisms that are based on intracellular acidification and protease activity. Incubation of CLC with monoclonal antibodies against HLA-DR, CD11b, CD18, CD50, CD54, CD58 or CD80, but not anti-major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), inhibited antigen-specific T-cell proliferation to varying degrees. We conclude that human CLC retain the ability to process and present protein antigens potently to CD4+ T cells. Thus, CLC have the capacity to participate actively in the generation and maintenance of T-helper cell immunity to viral antigens during HIV-1 infection. PMID:8698396

  4. Allergen presentation by epidermal Langerhans' cells from patients with atopic dermatitis is mediated by IgE.

    PubMed Central

    Mudde, G C; Van Reijsen, F C; Boland, G J; de Gast, G C; Bruijnzeel, P L; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the role of IgE-bearing Langerhans' cells (LC) from atopic dermatitis (AD) patients in antigen presentation, IgE+LC and non-IgE bearing LC (IgE-LC) from AD patients were investigated for their antigen-presenting capacity and compared to antigen-presenting cells (APC) from peripheral blood. The T-cell response to Candida albicans, using IgE+LC from AD patients as APC, was in the same range as with IgE-LC. Also, the T-cell response to Candida with autologous APC from peripheral blood did not significantly differ between these groups. In contrast to this finding, the T-cell response to house dust allergen (HDA) was dependent on the type of APC used. If non-T cells from peripheral blood were used as APC, both AD patients and controls responded to HDA. However, when LC were used as APC, a T-cell response to HDA was only observed in the presence of IgE+LC. IgE-LC from AD patients or LC from normal controls were unable to present HDA. Preincubation of IgE+LC with anti-IgE or anti-kappa/lambda antibodies inhibited HDA-induced T-cell proliferation, whereas the response to Candida was not affected. These in vitro results, which demonstrate the necessity of cell-bound IgE on LC for the presentation of aero-allergens, strongly correlate with the in vivo presence of a positive delayed patch reaction to the same antigens. When the LC of a patient appeared to be IgE-, the in vitro proliferative response as well as, in most cases, the in vivo patch test reaction to the same antigens was negative. In conclusion, these experiments demonstrate that there are at least two different mechanisms by which LC capture antigens for antigen presentation. In one of them cell-bound IgE, as can be demonstrated on LC from AD patients, plays a crucial role. The binding and presentation of HDA by APC from peripheral blood can take place independently of cell-bound IgE. Candida can be presented by both types of APC in the absence of IgE. PMID:2179131

  5. Confocal microscopy of epithelial and langerhans cells of the cornea in patients using travoprost drops containing two different preservatives.

    PubMed

    Marsovszky, László; Resch, Miklós D; Visontai, Zsuzsanna; Németh, János

    2014-07-01

    The recently developed confocal cornea microscopy offers the opportunity to examine pathologies of the cornea and to gain insight into the activity of innate immunity. We aimed to investigate the corneal epithelial and Langerhans cell (LC) densities along with dry eye parameters in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) subjects, treated with either of two commercially available travoprost 0.004 % topical medications containing different preservatives. (1: benzalkonium chloride 0.015 % (TravBAK) and 2: polyquaternium-1 (PQ) 0.001 % (TravPQ). Consecutive case series of nineteen POAG patients on TravBAK (mean age: 64.8 ± 13.6 years), nineteen POAG patients on TravPQ (mean age: 66.8 ± 11.3 years) and nineteen age-matched healthy control subjects (63.8 ± 8.2 years). Ocular surface disease index (OSDI), lid parallel conjunctival folds (LIPCOF), Schirmer test (ST) and tear break up time (TBUT) were assessed, and then corneal epithelial and LC densities were investigated with confocal microscopy. Tear production was significantly reduced in both glaucoma patient groups compared to healthy individuals (p < 0.05). TBUT was significantly reduced and epithelial cell densities were significantly greater in patients treated with TravBAK compared to healthy individuals (p < 0.05 for all). LC densities were greater in both glaucoma groups compared to control subjects (p < 0.05 for all). Travoprost therapy may compromise ocular surface. The limited alertness of the corneal immune system found in patients with TravPQ can be considered as indicators of a less disturbed ocular surface and better controlled corneal homeostasis.

  6. Confocal microscopy of epithelial and langerhans cells of the cornea in patients using travoprost drops containing two different preservatives.

    PubMed

    Marsovszky, László; Resch, Miklós D; Visontai, Zsuzsanna; Németh, János

    2014-07-01

    The recently developed confocal cornea microscopy offers the opportunity to examine pathologies of the cornea and to gain insight into the activity of innate immunity. We aimed to investigate the corneal epithelial and Langerhans cell (LC) densities along with dry eye parameters in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) subjects, treated with either of two commercially available travoprost 0.004 % topical medications containing different preservatives. (1: benzalkonium chloride 0.015 % (TravBAK) and 2: polyquaternium-1 (PQ) 0.001 % (TravPQ). Consecutive case series of nineteen POAG patients on TravBAK (mean age: 64.8 ± 13.6 years), nineteen POAG patients on TravPQ (mean age: 66.8 ± 11.3 years) and nineteen age-matched healthy control subjects (63.8 ± 8.2 years). Ocular surface disease index (OSDI), lid parallel conjunctival folds (LIPCOF), Schirmer test (ST) and tear break up time (TBUT) were assessed, and then corneal epithelial and LC densities were investigated with confocal microscopy. Tear production was significantly reduced in both glaucoma patient groups compared to healthy individuals (p < 0.05). TBUT was significantly reduced and epithelial cell densities were significantly greater in patients treated with TravBAK compared to healthy individuals (p < 0.05 for all). LC densities were greater in both glaucoma groups compared to control subjects (p < 0.05 for all). Travoprost therapy may compromise ocular surface. The limited alertness of the corneal immune system found in patients with TravPQ can be considered as indicators of a less disturbed ocular surface and better controlled corneal homeostasis. PMID:24623372

  7. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH): Guidelines for Diagnosis, Clinical Work-Up, and Treatment for Patients Till the Age of 18 Years

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Riccardo; Minkov, Milen; Astigarraga, Itziar; Schäfer, Eva; Nanduri, Vasanta; Jubran, Rima; Egeler, R Maarten; Janka, Gritta; Micic, Dragan; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Van Gool, Stefaan; Visser, Johannes; Weitzman, Sheila; Donadieu, Jean

    2013-01-01

    These guidelines for the management of patients up to 18 years with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) have been set up by a group of experts involved in the Euro Histio Net project who participated in national or international studies and in peer reviewed publications. Existing guidelines were reviewed and changed where new evidence was available in the literature up to 2012. Data and publications have been ranked according to evidence based medicine and when there was a lack of published data, consensus between experts was sought. Guidelines for diagnosis, initial clinical work-up, and treatment and long-term follow-up of LCH patients are presented. PMID:23109216

  8. Canine cutaneous histiocytoma is an epidermotropic Langerhans cell histiocytosis that expresses CD1 and specific beta 2-integrin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P. F.; Schrenzel, M. D.; Affolter, V. K.; Olivry, T.; Naydan, D.

    1996-01-01

    Canine cutaneous histiocytoma (CCH) is a common, benign neoplasm of the dog. Histiocytomas most commonly occur as solitary lesions that undergo spontaneous regression. The age-specific incidence rate for histiocytomas drops precipitously after 3 years, although histiocytomas occur in dogs of all ages. Langerhans cells (LCs) in humans and dogs express abundant major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and a variety of leukocyte antigens characteristic of dendritic cell differentiation including CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD11c. The immunophenotype of CCH resembled that of cutaneous LCs by virtue of the expression of CD1 molecules (CD1a, -b, and -c), CD11c, and major histocompatibility complex class II. Furthermore, histiocytoma cells had a tropism for epidermis, which was also consistent with an epidermal LC lineage. The expression of adhesion molecules such as CD11b (variable), CD44, CD54 (ICAM-1), and CD49d (VLA-4) in CCH indicated that the infiltrating cells had some of the characteristics of activated LCs, as these molecules are not expressed by normal, resting canine epidermal LCs. CCH did not express Thy-1 or CD4. Thy-1 expression is a characteristic of human and canine dermal dendrocytes, which are perivascular dendritic antigen-presenting cells closely related to epidermal LCs. CD4 expression is prevalent in human LC histiocytosis, and in this respect CCH differed from human LC histiocytosis. Here we demonstrate that CCH is a localized form of self-limiting LC histiocytosis, which predominantly expresses an epidermal LC phenotype. CCH occurs as solitary or, less commonly, as multiple cutaneous nodules or plaques, which rarely may extend beyond the skin to local lymph nodes. Regression of CCH occurs spontaneously in the vast majority of cases in primary and secondary sites, and is mediated by CD8+ alpha beta T cells. The high frequency of CCH within the general canine population offers the potential that the dog may provide an interesting model system to

  9. Suppression of the CD8 T cell response by human papillomavirus type 16 E7 occurs in Langerhans cell-depleted mice

    PubMed Central

    Jemon, K.; Leong, C.-M.; Ly, K.; Young, S. L.; McLellan, A. D.; Hibma, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an epitheliotropic virus that is the primary causal agent for cervical cancer. Langerhans cells (LC) are skin antigen presenting cells that are reduced in number in HPV-infected skin. The aim of this study was to understand the immune-modulatory effects of HPV16 E7 on LC and on the CD8 T cell response to a skin-expressed antigen. To test this, HPV16 E7 was expressed in mouse skin keratinocytes with the model antigen ovalbumin (Ova). Similar to what is observed in HPV-infected human skin, LC numbers were significantly reduced in E7-expressing mouse skin. This shows that expression of the E7 protein alone is sufficient to mediate LC depletion. Expression of E7 with Ova in keratinocytes strongly suppressed the Ova-specific CD8+ T cell response in the skin draining lymph node. When tested in LC-ablated mice, the CD8 T cell response to skin-expressed Ova in control mice was not affected, nor was the T cell response to Ova restored in E7-expressing skin. These data indicate a role for E7 in regulation of LC homeostasis in the skin and in suppression of antigen specific CD8 T cell expansion, but suggest that these two effects occur independent of each other. PMID:27708419

  10. Identification of proliferative and mature β-cells in the islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Bader, Erik; Migliorini, Adriana; Gegg, Moritz; Moruzzi, Noah; Gerdes, Jantje; Roscioni, Sara S; Bakhti, Mostafa; Brandl, Elisabeth; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Aichler, Michaela; Feuchtinger, Annette; Leitzinger, Christin; Zischka, Hans; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Jastroch, Martin; Tschöp, Matthias; Machicao, Fausto; Staiger, Harald; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Chmelova, Helena; Chouinard, Julie A; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Korsgren, Olle; Speier, Stephan; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-07-21

    Insulin-dependent diabetes is a complex multifactorial disorder characterized by loss or dysfunction of β-cells. Pancreatic β-cells differ in size, glucose responsiveness, insulin secretion and precursor cell potential; understanding the mechanisms that underlie this functional heterogeneity might make it possible to develop new regenerative approaches. Here we show that Fltp (also known as Flattop and Cfap126), a Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) effector and reporter gene acts as a marker gene that subdivides endocrine cells into two subpopulations and distinguishes proliferation-competent from mature β-cells with distinct molecular, physiological and ultrastructural features. Genetic lineage tracing revealed that endocrine subpopulations from Fltp-negative and -positive lineages react differently to physiological and pathological changes. The expression of Fltp increases when endocrine cells cluster together to form polarized and mature 3D islet mini-organs. We show that 3D architecture and Wnt/PCP ligands are sufficient to trigger β-cell maturation. By contrast, the Wnt/PCP effector Fltp is not necessary for β-cell development, proliferation or maturation. We conclude that 3D architecture and Wnt/PCP signalling underlie functional β-cell heterogeneity and induce β-cell maturation. The identification of Fltp as a marker for endocrine subpopulations sheds light on the molecular underpinnings of islet cell heterogeneity and plasticity and might enable targeting of endocrine subpopulations for the regeneration of functional β-cell mass in diabetic patients. PMID:27398620

  11. Selective and site-specific mobilization of dermal dendritic cells and Langerhans cells by Th1- and Th2-polarizing adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Sen, Debasish; Forrest, Luette; Kepler, Thomas B; Parker, Ian; Cahalan, Michael D

    2010-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) initiate and polarize adaptive immune responses toward varying functional outcomes. By means of intravital two-photon microscopy, we report that dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and Langerhans cells (LCs) are differentially mobilized during contact sensitization and by adjuvants such as unmethylated CpG oligonucleotide (CpG) and LPS that induce T helper type 1 (Th1) responses, or papain that induces T helper type 2 (Th2) responses. In ear pinna, contact sensitization, CpG, LPS, and papain all mobilized DDCs in three distinct phases: increased motility and dendritic probing, directed migration, and entry into lymphatic vessels. During the same treatments, the adjacent LCs in ear pinna remained immotile over a 48-hr period of observation. In contrast, footpads lacked DDCs and Th1-polarizing adjuvants selectively induced a delayed mobilization of LCs after 48 hr. Th1 polarization of CD4(+) T cells was independent of the immunization site, whereas ear immunization favored Th2 polarization, correlating with site-specific DC distribution and dynamics. Our results provide an initial description of peripheral DC dynamics in response to adjuvants and imply that LC mobilization enhances a Th1 response and is not sufficient to trigger a Th2 response, whereas mobilization of DDCs alone is sufficient to trigger T-cell proliferation and to polarize initial T-cell activation toward a Th2 response. PMID:20404167

  12. In situ expression of the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 on langerhans cells and inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells (IDEC) in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Schuller, E; Teichmann, B; Haberstok, J; Moderer, M; Bieber, T; Wollenberg, A

    2001-09-01

    The functional expression of costimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells may be a key event in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD). Recently, the expression of CD86 (B7-2/B70) has been demonstrated on CD1a+ epidermal dendritic cells (DC) in AD lesions by immunohistological and functional analysis. Therefore, we sought to further characterize the in situ expression of costimulatory molecules on these cells, considering the two subpopulations of (1) CD1a+++/CD11b- Langerhans cells (LC) containing Birbeck granules and (2) CD1a+/CD11b+++ inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells (IDEC), devoid of Birbeck granules, from AD and other inflammatory skin diseases. Flow cytometry, skin mixed lymphocyte reactions (SMLR) and immunohistological analysis were performed, and showed that IDEC and not LC are the relevant cells expressing the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in situ. This expression varied with the underlying diagnosis, with AD showing the highest expression of both CD80 and CD86 in situ. Furthermore, the expression of CD80, CD86 and CD36 were significantly correlated. With short-term culture, both CD80 and CD86 were further upregulated on LC and IDEC. Finally, anti-CD86 antibody reduced the stimulatory activity of epidermal DC. These results indicate that costimulatory molecules on LC and IDEC might play a role in the pathogenesis of AD.

  13. IL-34 is a tissue-restricted ligand of CSF1R required for the development of Langerhans cells and microglia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaming; Szretter, Kristy J; Vermi, William; Gilfillan, Susan; Rossini, Cristina; Cella, Marina; Barrow, Alexander D; Diamond, Michael S; Colonna, Marco

    2012-06-24

    The differentiation of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells into monocytes, tissue macrophages and some dendritic cell (DC) subtypes requires the growth factor CSF1 and its receptor, CSF1R. Langerhans cells (LCs) and microglia develop from embryonic myeloid precursor cells that populate the epidermis and central nervous system (CNS) before birth. Notably, LCs and microglia are present in CSF1-deficient mice but absent from CSF1R-deficient mice. Here we investigated whether an alternative CSF1R ligand, interleukin 34 (IL-34), is responsible for this discrepancy. Through the use of IL-34-deficient (Il34(LacZ/LacZ)) reporter mice, we found that keratinocytes and neurons were the main sources of IL-34. Il34(LacZ/LacZ) mice selectively lacked LCs and microglia and responded poorly to skin antigens and viral infection of the CNS. Thus, IL-34 specifically directs the differentiation of myeloid cells in the skin epidermis and CNS.

  14. Congenital "self-healing" Langerhans cell histiocytosis (Hashimoto-Pritzker disease): a report of two cases with the same cutaneous manifestations but different clinical course.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Victor Desmond; Ferrari, Chiara; Cesinaro, Anna Maria; Pellacani, Giovanni; Del Forno, Corrado

    2014-12-01

    Congenital self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis or Hashimoto-Pritzker disease is a rare condition present at birth or in the neonatal period characterized by small reddish-brown crusted papulonodular lesions. In most cases these lesions are not accompanied by systemic findings and tend to involute spontaneously within weeks or months, but in other cases there may be extracutaneous involvement and/or recurrence of the disease. This emphasizes that the clinical course is variable and a long-term follow-up is mandatory in order to reveal possible systemic involvement. We describe two cases of congenital self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis with widespread and very similar cutaneous manifestations but different clinical course. The first patient had multisystemic disease (with lymph nodes, bones, liver and lungs affected) that required systemic therapy. The second patient had cutaneous and bony lesions that resolved spontaneously. We think that the adjective "self-healing" is misleading and should be abandoned. We stress the importance of a complete systemic evaluation and the necessity of a long-term follow-up.

  15. Successful treatment of a case of acute myeloid leukemia following Langerhans cell histiocytosis in an adolescent: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gaixiang; Yang, Min; Huang, Jian; Jin, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare histiocytic disorder of unknown etiopathogenesis. Its clinical presentation is variable and ranges from isolated skin or bone disease to a life-threatening multisystem condition. LCH can occur at any age but is more frequent in the pediatric population. The diagnosis depends on clinical, histopathological and radiographic examination and should be confirmed by immunohistochemical study with CD1a, S100 protein and langerin, three markers used widely for identifying Langerhans cells. Herein, we report an adolescent with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M2) who was treated just with surgical management alone for LCH. As far as we know, this is the first case that the LCH patient without chemotherapy evolved into AML and was successfully cured. Cooperative studies of large numbers of LCH patients are needed to evaluate a possible association between LCH and acute leukemia, and to identify common risk factors or predisposing agents if such be present. The previously reported cases of LCH concomitant with other hematological disorders are also summarized and described compared with the present case. PMID:25932277

  16. Multifocal Skeletal Tuberculosis Mimicking Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in a Child: a Case Report With a Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Haghighatkhah, Hamidreza; Jafroodi, Yousef; Sanei Taheri, Morteza; Pourghorban, Ramin; Sadeghian Dehkordy, Afarin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Multifocal skeletal tuberculosis is a rare condition that may masquerade as Langerhans cell histiocytosis, especially in children. Case Presentation: We report a case of multifocal osseous tuberculosis in a 5-year-old female patient admitted to our hospital with a complaint of low back pain but no history of respiratory symptoms or malaise. Radiological findings included vertebra plana and multiple lytic lesions in both the frontal and pelvic bones. An initial diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis was made based on imaging findings; however, the patient underwent further evaluation for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and histopathologic findings confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The patient showed a nearly complete response after receiving a course of anti-tuberculosis drugs. Conclusions: A high index of suspicion is required for the early diagnosis and prompt treatment of patients with osseous tuberculosis. Given the high prevalence of tuberculosis in developing countries, tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of multifocal lytic lesions and vertebra plana, especially in children. PMID:26744631

  17. Langerhans cells require signals from both tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta for migration.

    PubMed Central

    Cumberbatch, M; Dearman, R J; Kimber, I

    1997-01-01

    The induction phase of contact sensitization is associated with the movement of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) from the skin and their migration, via afferent lymphatics, to draining lymph nodes where they accumulate as immunostimulatory dendritic cells (DC). It has been demonstrated previously that tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) provides an important signal for LC migration and that in the absence of this cytokine, movement of LC from the epidermis to regional lymph nodes is inhibited. Recent evidence indicates that interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), a cytokine produced in murine epidermis exclusively by LC, may also play a role in LC migration. The purpose of the investigations described here was to clarify, using relevant neutralizing anti-cytokine antibodies, the contributions made by TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta to the migration of LC from the epidermis. It was found that like anti-TNF-alpha, anti-IL-1 beta administered systemically to mice (by intraperitoneal injection), prior to skin sensitization with the contact allergen oxazolone, resulted in a marked inhibition of DC accumulation in draining lymph nodes. It was shown also that anti-IL-1 beta inhibited TNF-alpha-induced LC migration and DC accumulation and that; in similar fashion, the stimulation of LC migration and DC accumulation induced by IL-1 beta was compromised by prior treatment with anti-TNF-alpha. Based upon these data it is proposed that the stimulation of LC migration in response to skin sensitization requires the receipt by LC of two independent signals, one provided by TNF-alpha and the other by IL-1 beta. Morphological analyses of LC in epidermal sheets prepared from animals exposed to these cytokines with or without prior systemic treatment with anti-cytokine antibody suggested that the changes induced in LC by TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta may include the altered expression of adhesion molecules and acquisition of the ability to interact with and pass through the basement membrane. Images

  18. A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen T.; Carrero, Javier A.; Mohan, James F.; Calderon, Boris; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Unanue, Emil R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103+ dendritic cell (DC) population. By four weeks of age, CD4+ T cells entered islets coincident with an increase of CD103+ DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103+ DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103+ DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103+ DCs were essential for autoimmune diabetes development. PMID:25367577

  19. Expression and function of monoacylglycerol lipase in mouse β-cells and human islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Vilches-Flores, Alonso; Zhao, Min; Amiel, Stephanie A; Jones, Peter M; Persaud, Shanta J

    2012-01-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) are expressed by islet endocrine cells and activation of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors regulates insulin secretion from mouse and human β-cells. The current study aimed to investigate the expression and function, in mouse and human β-cells, of monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL), an enzyme that facilitates degradation of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). We found that MGL mRNA is expressed by MIN6 β-cells, mouse islets, human islets and enriched human islet β-cells, and immunohistochemistry indicated that MGL localisation in human islets is consistent with its expression by some β- and -α-cells. Blockade of MGL activity with the pharmacological inhibitor URB602 led to increased [Ca(2+)](i )and enhanced insulin secretion from MIN6 β-cells, and MGL inhibition also elevated insulin and glucagon secretion from isolated human islets in vitro. These data imply a stimulatory role for endogenous 2-AG in islets that is amplified when its degradation is blocked. PMID:22739267

  20. Functional Langerinhigh-Expressing Langerhans-like Cells Can Arise from CD14highCD16- Human Blood Monocytes in Serum-Free Condition.

    PubMed

    Picarda, Gaëlle; Chéneau, Coraline; Humbert, Jean-Marc; Bériou, Gaëlle; Pilet, Paul; Martin, Jérôme; Duteille, Franck; Perrot, Pierre; Bellier-Waast, Frédérique; Heslan, Michèle; Haspot, Fabienne; Guillon, Fabien; Josien, Regis; Halary, Franck Albert

    2016-05-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are epithelial APCs that sense danger signals and in turn trigger specific immune responses. In steady-state, they participate in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to self-antigens whereas under inflammation LCs efficiently trigger immune responses in secondary lymphoid organs. It has been demonstrated in mice that LC-deprived epithelia are rapidly replenished by short half-life langerin-expressing monocyte-derived LCs (MDLCs). These surrogate LCs are thought to be progressively replaced by langerin(high) LCs arising from self-renewing epithelial precursors of hematopoietic origin. How LCs arise from blood monocytes is not fully understood. Hence, we sought to characterize key factors that induce differentiation of langerin(high)-expressing monocyte-derived Langerhans-like cells. We identified GM-CSF and TGF-β1 as key cytokines to generate langerin(high)-expressing cells but only in serum-free conditions. These cells were shown to express the LC-specific TROP-2 and Axl surface markers and contained Birbeck granules. Surprisingly, E-cadherin was not spontaneously expressed by these cells but required a direct contact with keratinocytes to be stably induced. MDLCs induced stronger allogeneic T cell proliferations but released low amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon TLR stimulation compared with donor-paired monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Immature langerin(high) MDLCs were responsive to MIP-3β/CCL20 and CTAC/CCL27 chemokine stimulations. Finally, we demonstrated that those cells behaved as bona fide LCs when inserted in a three-dimensional rebuilt epithelium by becoming activated upon TLR or UV light stimulations. Collectively, these results prompt us to propose these langerin(high) MDLCs as a relevant model to address LC biology-related questions. PMID:27016604

  1. Modulation of T cell responses to recall antigens presented by Langerhans cells in HIV-discordant identical twins by anti-interleukin (IL)-10 antibodies and IL-12.

    PubMed Central

    Blauvelt, A; Chougnet, C; Shearer, G M; Katz, S I

    1996-01-01

    Decreased antigen (Ag)-specific T cell (TC) proliferation and IL-2 production are detected in all stages of HIV disease. To determine whether dendritic cell dysfunction and/or abnormal cytokine production contribute to HIV-induced immune dysregulation, we studies TC responses to recall Ags (influenza virus and tetanus toxoid) presented by Langerhans cells (LC) in six pairs of HIV-discordant identical twins, and the modulation of these responses by anti-IL-10 (alphaIL-10) mAbs and IL-12. LC from HIV+ twins induced IL-2 comparable to normal LC in cultures containing TC from uninfected twins. In contrast, IL-2 production was markedly decreased in cultures containing TC from HIV+ twins. IL-12 enhanced Ag-specific IL-2 production by TC from two patients with CD4+ counts > 600. In contrast, alphaIL-10 mAbs enhanced IL-2 production in influenza virus-stimulated cultures containing TC from two patients with CD4+ counts < 20. Thus, these findings suggest that immunologic dysfunction of dendritic cells does not contribute to impaired secondary immune responses in HIV+ individuals. Although few patients were studied, partial immune reconstitution in vitro, as demonstrated here, may help to predict those individuals who might benefit from cytokines or antibodies against cytokines as immunotherapy for HIV disease. PMID:8617889

  2. TGFβ Induces a SAMHD1-Independent Post-Entry Restriction to HIV-1 Infection of Human Epithelial Langerhans Cells.

    PubMed

    Czubala, Magdalena A; Finsterbusch, Katja; Ivory, Matthew O; Mitchell, J Paul; Ahmed, Zahra; Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Karoo, Richard O S; Coulman, Sion A; Gateley, Christopher; Birchall, James C; Blanchet, Fabien P; Piguet, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    Sterile alpha motif (SAM) and histidine-aspartic (HD) domains protein 1 (SAMHD1) was previously identified as a critical post-entry restriction factor to HIV-1 infection in myeloid dendritic cells. Here we show that SAMHD1 is also expressed in epidermis-isolated Langerhans cells (LC), but degradation of SAMHD1 does not rescue HIV-1 or vesicular stomatitis virus G-pseudotyped lentivectors infection in LC. Strikingly, using Langerhans cells model systems (mutz-3-derived LC, monocyte-derived LC [MDLC], and freshly isolated epidermal LC), we characterize previously unreported post-entry restriction activity to HIV-1 in these cells, which acts at HIV-1 reverse transcription, but remains independent of restriction factors SAMHD1 and myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2). We demonstrate that transforming growth factor-β signaling confers this potent HIV-1 restriction in MDLC during their differentiation and blocking of mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 2 (SMAD2) signaling in MDLC restores cells' infectivity. Interestingly, maturation of MDLC with a toll-like receptor 2 agonist or transforming growth factor-α significantly increases cells' susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, which may explain why HIV-1 acquisition is increased during coinfection with sexually transmitted infections. In conclusion, we report a SAMHD1-independent post-entry restriction in MDLC and LC isolated from epidermis, which inhibits HIV-1 replication. A better understanding of HIV-1 restriction and propagation from LC to CD4(+) T cells may help in the development of new microbicides or vaccines to curb HIV-1 infection at its earliest stages during mucosal transmission. PMID:27375111

  3. Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraerts, Martine; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    The discovery of adult stem cells in most adult tissues is the basis of a number of clinical studies that are carried out, with therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells as a prime example. Intense scientific debate is still ongoing as to whether adult stem cells may have a greater plasticity than previously thought. Although cells with some features of embryonic stem cells that, among others, express Oct4, Nanog and SSEA1 are isolated from fresh tissue, it is not clear if the greater differentiation potential is acquired during cell culture. Moreover, adult more pluripotent cells do not have all pluripotent characteristics typical for embryonic stem cells. Recently, some elegant studies were published in which adult cells could be completely reprogrammed to embryonic stem cell-like cells by overexpression of some key transcription factors for pluripotency (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). It will be interesting for the future to investigate the exact mechanisms underlying this reprogramming and whether similar transcription factor pathways are present and/or can be activated in adult more pluripotent stem cells.

  4. Mucosal Langerhans Cells Promote Differentiation of Th17 Cells in a Murine Model of Periodontitis but Are Not Required for Porphyromonas gingivalis–Driven Alveolar Bone Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Bittner-Eddy, Peter D.; Fischer, Lori A.; Kaplan, Daniel H.; Thieu, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic oral inflammatory disease affecting one in five individuals that can lead to tooth loss. CD4+ Th cells activated by a microbial biofilm are thought to contribute to the destruction of alveolar bone surrounding teeth by influencing osteoclastogenesis through IL-17A and receptor activator for NF-κB ligand effects. The relative roles of mucosal Ag presentation cells in directing Th cell immune responses against oral pathogens and their contribution to destruction of alveolar bone remain unknown. We tested the contribution of mucosal Langerhans cells (LCs) to alveolar bone homeostasis in mice following oral colonization with a well-characterized human periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis. We found that oral mucosal LCs did not protect from or exacerbate crestal alveolar bone destruction but were responsible for promoting differentiation of Th17 cells specific to P. gingivalis. In mice lacking LCs the Th17 response was suppressed and a Th1 response predominated. Bypassing LCs with systemic immunization of P. gingivalis resulted in a predominantly P. gingivalis–specific Th1 response regardless of whether LCs were present. Interestingly, we find that in vivo clonal expansion of P. gingivalis–specific Th cells and induced regulatory T cells does not depend on mucosal LCs. Furthermore, destruction of crestal alveolar bone induced by P. gingivalis colonization occurred regardless of the presence of mucosal LCs or P. gingivalis–specific Th17 cells. Our data indicate that both LCs and Th17 cells are redundant in contributing to alveolar bone destruction in a murine model of periodontitis. PMID:27402698

  5. High-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (Fc epsilon RI)-bearing eosinophils, mast cells, macrophages and Langerhans' cells in allergen-induced late-phase cutaneous reactions in atopic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ying, S; Barata, L T; Meng, Q; Grant, J A; Barkans, J; Durham, S R; Kay, A B

    1998-01-01

    We have used in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to investigate the kinetics of the expression for Fc epsilon RI mRNA (alpha-, beta- and gamma-chains), the alpha-chain protein product, as well as the phenotype of the mRNA- or protein-positive cells in allergen-induced late-phase skin reactions in atopic subjects. Compared with diluent controls, there were significant increases in the total number of mRNA+ cells for the alpha-, beta- and gamma-chains for Fc epsilon RI at all time-points (6, 24 and 48 hr) after allergen challenge (P < 0.01). By double IHC/ISH significant increases in alpha-, beta- and gamma-chain mRNA+ macrophages, eosinophils, mast cells and CD1a+ cells were also observed after allergen challenge (P < 0.05). The distribution of Fc epsilon RI subunit (alpha-, beta-, or gamma-chain) mRNA+ co-localization was CD68+ macrophages (42-47%), EG2+ eosinophils (33-39%), tryptase+ mast cells (5-11%) and CD1a+ Langerhans' cells (2-4%). Using single IHC, significant increases in the total number of Fc epsilon RI protein+ cells (P < 0.01) were observed 24 and 48 hr after allergen challenge. Double IHC showed that the distribution of Fc epsilon RI+ cells was tryptase+ mast cells (33%), CD68+ macrophages (36%), EG2+ eosinophils (20%), CD1a+ Langerhans' cells (4%) and unidentified cells (7%), at the 24-hr allergen-challenged sites. These observations suggest that the cutaneous late-phase reaction in man is associated with up-regulation of Fc epsilon RI on eosinophils, macrophages, mast cells and Langerhans' cells. Images Figure 6 PMID:9616380

  6. Islets of Langerhans from prohormone convertase-2 knockout mice show α-cell hyperplasia and tumorigenesis with elevated α-cell neogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Huw B; Reens, Jaimini; Brocklehurst, Simon R; Betts, Catherine J; Bickerton, Sue; Bigley, Alison L; Jenkins, Richard P; Whalley, Nicky M; Morgan, Derrick; Smith, David M

    2014-01-01

    Antagonism of the effects of glucagon as an adjunct therapy with other glucose-lowering drugs in the chronic treatment of diabetes has been suggested to aggressively control blood glucose levels. Antagonism of glucagon effects, by targeting glucagon secretion or disabling the glucagon receptor, is associated with α-cell hyperplasia. We evaluated the influence of total glucagon withdrawal on islets of Langerhans using prohormone convertase-2 knockout mice (PC2-ko), in which α-cell hyperplasia is present from a young age and persists throughout life, in order to understand whether or not sustained glucagon deficit would lead to islet tumorigenesis. PC2-ko and wild-type (WT) mice were maintained drug-free, and cohorts of these groups sampled at 3, 12 and 18 months for plasma biochemical and morphological (histological, immunohistochemical, electron microscopical and image analytical) assessments. WT mice showed no islet tumours up to termination of the study, but PC2-ko animals displayed marked changes in islet morphology from α-cell hypertrophy/hyperplasia/atypical hyperplasia, to adenomas and carcinomas, these latter being first encountered at 6–8 months. Islet hyperplasias and tumours primarily consisted of α-cells associated to varying degrees with other islet endocrine cell types. In addition to substantial increases in islet neoplasia, increased α-cell neogenesis associated primarily with pancreatic duct(ule)s was present. We conclude that absolute blockade of the glucagon signal results in tumorigenesis and that the PC2-ko mouse represents a valuable model for investigation of islet tumours and pancreatic ductal neogenesis. PMID:24456331

  7. HIV-1 Replication in Langerhans and Interstitial Dendritic Cells Is Inhibited by Neutralizing and Fc-Mediated Inhibitory Antibodies ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Peressin, M.; Holl, V.; Schmidt, S.; Decoville, T.; Mirisky, D.; Lederle, A.; Delaporte, M.; Xu, K.; Aubertin, A. M.; Moog, C.

    2011-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) and interstitial dendritic cells (IDCs) may be among the first human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) targets after sexual transmission. We generated cells of these types by differentiation of purified CD34+ cord blood cells. After in vitro infection with R5-tropic strains, we obtained similar percentages of infected cells for both dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Moreover, LC infection was not increased by blockage of langerin by antilangerin. These results indicate that, under our experimental conditions, there was no evidence of any preference of HIV replication in LCs versus IDCs. The inhibitory activity of HIV-1-specific IgAs and IgGs against HIV-1 replication in LCs and IDCs was analyzed. We found that neutralizing antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection of both DC subsets. Interestingly, HIV-1 was inhibited more efficiently by the IgGs than the corresponding IgA, due to an Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanism. Moreover, nonneutralizing inhibitory IgGs were able to inhibit infection of both LCs and IDCs. These results underline the importance of HIV-1 inhibition by the binding of the Fc part of IgGs to Fcγ receptors and suggest that the induction of neutralizing and nonneutralizing inhibitory IgGs in addition to neutralizing IgAs at mucosal sites may contribute to protection against sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:21084491

  8. Partial regeneration of beta-cells in the islets of Langerhans by Nymphayol a sterol isolated from Nymphaea stellata (Willd.) flowers.

    PubMed

    Subash-Babu, P; Ignacimuthu, S; Agastian, P; Varghese, Babu

    2009-04-01

    Reduction of the beta-cell mass is critical in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. The discovery of agents which induce regeneration of pancreatic beta-cells would be useful to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat diabetes. The present study was aimed at identifying a new agent for the control of diabetes through regeneration of pancreatic beta cells and insulin secretory potential. Nymphaea stellata flower chloroform extract (NSFCExt) showed significant plasma glucose lowering effect. Further NSFCExt was utilized to isolate and identify the lead compound based on bioassay guided fractionation; we found Nymphayol (25,26-dinorcholest-5-en-3beta-ol) a new crystal [space group P2(1) (No. 4), a=9.618(5), b=7.518(5), c=37.491(5)]. It was purified by repeat column. The structure was determined on the basis of X-ray crystallography and spectral data. Oral administration of Nymphayol for 45 days significantly (p<0.05) lowered the blood glucose level and more importantly it effectively increased the insulin content in diabetic rats. In addition, Nymphayol increased the number of beta cell mass enormously. Islet-like cell clusters in the islets of Langerhans were clearly observed based on histochemical and immunohistochemical study. PMID:19272781

  9. Intradermal injection of an anti-Langerin-HIVGag fusion vaccine targets epidermal Langerhans cells in nonhuman primates and can be tracked in vivo.

    PubMed

    Salabert, Nina; Todorova, Biliana; Martinon, Frédéric; Boisgard, Raphaël; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandra; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Cosma, Antonio; Kortulewski, Thierry; Banchereau, Jacques; Levy, Yves; Le Grand, Roger; Chapon, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    The development of new immunization strategies requires a better understanding of early molecular and cellular events occurring at the site of injection. The skin is particularly rich in immune cells and represents an attractive site for vaccine administration. Here, we specifically targeted vaccine antigens to epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) using a fusion protein composed of HIV antigens and a monoclonal antibody targeting Langerin. We developed a fluorescence imaging approach to visualize, in vivo, the vaccine-targeted cells. Studies were performed in nonhuman primates (NHPs) because of their relevance as a model to assess human vaccines. We directly demonstrated that in NHPs, intradermally injected anti-Langerin-HIVGag specifically targets epidermal LCs and induces rapid changes in the LC network, including LC activation and migration out of the epidermis. Vaccine targeting of LCs significantly improved anti-HIV immune response without requirement of an adjuvant. Although the co-injection of the TLR-7/8 synthetic ligand, R-848 (resiquimod), with the vaccine, did not enhance significantly the antibody response, it stimulated recruitment of HLA-DR+ inflammatory cells to the site of immunization. This study allowed us to characterize the dynamics of early local events following the injection of a vaccine-targeted epidermal LCs and R-848. PMID:26678013

  10. Differentiating intratumoral melanocytes from Langerhans cells in nonmelanocytic pigmented skin tumors in vivo by label-free third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Wei-Hung; Liao, Yi-Hua; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Wei, Ming-Liang; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2016-07-01

    Morphology and distribution of melanocytes are critical imaging information for the diagnosis of melanocytic lesions. However, how to image intratumoral melanocytes noninvasively in pigmented skin tumors is seldom investigated. Third-harmonic generation (THG) is shown to be enhanced by melanin, whereas high accuracy has been demonstrated using THG microscopy for in vivo differential diagnosis of nonmelanocytic pigmented skin tumors. It is thus desirable to investigate if label-free THG microscopy was capable to in vivo identify intratumoral melanocytes. In this study, histopathological correlations of label-free THG images with the immunohistochemical images stained with human melanoma black (HMB)-45 and cluster of differentiation 1a (CD1a) were made. The correlation results indicated that the intratumoral THG-bright dendritic-cell-like signals were endogenously derived from melanocytes rather than Langerhans cells (LCs). The consistency between THG-bright dendritic-cell-like signals and HMB-45 melanocyte staining showed a kappa coefficient of 0.807, 84.6% sensitivity, and 95% specificity. In contrast, a kappa coefficient of -0.37, 21.7% sensitivity, and 30% specificity were noted between the THG-bright dendritic-cell-like signals and CD1a staining for LCs. Our study indicates the capability of noninvasive label-free THG microscopy to differentiate intratumoral melanocytes from LCs, which is not feasible in previous in vivo label-free clinical-imaging modalities.

  11. Influence of High Aspect Ratio Vessel Cell Culture on TNF-Alpha, Insulin Secretion and Glucose Homeostasis in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans from Wistar Furth Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.a; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.

    1999-01-01

    The present studies were carried out to determine the influence of a ground based microgravity paradigm, utilizing the High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) cell culture upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. An additional aim was to elucidate alterations in insulin secretion and glucose utilization using the HARV low shear, gravity averaged vector, cell culture technique. Islets were isolated (1726 +/- 117, 150 micron islet equivalent units) from Wistar Furth rats and assigned to four treatment groups: 1) HARV, 2) HARV plus LPS, 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS. Following 48 hours of culture, insulin concentration was increased in both HARV and static cultures (p<0.05). Islet medium from HARV and static cultures were assayed for TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) and was measured at selected time points for 48 hours. TNF-alpha was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). This is a novel observation and indicates that TNF producing cells are present in islets and that LPS stimulates TNF secretion in isolated islets. A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the islet medium of the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). That TNF-alpha is associated with a decreased insulin secretion is intriguing, both as it relates to in-flight investigations, and as it may provide insight into the pathophysiology of Type I and Type 11 diabetes. Glucose concentration in islet medium was lesser throughout the experiment in static cultures, suggesting a decreased reliance upon glucose as a metabolic substrate in the islets cultured in HARVS. In conclusion, the present studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF production in the microgravity HARV paradigm. Additionally, alterations in fuel

  12. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexistence with pulmonary tuberculosis and right pneumothorax: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gao, Limin; Li, Huifang; Li, Gandi; Liu, Weiping; Li, Jinnan; Zhang, Wenyan

    2015-01-01

    We report an uncommon 22-year-old male Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH) case which co-existed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Unlike the common PLCH cases, this PLCH case has cervical lymph node involvement and right pneumothorax. The diagnosis was established by the imaging of lung and the biopsies of the lung and left neck lymph node. Imaging of the chest showed characteristic small nodules and thin-walled cysts and right pneumothorax. The LCH cells in the lung and left neck lymph node were characterized by large convoluted nuclei with cerebriform indentations of the nuclear envelope and longitudinal grooves. The nuclei contained small eosinophilic nucleoli and moderate amount cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, the histiocytoid cells were positive for Langerin, CD1a and S-100. Acid-fast bacilli were found in sputum and lung biopsy tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of PLCH with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexisted with pulmonary tuberculosis, right pneumothorax. A contribution of this case and review three of the five cases of PLCH with extrapulmonary involvement to lymph nodes resolved spontaneously after smoking cessation constitute a novel addition that it is inappropriate to regard pulmonary/nodal LCH as multi-organ or disseminated disease, and the treatment methods are the same whether the PLCH patient with lymph node involvement or not.

  13. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the urinary bladder in a patient with bladder cancer previously treated with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy.

    PubMed

    Numakura, Satoe; Morikawa, Teppei; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Toyoaki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2014-02-01

    We report an extremely rare case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the urinary bladder. A 68-year-old man presented with gross hematuria. Cystoscopy showed multiple papillary tumors in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Pathological diagnosis was high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma with lamina propria invasion. The patient received six treatments with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy. Seven months after surgery, follow-up cystoscopy showed three elevated lesions in the urinary bladder, two of which were identified histologically as recurrent urothelial carcinoma. Microscopic examination of the lesion at the anterior wall revealed diffuse infiltration of medium to large histiocytoid cells in the lamina propria, many of which had distorted nuclei and nuclear grooves. Dense eosinophilic infiltration was also observed. Immunohistochemically, the histiocytoid cells were diffusely positive for S-100 and CD1a, but negative for cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and melanosome-associated antigen recognized by HMB-45. Based on the histological and immunohistochemical features, we diagnosed the lesion as LCH of the urinary bladder. There was no evidence of recurrence of either bladder cancer or LCH after an 18-month follow-up. To avoid misdiagnosis, urologists and pathologists should be aware that LCH may develop in the urinary bladder after intravesical BCG therapy for bladder cancer.

  14. Requirement of MyD88 signaling in keratinocytes for Langerhans cell migration and initiation of atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in mice.

    PubMed

    Didovic, Sonja; Opitz, Friederike V; Holzmann, Bernhard; Förster, Irmgard; Weighardt, Heike

    2016-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory disease controlled by the innate and adaptive immune system. To elucidate the impact of innate immune signaling in AD, we analyzed MyD88-deficient mice in a murine model of AD-like dermatitis by epicutaneous sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA). Global MyD88 deficiency led to reduced epidermal thickening and diminished accumulation of macrophages within the inflamed skin. In addition, we observed impaired emigration of Langerhans cells (LCs) out of the epidermis of MyD88-deficient mice. These findings indicate that MyD88 deficiency affects various skin-resident cell types in the AD model. Moreover, production of IFN-g, IL-17, and CCL17 was reduced in skin draining lymph node cells and OVA-specific immunoglobulin levels were lower in MyD88-deficient mice. We further investigated the role of MyD88 in keratinocytes, as keratinocytes contribute to AD pathology. Exclusive expression of MyD88 in epidermal keratinocytes partially restored LC emigration after AD induction and expression of CCL17 in skin draining lymph nodes (LNs), but did not promote epidermal thickening nor production of IL-17. Altogether, these data demonstrate that MyD88 signaling in keratinocytes is able to restore LC migration in an otherwise MyD88-deficient background, and significantly contributes to the development of AD-like dermatitis.

  15. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexistence with pulmonary tuberculosis and right pneumothorax: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Limin; Li, Huifang; Li, Gandi; Liu, Weiping; Li, Jinnan; Zhang, Wenyan

    2015-01-01

    We report an uncommon 22-year-old male Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH) case which co-existed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Unlike the common PLCH cases, this PLCH case has cervical lymph node involvement and right pneumothorax. The diagnosis was established by the imaging of lung and the biopsies of the lung and left neck lymph node. Imaging of the chest showed characteristic small nodules and thin-walled cysts and right pneumothorax. The LCH cells in the lung and left neck lymph node were characterized by large convoluted nuclei with cerebriform indentations of the nuclear envelope and longitudinal grooves. The nuclei contained small eosinophilic nucleoli and moderate amount cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, the histiocytoid cells were positive for Langerin, CD1a and S-100. Acid-fast bacilli were found in sputum and lung biopsy tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of PLCH with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexisted with pulmonary tuberculosis, right pneumothorax. A contribution of this case and review three of the five cases of PLCH with extrapulmonary involvement to lymph nodes resolved spontaneously after smoking cessation constitute a novel addition that it is inappropriate to regard pulmonary/nodal LCH as multi-organ or disseminated disease, and the treatment methods are the same whether the PLCH patient with lymph node involvement or not. PMID:25973117

  16. Effects of glass ionomers and dental resin composites on viability of beta-cells and insulin release in isolated islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Persson-Sjögren, Solveig; Sjögren, Göran

    2003-09-01

    Information on the biocompatibility of glass ionomers and resin composites is sparse. To extend the scale of biological testing we evaluated the influence of those materials on insulin secretion at whole organ level in vitro. The effects on insulin secretion of three glass ionomers and two resin composites, aged for 1 week, were studied in isolated mouse islets of Langerhans at basal (5.5mM) and at stimulatory (11.1mM) D-glucose concentrations. In addition, viability of single mouse beta-cells was evaluated. The effect of glass ionomer specimens aged for 1 and 4 months on insulin secretion at 11.1mM D-glucose was also studied. None of the materials affected the viability of the beta-cells. At 5.5mM D-glucose none of the materials affected the insulin secretion. At 11.1mM D-glucose, the glass ionomers only decreased the secretion and glass ionomers aged for 1 month still decreased insulin release whereas after 4 months ageing only one of the glass ionomers affected the release. The result shows a dynamic effect on insulin release of the elements and/or compounds released from the specimens.

  17. High prevalence of BRAF V600E mutations in Erdheim-Chester disease but not in other non-Langerhans cell histiocytoses.

    PubMed

    Haroche, Julien; Charlotte, Frédéric; Arnaud, Laurent; von Deimling, Andreas; Hélias-Rodzewicz, Zofia; Hervier, Baptiste; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Launay, David; Lesot, Annette; Mokhtari, Karima; Canioni, Danielle; Galmiche, Louise; Rose, Christian; Schmalzing, Marc; Croockewit, Sandra; Kambouchner, Marianne; Copin, Marie-Christine; Fraitag, Sylvie; Sahm, Felix; Brousse, Nicole; Amoura, Zahir; Donadieu, Jean; Emile, Jean-François

    2012-09-27

    Histiocytoses are rare disorders of unknown origin with highly heterogeneous prognosis. BRAF mutations have been observed in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). We investigated the frequency of BRAF mutations in several types of histiocytoses. Histology from 127 patients with histiocytoses were reviewed. Detection of BRAF(V600) mutations was performed by pyrosequencing of DNA extracted from paraffin embedded samples. Diagnoses of Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD), LCH, Rosai-Dorfman disease, juvenile xanthogranuloma, histiocytic sarcoma, xanthoma disseminatum, interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma, and necrobiotic xanthogranuloma were performed in 46, 39, 23, 12, 3, 2, 1, and 1 patients, respectively. BRAF status was obtained in 93 cases. BRAF(V600E) mutations were detected in 13 of 24 (54%) ECD, 11 of 29 (38%) LCH, and none of the other histiocytoses. Four patients with ECD died of disease. The high frequency of BRAF(V600E) in LCH and ECD suggests a common origin of these diseases. Treatment with vemurafenib should be investigated in patients with malignant BRAF(V600E) histiocytosis. PMID:22879539

  18. Endothelial Cells Derived from the Blood-Brain Barrier and Islets of Langerhans Differ in their Response to the Effects of Bilirubin on Oxidative Stress Under Hyperglycemic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kapitulnik, Jaime; Benaim, Clara; Sasson, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) is a neurotoxic degradation product of heme. Its toxic effects include induction of apoptosis, and ultimately neuronal cell death. However, at low concentrations, UCB is a potent antioxidant that may protect cells and tissues against oxidative stress by neutralizing toxic metabolites such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). High glucose levels (hyperglycemia) generate reactive metabolites. Endothelial cell dysfunction, an early vascular complication in diabetes, has been associated with hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Both glucose and UCB are substrates for transport proteins in microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the current study we show that UCB (1-40 μM) induces apoptosis and reduces survival of bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain endothelial cell line which serves as an in vitro model of the BBB. These deleterious effects of UCB were enhanced in the presence of high glucose (25 mM) levels. Interestingly, the bEnd3 cells exhibited an increased sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of UCB when compared to the MS1 microcapillary endothelial cell line. MS1 cells originate from murine pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and are devoid of the barrier characteristics of BBB-derived endothelial cells. ROS production was increased in both bEnd3 and MS1 cells exposed to high glucose, as compared with cells exposed to normal (5.5 mM) glucose levels. While UCB (0.1-40 μM) did not alter ROS production in cells exposed to normal glucose, relatively low ("physiological") UCB concentrations (0.1-5 μM) attenuated ROS generation in both cell lines exposed to high glucose levels. Most strikingly, higher UCB concentrations (20-40 μM) increased ROS generation in bEnd3 cells exposed to high glucose, but not in similarly treated MS1 cells. These results may be of critical importance for understanding the vulnerability of the BBB endothelium upon exposure to increasing UCB levels under hyperglycemic conditions.

  19. Endothelial Cells Derived from the Blood-Brain Barrier and Islets of Langerhans Differ in their Response to the Effects of Bilirubin on Oxidative Stress Under Hyperglycemic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kapitulnik, Jaime; Benaim, Clara; Sasson, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) is a neurotoxic degradation product of heme. Its toxic effects include induction of apoptosis, and ultimately neuronal cell death. However, at low concentrations, UCB is a potent antioxidant that may protect cells and tissues against oxidative stress by neutralizing toxic metabolites such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). High glucose levels (hyperglycemia) generate reactive metabolites. Endothelial cell dysfunction, an early vascular complication in diabetes, has been associated with hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Both glucose and UCB are substrates for transport proteins in microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the current study we show that UCB (1-40 μM) induces apoptosis and reduces survival of bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain endothelial cell line which serves as an in vitro model of the BBB. These deleterious effects of UCB were enhanced in the presence of high glucose (25 mM) levels. Interestingly, the bEnd3 cells exhibited an increased sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of UCB when compared to the MS1 microcapillary endothelial cell line. MS1 cells originate from murine pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and are devoid of the barrier characteristics of BBB-derived endothelial cells. ROS production was increased in both bEnd3 and MS1 cells exposed to high glucose, as compared with cells exposed to normal (5.5 mM) glucose levels. While UCB (0.1-40 μM) did not alter ROS production in cells exposed to normal glucose, relatively low ("physiological") UCB concentrations (0.1-5 μM) attenuated ROS generation in both cell lines exposed to high glucose levels. Most strikingly, higher UCB concentrations (20-40 μM) increased ROS generation in bEnd3 cells exposed to high glucose, but not in similarly treated MS1 cells. These results may be of critical importance for understanding the vulnerability of the BBB endothelium upon exposure to increasing UCB levels under hyperglycemic conditions

  20. Antigen processing by epidermal Langerhans cells correlates with the level of biosynthesis of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and expression of invariant chain

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Two prior studies with a small number of T cell lines have shown that the presentation of native protein antigens by epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) is regulated. When freshly isolated, LC are efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC), but after a period of culture LC are inefficient or even inactive. The deficit in culture seems to be a selective loss in antigen processing, since cultured LC are otherwise rich in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II products and are active APC for alloantigens and mitogens, which do not require processing. We have extended the analysis by studying presentation to bulk populations of primed lymph node and a T-T hybrid. Only freshly isolated LC can be pulsed with the protein antigens myoglobin and conalbumin, but once pulsed, antigen is retained in an immunogenic form for at least 2 d. The acquisition of antigen, presumably as MHC-peptide complexes, is inhibited if the fresh LC are exposed to foreign protein in the presence of chloroquine or cycloheximide. The latter, in contrast, improves the efficacy of antigen pulsing in anti-Ig- stimulated B blasts. In additional studies of mechanism, we noted that both fresh and cultured LC endocytose similar amounts of an antigen, rhodamineovalbumin, into perinuclear granules. However, freshly isolated LC synthesize high levels class II MHC molecules and express higher amounts of the class II-associated invariant chain. Fresh LC are at least 5-10 times more active than many other cells types in the level of biosynthesis of MHC class II products. These findings provide a physiologic model in which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules appear to be the principal vehicle for effective antigen processing by APC of the dendritic cell lineage. Another APC, the B lymphoblast, does not appear to require newly synthesized MHC class II molecules for presentation. PMID:2121888

  1. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: therapeutic strategy and outcome in a 30-year nationwide cohort of 1478 patients under 18 years of age.

    PubMed

    Rigaud, Charlotte; Barkaoui, Mohamed A; Thomas, Caroline; Bertrand, Yves; Lambilliotte, Anne; Miron, Jean; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Plat, Geneviève; Jeziorski, Eric; Galambrun, Claire; Mansuy, Ludovic; Lutz, Patrick; Deville, Anne; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Reguerre, Yves; Fraitag, Sylvie; Coulomb, Aurore; Gandemer, Virginie; Leboulanger, Nicolas; Moshous, Despina; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Tazi, Abdellatif; Heritier, Sébastien; Emile, Jean-François; Donadieu, Jean

    2016-09-01

    The French national cohort of children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) has included 1478 patients since it was established in 1983. LCH therapeutic strategies substantially changed in 1998, so we have divided the cohort into two 15-year periods. Starting in 1998, therapy duration increased from 6 to 12 months, repeated induction therapy was performed in cases showing a poor response to the first induction with vinblastine and steroids, and refractory disease in a risk organ (RO+) was treated with cladribine and cytarabine. A total of 483 (33%) patients were enrolled before 1998, and 995 (67%) after 1998. Five-year survival was 96·6% (95% confidence interval: 95·4-97·5%) overall, improving from 92% pre-1998 to 99% post-1998 (P < 0·001 adjusted to disease extent). This change was supported by an increase in 5-year survival from 60% to 92% in the RO+ group. Survival was particularly associated with cladribine and cytarabine among refractory RO+ patients. Disease reactivation was slightly less frequent after 1998, due to better enrolment of single-system patients, extended therapy duration, and more efficient second-line therapy. The crude rates of endocrine and neurological sequelae (the most frequent sequelae) appeared to improve over time, but this difference was not observed when the analysis was stratified by disease extent. PMID:27273725

  2. Effects of treatment with a combination of cardiac rehabilitation and bosentan in patients with pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis associated with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yusuke; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Fujimi, Kanta; Yano, Masaya; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Yanagisawa, Jun; Hiratsuka, Masafumi; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Akinori; Saku, Keijiro

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), which is classified as group 5 in the clinical classification of PH, is sometimes a complication of Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH), and is associated with high mortality. A 36-year-old woman had suffered from severe dyspnea 9 years previously and was diagnosed with PLCH and was on a waiting list for a lung transplant. Right heart failure had been observed and the mean pulmonary artery pressure was over 40 mmHg. The patient was diagnosed as PLCH with PH. After combined treatment with exercise rehabilitation and bosentan for 6 months, the cardiothoracic ratio, brain natriuretic peptide, and bodyweight were significantly decreased (cardiothoracic ratio from 43 to 38%, brain natriuretic peptide from 284 to10 pg/ml and bodyweight from 63 to 58 kg). Six-minute walk test also improved from 214 to 275 meters and the SF36 score for screening of depressive and anxiety disorders was improved. This is the report demonstrating the efficacy and safety of cardiac rehabilitation in combination with bosentan in a single patient with PLCH associated with PH.

  3. Dramatic efficacy of vemurafenib in both multisystemic and refractory Erdheim-Chester disease and Langerhans cell histiocytosis harboring the BRAF V600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Haroche, Julien; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Emile, Jean-François; Arnaud, Laurent; Maksud, Philippe; Charlotte, Frédéric; Cluzel, Philippe; Drier, Aurélie; Hervier, Baptiste; Benameur, Neïla; Besnard, Sophie; Donadieu, Jean; Amoura, Zahir

    2013-02-28

    Histiocytoses are rare disorders of unknown origin with highly heterogeneous prognosis. BRAFV600E gain-of-function mutations have been observed in 57% of cases of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and 54% of cases of Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD), but not in other types of histiocytoses. Targeted therapy with an inhibitor of mutated BRAF (vemurafenib) improves survival of patients with melanoma. Here, we report vemurafenib treatment of 3 patients with multisystemic and refractory ECD carrying the BRAFV600E mutation; 2 also had skin or lymph node LCH involvement. The patients were assessed clinically, biologically (CRP values), histologically (skin biopsy), and morphologically (positron emission tomography [PET], computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging). For all patients, vemurafenib treatment led to substantial and rapid clinical and biologic improvement, and the tumor response was confirmed by PET, computed tomography, and/or magnetic resonance imaging 1 month after treatment initiation. For the first patient treated, the PET response increased between months 1 and 4 of treatment. The treatment remained effective after 4 months of follow-up although persistent disease activity was still observed. Treatment with vemurafenib, a newly approved BRAF inhibitor, should be considered for patients with severe and refractory BRAFV600E histiocytoses, particularly when the disease is life-threatening. PMID:23258922

  4. Effect of tobacco and alcohol consumption on the Langerhans cell population of human lingual epithelium determined using a monoclonal antibody against HLADR.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A W; Williams, D M; Scott, J

    1991-02-01

    Tobacco and alcohol consumption are known predisposing factors to the development of oral cancer, though the mechanism by which they act is unclear. The density of Langerhans cells (LC) has been shown to decrease in the uterine cervix of smokers, possibly indicating reduced immune surveillance and increased risk of malignant change. This study examined biopsies of normal human lateral border of tongue taken from 41 necropsies whose histories of tobacco and alcohol consumption were known. LC were identified in fixed, wax-embedded sections using a monoclonal antibody to HLADR and an immunoperoxidase technique. The mean density of LC in smokers of the equivalent of 11 or more cigarettes daily was significantly higher than moderate and non-smokers when counts were expressed per mm epithelial surface and basement membrane length. There were no significant differences in LC numbers in relation to alcohol consumption, age or sex, but there was a significant interaction between tobacco and alcohol. The results suggest that either human oral LC respond to external toxins, or that physical changes in the epithelial barrier induced by such toxins necessitate the presence of more LC to maintain the integrity of the epithelium.

  5. BRAF V600E mutation correlates with suppressive tumor immune microenvironment and reduced disease-free survival in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kaixuan; Wang, Zhe; Ohshima, Koichi; Liu, Yixiong; Zhang, Weichen; Wang, Lu; Fan, Linni; Li, Mingyang; Li, Xia; Wang, Yingmei; Yu, Zhou; Yan, Qingguo; Guo, Shuangping; Wei, Jie; Guo, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplasm of myeloid origin characterized by a clonal proliferation of CD1a(+)/CD207(+) dendritic cells. Recurrent BRAF V600E mutation has been reported in LCH. In the present report, we confirm the feasibility of the high-specificity monoclonal antibody VE1 for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in 36/97 (37.1%) retrospectively enrolled patients with LCH; concordant immunohistochemistry and Sanger sequencing results were seen in 94.8% of cases. We then assessed the tumor immune microenvironment status in LCH, and found that the GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3)(+)/T-bet(+) ratio could distinguish between clinical multi-system/single-system (SS) multifocal and SS unifocal LCH. Notably, we found that BRAF V600E mutation is significantly correlated with increased programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) expression and forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cells (p < 0.001, 0.009, respectively). Moreover, Cox multivariate survival analysis showed that BRAF V600E mutation and PDL1 were independent prognostic factors of poor disease-free survival (DFS) in LCH (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-5.56, p = 0.044; HR = 3.06, 95%CI 1.14-7.14, p = 0.025, respectively), and the superiority of PDL1 in sensitivity and specificity as biomarker for DFS in LCH was demonstrated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves when compared with BRAF V600E and risk category. Collectively, this study identifies for the first time relationship between BRAF V600E mutation and a suppressive tumor immune microenvironment in LCH, resulting in disruption of host-tumor immune surveillance, which is DFS. Our findings may provide a rationale for combining immunotherapy and BRAF-targeted therapy for treating patients with BRAF V600E mutant LCH. PMID:27622040

  6. BRAF V600E mutation correlates with suppressive tumor immune microenvironment and reduced disease-free survival in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Kaixuan; Wang, Zhe; Ohshima, Koichi; Liu, Yixiong; Zhang, Weichen; Wang, Lu; Fan, Linni; Li, Mingyang; Li, Xia; Wang, Yingmei; Yu, Zhou; Yan, Qingguo; Guo, Shuangping; Wei, Jie; Guo, Ying

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplasm of myeloid origin characterized by a clonal proliferation of CD1a+/CD207+ dendritic cells. Recurrent BRAF V600E mutation has been reported in LCH. In the present report, we confirm the feasibility of the high-specificity monoclonal antibody VE1 for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in 36/97 (37.1%) retrospectively enrolled patients with LCH; concordant immunohistochemistry and Sanger sequencing results were seen in 94.8% of cases. We then assessed the tumor immune microenvironment status in LCH, and found that the GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3)+/T-bet+ ratio could distinguish between clinical multi-system/single-system (SS) multifocal and SS unifocal LCH. Notably, we found that BRAF V600E mutation is significantly correlated with increased programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) expression and forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)+ regulatory T cells (p < 0.001, 0.009, respectively). Moreover, Cox multivariate survival analysis showed that BRAF V600E mutation and PDL1 were independent prognostic factors of poor disease-free survival (DFS) in LCH (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–5.56, p = 0.044; HR = 3.06, 95%CI 1.14–7.14, p = 0.025, respectively), and the superiority of PDL1 in sensitivity and specificity as biomarker for DFS in LCH was demonstrated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves when compared with BRAF V600E and risk category. Collectively, this study identifies for the first time relationship between BRAF V600E mutation and a suppressive tumor immune microenvironment in LCH, resulting in disruption of host–tumor immune surveillance, which is DFS. Our findings may provide a rationale for combining immunotherapy and BRAF-targeted therapy for treating patients with BRAF V600E mutant LCH.

  7. BRAF V600E mutation correlates with suppressive tumor immune microenvironment and reduced disease-free survival in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Kaixuan; Wang, Zhe; Ohshima, Koichi; Liu, Yixiong; Zhang, Weichen; Wang, Lu; Fan, Linni; Li, Mingyang; Li, Xia; Wang, Yingmei; Yu, Zhou; Yan, Qingguo; Guo, Shuangping; Wei, Jie; Guo, Ying

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplasm of myeloid origin characterized by a clonal proliferation of CD1a+/CD207+ dendritic cells. Recurrent BRAF V600E mutation has been reported in LCH. In the present report, we confirm the feasibility of the high-specificity monoclonal antibody VE1 for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in 36/97 (37.1%) retrospectively enrolled patients with LCH; concordant immunohistochemistry and Sanger sequencing results were seen in 94.8% of cases. We then assessed the tumor immune microenvironment status in LCH, and found that the GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3)+/T-bet+ ratio could distinguish between clinical multi-system/single-system (SS) multifocal and SS unifocal LCH. Notably, we found that BRAF V600E mutation is significantly correlated with increased programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) expression and forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)+ regulatory T cells (p < 0.001, 0.009, respectively). Moreover, Cox multivariate survival analysis showed that BRAF V600E mutation and PDL1 were independent prognostic factors of poor disease-free survival (DFS) in LCH (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–5.56, p = 0.044; HR = 3.06, 95%CI 1.14–7.14, p = 0.025, respectively), and the superiority of PDL1 in sensitivity and specificity as biomarker for DFS in LCH was demonstrated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves when compared with BRAF V600E and risk category. Collectively, this study identifies for the first time relationship between BRAF V600E mutation and a suppressive tumor immune microenvironment in LCH, resulting in disruption of host–tumor immune surveillance, which is DFS. Our findings may provide a rationale for combining immunotherapy and BRAF-targeted therapy for treating patients with BRAF V600E mutant LCH. PMID:27622040

  8. Interferon-gamma differentially regulates CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2/B70) expression on human Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Yokozeki, H; Katayama, I; Ohki, O; Arimura, M; Takayama, K; Matsunaga, T; Satoh, T; Umeda, T; Azuma, M; Okumura, K; Nishioka, K

    1997-06-01

    CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2/B70) have recently been identified in cultured human Langerhans cells (LCs), although their role and regulatory properties remain unclear. We present our comparison of the expression of the molecules, mRNAs and the function between CD80 and CD86 in human LCs treated by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). We examined the regulatory properties of CD80 and CD86 expression in human LCs pretreated with IFN-gamma. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the mean fluorescence intensity of CD86 but not CD80 was enhanced. However, the percentage modulation of both CD80 and CD86 positive cells were significantly up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner, after 48-h culturing with IFN-gamma. The regulatory properties of CD80 and CD86 mRNA expressions in human LC were studied using polymerase chain reaction methods. We found that both CD80 and CD86 mRNA of enriched LCs following IFN-gamma pretreatment for 12 h were higher than those without pretreatment. We have demonstrated that the primary allogeneic mixed epidermal cell-lymphocyte reaction induced by human LCs treated by IFN-gamma increased in a dose-dependent manner. There was a 61.5% inhibition by anti-CD86 monoclonal antibody and a 32.5% inhibition by anti-CD80 monoclonal antibody. These data indicate that the CD80 and CD86 expression of human LCs may be differently regulated by IFN-gamma.

  9. [Effect of irradiation with dental polymerized lamps on human Langerhans cells: a study made on human skin transplanted to nude mice].

    PubMed

    Bonding, N

    1992-04-01

    Light polymerized composite resin materials are now widely used in dentistry. Most resins are polymerized by light sources which have a powerful emission of visible light and a small emission in the ultraviolet light A spectrum (UV-A 320-400 mm). Possible eye damage, induced by such light, has been investigated, but the effects on the oral mucosa, which is directly exposed to the light, have been examined in only one animal study. Langerhans cells (LC) are dendritic non-epithelial cells which form a network within stratified epithelia. LC have features of macrophages, functions as antigen-presenting cells, and play an important role in the immune system associated with skin and oral mucosa. Pilot studies on human skin transplanted to nude mice showed that radiation with small therapeutic doses from a dental light curing unit (DLU) having only a small fraction of UV-light can reduce or deplete the OKT6 surface marker of LC in human epithelium. Further investigation of the photobiologic mechanisms involved spectral analyses of the emmission from the lamps and construction of a suitable light source for establishing an action spectrum for LC in the UV-A range. The action spectrum for LC in the UV-A range was obtained by exposing human skin, grafted to nude mice, to monochromatic light with a band pass of 5-10 nm. Criterion for threshold doses was total depletion of LC, visualized by staining with known LC-markers, monoclonal antibodies OKT6, DAKO-Vimentin, DAKO-HLA-DR and DAKO-S-100. The action spectrum for LC consisted of a biphasic curve, with a non-linear, strong wave-length dependency.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1412043

  10. Thymus and Mediastinal Node Involvement in Childhood Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: Long-Term Follow-Up From the French National Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ducassou, Stephane; Seyrig, Fanny; Thomas, Caroline; Lambilliotte, Anne; Marec-Berard, Perrine; Berger, Claire; Plat, Genevieve; Brugiere, Laurence; Ouache, Marie; Barkaoui, Mohamed; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Lutz, Patrick; Leverger, Guy; Rialland, Xavier; Mansuy, Ludovic; Pacquement, Helene; Jeziorski, Eric; Gandemer, Virginie; Chalard, François; Chateil, Jean François; Tazi, Abdellatif; Emile, Jean François; Donadieu, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Background Mediastinal involvement (MI) in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) has been rarely reported. Here, we describe the clinical, radiological, and biological presentation, and the outcome of childhood LCH with MI. Method From the French LCH register, which includes 1,423 patients aged less than 18 years, we retrieved the medical charts of patients with mediastinal enlargement detected on chest X-rays. Results Thirty-seven patients were retrieved, including 18 males; median age of diagnosis was 0.7 years, and median follow-up time was 6.2 years. The prevalence of MI varied with the age at diagnosis, ranging from 7% below 1 year old to less than 1% at >5 years. Thirteen cases (35%) were diagnosed because of MI-related symptoms, including respiratory distress (N = 4), superior venous cava syndrome (N = 2), and/or cough and polypnea (N = 10). CT scans performed in 32 cases at diagnosis showed tracheal compression (N = 5), cava thrombosis (N = 2), and/or calcification (N = 16). All patients presented multi-system disease at LCH diagnosis, and 35/37 were initially treated with vinblastine and corticosteroids. Death occurred in five cases, due to MI (N = 1) or hematological refractory involvement (N = 4). The overall 5-year survival was 87.1%, and immunodeficiency was not detected as a sequel. Conclusions MI in LCH mainly occurs in young children, and diagnosis was based on CT showing thymus enlargement and calcifications. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013;60:1759–1765. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23813854

  11. Attenuation of niacin-induced prostaglandin D2 generation by omega-3 fatty acids in THP-1 macrophages and Langerhans dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    VanHorn, Justin; Altenburg, Jeffrey D; Harvey, Kevin A; Xu, Zhidong; Kovacs, Richard J; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2012-01-01

    Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid, is an organic compound that has several cardio-beneficial effects. However, its use is limited due to the induction of a variable flushing response in most individuals. Flushing occurs from a niacin receptor mediated generation of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid metabolism. This study examined the ability of docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), to attenuate niacin-induced prostaglandins in THP-1 macrophages. Niacin induced both PGD2 and PGE2 generation in a dose-dependent manner. Niacin also caused an increase in cytosolic calcium and activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2. The increase in PGD2 and PGE2 was reduced by both docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, but not by oleic acid. Omega-3 PUFAs efficiently incorporated into cellular phospholipids at the expense of arachidonic acid, whereas oleic acid incorporated to a higher extent but had no effect on arachidonic acid levels. Omega-3 PUFAs also reduced surface expression of GPR109A, a human niacin receptor. Furthermore, omega-3 PUFAs also inhibited the niacin-induced increase in cytosolic calcium. Niacin and/or omega-3 PUFAs minimally affected cyclooxygenase-1 activity and had no effect on cyclooxygenase -2 activity. The effects of niacin on PGD2 generation were further confirmed using Langerhans dendritic cells. Results of the present study indicate that omega-3 PUFAs reduced niacin-induced prostaglandins formation by diminishing the availability of their substrate, as well as reducing the surface expression of niacin receptors. In conclusion, this study suggests that the regular use of omega-3 PUFAs along with niacin can potentially reduce the niacin-induced flushing response in sensitive patients. PMID:22442634

  12. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  13. Adult stem cells and tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Körbling, M; Estrov, Z; Champlin, R

    2003-08-01

    Recently, adult stem cells originating from bone marrow or peripheral blood have been suggested to contribute to repair and genesis of cells specific for liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, gut, and brain tissue. The mechanism involved has been termed transdifferentiation, although other explanations including cell fusion have been postulated. Using adult stem cells to generate or repair solid organ tissue obviates the immunologic, ethical, and teratogenic issues that accompany embryonic stem cells.

  14. Progenitor cells in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Holland, Andrew M; Góñez, L Jorge; Harrison, Leonard C

    2004-01-01

    The beta-cell mass in the adult pancreas possesses the ability to undergo limited regeneration following injury. Identifying the progenitor cells involved in this process and understanding the mechanisms leading to their maturation will open new avenues for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, despite steady advances in determining the molecular basis of early pancreatic development, the identification of pancreatic stem cells or beta-cell progenitors and the molecular mechanisms underlying beta-cell regeneration remain unclear. Recent advances in the directed differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells has heightened interest in the possible application of stem cell therapy in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Drawing on the expanding knowledge of pancreas development, beta-cell regeneration and stem cell research, this review focuses on progenitor cells in the adult pancreas as a potential source of beta-cells. PMID:14737742

  15. Correlation of E6 and E7 levels in high-risk HPV16 type cervical lesions with CCL20 and Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B; Xue, M

    2015-09-08

    The human papillomavirus (HPV)16 E6 and E7 correlation with chemokine ligand (CCL)20 expression and Langerhans cells (LCs) in cervical lesions was investigated. We enrolled 43 patients with surgically treated cervical lesions from the Department of Gynecology in our hospital, and 20 controls without cervical lesions. Subjects were divided by pathology: HPV16(-) and HPV16(+) normal cervical groups (N = 10 each), and HPV16(+) cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), cervical invasive carcinoma (N = 15 each), and in situ carcinoma (N = 13) groups. E6, E7, the LC surface marker CD1a, and CCL20 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. E6 and E7 in HPV16-type lesions were correlated with CCL20 and LCs. The average high power field cell numbers of CD1a+ LCs in the HPV(-) and HPV(+) normal cervix groups, and the CINI-II, CINIII in situ and cervical carcinoma groups were 22.89 ± 4.84, 13.7 ± 2.26, 9.2 ± 1.68, 5.9 ± 1.59, and 5.5 ± 1.58, respectively. Significant between-group differences existed except between cervical carcinoma and CINIII groups (P < 0.05). CCL20+ rates in each group were 70, 60, 60, 15.38, and 13.33%, respectively. E6/E7-positive expression rates in each group were 20/20, 66.7/66.7, 76.9/69.2, and 86.67/73.3%, respectively. CCL20 was positively correlated with CD1a (r = 0.649), and negatively correlated with E7 (r = -0.946) and E6 (r = -0.949). CD1a was negatively correlated with E6 (r = -0.632) and E7 (r = -0.632). Downregulation of CCL20 leading to LC decline is a key factor in cervical lesions. High-risk HPV-type lesions might inhibit the chemokine CCL20 through E6 and E7 to escape the immune response.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-17 differently affects Langerhans cell distribution and activation in an innovative three-dimensional model of normal human skin.

    PubMed

    Prignano, Francesca; Arnaboldi, Francesca; Cornaghi, Laura; Landoni, Federica; Tripo, Lara; Preis, Franz William Baruffaldi; Donetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    Among the several cytokines involved in the psoriasis pathogenesis, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-17 play a central role. Many biomolecular steps remain unknown due to difficulty to obtain psoriatic models. To investigate the effect of TNF-alpha and IL-17 on the ultrastructure, immunophenotype, and number of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), human skin explants (n=7) were cultured air-liquid interface in a Transwell system. Four different conditions were used: medium alone (control), medium added with 100 ng/ml TNF-alpha or 50 ng/ml IL-17 or a combination of both cytokines. Samples were harvested 24 and 48 h after cytokine addition and were frozen. Samples harvested at 24h were also processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By immunofluorescence analysis with anti-human Langerin antibody (three experiments/sample) we calculated the percentage of LCs/mm(2) of living epidermis after 24 and 48 h of incubation (considering control as 100%). At 24h LC number was significantly higher in samples treated with both cytokines (216.71+15.10%; p<0.001) and in TNF-alpha (125.74+26.24%; p<0.05). No differences were observed in IL-17-treated samples (100.14+38.42%). After 48 h, the number of epidermal Langerin-positive cells in IL-17- and TNF-alpha treated samples slightly decreased (94.99+36.79% and 101.37+23% vs. their controls, respectively). With the combination of both cytokines epidermal LCs strongly decreased (120+13.36%). By TEM, upon TNF-alpha stimulus LCs appeared with few organelles, mostly mitochondria, lysosomes, and scattered peripherical BGs. Upon IL-17 stimulus, LCs showed a cytoplasm with many mitochondria and numerous BGs close to the perinuclear space and Golgi apparatus, but also at the periphery, at the beginning of the dendrites. The addition of both cytokines did not affect LC ultrastructure. Our study showed that IL-17 induced significant changes in LC ultrastructure, while the combination of both cytokines seems to

  17. Commercial sunscreen lotions prevent ultraviolet radiation-induced depletion of epidermal Langerhans cells in Skh-1 and C3H mice.

    PubMed

    Beasley, D G; Montgomery, M A; Moloney, S J; Edmonds, S; Roberts, L K

    1998-01-01

    There is much controversy regarding the ability of sunscreens to prevent ultraviolet (UV)-induced immune suppression. Epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) play a key antigen-presenting role in the afferent limb of the immune system's response to antigens introduced through the skin. It has been suggested that depletion of LC in UV-exposed skin is a critical step toward the induction of immunosuppression by UV radiation. There are a number of disparate reports with inconsistent results concerning the ability of sunscreens to prevent UV-induced depletion of LC. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the ability of sunscreens to prevent UV-induced LC depletion in mice. Epidermal sheets obtained from skin biopsies taken from mice exposed to UV radiation from Kodacel-filtered FS20 sunlamps, which do not emit UV power at wavelengths < 290 nm, were immunoperoxidase stained for LC using a rat monoclonal antibody against mouse Ia (major histocompatibility complex class II antigen). Time course and dose-response curves for LC depletion were generated for Skh-1 and C3H mice. Dose-response curves for acute UV exposure induced depletion of LC in Skh-1 and C3H mice were similar, but not identical. LC density in the skin of Skh-1 mice that received chronic UV exposure (3 days/week for 8 weeks) was reduced by 62% after 2 weeks of exposure, but returned to normal levels by 6 weeks. Five commercial sunscreen lotions with labeled sun protection factors (SPF) of 4, 8, 15, 30 and 45 were tested for their capacity to block UV-induced depletion of LC. LC were depleted approximately 75% in the skin of unprotected or placebo lotion treated Skh-1 mice exposed to UV given on two consecutive days. Conversely, LC depletion was prevented in similarly UV exposed Skh-1 mice protected with a SPF 30 sunscreen. In C3H mice the levels of protection against LC depletion provided by the five sunscreens were proportional to the level of protection predicted by their labeled SPF. Comparisons

  18. High-risk human papilloma virus infection decreases the frequency of dendritic Langerhans' cells in the human female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Mendez-Cruz, Rene; Ojeda-Ortiz, Jorge; Muñoz-Molina, Rebeca; Balderas-Carrillo, Oscar; de la Luz Diaz-Soberanes, Maria; Lebecque, Serge; Saeland, Sem; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are often arranged in planar layers in tissues with high antigenic exposure, such as skin and mucosae. Providing an en face view, this arrangement optimizes in situ analysis regarding morphology (even of individual dendrites), topographic distribution (regular/clustered) and quantification. The few reports on human genital DC usually utilize single markers and conventional sections, restricting immunolabelling only to cell parts sectioned by the cut. To better assess DC in situ, we labelled epithelial sheets, prepared from fresh cervix biopsies, with antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-CII, CD1a and Langerin, revealing (with each of these markers) a dense DC network in a planar-like, regular distribution. Using the hybrid capture system to detect the high-risk mucotropic human papilloma virus (HPV) group, 16 positive and five negative women were studied and the results were compared between these groups. DC frequency per area was substantially reduced (to ≈ 50% for the three markers) in samples from all HPV-infected patients compared with samples from controls. Unlike HPV– samples, Langerin+ DC in HPV+ cervix exhibited a highly accentuated dendritic appearance. We believe this to be the first study using these three DC-restricted markers (Langerin, CD1a and MHC-CII) in cervical epithelial sheets from high-risk HPV+ donors and also the first study to demonstrate the morphological and quantitative changes triggered by high-risk HPV infection. Cervical DC reduction in early, premalignant high-risk HPV infection might represent viral subversion strategies interfering with efficient antigen handling by the immune system's peripheral sentinels, the DC, perhaps hampering appropriate recruitment and subsequent development of effector (cytotoxic) T cells. PMID:16423058

  19. Hair follicle targeting, penetration enhancement and Langerhans cell activation make cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping a promising delivery technique for transcutaneous immunization with large molecules and particle-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Annika; Hadam, Sabrina; Deckert, Iliane; Schmidt, Julia; Stroux, Andrea; Afraz, Zahra; Rancan, Fiorenza; Lademann, Jürgen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) requires targeting of a maximum number of skin antigen-presenting cells as non-invasive as possible on small skin areas. In two clinical trials, we introduced cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) as a safe method for TCI. Here, using ex vivo human skin, we demonstrate that one CSSS procedure removed only 30% of stratum corneum, but significantly increased the penetration of 200 nm polystyrene particles deep into vellus and intermediate hair follicles from where they could not been retrieved by conventional tape stripping. Two subsequent CSSS had no striking additional effect. CSSS increased particle penetration in superficial stratum corneum and induced Langerhans cell activation. Formulation in amphiphilic ointment or massage did not substantially influences the interfollicular penetration profiles. Hair follicle (HF) targeting by CSSS could become a highly effective tool for TCI when combined with carrier-based delivery and is gaining new attention as our understanding on the HF immune system increases. PMID:25382068

  20. Hair follicle targeting, penetration enhancement and Langerhans cell activation make cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping a promising delivery technique for transcutaneous immunization with large molecules and particle-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Annika; Hadam, Sabrina; Deckert, Iliane; Schmidt, Julia; Stroux, Andrea; Afraz, Zahra; Rancan, Fiorenza; Lademann, Jürgen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) requires targeting of a maximum number of skin antigen-presenting cells as non-invasive as possible on small skin areas. In two clinical trials, we introduced cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) as a safe method for TCI. Here, using ex vivo human skin, we demonstrate that one CSSS procedure removed only 30% of stratum corneum, but significantly increased the penetration of 200 nm polystyrene particles deep into vellus and intermediate hair follicles from where they could not been retrieved by conventional tape stripping. Two subsequent CSSS had no striking additional effect. CSSS increased particle penetration in superficial stratum corneum and induced Langerhans cell activation. Formulation in amphiphilic ointment or massage did not substantially influences the interfollicular penetration profiles. Hair follicle (HF) targeting by CSSS could become a highly effective tool for TCI when combined with carrier-based delivery and is gaining new attention as our understanding on the HF immune system increases.

  1. Immunological control of adult neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs only in discrete regions of adult central nervous system: the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone. These areas are populated by adult neural stem cells (aNSC) that are regulated by a number of molecules and signaling pathways, which control their cell fate choices, survival and proliferation rates. For a long time, it was believed that the immune system did not exert any control on neural proliferative niches. However, it has been observed that many pathological and inflammatory conditions significantly affect NSC niches. Even more, increasing evidence indicates that chemokines and cytokines play an important role in regulating proliferation, cell fate choices, migration and survival of NSCs under physiological conditions. Hence, the immune system is emerging is an important regulator of neurogenic niches in the adult brain, which may have clinical relevance in several brain diseases. PMID:20861925

  2. Adult Stem Cells and Diabetes Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ilgun, Handenur; Kim, Joseph William; Luo, LuGuang

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that diabetes will be the fourth most prevalent disease by 2050. Developing a new therapy for diabetes is a challenge for researchers and clinicians in field. Many medications are being used for treatment of diabetes however with no conclusive and effective results therefore alternative therapies are required. Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for diabetes therapy, and it has involved embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, and pluripotent stem cells. In this review, we focus on adult stem cells, especial human bone marrow stem cells (BM) for diabetes therapy, its history, and current development. We discuss prospects for future diabetes therapy such as induced pluripotent stem cells which have popularity in stem cell research area. PMID:27123495

  3. Excitation wave propagation as a possible mechanism for signal transmission in pancreatic islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidi, O V; Mornev, O A; Skyggebjerg, O; Arkhammar, P; Thastrup, O; Sørensen, M P; Christiansen, P L; Conradsen, K; Scott, A C

    2001-01-01

    In response to glucose application, beta-cells forming pancreatic islets of Langerhans start bursting oscillations of the membrane potential and intracellular calcium concentration, inducing insulin secretion by the cells. Until recently, it has been assumed that the bursting activity of beta-cells in a single islet of Langerhans is synchronized across the whole islet due to coupling between the cells. However, time delays of several seconds in the activity of distant cells are usually observed in the islets of Langerhans, indicating that electrical/calcium wave propagation through the islets can occur. This work presents both experimental and theoretical evidence for wave propagation in the islets of Langerhans. Experiments with Fura-2 fluorescence monitoring of spatiotemporal calcium dynamics in the islets have clearly shown such wave propagation. Furthermore, numerical simulations of the model describing a cluster of electrically coupled beta-cells have supported our view that the experimentally observed calcium waves are due to electric pulses propagating through the cluster. This point of view is also supported by independent experimental results. Based on the model equations, an approximate analytical expression for the wave velocity is introduced, indicating which parameters can alter the velocity. We point to the possible role of the observed waves as signals controlling the insulin secretion inside the islets of Langerhans, in particular, in the regions that cannot be reached by any external stimuli such as high glucose concentration outside the islets. PMID:11222284

  4. Adult stem-like cells in kidney

    PubMed Central

    Hishikawa, Keiichi; Takase, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Taro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatment for kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivation of kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidney tissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lower vertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephrons after tubular damages is commonly observed after renal injury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitor cell or system is reportedly presents suggesting that adult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinical targets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclear if kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. In general, stemness is defined by several factors such as self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency and characteristic gene expression profiles. The definite use of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidney regeneration, and here we describe the recent broad findings of kidney regeneration and the cells that contribute regeneration. PMID:25815133

  5. Adult stem-like cells in kidney.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Keiichi; Takase, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Taro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-26

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatment for kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivation of kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidney tissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lower vertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephrons after tubular damages is commonly observed after renal injury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitor cell or system is reportedly presents suggesting that adult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinical targets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclear if kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. In general, stemness is defined by several factors such as self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency and characteristic gene expression profiles. The definite use of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidney regeneration, and here we describe the recent broad findings of kidney regeneration and the cells that contribute regeneration. PMID:25815133

  6. Adult Stem Cell Responses to Nanostimuli

    PubMed Central

    Tsimbouri, Penelope M.

    2015-01-01

    Adult or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been found in different tissues in the body, residing in stem cell microenvironments called “stem cell niches”. They play different roles but their main activity is to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the lifetime of an organism. Their ability to differentiate into different cell types makes them an ideal tool to study tissue development and to use them in cell-based therapies. This differentiation process is subject to both internal and external forces at the nanoscale level and this response of stem cells to nanostimuli is the focus of this review. PMID:26193326

  7. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Lisa B.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan. PMID:24757526

  8. Dengue fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus synthetic peptides, with motifs to fit HLA class I haplotypes prevalent in human populations in endemic regions, can be used for application to skin Langerhans cells to prime antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs)--a novel approach to the protection of humans.

    PubMed

    Becker, Y

    1994-09-01

    Flaviviruses were reported to induce CD8+ cytotoxic T cells in infected individuals, indicating that nonapeptides, proteolytic cleavage products of the viral precursor protein, enter the endoplasmic reticulum in infected cells and interact with HLA class I molecules. The assembled HLA class I molecules are transported to the plasma membrane and prime CD8+ T cells. Current knowledge of the interaction of viral peptides with HLA molecules is reviewed. Based on this review, an idea is presented to use synthetic flavivirus peptides with an amino acid motif to fit with the HLA class I peptide binding group of HLA haplotypes prevalent in a given population in an endemic area. These synthetic viral peptides may be introduced into the human skin using a lotion containing the peptides ("Peplotion") together with substances capable of enhancing the penetration of these peptides into the skin to reach Langerhans cells. The peptide-treated Langerhans cells, professional antigen-presenting cells, may bind the synthetic viral peptides by their HLA class I peptide-binding grooves. Antigens carrying Langerhans cells are able to migrate and induce the cellular immune response in the lymph nodes. This approach to the priming of antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T cells may provide cellular immune protection from flavivirus infection without inducing the humoral immune response, which can lead to the shock syndrome in Dengue fever patients. To be able to develop anti-Dengue virus synthetic peptides for populations with different HLA class I haplotypes, it is necessary to develop computational studies to design HLA class I Dengue virus synthetic peptides with motifs to fit the HLA haplotypes of the population living in an endemic region for Dengue fever. Experiments to study Dengue virus and Japanese encephalitis peptides vaccines and their effectiveness in protection against Dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis are needed. The development of human antiviral vaccines for application of viral

  9. Comparative genomics analysis of mononuclear phagocyte subsets confirms homology between lymphoid tissue-resident and dermal XCR1(+) DCs in mouse and human and distinguishes them from Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Sabrina; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Chelbi, Rabie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent; Dalod, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mononuclear phagocytes which exhibit a branching (dendritic) morphology and excel at naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of cell surface molecules and later shown to possess distinct functions. DC subset differentiation is orchestrated by transcription factors, growth factors and cytokines. Identifying DC subsets is challenging as very few cell surface molecules are uniquely expressed on any one of these cell populations. There is no standard consensus to identify mononuclear phagocyte subsets; varying antigens are employed depending on the tissue and animal species studied and between laboratories. This has led to confusion in how to accurately define and classify DCs across tissues and between species. Here we report a comparative genomics strategy that enables universal definition of DC and other mononuclear phagocyte subsets across species. We performed a meta-analysis of several public datasets of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte subsets isolated from blood, spleen, skin or cutaneous lymph nodes, including by using a novel and user friendly software, BubbleGUM, which generates and integrates gene signatures for high throughput gene set enrichment analysis. This analysis demonstrates the equivalence between human and mouse skin XCR1(+) DCs, and between mouse and human Langerhans cells.

  10. Comparative genomics analysis of mononuclear phagocyte subsets confirms homology between lymphoid tissue-resident and dermal XCR1(+) DCs in mouse and human and distinguishes them from Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Sabrina; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Chelbi, Rabie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent; Dalod, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mononuclear phagocytes which exhibit a branching (dendritic) morphology and excel at naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of cell surface molecules and later shown to possess distinct functions. DC subset differentiation is orchestrated by transcription factors, growth factors and cytokines. Identifying DC subsets is challenging as very few cell surface molecules are uniquely expressed on any one of these cell populations. There is no standard consensus to identify mononuclear phagocyte subsets; varying antigens are employed depending on the tissue and animal species studied and between laboratories. This has led to confusion in how to accurately define and classify DCs across tissues and between species. Here we report a comparative genomics strategy that enables universal definition of DC and other mononuclear phagocyte subsets across species. We performed a meta-analysis of several public datasets of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte subsets isolated from blood, spleen, skin or cutaneous lymph nodes, including by using a novel and user friendly software, BubbleGUM, which generates and integrates gene signatures for high throughput gene set enrichment analysis. This analysis demonstrates the equivalence between human and mouse skin XCR1(+) DCs, and between mouse and human Langerhans cells. PMID:26966045

  11. Comparative genomics analysis of mononuclear phagocyte subsets confirms homology between lymphoid tissue-resident and dermal XCR1+ DCs in mouse and human and distinguishes them from Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Sabrina; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Chelbi, Rabie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent; Dalod, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mononuclear phagocytes which exhibit a branching (dendritic) morphology and excel at naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of cell surface molecules and later shown to possess distinct functions. DC subset differentiation is orchestrated by transcription factors, growth factors and cytokines. Identifying DC subsets is challenging as very few cell surface molecules are uniquely expressed on any one of these cell populations. There is no standard consensus to identify mononuclear phagocyte subsets; varying antigens are employed depending on the tissue and animal species studied and between laboratories. This has led to confusion in how to accurately define and classify DCs across tissues and between species. Here we report a comparative genomics strategy that enables universal definition of DC and other mononuclear phagocyte subsets across species. We performed a meta-analysis of several public datasets of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte subsets isolated from blood, spleen, skin or cutaneous lymph nodes, including by using a novel and user friendly software, BubbleGUM, which generates and integrates gene signatures for high throughput gene set enrichment analysis. This analysis demonstrates the equivalence between human and mouse skin XCR1+ DCs, and between mouse and human Langerhans cells. PMID:26966045

  12. Damage to pancreatic acinar cells and preservation of islets of Langerhans in a rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn).

    PubMed

    Carcano-Diaz, Katya; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Loera-Arias, Maria de Jesus; Garcia-Juarez, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh) is a poisonous plant that grows in some regions of the American continent. Consuming large amounts of Kh fruit results in acute intoxication leading to respiratory failure, culminating in death within days. There is evidence of histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys following accidental and experimental Kh intoxication. To date, the microscopic effect of Kh consumption on the pancreas has not been described. We examined the early effects of Kh fruit on pancreatic tissue at different stages of acute intoxication in the Wistar rat. We found progressive damage confined to the exocrine pancreas, starting with a reduction in the number of zymogen granules, loss of acinar architecture, the presence of autophagy-like vesicles, apoptosis and inflammatory infiltrate. The pancreatic pathology culminated in damaged acini characterized by necrosis and edema, with a complete loss of lobular architecture. Interestingly, the morphology of the islets of Langerhans was conserved throughout our evaluations. Taken together, our results indicate the damage induced by a high dose of Kh fruit in the Wistar rat is consistent with an early acute necrotizing pancreatitis that exclusively affects the exocrine pancreas. Therefore, this system might be useful as an animal model to study the treatment of pancreatic diseases. More importantly, as the islets of Langerhans were preserved, the active compounds of Kh fruit could be utilized for the treatment of acinar pancreatic cancer. Further studies might provide insight into the severity of acute Kh intoxication in humans and influence the design of treatments for pancreatic diseases and acinar pancreatic cancer. PMID:26877198

  13. Adult neural stem cells stake their ground

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daniel A.; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The birth of new neurons in the walls of the adult brain lateral ventricles has captured the attention of many neuroscientists for over two decades, yielding key insights into the identity and regulation of neural stem cells (NSCs). In the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), NSCs are a specialized form of astrocyte that generates several types of neurons for the olfactory bulb. Here we discuss recent findings regarding the unique organization of the V-SVZ NSCs niche, the multiple regulatory controls of neuronal production, the distinct regional identities of adult NSCs, and the epigenetic mechanisms that maintain adult neurogenesis. Understanding how V-SVZ NSCs establish and maintain lifelong neurogenesis continues to provide surprising insights into the cellular and molecular regulation of neural development. PMID:25223700

  14. Translational research of adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Gen

    2015-11-26

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) secondary to chronic coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Its prevalence is increasing despite advances in medical and device therapies. Cell based therapies generating new cardiomyocytes and vessels have emerged as a promising treatment to reverse functional deterioration and prevent the progression to CHF. Functional efficacy of progenitor cells isolated from the bone marrow and the heart have been evaluated in preclinical large animal models. Furthermore, several clinical trials using autologous and allogeneic stem cells and progenitor cells have demonstrated their safety in humans yet their clinical relevance is inconclusive. This review will discuss the clinical therapeutic applications of three specific adult stem cells that have shown particularly promising regenerative effects in preclinical studies, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell, heart derived cardiosphere-derived cell and cardiac stem cell. We will also discuss future therapeutic approaches.

  15. Neural Crest As the Source of Adult Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pierret, Chris; Spears, Kathleen; Maruniak, Joel A.; Kirk, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that adult stem cells can cross germ layer boundaries. For example, bone marrow-derived stem cells appear to differentiate into neurons and glial cells, as well as other types of cells. How can stem cells from bone marrow, pancreas, skin, or fat become neurons and glia; in other words, what molecular and cellular events direct mesodermal cells to a neural fate? Transdifferentiation, dediffereniation, and fusion of donor adult stem cells with fully differentiated host cells have been proposed to explain the plasticity of adult stem cells. Here we review the origin of select adult stem cell populations and propose a unifying hypothesis to explain adult stem cell plasticity. In addition, we outline specific experiments to test our hypothesis. We propose that peripheral, tissue-derived, or adult stem cells are all progeny of the neural crest. PMID:16646675

  16. Evaluation of the role of CD207 on Langerhans cells in a murine model of atopic dermatitis by in situ imaging using Cr:forsterite laser-based multimodality nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jyh-Hong; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2012-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an allergic inflammatory disease of skin. It remains unclear that CD207 of Langerhans cells (LCs) plays a central role in the development of allergic sensitization. There is little data on LCs within the microenviroment in vivo. We used a murine model of epicutaneous (EC) ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization inducing an inflammatory skin resembling AD to explore the role of CD207 in the pathogenesis of AD. Cr:forsterite laser-based multimodality nonlinear microscopy was applied for in situ imaging. Peritoneal injections of Alexa Fluor 647-rat anti-mouse CD207 into mice were performed to specifically trace the LCs. Peritoneal injections of OVA-Alexa Fluor 647 conjugate into mice were performed to specifically trace the OVA. We found that combining Alexa Fluor fluorescent probes with multimodality nonlinear microscopy permitted the unequivocal in situ imaging of CD207-expressing LCs. The relevant time-course, expressional, and functional studies reveal that CD207 of LCs plays an essential role during the induction of EC sensitization. We establish and validate that Cr:forsterite laser-based multimodality nonlinear microscopy is applicable for the specific detection of labeled mAb-bound LCs and labeled antigen. We suggest that CD207-expressing LCs initiate the allergic response through the CD207 mediated epicutaneous sensitization associated with the development of AD.

  17. Phenotypic and Functional Properties of Human Steady State CD14+ and CD1a+ Antigen Presenting Cells and Epidermal Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fehres, Cynthia. M.; Bruijns, Sven C. M.; Sotthewes, Brigit N.; Kalay, Hakan; Schaffer, Lana; Head, Steven R.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous antigen presenting cells (APCs) are critical for the induction and regulation of skin immune responses. The human skin contains phenotypically and functionally distinct APCs subsets that are present at two separated locations. While CD1ahigh LCs form a dense network in the epidermis, the CD14+ and CD1a+ APCs reside in the dermal compartment. A better understanding of the biology of human skin APC subsets is necessary for the improvement of vaccine strategies that use the skin as administration route. In particular, progress in the characterization of uptake and activatory receptors will certainly improve APC-targeting strategies in vaccination. Here we performed a detailed analysis of the expression and function of glycan-binding and pattern-recognition receptors in skin APC subsets. The results demonstrate that under steady state conditions human CD1a+ dermal dendritic cells (DCs) were phenotypically most mature as measured by the expression of CD83 and CD86, whereas the CD14+ cells showed a higher expression of the CLRs DC-SIGN, mannose receptor and DCIR and had potent antigen uptake capacity. Furthermore, steady state LCs showed superior antigen cross-presentation as compared to the dermal APC subsets. Our results also demonstrate that the TLR3 ligand polyribosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (pI:C) was the most potent stimulator of cytokine production by both LCs and dDCs. These studies warrant further exploration of human CD1a+ dDCs and LCs as target cells for cancer vaccination to induce anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:26605924

  18. Adult Mouse Cortical Cell Taxonomy by Single Cell Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T.; Sorensen, Staci A.; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M.; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. Here, we construct a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice based on single cell RNA-sequencing. We identify 49 transcriptomic cell types including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and seven non-neuronal types. We also analyze cell-type specific mRNA processing and characterize genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we show that some of our transcriptomic cell types display specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  19. Adult mouse cortical cell taxonomy revealed by single cell transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T; Sorensen, Staci A; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-02-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. We constructed a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice on the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing. We identified 49 transcriptomic cell types, including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and 7 non-neuronal types. We also analyzed cell type-specific mRNA processing and characterized genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we found that some of our transcriptomic cell types displayed specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single-cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties.

  20. Ovarian adult stem cells: hope or pitfall?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ovarian biology has been based on the dogma that oocytes reserve in female mammals included a finite number, established before or at birth and it is determined by the number and quality of primordial follicles developed during the neonatal period. The restricted supply of oocytes in adult female mammals has been disputed in recent years by supporters of postnatal neo-oogenesis. Recent experimental data showed that ovarian surface epithelium and cortical tissue from both mouse and human were proved to contain very low proportion of cells able to propagate themselves, but also to generate immature oocytes in vitro or in vivo, when transplanted into immunodeficient mice ovaries. By mentioning several landmarks of ovarian stem cell reserve and addressing the exciting perspective of translation into clinical practice as treatment for infertility pathologies, the purpose of this article is to review the knowledge about adult mammalian ovarian stem cells, a topic that, since the first approach quickly attracted the attention of both the scientific media and patients. PMID:25018783

  1. Adult Orbital Xanthogranulomatous Disease: A Review with Emphasis on Etiology, Systemic Associations, Diagnostic Tools, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kerstetter, Justin; Wang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Adult orbital xanthogranulomatous diseases are rare entities and encompass a group of disorders with varying manifestations that are poorly understood. Taken as a group, there are non-Langerhans histiocytic disorders (type II) that are diagnosed histologically by the presence of foamy histiocytes, Touton giant cells, and varying degrees of fibrosis. Based on the accompanying systemic associations, there are 4 main categories of adult xanthogranulomatous disease: adult-onset xanthogranuloma, adult-onset asthma and periocular xanthogranuloma, necrobiotic xanthogranuloma, and Erdheim-Chester disease. Herein, we discuss the etiopathogenesis, systemic associations, methods of diagnosis, and treatment options for these disorders.

  2. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke. PMID:27733032

  3. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Kunihiro

    2012-04-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) was first described in 1977 as a distinct clinico-pathological entity with a suspected viral etiology. Subsequently, a novel RNA retrovirus, human T-cell leukemia/lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was isolated from a cell line established from the leukemic cells of an ATL patient, and the finding of a clear association with ATL led to its inclusion among human carcinogenic pathogens. The three major routes of HTLV-1 transmission are mother-to-child infections via breast milk, sexual intercourse, and blood transfusions. HTLV-1 infection early in life, presumably from breast feeding, is crucial in the development of ATL. The diversity in clinical features and prognosis of patients with this disease has led to its subtype-classification into four categories, acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering types defined by organ involvement, and LDH and calcium values. In cases of acute, lymphoma, or unfavorable chronic subtypes (aggressive ATL), intensive chemotherapy such as VCAP-AMP-VECP is usually recommended. In cases of favorable chronic or smoldering ATL (indolent ATL), watchful waiting until disease progression has been recommended although the long term prognosis was inferior to those of, for instance, chronic lymphoid leukemia. Retrospective analysis suggested that the combination of interferon alpha and zidovudine was apparently promising for the treatment of ATL, especially for types with leukemic manifestation. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is also promising for the treatment of aggressive ATL possibly reflecting graft vs. ATL effect. Several new agent-trials for ATL are ongoing and in preparation, including a defucosylated humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 monoclonal antibody. Two steps should be considered for the prevention of HTLV-1-associated ATL. The first is the prevention of HTLV-1 infections and the second is the prevention of ATL among HTLV-1 carriers. So far, no agent has been found to be

  4. Cell Phone Use by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryen, Diane Nelson; Carey, Allison; Friedman, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Although cell phone use has grown dramatically, there is a gap in cell phone access between people with disabilities and the general public. The importance of cell phone use among people with intellectual disabilities and studies about use of cell phones by adults with intellectual disabilities was described. Our goal was to determine the extent…

  5. Classification of microscopy images of Langerhans islets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å vihlík, Jan; Kybic, Jan; Habart, David; Berková, Zuzana; Girman, Peter; Kříž, Jan; Zacharovová, Klára

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of images of Langerhans islets is a crucial procedure for planning an islet transplantation, which is a promising diabetes treatment. This paper deals with segmentation of microscopy images of Langerhans islets and evaluation of islet parameters such as area, diameter, or volume (IE). For all the available images, the ground truth and the islet parameters were independently evaluated by four medical experts. We use a pixelwise linear classifier (perceptron algorithm) and SVM (support vector machine) for image segmentation. The volume is estimated based on circle or ellipse fitting to individual islets. The segmentations were compared with the corresponding ground truth. Quantitative islet parameters were also evaluated and compared with parameters given by medical experts. We can conclude that accuracy of the presented fully automatic algorithm is fully comparable with medical experts.

  6. Markers of epidermal stem cell subpopulations in adult mammalian skin.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-10-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties.

  7. Enterovirus infection of human islets of Langerhans affects β-cell function resulting in disintegrated islets, decreased glucose stimulated insulin secretion and loss of Golgi structure

    PubMed Central

    Hodik, M; Skog, O; Lukinius, A; Isaza-Correa, J M; Kuipers, J; Giepmans, B N G; Frisk, G

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis In type 1 diabetes (T1D), most insulin-producing β cells are destroyed, but the trigger is unknown. One of the possible triggers is a virus infection and the aim of this study was to test if enterovirus infection affects glucose stimulated insulin secretion and the effect of virus replication on cellular macromolecules and organelles involved in insulin secretion. Methods Isolated human islets were infected with different strains of coxsackievirus B (CVB) virus and the glucose-stimulated insulin release (GSIS) was measured in a dynamic perifusion system. Classical morphological electron microscopy, large-scale electron microscopy, so-called nanotomy, and immunohistochemistry were used to study to what extent virus-infected β cells contained insulin, and real-time PCR was used to analyze virus induced changes of islet specific genes. Results In islets infected with CVB, GSIS was reduced in correlation with the degree of virus-induced islet disintegration. The expression of the gene encoding insulin was decreased in infected islets, whereas the expression of glucagon was not affected. Also, in islets that were somewhat disintegrated, there were uninfected β cells. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that virus particles and virus replication complexes were only present in β cells. There was a significant number of insulin granules remaining in the virus-infected β cells, despite decreased expression of insulin mRNA. In addition, no typical Golgi apparatus was detected in these cells. Exposure of islets to synthetic dsRNA potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Conclusions/interpretation Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion; organelles involved in insulin secretion and gene expression were all affected by CVB replication in β cells. PMID:27547409

  8. Synthesis of glycosaminoglycans by islets of Langerhans

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T.; Cooperstein, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Incorporation of (/sup 35/S)-sulfate into glycosaminoglycans (GAG) of toadfish islets of Langerhans in vitro was examined. (/sup 35/S)-sulfated GAG were synthesized by a component of the microsomal fraction, and subsequently transferred to the secretion granules, mitochondria and nuclei. The predominant type of GAG synthesized was heparan sulfate, but chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfate and dermatan sulfate were also found. 36 references, 3 tables.

  9. Gliadin fragments and a specific gliadin 33-mer peptide close KATP channels and induce insulin secretion in INS-1E cells and rat islets of langerhans.

    PubMed

    Dall, Morten; Calloe, Kirstine; Haupt-Jorgensen, Martin; Larsen, Jesper; Schmitt, Nicole; Josefsen, Knud; Buschard, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    In non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, diabetes incidence is reduced by a gluten-free diet. Gluten peptides, such as the compound gliadin, can cross the intestinal barrier and may directly affect pancreatic beta cells. We investigated the effects of enzymatically-digested gliadin in NOD mice, INS-1E cells and rat islets. Six injections of gliadin digest in 6-week-old NOD mice did not affect diabetes development, but increased weight gain (20% increase by day 100). In INS-1E cells, incubation with gliadin digest induced a dose-dependent increase in insulin secretion, up to 2.5-fold after 24 hours. A similar effect was observed in isolated rat islets (1.6-fold increase). In INS-1E cells, diazoxide reduced the stimulatory effect of gliadin digest. Additionally, gliadin digest was shown to decrease current through KATP-channels. A specific gliadin 33-mer had a similar effect, both on current and insulin secretion. Finally, INS-1E incubation with gliadin digest potentiated palmitate-induced insulin secretion by 13% compared to controls. Our data suggest that gliadin fragments may contribute to the beta-cell hyperactivity observed prior to the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:23785500

  10. Potential of embryonic and adult stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Jaroslaw; Wiese, Cornelia; Rolletschek, Alexandra; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Cross, Michael; Wobus, Anna M

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of stem cell research indicate their enormous potential as a source of tissue for regenerative therapies. The success of such applications will depend on the precise properties and potentials of stem cells isolated either from embryonic, fetal or adult tissues. Embryonic stem cells established from the inner cell mass of early mouse embryos are characterized by nearly unlimited proliferation, and the capacity to differentiate into derivatives of essentially all lineages. The recent isolation and culture of human embryonic stem cell lines presents new opportunities for reconstructive medicine. However, important problems remain; first, the derivation of human embryonic stem cells from in vitro fertilized blastocysts creates ethical problems, and second, the current techniques for the directed differentiation into somatic cell populations yield impure products with tumorigenic potential. Recent studies have also suggested an unexpectedly wide developmental potential of adult tissue-specific stem cells. Here too, many questions remain concerning the nature and status of adult stem cells both in vivo and in vitro and their proliferation and differentiation/transdifferentiation capacity. This review focuses on those issues of embryonic and adult stem cell biology most relevant to their in vitro propagation and differentiation. Questions and problems related to the use of human embryonic and adult stem cells in tissue regeneration and transplantation are discussed.

  11. Correlations between beta-cells' calcium dynamics reveal differences in functional connectivity patterns in islets of Langerhans from pancreas tissue slices under low and high levels of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stožer, Andraž; Gosak, Marko; Korošak, Dean; Yakubo, Kousuke; Dolenšek, Jure; Marhl, Marko; Rupnik, Marjan Slak

    2012-08-01

    In the last decade, approach developed in the frame of complex network theory has presented very successful and popular tools for studying the structure and functioning of complex systems. A particularly attractive avenue in this context is the analysis of biological systems, since structural principles of complex networks have been identified at all scales of functioning of living organisms. In the present paper, we propose the construction of a complex network representation of a pancreatic islet. In this compact microorgan, under physiological conditions the release of the single most important anabolic hormone insulin is robustly controlled by an efficient cell-to-cell communication mediated by gap junctions. Here, we extract networks of insulin releasing beta-cells from experimentally measured time series data on calcium dynamics and from positional information obtained by confocal laser-scanning functional imaging of islets in acute pancreatic tissue slices. In particular, connectivity patterns are determined on the basis of correlations between calcium dynamics in the islet. The extracted networks are then scrutinized with conventional tools for network analysis, whereby particular importance is devoted to comparison of the network structure under low and high glucose levels, i.e. physiologically resting and stimulating conditions, respectively. We show that the cellular dynamics is more correlated under stimulation and that the networks obtained in both regimes display a different organization. The range of interactions among beta cells is significantly shorter in the case of a higher stimulation. Our results thus provide novel insights into the relationship between network topology and functional organization of pancreatic islets.

  12. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of atlantoaxial joint in a middle-aged man presenting with deafness as first symptom and soft-tissue mass at neck showing excellent response to radiotherapy alone: Report of an extremely rare and unusual clinical condition and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Dodul; Julka, P. K.; Jana, Manisha; Walia, Ritika; Chaudhuri, Tamojit

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disorder of clonal proliferation of dendritic cell mainly occurring in children. Spine involvement is rare. This usually presents with pain and torticollis when neck is involved. Histopathology with immunohistochemistry is confirmatory. Local curative therapy with excision or curettage is used for localized disease. Radiotherapy is usually reserved for selected cases. Systemic chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for widespread systemic disease. In this article, we present an unusual presentation of atlantoaxial LCH with mastoid involvement resulting in hearing loss as the first symptom and quadruparesis in a middle aged male patient, which was also associated with soft-tissue mass at the nape of the neck and deafness. The patient was treated with radical radiotherapy, which provided excellent response to the disease. Involvement of atlantoaxial joint and temporal bone associated with soft-tissue mass neck and deafness in a middle-aged man is an extremely rare clinical situation. PMID:25506166

  13. Reprogramming adult cells during organ regeneration in forest species

    PubMed Central

    Abarca, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of regenerating whole plants from somatic differentiated cells emphasizes the plasticity of plant development. Cell-type respecification during regeneration can be induced in adult tissues as a consequence of injuries, changes in external or internal stimuli or changes in positional information. However, in many plant species, switching the developmental program of adult cells prior to organ regeneration is difficult, especially in forest species. Besides its impact on forest productivity, basic information on the flexibility of cell differentiation is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the epigenetic control of cell differentiation and plant development. Studies of reprogramming adult cells in terms of regulative expression changes of selected genes will be of great interest to unveil basic mechanisms regulating cellular plasticity. PMID:19820297

  14. Histomorphometric study on blood cells in male adult ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Tadjalli, Mina; Nazifi, Saeed; Marzban Abbasabadi, Behrokh; Majidi, Banafsheh

    2013-01-01

    In order to perform a histomorphometric study of blood cells in male adult ostrich, blood samples were obtained from jugular vein of 10 clinically healthy male adult ostriches (2 - 3 years old). The slides were stained with the Giemsa methods and the smears were evaluated for cellular morphology, with cellular size being determined by micrometry. The findings of this study revealed that the shape of the cell, cytoplasm and nucleus of erythrocytes in male adult ostriches were similar to those in other birds such as quails, chickens, Iranian green-head ducks. PMID:25653798

  15. The Frequency of Langerhans Islets β-Cells Autoantibodies (Anti-GAD) in Georgian Children and Adolescents with Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Giorgadze, Elene

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes mellitus are organ-specific autoimmune diseases. There is large evidence that autoimmunity against the thyroid gland in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus is increased, but little is known about anti-islet cell autoimmune status in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We evaluated the concentration of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) which are widely used as a diagnostic and predictive tool for type 1 diabetes mellitus, in school-aged Georgian children with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Methods. The frequency of anti-GAD antibodies was measured in Georgian school-aged children with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and compared to healthy age and sex matched controls. Results. Of the 41 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis 4 (9.8%) were positive for GAD antibodies. The frequency of GAD positivity in the chronic autoimmune thyroiditis group was significantly higher than in the control subjects (P = 0.036). Conclusion. In the study we found that the frequency of GAD antibody positivity in autoimmune thyroiditis patients was significantly higher (9.8%, P = 0.036) than in the control group. Our findings support the concept that patients with autoimmune thyroid disease may develop type 1 diabetes mellitus in future life. PMID:27429616

  16. The Frequency of Langerhans Islets β-Cells Autoantibodies (Anti-GAD) in Georgian Children and Adolescents with Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Balakhadze, Mariam; Giorgadze, Elene; Lomidze, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes mellitus are organ-specific autoimmune diseases. There is large evidence that autoimmunity against the thyroid gland in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus is increased, but little is known about anti-islet cell autoimmune status in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We evaluated the concentration of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) which are widely used as a diagnostic and predictive tool for type 1 diabetes mellitus, in school-aged Georgian children with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Methods. The frequency of anti-GAD antibodies was measured in Georgian school-aged children with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and compared to healthy age and sex matched controls. Results. Of the 41 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis 4 (9.8%) were positive for GAD antibodies. The frequency of GAD positivity in the chronic autoimmune thyroiditis group was significantly higher than in the control subjects (P = 0.036). Conclusion. In the study we found that the frequency of GAD antibody positivity in autoimmune thyroiditis patients was significantly higher (9.8%, P = 0.036) than in the control group. Our findings support the concept that patients with autoimmune thyroid disease may develop type 1 diabetes mellitus in future life. PMID:27429616

  17. Long-term in vivo polychlorinated biphenyl 126 exposure induces oxidative stress and alters proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; dos Anjos, Fabyana Maria; Shimada, Ana Lúcia; Cruz, Wesley Soares; Drewes, Carine Cristiane; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra Helena

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a risk factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We investigated this hypothesis using long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure to rats addressing metabolic, cellular and proteomic parameters. Male Wistar rats were exposed to PCB126 (0.1, 1 or 10 μg/kg of body weight/day; for 15 days) or vehicle by intranasal instillation. Systemic alterations were quantified by body weight, insulin and glucose tolerance, and blood biochemical profile. Pancreatic toxicity was measured by inflammatory parameters, cell viability and cycle, free radical generation, and proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans. In vivo PCB126 exposure enhanced the body weight gain, impaired insulin sensitivity, reduced adipose tissue deposit, and elevated serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin levels. Inflammatory parameters in the pancreas and cell morphology, viability and cycle were not altered in islets of Langerhans. Nevertheless, in vivo PCB126 exposure increased free radical generation and modified the expression of proteins related to oxidative stress on islets of Langerhans, which are indicative of early β-cell failure. Data herein obtained show that long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure through intranasal route induced alterations on islets of Langerhans related to early end points of DM2. PMID:27292372

  18. Long-term in vivo polychlorinated biphenyl 126 exposure induces oxidative stress and alters proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; Dos Anjos, Fabyana Maria; Shimada, Ana Lúcia; Cruz, Wesley Soares; Drewes, Carine Cristiane; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra Helena

    2016-06-01

    It has been recently proposed that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a risk factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We investigated this hypothesis using long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure to rats addressing metabolic, cellular and proteomic parameters. Male Wistar rats were exposed to PCB126 (0.1, 1 or 10 μg/kg of body weight/day; for 15 days) or vehicle by intranasal instillation. Systemic alterations were quantified by body weight, insulin and glucose tolerance, and blood biochemical profile. Pancreatic toxicity was measured by inflammatory parameters, cell viability and cycle, free radical generation, and proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans. In vivo PCB126 exposure enhanced the body weight gain, impaired insulin sensitivity, reduced adipose tissue deposit, and elevated serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin levels. Inflammatory parameters in the pancreas and cell morphology, viability and cycle were not altered in islets of Langerhans. Nevertheless, in vivo PCB126 exposure increased free radical generation and modified the expression of proteins related to oxidative stress on islets of Langerhans, which are indicative of early β-cell failure. Data herein obtained show that long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure through intranasal route induced alterations on islets of Langerhans related to early end points of DM2.

  19. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  20. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-21

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  1. [Multipotency of adult stem cells derived from human amnion].

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingxia; Li, Weijia; Li, Bingzong; Li, Jing; Zhao, Chunhua

    2009-05-01

    Adult stem cells are drawing more and more attention due to the potential application in degenerative medicine without posing any moral problem. There is growing evidence showing that the human amnion contains various types of adult stem cell. Since amniotic tissue is readily available, it has the potential to be an important source of regenerative medicine material. In this study we tried to find multipotent adult stem cells in human amnion. We isolated stem cells from amniotic mesenchymal cells by limiting dilution assay. Similar to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, these cells displayed a fibroblast like appearance. They were positive for CD105, CD29, CD44, negative for haematopoietic (GlyA, CD31, CD34, CD45) and epithelial cell (pan-CK) markers. These stem cells had the potential to differentiate not only into osteogenic, adipogenic and endothelial lineages, but also hepatocyte-like cells and neural cells at the single-cell level depending on the culture conditions. They had the capacity for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation even after being expanded for more than 30 population doublings in vitro. So they may be an ideal stem cell source for inherited or degenerative diseases treatment.

  2. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  3. Automated separation of merged Langerhans islets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švihlík, Jan; Kybic, Jan; Habart, David

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with separation of merged Langerhans islets in segmentations in order to evaluate correct histogram of islet diameters. A distribution of islet diameters is useful for determining the feasibility of islet transplantation in diabetes. First, the merged islets at training segmentations are manually separated by medical experts. Based on the single islets, the merged islets are identified and the SVM classifier is trained on both classes (merged/single islets). The testing segmentations were over-segmented using watershed transform and the most probable back merging of islets were found using trained SVM classifier. Finally, the optimized segmentation is compared with ground truth segmentation (correctly separated islets).

  4. The types of endocrine cells in the pancreas of Sunda porcupine (Hystrix javanica)

    PubMed Central

    Budipitojo, Teguh; Fibrianto, Yuda Heru; Mulyani, Guntari Titik

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To identify the types of endocrine cells in the pancreas of the Sunda porcupine (Hystrix javanica) and its immunolocalization. Materials and Methods: Five adult H. javanica were used without sexual distinction. The presences of endocrine cells (glucagon, insulin, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide [PP]) in pancreatic tissues were detected using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method. Results: The fusiform, round, and oval form endocrine cells were detected in the islets of Langerhans and exocrine parts. Most of the insulin cells were found in the central area, glucagon cells were identified in the central and peripheral areas, and somatostatin and PP cells were detected in the mantle area of the islets of Langerhans. Glucagon and somatostatin cells were also detected in smaller numbers of peripheral parts of the islet. In all of the islet parts, glucagon endocrine cells were most prevalent cell type and then, somatostatin, insulin, and PP. In the exocrine parts, PP, somatostatin, glucagon, and insulin endocrine cells were found in the inter-acinus part with moderate, moderate, a few and rare numbers, in that order. In the pancreatic duct, glucagon and somatostatin cells were found between epithelial cells in rare numbers. Conclusion: The pancreas of Sunda porcupine (H. javanica) contains four types of major pancreatic endocrine cells with approximately similar distribution patterns to the other rodents, except for abundant glucagon cells in the peripheral area of the islets of Langerhans. PMID:27397977

  5. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  6. Therapeutics from Adult Stem Cells and the Hype Curve.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Greg

    2016-05-12

    The Gartner curve for regenerative and stem cell therapeutics is currently climbing out of the "trough of disillusionment" and into the "slope of enlightenment". Understanding that the early years of stem cell therapy relied on the model of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and then moved into a period of the overhype of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), instead of using the model of 40 years of success, i.e. adult stem cells used in bone marrow transplants, the field of stem cell therapy has languished for years, trying to move beyond the early and poorly understood success of bone marrow transplants. Recent studies in the lab and clinic show that adult stem cells of various types, and the molecules that they release, avoid the issues associated with ESCs and iPSCs and lead to better therapeutic outcomes and into the slope of enlightenment. PMID:27190588

  7. [Generation of new nerve cells in the adult human brain].

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Meyer, Morten; Rasmussen, Jens Zimmer

    2003-03-31

    Generation of new nerve cells (neurogenesis) is normally considered to be limited to the fetal and early postnatal period. Thus, damaged nerve cells are not expected to be replaced by generation of new cells. The brain is, however, more plastic than previously assumed. This also includes neurogenesis in the adult human brain. In particular two brain regions show continuous division of neural stem and progenitor cells generating neurons and glial cells, namely the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zones of the lateral ventricles. From the latter region newly generated neuroblasts (immature nerve cells) migrate toward the olfactory bulb where they differentiate into neurons. In the dentate gyrus the newly generated neurons become functionally integrated in the granule cell layer, where they are believed to be of importance to learning and memory. It is at present not known whether neurogenesis in the adult human brain can be manipulated for specific repair after brain damage.

  8. Therapeutics from Adult Stem Cells and the Hype Curve.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Greg

    2016-05-12

    The Gartner curve for regenerative and stem cell therapeutics is currently climbing out of the "trough of disillusionment" and into the "slope of enlightenment". Understanding that the early years of stem cell therapy relied on the model of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and then moved into a period of the overhype of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), instead of using the model of 40 years of success, i.e. adult stem cells used in bone marrow transplants, the field of stem cell therapy has languished for years, trying to move beyond the early and poorly understood success of bone marrow transplants. Recent studies in the lab and clinic show that adult stem cells of various types, and the molecules that they release, avoid the issues associated with ESCs and iPSCs and lead to better therapeutic outcomes and into the slope of enlightenment.

  9. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bordiuk, Olivia L; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J; Semënov, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain.

  10. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bordiuk, Olivia L; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J; Semënov, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain. PMID:25375658

  11. Stem Cell-Mediated Regeneration of the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury of the adult mammalian brain is often associated with persistent functional deficits as its potential for regeneration and capacity to rebuild lost neural structures is limited. However, the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) persist throughout life in discrete regions of the brain, novel approaches to induce the formation of neuronal and glial cells, and recently developed strategies to generate tissue for exogenous cell replacement strategies opened novel perspectives how to regenerate the adult brain. Here, we will review recently developed approaches for brain repair and discuss future perspectives that may eventually allow for developing novel treatment strategies in acute and chronic brain injury. PMID:27781019

  12. Tax fingerprint in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bazarbachi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    In this issue of Blood, Fujikawa et al demonstrate that the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax induces an epigenetic-dependent global modification of host gene expression in adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL). Hence, the fingerprint of Tax is all over ATL and this may be used for finally capturing ATL. PMID:27056993

  13. Differentiated cells are more efficient than adult stem cells for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sung, Li-Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Song, Yifang; Smith, Sadie L; Chang, Ching-Chien; Inoue, Kimiko; Kuo, Lynn; Lian, Jin; Li, Ao; Tian, X Cindy; Tuck, David P; Weissman, Sherman M; Yang, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Tao

    2006-11-01

    Since the creation of Dolly via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), more than a dozen species of mammals have been cloned using this technology. One hypothesis for the limited success of cloning via SCNT (1%-5%) is that the clones are likely to be derived from adult stem cells. Support for this hypothesis comes from the findings that the reproductive cloning efficiency for embryonic stem cells is five to ten times higher than that for somatic cells as donors and that cloned pups cannot be produced directly from cloned embryos derived from differentiated B and T cells or neuronal cells. The question remains as to whether SCNT-derived animal clones can be derived from truly differentiated somatic cells. We tested this hypothesis with mouse hematopoietic cells at different differentiation stages: hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and granulocytes. We found that cloning efficiency increases over the differentiation hierarchy, and terminally differentiated postmitotic granulocytes yield cloned pups with the greatest cloning efficiency.

  14. Radiological features of thymic langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Karoly; Herbrüggen, Heidrun; Pötschger, Ulrike; Prosch, Helmut; Minkov, Milen

    2013-11-01

    TI was reported in 18/1,264 (1.4%) LCH patients. All nine patients with TI at initial LCH presentation were below 2 years of age and had multisystem LCH (9/242, 4%). Images (sonography, CT, MRI) for central review were available in 15 cases. Characteristic findings of TI were thymus enlargement (67%), few to many cysts (80%), and few to many calcifications (100%). Sonographic and MRI findings were in excellent agreement. We recommend adding sonography of the thymus to the standard for initial clinical evaluation of LCH patients below the age of 2 years.

  15. Neural stem cells in the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    For decades, it was believed that the adult brain was a quiescent organ unable to produce new neurons. At the beginning of the1960's, this dogma was challenged by a small group of neuroscientists. To date, it is well-known that new neurons are generated in the adult brain throughout life. Adult neurogenesis is primary confined to the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus within the hippocampus. In both the human and the rodent brain, the primary progenitor of adult SVZ is a subpopulation of astrocytes that have stem-cell-like features. The human SVZ possesses a peculiar cell composition and displays important organizational differences when compared to the SVZ of other mammals. Some evidence suggests that the human SVZ may be not only an endogenous source of neural precursor cells for brain repair, but also a source of brain tumors. In this review, we described the cytoarchitecture and cellular composition of the SVZ in the adult human brain. We also discussed some clinical implications of SVZ, such as: stem-cell-based therapies against neurodegenerative diseases and its potential as a source of malignant cells. Understanding the biology of human SVZ and its neural progenitors is one of the crucial steps to develop novel therapies against neurological diseases in humans. PMID:23181200

  16. Primary Afferent Synapses on Developing and Adult Renshaw Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mentis, George Z.; Siembab, Valerie C.; Zerda, Ricardo; O’Donovan, Michael J.; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms that diversify adult interneurons from a few pools of embryonic neurons are unknown. Renshaw cells, Ia inhibitory interneurons (IaINs), and possibly other types of mammalian spinal interneurons have common embryonic origins within the V1 group. However, in contrast to IaINs and other V1-derived interneurons, adult Renshaw cells receive motor axon synapses and lack proprioceptive inputs. Here, we investigated how this specific pattern of connectivity emerges during the development of Renshaw cells. Tract tracing and immunocytochemical markers [parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1)] showed that most embryonic (embryonic day 18) Renshaw cells lack dorsal root inputs, but more than half received dorsal root synapses by postnatal day 0 (P0) and this input spread to all Renshaw cells by P10–P15. Electrophysiological recordings in neonates indicated that this input is functional and evokes Renshaw cell firing. VGLUT1-IR bouton density on Renshaw cells increased until P15 but thereafter decreased because of limited synapse proliferation coupled with the enlargement of Renshaw cell dendrites. In parallel, Renshaw cell postsynaptic densities apposed to VGLUT1-IR synapses became smaller in adult compared with P15. In contrast, vesicular acetylcholine transporter-IR motor axon synapses contact embryonic Renshaw cells and proliferate postnatally matching Renshaw cell growth. Like other V1 neurons, Renshaw cells are thus competent to receive sensory synapses. However, after P15, these sensory inputs appear deselected through arrested proliferation and synapse weakening. Thus, Renshaw cells shift from integrating sensory and motor inputs in neonates to predominantly motor inputs in adult. Similar synaptic weight shifts on interneurons may be involved in the maturation of motor reflexes and locomotor circuitry. PMID:17182780

  17. DNA damage response in adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Insinga, Alessandra; Cicalese, Angelo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    This review discusses the processes of DNA-damage-response and DNA-damage repair in stem and progenitor cells of several tissues. The long life-span of stem cells suggests that they may respond differently to DNA damage than their downstream progeny and, indeed, studies have begun to elucidate the unique stem cell response mechanisms to DNA damage. Because the DNA damage responses in stem cells and progenitor cells are distinctly different, stem and progenitor cells should be considered as two different entities from this point of view. Hematopoietic and mammary stem cells display a unique DNA-damage response, which involves active inhibition of apoptosis, entry into the cell-cycle, symmetric division, partial DNA repair and maintenance of self-renewal. Each of these biological events depends on the up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21. Moreover, inhibition of apoptosis and symmetric stem cell division are the consequence of the down-regulation of the tumor suppressor p53, as a direct result of p21 up-regulation. A deeper understanding of these processes is required before these findings can be translated into human anti-aging and anti-cancer therapies. One needs to clarify and dissect the pathways that control p21 regulation in normal and cancer stem cells and define (a) how p21 blocks p53 functions in stem cells and (b) how p21 promotes DNA repair in stem cells. Is this effect dependent on p21s ability to inhibit p53? Such molecular knowledge may pave the way to methods for maintaining short-term tissue reconstitution while retaining long-term cellular and genomic integrity.

  18. Markers of Epidermal Stem Cell Subpopulations in Adult Mammalian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties. PMID:24993676

  19. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  20. Immature rat Leydig cells are intrinsically less sensitive than adult Leydig cells to ethane dimethanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Kelce, W R; Zirkin, B R; Ewing, L L

    1991-11-01

    Leydig cells from immature rat testes appear to be insensitive to doses of ethane-1,2-dimethanesulfonate (EDS) which eliminate Leydig cells from adult rat testes. We sought to determine whether this differential response to EDS is intrinsic to the Leydig cell or mediated by other intra- or extratesticular differences between adult and immature rats. To differentiate among these possibilities, Leydig cells were exposed to EDS (1) in vivo, (2) through in vitro testicular perfusion, or (3) in highly purified Leydig cell primary cultures. Four days after ip injections of 85 mg EDS/kg body wt Leydig cells were eliminated from testes of adult, but not immature rats. Total androgen production by testes perfused in vitro with 94 micrograms EDS/ml was dramatically reduced in adult, but not immature rats. Highly purified adult, but not immature, rat Leydig cells were far more sensitive to the effects of EDS on luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen production (functional effects; apparent EC50 = 94 for adult and 407 micrograms/ml for immature rat Leydig cells) and on [35S]methionine incorporation (cytotoxic effects; apparent EC50 = 140 for adult and 1000 micrograms/ml for immature rat Leydig cells). Finally, the in vitro effects of EDS were both cell type and chemical specific. Since the differential response of adult and immature rat Leydig cells to EDS was manifest in vivo, during in vitro testicular perfusion, and in highly purified Leydig cell primary cultures, we conclude that immature rat Leydig cells are intrinsically less sensitive to the specific cytotoxic effects of EDS than adult rat Leydig cells.

  1. Microfabricated biocapsules for the immunoisolation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Tejal Ashwin

    1998-08-01

    A silicon-based microfabricated biocapsule was developed and evaluated for use in the immunoisolation of transplanted cells, specifically pancreatic islets of Langerhans for the treatment of Type I diabetes. The transplantation of cells with specific functions is a promising therapy for a wide variety of pathologies including diabetes, Parkinson's, and hemophilia. Such transplanted cells, however, are sensitive to both cellular and humoral immune rejection as well as damage by autoimmune activity, without chronic immunosuppression. The research presented in this dissertation investigated whether microfabricated silicon-based biocapsules, with uniform membrane pore sizes in the tens of nanometer range, could provide an immunoprotective environment for pancreatic islets and other insulin-secreting cell lines, while maintaining cell viability and functionality. By utilizing fabrication techniques commonly employed in the microelectronics industry (MEMS), membranes were fabricated with precisely controlled and uniform pore sizes, allowing the optimization of biocapsule membrane parameters for the encapsulation of specific hormone-secreting cell types. The biocapsule-forming process employed bulk micromachining to define cell-containing chambers within single crystalline silicon wafers. These chambers interface with the surrounding biological environment through polycrystalline silicon filter membranes, which were surface micromachined to present a high density of uniform pores to allow sufficient permeability to oxygen, glucose, and insulin. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments established the biocompatibility of the microfabricated biocapsule, and demonstrated that encapsulated cells could live and function normally in terms of insulin-secretion within microfabricated environments for extended periods of time. This novel research shows the potential of using microfabricated biocapsules for the encapsulation of several different cell xenografts. The semipermeability

  2. Adult granulosa cell tumor of the testis masquerading as hydrocele

    PubMed Central

    Vallonthaiel, Archana George; Kakkar, Aanchal; Singh, Animesh; Dogra, Prem N; Ray, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adult testicular granulosa cell tumor is a rare, potentially malignant sex cord-stromal tumor, of which 30 cases have been described to date. We report the case of a 43-year-old male who complained of a left testicular swelling. Scrotal ultrasound showed a cystic lesion, suggestive of hydrocele. However, due to a clinical suspicion of a solid-cystic neoplasm, a high inguinal orchidectomy was performed, which, on pathological examination, was diagnosed as adult granulosa cell tumor. Adult testicular granulosa cell tumors have aggressive behaviour as compared to their ovarian counterparts. They may rarely be predominantly cystic and present as hydrocele. Lymph node and distant metastases have been reported in few cases. Role of MIB-1 labelling index in prognostication is not well defined. Therefore, their recognition and documentation of their behaviour is important from a diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic point of view. PMID:26742984

  3. Langerin-expressing dendritic cells in human tissues are related to CD1c+ dendritic cells and distinct from Langerhans cells and CD141high XCR1+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Venetia; McGovern, Naomi; Milne, Paul; Dickinson, Rachel; Pagan, Sarah; Cookson, Sharon; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Collin, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Langerin is a C-type lectin expressed at high level by LCs of the epidermis. Langerin is also expressed by CD8(+)/CD103(+) XCR1(+) cross-presenting DCs of mice but is not found on the homologous human CD141(high) XCR1(+) myeloid DC. Here, we show that langerin is expressed at a low level on DCs isolated from dermis, lung, liver, and lymphoid tissue and that langerin(+) DCs are closely related to CD1c(+) myeloid DCs. They are distinguishable from LCs by the level of expression of CD1a, EpCAM, CD11b, CD11c, CD13, and CD33 and are found in tissues and tissue-draining LNs devoid of LCs. They are unrelated to CD141(high) XCR1(+) myeloid DCs, lacking the characteristic expression profile of cross-presenting DCs, conserved between mammalian species. Stem cell transplantation and DC deficiency models confirm that dermal langerin(+) DCs have an independent homeostasis to LCs. Langerin is not expressed by freshly isolated CD1c(+) blood DCs but is rapidly induced on CD1c(+) DCs by serum or TGF-β via an ALK-3-dependent pathway. These results show that langerin is expressed outside of the LC compartment of humans and highlight a species difference: langerin is expressed by the XCR1(+) "DC1" population of mice but is restricted to the CD1c(+) "DC2" population of humans (homologous to CD11b(+) DCs in the mouse).

  4. Purinergic signaling promotes proliferation of adult mouse subventricular zone cells.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Satoshi; Sunabori, Takehiko; Kanki, Hiroaki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Gachet, Christian; Koizumi, Schuichi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2012-07-01

    In adult mammalian brains, neural stem cells (NSCs) exist in the subventricular zone (SVZ), where persistent neurogenesis continues throughout life. Those NSCs produce neuroblasts that migrate into the olfactory bulb via formation of transit-amplifying cells, which are committed precursor cells of the neuronal lineage. In this SVZ niche, cell-cell communications conducted by diffusible factors as well as physical cell-cell contacts are important for the regulation of the proliferation and fate determination of NSCs. Previous studies have suggested that extracellular purinergic signaling, which is mediated by purine compounds such as ATP, plays important roles in cell-cell communication in the CNS. Purinergic signaling also promotes the proliferation of adult NSCs in vitro. However, the in vivo roles of purinergic signaling in the neurogenic niche still remain unknown. In this study, ATP infusion into the lateral ventricle of the mouse brain resulted in an increase in the numbers of rapidly dividing cells and Mash1-positive transit-amplifying cells (Type C cells) in the SVZ. Mash1-positive cells express the P2Y1 purinergic signaling receptor and infusion of the P2Y1 receptor-specific antagonist MRS2179 decreased the number of rapidly dividing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells and Type C cells. Moreover, a 17% reduction of rapidly dividing BrdU-positive cells and a 19% reduction of Mash1-positive cells were observed in P2Y1 knock-out mice. Together, these results suggest that purinergic signaling promotes the proliferation of rapidly dividing cells and transit-amplifying cells, in the SVZ niche through the P2Y1 receptor. PMID:22764232

  5. Spatial control of adult stem cell fate using nanotopographic cues

    PubMed Central

    An, Steven S.; Afzal, Junaid; Lee, Suengwon; Kwak, Moonkyu; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Levchenko, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells hold great promise as a source of diverse terminally differentiated cell types for tissue engineering applications. However, due to the complexity of chemical and mechanical cues specifying differentiation outcomes, development of arbitrarily complex geometric and structural arrangements of cells, adopting multiple fates from the same initial stem cell population, has been difficult. Here, we show that the topography of the cell adhesion substratum can be an instructive cue to adult stem cells and topographical variations can strongly bias the differentiation outcome of the cells towards adipocyte or osteocyte fates. Switches in cell fate decision from adipogenic to osteogenic lineages were accompanied by changes in cytoskeletal stiffness, spanning a considerable range in the cell softness/rigidity spectrum. Our findings suggest that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) can respond to the varying density of nanotopographical cues by regulating their internal cytoskeletal network and use these mechanical changes to guide them toward making cell fate decisions. We used this finding to design a complex two-dimensional pattern of co-localized cells preferentially adopting two alternative fates, thus paving the road for designing and building more complex tissue constructs with diverse biomedical applications. PMID:24388388

  6. Adult stem cells and their ability to differentiate.

    PubMed

    Tarnowski, Maciej; Sieron, Aleksander L

    2006-08-01

    This is a review of the current status of knowledge on adult stem cells as well as the criteria and evidence for their potential to transform into different cell types and cell lineages. Reports on stem cell sources, focusing on tissues from adult subjects, were also investigated. Numerous reports have been published on the search for early markers of both stem cells and the precursors of various cell lineages. The question is still open about the characteristics of the primary stem cell. The existing proofs and hypotheses have not yielded final solutions to this problem. From a practical point of view it is also crucial to find a minimal set of markers determining the phenotypes of the precursor cells of a particular cell lineage. Several lines of evidence seem to bring closer the day when we will be able to detect the right stem cell niche and successfully isolate precursor cells that are needed for the treatment of a particular disorder. Recent reports on cases of cancer in patients subjected to stem cell therapy are yet another controversial issue looked into in this review, although the pros and cons emerging from the results of published studies still do not provide satisfying evidence to fully understand this issue.

  7. Walking stability during cell phone use in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Higginson, Christopher I; Seymour, Kelly; Kamerdze, Morgan; Higginson, Jill S

    2015-05-01

    The number of falls and/or accidental injuries associated with cellular phone use during walking is growing rapidly. Understanding the effects of concurrent cell phone use on human gait may help develop safety guidelines for pedestrians. It was shown previously that older adults had more pronounced dual-task interferences than younger adults when concurrent cognitive task required visual information processing. Thus, cell phone use might have greater impact on walking stability in older than in younger adults. This study examined gait stability and variability during a cell phone dialing task (phone) and two classic cognitive tasks, the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) and Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). Nine older and seven younger healthy adults walked on a treadmill at four different conditions: walking only, PASAT, phone, and SDMT. We computed short-term local divergence exponent (LDE) of the trunk motion (local stability), dynamic margins of stability (MOS), step spatiotemporal measures, and kinematic variability. Older and younger adults had similar values of short-term LDE during all conditions, indicating that local stability was not affected by the dual-task. Compared to walking only, older and younger adults walked with significantly greater average mediolateral MOS during phone and SDMT conditions but significantly less ankle angle variability during all dual-tasks and less knee angle variability during PASAT. The current findings demonstrate that healthy adults may try to control foot placement and joint kinematics during cell phone use or another cognitive task with a visual component to ensure sufficient dynamic margins of stability and maintain local stability.

  8. Walking Stability during Cell Phone Use in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Higginson, Christopher I.; Seymour, Kelly; Kamerdze, Morgan; Higginson, Jill S.

    2015-01-01

    The number of falls and/or accidental injuries associated with cellular phone use during walking is growing rapidly. Understanding the effects of concurrent cell phone use on human gait may help develop safety guidelines for pedestrians. It was shown previously that older adults had more pronounced dual-task interferences than younger adults when concurrent cognitive task required visual information processing. Thus, cell phone use might have greater impact on walking stability in older than in younger adults. This study examined gait stability and variability during a cell phone dialing task (phone) and two classic cognitive tasks, the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) and Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). Nine older and seven younger healthy adults walked on a treadmill at four different conditions: walking only, PASAT, phone, and SDMT. We computed short-term local divergence exponent (LDE) of the trunk motion (local stability), dynamic margins of stability (MOS), step spatiotemporal measures, and kinematic variability. Older and younger adults had similar values of short-term LDE during all conditions, indicating that local stability was not affected by the dual-task. Compared to walking only, older and younger adults walked with significantly greater average mediolateral MOS during phone and SDMT conditions but significantly less ankle angle variability during all dual-tasks and less knee angle variability during PASAT. The current findings demonstrate that healthy adults may try to control foot placement and joint kinematics during cell phone use or another cognitive task with a visual component to ensure sufficient dynamic margins of stability and maintain local stability. PMID:25890490

  9. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Brignier, Anne C; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2010-02-01

    There are many types of stem cells. All share the characteristics of being able to self-renew and to give rise to differentiated progeny. Over the last decades, great excitement has been generated by the prospect of being able to exploit these properties for the repair, improvement, and/or replacement of damaged organs. However, many hurdles, both scientific and ethical, remain in the path of using human embryonic stem cells for tissue-engineering purposes. In this report we review current strategies for isolating, enriching, and, most recently, inducing the development of human pluripotent stem cells. In so doing, we discuss the scientific and ethical issues associated with this endeavor. Finally, progress in the use of stem cells as therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, and various neurologic and immunohematologic disorders, and as vehicles for the delivery of gene therapy, is briefly discussed. PMID:20061008

  10. In Vivo Dedifferentiation of Adult Adipose Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Feng; Dong, Ziqing; Chang, Qiang; Gao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adipocytes can dedifferentiate into fibroblast-like cells in vitro and thereby acquire proliferation and multipotent capacities to participate in the repair of various organs and tissues. Whether dedifferentiation occurs under physiological or pathological conditions in vivo is unknown. Methods A tissue expander was placed under the inguinal fat pads of rats and gradually expanded by injection of water. Samples were collected at various time points, and morphological, histological, cytological, ultrastructural, and gene expression analyses were conducted. In a separate experiment, purified green fluorescent protein+ adipocytes were transplanted into C57 mice and collected at various time points. The transplanted adipocytes were assessed by bioluminescence imaging and whole-mount staining. Results The expanded fat pad was obviously thinner than the untreated fat pad on the opposite side. It was also tougher in texture and with more blood vessels attached. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy indicated there were fewer monolocular adipocytes in the expanded fat pad and the morphology of these cells was altered, most notably their lipid content was discarded. Immunohistochemistry showed that the expanded fat pad contained an increased number of proliferative cells, which may have been derived from adipocytes. Following removal of the tissue expander, many small adipocytes were observed. Bioluminescence imaging suggested that some adipocytes survived when transplanted into an ischemic-hypoxic environment. Whole-mount staining revealed that surviving adipocytes underwent a process similar to adipocyte dedifferentiation in vitro. Monolocular adipocytes became multilocular adipocytes and then fibroblast-like cells. Conclusions Mature adipocytes may be able to dedifferentiate in vivo, and this may be an adipose tissue self-repair mechanism. The capacity of adipocytes to dedifferentiate into stem cell-like cells may also have a

  11. EMPOWERING ADULT STEM CELLS FOR MYOCARDIAL REGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Sadia; Siddiqi, Sailay; Collins, Brett; Sussman, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment strategies for heart failure remain a high priority for ongoing research due to the profound unmet need in clinical disease coupled with lack of significant translational progress. The underlying issue is the same whether the cause is acute damage, chronic stress from disease, or aging: progressive loss of functional cardiomyocytes and diminished hemodynamic output. To stave off cardiomyocyte losses, a number of strategic approaches have been embraced in recent years involving both molecular and cellular approaches to augment myocardial structure and performance. Resultant excitement surrounding regenerative medicine in the heart has been tempered by realizations that reparative processes in the heart are insufficient to restore damaged myocardium to normal functional capacity and that cellular cardiomyoplasty is hampered by poor survival, proliferation, engraftment and differentiation of the donated population. To overcome these limitations, a combination of molecular and cellular approaches needs to be adopted involving use of genetic engineering to enhance resistance to cell death and increase regenerative capacity. This review will highlight biological properties of approached to potentiate stem cell-mediated regeneration to promote enhanced myocardial regeneration, persistence of donated cells, and long lasting tissue repair. Optimizing cell delivery and harnessing the power of survival signaling cascades for ex vivo genetic modification of stem cells prior to reintroduction into the patient will be critical to enhance the efficacy of cellular cardiomyoplasty. Once this goal is achieved, then cell-based therapy has great promise for treatment of heart failure to combat the loss of cardiac structure and function associated with acute damage, chronic disease or aging. PMID:22158649

  12. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  13. Stirred bioreactors for the expansion of adult pancreatic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Serra, Margarida; Brito, Catarina; Leite, Sofia B; Gorjup, Erwin; von Briesen, Hagen; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M

    2009-01-01

    Adult pluripotent stem cells are a cellular resource representing unprecedented potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Complementary to this promise, there is a need for efficient bioprocesses for their large scale expansion and/or differentiation. With this goal in mind, our work focused on the development of three-dimensional (3-D) culture systems for controlled expansion of adult pancreatic stem cells (PSCs). For this purpose, two different culturing strategies were evaluated, using spinner vessels: cell aggregated cultures versus microcarrier technology. The use of microcarrier supports (Cytodex 1 and Cytodex 3) rendered expanded cell populations which retained their self-renewal ability, cell marker, and the potential to differentiate into adipocytes. This strategy surmounted the drawbacks of aggregates in culture which were demonstrably unfeasible as cells clumped together did not proliferate and lost PSC marker expression. Furthermore, the results obtained showed that although both microcarriers tested here were suitable for sustaining cell expansion, Cytodex 3 provided a better substrate for the promotion of cell adherence and growth. For the latter approach, the potential of bioreactor technology was combined with the efficient Cytodex 3 strategy under controlled environmental conditions (pH-7.2, pO2-30% and temperature-37 degrees C); cell growth was more efficient, as shown by faster doubling time, higher growth rate and higher fold increase in cell concentration, when compared to spinner cultures. This study describes a robust bioprocess for the controlled expansion of adult PSC, representing an efficient starting point for the development of novel technologies for cell therapy.

  14. New Nerve Cells for the Adult Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempermann, Gerd; Gage, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    Contrary to dogma, the human brain does produce new nerve cells in adulthood. The mature human brain spawns neurons routinely in the hippocampus, an area important to memory and learning. This research can make it possible to ease any number of disorders involving neurological damage and death. (CCM)

  15. Isolation, culture and analysis of adult subependymal neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Belenguer, Germán; Domingo-Muelas, Ana; Ferrón, Sacri R; Morante-Redolat, José Manuel; Fariñas, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Individual cells dissected from the subependymal neurogenic niche of the adult mouse brain proliferate in medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and/or epidermal growth factor (EGF) as mitogens, to produce multipotent clonal aggregates called neurospheres. These cultures constitute a powerful tool for the study of neural stem cells (NSCs) provided that they allow the analysis of their features and potential capacity in a controlled environment that can be modulated and monitored more accurately than in vivo. Clonogenic and population analyses under mitogen addition or withdrawal allow the quantification of the self-renewing and multilineage potency of these cells and the identification of the mechanisms involved in these properties. Here, we describe a set of procedures developed and/or modified by our group including several experimental options that can be used either independently or in combination for the ex vivo assessment of cell properties of NSCs obtained from the adult subependymal niche. PMID:27016251

  16. Isolation of Mouse Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Domínguez, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of any pancreatic islet isolation is obtaining pure, viable and functional pancreatic islets, either for in vitro or in vivo purposes. The islets of Langerhans are complex microorgans with the important role of regulating glucose homeostasis. Imbalances in glucose homeostasis lead to diabetes, which is defined by the American Diabetes Association as a "group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action or both" (American Diabetes Association 2011). Currently, the rising demand of human islets is provoking a shortage of this tissue, limiting research and clinical practice on this field. In this scenario, it is essential to investigate and improve islet isolation procedures in animal models, while keeping in mind the anatomical and functional differences between species. This chapter discusses the main aspects of mouse islet isolation research, highlighting the critical factors and shortcomings to take into account for the selection and/or optimization of a mouse islet isolation protocol. PMID:27586420

  17. Live Imaging of Adult Neural Stem Cells in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Felipe; Costa, Marcos R.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cells of the neural lineage within the brain is not restricted to early development. New neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes are produced in the adult brain throughout the entire murine life. However, despite the extensive research performed in the field of adult neurogenesis during the past years, fundamental questions regarding the cell biology of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) remain to be uncovered. For instance, it is crucial to elucidate whether a single aNSC is capable of differentiating into all three different macroglial cell types in vivo or these distinct progenies constitute entirely separate lineages. Similarly, the cell cycle length, the time and mode of division (symmetric vs. asymmetric) that these cells undergo within their lineage progression are interesting questions under current investigation. In this sense, live imaging constitutes a valuable ally in the search of reliable answers to the previous questions. In spite of the current limitations of technology new approaches are being developed and outstanding amount of knowledge is being piled up providing interesting insights in the behavior of aNSCs. Here, we will review the state of the art of live imaging as well as the alternative models that currently offer new answers to critical questions. PMID:27013941

  18. Hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and leukemic stem cells in adult myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ashley P

    2013-05-01

    The understanding of myeloproliferative neoplasms has changed dramatically since Dameshek proposed his classification over 50 years ago. Our knowledge of the types of cells which constitute the hematopoietic system and of how they are regulated has also appreciated significantly over this time. This review relates what is currently known about the acquired genetic mutations associated with adult myeloproliferative neoplasms to how they lead to the hematopoietic perturbations of myeloproliferative disease. There is a particular focus on how stem and progenitor cell compartments are affected by BCR-ABL1 and JAK2V617F mutations, and the particular issue of resistance of leukemic stem cells to conventional and targeted therapies. PMID:23013358

  19. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Carol F.; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. PMID:26111446

  20. Intraganglionic interactions between satellite cells and adult sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly; Koshy, Dilip; Cheng, Chu; Guo, GuiFang; Martinez, Jose A; Duraikannu, Arul; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    Perineuronal satellite cells have an intimate anatomical relationship with sensory neurons that suggests close functional collaboration and mutual support. We examined several facets of this relationship in adult sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Collaboration included the support of process outgrowth by clustering of satellite cells, induction of distal branching behavior by soma signaling, the capacity of satellite cells to respond to distal axon injury of its neighboring neurons, and evidence of direct neuron-satellite cell exchange. In vitro, closely adherent coharvested satellite cells routinely clustered around new outgrowing processes and groups of satellite cells attracted neurite processes. Similar clustering was encountered in the pseudounipolar processes of intact sensory neurons within intact DRG in vivo. While short term exposure of distal growth cones of unselected adult sensory neurons to transient gradients of a PTEN inhibitor had negligible impacts on their behavior, exposure of the soma induced early and substantial growth of their distant neurites and branches, an example of local soma signaling. In turn, satellite cells sensed when distal neuronal axons were injured by enlarging and proliferating. We also observed that satellite cells were capable of internalizing and expressing a neuron fluorochrome label, diamidino yellow, applied remotely to distal injured axons of the neuron and retrogradely transported to dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. The findings illustrate a robust interaction between intranganglionic neurons and glial cells that involve two way signals, features that may be critical for both regenerative responses and ongoing maintenance. PMID:25979201

  1. Intraganglionic interactions between satellite cells and adult sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly; Koshy, Dilip; Cheng, Chu; Guo, GuiFang; Martinez, Jose A; Duraikannu, Arul; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    Perineuronal satellite cells have an intimate anatomical relationship with sensory neurons that suggests close functional collaboration and mutual support. We examined several facets of this relationship in adult sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Collaboration included the support of process outgrowth by clustering of satellite cells, induction of distal branching behavior by soma signaling, the capacity of satellite cells to respond to distal axon injury of its neighboring neurons, and evidence of direct neuron-satellite cell exchange. In vitro, closely adherent coharvested satellite cells routinely clustered around new outgrowing processes and groups of satellite cells attracted neurite processes. Similar clustering was encountered in the pseudounipolar processes of intact sensory neurons within intact DRG in vivo. While short term exposure of distal growth cones of unselected adult sensory neurons to transient gradients of a PTEN inhibitor had negligible impacts on their behavior, exposure of the soma induced early and substantial growth of their distant neurites and branches, an example of local soma signaling. In turn, satellite cells sensed when distal neuronal axons were injured by enlarging and proliferating. We also observed that satellite cells were capable of internalizing and expressing a neuron fluorochrome label, diamidino yellow, applied remotely to distal injured axons of the neuron and retrogradely transported to dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. The findings illustrate a robust interaction between intranganglionic neurons and glial cells that involve two way signals, features that may be critical for both regenerative responses and ongoing maintenance.

  2. Wnt signaling in adult intestinal stem cells and cancer.

    PubMed

    Krausova, Michaela; Korinek, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Signaling initiated by secreted glycoproteins of the Wnt family regulates many aspects of embryonic development and it is involved in homeostasis of adult tissues. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract the Wnt pathway maintains the self-renewal capacity of epithelial stem cells. The stem cell attributes are conferred by mutual interactions of the stem cell with its local microenvironment, the stem cell niche. The niche ensures that the threshold of Wnt signaling in the stem cell is kept in physiological range. In addition, the Wnt pathway involves various feedback loops that balance the opposing processes of cell proliferation and differentiation. Today, we have compelling evidence that mutations causing aberrant activation of the Wnt pathway promote expansion of undifferentiated progenitors and lead to cancer. The review summarizes recent advances in characterization of adult epithelial stem cells in the gut. We mainly focus on discoveries related to molecular mechanisms regulating the output of the Wnt pathway. Moreover, we present novel experimental approaches utilized to investigate the epithelial cell signaling circuitry in vivo and in vitro. Pivotal aspects of tissue homeostasis are often deduced from studies of tumor cells; therefore, we also discuss some latest results gleaned from the deep genome sequencing studies of human carcinomas of the colon and rectum. PMID:24308963

  3. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  4. Axonal control of the adult neural stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Chen, Jiadong; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Obernier, Kirsten; Guinto, Cristina D; Tecott, Laurence H; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Kriegstein, Arnold; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-04-01

    The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) is an extensive germinal niche containing neural stem cells (NSCs) in the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult brain. How the adult brain's neural activity influences the behavior of adult NSCs remains largely unknown. We show that serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from a small group of neurons in the raphe form an extensive plexus on most of the ventricular walls. Electron microscopy revealed intimate contacts between 5HT axons and NSCs (B1) or ependymal cells (E1) and these cells were labeled by a transsynaptic viral tracer injected into the raphe. B1 cells express the 5HT receptors 2C and 5A. Electrophysiology showed that activation of these receptors in B1 cells induced small inward currents. Intraventricular infusion of 5HT2C agonist or antagonist increased or decreased V-SVZ proliferation, respectively. These results indicate that supraependymal 5HT axons directly interact with NSCs to regulate neurogenesis via 5HT2C. PMID:24561083

  5. Axonal Control of the Adult Neural Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Chen, Jiadong; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Obernier, Kirsten; Guinto, Cristina D.; Tecott, Laurence H.; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Kriegstein, Arnold; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) is an extensive germinal niche containing neural stem cells (NSC) in the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult brain. How the adult brain’s neural activity influences the behavior of adult NSCs remains largely unknown. We show that serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from a small group of neurons in the raphe form an extensive plexus on most of the ventricular walls. Electron microscopy revealed intimate contacts between 5HT axons and NSCs (B1) or ependymal cells (E1) and these cells were labeled by a transsynaptic viral tracer injected into the raphe. B1 cells express the 5HT receptors 2C and 5A. Electrophysiology showed that activation of these receptors in B1 cells induced small inward currents. Intraventricular infusion of 5HT2C agonist or antagonist increased or decreased V-SVZ proliferation, respectively. These results indicate that supraependymal 5HT axons directly interact with NSCs to regulate neurogenesis via 5HT2C. PMID:24561083

  6. Direct transcriptional reprogramming of adult cells to embryonic nephron progenitors.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Caroline E; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M; Ineson, Jessica; Suhaimi, Norseha; Takasato, Minoru; Rae, Fiona; Little, Melissa H

    2013-09-01

    Direct reprogramming involves the enforced re-expression of key transcription factors to redefine a cellular state. The nephron progenitor population of the embryonic kidney gives rise to all cells within the nephron other than the collecting duct through a mesenchyme-to-epithelial transition, but this population is exhausted around the time of birth. Here, we sought to identify the conditions under which adult proximal tubule cells could be directly transcriptionally reprogrammed to nephron progenitors. Using a combinatorial screen for lineage-instructive transcription factors, we identified a pool of six genes (SIX1, SIX2, OSR1, EYA1, HOXA11, and SNAI2) that activated a network of genes consistent with a cap mesenchyme/nephron progenitor phenotype in the adult proximal tubule (HK2) cell line. Consistent with these reprogrammed cells being nephron progenitors, we observed differential contribution of the reprogrammed population into the Six2(+) nephron progenitor fields of an embryonic kidney explant. Dereplication of the pool suggested that SNAI2 can suppress E-CADHERIN, presumably assisting in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) required to form nephron progenitors. However, neither TGFβ-induced EMT nor SNAI2 overexpression alone was sufficient to create this phenotype, suggesting that additional factors are required. In conclusion, these results suggest that reinitiation of kidney development from a population of adult cells by generating embryonic progenitors may be feasible, opening the way for additional cellular and bioengineering approaches to renal repair and regeneration.

  7. Adult stem cells applied to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-López, M D; Zamora-Navas, P; García-Herrera, J M; Godino, M; López-Puertas, J M; Guerado, E; Becerra, J; Andrades, J A

    2008-01-01

    Regeneration takes place in the body at a moment or another throughout life. Bone, cartilage, and tendons (the key components of the structure and articulation in the body) have a limited capacity for self-repair and, after traumatic injury or disease, the regenerative power of adult tissue is often insufficient. When organs or tissues are irreparably damaged, they may be replaced by an artificial device or by a donor organ. However, the number of available donor organs is considerably limited. Generation of tissue-engineered replacement organs by extracting stem cells from the patient, growing them and modifying them in clinical conditions after re-introduction in the body represents an ideal source for corrective treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the multipotential progenitors that give rise to skeletal cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, muscle (skeletal and cardiac muscle), adipocytes (fat tissue) and hematopoietic (blood)-supportive stromal cells. MSCs are found in multiple connective tissues, in adult bone marrow, skeletal muscles and fat pads. The wide representation in adult tissues may be related to the existence of a circulating blood pool or that MSCs are associated to the vascular system.

  8. Germ Cell Tumors in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Calaminus, Gabriele; Joffe, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) represent a group of biologically complex malignancies that affect patients at different sites within the body and at different ages. The varying nature of these tumors reflects their cell of origin which is the primordial germ cell, which normally gives rise to ovarian and testicular egg and sperm producing cells. These cells retain an ability to give rise to all types of human tissues, and this is illustrated by the different kinds of GCTs that occur. In adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients, GCTs predominantly present as testicular, ovarian or mediastinal primary GCTs, and represent some of the most complex therapeutic challenges within any AYA practice. The varying types of GCTs, defined by primary site and/or age at presentation, can look very similar microscopically. However, there is growing evidence that they may have different molecular characteristics, different biology and different requirements for curative treatments. Whilst in adult testicular GCTs there is evidence for an environmental cause during fetal development and a genetic component, these causative factors are much less well understood in other GCTs. GCTs are some of the most curable cancers in adults, but some patients exhibit resistance to standard treatments. Because of this, today's clinical research is directed at understanding how to best utilize toxic therapies and promote healthy survivorship. This chapter explores the biology, behavior and treatment of GCTs and discusses how the AYA group of GCTs may hold some of the keys to understanding fundamental unanswered questions of biological variance and curability in GCTs. PMID:27595361

  9. Biology of the adult enteric neural stem cell.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Mondaca, Sandino; Carreón-Rodríguez, Alfonso; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence has accumulated in recent years supporting the existence of neural stem cells in the adult gut. There are at least three groups that have obtained them using different methodologies and have described them in vitro. There is a growing amount of knowledge on their biology, but many questions are yet unanswered. Among these questions is whether these cells are part of a permanent undifferentiated pool or are recruited in a regular basis; in addition, the factors and genes involved in their survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation are largely unknown. Finally, with between 10 and 20% of adults suffering from diseases involving the enteric nervous system, most notably irritable bowel syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux, what is the possible role of enteric nervous stem cells in health and disease?

  10. In vivo cell tracking and quantification method in adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Alt, Clemens; Li, Pulin; White, Richard M.; Zon, Leonard I.; Wei, Xunbin; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-03-01

    Zebrafish have become a powerful vertebrate model organism for drug discovery, cancer and stem cell research. A recently developed transparent adult zebrafish using double pigmentation mutant, called casper, provide unparalleled imaging power in in vivo longitudinal analysis of biological processes at an anatomic resolution not readily achievable in murine or other systems. In this paper we introduce an optical method for simultaneous visualization and cell quantification, which combines the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and the in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC). The system is designed specifically for non-invasive tracking of both stationary and circulating cells in adult zebrafish casper, under physiological conditions in the same fish over time. The confocal imaging part in this system serves the dual purposes of imaging fish tissue microstructure and a 3D navigation tool to locate a suitable vessel for circulating cell counting. The multi-color, multi-channel instrument allows the detection of multiple cell populations or different tissues or organs simultaneously. We demonstrate initial testing of this novel instrument by imaging vasculature and tracking circulating cells in CD41: GFP/Gata1: DsRed transgenic casper fish whose thrombocytes/erythrocytes express the green and red fluorescent proteins. Circulating fluorescent cell incidents were recorded and counted repeatedly over time and in different types of vessels. Great application opportunities in cancer and stem cell researches are discussed.

  11. Recent advances in bone regeneration using adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zigdon-Giladi, Hadar; Rudich, Utai; Michaeli Geller, Gal; Evron, Ayelet

    2015-04-26

    Bone is a highly vascularized tissue reliant on the close spatial and temporal association between blood vessels and bone cells. Therefore, cells that participate in vasculogenesis and osteogenesis play a pivotal role in bone formation during prenatal and postnatal periods. Nevertheless, spontaneous healing of bone fracture is occasionally impaired due to insufficient blood and cellular supply to the site of injury. In these cases, bone regeneration process is interrupted, which might result in delayed union or even nonunion of the fracture. Nonunion fracture is difficult to treat and have a high financial impact. In the last decade, numerous technological advancements in bone tissue engineering and cell-therapy opened new horizon in the field of bone regeneration. This review starts with presentation of the biological processes involved in bone development, bone remodeling, fracture healing process and the microenvironment at bone healing sites. Then, we discuss the rationale for using adult stem cells and listed the characteristics of the available cells for bone regeneration. The mechanism of action and epigenetic regulations for osteogenic differentiation are also described. Finally, we review the literature for translational and clinical trials that investigated the use of adult stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and CD34(+) blood progenitors) for bone regeneration.

  12. Wildtype adult stem cells, unlike tumor cells, are resistant to cellular damages in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meifang; Zhao, Hang; Zhao, Hanfei; Binari, Richard; Perrimon, Norbert; Li, Zhouhua

    2016-03-15

    Adult stem cells or residential progenitor cells are critical to maintain the structure and function of adult tissues (homeostasis) throughout the lifetime of an individual. Mis-regulation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation often leads to diseases including cancer, however, how wildtype adult stem cells and cancer cells respond to cellular damages remains unclear. We find that in the adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs), unlike tumor intestinal cells, are resistant to various cellular damages. Tumor intestinal cells, unlike wildtype ISCs, are easily eliminated by apoptosis. Further, their proliferation is inhibited upon autophagy induction, and autophagy-mediated tumor inhibition is independent of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibition of tumorigenesis by autophagy is likely through the sequestration and degradation of mitochondria, as compromising mitochondria activity in these tumor models mimics the induction of autophagy and increasing the production of mitochondria alleviates the tumor-suppression capacity of autophagy. Together, these data demonstrate that wildtype adult stem cells and tumor cells show dramatic differences in sensitivity to cellular damages, thus providing potential therapeutic implications targeting tumorigenesis. PMID:26845534

  13. Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parmesar, Kevon; Raj, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established treatment option for both hematological malignancies and nonmalignant conditions such as aplastic anemia and haemoglobinopathies. For those patients lacking a suitable matched sibling or matched unrelated donor, haploidentical donors are an alternative expedient donor pool. Historically, haploidentical transplantation led to high rates of graft rejection and GVHD. Strategies to circumvent these issues include T cell depletion and management of complications thereof or T replete transplants with GVHD prophylaxis. This review is an overview of these strategies and contemporaneous outcomes for hematological malignancies in adult haploidentical stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:27313619

  14. Adult stem cell plasticity: will engineered tissues be rejected?

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Te-Chao; Alison, Malcolm R; Wright, Nicholas A; Poulsom, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The dogma that adult tissue-specific stem cells remain committed to supporting only their own tissue has been challenged; a new hypothesis, that adult stem cells demonstrate plasticity in their repertoires, is being tested. This is important because it seems possible that haematopoietic stem cells, for example, could be exploited to generate and perhaps deliver cell-based therapies deep within existing nonhaematopoietic organs. Much of the evidence for plasticity derives from histological studies of tissues from patients or animals that have received grafts of cells or whole organs, from a donor bearing (or lacking) a definitive marker. Detection in the recipient of appropriately differentiated cells bearing the donor marker is indicative of a switch in phenotype of a stem cell or a member of a transit amplifying population or of a differentiated cell. In this review, we discuss evidence for these changes occurring but do not consider the molecular basis of cell commitment. In general, the extent of engraftment is low but may be increased if tissues are damaged. In model systems of liver regeneration, the repeated application of a selection pressure increases levels of engraftment considerably; how this occurs is unclear. Cell fusion plays a part in regeneration and remodelling of the liver, skeletal muscle and even regions of the brain. Genetic disease may be amenable to some forms of cell therapy, yet immune rejection will present challenges. Graft-vs.-host disease will continue to present problems, although this may be avoided if the cells were derived from the recipient or they were tolerized. Despite great expectations for cellular therapies, there are indications that attempts to replace missing proteins could be confounded simply by the development of specific immunity that rejects the new phenotype. PMID:15255965

  15. First cloned swamp buffalo produced from adult ear fibroblast cell.

    PubMed

    Tasripoo, K; Suthikrai, W; Sophon, S; Jintana, R; Nualchuen, W; Usawang, S; Bintvihok, A; Techakumphu, M; Srisakwattana, K

    2014-07-01

    The world's first cloned swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) derived from adult ear skin fibroblast has been reported. Donor fibroblast cells were produced from biopsies taken from adult male ear skin and in vitro matured oocytes obtained from a slaughterhouse were used as cytoplasts. A total of 39 blastocysts and 19 morulae fresh embryos were transferred into 12 recipient buffaloes. Progesterone assays indicated establishment of pregnancy in 10 of the 12 buffaloes (83.3%) after 45 days, with six animals still pregnant at 3 months. One recipient maintained pregnancy to term and naturally delivered a 40 kg male calf after 326 days of gestation. DNA analysis showed that the cloned calf was genetically identical to the donor cells. Genotype analyses, using 12 buffalo microsatellite markers, confirmed that the cloned calf was derived from the donor cell lines. In conclusion, the present study reports, for the first time, the establishment of pregnancy and birth of the first cloned Thai swamp buffalo derived from adult ear skin fibroblast cells.

  16. [Therapeutic use of stem cells. II. Adult stem cells].

    PubMed

    Uzan, Georges

    2004-09-30

    Many degenerative diseases are not curable by means of classical medicine. The long term objective of cell therapy is to treat the patients with their own stem cells that could be either purified from the diseased organ or from "reservoirs" of stem cells such as that constituted by the bone marrow. The existence of stem cells in the organs or reservoirs is now established in vitro and in some cases, in animal models. Numbers of technical problems linked to the scarcity of these cells still delay the clinical use of purified stem cells. However, clinical protocols using heterogeneous cell populations have already started to treat a growing number of diseases. In some case, autologous cells can be used, as it is the case for bone marrow transplantation in blood diseases. Mesenchymal cells, also purified from the bone marrow are currently used in orthopaedic diseases. Because these cells reveal a broad differentiation potential, active research programs explore their possible use for treatment of other diseases. Bone marrow also contains vascular stem cells that could be active in reappearing defective vessels responsible for ischaemic diseases. Indeed, clinical trials in which bone marrow cells are injected in the cardiac muscle of patients with myocardial infarction or in the leg muscle (gastrocnemius) of patients with hind limb ischaemia have already started. Artificial skin prepared from skin biopsies is used for the reconstitution of the derma of severely burned patients. Clinical trials have also started, using allogenic cells. The patients must be treated by immunosuppressive drugs. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson have been successfully treated by intra-cerebral injection of foetal neurones. Pancreatic islets implanted in the liver have shown to re-establish a normal glycaemia in diabetic patients. However, all these clinical trials use differentiated cells or at least progenitors which display differentiation potential and lifetime much more

  17. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  18. Cell secretion from the adult lamprey supraneural body tissues possesses cytocidal activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yue; Wang, Shiyue; Ba, Wei; Li, Qingwei

    2015-01-01

    The supraneural body was identified in the adult lamprey, and its secretions induced the death of a variety of tumor cells but had no effect on normal cells. The cell secretions from different lamprey tissues were separated, and these secretions killed human tumor cells to varying degrees. The cell secretions induced remarkable cell morphological alterations such as cell blebbing, and the plasma membrane was destroyed by the secretions. In addition, the secretions induced morphological alterations of the mitochondria, cytoskeletal structure, and endoplasmic reticulum, eventually leading to cell death. These observations suggest the presence of a novel protein in the lamprey and the possibility of new applications for the protein in the medical field.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells instruct oligodendrogenic fate decision on adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Francisco J; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Pedre, Xiomara; Ploetz, Sonja; Caioni, Massimiliano; Lois, Carlos; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Aigner, Ludwig

    2006-10-01

    Adult stem cells reside in different tissues and organs of the adult organism. Among these cells are MSCs that are located in the adult bone marrow and NSCs that exist in the adult central nervous system (CNS). In transplantation experiments, MSCs demonstrated neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects that were associated with functional improvements. The underlying mechanisms are largely unidentified. Here, we reveal that the interactions between adult MSCs and NSCs, mediated by soluble factors, induce oligodendrogenic fate decision in NSCs at the expense of astrogenesis. This was demonstrated (a) by an increase in the percentage of cells expressing the oligodendrocyte markers GalC and myelin basic protein, (b) by a reduction in the percentage of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells, and (c) by the expression pattern of cell fate determinants specific for oligodendrogenic differentiation. Thus, it involved enhanced expression of the oligodendrogenic transcription factors Olig1, Olig2, and Nkx2.2 and diminished expression of Id2, an inhibitor of oligodendrogenic differentiation. Results of (a) 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine pulse-labeling of cells, (b) cell fate analysis, and (c) cell death/survival analysis suggested an inductive mechanism and excluded a selection process. A candidate factor screen excluded a number of growth factors, cytokines, and neurotrophins that have previously been shown to influence neurogenesis and neural differentiation from the oligodendrogenic activity derived from the MSCs. This work might have major implications for the development of future transplantation strategies for the treatment of degenerative diseases in the CNS. PMID:16763198

  20. Emerging restorative treatments for Parkinson's disease: manipulation and inducement of dopaminergic neurons from adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junpeng; Xu, Qunyuan

    2011-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease, characterized by a selective loss of midbrain Dopaminergic (DA) neurons. To address this problem, various types of stem cells that have potential to differentiate into DA neurons are being investigated as cellular therapies for PD, including cells derived from embryonic or adult donor tissue, and embryonic stem cells. These cell sources, however, have raised certain questions with regard to ethical and rejection issues. Recent progress in adult stems has further proved that the cells derived from adult tissue could be expanded and differentiated into DA precursor cells in vitro, and cell therapy with adult stem cells could produce a clear improvement for PD models. Using adult stem cells for clinic application may not only overcome the ethical problem inherent in using human fetal tissue or embryonic stem cells, but also open the possibility for autologous transplantation. The patient-specific adult stem cell is therefore a potential and prospective candidate for PD treatment.

  1. Pulmonary Langerhans Histiocytosis: an uncommon cause of interstitial pneumonia in a patient with Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    González García, Andrés; Callejas Rubio, José Luis; Ríos Fernández, Raquel; Ortego Centeno, Norberto

    2016-03-01

    Sjögren syndrome is a chronic, systemic, and autoimmune disorder that targets exocrine glands by remarkable B cell hyperactivity. Eventually, it is associated with extra-glandular clinical manifestations that affect essentially any organ system, including pulmonary involvement. Interstitial lung disease is one of the most serious pulmonary complications, and the early diagnosis is essential to initiate a prompt therapy. On the other hand, Sjögren syndrome could present concomitantly with several rheumatologic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis. Pulmonary Langerhans Histiocytosis is a rare clonal proliferative disease characterized by pulmonary involvement by cells phenotypically similar to Langerhans cells. We describe the case of a nonsmoker 62-year-old woman with Sjögren syndrome who presented concomitantly a Pulmonary Langerhans Histiocytosis mimicking a pulmonary complication of its Sjögren. Fortunately, she had a well response to corticosteroids and azathioprine regimen. The aim of the paper is to emphasize the importance of the good differential diagnosis related to the pulmonary involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of these two entities in the literature.

  2. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N.; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Panganiban, Clarisse H.; Havens, Luke T.; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  3. Adult stem cells therapy for urine incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Stangel-Wójcikiewicz, Klaudia; Majka, Marcin; Basta, Antoni; Stec, Małgorzata; Pabian, Wojciech; Piwowar, Monika; Chancellor, Michael B

    2010-05-01

    The past few years brought high development in obtaining and culturing autologous adult stem cells. In this paper we review publications of experimental investigations and clinical trials of the muscle-derived cells and the application in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence among women. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be obtained from bone marrow but it is associated with a painful biopsy procedure. Collection of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) is less harmful because the skeletal muscle biopsy is performed with a small caliber needle in local anesthesia. The stem-based therapy could be the next step in the treatment of urinary incontinence. There are still many elements of therapy such as effectiveness or long-term side effects which need to be researched.

  4. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  5. Two sporadic cases of adult-onset progressive mucinous histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Young, A; Olivere, J; Yoo, S; Martins, C; Barrett, T

    2006-02-01

    Progressive mucinous histiocytosis is a rare, benign, non-Langerhans' cell histiocytosis limited to the skin. Ten cases--all women--in four families and one sporadic case have been described in the literature. The disorder usually begins in childhood and progresses slowly. We report two sporadic cases of adult-onset progressive mucinous histiocytosis in unrelated African-American women, aged 48 and 55 years, respectively, who developed red-brown and flesh-coloured, asymptomatic papules on the face, the arms and the legs without truncal, mucosal or visceral involvement. The lesions showed no spontaneous regression. Both patients lacked associated systemic symptoms, including polyuria, polydipsia or seizures. There was no underlying hyperlipidaemia, paraproteinaemia or lymphoproliferative disease. No family history of similar lesions could be identified. Light microscopy revealed dermal proliferation of spindle-shaped histiocytes with abundant mucin deposition. Electron microscopy demonstrated a high number of myelin figures or zebra bodies in the cytoplasm of histiocytes. On immunohistochemistry, positive staining with macrophage markers--CD68, HAM56 and lysozyme--and factor XIIIa, a transglutaminase present in dermal dendrocytes, and negative staining with Langerhans' cell markers--CD1a and S100--and CD34, a marker present in dermal dendritic cells derived from uncommitted mesenchymal cells, were observed. PMID:16420313

  6. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  7. A novel view of the adult bone marrow stem cell hierarchy and stem cell trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, M Z

    2015-04-01

    This review presents a novel view and working hypothesis about the hierarchy within the adult bone marrow stem cell compartment and the still-intriguing question of whether adult bone marrow contains primitive stem cells from early embryonic development, such as cells derived from the epiblast, migrating primordial germ cells or yolk sac-derived hemangioblasts. It also presents a novel view of the mechanisms that govern stem cell mobilization and homing, with special emphasis on the role of the complement cascade as a trigger for egress of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow into blood as well as the emerging role of novel homing factors and priming mechanisms that support stromal-derived factor 1-mediated homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells after transplantation.

  8. A novel view of the adult bone marrow stem cell hierarchy and stem cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, M Z

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a novel view and working hypothesis about the hierarchy within the adult bone marrow stem cell compartment and the still-intriguing question of whether adult bone marrow contains primitive stem cells from early embryonic development, such as cells derived from the epiblast, migrating primordial germ cells or yolk sac-derived hemangioblasts. It also presents a novel view of the mechanisms that govern stem cell mobilization and homing, with special emphasis on the role of the complement cascade as a trigger for egress of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow into blood as well as the emerging role of novel homing factors and priming mechanisms that support stromal-derived factor 1-mediated homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells after transplantation. PMID:25486871

  9. Robust G2 pausing of adult stem cells in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Buzgariu, Wanda; Crescenzi, Marco; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Hydra is a freshwater hydrozoan polyp that constantly renews its two tissue layers thanks to three distinct stem cell populations that cannot replace each other, epithelial ectodermal, epithelial endodermal, and multipotent interstitial. These adult stem cells, located in the central body column, exhibit different cycling paces, slow for the epithelial, fast for the interstitial. To monitor the changes in cell cycling in Hydra, we established a fast and efficient flow cytometry procedure, which we validated by confirming previous findings, as the Nocodazole-induced reversible arrest of cell cycling in G2/M, and the mitogenic signal provided by feeding. Then to dissect the cycling and differentiation behaviors of the interstitial stem cells, we used the AEP_cnnos1 and AEP_Icy1 transgenic lines that constitutively express GFP in this lineage. For the epithelial lineages we used the sf-1 strain that rapidly eliminates the fast cycling cells upon heat-shock and progressively becomes epithelial. This study evidences similar cycling patterns for the interstitial and epithelial stem cells, which all alternate between the G2 and S-phases traversing a minimal G1-phase. We also found interstitial progenitors with a shorter G2 that pause in G1/G0. At the animal extremities, most cells no longer cycle, the epithelial cells terminally differentiate in G2 and the interstitial progenitors in G1/G0. At the apical pole ~80% cells are post-mitotic differentiated cells, reflecting the higher density of neurons and nematocytes in this region. We discuss how the robust G2 pausing of stem cells, maintained over weeks of starvation, may contribute to regeneration.

  10. Epigenomic Reprogramming of Adult Cardiomyocyte-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Zhong, Jiang F; Qiu, Hongyu; Robb MacLellan, W.; Marbán, Eduardo; Wang, Charles

    2015-01-01

    It has been believed that mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are terminally-differentiated and are unable to proliferate. Recently, using a bi-transgenic ACM fate mapping mouse model and an in vitro culture system, we demonstrated that adult mouse cardiomyocytes were able to dedifferentiate into cardiac progenitor-like cells (CPCs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Here we integrate single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylation analyses to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and cell cycle reentry of mouse ACMs. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, dedifferentiated mouse cardiomyocyte-derived CPCs (mCPCs) display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlated well with the methylome, our transcriptomic data showed that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implantation of mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. Our study demonstrates that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. PMID:26657817

  11. Integrated molecular analysis of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kitanaka, Akira; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shimamura, Teppei; Yasunaga, Jun-Ichirou; Totoki, Yasushi; Chiba, Kenichi; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Nagae, Genta; Ishii, Ryohei; Muto, Satsuki; Kotani, Shinichi; Watatani, Yosaku; Takeda, June; Sanada, Masashi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Sato, Yusuke; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Makishima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Ma, Guangyong; Nosaka, Kisato; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Itonaga, Hidehiro; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Munakata, Wataru; Ogasawara, Hideaki; Sato, Toshitaka; Sasai, Ken; Muramoto, Kenzo; Penova, Marina; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Shide, Kotaro; Kubuki, Yoko; Hidaka, Tomonori; Kameda, Takuro; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Ishiyama, Ken; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Tobinai, Kensei; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nureki, Osamu; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Toshiki; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Matsuoka, Masao; Miyano, Satoru; Shimoda, Kazuya; Ogawa, Seishi

    2015-11-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a peripheral T cell neoplasm of largely unknown genetic basis, associated with human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here we describe an integrated molecular study in which we performed whole-genome, exome, transcriptome and targeted resequencing, as well as array-based copy number and methylation analyses, in a total of 426 ATL cases. The identified alterations overlap significantly with the HTLV-1 Tax interactome and are highly enriched for T cell receptor-NF-κB signaling, T cell trafficking and other T cell-related pathways as well as immunosurveillance. Other notable features include a predominance of activating mutations (in PLCG1, PRKCB, CARD11, VAV1, IRF4, FYN, CCR4 and CCR7) and gene fusions (CTLA4-CD28 and ICOS-CD28). We also discovered frequent intragenic deletions involving IKZF2, CARD11 and TP73 and mutations in GATA3, HNRNPA2B1, GPR183, CSNK2A1, CSNK2B and CSNK1A1. Our findings not only provide unique insights into key molecules in T cell signaling but will also guide the development of new diagnostics and therapeutics in this intractable tumor. PMID:26437031

  12. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras.

    PubMed

    Keighren, Margaret A; Flockhart, Jean H; West, John D

    2016-05-15

    The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera with functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1(-/-) null cells in adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras and determine if Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes in one female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c), this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many adult tissues.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned cattle produced by fetal and adult cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, R; Schinogl, P; Zakhartchenko, V; Achmann, R; Schernthaner, W; Stojkovic, M; Wolf, E; Müller, M; Brem, G

    2000-07-01

    Mammals have been cloned from adult donor cells. Here we report the first cases of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy in adult mammalian clones generated from fetal and adult donor cells. The heteroplasmic clones included a healthy cattle equivalent of the sheep Dolly, for which a lack of heteroplasmy was reported.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned cattle produced by fetal and adult cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, R; Schinogl, P; Zakhartchenko, V; Achmann, R; Schernthaner, W; Stojkovic, M; Wolf, E; Müller, M; Brem, G

    2000-07-01

    Mammals have been cloned from adult donor cells. Here we report the first cases of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy in adult mammalian clones generated from fetal and adult donor cells. The heteroplasmic clones included a healthy cattle equivalent of the sheep Dolly, for which a lack of heteroplasmy was reported. PMID:10888867

  15. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yared, Jean A.; Kimball, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients. PMID:26610571

  16. Human germ cell differentiation from fetal- and adult-derived induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Panula, Sarita; Medrano, Jose V.; Kee, Kehkooi; Bergström, Rosita; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Byers, Blake; Wilson, Kitchener D.; Wu, Joseph C.; Simon, Carlos; Hovatta, Outi; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, our understanding of molecular genetic aspects of human germ cell development has been limited, at least in part due to inaccessibility of early stages of human development to experimentation. However, the derivation of pluripotent stem cells may provide the necessary human genetic system to study germ cell development. In this study, we compared the potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), derived from adult and fetal somatic cells to form primordial and meiotic germ cells, relative to human embryonic stem cells. We found that ∼5% of human iPSCs differentiated to primordial germ cells (PGCs) following induction with bone morphogenetic proteins. Furthermore, we observed that PGCs expressed green fluorescent protein from a germ cell-specific reporter and were enriched for the expression of endogenous germ cell-specific proteins and mRNAs. In response to the overexpression of intrinsic regulators, we also observed that iPSCs formed meiotic cells with extensive synaptonemal complexes and post-meiotic haploid cells with a similar pattern of ACROSIN staining as observed in human spermatids. These results indicate that human iPSCs derived from reprogramming of adult somatic cells can form germline cells. This system may provide a useful model for molecular genetic studies of human germline formation and pathology and a novel platform for clinical studies and potential therapeutical applications. PMID:21131292

  17. Adult human adipose tissue contains several types of multipotent cells.

    PubMed

    Tallone, Tiziano; Realini, Claudio; Böhmler, Andreas; Kornfeld, Christopher; Vassalli, Giuseppe; Moccetti, Tiziano; Bardelli, Silvana; Soldati, Gianni

    2011-04-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells that can be easily isolated from various tissues and expanded in vitro. Many reports on their pluripotency and possible clinical applications have raised hopes and interest in MSCs. In an attempt to unify the terminology and the criteria to label a cell as MSC, in 2006 the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) proposed a standard set of rules to define the identity of these cells. However, MSCs are still extracted from different tissues, by diverse isolation protocols, are cultured and expanded in different media and conditions. All these variables may have profound effects on the selection of cell types and the composition of heterogeneous subpopulations, on the selective expansion of specific cell populations with totally different potentials and ergo, on the long-term fate of the cells upon in vitro culture. Therefore, specific molecular and cellular markers that identify MSCs subsets as well as standardization of expansion protocols for these cells are urgently needed. Here, we briefly discuss new useful markers and recent data supporting the rapidly emerging concept that many different types of progenitor cells are found in close association with blood vessels. This knowledge may promote the necessary technical improvements required to reduce variability and promote higher efficacy and safety when isolating and expanding these cells for therapeutic use. In the light of the discussed data, particularly the identification of new markers, and advances in the understanding of fundamental MSC biology, we also suggest a revision of the 2006 ISCT criteria.

  18. Microarray analysis of gene expression in adult retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Dmitry; Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Nathanson, Lubov; McKinnon, Stuart J; Shestopalov, Valery I

    2006-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) transfer visual information to the brain and are known to be susceptible to selective degeneration in various neuropathies such as glaucoma. This selective vulnerability suggests that these highly specialized neurons possess a distinct gene expression profile that becomes altered by neuropathy-associated stresses, which lead to the RGC death. In this study, to identify genes expressed predominantly in adult RGCs, a global transcriptional profile of purified primary RGCs has been compared to that of the whole retina. To avoid alterations of the original gene expression profile by cell culture conditions, we isolated RNA directly from adult RGCs purified by immunopanning without prior sub-cultivation. Genes expressed predominantly in RGCs included: Nrg1, Rgn, 14-3-3 family (Ywhah, Ywhaz, Ywhab), Nrn1, Gap43, Vsnl1, Rgs4. Some of these genes may serve as novel markers for these neurons. Our analysis revealed enrichment in genes controlling the pro-survival pathways in RGCs as compared to other retinal cells. PMID:16376886

  19. Chronic ethanol consumption transiently reduces adult neural progenitor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rice, Ann C; Bullock, M Ross; Shelton, Keith L

    2004-06-11

    Adult neural stem/progenitor cells proliferate throughout the life of the animal in the subependymal zone and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG). Treatments such as enriched environment, dietary restriction, running and anti-depressants increase proliferation, however, stress and opiates have been shown to decrease proliferation. While models of binge ethanol drinking decreases proliferation, few studies have characterized the effect chronic ethanol usage has on progenitor cell proliferation. In this study, we have examined changes in the progenitor cell proliferation rate following chronic ethanol consumption. Animals were given a nutritionally balanced liquid diet containing 6.5% v/v ethanol or an isocalorically balanced liquid diet. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered (150 mg/kg x 3) and the animals sacrificed 2 h after the last injection on days 3, 10 or 30 of the ethanol diet. Coronal brain blocks were paraffin embedded and 6 microm sections sliced and immunohistochemically stained for BrdU. Quantitation of the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the subgranular zone of the DG revealed a significant decrease only at the 3-day time-point, with recovery by the 10- and 30-day time-points. Thus, the progenitor cell proliferation rate is transiently decreased by chronic ethanol usage. This data suggests that chronic alcohol use results in a compensatory response that restores the progenitor cell proliferation rate.

  20. The simplest method for in vitro β-cell production from human adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Dilli Ram; Seo, Kwang-Won; Sun, Bo; Seo, Min-Soo; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Seo, Yoo-Jin; Marcin, Jurga; Forraz, Nicolas; Roy, Helene Le; Larry, Denner; Colin, McGuckin; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a challenging autoimmune disease. Biomedical researchers are currently exploring efficient and effective ways to solve this challenge. The potential of stem cell therapies for treating diabetes represents one of the major focuses of current research on diabetes treatment. Here, we have attempted to differentiate adult stem cells from umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal cells (UCB-MSC), Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSC) and amniotic epithelial stem cells (AE-SC) into insulin-producing cells. The serum-free protocol developed in this study resulted in the differentiation of cells into definitive endoderm, pancreatic foregut, pancreatic endoderm and, finally, pancreatic endocrine cells, which expressed the marker genes SOX17, PDX1, NGN3, NKX6.1, INS, GCG, and PPY, respectively. Detection of the expression of the gap junction-related gene connexin-36 (CX36) using RT-PCR provided conclusive evidence for insulin-producing cell differentiation. In addition to this RT-PCR result, insulin and C-peptide protein were detected by immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Glucose stimulation test results showed that significantly greater amounts of C-peptide and insulin were released from differentiated cells than from undifferentiated cells. In conclusion, the methods investigated in this study can be considered an effective and efficient means of obtaining insulin-producing cells from adult stem cells within a week.

  1. Telomere-to-centromere ratio of bovine clones, embryos, gametes, fetal cells, and adult cells.

    PubMed

    Meerdo, Lora N; Reed, William A; White, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    In 1997, Dolly, the first animal cloned from an adult cell, was born. It was announced in 1999 that Dolly might be aging faster than normal because her telomeres were shorter than age-matched control sheep. Telomeres, a repeated DNA sequence located at the ends of linear chromosomes, allow for base pair loss during DNA replication. Telomere shortening acts as a "mitotic clock," leading to replicative senescence. By using whole cell lysate and slot-blot analysis, we determined the telomere-to-centromere ratio (T/C) for bovine gametes, embryos, fetal tissues (brain, heart, lung, kidney, uterus, ovary, and skin), adult donor cells, and cloned embryos. Our data indicates a consistency in T/C among the various fetal tissues. The T/C of sperm is significantly lower than in oocytes. The T/C decreases from the oocyte to the 2-8-cell stage embryo, increases dramatically at the morula stage, and decreases at the blastocyst stage. Our data shows no significant difference in T/C between cloned embryos and in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos, but there is a significant difference between cloned embryos and adult donor cells. In conclusion, the enucleated bovine oocyte has the ability to reestablish the telomere length of adult somatic cell donor nuclei. PMID:15996118

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is essential for physiological Beta cell function and islet vascularization in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Christoffersson, Gustaf; Waldén, Tomas; Sandberg, Monica; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Phillipson, Mia

    2015-04-01

    The availability of paracrine factors in the islets of Langerhans, and the constitution of the beta cell basement membrane can both be affected by proteolytic enzymes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the extracellular matrix-degrading enzyme gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp-9) on islet function in mice. Islet function of Mmp9-deficient (Mmp9(-/-)) mice and their wild-type littermates was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. The pancreata of Mmp9(-/-) mice did not differ from wild type in islet mass or distribution. However, Mmp9(-/-) mice had an impaired response to a glucose load in vivo, with lower serum insulin levels. The glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was reduced also in vitro in isolated Mmp9(-/-) islets. The vascular density of Mmp9(-/-) islets was lower, and the capillaries had fewer fenestrations, whereas the islet blood flow was threefold higher. These alterations could partly be explained by compensatory changes in the expression of matrix-related proteins. This in-depth investigation of the effects of the loss of MMP-9 function on pancreatic islets uncovers a deteriorated beta cell function that is primarily due to a shift in the beta cell phenotype, but also due to islet vascular aberrations. This likely reflects the importance of a normal islet matrix turnover exerted by MMP-9, and concomitant release of paracrine factors sequestered on the matrix.

  3. Development of Adult-Generated Cell Connectivity with Excitatory and Inhibitory Cell Populations in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Restivo, Leonardo; Niibori, Yosuke; Mercaldo, Valentina; Josselyn, Sheena A; Frankland, Paul W

    2015-07-22

    New neurons are generated continuously in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus and integrate into existing hippocampal circuits throughout adulthood. Although the addition of these new neurons may facilitate the formation of new memories, as they integrate, they provide additional excitatory drive to CA3 pyramidal neurons. During development, to maintain homeostasis, new neurons form preferential contacts with local inhibitory circuits. Using retroviral and transgenic approaches to label adult-generated granule cells, we first asked whether a comparable process occurs in the adult hippocampus in mice. Similar to development, we found that, during adulthood, new neurons form connections with inhibitory cells in the dentate gyrus, hilus, and CA3 regions as they integrate into hippocampal circuits. In particular, en passant bouton and filopodia connections with CA3 interneurons peak when adult-generated dentate granule cells (DGCs) are ∼4 weeks of age, a time point when these cells are most excitable. Consistent with this, optical stimulation of 4-week-old (but not 6- or 8-week-old) adult-generated DGCs strongly activated CA3 interneurons. Finally, we found that CA3 interneurons were activated robustly during learning and that their activity was strongly coupled with activity of 4-week-old (but not older) adult-generated DGCs. These data indicate that, as adult-generated neurons integrate into hippocampal circuits, they transiently form strong anatomical, effective, and functional connections with local inhibitory circuits in CA3. Significance statement: New neurons are generated continuously in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus and integrate into existing hippocampal circuits throughout adulthood. Understanding how these cells integrate within well formed circuits will increase our knowledge about the basic principles governing circuit assembly in the adult hippocampus. This study uses a combined connectivity analysis (anatomical, functional, and effective

  4. Conditionally reprogrammed cells represent a stem-like state of adult epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Suprynowicz, Frank A.; Upadhyay, Geeta; Krawczyk, Ewa; Kramer, Sarah C.; Hebert, Jess D.; Liu, Xuefeng; Yuan, Hang; Cheluvaraju, Chaitra; Clapp, Phillip W.; Boucher, Richard C.; Kamonjoh, Christopher M.; Randell, Scott H.; Schlegel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The combination of irradiated fibroblast feeder cells and Rho kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, conditionally induces an indefinite proliferative state in primary mammalian epithelial cells. These conditionally reprogrammed cells (CRCs) are karyotype-stable and nontumorigenic. Because self-renewal is a recognized property of stem cells, we investigated whether Y-27632 and feeder cells induced a stem-like phenotype. We found that CRCs share characteristics of adult stem cells and exhibit up-regulated expression of α6 and β1 integrins, ΔNp63α, CD44, and telomerase reverse transcriptase, as well as decreased Notch signaling and an increased level of nuclear β-catenin. The induction of CRCs is rapid (occurs within 2 d) and results from reprogramming of the entire cell population rather than the selection of a minor subpopulation. CRCs do not overexpress the transcription factor sets characteristic of embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells (e.g., Sox2, Oct4, Nanog, or Klf4). The induction of CRCs is also reversible, and removal of Y-27632 and feeders allows the cells to differentiate normally. Thus, when CRCs from ectocervical epithelium or tracheal epithelium are placed in an air–liquid interface culture system, the cervical cells form a well differentiated stratified squamous epithelium, whereas the tracheal cells form a ciliated airway epithelium. We discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities afforded by a method that can generate adult stem-like cells in vitro without genetic manipulation. PMID:23169653

  5. Adult somatic stem cells in the human parasite, Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Wang, Bo; Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Tharp, Marla; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Schistosomiasis is among the most prevalent human parasitic diseases, affecting more than 200 million people worldwide1. The etiological agents of this disease are trematode flatworms (Schistosoma) that live and lay eggs within the vasculature of the host. These eggs lodge in host tissues, causing inflammatory responses that are the primary cause of morbidity. Because these parasites can live and reproduce within human hosts for decades2, elucidating the mechanisms that promote their longevity is of fundamental importance. Although adult pluripotent stem cells, called neoblasts, drive long-term homeostatic tissue maintenance in long-lived free-living flatworms3,4 (e.g., planarians), and neoblast-like cells have been described in some parasitic tapeworms5, little is known about whether similar cell types exist in any trematode species. Here, we describe a population of neoblast-like cells in the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. These cells resemble planarian neoblasts morphologically and share their ability to proliferate and differentiate into derivatives of multiple germ layers. Capitalizing on available genomic resources6,7 and RNAseq-based gene expression profiling, we find that these schistosome neoblast-like cells express a fibroblast growth factor receptor ortholog. Using RNA interference we demonstrate that this gene is required for the maintenance of these neoblast-like cells. Our observations suggest that adaptation of developmental strategies shared by free-living ancestors to modern-day schistosomes likely contributed to the success of these animals as long-lived obligate parasites. We expect that future studies deciphering the function of these neoblast-like cells will have important implications for understanding the biology of these devastating parasites. PMID:23426263

  6. Regenerative capacity of adult cortical thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rode, Immanuel; Boehm, Thomas

    2012-02-28

    Involution of the thymus is accompanied by a decline in the number of thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and a severely restricted peripheral repertoire of T-cell specificities. TECs are essential for T-cell differentiation; they originate from a bipotent progenitor that gives rise to cells of cortical (cTEC) and medullary (mTEC) phenotypes, via compartment-specific progenitors. Upon acute selective near-total ablation during embryogenesis, regeneration of TECs fails, suggesting that losses from the pool of TEC progenitors are not compensated. However, it is unclear whether this is also true for the compartment-specific progenitors. The decline of cTECs is a prominent feature of thymic involution. Because cTECs support early stages of T-cell development and hence determine the overall lymphopoietic capacity of the thymus, it is possible that the lack of sustained regenerative capacity of cTEC progenitor cells underlies the process of thymic involution. Here, we examine this hypothesis by cell-type-specific conditional ablation of cTECs. Expression of the human diphtheria toxin receptor (hDTR) gene under the regulatory influence of the chemokine receptor Ccx-ckr1 gene renders cTECs sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of diphtheria toxin (DT). As expected, DT treatment of preadolescent and adult mice led to a dramatic loss of cTECs, accompanied by a rapid demise of immature thymocytes. Unexpectedly, however, the cTEC compartment regenerated after cessation of treatment, accompanied by the restoration of T-cell development. These findings provide the basis for the development of targeted interventions unlocking the latent regenerative potential of cTECs to counter thymic involution.

  7. Abnormal Pulmonary Function in Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Klings, Elizabeth S.; Wyszynski, Diego F.; Nolan, Vikki G.; Steinberg, Martin H.

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary complications of sickle cell anemia (Hb-SS) commonly cause morbidity, yet few large studies of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in this population have been reported. Objectives: PFTs (spirometry, lung volumes, and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide [DLCO]) from 310 adults with Hb-SS were analyzed to determine the pattern of pulmonary dysfunction and their association with other systemic complications of sickle cell disease. Methods: Raw PFT data were compared with predicted values. Each subject was subclassified into one of five groups: obstructive physiology, restrictive physiology, mixed obstructive/restrictive physiology, isolated low DLCO, or normal. The association between laboratory data of patients with decreased DLCO or restrictive physiology and those of normal subjects was assessed by multivariate linear regression. Measurements and Main Results: Normal PFTs were present in only 31 of 310 (10%) patients. Overall, adults with Hb-SS were characterized by decreased total lung capacities (70.2 ± 14.7% predicted) and DlCO (64.5 ± 19.9%). The most common PFT patterns were restrictive physiology (74%) and isolated low DlCO (13%). Decreased DLCO was associated with thrombocytosis (p = 0.05), with hepatic dysfunction (elevated alanine aminotransferase; p = 0.07), and a trend toward renal dysfunction (elevated blood urea nitrogen and creatinine; p = 0.05 and 0.07, respectively). Conclusions: Pulmonary function is abnormal in 90% of adult patients with Hb-SS. Common abnormalities include restrictive physiology and decreased DLCO. Decreased DLCO may indicate more severe sickle vasculopathy characterized by impaired hepatic and renal function. PMID:16556694

  8. Contribution of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Adult Mouse Inner Ear: Mesenchymal Cells and Fibrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Schmiedt, Richard A.; Minamiguchi, Hitoshi; Zhou, Daohong; Smythe, Nancy; Liu, Liya; Ogawa, Makio; Schulte, Bradley A.

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells have shown plasticity with a capacity to differentiate into a variety of specialized cells. To test the hypothesis that some cells in the inner ear are derived from BM, we transplanted either isolated whole BM cells or clonally expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) prepared from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into irradiated adult mice. Isolated GFP+ BM cells also were transplanted into conditioned newborn mice derived from pregnant mice injected with busulfan (which ablates HSCs in the newborns). Quantification of GFP+ cells was performed 3-20 months after transplant. GFP+ cells were found in the inner ear with all transplant conditions. They were most abundant within the spiral ligament but were also found in other locations normally occupied by fibrocytes and mesenchymal cells. No GFP+ neurons or hair cells were observed in inner ears of transplanted mice. Dual immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that most of the GFP+ cells were negative for CD45, a macrophage and hematopoietic cell marker. A portion of the GFP+ cells in the spiral ligament expressed immunoreactive Na, K-ATPase or the Na-K-Cl transporter (NKCC), proteins used as markers for specialized ion transport fibrocytes. Phenotypic studies indicated that the GFP+ cells did not arise from fusion of donor cells with endogenous cells. This study provides the first evidence for the origin of inner ear cells from BM and more specifically from HSCs. The results suggest that mesenchymal cells, including fibrocytes in the adult inner ear, may be derived continuously from HSCs. PMID:16538683

  9. Adult mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering versus regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arnold I

    2007-11-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from bone marrow or marrow aspirates and because they are culture-dish adherent, they can be expanded in culture while maintaining their multipotency. The MSCs have been used in preclinical models for tissue engineering of bone, cartilage, muscle, marrow stroma, tendon, fat, and other connective tissues. These tissue-engineered materials show considerable promise for use in rebuilding damaged or diseased mesenchymal tissues. Unanticipated is the realization that the MSCs secrete a large spectrum of bioactive molecules. These molecules are immunosuppressive, especially for T-cells and, thus, allogeneic MSCs can be considered for therapeutic use. In this context, the secreted bioactive molecules provide a regenerative microenvironment for a variety of injured adult tissues to limit the area of damage and to mount a self-regulated regenerative response. This regenerative microenvironment is referred to as trophic activity and, therefore, MSCs appear to be valuable mediators for tissue repair and regeneration. The natural titers of MSCs that are drawn to sites of tissue injury can be augmented by allogeneic MSCs delivered via the bloodstream. Indeed, human clinical trials are now under way to use allogeneic MSCs for treatment of myocardial infarcts, graft-versus-host disease, Crohn's Disease, cartilage and meniscus repair, stroke, and spinal cord injury. This review summarizes the biological basis for the in vivo functioning of MSCs through development and aging. PMID:17620285

  10. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process

    PubMed Central

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Houlihan, Alison; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix–only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in orthopedic applications

  11. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process.

    PubMed

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Houlihan, Alison; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix-only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in orthopedic applications. PMID

  12. Pluripotency of adult stem cells derived from human and rat pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Birth, M.; Rohwedel, J.; Assmuth, K.; Goepel, A.; Wedel, T.

    Adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells found within fully developed tissues or organs of an adult individuum. Until recently, these cells have been considered to bear less self-renewal ability and differentiation potency compared to embryonic stem cells. In recent studies an undifferentiated cell type was found in primary cultures of isolated acini from exocrine pancreas termed pancreatic stellate cells. Here we show that pancreatic stellate-like cells have the capacity of extended self-renewal and are able to differentiate spontaneously into cell types of all three germ layers expressing markers for smooth muscle cells, neurons, glial cells, epithelial cells, chondrocytes and secretory cells (insulin, amylase). Differentiation and subsequent formation of three-dimensional cellular aggregates (organoid bodies) were induced by merely culturing pancreatic stellate-like cells in hanging drops. These cells were developed into stable, long-term, in vitro cultures of both primary undifferentiated cell lines as well as organoid cultures. Thus, evidence is given that cell lineages of endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal origin arise spontaneously from a single adult undifferentiated cell type. Based on the present findings it is assumed that pancreatic stellate-like cells are a new class of lineage uncommitted pluripotent adult stem cells with a remarkable self-renewal ability and differentiation potency. The data emphasize the versatility of adult stem cells and may lead to a reappraisal of their use for the treatment of inherited disorders or acquired degenerative diseases.

  13. Adult bone marrow: which stem cells for cellular therapy protocols in neurodegenerative disorders?

    PubMed

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy.

  14. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Carol Ann Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  15. Label-Retaining Cells in the Adult Murine Salivary Glands Possess Characteristics of Adult Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chibly, Alejandro M.; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction. PMID:25238060

  16. Label-retaining cells in the adult murine salivary glands possess characteristics of adult progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chibly, Alejandro M; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction.

  17. Adult T-Cell Leukemia: A Review of Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Masako; Watanabe, Toshiki; Yamaguchi, Kazunari

    2012-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) infection and often occurs in HTLV-1-endemic areas, such as southwestern Japan, the Caribbean islands, Central and South America, Intertropical Africa, and Middle East. To date, many epidemiological studies have been conducted to investigate the incidence of ATL among general population or HTLV-1 carriers and to identify a variety of laboratory, molecular, and host-specific markers to be possible predictive factors for developing ATL because HTLV-1 infection alone is not sufficient to develop ATL. This literature review focuses on the epidemiology of ATL and the risk factors for the development of ATL from HTLV-1 carriers, while keeping information on the epidemiology of HTLV-1 to a minimum. The main lines of epidemiological evidence are: (1) ATL occurs mostly in adults, at least 20–30 years after the HTLV-1 infection, (2) age at onset differs across geographic areas: the average age in the Central and South America (around 40 years old) is younger than that in Japan (around 60 years old), (3) ATL occurs in those infected in childhood, but seldom occurs in those infected in adulthood, (4) male carriers have about a three- to fivefold higher risk of developing ATL than female, (5) the estimated lifetime risk of developing ATL in HTLV-1 carriers is 6–7% for men and 2–3% for women in Japan, (6) a low anti-Tax reactivity, a high soluble interleukin-2 receptor level, a high anti-HTLV-1 titer, and high levels of circulating abnormal lymphocytes and white blood cell count are accepted risk factors for the development of ATL, and (7) a higher proviral load (more than 4 copies/100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells) is an independent risk factor for progression of ATL. Nevertheless, the current epidemiological evidence is insufficient to fully understand the oncogenesis of ATL. Further well-designed epidemiological studies are needed. PMID

  18. Topography of Purkinje cells and other calbindin-immunoreactive cells within adult and hatchling turtle cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Michael; Ward, Kyle C; Tolbert, Daniel L

    2009-12-01

    The turtle's cerebellum (Cb) is an unfoliated sheet, so the topography of its entire cortex can be easily studied physiologically by optical recordings. However, unlike the mammalian Cb, little is known about the topography of turtle Purkinje cells (PCs). Here, topography was examined using calbindin-D(28K) immunohistochemistry of adult and hatchling turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans, 2.5-15 cm carapace length). Each Cb was flattened between two Sylgard sheets and fixed in paraformaldehyde. Sections (52 microm thick) were cut parallel to the flattened cortex (tangential), resulting in calbindin-immunolabeled PCs being localized to three to six sections for each turtle. PC position and size were quantified using Neurolucida Image Analysis system. Although hatchling Cb were medial-laterally narrower (3.0 vs. 6.5 mm) and rostral-caudally shorter (2.5 vs. 5.5 mm) than adult Cb, both averaged near 15,000 PCs distributed uniformly. Hatchling PCs were smaller than adult PCs (178 vs. 551 microm(2)) and more densely packed (2,180 vs. 625 cells/mm(2)). Calbindin immunoreactivity also labeled non-PCs along the Cb's marginal rim and its caudal pole. Many of these were very small (22.9 microm(2)) ovoid-shaped cells clustered together, possibly proliferating external granule layer cells. Other labeled cells were larger and fusiform-shaped (12.6 x 33.4 microm) adjacent to inner granule cells along the marginal rim, suggestive of migrating cells. It is not known whether these are new neurons being generated within the adult and hatchling Cb and if they connect to efferent and afferent paths. Based on these anatomical findings, we suggest that unique physiological features may exist along the rim of the turtle Cb.

  19. Molecular Pathology of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm of highly pleomorphic lymphoid cells. ATLL is usually widely disseminated, and it is caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It is a disease with a long latency, and affected individuals are usually exposed to the virus very early in life. The cumulative incidence of ATLL is estimated to be 2.5% among HTLV-1 carriers. ATLL cells express CD2, CD3, CD5, CD4, and CD25, as well as CCR4 and FoxP3 of the regulatory T-cell marker. HTLV-1 is causally linked to ATLL, but infection alone is not sufficient to result in neoplastic transformation. A significant finding in this connection is that the Tax viral protein leads to transcriptional activation of many genes, while the HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor is thought to be important for T-cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Half of ATLL cases retain the ability to express HTLV-1 Tax, which is a target of HTLV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). An increase in HTLV-1-specific CTL responses is observed in some asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers. Although HTLV-1-specific CTL are also present in the peripheral blood of ATLL patients, they do not expand sufficiently. We investigated the clinicopathological features and analyzed the staining of Tax-specific CTL and FoxP3. Tax-specific CTL correlated inversely with FoxP3, an increase in the ratio of CD163+ tumor-associated macrophages was associated with worse clinical prognosis, and ATLL cell lines proliferated significantly following direct co-culture with M2 macrophages. Several clinical variants of ATLL have been identified: acute, lymphomatous, chronic, and smoldering. Oligo-array comparative genomic hybridization revealed that genomic loss of 9p21.3 was a significant characteristic of acute-type, but not of chronic-type ATLL. Furthermore, we found that genomic alteration of CD58, which is implicated in immune escape, is more frequently observed in acute than in chronic ATLL. Interestingly

  20. Embryonic and adult stem cells as a source for cell therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yossef S; Stroomza, Merav; Melamed, Eldad; Offen, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The rationale behind the use of cells as therapeutic modalities for neurodegenerative diseases in general, and in Parkinson's disease (PD) in particular, is that they will improve patient's functioning by replacing the damaged cell population. It is reasoned that these cells will survive, grow neurites, establish functional synapses, integrate best and durably with the host tissue mainly in the striatum, renew the impaired wiring, and lead to meaningful clinical improvement. To increase the generation of dopamine, researchers have already transplanted non-neuronal cells, without any genetic manipulation or after introduction of genes such as tyrosine hydroxylase, in animal models of PD. Because these cells were not of neuronal origin, they developed without control, did not integrate well into the brain parenchyma, and their survival rates were low. Clinical experiments using cell transplantation as a therapy for PD have been conducted since the 1980s. Most of these experiments used fetal dopaminergic cells originating in the ventral mesencephalic tissue obtained from fetuses. Although it was shown that the transplanted cells survived and some patients benefited from this treatment, others suffered from severe dyskinesia, probably caused by the graft's excessive and uncontrolled production and release of dopamine. It is now recognized that cell-replacement strategy will be effective in PD only if the transplanted cells have the same abilities, such as dopamine synthesis and control release, reuptake, and metabolizing dopamine, as the original dopaminergic neurons. Recent studies on embryonic and adult stem cells have demonstrated that cells are able to both self-renew and produce differentiated tissues, including dopaminergic neurons. These new methods offer real hope for tissue replacement in a wide range of diseases, especially PD. In this review we summarize the evidence of dopaminergic neuron generation from embryonic and adult stem cells, and discuss their

  1. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras

    PubMed Central

    Keighren, Margaret A.; Flockhart, Jean H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1−/− null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1−/− null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera with functional Gpi1−/− null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1−/− null cells in adult Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaeras and determine if Gpi1−/− null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1−/− null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1−/− null oocytes in one female Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1−/− null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c, this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1−/− null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1−/− null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1−/− null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1−/− null cells could survive in many adult tissues. PMID:27103217

  2. Robust regeneration of adult zebrafish lateral line hair cells reflects continued precursor pool maintenance.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Ivan A; Kappedal, Ryan; Mackenzie, Scott M; Hailey, Dale W; Hoffman, Trevor L; Schilling, Thomas F; Raible, David W

    2015-06-15

    We have examined lateral line hair cell and support cell maintenance in adult zebrafish when growth is largely complete. We demonstrate that adult zebrafish not only replenish hair cells after a single instance of hair cell damage, but also maintain hair cells and support cells after multiple rounds of damage and regeneration. We find that hair cells undergo continuous turnover in adult zebrafish in the absence of damage. We identify mitotically-distinct support cell populations and show that hair cells regenerate from underlying support cells in a region-specific manner. Our results demonstrate that there are two distinct support cell populations in the lateral line, which may help explain why zebrafish hair cell regeneration is extremely robust, retained throughout life, and potentially unlimited in regenerative capacity.

  3. Ascl3 marks adult progenitor cells of the mouse salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Rugel-Stahl, Anastasia; Elliott, Marilyn E; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2012-05-01

    The Ascl3 transcription factor marks a subset of salivary gland duct cells present in the three major salivary glands of the mouse. In vivo, these cells generate both duct and secretory acinar cell descendants. Here, we have analyzed whether Ascl3-expressing cells retain this multipotent lineage potential in adult glands. Cells isolated from mouse salivary glands were cultured in vitro as non-adherent spheres. Lineage tracing of the Ascl3-expressing cells within the spheres demonstrates that Ascl3+ cells isolated from adult glands remain multipotent, generating both duct and acinar cell types in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the progenitor cells characterized by Keratin 5 expression are an independent population from Ascl3+ progenitor cells. We conclude that the Ascl3+ cells are intermediate lineage-restricted progenitor cells of the adult salivary glands.

  4. Robust regeneration of adult zebrafish lateral line hair cells reflects continued precursor pool maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Ivan A.; Kappedal, Ryan; Mackenzie, Scott M.; Hailey, Dale W.; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Schilling, Thomas F.; Raible, David W.

    2015-01-01

    We have examined lateral line hair cell and support cell maintenance in adult zebrafish when growth is largely complete. We demonstrate that adult zebrafish not only replenish hair cells after a single instance of hair cell damage, but also maintain hair cells and support cells after multiple rounds of damage and regeneration. We find that hair cells undergo continuous turnover in adult zebrafish in the absence of damage. We identify mitotically-distinct support cell populations and show that hair cells regenerate from underlying support cells in a region-specific manner. Our results demonstrate that there are two distinct support cell populations in the lateral line, which may help explain why zebrafish hair cell regeneration is extremely robust, retained throughout life, and potentially unlimited in regenerative capacity. PMID:25869855

  5. A single cell bioengineering approach to elucidate mechanisms of adult stem cell self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Penney M; Corbel, Stephane; Doyonnas, Regis; Havenstrite, Karen; Magnusson, Klas E G; Blau, Helen M

    2012-04-01

    The goal of regenerative medicine is to restore form and function to damaged and aging tissues. Adult stem cells, present in tissues such as skeletal muscle, comprise a reservoir of cells with a remarkable capacity to proliferate and repair tissue damage. Muscle stem cells, known as satellite cells, reside in a quiescent state in an anatomically distinct compartment, or niche, ensheathed between the membrane of the myofiber and the basal lamina. Recently, procedures for isolating satellite cells were developed and experiments testing their function upon transplantation into muscles revealed an extraordinary potential to contribute to muscle fibers and access and replenish the satellite cell compartment. However, these properties are rapidly lost once satellite cells are plated in culture. Accordingly, elucidating the role of extrinsic factors in controlling muscle stem cell fate, in particular self-renewal, is critical. Through careful design of bioengineered culture platforms, analysis of specific proteins presented to stem cells is possible. Critical to the success of the approach is single cell analysis, as more rapidly proliferating progenitors may mask the behavior of stem cells that proliferate slowly. Bioengineering approaches provide a potent means of gaining insight into the role of extrinsic factors in the stem cell microenvironment on stem cell function and the mechanisms that control their diverse fates. Ultimately, the multidisciplinary approach presented here will lead to novel therapeutic strategies for degenerative diseases. PMID:22327505

  6. Endothelial juxtaposition of distinct adult stem cells activates angiogenesis signaling molecules in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Elham; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Siavashi, Vahid; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis needs a comprehensive understanding of endothelial cell (EC) function and biological factors and cells that interplay with ECs. Stem cells are considered the key components of pro- and anti-angiogenic milieu in a wide variety of physiopathological states, and interactions of EC-stem cells have been the subject of controversy in recent years. In this study, the potential effects of three tissue-specific adult stem cells, namely rat marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs) and rat muscle-derived satellite cells (rSCs), on the endothelial activation of key angiogenic signaling molecules, including VEGF, Ang-2, VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and Tie2-pho, were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMECs) were cocultured with the stem cells or incubated with the stem cell-derived conditioned media on Matrigel. Following HUVEC-stem cell coculture, CD31-positive ECs were flow sorted and subjected to western blotting to analyze potential changes in the expression of the pro-angiogenic signaling molecules. Elongation and co-alignment of the stem cells were seen along the EC tubes in the EC-stem cell cocultures on Matrigel, with cell-to-cell dye communication in the EC-rBMSC cocultures. Moreover, rBMSCs and rADSCs significantly improved endothelial tubulogenesis in both juxtacrine and paracrine manners. These two latter stem cells dynamically up-regulated VEGF, Ang-2, VREGR-2, and Tie-2 but down-regulated Tie2-pho and the Tie2-pho/Tie-2 ratio in HUVECs. Induction of pro-angiogenic signaling in ECs by marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs further indicates the significance of stem cell milieu in angiogenesis dynamics. PMID:26068799

  7. Regulation of seminiferous tubule-associated stem Leydig cells in adult rat testes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoheng; Wang, Zhao; Jiang, Zhenming; Guo, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuxi; Li, Chenhao; Chung, Jinyong; Folmer, Janet; Liu, June; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Renshan; Zirkin, Barry R; Chen, Haolin

    2016-03-01

    Testicular Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in males. Adult Leydig cells have been shown to arise from stem cells present in the neonatal testis. Once established, adult Leydig cells turn over only slowly during adult life, but when these cells are eliminated experimentally from the adult testis, new Leydig cells rapidly reappear. As in the neonatal testis, stem cells in the adult testis are presumed to be the source of the new Leydig cells. As yet, the mechanisms involved in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of these stem cells remain unknown. We developed a unique in vitro system of cultured seminiferous tubules to assess the ability of factors from the seminiferous tubules to regulate the proliferation of the tubule-associated stem cells, and their subsequent entry into the Leydig cell lineage. The proliferation of the stem Leydig cells was stimulated by paracrine factors including Desert hedgehog (DHH), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and activin. Suppression of proliferation occurred with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). The differentiation of the stem cells was regulated positively by DHH, lithium- induced signaling, and activin, and negatively by TGF-β, PDGFBB, and FGF2. DHH functioned as a commitment factor, inducing the transition of stem cells to the progenitor stage and thus into the Leydig cell lineage. Additionally, CD90 (Thy1) was found to be a unique stem cell surface marker that was used to obtain purified stem cells by flow cytometry.

  8. Regulation of seminiferous tubule-associated stem Leydig cells in adult rat testes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoheng; Wang, Zhao; Jiang, Zhenming; Guo, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuxi; Li, Chenhao; Chung, Jinyong; Folmer, Janet; Liu, June; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Renshan; Zirkin, Barry R.; Chen, Haolin

    2016-01-01

    Testicular Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in males. Adult Leydig cells have been shown to arise from stem cells present in the neonatal testis. Once established, adult Leydig cells turn over only slowly during adult life, but when these cells are eliminated experimentally from the adult testis, new Leydig cells rapidly reappear. As in the neonatal testis, stem cells in the adult testis are presumed to be the source of the new Leydig cells. As yet, the mechanisms involved in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of these stem cells remain unknown. We developed a unique in vitro system of cultured seminiferous tubules to assess the ability of factors from the seminiferous tubules to regulate the proliferation of the tubule-associated stem cells, and their subsequent entry into the Leydig cell lineage. The proliferation of the stem Leydig cells was stimulated by paracrine factors including Desert hedgehog (DHH), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and activin. Suppression of proliferation occurred with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). The differentiation of the stem cells was regulated positively by DHH, lithium- induced signaling, and activin, and negatively by TGF-β, PDGFBB, and FGF2. DHH functioned as a commitment factor, inducing the transition of stem cells to the progenitor stage and thus into the Leydig cell lineage. Additionally, CD90 (Thy1) was found to be a unique stem cell surface marker that was used to obtain purified stem cells by flow cytometry. PMID:26929346

  9. Fetal programming of adult Leydig cell function by androgenic effects on stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Karen R.; Smith, Lee B.; Atanassova, Nina; Macpherson, Sheila; McKinnell, Chris; van den Driesche, Sander; Jobling, Matthew S.; Chambers, Thomas J. G.; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; O’Hara, Laura; Platts, Sophie; Renato de Franca, Luiz; Lara, Nathália L. M.; Anderson, Richard A.; Sharpe, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth plays a role in programming of adult cardiometabolic disorders, which in men, are associated with lowered testosterone levels. Fetal growth and fetal androgen exposure can also predetermine testosterone levels in men, although how is unknown, because the adult Leydig cells (ALCs) that produce testosterone do not differentiate until puberty. To explain this conundrum, we hypothesized that stem cells for ALCs must be present in the fetal testis and might be susceptible to programming by fetal androgen exposure during masculinization. To address this hypothesis, we used ALC ablation/regeneration to identify that, in rats, ALCs derive from stem/progenitor cells that express chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II. These stem cells are abundant in the fetal testis of humans and rodents, and lineage tracing in mice shows that they develop into ALCs. The stem cells also express androgen receptors (ARs). Reduction in fetal androgen action through AR KO in mice or dibutyl phthalate (DBP) -induced reduction in intratesticular testosterone in rats reduced ALC stem cell number by ∼40% at birth to adulthood and induced compensated ALC failure (low/normal testosterone and elevated luteinizing hormone). In DBP-exposed males, this failure was probably explained by reduced testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, which is associated with increased histone methylation (H3K27me3) in the proximal promoter. Accordingly, ALCs and ALC stem cells immunoexpressed increased H3K27me3, a change that was also evident in ALC stem cells in fetal testes. These studies highlight how a key component of male reproductive development can fundamentally reprogram adult hormone production (through an epigenetic change), which might affect lifetime disease risk. PMID:24753613

  10. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  11. Insulin withdrawal-induced cell death in adult hippocampal neural stem cells as a model of autophagic cell death.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Goudreau, John L; Lookingland, Keith J; Kim, Seong Who; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2009-02-01

    The term "autophagic cell death" was coined to describe a form of cell death associated with the massive formation of autophagic vacuoles without signs of apoptosis. However, questions about the actual role of autophagy and its molecular basis in cell death remain to be elucidated. We recently reported that adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells undergo autophagic cell death following insulin withdrawal. Insulin-deprived HCN cells exhibit morphological and biochemical markers of autophagy, including accumulation of Beclin 1 and the type II form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) without evidence of apoptosis. Suppression of autophagy by knockdown of Atg7 reduces cell death, whereas promotion of autophagy with rapamycin augments cell death in insulin-deficient HCN cells. These data reveal a causative role of autophagy in insulin withdrawal-induced HCN cell death. HCN cells have intact apoptotic capability despite the lack of apoptosis following insulin withdrawal. Our study demonstrates that autophagy is the default cell death mechanism in insulin-deficient HCN cells, and provides a genuine model of autophagic cell death in apoptosis-intact cells. Novel insight into molecular mechanisms of this underappreciated form of programmed cell death should facilitate the development of therapeutic methods to cope with human diseases caused by dysregulated cell death.

  12. Biology of the Sertoli Cell in the Fetal, Pubertal, and Adult Mammalian Testis.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Zarzycka, Marta; Mruk, Dolores D

    2016-01-01

    A healthy man typically produces between 50 × 10(6) and 200 × 10(6) spermatozoa per day by spermatogenesis; in the absence of Sertoli cells in the male gonad, this individual would be infertile. In the adult testis, Sertoli cells are sustentacular cells that support germ cell development by secreting proteins and other important biomolecules that are essential for germ cell survival and maturation, establishing the blood-testis barrier, and facilitating spermatozoa detachment at spermiation. In the fetal testis, on the other hand, pre-Sertoli cells form the testis cords, the future seminiferous tubules. However, the role of pre-Sertoli cells in this process is much less clear than the function of Sertoli cells in the adult testis. Within this framework, we provide an overview of the biology of the fetal, pubertal, and adult Sertoli cell, highlighting relevant cell biology studies that have expanded our understanding of mammalian spermatogenesis. PMID:27300181

  13. Clinical Trials of Adult Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Bang, Oh Young

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a potential regenerative strategy for patients with neurologic deficits. Studies involving animal models of ischemic stroke have shown that stem cells transplanted into the brain can lead to functional improvement. With current advances in the understanding regarding the effects of introducing stem cells and their mechanisms of action, several clinical trials of stem cell therapy have been conducted in patients with stroke since 2005, including studies using mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, and neural stem/progenitor cells. In addition, several clinical trials of the use of adult stem cells to treat ischemic stroke are ongoing. This review presents the status of our understanding of adult stem cells and results from clinical trials, and introduces ongoing clinical studies of adult stem cell therapy in the field of stroke.

  14. NGF induces adult stem Leydig cells to proliferate and differentiate during Leydig cell regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Huaxi; Yang, Yan; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Ge, Renshan; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Nerve growth factor has shown significant changes on mRNA levels during Adult Leydig cells regeneration. •We established the organ culture model of rat seminiferous tubules with ethane dimethyl sulphonate (EDS) treatment. •Nerve growth factor has shown proliferation and differentiation-promoting effects on Adult stem Leydig cells. •Nerve growth factor induces progenitor Leydig cells to proliferate and differentiate and immature Leydig cells to proliferate. -- Abstract: Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been reported to be involved in male reproductive physiology. However, few reports have described the activity of NGF during Leydig cell development. The objective of the present study was to examine the role of NGF during stem-Leydig-cell (SLC) regeneration. We investigated the effects of NGF on Leydig-cell (LC) regeneration by measuring mRNA levels in the adult rat testis after ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) treatment. Furthermore, we used the established organ culture model of rat seminiferous tubules to examine the regulation of NGF during SLC proliferation and differentiation using EdU staining, real-time PCR and western blotting. Progenitor Leydig cells (PLCs) and immature Leydig cells (ILCs) were also used to investigate the effects of NGF on LCs at different developmental stages. NGF mRNA levels changed significantly during Leydig-cell regeneration in vivo. In vitro, NGF significantly promoted the proliferation of stem Leydig cells and also induced steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and 3β-HSD protein expression. The data from PLCs and ILCs showed that NGF could increase Cyclin D1 and Hsd 17b3 mRNA levels in PLCs and Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in ILCs. These results indicate that NGF may play an important role during LC regeneration by regulating the proliferation and differentiation of LCs at different developmental stages, from SLCs to PLCs and from PLCs to ILCs. The discovery of this effect of NGF on Leydig cells will provide useful

  15. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Mizuho; Uota, Shin; Saitoh, Yasunori; Takahashi, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Haruyo; Amet, Tohti; Arai, Ayako; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2009-01-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL.

  16. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediate