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Sample records for adult macaque monkeys

  1. Transplantation of Adult Monkey Neural Stem Cells into A Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Model in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hajinasrollah, Mostafa; Zare Mehrjerdi, Nargess; Azizi, Hossein; Hemmesi, Katayoun; Moghiminasr, Reza; Azhdari, Zahra; Talebi, Ardeshir; Mohitmafi, Soroush; Vosough Taqi Dizaj, Ahmad; Sharifi, Giuve; Baharvand, Hossein; Rezaee, Omidvar; Kiani, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Objective Currently, cellular transplantation for spinal cord injuries (SCI) is the subject of numerous preclinical studies. Among the many cell types in the adult brain, there is a unique subpopulation of neural stem cells (NSC) that can self-renew and differentiate into neurons. The study aims, therefore, to explore the efficacy of adult monkey NSC (mNSC) in a primate SCI model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, isolated mNSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and RT-PCR. Next, BrdU-labeled cells were transplanted into a SCI model. The SCI animal model was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analysis. Animals were clinically observed for 6 months. Results Analysis confirmed homing of mNSCs into the injury site. Transplanted cells expressed neuronal markers (TubIII). Hind limb performance improved in trans- planted animals based on Tarlov’s scale and our established behavioral tests for monkeys. Conclusion Our findings have indicated that mNSCs can facilitate recovery in contusion SCI models in rhesus macaque monkeys. Additional studies are necessary to determine the im- provement mechanisms after cell transplantation. PMID:24567941

  2. Maturation time of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus of adult macaque monkeys exceeds six months.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Shawn J; Williams, Nancy I; Stanton, Gregory B; Cameron, Judy L; Greenough, William T

    2011-06-21

    We studied two groups of adult macaque monkeys to determine the time course of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the first group, six adult monkeys (Macaca mulatta) received a single injection of the thymidine analog BrdU (75 mg/kg), which is incorporated into replicating DNA and serves as a marker for new cell birth. Brain tissue was collected 48 h, 2 wk, and 6 wk after BrdU injection to examine the initial stages of neurogenesis. Because mature neurons were not evident at 6 wk, we examined tissue collected over a longer time course in a second study. In this study, eight monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) who were subjects in a separate exercise study received 10 weekly injections of BrdU (75 mg/kg), and brain tissue was collected at 16 and 28 wk from the first injection. Based on the timing of expression of neuronal cell markers (βIII-tubulin, doublecortin, NeuN), the extent of dendritic arborization, and acquisition of mature cell body morphology, we show that granule cell maturation in the dentate gyrus of a nonhuman primate is protracted over a minimum of a 6-mo time period, more than 6 times longer than in rodents. The lengthened time course for new cell maturation in nonhuman primates may be appropriate for preservation of neural plasticity over their longer life span and is relevant to our understanding of antidepressant and other therapies that have been linked to neurogenesis in humans.

  3. Spatial Relational Memory in 9-Month-Old Macaque Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2006-01-01

    This experiment assesses spatial and nonspatial relational memory in freely moving 9-mo-old and adult (11-13-yr-old) macaque monkeys ("Macaca mulatta"). We tested the use of proximal landmarks, two different objects placed at the center of an open-field arena, as conditional cues allowing monkeys to predict the location of food rewards hidden in…

  4. Macaque monkeys experience visual crowding.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Erin A; Olson, Carl R

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral vision, objects that are easily discriminated on their own become less discriminable in the presence of surrounding clutter. This phenomenon is known as crowding.The neural mechanisms underlying crowding are not well understood. Better insight might come from single-neuron recording in nonhuman primates, provided they exhibit crowding; however, previous demonstrations of crowding have been confined to humans. In the present study, we set out to determine whether crowding occurs in rhesus macaque monkeys. We found that animals trained to identify a target letter among flankers displayed three hallmarks of crowding as established in humans. First, at a given eccentricity, increasing the spacing between the target and the flankers improved recognition accuracy. Second, the critical spacing, defined as the minimal spacing at which target discrimination was reliable, was proportional to eccentricity. Third, the critical spacing was largely unaffected by object size. We conclude that monkeys, like humans, experience crowding. These findings open the door to studies of crowding at the neuronal level in the monkey visual system.

  5. Chronic, multisite, multielectrode recordings in macaque monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.; Dimitrov, Dragan; Carmena, Jose M.; Crist, Roy; Lehew, Gary; Kralik, Jerald D.; Wise, Steven P.

    2003-09-01

    A paradigm is described for recording the activity of single cortical neurons from awake, behaving macaque monkeys. Its unique features include high-density microwire arrays and multichannel instrumentation. Three adult rhesus monkeys received microwire array implants, totaling 96-704 microwires per subject, in up to five cortical areas, sometimes bilaterally. Recordings 3-4 weeks after implantation yielded 421 single neurons with a mean peak-to-peak voltage of 115 ± 3 μV and a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. As many as 247 cortical neurons were recorded in one session, and at least 58 neurons were isolated from one subject 18 months after implantation. This method should benefit neurophysiological investigation of learning, perception, and sensorimotor integration in primates and the development of neuroprosthetic devices.

  6. Depth perception from moving cast shadow in macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Usui, Nobuo; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Taira, Masato; Katsuyama, Narumi

    2015-07-15

    In the present study, we investigate whether the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow. To accomplish this, we conducted two experiments. In the first experiment, an adult Japanese monkey was trained in a motion discrimination task in depth by binocular disparity. A square was presented on the display so that it appeared with a binocular disparity of 0.12 degrees (initial position), and moved toward (approaching) or away from (receding) the monkey for 1s. The monkey was trained to discriminate the approaching and receding motion of the square by GO/delayed GO-type responses. The monkey showed a significantly high accuracy rate in the task, and the performance was maintained when the position, color, and shape of the moving object were changed. In the next experiment, the change in the disparity was gradually decreased in the motion discrimination task. The results showed that the performance of the monkey declined as the distance of the approaching and receding motion of the square decreased from the initial position. However, when a moving cast shadow was added to the stimulus, the monkey responded to the motion in depth induced by the cast shadow in the same way as by binocular disparity; the reward was delivered randomly or given in all trials to prevent the learning of the 2D motion of the shadow in the frontal plane. These results suggest that the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow as well as using binocular disparity.

  7. Transmission of Naturally Occurring Lymphoma in Macaque Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ronald D.; Blake, Beverly J.; Chalifoux, Laura V.; Sehgal, Prabhat K.; King, Norval W.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1983-08-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and cryptosporidiosis. They also showed evidence of an abnormal circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell. These findings, all characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) of macaques, suggest a link between these transmissible lymphomas and AIDS in macaque monkeys.

  8. Color vision test for dichromatic and trichromatic macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Koida, Kowa; Yokoi, Isao; Okazawa, Gouki; Mikami, Akichika; Widayati, Kanthi Arum; Miyachi, Shigehiro; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2013-01-01

    Dichromacy is a color vision defect in which one of the three cone photoreceptors is absent. Individuals with dichromacy are called dichromats (or sometimes "color-blind"), and their color discrimination performance has contributed significantly to our understanding of color vision. Macaque monkeys, which normally have trichromatic color vision that is nearly identical to humans, have been used extensively in neurophysiological studies of color vision. In the present study we employed two tests, a pseudoisochromatic color discrimination test and a monochromatic light detection test, to compare the color vision of genetically identified dichromatic macaques (Macaca fascicularis) with that of normal trichromatic macaques. In the color discrimination test, dichromats could not discriminate colors along the protanopic confusion line, though trichromats could. In the light detection test, the relative thresholds for longer wavelength light were higher in the dichromats than the trichromats, indicating dichromats to be less sensitive to longer wavelength light. Because the dichromatic macaque is very rare, the present study provides valuable new information on the color vision behavior of dichromatic macaques, which may be a useful animal model of human dichromacy. The behavioral tests used in the present study have been previously used to characterize the color behaviors of trichromatic as well as dichromatic new world monkeys. The present results show that comparative studies of color vision employing similar tests may be feasible to examine the difference in color behaviors between trichromatic and dichromatic individuals, although the genetic mechanisms of trichromacy/dichromacy is quite different between new world monkeys and macaques. PMID:24187056

  9. Color vision test for dichromatic and trichromatic macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Koida, Kowa; Yokoi, Isao; Okazawa, Gouki; Mikami, Akichika; Widayati, Kanthi Arum; Miyachi, Shigehiro; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2013-11-01

    Dichromacy is a color vision defect in which one of the three cone photoreceptors is absent. Individuals with dichromacy are called dichromats (or sometimes "color-blind"), and their color discrimination performance has contributed significantly to our understanding of color vision. Macaque monkeys, which normally have trichromatic color vision that is nearly identical to humans, have been used extensively in neurophysiological studies of color vision. In the present study we employed two tests, a pseudoisochromatic color discrimination test and a monochromatic light detection test, to compare the color vision of genetically identified dichromatic macaques (Macaca fascicularis) with that of normal trichromatic macaques. In the color discrimination test, dichromats could not discriminate colors along the protanopic confusion line, though trichromats could. In the light detection test, the relative thresholds for longer wavelength light were higher in the dichromats than the trichromats, indicating dichromats to be less sensitive to longer wavelength light. Because the dichromatic macaque is very rare, the present study provides valuable new information on the color vision behavior of dichromatic macaques, which may be a useful animal model of human dichromacy. The behavioral tests used in the present study have been previously used to characterize the color behaviors of trichromatic as well as dichromatic new world monkeys. The present results show that comparative studies of color vision employing similar tests may be feasible to examine the difference in color behaviors between trichromatic and dichromatic individuals, although the genetic mechanisms of trichromacy/dichromacy is quite different between new world monkeys and macaques.

  10. Auditory Artificial Grammar Learning in Macaque and Marmoset Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Benjamin; Slater, Heather; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Milne, Alice E.; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Smith, Kenny

    2013-01-01

    Artificial grammars (AG) are designed to emulate aspects of the structure of language, and AG learning (AGL) paradigms can be used to study the extent of nonhuman animals' structure-learning capabilities. However, different AG structures have been used with nonhuman animals and are difficult to compare across studies and species. We developed a simple quantitative parameter space, which we used to summarize previous nonhuman animal AGL results. This was used to highlight an under-studied AG with a forward-branching structure, designed to model certain aspects of the nondeterministic nature of word transitions in natural language and animal song. We tested whether two monkey species could learn aspects of this auditory AG. After habituating the monkeys to the AG, analysis of video recordings showed that common marmosets (New World monkeys) differentiated between well formed, correct testing sequences and those violating the AG structure based primarily on simple learning strategies. By comparison, Rhesus macaques (Old World monkeys) showed evidence for deeper levels of AGL. A novel eye-tracking approach confirmed this result in the macaques and demonstrated evidence for more complex AGL. This study provides evidence for a previously unknown level of AGL complexity in Old World monkeys that seems less evident in New World monkeys, which are more distant evolutionary relatives to humans. The findings allow for the development of both marmosets and macaques as neurobiological model systems to study different aspects of AGL at the neuronal level. PMID:24285889

  11. [Visually-guided discrimination and preference of sexuality in female macaque monkeys].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, M

    1997-04-01

    Visual information about face and body including facial expression and bodily behavioral patterns has been known to play an important role in social and emotional communication in monkeys. Its involvement in sexual activity has also been demonstrated in male monkeys but it is poorly understood in female monkeys. In the present study, visually-guided discrimination and preference of sexuality were investigated in female macaque monkeys performing operant bar-press tasks in an experimental cage which had a transparent panel facing a display. In the sex discrimination task, two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to discriminate sex of a monkey shown in a picture which was randomly selected from six photographs (three males and three females) and was presented on the display. The monkey pressed a right or left bar for male or female monkey, respectively, to get water as a reward. Under this discrimination task, the monkeys could discriminate the sexes of monkeys shown in newly presented pictures. When choice bars were reversed, correct responses significantly decreased below chance level. In the sex preference task, three rhesus monkeys and three Japanese monkeys (M. juscata) were used. The monkeys voluntarily pressed the bar to watch the video movie showing either male or female rhesus monkeys. The movies were presented as long as the subject kept pressing the bar. The same movie was continued when the monkey pressed the bar again within 10s after the previous release of the bar, while it was changed to the other when 10s passed after the subject released the bar. The total duration of the responses in daily sessions was measured. In this visual preference task, four out of six monkeys showed sex preference. Three adult Japanese monkeys (6-8 y) pressed the bar to watch the video movie of male monkeys which was taken in breeding season with longer duration than that of female monkeys taken in the same season. The other two adult rhesus monkeys (7 8 y) did not

  12. Noninvasive scalp recording of cortical auditory evoked potentials in the alert macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nejime, Masafumi; Konoike, Naho; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2015-09-01

    Scalp-recorded evoked potentials (EP) provide researchers and clinicians with irreplaceable means for recording stimulus-related neural activities in the human brain, due to its high temporal resolution, handiness, and, perhaps more importantly, non-invasiveness. This work recorded the scalp cortical auditory EP (CAEP) in unanesthetized monkeys by using methods that are essentially identical to those applied to humans. Young adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, 5-7 years old) were seated in a monkey chair, and their head movements were partially restricted by polystyrene blocks and tension poles placed around their head. Individual electrodes were fixated on their scalp using collodion according to the 10-20 system. Pure tone stimuli were presented while electroencephalograms were recorded from up to nineteen channels, including an electrooculogram channel. In all monkeys (n = 3), the recorded CAEP comprised a series of positive and negative deflections, labeled here as macaque P1 (mP1), macaque N1 (mN1), macaque P2 (mP2), and macaque N2 (mN2), and these transient responses to sound onset were followed by a sustained potential that continued for the duration of the sound, labeled the macaque sustained potential (mSP). mP1, mN2 and mSP were the prominent responses, and they had maximal amplitudes over frontal/central midline electrode sites, consistent with generators in auditory cortices. The study represents the first noninvasive scalp recording of CAEP in alert rhesus monkeys, to our knowledge.

  13. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M; Swanbeck, Sonja N; Conway, Bevil R

    2014-07-15

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism.

  14. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A.; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L.; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M.; Swanbeck, Sonja N.; Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism. PMID:25027164

  15. A spontaneous depressive pattern in adult female rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Dongdong; Rizak, Joshua; Chu, Xunxun; Li, Zhifei; Yang, Shangchuan; Lü, Longbao; Yang, Lichuan; Yang, Qing; Yang, Bo; Pan, Lei; Yin, Yong; Chen, Lin; Feng, Xiaoli; Hu, Xintian

    2015-01-01

    Non-human primates offer unique opportunities to study the development of depression rooted in behavioral and physiological abnormalities. This study observed adult female rhesus macaques within social hierarchies and aimed to characterize the physiological and brain abnormalities accompanying depressive-like behavior. The behaviors of 31 female rhesus macaques from 14 different breeding groups were video recorded, and the footage was analyzed using the focal animal technique. There were 13 monkeys who never displayed huddling behavior (non-huddlers). The remaining 18 monkeys were divided into two groups according the mean time spent in the huddle posture. Four monkeys were designated as high huddlers, whereas the other 14 monkeys were low huddlers. An inverse relationship was discovered between social rank and depression. High huddlers spent more time engaging in physical contact and in close proximity to other monkeys, as well as less time spontaneously and reactively locomoting, than low huddlers and/or non-huddlers. Cortisol levels measured from the hair were elevated significantly in high huddlers compared with low huddlers and non-huddlers, and the measured cortisol levels were specifically higher in high huddlers than subordinate or dominant control monkeys. Regional cerebral blood flow data revealed significant and widespread decreases in high huddlers compared with non-huddlers. PMID:26059851

  16. Economic choices reveal probability distortion in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, William R; Lak, Armin; Bossaerts, Peter; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-02-18

    Economic choices are largely determined by two principal elements, reward value (utility) and probability. Although nonlinear utility functions have been acknowledged for centuries, nonlinear probability weighting (probability distortion) was only recently recognized as a ubiquitous aspect of real-world choice behavior. Even when outcome probabilities are known and acknowledged, human decision makers often overweight low probability outcomes and underweight high probability outcomes. Whereas recent studies measured utility functions and their corresponding neural correlates in monkeys, it is not known whether monkeys distort probability in a manner similar to humans. Therefore, we investigated economic choices in macaque monkeys for evidence of probability distortion. We trained two monkeys to predict reward from probabilistic gambles with constant outcome values (0.5 ml or nothing). The probability of winning was conveyed using explicit visual cues (sector stimuli). Choices between the gambles revealed that the monkeys used the explicit probability information to make meaningful decisions. Using these cues, we measured probability distortion from choices between the gambles and safe rewards. Parametric modeling of the choices revealed classic probability weighting functions with inverted-S shape. Therefore, the animals overweighted low probability rewards and underweighted high probability rewards. Empirical investigation of the behavior verified that the choices were best explained by a combination of nonlinear value and nonlinear probability distortion. Together, these results suggest that probability distortion may reflect evolutionarily preserved neuronal processing.

  17. Economic Choices Reveal Probability Distortion in Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Lak, Armin; Bossaerts, Peter; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Economic choices are largely determined by two principal elements, reward value (utility) and probability. Although nonlinear utility functions have been acknowledged for centuries, nonlinear probability weighting (probability distortion) was only recently recognized as a ubiquitous aspect of real-world choice behavior. Even when outcome probabilities are known and acknowledged, human decision makers often overweight low probability outcomes and underweight high probability outcomes. Whereas recent studies measured utility functions and their corresponding neural correlates in monkeys, it is not known whether monkeys distort probability in a manner similar to humans. Therefore, we investigated economic choices in macaque monkeys for evidence of probability distortion. We trained two monkeys to predict reward from probabilistic gambles with constant outcome values (0.5 ml or nothing). The probability of winning was conveyed using explicit visual cues (sector stimuli). Choices between the gambles revealed that the monkeys used the explicit probability information to make meaningful decisions. Using these cues, we measured probability distortion from choices between the gambles and safe rewards. Parametric modeling of the choices revealed classic probability weighting functions with inverted-S shape. Therefore, the animals overweighted low probability rewards and underweighted high probability rewards. Empirical investigation of the behavior verified that the choices were best explained by a combination of nonlinear value and nonlinear probability distortion. Together, these results suggest that probability distortion may reflect evolutionarily preserved neuronal processing. PMID:25698750

  18. Preserved number of entorhinal cortex layer II neurons in aged macaque monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazzaley, A. H.; Thakker, M. M.; Hof, P. R.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The perforant path, which consists of the projection from the layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex to the outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, is a critical circuit involved in learning and memory formation. Accordingly, disturbances in this circuit may contribute to age-related cognitive deficits. In a previous study, we demonstrated a decrease in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 immunofluorescence intensity in the outer molecular layer of aged macaque monkeys. In this study, we used the optical fractionator, a stereological method, to determine if a loss of layer II neurons occurred in the same animals in which the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 alteration was observed. Our results revealed no significant differences in the number of layer II neurons between juvenile, young adult, and aged macaque monkeys. These results suggest that the circuit-specific decrease in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 reported previously occurs in the absence of structural compromise of the perforant path, and thus may be linked to an age-related change in the physiological properties of this circuit.

  19. A Characterization of Aerosolized Sudan Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys, Cynomolgus Macaques, and Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrun, Elizabeth E.; Bloomfield, Holly A.; Dye, John M.; Hunter, Ty C.; Dabisch, Paul A.; Garza, Nicole L.; Bramel, Nicholas R.; Baker, Reese J.; Williams, Roger D.; Nichols, Donald K.; Nalca, Aysegul

    2012-01-01

    Filoviruses are members of the genera Ebolavirus, Marburgvirus, and “Cuevavirus”. Because they cause human disease with high lethality and could potentially be used as a bioweapon, these viruses are classified as CDC Category A Bioterrorism Agents. Filoviruses are relatively stable in aerosols, retain virulence after lyophilization, and can be present on contaminated surfaces for extended periods of time. This study explores the characteristics of aerosolized Sudan virus (SUDV) Boniface in non-human primates (NHP) belonging to three different species. Groups of cynomolgus macaques (cyno), rhesus macaques (rhesus), and African green monkeys (AGM) were challenged with target doses of 50 or 500 plaque-forming units (pfu) of aerosolized SUDV. Exposure to either viral dose resulted in increased body temperatures in all three NHP species beginning on days 4–5 post-exposure. Other clinical findings for all three NHP species included leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, dehydration, and lymphadenopathy. Disease in all of the NHPs was severe beginning on day 6 post-exposure, and all animals except one surviving rhesus macaque were euthanized by day 14. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) concentrations were elevated during the course of disease in all three species; however, AGMs had significantly higher ALT and AST concentrations than cynos and rhesus. While all three species had detectable viral load by days 3-4 post exposure, Rhesus had lower average peak viral load than cynos or AGMs. Overall, the results indicate that the disease course after exposure to aerosolized SUDV is similar for all three species of NHP. PMID:23202456

  20. Prevalence of antibodies to 3 retroviruses in a captive colony of macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Daniel, M D; Letvin, N L; Sehgal, P K; Schmidt, D K; Silva, D P; Solomon, K R; Hodi, F S; Ringler, D J; Hunt, R D; King, N W

    1988-04-15

    The prevalence of antibodies to 3 retroviruses in the macaque colony of the New England Regional Primate Research Center (NERPRC) was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedures as well as radioimmunoprecipitation-SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and indirect immunofluorescence tests. Out of 848 macaques, 3 (0.35%) had antibodies to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), 27 (3.2%) had antibodies to simian T-lymphotropic virus type I (STLV-1) and approximately 285 (34%) had antibodies to type D retrovirus. Of 3 macaques infected with SIV, 2 were rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and I was a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). STLV-1 and D retrovirus infection occurred in all 4 macaque species examined. SIV, STLV-1 and D retroviruses were isolated from sero-positive macaques. The low prevalence of SIV infection suggests that SIV is not being readily transmitted among macaques at NERPRC; this contrasts markedly with the high SIV prevalence in some captive mangabey colonies. In contrast to African green monkeys from eastern Africa, 160 Caribbean green monkeys examined showed no sign of SIV infection. These results provide a framework for monitoring spontaneous disease associated with infection by these 3 retroviruses and will help in further definition of STLV-1 and SIV infection of non-human primates as animal models for human disease.

  1. Minor contributions of the maxillary sinus to the air-conditioning performance in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mori, Futoshi; Hanida, Sho; Kumahata, Kiyoshi; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Suzuki, Juri; Matsuzawa, Teruo; Nishimura, Takeshi D

    2015-08-01

    The nasal passages mainly adjust the temperature and humidity of inhaled air to reach the alveolar condition required in the lungs. By contrast to most other non-human primates, macaque monkeys are distributed widely among tropical, temperate and subarctic regions, and thus some species need to condition the inhaled air in cool and dry ambient atmospheric areas. The internal nasal anatomy is believed to have undergone adaptive modifications to improve the air-conditioning performance. Furthermore, the maxillary sinus (MS), an accessory hollow communicating with the nasal cavity, is found in macaques, whereas it is absent in most other extant Old World monkeys, including savanna monkeys. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics simulations to simulate the airflow and heat and water exchange over the mucosal surface in the nasal passage. Using the topology models of the nasal cavity with and without the MS, we demonstrated that the MS makes little contribution to the airflow pattern and the air-conditioning performance within the nasal cavity in macaques. Instead, the inhaled air is conditioned well in the anterior portion of the nasal cavity before reaching the MS in both macaques and savanna monkeys. These findings suggest that the evolutionary modifications and coetaneous variations in the nasal anatomy are rather independent of transitions and variations in the climate and atmospheric environment found in the habitats of macaques.

  2. Biomechanical analysis of vertical climbing in the spider monkey and the Japanese macaque.

    PubMed

    Hirasaki, E; Kumakura, H; Matano, S

    2000-12-01

    Climbing is one of the most important components of primate locomotor modes. We previously reported that the kinesiological characteristics of vertical climbing by the spider monkey and Japanese macaque are clearly different, based on their kinetics and kinematics. In this study, a more detailed analysis using inverse dynamics was conducted to estimate the biomechanical characteristics of vertical climbing in the spider monkey and Japanese macaque. One of the main findings was the difference in forelimb use by the two species. The results of a joint moment analysis and estimates of muscular force indicate that the spider monkey uses its forelimbs to keep the body close to the substrate, rather than to generate propulsion. The forelimb of the Japanese macaque, on the other hand, likely contributes more to propulsion. This supports the idea that "forelimb-hindlimb differentiation" is promoted in the spider monkey. The estimated muscular force also suggests that the spider monkey type of climbing could develop the hindlimb extensor muscles, which are important in bipedal posture and walking. As a result, we conclude that the spider monkey type of climbing could be functionally preadaptive for human bipedalism. This type of climbing would develop the hip and knee extensor muscles, and result in more extended lower limb joints, a more erect trunk posture, and more functionally differentiated fore- and hindlimbs, all of which are important characteristics of human bipedalism.

  3. Prefrontal connections of the parabelt auditory cortex in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hackett, T A; Stepniewska, I; Kaas, J H

    1999-01-30

    In the present study, we determined connections of three newly defined regions of auditory cortex with regions of the frontal lobe, and how two of these regions in the frontal lobe interconnect and connect to other portions of frontal cortex and the temporal lobe in macaque monkeys. We conceptualize auditory cortex as including a core of primary areas, a surrounding belt of auditory areas, a lateral parabelt of two divisions, and adjoining regions of temporal cortex with parabelt connections. Injections of several different fluorescent tracers and wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) were placed in caudal (CPB) and rostral (RPB) divisions of the parabelt, and in cortex of the superior temporal gyrus rostral to the parabelt with parabelt connections (STGr). Injections were also placed in two regions of the frontal lobe that were labeled by a parabelt injection in the same case. The results lead to several major conclusions. First, CPB injections label many neurons in dorsal prearcuate cortex in the region of the frontal eye field and neurons in dorsal prefrontal cortex of the principal sulcus, but few or no neurons in orbitofrontal cortex. Fine-grain label in these same regions as a result of a WGA-HRP injection suggests that the connections are reciprocal. Second, RPB injections label overlapping prearcuate and principal sulcus locations, as well as more rostral cortex of the principal sulcus, and several locations in orbitofrontal cortex. Third, STGr injections label locations in orbitofrontal cortex, some of which overlap those of RPB injections, but not prearcuate or principal sulcus locations. Fourth, injections in prearcuate and principal sulcus locations labeled by a CPB injection labeled neurons in CPB and RPB, with little involvement of the auditory belt and no involvement of the core. In addition, the results indicated that the two frontal lobe regions are densely interconnected. They also connect with largely separate

  4. Monkey see, Monkey reach: Action selection of reaching movements in the macaque monkey

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Camperio-Ciani, Andrea; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient systems are needed to link perception with action in the context of the highly complex environments in which primates move and interact. Another important component is, nonetheless, needed for action: selection. When one piece of fruit from a branch is being chosen by a monkey, many other pieces are within reach and visible: do the perceptual features of the objects surrounding a target determine interference effects? In humans, reaching to grasp a desired object appears to integrate the motor features of the objects which might become potential targets - a process which seems to be driven by inhibitory attention mechanisms. Here we show that non-human primates use similar mechanisms when carrying out goal-directed actions. The data indicate that the volumetric features of distractors are internally represented, implying that the basic cognitive operations allowing for action selection have deep evolutionary roots. PMID:24503774

  5. Evidence for visual cortical area homologs in cat and macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Payne, B R

    1993-01-01

    The maps of visuotopically discrete visual cerebral cortical areas in the cat and the macaque monkey are compared and gaps in knowledge are identified that limit such comparisons. Cat areas 17, 18, and 19 can be equated with macaque areas V1, V2, and V3, respectively, based on criteria of relative position in the cortical mantle, internal organization of visual field representations, and trans- and subcortical connections. Using these same criteria, a visual area on the medial bank of the lateral suprasylvian sulcus (area PMLS) in the cat can be equated with macaque area V5. The equivalences are supported by data on neuronal receptive field properties and the contributions the areas make to visual behavior. Although the data are scanty for most other visual areas, there are enough data tentatively to equate collectively cat areas 20a and 20b with macaque areas TF and TH and to liken cat areas 21a and 21b with macaque area V4. What is not clear is if there is a region in cat that is equivalent to area TE in the macaque monkey. If there is, it likely lies on the banks of the posterior suprasylvian sulcus between areas 20 and 21 and the polysensory cortex of the posterior ectosylvian gyrus. Knowledge gained from prior research on macaque areas V4 and TE can be used to formulate specific additional investigations of cat area 21 and the uncharted posterior suprasylvian sulcus. In addition, prior investigations carried out on cat area 20 can be used to devise specific explorations of macaque areas TF and TH.

  6. Monkey see, monkey do: contagious itch in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Feneran, Ashley N; O'Donnell, Russell; Press, Ashley; Yosipovitch, Gil; Cline, Mark; Dugan, Greg; Papoiu, Alexandru D P; Nattkemper, Leigh A; Chan, Yiong Huak; Shively, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    "Contagious itch" has been anecdotally reported and recently confirmed in a controlled setting in humans. Here, we investigated in adult rhesus macaques whether 'contagious itch' occurs spontaneously in monkeys. In a first experiment, the latency to scratch following cage-mate scratching was observed in pair-housed adult rhesus macaques. Scratching increased within the first 60 s and subsequently declined. In a second experiment, scratching behavior was recorded for individually caged adult rhesus macaques which where shown videos of monkeys scratching, but also neutral stimuli. A greater frequency of scratching was observed when monkeys viewed a video sequence of another monkey scratching as well as during the neutral stimulus immediately following the monkey scratching segment. In conclusion, viewing other monkeys scratching significantly increased scratching behavior in adult rhesus macaques.

  7. Social Isolation Rearing: Species Differences in Behavior of Macaque Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackett, Gene P.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Social and nonsocial behaviors of infant rhesus (macaca mulatta) and pigtail (M. nemestrina) monkeys reared in total social isolation were compared with those of socialized controls. Results question the generality of rhesus total isolate behavior as a model for some human problems. (Author/SB)

  8. Distribution of glutamatergic, GABAergic, and glycinergic neurons in the auditory pathways of macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Inoue, K; Takada, M

    2015-12-01

    Macaque monkeys use complex communication calls and are regarded as a model for studying the coding and decoding of complex sound in the auditory system. However, little is known about the distribution of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the auditory system of macaque monkeys. In this study, we examined the overall distribution of cell bodies that expressed mRNAs for VGLUT1, and VGLUT2 (markers for glutamatergic neurons), GAD67 (a marker for GABAergic neurons), and GLYT2 (a marker for glycinergic neurons) in the auditory system of the Japanese macaque. In addition, we performed immunohistochemistry for VGLUT1, VGLUT2, and GAD67 in order to compare the distribution of proteins and mRNAs. We found that most of the excitatory neurons in the auditory brainstem expressed VGLUT2. In contrast, the expression of VGLUT1 mRNA was restricted to the auditory cortex (AC), periolivary nuclei, and cochlear nuclei (CN). The co-expression of GAD67 and GLYT2 mRNAs was common in the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL), CN, and superior olivary complex except for the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, which expressed GLYT2 alone. In contrast, the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus, inferior colliculus, thalamus, and AC expressed GAD67 alone. The absence of co-expression of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the medial geniculate, medial superior olive, and VNLL suggests that synaptic responses in the target neurons of these nuclei may be different between rodents and macaque monkeys.

  9. Modeling depression in adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Willard, Stephanie L; Shively, Carol A

    2012-06-01

    Depressive disorders are prevalent, costly, and poorly understood. Male rodents in stress paradigms are most commonly used as animal models, despite the two-fold increased prevalence of depression in women and sex differences in response to stress. Although these models have provided valuable insights, new models are needed to move the field forward. Social stress-associated behavioral depression in adult female cynomolgus macaques closely resembles human depression in physiological, neurobiological, and behavioral characteristics, including reduced body mass, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis perturbations, autonomic dysfunction, increased cardiovascular disease risk, reduced hippocampal volume, altered serotonergic function, decreased activity levels, and increased mortality. In addition, behaviorally depressed monkeys also have low ovarian steroid concentrations, even though they continue to have menstrual cycles. Although this type of ovarian dysfunction has not been reported in depressed women and is difficult to identify, it may be the key to understanding the high prevalence of depression in women. Depressive behavior in female cynomolgus monkeys is naturally occurring and not induced by experimental manipulation. Different social environmental challenges, including isolation vs. subordination, may elicit the depression-like response in some animals and not others. Similarly, social subordination is stressful and depressive behavior is more common in socially subordinate monkeys. Yet, not all subordinates exhibit behavioral depression, suggesting individual differences in sensitivity to specific environmental stressors and enhanced risk of behavioral depression in some individuals. The behavior and neurobiology of subordinates is distinctly different than that of behaviorally depressed monkeys, which affords the opportunity to differentiate between stressed and depressed states. Thus, behaviorally depressed monkeys exhibit numerous physiological

  10. Personality Structure in Brown Capuchin Monkeys: Comparisons with Chimpanzees, Orangutans, and Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Morton, F. Blake; Lee, Phyllis C.; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Thierry, Bernard; Paukner, Annika; de Waal, Frans B. M.; Widness, Jane; Essler, Jennifer L.; Weiss, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Species comparisons of personality structure (i.e. how many personality dimensions and the characteristics of those dimensions) can facilitate questions about the adaptive function of personality in nonhuman primates. Here we investigate personality structure in the brown capuchin monkey (Sapajus apella), a New World primate species, and compare this structure to those of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), orangutans (Pongo spp.), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Brown capuchins evolved behavioral and cognitive traits that are qualitatively similar to those of great apes, and individual differences in behavior and cognition are closely associated with differences in personality. Thus, we hypothesized that brown capuchin personality structure would overlap more with great apes than with rhesus macaques. We obtained personality ratings from seven sites on 127 brown capuchin monkeys. Principal-components analysis identified five personality dimensions (Assertiveness, Openness, Neuroticism, Sociability, and Attentiveness), which were reliable across raters and, in a subset of subjects, significantly correlated with relevant behaviors up to a year later. Comparisons between species revealed that brown capuchins and great apes overlapped in personality structure, particularly chimpanzees in the case of Neuroticism. However, in some respects (i.e. capuchin Sociability and Openness) the similarities between capuchins and great apes were not significantly greater than those between capuchins and rhesus macaques. We discuss the relevance of our results to brown capuchin behavior, and the evolution of personality structure in primates. PMID:23668695

  11. Neonatal Hippocampal Damage Impairs Specific Food/Place Associations in Adult Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Glavis-Bloom, Courtney; Alvarado, Maria C.; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a novel spatial memory paradigm for monkeys and reports the effects of neonatal damage to the hippocampus on performance in adulthood. Monkeys were trained to forage in eight boxes hung on the walls of a large enclosure. Each box contained a different food item that varied in its intrinsic reward value, as determined from food preference testing. Monkeys were trained on a spatial and a cued version of the task. In the spatial task, the boxes looked identical and remained fixed in location whereas in the cued task, the boxes were individuated with colored plaques and changed location on each trial. Ten adult Rhesus macaques (5 neonatal sham-operated and 5 with neonatal neurotoxic hippocampal lesions) were allowed to forage once daily until they preferentially visited boxes containing preferred foods. The data suggest that all monkeys learned to discriminate preferred from nonpreferred food locations, but that monkeys with neonatal hippocampal damage committed significantly more working memory errors than controls in both tasks. Furthermore, following selective satiation, controls altered their foraging pattern to avoid the satiated food, whereas lesioned animals did not, suggesting that neonatal hippocampal lesions prohibit learning of specific food-place associations. We conclude that whereas an intact hippocampus is necessary to form specific item-in-place associations, in its absence, cortical areas may support more broad distinctions between food types that allow monkeys to discriminate places containing highly preferred foods. PMID:23398438

  12. Learning by observation in the macaque monkey under high experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Isbaine, Faiçal; Demolliens, Marie; Belmalih, Abdelouahed; Brovelli, Andrea; Boussaoud, Driss

    2015-08-01

    While neuroscience research has tremendously advanced our knowledge about the neural mechanisms of individual learning, i.e. through trial-and-error, it is only recently that neuroscientists have begun to study observational learning, and thus little is known about its neural mechanisms. One limitation is that observational learning has been addressed under unconstrained experimental conditions, not compatible with neuronal recordings. This study examined observational learning in macaque monkeys under the constraining conditions of behavioral neurophysiology. Two animals sat in primate chairs facing each other, with their head fixed. A touch screen was placed face up between the chairs at arm's reach, and the monkeys were trained on an abstract visuomotor associative task. In one experiment, the monkeys alternated the roles of "actor" and "observer". The actor learned to associate visual cues with reaching targets, while the observer "watched" freely. Then, the observer was given the same cue-target associations just performed by the actor, or had to learn new, not previously observed ones. The results show that learning performance is better after observation. In experiment 2, one monkey learned from a human actor who performed the task with errors only, or with successes only in separate blocks. The monkey's gain in performance was higher after observation of errors than after successes. The findings suggest that observational learning can occur even under highly constraining conditions, and open the way for investigating the neuronal correlates of social learning using the methods of behavioral neurophysiology. PMID:25934491

  13. Learning by observation in the macaque monkey under high experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Isbaine, Faiçal; Demolliens, Marie; Belmalih, Abdelouahed; Brovelli, Andrea; Boussaoud, Driss

    2015-08-01

    While neuroscience research has tremendously advanced our knowledge about the neural mechanisms of individual learning, i.e. through trial-and-error, it is only recently that neuroscientists have begun to study observational learning, and thus little is known about its neural mechanisms. One limitation is that observational learning has been addressed under unconstrained experimental conditions, not compatible with neuronal recordings. This study examined observational learning in macaque monkeys under the constraining conditions of behavioral neurophysiology. Two animals sat in primate chairs facing each other, with their head fixed. A touch screen was placed face up between the chairs at arm's reach, and the monkeys were trained on an abstract visuomotor associative task. In one experiment, the monkeys alternated the roles of "actor" and "observer". The actor learned to associate visual cues with reaching targets, while the observer "watched" freely. Then, the observer was given the same cue-target associations just performed by the actor, or had to learn new, not previously observed ones. The results show that learning performance is better after observation. In experiment 2, one monkey learned from a human actor who performed the task with errors only, or with successes only in separate blocks. The monkey's gain in performance was higher after observation of errors than after successes. The findings suggest that observational learning can occur even under highly constraining conditions, and open the way for investigating the neuronal correlates of social learning using the methods of behavioral neurophysiology.

  14. Spatial processing in the auditory cortex of the macaque monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2000-10-01

    The patterns of cortico-cortical and cortico-thalamic connections of auditory cortical areas in the rhesus monkey have led to the hypothesis that acoustic information is processed in series and in parallel in the primate auditory cortex. Recent physiological experiments in the behaving monkey indicate that the response properties of neurons in different cortical areas are both functionally distinct from each other, which is indicative of parallel processing, and functionally similar to each other, which is indicative of serial processing. Thus, auditory cortical processing may be similar to the serial and parallel "what" and "where" processing by the primate visual cortex. If "where" information is serially processed in the primate auditory cortex, neurons in cortical areas along this pathway should have progressively better spatial tuning properties. This prediction is supported by recent experiments that have shown that neurons in the caudomedial field have better spatial tuning properties than neurons in the primary auditory cortex. Neurons in the caudomedial field are also better than primary auditory cortex neurons at predicting the sound localization ability across different stimulus frequencies and bandwidths in both azimuth and elevation. These data support the hypothesis that the primate auditory cortex processes acoustic information in a serial and parallel manner and suggest that this may be a general cortical mechanism for sensory perception.

  15. Covert Shifts of Spatial Attention in the Macaque Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Caspari, Natalie; Janssens, Thomas; Mantini, Dante; Vandenberghe, Rik

    2015-01-01

    In the awake state, shifts of spatial attention alternate with periods of sustained attention at a fixed location or object. Human fMRI experiments revealed the critical role of the superior parietal lobule (SPL) in shifting spatial attention, a finding not predicted by human lesion studies and monkey electrophysiology. To investigate whether a potential homolog of the human SPL shifting region exists in monkeys (Macaca mulatta), we adopted an event-related fMRI paradigm that closely resembled a human experiment (Molenberghs et al., 2007). In this paradigm, a pair of relevant and irrelevant shapes was continuously present on the horizontal meridian. Subjects had to covertly detect a dimming of the relevant shape while ignoring the irrelevant dimmings. The events of interest consisted of the replacement of one stimulus pair by the next. During shift but not stay events, the relevant shape of the new pair appeared at the contralateral position relative to the previous one. Spatial shifting events activated parietal areas V6/V6A and medial intraparietal area, caudo-dorsal visual areas, the most posterior portion of the superior temporal sulcus, and several smaller frontal areas. These areas were not activated during passive stimulation with the same sensory stimuli. During stay events, strong direction-sensitive attention signals were observed in a distributed set of contralateral visual, temporal, parietal, and lateral prefrontal areas, the vast majority overlapping with the sensory stimulus representation. We suggest medial intraparietal area and V6/V6A as functional counterparts of human SPL because they contained the most widespread shift signals in the absence of contralateral stay activity, resembling the functional characteristics of the human SPL shifting area. PMID:25995460

  16. The medial parietal occipital areas in the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Gamberini, Michela; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The number, location, extent, and functional properties of the cortical areas that occupy the medial parieto-occipital cortex (mPOC) have been, and still is, a matter of scientific debate. The mPOC is a convoluted region of the brain that presents a high level of individual variability, and the fact that many areas of mPOC are located within very deep sulci further limits the possibility to investigate their anatomo-functional properties. In the present review, we summarize the location and extent of mPOC areas in the macaque brain as obtained by architectural, connectional, and functional data. The different approaches lead to a subdivision of mPOC that includes areas V2, V3, V6, V6Av, and V6Ad. Extrastriate areas V2 and V3 occupy the posterior wall of the parieto-occipital sulcus (POs). The fundus of POs and the ventralmost part of the anterior wall of the sulcus are occupied by a retinotopically organized visual area, called V6, which represents the contralateral part of the visual field and emphasizes its periphery. The remaining part of the anterior wall of POs is occupied by two areas, V6Av and V6Ad, which contain visual as well as arm reaching neurons. Our analyses suggest that areas V6 and V6Av, together, occupy the cortical territory previously described as area PO. Functionally, area V6 is a motion area particularly sensitive to the real motion of objects in the animal's field of view, while V6Av and V6Ad are visuomotor areas likely involved in the visual guidance of arm movement and object prehension. PMID:26241957

  17. Niche partitioning between sympatric rhesus macaques and Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys at Baimaxueshan Nature Reserve, China.

    PubMed

    Grueter, Cyril C; Li, Da-Yong; Feng, Shun-Kai; Ren, Bao-Ping

    2010-10-01

    Here we provide a preliminary assessment of dietary and habitat requirements of two sympatric primate taxa, a "simple-stomached" and "complex-stomached" species (Rhinopithecus bieti Colobinae vs. Macaca mulatta Cercopithecinae), as a basis for illuminating how the two coexist. Of ca. 22 plant food species consumed by the macaques, at least 16 were also eaten by the snub-nosed monkeys. Both species showed a preference for fruits. While the snub-nosed monkeys did not utilize any resources associated with human communities, rhesus macaques did occasionally raid agricultural crops. The mean elevation of the snub-nosed monkey group was 3,218 m, while the mean elevation of the macaque group was 2,995 m. Macaques were also spotted on meadows whereas snub-nosed monkeys evidently avoided these. For both species, mixed deciduous broadleaf/conifer forest was the most frequently used ecotype, but whereas evergreen broadleaf forest (Cyclobalanopsis community) accounted for only 3% of the location records of the snub-nosed monkeys, it accounted for 36% of the location records of the macaques. Groups of the two species usually kept a considerable spatial distance from one another (mean 2.4 km). One close encounter and confrontation between groups of the two species resulted in the macaque group moving away. Our findings suggest that the coexistence of the two taxa is facilitated via differential macrohabitat use and spatial avoidance. Although divergent habitat-use strategies may reflect interspecific competition, they may also merely reflect different physiological or ecological requirements.

  18. FACIAL ASYMMETRY IS NEGATIVELY RELATED TO CONDITION IN FEMALE MACAQUE MONKEYS.

    PubMed

    Little, Anthony C; Paukner, Annika; Woodward, Ruth A; Suomi, Stephen J

    2012-09-01

    The face is an important visual trait in social communication across many species. In evolutionary terms there are large and obvious selective advantages in detecting healthy partners, both in terms of avoiding individuals with poor health to minimise contagion and in mating with individuals with high health to help ensure healthy offspring. Many models of sexual selection suggest that an individual's phenotype provides cues to their quality. Fluctuating asymmetry is a trait that is proposed to be an honest indicator of quality and previous studies have demonstrated that rhesus monkeys gaze longer at symmetric faces, suggesting preferences for such faces. The current study examined the relationship between measured facial symmetry and measures of health in a captive population of female rhesus macaque monkeys. We measured asymmetry from landmarks marked on front-on facial photographs and computed measures of health based on veterinary health and condition ratings, number of minor and major wounds sustained, and gain in weight over the first four years of life. Analysis revealed that facial asymmetry was negatively related to condition related health measures, with symmetric individuals being healthier than more asymmetric individuals. Facial asymmetry appears to be an honest indicator of health in rhesus macaques and asymmetry may then be used by conspecifics in mate-choice situations. More broadly, our data support the notion that faces are valuable sources of information in non-human primates and that sexual selection based on facial information is potentially important across the primate lineage.

  19. Motor command for precision grip in the macaque monkey can be mediated by spinal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Alstermark, B; Pettersson, L G; Nishimura, Y; Yoshino-Saito, K; Tsuboi, F; Takahashi, M; Isa, T

    2011-07-01

    In motor control, the general view is still that spinal interneurons mainly contribute to reflexes and automatic movements. The question raised here is whether spinal interneurons can mediate the cortical command for independent finger movements, like a precision grip between the thumb and index finger in the macaque monkey, or if this function depends exclusively on a direct corticomotoneuronal pathway. This study is a followup of a previous report (Sasaki et al. J Neurophysiol 92: 3142-3147, 2004) in which we trained macaque monkeys to pick a small piece of sweet potato from a cylinder by a precision grip between the index finger and thumb. We have now isolated one spinal interneuronal system, the C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons with projection to hand and arm motoneurons. In the previous study, the lateral corticospinal tract (CST) was interrupted in C4/C5 (input intact to the C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons), and in this study, the CST was interrupted in C2 (input abolished). The precision grip could be performed within the first 15 days after a CST lesion in C4/C5 but not in C2. We conclude that C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons also can carry the command for precision grip. PMID:21511706

  20. Central projections of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in the macaque monkey

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, J.; Kankipati, L.; Strang, C.E.; Peterson, B.B.; Dacey, D.; Gamlin, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle via intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin and the neuropeptide PACAP. The ipRGCs regulate other non-image-forming visual functions such as the pupillary light reflex, masking behaviour and light induced melatonin suppression. To evaluate whether PACAP immunoreactive retinal projections are useful as a marker for central projection of ipRGCs in the monkey brain, we characterized the occurrence of PACAP in melanopsin expressing ipRGCs and in the retinal target areas in the brain visualized by the anterograde tracer Cholera Toxin subunit B (CtB) in combination with PACAP staining. In the retina, PACAP and melanopsin were found to be co-stored in 99% of melanopsin expressing cells characterized as inner and outer stratifying melanopsin RGCs. Two macaque monkeys were anesthetized and received a unilateral intravitreal injection of CtB. Bilateral retinal projections containing co-localized CtB and PACAP immunostaining were identified in the SCN, the lateral geniculate complex (LGN) including the pregeniculate nucleus (PrGC), the pretectal olivary nucleus (PON), the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT), the brachium of the superior colliculus (BSC), and the superior colliculus (SC). In conclusion, PACAP immunoreactive projections with co-localized CtB represent retinal projections of ipRGCs in the macaque monkey, and support previous retrograde tracer studies demonstrating that melanopsin containing retinal projections reach areas in the primate brain involved in both image and non-image-forming visual processing. PMID:24752373

  1. Characteristics of Spontaneous Square-Wave Jerks in the Healthy Macaque Monkey during Visual Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Costela, Francisco M.; Otero-Millan, Jorge; McCamy, Michael B.; Macknik, Stephen L.; Di Stasi, Leandro L.; Rieiro, Héctor; Leigh, John R.; Troncoso, Xoana G.; Najafian Jazi, Ali; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Saccadic intrusions (SIs), predominantly horizontal saccades that interrupt accurate fixation, include square-wave jerks (SWJs; the most common type of SI), which consist of an initial saccade away from the fixation target followed, after a short delay, by a return saccade that brings the eye back onto target. SWJs are present in most human subjects, but are prominent by their increased frequency and size in certain parkinsonian disorders and in recessive, hereditary spinocerebellar ataxias. SWJs have been also documented in monkeys with tectal and cerebellar etiologies, but no studies to date have investigated the occurrence of SWJs in healthy nonhuman primates. Here we set out to determine the characteristics of SWJs in healthy rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) during attempted fixation of a small visual target. Our results indicate that SWJs are common in healthy nonhuman primates. We moreover found primate SWJs to share many characteristics with human SWJs, including the relationship between the size of a saccade and its likelihood to be part of a SWJ. One main discrepancy between monkey and human SWJs was that monkey SWJs tended to be more vertical than horizontal, whereas human SWJs have a strong horizontal preference. Yet, our combined data indicate that primate and human SWJs play a similar role in fixation correction, suggesting that they share a comparable coupling mechanism at the oculomotor generation level. These findings constrain the potential brain areas and mechanisms underlying the generation of fixational saccades in human and nonhuman primates. PMID:26067994

  2. Biological variables in the hair uptake of methylmercury from blood in the Macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Mottet, N.K.; Body, R.L.; Wilkens, V.; Burbacher, T.M.

    1987-04-01

    The total mercury (Hg) in hair and blood of 45 young healthy adult female Macaque fascicularis given 0, 50, 70, or 90 ..mu..g MeHg/kg body wt orally in apple juice daily revealed a close and constant ratio between blood Hg and hair. The amount of hair Hg does not increase with time (maximum period of observation 490 days) at a given dose level. Also the ratio was unchanged between background and subtoxic dose levels. Individuals at a given dose level with a higher-than-average blood level had a proportionately higher hair level. The Macaque blood/hair ratio is markedly lower than that reported for humans. Pregnancy did not have an appreciable effect on the hair mercury level. Review of the known variables in human and Macaque hair growth and structures does not provide an explanation for the difference. They suggest that an as yet unidentified biological variable(s), possibly circumfollicular blood flow, could account for the difference. This ratio difference notwithstanding, controlled studies on Macaque hair such as this add support for the validity of terminal hair as a trace metal exposure indicator.

  3. Evidence for Motor Planning in Monkeys: Rhesus Macaques Select Efficient Grips when Transporting Spoons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Eliza L.; Berthier, Neil E.; Metevier, Christina M.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2011-01-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naive adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with…

  4. Influence of History on Saccade Countermanding Performance in Humans and Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Emeric, Erik E.; Brown, Joshua W.; Boucher, Leanne; Carpenter, Roger H. S.; Hanes, Doug P.; Harris, Robin; Logan, Gordon D.; Mashru, Reena N.; Paré, Martin; Pouget, Pierre; Stuphorn, Veit; Taylor, Tracy L.; Schall, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    The stop-signal or countermanding task probes the ability to control action by requiring subjects to withhold a planned movement in response to an infrequent stop signal which they do with variable success depending on the delay of the stop signal. We investigated whether performance of humans and macaque monkeys in a saccade countermanding task was influenced by stimulus and performance history. In spite of idiosyncrasies across subjects several trends were evident in both humans and monkeys. Response time decreased after successive trials with no stop signal. Response time increased after successive trials with a stop signal. However, post error slowing was not observed. Increased response time was observed mainly or only after cancelled (signal inhibit) trials and not after noncancelled (signal respond) trials. These global trends were based on rapid adjustments of response time in response to momentary fluctuations in the fraction of stop signal trials. The effects of trial sequence on the probability of responding were weaker and more idiosyncratic across subjects when stop signal fraction was fixed. However, both response time and probability of responding were influenced strongly by variations in the fraction of stop signal trials. These results indicate that the race model of countermanding performance requires extension to account for these sequential dependencies and provide a basis for physiological studies of executive control of countermanding saccade performance. PMID:17081584

  5. EVIDENCE FOR MOTOR PLANNING IN MONKEYS: RHESUS MACAQUES SELECT EFFICIENT GRIPS WHEN TRANSPORTING SPOONS

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Eliza L.; Berthier, Neil E.; Metevier, Christina M.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2014-01-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naïve adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with the elevated spoon problem, and observed how monkeys learned the affordances of spoons over sessions. Strikingly, monkeys developed two different strategies for efficient spoon transport in just 12 to 36 trials. In subsequent testing with a novel double bowl spoon approximately 1 year later, monkeys demonstrated that they were attending to the baited spoon bowl and continued to select efficient grips for transporting the spoon. Monkey data were contrasted with previous studies in human infants using a perception-action perspective in an effort to understand the fundamentals of tool use and motor planning that may be common in the development of these abilities across species and their origins in human behavior. PMID:21676101

  6. Does the macaque monkey provide a good model for studying human executive control? A comparative behavioral study of task switching.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Luana; Chelazzi, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    The ability to swiftly and smoothly switch from one task set to another is central to intelligent behavior, because it allows an organism to flexibly adapt to ever changing environmental conditions and internal needs. For this reason, researchers interested in executive control processes have often relied on task-switching paradigms as powerful tools to uncover the underlying cognitive and brain architecture. In order to gather fundamental information at the single-cell level, it would be greatly helpful to demonstrate that non-human primates, especially the macaque monkey, share with us similar behavioral manifestations of task-switching and therefore, in all likelihood, similar underlying brain mechanisms. Unfortunately, prior attempts have provided negative results (e.g., Stoet & Snyder, 2003b), in that it was reported that macaques do not show the typical signature of task-switching operations at the behavioral level, represented by switch costs. If confirmed, this would indicate that the macaque cannot be used as a model approach to explore human executive control mechanisms by means of task-switching paradigms. We have therefore decided to re-explore this issue, by conducting a comparative experiment on a group of human participants and two macaque monkeys, whereby we measured and compared performance costs linked to task switching and resistance to interference across the two species. Contrary to what previously reported, we found that both species display robust task switching costs, thus supporting the claim that macaque monkeys provide an exquisitely suitable model to study the brain mechanisms responsible for maintaining and switching task sets. PMID:21720549

  7. Detection thresholds for intensity increments in a single harmonic of synthetic Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) monkey coo calls.

    PubMed

    Le Prell, Colleen G; Moody, David B

    2002-09-01

    There is evidence that Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) are extremely sensitive to dynamic changes in the relative amplitudes of coo call harmonics during discrimination tests. To verify this evidence using more controlled stimulus configurations, the authors examined threshold sensitivity of macaque monkeys to amplitude increments added to the standard level of coo call harmonics. Psychophysical threshold determination methods paralleled those used previously to determine macaque sensitivity to amplitude increments added to vowel-like stimuli. Variation was detectable although thresholds were elevated relative to those obtained with vowel-like stimuli in another investigation (C. G. Le Prell, A. J. Niemiec, & D. B. Moody, 2001). This elevation was probably a function of natural amplitude modulation in the standard stimuli.

  8. Alterations of Hippocampal Projections in Adult Macaques with Neonatal Hippocampal Lesions: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yuguang; Payne, Christa; Li, Longchuan; Hu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xiaodong; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychological and brain imaging studies have demonstrated persistent deficits in memory functions and structural changes after neonatal neurotoxic hippocampal lesion in monkeys. However, the relevant microstructural changes in the white matter of affected brain regions following this early insult remain unknown. This study assessed white matter integrity in the main hippocampal projections of adult macaque monkeys with neonatal hippocampal lesions, by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Data analysis was performed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and compared with volume of interest statistics. Alterations of fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity indices were observed in fornix, temporal stem, ventromedial prefrontal cortex and optical radiations. To further validate the lesion effects on the prefrontal cortex, probabilistic diffusion tractography was used to examine the integrity of the fiber connections between hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and alterations were found in these connections. In addition, increased radial diffusivity in the left ventromedial prefrontal cortex correlated negatively with the severity of deficits in working memory in the same monkeys. The findings revealed microstructural changes due to neonatal hippocampal lesion, and confirmed that neonatal neurotoxic hippocampal lesions resulted in significant and enduring functional alterations in the hippocampal projection system. PMID:25204865

  9. Morphology and connections of intratrigeminal cells and axons in the macaque monkey

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Susan; May, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal primary afferent fibers have small receptive fields and discrete submodalities, but second order trigeminal neurons often display larger receptive fields with complex, multimodal responses. Moreover, while most large caliber afferents terminate exclusively in the principal trigeminal nucleus, and pars caudalis (sVc) of the spinal trigeminal nucleus receives almost exclusively small caliber afferents, the characteristics of second order neurons do not always reflect this dichotomy. These surprising characteristics may be due to a network of intratrigeminal connections modifying primary afferent contributions. This study characterizes the distribution and morphology of intratrigeminal cells and axons in a macaque monkeys. Tracer injections centered in the principal nucleus (pV) and adjacent pars oralis retrogradely labeled neurons bilaterally in pars interpolaris (sVi), but only ipsilaterally, in sVc. Labeled axons terminated contralaterally within sVi and caudalis. Features of the intratrigeminal cells in ipsilateral sVc suggest that both nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons project to principalis. A commissural projection to contralateral principalis was also revealed. Injections into sVc labeled cells and terminals in pV and pars oralis on both sides, indicating the presence of bilateral reciprocal connections. Labeled terminals and cells were also present bilaterally in sVi and in contralateral sVc. Interpolaris injections produced labeling patterns similar to those of sVc. Thus, the rostral and caudal poles of the macaque trigeminal complex are richly interconnected by ipsilateral ascending and descending connections providing an anatomical substrate for complex analysis of oro-facial stimuli. Sparser reciprocal crossed intratrigeminal connections may be important for conjugate reflex movements, such as the corneal blink reflex. PMID:23754988

  10. Neurofilament protein is differentially distributed in subpopulations of corticocortical projection neurons in the macaque monkey visual pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Ungerleider, L. G.; Webster, M. J.; Gattass, R.; Adams, M. M.; Sailstad, C. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies of the primate cerebral cortex have shown that neurofilament protein is present in pyramidal neuron subpopulations displaying specific regional and laminar distribution patterns. In order to characterize further the neurochemical phenotype of the neurons furnishing feedforward and feedback pathways in the visual cortex of the macaque monkey, we performed an analysis of the distribution of neurofilament protein in corticocortical projection neurons in areas V1, V2, V3, V3A, V4, and MT. Injections of the retrogradely transported dyes Fast Blue and Diamidino Yellow were placed within areas V4 and MT, or in areas V1 and V2, in 14 adult rhesus monkeys, and the brains of these animals were processed for immunohistochemistry with an antibody to nonphosphorylated epitopes of the medium and heavy molecular weight subunits of the neurofilament protein. Overall, there was a higher proportion of neurons projecting from areas V1, V2, V3, and V3A to area MT that were neurofilament protein-immunoreactive (57-100%), than to area V4 (25-36%). In contrast, feedback projections from areas MT, V4, and V3 exhibited a more consistent proportion of neurofilament protein-containing neurons (70-80%), regardless of their target areas (V1 or V2). In addition, the vast majority of feedback neurons projecting to areas V1 and V2 were located in layers V and VI in areas V4 and MT, while they were observed in both supragranular and infragranular layers in area V3. The laminar distribution of feedforward projecting neurons was heterogeneous. In area V1, Meynert and layer IVB cells were found to project to area MT, while neurons projecting to area V4 were particularly dense in layer III within the foveal representation. In area V2, almost all neurons projecting to areas MT or V4 were located in layer III, whereas they were found in both layers II-III and V-VI in areas V3 and V3A. These results suggest that neurofilament protein identifies particular subpopulations of

  11. Emergence and evolution of inter-specific segregating retrocopies in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Qu; Su, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Retroposition is an RNA-mediated mechanism to generate gene duplication, and is believed to play an important role in genome evolution and phenotypic adaptation in various species including primates. Previous studies suggested an elevated rate of recent retroposition in the rhesus macaque genome. To better understand the impact of retroposition on macaque species which have undergone an adaptive radiation approximately 3–6 million years ago, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify recently derived retrocopies in cynomolgus monkeys. As a result, we identified seven experimentally validated young retrocopies, all of which are polymorphic in cynomolgus monkeys. Unexpectedly, five of them are also present in rhesus monkeys and are still segregating. Molecular evolutionary analysis indicates that the observed inter-specific polymorphism is attribute to ancestral polymorphism. Further population genetics analysis provided strong evidence of balancing selection on at least one case (Crab-eating monkey retrocopy 6, or CER6) in both species. CER6 is in adjacent with an immunoglobulin related gene and may be involved in host-pathogen interaction, a well-known target of balancing selection. Altogether, our data support that retroposition is an important force to shape genome evolution and species adaptation. PMID:27600022

  12. Emergence and evolution of inter-specific segregating retrocopies in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Qu; Su, Bing

    2016-09-07

    Retroposition is an RNA-mediated mechanism to generate gene duplication, and is believed to play an important role in genome evolution and phenotypic adaptation in various species including primates. Previous studies suggested an elevated rate of recent retroposition in the rhesus macaque genome. To better understand the impact of retroposition on macaque species which have undergone an adaptive radiation approximately 3-6 million years ago, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify recently derived retrocopies in cynomolgus monkeys. As a result, we identified seven experimentally validated young retrocopies, all of which are polymorphic in cynomolgus monkeys. Unexpectedly, five of them are also present in rhesus monkeys and are still segregating. Molecular evolutionary analysis indicates that the observed inter-specific polymorphism is attribute to ancestral polymorphism. Further population genetics analysis provided strong evidence of balancing selection on at least one case (Crab-eating monkey retrocopy 6, or CER6) in both species. CER6 is in adjacent with an immunoglobulin related gene and may be involved in host-pathogen interaction, a well-known target of balancing selection. Altogether, our data support that retroposition is an important force to shape genome evolution and species adaptation.

  13. Emergence and evolution of inter-specific segregating retrocopies in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Qu; Su, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Retroposition is an RNA-mediated mechanism to generate gene duplication, and is believed to play an important role in genome evolution and phenotypic adaptation in various species including primates. Previous studies suggested an elevated rate of recent retroposition in the rhesus macaque genome. To better understand the impact of retroposition on macaque species which have undergone an adaptive radiation approximately 3-6 million years ago, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify recently derived retrocopies in cynomolgus monkeys. As a result, we identified seven experimentally validated young retrocopies, all of which are polymorphic in cynomolgus monkeys. Unexpectedly, five of them are also present in rhesus monkeys and are still segregating. Molecular evolutionary analysis indicates that the observed inter-specific polymorphism is attribute to ancestral polymorphism. Further population genetics analysis provided strong evidence of balancing selection on at least one case (Crab-eating monkey retrocopy 6, or CER6) in both species. CER6 is in adjacent with an immunoglobulin related gene and may be involved in host-pathogen interaction, a well-known target of balancing selection. Altogether, our data support that retroposition is an important force to shape genome evolution and species adaptation. PMID:27600022

  14. Methylphenidate does not enhance visual working memory but benefits motivation in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Oemisch, Mariann; Johnston, Kevin; Paré, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Working memory is a limited-capacity cognitive process that retains relevant information temporarily to guide thoughts and behavior. A large body of work has suggested that catecholamines exert a major modulatory influence on cognition, but there is only equivocal evidence of a direct influence on working memory ability, which would be reflected in a dependence on working memory load. Here we tested the contribution of catecholamines to working memory by administering a wide range of acute oral doses of the dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor methylphenidate (MPH, 0.1-9 mg/kg) to three female macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta), whose working memory ability was measured from their performance in a visual sequential comparison task. This task allows the systematic manipulation of working memory load, and we therefore tested the specific hypothesis that MPH modulates performance in a manner that depends on both dose and memory load. We found no evidence of a dose- or memory load-dependent effect of MPH on performance. In contrast, significant effects on measures of motivation were observed. These findings suggest that an acute increase in catecholamines does not seem to affect the retention of visual information per se. As such, these results help delimit the effects of MPH on cognition. PMID:27329555

  15. Temporal plasticity involved in recovery from manual dexterity deficit after motor cortex lesion in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yumi; Higo, Noriyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Nishimura, Yukio; Sugiyama, Yoko; Oishi, Takao; Tsukada, Hideo; Isa, Tadashi; Onoe, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    The question of how intensive motor training restores motor function after brain damage or stroke remains unresolved. Here we show that the ipsilesional ventral premotor cortex (PMv) and perilesional primary motor cortex (M1) of rhesus macaque monkeys are involved in the recovery of manual dexterity after a lesion of M1. A focal lesion of the hand digit area in M1 was made by means of ibotenic acid injection. This lesion initially caused flaccid paralysis in the contralateral hand but was followed by functional recovery of hand movements, including precision grip, during the course of daily postlesion motor training. Brain imaging of regional cerebral blood flow by means of H2 (15)O-positron emission tomography revealed enhanced activity of the PMv during the early postrecovery period and increased functional connectivity within M1 during the late postrecovery period. The causal role of these areas in motor recovery was confirmed by means of pharmacological inactivation by muscimol during the different recovery periods. These findings indicate that, in both the remaining primary motor and premotor cortical areas, time-dependent plastic changes in neural activity and connectivity are involved in functional recovery from the motor deficit caused by the M1 lesion. Therefore, it is likely that the PMv, an area distant from the core of the lesion, plays an important role during the early postrecovery period, whereas the perilesional M1 contributes to functional recovery especially during the late postrecovery period.

  16. Structure and function of the middle temporal visual area (MT) in the marmoset: Comparisons with the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Lui, Leo L; Rosa, Marcello G P

    2015-04-01

    Although macaque monkeys have been dominant models in visual neuroscience, recent scientific advances suggest that marmosets provide a valuable alternative in the context of many types of experiments. Here we focus on the middle temporal area (MT), the most extensively studied extrastriate area in primates, and discuss similarities and differences between marmosets and macaques. The basic response properties of MT cells are similar in these species, including direction selectivity, speed tuning, and receptive field centre-surround organization. However, there are differences associated with spatial processing: receptive fields are larger in the marmoset than in the macaque, and MT neurons have preferences for lower spatial frequencies. Comparative analysis of anatomical connections show neural projections from several higher-order association areas to marmoset MT, which seem to be absent or reduced in the macaque. This suggests that cognitive processes could influence the activity of marmoset MT cells more directly. Despite a relative reduction in visual acuity, the present knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of MT in the marmoset suggests that simple low-level visual tasks, which are standard in the literature, are well within the capabilities of marmosets, opening the way for comparative studies of perception and cognition in primate brains of different sizes.

  17. A suitable method for the detection of a potential fraud of bringing macaque monkey meat into the food chain.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Nur Raifana Abdul; Ali, Md Eaqub; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Rahman, Md Mahfujur; Razzak, Md Abdur; Asing; Amin, Md Al

    2015-01-01

    Being the third-largest primate population has not made macaque (Macaca fascicularis sp.) monkeys less exposed to threats and dangers. Despite wildlife protection, they have been widely hunted and consumed in several countries because of their purported nutritional values. In addition to trading as pure bush meats in several places, monkey meat has been sold in meatball and soup products in Indonesia. Thus the possibility of macaque meat trafficking under the label of common meats is quite high. This paper reports the development of a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay with the shortest amplicon length for the confirmed detection of monkey meat under compromised states which are known to degrade DNA. We amplified a 120-bp region of d-loop gene using a pair of macaque-specific primers and confirmed their specificity for the target species through cross-challenging against 17 different species using a 141-bp site of an 18 S rRNA gene as an endogenous control for eukaryotes. This eliminated the possibilities of any false-negative detection with complex matrices or degraded specimens. The detection limit was 0.00001 ng DNA in a pure state and 0.1% of meat in mixed matrices and commercial meatball products. RFLP analysis further authenticated the originality of the PCR product and distinctive restriction patterns were found upon AluI and CViKI-1 digestion. A micro-fluidic lab-on-a-chip automated electrophoretic system separated the fragments with high resolution. The assay was validated for screening commercial meatball products with sufficient internal control. PMID:25906074

  18. A suitable method for the detection of a potential fraud of bringing macaque monkey meat into the food chain.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Nur Raifana Abdul; Ali, Md Eaqub; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Rahman, Md Mahfujur; Razzak, Md Abdur; Asing; Amin, Md Al

    2015-01-01

    Being the third-largest primate population has not made macaque (Macaca fascicularis sp.) monkeys less exposed to threats and dangers. Despite wildlife protection, they have been widely hunted and consumed in several countries because of their purported nutritional values. In addition to trading as pure bush meats in several places, monkey meat has been sold in meatball and soup products in Indonesia. Thus the possibility of macaque meat trafficking under the label of common meats is quite high. This paper reports the development of a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay with the shortest amplicon length for the confirmed detection of monkey meat under compromised states which are known to degrade DNA. We amplified a 120-bp region of d-loop gene using a pair of macaque-specific primers and confirmed their specificity for the target species through cross-challenging against 17 different species using a 141-bp site of an 18 S rRNA gene as an endogenous control for eukaryotes. This eliminated the possibilities of any false-negative detection with complex matrices or degraded specimens. The detection limit was 0.00001 ng DNA in a pure state and 0.1% of meat in mixed matrices and commercial meatball products. RFLP analysis further authenticated the originality of the PCR product and distinctive restriction patterns were found upon AluI and CViKI-1 digestion. A micro-fluidic lab-on-a-chip automated electrophoretic system separated the fragments with high resolution. The assay was validated for screening commercial meatball products with sufficient internal control.

  19. Auditory Properties in the Parabelt Regions of the Superior Temporal Gyrus in the Awake Macaque Monkey: An Initial Survey

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Stephen; Ross, Deborah; Falchier, Arnaud; Hackett, Troy A.; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    The superior temporal gyrus (STG) is on the inferior–lateral brain surface near the external ear. In macaques, 2/3 of the STG is occupied by an auditory cortical region, the “parabelt,” which is part of a network of inferior temporal areas subserving communication and social cognition as well as object recognition and other functions. However, due to its location beneath the squamous temporal bone and temporalis muscle, the STG, like other inferior temporal regions, has been a challenging target for physiological studies in awake-behaving macaques. We designed a new procedure for implanting recording chambers to provide direct access to the STG, allowing us to evaluate neuronal properties and their topography across the full extent of the STG in awake-behaving macaques. Initial surveys of the STG have yielded several new findings. Unexpectedly, STG sites in monkeys that were listening passively responded to tones with magnitudes comparable to those of responses to 1/3 octave band-pass noise. Mapping results showed longer response latencies in more rostral sites and possible tonotopic patterns parallel to core and belt areas, suggesting the reversal of gradients between caudal and rostral parabelt areas. These results will help further exploration of parabelt areas. PMID:25762661

  20. Infinium monkeys: Infinium 450K array for the Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Ong, Mei-Lyn; Tan, Peck Yean; MacIsaac, Julia L; Mah, Sarah M; Buschdorf, Jan Paul; Cheong, Clara Y; Stunkel, Walter; Chan, Louiza; Gluckman, Peter D; Chng, Keefe; Kobor, Michael S; Meaney, Michael J; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2014-05-08

    The Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip Array (Infinium 450K) is a robust and cost-efficient survey of genome-wide DNA methylation patterns. Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque) is an important disease model; however, its genome sequence is only recently published, and few tools exist to interrogate the molecular state of Cynomolgus macaque tissues. Although the Infinium 450K is a hybridization array designed to the human genome, the relative conservation between the macaque and human genomes makes its use in macaques feasible. Here, we used the Infinium 450K array to assay DNA methylation in 11 macaque muscle biopsies. We showed that probe hybridization efficiency was related to the degree of sequence identity between the human probes and the macaque genome sequence. Approximately 61% of the Human Infinium 450K probes could be reliably mapped to the Cynomolgus macaque genome and contain a CpG site of interest. We also compared the Infinium 450K data to reduced representation bisulfite sequencing data generated on the same samples and found a high level of concordance between the two independent methodologies, which can be further improved by filtering for probe sequence identity and mismatch location. We conclude that the Infinium 450K array can be used to measure the DNA methylome of Cynomolgus macaque tissues using the provided filters. We also provide a pipeline for validation of the array in other species using a simple BLAST-based sequence identify filter.

  1. Independence and merger of thalamocortical channels within macaque monkey primary visual cortex: anatomy of interlaminar projections.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, T; Levitt, J B; Lund, J S

    1994-01-01

    An important issue in understanding the function of primary visual cortex in the macaque monkey is how the several efferent neuron groups projecting to extrastriate cortex acquire their different response properties. To assist our understanding of this issue, we have compared the anatomical distribution of V1 intrinsic relays that carry information derived from magno- (M) and parvocellular (P) divisions of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus between thalamic recipient neurons and interareal efferent neuron groups within area V1. We used small, iontophoretic injections of biocytin placed in individual cortical laminae of area V1 to trace orthograde and retrograde inter- and intralaminar projections. In either the same or adjacent sections, the tissue was reacted for cytochrome oxidase (CO), which provides important landmarks for different efferent neuron populations located in CO rich blobs and CO poor interblobs in laminae 2/3, as well as defining clear boundaries for the populations of efferent neurons in laminae 4A and 4B. This study shows that the interblobs, but not the blobs, receive direct input from thalamic recipient 4C neurons; the interblobs receive relays from mid 4C neurons (believed to receive convergent M and P inputs), while blobs receive indirect inputs from either M or P (or both) pathways through layers 4B (which receives M relays from layer 4C alpha) and 4A (which receives P relays directly from the thalamus as well as from layer 4C beta). The property of orientation selectivity, most prominent in the interblob regions and in layer 4B, may have a common origin from oriented lateral projections made by mid 4C spiny stellate neurons. While layer 4B efferents may emphasize M characteristics and layer 4A efferents emphasize P characteristics, the dendrites of their constituent pyramidal neurons may provide anatomical access to the other channel since both blob and interblob regions in layers 2/3 have anatomical access to M and P driven relays

  2. Quadrature RF Coil for In Vivo Brain MRI of a Macaque Monkey in a Stereotaxic Head Frame

    PubMed Central

    ROOPNARIANE, COLIN A.; RYU, YEUN-CHUL; TOFIGHI, MOHAMMAD-REZA; MILLER, PATTI A.; OH, SUKHOON; WANG, JIANLI; PARK, BU SIK; ANSEL, LUKAS; LIEU, CHRISTOPHER A.; SUBRAMANIAN, THYAGARAJAN; YANG, QING X.; COLLINS, CHRISTOPHER M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a quadrature volume coil designed for brain imaging of a macaque monkey fixed in a sphinx position (facing down the bore) within a stereotactic frame at 3 T, where the position of the monkey and presence of the frame preclude use of existing coils. Requirements include the ability to position and remove the coil without disturbing the position of the monkey in the frame. A saddle coil and a solenoid were combined on a modified cylindrical former and connected in quadrature as to produce a homogeneous circularly polarized field throughout the brain. To allow the loops of the saddle coil to encompass the ear posts, partial disassembly and reassembly were facilitated by embedding pin and socket contacts into separate pieces of the former. Coil design included simulation of the electromagnetic fields for the coil containing a 3D model of a monkey’s head. The resulting coil produced adequate homogeneity and signal-to-noise ratio throughout the brain. PMID:22611340

  3. Visual Responsiveness of Neurons in the Secondary Somatosensory Area and its Surrounding Parietal Operculum Regions in Awake Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hihara, Sayaka; Taoka, Miki; Tanaka, Michio; Iriki, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Previous neurophysiological studies performed in macaque monkeys have shown that the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) is essentially engaged in the processing of somatosensory information and no other sensory input has been reported. In contrast, recent human brain-imaging studies have revealed the effects of visual and auditory stimuli on SII activity, which suggest multisensory integration in the human SII. To determine whether multisensory responses of the SII also exist in nonhuman primates, we recorded single-unit activity in response to visual and auditory stimuli from the SII and surrounding regions in 8 hemispheres from 6 awake monkeys. Among 1157 recorded neurons, 306 neurons responded to visual stimuli. These visual neurons usually responded to rather complex stimuli, such as stimulation of the peripersonal space (40.5%), observation of human action (29.1%), and moving-object stimulation outside the monkey's reach (23.9%). We occasionally applied auditory stimuli to visual neurons and found 10 auditory-responsive neurons that exhibited somatosensory responses. The visual neurons were distributed continuously along the lateral sulcus covering the entire SII, along with other somatosensory neurons. These results highlight the need to investigate novel functional roles—other than somesthetic sensory processing—of the SII. PMID:25962920

  4. Measurement of Neuronal Activity in a Macaque Monkey in Response to Animate Images Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wakita, Masumi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Ishizuka, Takashi; Schnackenberg, Joerg; Fujiawara, Michiyuki; Masataka, Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used extensively for functional neuroimaging over the past decade, in part because it is considered a powerful tool for investigating brain function in human infants and young children, for whom other neuroimaging techniques are not suitable. In particular, several studies have measured hemodynamic responses in the occipital region in infants upon exposure to visual stimuli. In the present study, we used a multi-channel NIRS to measure neuronal activity in a macaque monkey who was trained to watch videos showing various circus animals performing acrobatic activities without fixing the head position of the monkey. Cortical activity from the occipital region was measured first by placing a probe comprising a 3 × 5 array of emitters and detectors (2 × 4 cm) on the area (area 17), and the robustness and stability of the results were confirmed across sessions. Cortical responses were then measured from the dorsofrontal region. The oxygenated hemoglobin signals increased in area 9 and decreased in area 8b in response to viewing the videos. The results suggest that these regions are involved in cognitive processing of visually presented stimuli. The monkey showed positive responsiveness to the stimuli from the affective standpoint, but its attentional response to them was an inhibitory one. PMID:20676236

  5. Measurement of neuronal activity in a macaque monkey in response to animate images using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masumi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Ishizuka, Takashi; Schnackenberg, Joerg; Fujiawara, Michiyuki; Masataka, Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used extensively for functional neuroimaging over the past decade, in part because it is considered a powerful tool for investigating brain function in human infants and young children, for whom other neuroimaging techniques are not suitable. In particular, several studies have measured hemodynamic responses in the occipital region in infants upon exposure to visual stimuli. In the present study, we used a multi-channel NIRS to measure neuronal activity in a macaque monkey who was trained to watch videos showing various circus animals performing acrobatic activities without fixing the head position of the monkey. Cortical activity from the occipital region was measured first by placing a probe comprising a 3 x 5 array of emitters and detectors (2 x 4 cm) on the area (area 17), and the robustness and stability of the results were confirmed across sessions. Cortical responses were then measured from the dorsofrontal region. The oxygenated hemoglobin signals increased in area 9 and decreased in area 8b in response to viewing the videos. The results suggest that these regions are involved in cognitive processing of visually presented stimuli. The monkey showed positive responsiveness to the stimuli from the affective standpoint, but its attentional response to them was an inhibitory one.

  6. Visual Responsiveness of Neurons in the Secondary Somatosensory Area and its Surrounding Parietal Operculum Regions in Awake Macaque Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hihara, Sayaka; Taoka, Miki; Tanaka, Michio; Iriki, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Previous neurophysiological studies performed in macaque monkeys have shown that the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) is essentially engaged in the processing of somatosensory information and no other sensory input has been reported. In contrast, recent human brain-imaging studies have revealed the effects of visual and auditory stimuli on SII activity, which suggest multisensory integration in the human SII. To determine whether multisensory responses of the SII also exist in nonhuman primates, we recorded single-unit activity in response to visual and auditory stimuli from the SII and surrounding regions in 8 hemispheres from 6 awake monkeys. Among 1157 recorded neurons, 306 neurons responded to visual stimuli. These visual neurons usually responded to rather complex stimuli, such as stimulation of the peripersonal space (40.5%), observation of human action (29.1%), and moving-object stimulation outside the monkey's reach (23.9%). We occasionally applied auditory stimuli to visual neurons and found 10 auditory-responsive neurons that exhibited somatosensory responses. The visual neurons were distributed continuously along the lateral sulcus covering the entire SII, along with other somatosensory neurons. These results highlight the need to investigate novel functional roles-other than somesthetic sensory processing-of the SII.

  7. METABOLIC SYNDROME AND NEUROMETABOLIC ASYMMETRY OF HIPPOCAMPUS IN ADULT BONNET MONKEYS

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Mao, Xiangling; Smith, Eric L.P.; Kaufman, Daniel; Gorman, Jack M.; Owens, Michael J.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Banerji, Mary Ann; Rosenblum, Leonard A.; Kral, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with the insulin resistance metabolic syndrome, postulated to be mediated by stress-induced alterations within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In adult bonnet macaques we examined relationships between components of the metabolic syndrome, hippocampal neurometabolic asymmetry, an indicator of negative affect, and juvenile cerebrospinal fluid (csf) corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) levels obtained after stress exposure associated with maternal food insecurity and in controls. Methods Eleven adult male monkeys (seven with early life stress) who had undergone csf-CRF analyses as juveniles had magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of bilateral hippocampus, morphometry (body mass index, BMI; sagittal abdominal diameter, SAD) and determination of fasting plasma glucose and insulin as adults. Neurometabolite ratios included N-acetyl-aspartate as numerator (NAA; a marker of neuronal integrity) and choline (Cho; cell turnover) and creatine (Cr; reference analyte) as denominators. Results Elevated juvenile csf-CRF levels positively predicted adult BMI and SAD and were associated with right > left shift of NAA ratio within the hippocampus. Adult visceral obesity and insulin level correlated with right > left shift in hippocampal NAA concentrations, controlling for age and denominator. Conclusion Juvenile csf-CRF levels, a neuropeptide associated with early life stress, predict adult visceral obesity and hippocampal asymmetry supporting the hypothesis that metabolic syndrome in adults may be related to early life stress. Furthermore, this study demonstrates asymmetrical hippocampal alterations related to obesity. PMID:21459102

  8. Macaque monkeys can learn token values from human models through vicarious reward.

    PubMed

    Bevacqua, Sara; Cerasti, Erika; Falcone, Rossella; Cervelloni, Milena; Brunamonti, Emiliano; Ferraina, Stefano; Genovesio, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Monkeys can learn the symbolic meaning of tokens, and exchange them to get a reward. Monkeys can also learn the symbolic value of a token by observing conspecifics but it is not clear if they can learn passively by observing other actors, e.g., humans. To answer this question, we tested two monkeys in a token exchange paradigm in three experiments. Monkeys learned token values through observation of human models exchanging them. We used, after a phase of object familiarization, different sets of tokens. One token of each set was rewarded with a bit of apple. Other tokens had zero value (neutral tokens). Each token was presented only in one set. During the observation phase, monkeys watched the human model exchange tokens and watched them consume rewards (vicarious rewards). In the test phase, the monkeys were asked to exchange one of the tokens for food reward. Sets of three tokens were used in the first experiment and sets of two tokens were used in the second and third experiments. The valuable token was presented with different probabilities in the observation phase during the first and second experiments in which the monkeys exchanged the valuable token more frequently than any of the neutral tokens. The third experiments examined the effect of unequal probabilities. Our results support the view that monkeys can learn from non-conspecific actors through vicarious reward, even a symbolic task like the token-exchange task. PMID:23544115

  9. Measurement of Blood Volume in Adult Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Theodore R; Blue, Steven W; Park, Byung S; Greisel, Jennifer J; Conn, P Michael; Pau, Francis K-Y

    2015-01-01

    Most biomedical facilities that use rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) limit the amount of blood that may be collected for experimental purposes. These limits typically are expressed as a percentage of blood volume (BV), estimated by using a fixed ratio of blood (mL) per body weight (kg). BV estimation ratios vary widely among facilities and typically do not factor in variables known to influence BV in humans: sex, age, and body condition. We used indicator dilution methodology to determine the BV of 20 adult rhesus macaques (10 male, 10 female) that varied widely in body condition. We measured body composition by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, weight, crown-to-rump length, and body condition score. Two indicators, FITC-labeled hydroxyethyl starch (FITC–HES) and radioiodinated rhesus serum albumin (125I-RhSA), were injected simultaneously, followed by serial blood collection. Plasma volume at time 0 was determined by linear regression. BV was calculated from the plasma volume and Hct. We found that BV calculated by using FITC–HES was consistently lower than BV calculated by using 125I-RhSA. Sex and age did not significantly affect BV. Percentage body fat was significantly associated with BV. Subjects categorized as having ‘optimal’ body condition score had 18% body fat and 62.1 mL/kg BV (by FITC–HES; 74.5 mL/kg by 125I-RhSA). Each 1% increase in body fat corresponded to approximately 1 mL/kg decrease in BV. Body condition score correlated with the body fat percentage (R2 = 0.7469). We provide an equation for calculating BV from weight and body condition score. PMID:26632777

  10. Mixed-complexity artificial grammar learning in humans and macaque monkeys: evaluating learning strategies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benjamin; Smith, Kenny; Petkov, Christopher I

    2015-03-01

    Artificial grammars (AG) can be used to generate rule-based sequences of stimuli. Some of these can be used to investigate sequence-processing computations in non-human animals that might be related to, but not unique to, human language. Previous AG learning studies in non-human animals have used different AGs to separately test for specific sequence-processing abilities. However, given that natural language and certain animal communication systems (in particular, song) have multiple levels of complexity, mixed-complexity AGs are needed to simultaneously evaluate sensitivity to the different features of the AG. Here, we tested humans and Rhesus macaques using a mixed-complexity auditory AG, containing both adjacent (local) and non-adjacent (longer-distance) relationships. Following exposure to exemplary sequences generated by the AG, humans and macaques were individually tested with sequences that were either consistent with the AG or violated specific adjacent or non-adjacent relationships. We observed a considerable level of cross-species correspondence in the sensitivity of both humans and macaques to the adjacent AG relationships and to the statistical properties of the sequences. We found no significant sensitivity to the non-adjacent AG relationships in the macaques. A subset of humans was sensitive to this non-adjacent relationship, revealing interesting between- and within-species differences in AG learning strategies. The results suggest that humans and macaques are largely comparably sensitive to the adjacent AG relationships and their statistical properties. However, in the presence of multiple cues to grammaticality, the non-adjacent relationships are less salient to the macaques and many of the humans.

  11. What studies of macaque monkeys have told us about human color vision

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Animal models are a necessary component of systems neuroscience research. Determining which animal model to use for a given study involves a complicated calculus. Some experimental manipulations are easily made in some animal models but impossible in others. Some animal models are similar to humans with respect to particular scientific questions, and others are less so. In this review, I discuss work done in my laboratory to investigate the neural mechanisms of color vision in the rhesus macaque. The emphasis is on the strengths of the macaque model, but shortcomings are also discussed. PMID:25445192

  12. Background and stimulus-induced patterns of high metabolic activity in the visual cortex (area 17) of the squirrel and macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, A.L.; Hendrickson, A.E.

    1983-02-01

    The authors have used 2-deoxy-D-(/sup 14/C)glucose (2-DG) autoradiography and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry to examine background and stimulus-induced patterns of metabolic activity in monkey striate cortex. In squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) that binocularly or monocularly viewed diffuse white light or binocularly viewed bars of many orientations and spatial frequencies, 2-DG consumption was not uniform across the cortex but consisted of regularly spaced radial zones of high uptake. The cytochrome oxidase stain in these animals also revealed patches of high metabolism which coincided with the 2-DG patches. Squirrel monkeys binocularly viewing vertical stripes showed parallel bands of increased 2-DG uptake in the cortex, while the cytochrome label in these animals remained patchy. In macaque (Macaca nemestrina) monkeys, binocular stimulation with many orientations and spatial frequencies produced radial zones of high 2-DG uptake. When viewed tangentially, these zones formed a dots-in-rows pattern with a spacing of 350 X 500 microns; cytochrome oxidase staining produced an identical pattern. Macaca differed from Saimiri in that monocular stimulation labeled alternate rows. These results indicate that there are radial zones of high background metabolism across squirrel and macaque monkey striate cortex. In Saimiri these zones do not appear to be related to an eye dominance system, while in Macaca they do. The presence of these zones of high metabolism may complicate the interpretation of 2-DG autoradiographs that result from specific visual stimuli.

  13. Effect of chronic exposure to antipsychotic medication on cell numbers in the parietal cortex of macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Konopaske, Glenn T; Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Pierri, Joseph N; Wu, Qiang; Sampson, Allan R; Lewis, David A

    2007-06-01

    Both in vivo and post-mortem investigations have demonstrated smaller volumes of the whole brain and of certain brain regions in individuals with schizophrenia. It is unclear to what degree such smaller volumes are due to the illness or to the effects of antipsychotic medication treatment. Indeed, we recently reported that chronic exposure of macaque monkeys to haloperidol or olanzapine, at doses producing plasma levels in the therapeutic range in schizophrenia subjects, was associated with significantly smaller total brain weight and volume, including an 11.8-15.2% smaller gray matter volume in the left parietal lobe. Consequently, in this study we sought to determine whether these smaller volumes were associated with lower numbers of the gray matter's constituent cellular elements. The use of point counting and Cavalieri's principle on Nissl-stained sections confirmed a 14.6% smaller gray matter volume in the left parietal lobe from antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. Use of the optical fractionator method to estimate the number of each cell type in the gray matter revealed a significant 14.2% lower glial cell number with a concomitant 10.2% higher neuron density. The numbers of neurons and endothelial cells did not differ between groups. Together, the findings of smaller gray matter volume, lower glial cell number, and higher neuron density without a difference in total neuron number in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys parallel the results of post-mortem schizophrenia studies, and raise the possibility that such observations in schizophrenia subjects might be due, at least in part, to antipsychotic medication effects. PMID:17063154

  14. A preliminary study on activity budget, daily travel distance and feeding behaviour of long-tailed macaques and spectacled dusky leaf monkey in Bangi campus of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruslin, Farhani; Yaakop, Salmah; Zain, Badrul Munir Md.

    2014-09-01

    The activity budget, ranging behaviour and feeding behaviour of a multimale-multifemale group of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and a multimale-multifemale group of spectacled dusky leaf monkey (Trachypithecus obscurus) were studied. A total of 145 hours and 143 hours have been spent to observe the group of long-tailed macaque and spectacled dusky leaf monkey that ranged the same habitat adjacent to the campus areas. The researchers examined the activity budgets, daily travel length and feeding activity of both species and distinguished how the sympatric species used the same forested habitat. Preliminary study found that the long-tailed macaques spent longer time feeding, moving than resting and other activities. On the other hand, the dusky leaf monkey spent much time in feeding and resting than moving. The differences of daily pattern between these two groups are significant. Macaques have higher daily mean of path length compared to the dusky leaf monkey and spent much time moving compare to the leaf monkey group. The spectacled dusky leaf monkey group also has fully utilized the forested areas where else the long-tailed macaques adopted foraging to the adjacent residential colleges.

  15. Complementary subicular pathways to the anterior thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies in the rat and macaque monkey brain.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Kat; Dillingham, Christopher M; Wright, Nicholas F; Saunders, Richard C; Vann, Seralynne D; Aggleton, John P

    2016-04-01

    The origins of the hippocampal (subicular) projections to the anterior thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies were compared in rats and macaque monkeys using retrograde tracers. These projections form core components of the Papez circuit, which is vital for normal memory. The study revealed a complex pattern of subicular efferents, consistent with the presence of different, parallel information streams, whose segregation appears more marked in the rat brain. In both species, the cells projecting to the mammillary bodies and anterior thalamic nuclei showed laminar separation but also differed along other hippocampal axes. In the rat, these diencephalic inputs showed complementary topographies in the proximal-distal (columnar) plane, consistent with differential involvement in object-based (proximal subiculum) and context-based (distal subiculum) information. The medial mammillary inputs, which arose along the anterior-posterior extent of the rat subiculum, favoured the central subiculum (septal hippocampus) and the more proximal subiculum (temporal hippocampus). In contrast, anterior thalamic inputs were largely confined to the dorsal (i.e. septal and intermediate) subiculum, where projections to the anteromedial nucleus favoured the proximal subiculum while those to the anteroventral nucleus predominantly arose in the distal subiculum. In the macaque, the corresponding diencephalic inputs were again distinguished by anterior-posterior topographies, as subicular inputs to the medial mammillary bodies predominantly arose from the posterior hippocampus while subicular inputs to the anteromedial thalamic nucleus predominantly arose from the anterior hippocampus. Unlike the rat, there was no clear evidence of proximal-distal separation as all of these medial diencephalic projections preferentially arose from the more distal subiculum. PMID:26855336

  16. Somato-motor haptic processing in posterior inner perisylvian region (SII/pIC) of the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Fornia, Luca; Grandi, Laura Clara; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Gallese, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    The posterior inner perisylvian region including the secondary somatosensory cortex (area SII) and the adjacent region of posterior insular cortex (pIC) has been implicated in haptic processing by integrating somato-motor information during hand-manipulation, both in humans and in non-human primates. However, motor-related properties during hand-manipulation are still largely unknown. To investigate a motor-related activity in the hand region of SII/pIC, two macaque monkeys were trained to perform a hand-manipulation task, requiring 3 different grip types (precision grip, finger exploration, side grip) both in light and in dark conditions. Our results showed that 70% (n = 33/48) of task related neurons within SII/pIC were only activated during monkeys' active hand-manipulation. Of those 33 neurons, 15 (45%) began to discharge before hand-target contact, while the remaining neurons were tonically active after contact. Thirty-percent (n = 15/48) of studied neurons responded to both passive somatosensory stimulation and to the motor task. A consistent percentage of task-related neurons in SII/pIC was selectively activated during finger exploration (FE) and precision grasping (PG) execution, suggesting they play a pivotal role in control skilled finger movements. Furthermore, hand-manipulation-related neurons also responded when visual feedback was absent in the dark. Altogether, our results suggest that somato-motor neurons in SII/pIC likely contribute to haptic processing from the initial to the final phase of grasping and object manipulation. Such motor-related activity could also provide the somato-motor binding principle enabling the translation of diachronic somatosensory inputs into a coherent image of the explored object.

  17. Ventral premotor-motor cortex interactions in the macaque monkey during grasp: response of single neurons to intracortical microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Kraskov, Alexander; Prabhu, Gita; Quallo, Marsha M; Lemon, Roger N; Brochier, Thomas

    2011-06-15

    Recent stimulation studies in monkeys and humans have shown strong interactions between ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and the hand area of primary motor cortex (M1). These short-latency interactions usually involve facilitation from F5 of M1 outputs to hand muscles, although suppression has also been reported. This study, performed in three awake macaque monkeys, sought evidence that these interactions could be mediated by short-latency excitatory and inhibitory responses of single M1 neurons active during grasping tasks. We recorded responses of these M1 neurons to single low-threshold (≤40 μA) intracortical microstimuli delivered to F5 sites at which grasp-related neurons were recorded. In 29 sessions, we tested 232 M1 neurons with stimuli delivered to between one and four sites in F5. Of the 415 responses recorded, 142 (34%) showed significant effects. The most common type of response was pure excitation (53% of responses), with short latency (1.8-3.0 ms) and brief duration (∼1 ms); purely inhibitory responses had slightly longer latencies (2-5 ms) and were of small amplitude and longer duration (5-7 ms). They accounted for 13% of responses, whereas mixed excitation then inhibition was seen in 34%. Remarkably, a rather similar set of findings applied to 280 responses of 138 F5 neurons to M1 stimulation; 109 (34%) responses showed significant effects. Thus, with low-intensity stimuli, the dominant interaction between these two cortical areas is one of short-latency, brief excitation, most likely mediated by reciprocal F5-M1 connections. Some neurons were tested with stimuli at both 20 and 40 μA; inhibition tended to dominate at the higher intensity. PMID:21677165

  18. Background and stimulus-induced patterns of high metabolic activity in the visual cortex (area 17) of the squirrel and macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, A.L.; Hendrickson, A.E.

    1983-02-01

    We have used 2-deoxy-D-(/sup 14/C)glucose (2-DG) autoradiography and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry to examine background and stimulus-induced patterns of metabolic activity in monkey striate cortex. In squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) that binocularly or monocularly viewed diffuse white light or binocularly viewed bars of many orientations and spatial frequencies, 2-DG consumption was not uniform across the cortex but consisted of regularly spaced radial zones of high uptake. The zones extended through all laminae except IVc beta and, when viewed tangentially, formed separate patches 500 microns apart. The cytochrome oxidase stain in these animals also revealed patches of high metabolism which coincided with the 2-DG patches. Squirrel monkeys binocularly viewing vertical stripes showed parallel bands of increased 2-DG uptake in the cortex, while the cytochrome label in these animals remained patchy. When monkeys were kept in the dark during 2-DG exposure, 2-DG-labeled patches were not seen but cytochrome oxidase-positive patches remained. In macaque (Macaca nemestrina) monkeys, binocular stimulation with many orientations and spatial frequencies produced radial zones of high 2-DG uptake in layers I to IVa and VI. When viewed tangentially, these zones formed a dots-in-rows pattern with a spacing of 350 X 500 microns; cytochrome oxidase staining produced an identical pattern. Macaca differed from Saimiri in that monocular stimulation labeled alternate rows. These results indicate that there are radial zones of high background metabolism across squirrel and macaque monkey striate cortex. In Saimiri these zones do not appear to be related to an eye dominance system, while in Macaca they do. The presence of these zones of high metabolism may complicate the interpretation of 2-DG autoradiographs that result from specific visual stimuli.

  19. Functional properties of grasping-related neurons in the dorsal premotor area F2 of the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Raos, Vassilis; Umiltá, Maria-Alessandra; Gallese, Vittorio; Fogassi, Leonardo

    2004-10-01

    We investigated the properties of neurons located in the distal forelimb field of dorsal premotor area F2 of macaque monkey using a behavioral paradigm for studying the neuronal discharge during observation (object fixation condition) and grasping of different 3-dimensional objects with and without visual guidance of the movement (movement in light and movement in dark conditions, respectively). The main result is that almost all studied neurons were selective for both the type of prehension and the wrist orientation required for grasping an object. Three categories of neurons were found: purely motor, visually modulated, and visuomotor neurons. The discharge of purely motor neurons was not affected by either object presentation or by the visual feedback of the hand approaching to and interacting with the object. Visually modulated neurons presented a different discharge in the 2 movement conditions, this determining a decrease in selectivity for the grip and wrist orientation in the movement in dark condition. Visuomotor neurons typically discharged during the object fixation task even in the absence of any grasping movement. Nine of them also displayed a different discharge rate between the 2 movement conditions. Congruence was observed between the neuron response during the most effective type of prehension and the neuron response during observation of the object requiring that particular prehension. These results indicate an important role of F2 in the control of goal-related hand movements. PMID:15163668

  20. Callosally projecting neurons in the macaque monkey V1/V2 border are enriched in nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Ungerleider, L. G.; Adams, M. M.; Webster, M. J.; Gattass, R.; Blumberg, D. M.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies combined with retrograde tracing in macaque monkeys have demonstrated that corticocortical projections can be differentiated by their content of neurofilament protein. The present study analyzed the distribution of nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein in callosally projecting neurons located at the V1/V2 border. All of the retrogradely labeled neurons were located in layer III at the V1/V2 border and at an immediately adjacent zone of area V2. A quantitative analysis showed that the vast majority (almost 95%) of these interhemispheric projection neurons contain neurofilament protein immunoreactivity. This observation differs from data obtained in other sets of callosal connections, including homotypical interhemispheric projections in the prefrontal, temporal, and parietal association cortices, that were found to contain uniformly low proportions of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons. Comparably, highly variable proportions of neurofilament protein-containing neurons have been reported in intrahemispheric corticocortical pathways, including feedforward and feedback visual connections. These results indicate that neurofilament protein is a prominent neurochemical feature that identifies a particular population of interhemispheric projection neurons at the V1/V2 border and suggest that this biochemical attribute may be critical for the function of this subset of callosal neurons.

  1. Neurofilament protein defines regional patterns of cortical organization in the macaque monkey visual system: a quantitative immunohistochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Visual function in monkeys is subserved at the cortical level by a large number of areas defined by their specific physiological properties and connectivity patterns. For most of these cortical fields, a precise index of their degree of anatomical specialization has not yet been defined, although many regional patterns have been described using Nissl or myelin stains. In the present study, an attempt has been made to elucidate the regional characteristics, and to varying degrees boundaries, of several visual cortical areas in the macaque monkey using an antibody to neurofilament protein (SMI32). This antibody labels a subset of pyramidal neurons with highly specific regional and laminar distribution patterns in the cerebral cortex. Based on the staining patterns and regional quantitative analysis, as many as 28 cortical fields were reliably identified. Each field had a homogeneous distribution of labeled neurons, except area V1, where increases in layer IVB cell and in Meynert cell counts paralleled the increase in the degree of eccentricity in the visual field representation. Within the occipitotemporal pathway, areas V3 and V4 and fields in the inferior temporal cortex were characterized by a distinct population of neurofilament-rich neurons in layers II-IIIa, whereas areas located in the parietal cortex and part of the occipitoparietal pathway had a consistent population of large labeled neurons in layer Va. The mediotemporal areas MT and MST displayed a distinct population of densely labeled neurons in layer VI. Quantitative analysis of the laminar distribution of the labeled neurons demonstrated that the visual cortical areas could be grouped in four hierarchical levels based on the ratio of neuron counts between infragranular and supragranular layers, with the first (areas V1, V2, V3, and V3A) and third (temporal and parietal regions) levels characterized by low ratios and the second (areas MT, MST, and V4) and fourth (frontal regions) levels characterized by

  2. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Woodling, Kellie A.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production volume industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 is controversial because of the potential for endocrine disruption, particularly during perinatal development, as suggested by in vitro, experimental animal, and epidemiological studies. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal rhesus monkeys by oral (PND 5, 35, 70) and intravenous injection (PND 77) routes using d6-BPA to avoid sample contamination. The concentration-time profiles observed in adult monkeys following oral administration of 100 {mu}g/kg bw were remarkably similar to those previously reported in human volunteers given a similar dose; moreover, minimal pharmacokinetic differences were observed between neonatal and adult monkeys for the receptor-active aglycone form of BPA. Circulating concentrations of BPA aglycone were quite low following oral administration (< 1% of total), which reflects the redundancy of active UDP-glucuronosyl transferase isoforms in both gut and liver. No age-related changes were seen in internal exposure metrics for aglycone BPA in monkeys, a result clearly different from developing rats where significant inverse age-related changes, based on immaturity of Phase II metabolism and renal excretion, were recently reported. These observations imply that any toxicological effect observed in rats from early postnatal exposures to BPA could over-predict those possible in primates of the same age, based on significantly higher internal exposures and overall immaturity at birth.

  3. Two types of periglomerular cells in the olfactory bulb of the macaque monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Liberia, Teresa; Blasco-Ibáñez, José Miguel; Nácher, Juan; Varea, Emilio; Lanciego, José Luis; Crespo, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) of mammals is the brain region that receives the sensory information coming from the olfactory epithelium. The entrance of the olfactory information occurs in spherical structures of neuropil named olfactory glomeruli and is modulated by a population of interneurons known as periglomerular cells (PG). It has been demonstrated that there are two types of PG in the OB of some macrosmatic mammals, including rats and mice. Type 1 PG (PG-1) receive synapses from the olfactory nerve, whereas type 2 PG (PG-2) do not receive synapses from the olfactory axons. To date, the presence of the two types of PG has not been investigated in microsmatic mammals. In this context, we analyze the presence of PG-1 and PG-2 in the OB of the long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis). For that, we used the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase, the neuronal isoform of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase and the calcium-binding proteins calbindin D-28k and calretinin as neurochemical markers. Our results demonstrate that the OB of the macaque contains PG-1 and PG-2. A subpopulation of PG-1 expresses tyrosine hydroxylase and another expresses the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase. In addition, a subpopulation of PG-2 expresses calbindin D-28k and another expresses calretinin. Double immunofluorescence demonstrates that there is no colocalization of two markers in the same PG. These results mimic those found in macrosmatic animals. The presence of two types of PG in the glomerular circuits seems to be a key principle for the organization of the OB of mammals.

  4. The effect of vertical disparities on depth representation in macaque monkeys: MT physiology and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Syed A.; Christiansen, Daniel L.; Morgan, Michael L.; DeAngelis, Gregory C.

    2008-01-01

    Horizontal binocular disparities provide information about the distance of objects relative to the point of ocular fixation, and must be combined with an estimate of viewing distance in order to recover the egocentric distance of an object. Vergence angle and the gradient of vertical disparities across the visual field are thought to provide independent sources of viewing distance information, based on human behavioral studies. While the effect of vergence angle on horizontal disparity selectivity in early visual cortex has been examined (with mixed results), the effect of the vertical disparity field has not been explored. We manipulated the vertical disparities in a large random-dot stimulus to simulate different viewing distances, and we examined the effect of this manipulation on both the responses of neurons in the middle temporal (MT) area and on the psychophysical performance of the animal in a curvature discrimination task. We report here that alterations to the vertical disparity field have no effect on the horizontal disparity tuning of MT neurons. However, the same manipulation strongly and systematically biases the monkey's judgments of curvature, consistent with previous human studies. We conclude that monkeys, like humans, make use of the vertical disparity field to estimate viewing distance, but that the physiological mechanisms for this effect occur either downstream of MT or in a different pathway. PMID:18077666

  5. The Franco-American macaque experiment. [bone demineralization of monkeys on Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipriano, Leonard F.; Ballard, Rodney W.

    1988-01-01

    The details of studies to be carried out jointly by French and American teams on two rhesus monkeys prepared for future experiments aboard the Space Shuttle are discussed together with the equipment involved. Seven science discipline teams were formed, which will study the effects of flight and/or weightlessness on the bone and calcium metabolism, the behavior, the cardiovascular system, the fluid balance and electrolytes, the muscle system, the neurovestibular interactions, and the sleep/biorhythm cycles. New behavioral training techniques were developed, in which the animals were trained to respond to behavioral tasks in order to measure the parameters involving eye/hand coordination, the response time to target tracking, visual discrimination, and muscle forces used by the animals. A large data set will be obtained from different animals on the two to three Space Shuttle flights; the hardware technologies developed for these experiments will be applied for primate experiments on the Space Station.

  6. Origin and topography of fibers contributing to the fornix in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Richard C; Aggleton, John P

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of neurons contributing to the fornix was mapped by placing the retrograde tracer horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in polyacrylamide gels in different medial to lateral locations within the fornix of three rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). The HRP was placed from 3 to 5 mm caudal to the descending columns of the fornix. Additional information came from a series of rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fasciculata) with anterograde tracer injections in the medial temporal lobe. The hippocampal formation, including the subiculum and presubiculum, together with the entorhinal cortex (EC) and perirhinal cortex (area 35) contribute numerous axons to the fornix in a topographical manner. In contrast, the lateral perirhinal cortex (area 36) and parahippocampal cortical areas TF and TH only contained a handful of cells labeled via the fornix. The medial fornix originates from cells in the caudal half of the subiculum, the lamina principalis interna of the caudal half of the presubiculum, and from the perirhinal cortex (area 35). The intermediate portion of the fornix (i.e., that part midway between the midline and most lateral parts of the fornix) originates from cells in the rostral half of the subiculum and prosubiculum, the anterior presubiculum (only from the lamina principalis externa), the caudal presubiculum (primarily from lamina principalis interna), the rostral half of CA3, the EC (primarily 28I and 28M), and the perirhinal cortex (area 35). The lateral parts of the fornix arise from the rostral EC (28L only) and the most rostral portion of CA3. Subcortically, the medial septum, nucleus of the diagonal band, supramammillary nucleus, lateral hypothalamus, dorsal raphe nucleus, and the thalamic nucleus reuniens all send projections through the fornix, which presumably terminate in the hippocampus and adjacent parahippocampal region. These results not only help to define those regions that project via the fornix, but also reveal those subcortical

  7. Responses of single corticospinal neurons to intracortical stimulation of primary motor and premotor cortex in the anesthetized macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Maier, Marc A; Kirkwood, Peter A; Brochier, Thomas; Lemon, Roger N

    2013-06-01

    The responses of individual primate corticospinal neurons to localized electrical stimulation of primary motor (M1) and of ventral premotor cortex (area F5) are poorly documented. To rectify this and to study interactions between responses from these areas, we recorded corticospinal axons, identified by pyramidal tract stimulation, in the cervical spinal cord of three chloralose-anesthetized macaque monkeys. Single stimuli (≤400 μA) were delivered to the hand area of M1 or F5 through intracortical microwire arrays. Only 14/112 (13%) axons showed responses to M1 stimuli that indicated direct intracortical activation of corticospinal neurons (D-responses); no D-responses were seen from F5. In contrast, 62 axons (55%) exhibited consistent later responses to M1 stimulation, corresponding to indirect activation (I-responses), showing that single-pulse intracortical stimulation of motor areas can result in trans-synaptic activation of a high proportion of the corticospinal output. A combined latency histogram of all axon responses was nonperiodic, clearly different from the periodic surface-recorded corticospinal volleys. This was readily explained by correcting for conduction velocities of individual axons. D-responding axons, taken as originating in neurons close to the M1 stimulating electrodes, showed more I-responses from M1 than those without a D-response, and 8/10 of these axons also responded to F5 stimulation. Altogether, 33% of tested axons responded to F5 stimulation, most of which also showed I-responses from M1. These excitatory effects are in keeping with facilitation of hand muscles evoked from F5 being relayed via M1. This was further demonstrated by facilitation of test responses from M1 by conditioning F5 stimuli. PMID:23536718

  8. White Matter Neurons in Young Adult and Aged Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Farzad; Wang, Xiyue; Rosene, Douglas L.; Rockland, Kathleen S.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and non-human primates (NHP), white matter neurons (WMNs) persist beyond early development. Their functional importance is largely unknown, but they have both corticothalamic and corticocortical connectivity and at least one subpopulation has been implicated in vascular regulation and sleep. Several other studies have reported that the density of WMNs in humans is altered in neuropathological or psychiatric conditions. The present investigation evaluates and compares the density of superficial and deep WMNs in frontal (FR), temporal (TE), and parietal (Par) association regions of four young adult and four aged male rhesus monkeys. A major aim was to determine whether there was age-related neuronal loss, as might be expected given the substantial age-related changes known to occur in the surrounding white matter environment. Neurons were visualized by immunocytochemistry for Neu-N in coronal tissue sections (30 μm thickness), and neuronal density was assessed by systematic random sampling. Per 0.16 mm2 sampling box, this yielded about 40 neurons in the superficial WM and 10 in the deep WM. Consistent with multiple studies of cell density in the cortical gray matter of normal brains, neither the superficial nor deep WM populations showed statistically significant age-related neuronal loss, although we observed a moderate decrease with age for the deep WMNs in the frontal region. Morphometric analyses, in contrast, showed significant age effects in soma size and circularity. In specific, superficial WMNs were larger in FR and Par WM regions of the young monkeys; but in the TE, these were larger in the older monkeys. An age effect was also observed for soma circularity: superficial WMNs were more circular in FR and Par of the older monkeys. This second, morphometric result raises the question of whether other age-related morphological, connectivity, or molecular changes occur in the WMNs. These could have multiple impacts, given the wide range of putative

  9. Fasting induced kisspeptin signaling suppression is regulated by glutamate mediated cues in adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Shamas, Shazia; Khan, Saeed-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Muhammad Yousaf; Shabbir, Nadia; Zubair, Hira; Shafqat, Saira; Wahab, Fazal; Shahab, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Kisspeptin signaling is suppressed by short term fasting. It has been reported that hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression decreased after 48h of fasting in male rhesus monkey. But the mechanism involved in the reduction of kisspeptin signaling after 48h of fasting is unknown. Recent studies have suggested the role of afferent excitatory and inhibitory pathways in the regulation of kisspeptin neurons. Therefore, this study was designed to observe the changes in the glutamate and GABA signaling during fed and 48h fasting states by performing immunofluorescence to examine the interaction of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors and by performing SYBR green qRT-PCR to measure and quantify the levels of Kiss1, Kiss1r, NR1 and GAD67 mRNA in the POA and MBH of adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) during 48h of fasting (n=2) and fed ad libitum (n=2). Plasma testosterone (p<0.05) and blood glucose levels were significantly (p<0.001) decreased after short term fasting. Our results clearly showed that expression of hypothalamic Kiss1, Kiss1r and NR1 mRNA was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in adult male rhesus monkeys which were fasted for 48h as compared to those which were fed ad libitum. There was no clear difference in the GAD67 mRNA contents between the two groups. Number of kisspeptin neurons and the interactions of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 were significantly (p<0.05) reduced after 48h fasting. These observations suggest that decreased kisspeptin signaling during fasting may occur due to reduction in glutamatergic inputs to kisspeptin neurons. Our results also suggest that fasting induced suppression of kisspeptin signaling is not mediated through GABAergic neurons.

  10. Fasting induced kisspeptin signaling suppression is regulated by glutamate mediated cues in adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Shamas, Shazia; Khan, Saeed-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Muhammad Yousaf; Shabbir, Nadia; Zubair, Hira; Shafqat, Saira; Wahab, Fazal; Shahab, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Kisspeptin signaling is suppressed by short term fasting. It has been reported that hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression decreased after 48h of fasting in male rhesus monkey. But the mechanism involved in the reduction of kisspeptin signaling after 48h of fasting is unknown. Recent studies have suggested the role of afferent excitatory and inhibitory pathways in the regulation of kisspeptin neurons. Therefore, this study was designed to observe the changes in the glutamate and GABA signaling during fed and 48h fasting states by performing immunofluorescence to examine the interaction of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors and by performing SYBR green qRT-PCR to measure and quantify the levels of Kiss1, Kiss1r, NR1 and GAD67 mRNA in the POA and MBH of adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) during 48h of fasting (n=2) and fed ad libitum (n=2). Plasma testosterone (p<0.05) and blood glucose levels were significantly (p<0.001) decreased after short term fasting. Our results clearly showed that expression of hypothalamic Kiss1, Kiss1r and NR1 mRNA was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in adult male rhesus monkeys which were fasted for 48h as compared to those which were fed ad libitum. There was no clear difference in the GAD67 mRNA contents between the two groups. Number of kisspeptin neurons and the interactions of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 were significantly (p<0.05) reduced after 48h fasting. These observations suggest that decreased kisspeptin signaling during fasting may occur due to reduction in glutamatergic inputs to kisspeptin neurons. Our results also suggest that fasting induced suppression of kisspeptin signaling is not mediated through GABAergic neurons. PMID:26138506

  11. Behavioural Profiles in Captive-Bred Cynomolgus Macaques: Towards Monkey Models of Mental Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Sandrine M. J.; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Li, Qin; Hausberger, Martine; Bezard, Erwan

    2013-01-01

    Background To date, experimental and preclinical studies on neuropsychiatric conditions have almost exclusively been performed in experimentally-induced animal models and have only rarely relied upon an ethological approach where animals have been observed in more naturalistic settings. The laboratory species of choice has been the rodent while the potential of more closely-related non-human primates have remained largely underexplored. Methods The present study, therefore, aimed at investigating the possible existence of spontaneous atypical/abnormal behaviours displayed by 40 cynomolgus macaques in captive conditions using an unbiased ethological scan-sampling analysis followed by multifactorial correspondence analysis and a hierarchical clustering. Results The study identified five distinct profiles (groups A to E) that significantly differed on several behaviours, body postures, body orientations, gaze directions and locations in the cage environment. We suggest that animals from the low n groups (D and E) present depressive-like and anxious-like symptoms, reminiscent of depressive and generalized anxiety disorders. Inter-individual differences were highlighted through unbiased ethological observations of spontaneous behaviours and associated parameters, although these were not associated with differences in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid levels of either stress-related hormones or monoamines, i.e. in accordance with the human situation. Conclusions No interventional behavioural testing was required to discriminate between 3 typical and 2 atypical ethologically-defined behavioural profiles, reminiscent of certain depressive-like and anxiety-like symptoms. The use of unbiased behavioural observations might, thus, allow the identification of animal models of human mental/behavioural disorders and their most appropriate control groups. PMID:23658620

  12. Induction of immune response in macaque monkeys infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus having the TNF-{alpha} gene at an early stage of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Yuya; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Ibuki, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hajime; Kaneyasu, Kentaro; Goto, Yoshitaka; Hayami, Masanori; Miura, Tomoyuki; Haga, Takeshi . E-mail: a0d518u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-20

    TNF-{alpha} has been implicated in the pathogenesis of, and the immune response against, HIV-1 infection. To clarify the roles of TNF-{alpha} against HIV-1-related virus infection in an SHIV-macaque model, we genetically engineered an SHIV to express the TNF-{alpha} gene (SHIV-TNF) and characterized the virus's properties in vivo. After the acute viremic stage, the plasma viral loads declined earlier in the SHIV-TNF-inoculated monkeys than in the parental SHIV (SHIV-NI)-inoculated monkeys. SHIV-TNF induced cell death in the lymph nodes without depletion of circulating CD4{sup +} T cells. SHIV-TNF provided some immunity in monkeys by increasing the production of the chemokine RANTES and by inducing an antigen-specific proliferation of lymphocytes. The monkeys immunized with SHIV-TNF were partly protected against a pathogenic SHIV (SHIV-C2/1) challenge. These findings suggest that TNF-{alpha} contributes to the induction of an effective immune response against HIV-1 rather than to the progression of disease at the early stage of infection.

  13. Representation of perceptually invisible image motion in extrastriate visual area MT of macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hohl, Sonja S; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2011-11-16

    Why does the world appear stable despite the visual motion induced by eye movements during fixation? We find that the answer must reside in how visual motion signals are interpreted by perception, because MT neurons in monkeys respond to the image motion caused by eye drifts in the presence of a stationary stimulus. Several features suggest a visual origin for the responses of MT neurons during fixation: spike-triggered averaging yields a peak image velocity in the preferred direction that precedes spikes by ∼60 ms; image velocity during fixation and firing rate show similar peaks in power at 4-5 Hz; and average MT firing during a period of fixation is related monotonically to the image speed along the preferred axis of the neurons 60 ms earlier. The percept caused by the responses of MT neurons during fixation depends on the distribution of activity across the population of neurons of different preferred speeds. For imposed stimulus motion, the population response peaks for neurons that prefer the actual target speed. For small image motions caused by eye drifts during fixation, the population response is large, but is noisy and does not show a clear peak. This representation of image motion in MT would be ignored if perception interprets the population response in the context of a prior of zero speed. Then, we would see a stable scene despite MT responses caused by eye drifts during fixation. PMID:22090483

  14. Effect of habitat quality on diet flexibility in Barbary macaques.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Nelly; Motsch, Peggy; Delahaye, Alexia; Saintvanne, Alice; Le Flohic, Guillaume; Dupé, Sandrine; Vallet, Dominique; Qarro, Mohamed; Tattou, Mohamed Ibn; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-07-01

    Barbary macaques live in extreme temperate environments characterized by strongly seasonal resource availability. They are mainly terrestrial while foraging, harvesting food from the herbaceous layer. These monkeys are threatened mainly because of anthropogenic habitat degradation. We studied the adaptive capacities of wild groups of Barbary macaques that lived in different cedar forests undergoing varying extents of grazing pressure from domestic livestock. In all three sites, diet varied seasonally. Heavy grazing led to a significant decrease in herbaceous production and species richness. As a consequence, the monkeys' diet in this poor habitat showed a decreased plant species richness. Moreover, it incorporated fewer above-ground herbaceous resources, and a greater proportion of subterranean resources (especially hypogeous fungi and subterranean invertebrates such as earthworms, eggs and adults of earwigs, and ant's larvae) than the diet of monkeys inhabiting ungrazed forest. Cedar bark, cedar strobiles, earthworms, and earwigs were part of the monkeys' diet only in grazed forest. Monkeys in heavily grazed forest compensated for a lack of herbaceous foods by eating subterranean foods preferentially to tree and shrub products. The foods they consumed take longer to harvest and process than the seeds or leaves consumed by Barbary macaques in less heavily grazed forest habitats. Our results suggest that monkeys do differ in their diets according to the degree of habitat change induced by human activities. They also highlight the dietary flexibility of Barbary macaques as a key element that allows them to cope with degraded habitats. We later compare the dietary adjustments of Barbary macaques facing environmental change to dietary strategies of other macaques and temperate-zone primates.

  15. Effect of habitat quality on diet flexibility in Barbary macaques.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Nelly; Motsch, Peggy; Delahaye, Alexia; Saintvanne, Alice; Le Flohic, Guillaume; Dupé, Sandrine; Vallet, Dominique; Qarro, Mohamed; Tattou, Mohamed Ibn; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-07-01

    Barbary macaques live in extreme temperate environments characterized by strongly seasonal resource availability. They are mainly terrestrial while foraging, harvesting food from the herbaceous layer. These monkeys are threatened mainly because of anthropogenic habitat degradation. We studied the adaptive capacities of wild groups of Barbary macaques that lived in different cedar forests undergoing varying extents of grazing pressure from domestic livestock. In all three sites, diet varied seasonally. Heavy grazing led to a significant decrease in herbaceous production and species richness. As a consequence, the monkeys' diet in this poor habitat showed a decreased plant species richness. Moreover, it incorporated fewer above-ground herbaceous resources, and a greater proportion of subterranean resources (especially hypogeous fungi and subterranean invertebrates such as earthworms, eggs and adults of earwigs, and ant's larvae) than the diet of monkeys inhabiting ungrazed forest. Cedar bark, cedar strobiles, earthworms, and earwigs were part of the monkeys' diet only in grazed forest. Monkeys in heavily grazed forest compensated for a lack of herbaceous foods by eating subterranean foods preferentially to tree and shrub products. The foods they consumed take longer to harvest and process than the seeds or leaves consumed by Barbary macaques in less heavily grazed forest habitats. Our results suggest that monkeys do differ in their diets according to the degree of habitat change induced by human activities. They also highlight the dietary flexibility of Barbary macaques as a key element that allows them to cope with degraded habitats. We later compare the dietary adjustments of Barbary macaques facing environmental change to dietary strategies of other macaques and temperate-zone primates. PMID:24573596

  16. Elimination of Schistosoma mansoni Adult Worms by Rhesus Macaques: Basis for a Therapeutic Vaccine?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R. Alan; Langermans, Jan A. M.; van Dam, Govert J.; Vervenne, Richard A.; Hall, Stephanie L.; Borges, William C.; Dillon, Gary P.; Thomas, Alan W.; Coulson, Patricia S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Among animal models of schistosomiasis, the rhesus macaque is unique in that an infection establishes but egg excretion rapidly diminishes, potentially due to loss of adult worms from the portal system via shunts or death by immune attack. Principal Findings To investigate this, six rhesus macaques were exposed to Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and the infection monitored until portal perfusion at 18 weeks. Despite a wide variation in worm numbers recovered, fecal egg output and circulating antigen levels indicated that a substantial population had established in all animals. Half the macaques had portal hypertension but only one had portacaval shunts, ruling out translocation to the lungs as the reason for loss of adult burden. Many worms had a shrunken and pallid appearance, with degenerative changes in intestines and reproductive organs. Tegument, gut epithelia and muscles appeared cytologically intact but the parenchyma was virtually devoid of content. An early and intense IgG production correlated with low worm burden at perfusion, and blood-feeding worms cultured in the presence of serum from these animals had stunted growth. Using immunoproteomics, gut digestive enzymes, tegument surface hydrolases and antioxidant enzymes were identified as targets of IgG in the high responder animals. Significance It appears that worms starve to death after cessation of blood feeding, as a result of antibody-mediated processes. We suggest that proteins in the three categories above, formulated to trigger the appropriate mechanisms operating in rhesus macaques, would have both prophylactic and therapeutic potential as a human vaccine. PMID:18820739

  17. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 shows different patterns of localization within the parallel visual pathways in macaque and squirrel monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shostak, Yuri; Wenger, Ashley; Mavity-Hudson, Julia; Casagrande, Vivien A

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is used as an excitatory neurotransmitter by the koniocellular (K), magnocellular (M), and parvocellular (P) pathways to transfer signals from the primate lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) to primary visual cortex (V1). Glutamate acts through both fast ionotropic receptors, which appear to carry the main sensory message, and slower, modulatory metabotropic receptors (mGluRs). In this study, we asked whether mGluR5 relates in distinct ways to the K, M, and P LGN axons in V1. To answer this question, we used light microscopic immunocytochemistry and preembedding electron microscopic immunogold labeling to determine the localization of mGluR5 within the layers of V1 in relation to the K, M, and P pathways in macaque and squirrel monkeys. These pathways were labeled separately via wheat germ agglutinin–horseradish peroxidase (WGA–HRP) injections targeting the LGN layers. mGluR5 is of interest because it: 1) has been shown to be expressed in the thalamic input layers; 2) appears to be responsible for some types of oscillatory firing, which could be important in the binding of visual features; and 3) has been associated with a number of sensory-motor gating-related pathologies, including schizophrenia and autism. Our results demonstrated the presence of mGluR5 in the neuropil of all V1 layers. This protein was lowest in IVCα (M input) and the infragranular layers. In layer IVC, mGluR5 also was found postsynaptic to about 30% of labeled axons, but the distribution was uneven, such that postsynaptic mGluR5 label tended to occur opposite smaller (presumed P), and not larger (presumed M) axon terminals. Only in the K pathway in layer IIIB, however, was mGluR5 always found in the axon terminals themselves. The presence of mGluR5 in K axons and not in M and P axons, and the presence of mGluR5 postsynaptic mainly to smaller P and not larger M axons suggest that the response to the release of glutamate is modulated in distinct ways within and between the parallel

  18. Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) mothers huddle with their young offspring instead of adult females for thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masataka; Nakamichi, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    It is unclear whom animals select to huddle with for thermoregulation. In this study, we investigated whom Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) mothers huddled with-their young offspring or other adult group members-when there is need for thermoregulation. We used a focal-animal sampling method, targeting 17 females at Katsuyama, Okayama Prefecture, Japan. A majority of huddling among adult females was recorded during winter season (December, January, and February). Females who had young (0- or 1-year-old) offspring huddled less frequently with other adult females compared to females who did not have young offspring in winter. However, including young offspring, the frequency of huddling with any other individuals did not differ by whether females had young offspring. Moreover, the females who did not have young offspring huddled with other adult females more often in cloudy than in sunny weather during winter season. In contrast, females who had young offspring increased huddling with their young offspring in cloudy than in sunny weather, but did not do so with other adult females. This study indicates that Japanese macaque mothers huddle with their young offspring instead of other adult females when there is need for thermoregulation.

  19. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Tim; Mallow, Johannes; Plaumann, Markus; Luchtmann, Michael; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF) is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx) and a phased array coil for receive (Rx) tightly enclosing the monkey’s head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW) excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI. Methods The TW Primate System (TWPS) uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil. Results The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired. Conclusion The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system. PMID:26066653

  20. Rotational Displacement Skills in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Kelly D.; Santos, Laurie R.

    2016-01-01

    Rotational displacement tasks, in which participants must track an object at a hiding location within an array while the array rotates, exhibit a puzzling developmental pattern in humans. Human children take an unusually long time to master this task and tend to solve rotational problems through the use of nongeometric features or landmarks as opposed to other kinds of spatial cues. We investigated whether these developmental characteristics are unique to humans by testing rotational displacement skills in a monkey species, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), using a looking-time method. Monkeys first saw food hidden in two differently colored boxes within an array. The array was then rotated 180° and the boxes reopened to reveal the food in an expected or unexpected location. Our first two experiments explored the developmental time-course of performance on this rotational displacement task. We found that adult macaques looked longer at the unexpected event, but such performance was not mirrored in younger-aged macaques. In a third study, we systematically varied featural information and visible access to the array to investigate which strategies adult macaques used in solving rotational displacements. Our results show that adult macaques need both sets of information to solve the task. Taken together, these results suggest both similarities and differences in mechanisms by which human and nonhuman primates develop this spatial skill. PMID:22866770

  1. [Comparisons of aggressive behavior for Tibetan Macaques (Macaca thibetana) to tourists from Mt. Huangshan, China].

    PubMed

    Ji, Huan; Li, Jin-Hua; Sun, Bing-Hua; Zhu, Yong

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between monkey-human aggressive behaviors and age/sex classes of monkey (initiator) and human (recipient), by using all-occurrence sampling and continuous recording, we evaluated the monkey-human aggressive behaviors between macaques (Macaca thibetana) and tourists at Mt. Huangshan in two periods (Nov.-Dec.2008 and Apr.-May 2009). After we divide the aggression into three types according to the dangerous level to tourists, some significant patterns were observed.Our observations indicate that Tibetan macaques respond differently to human according to the age/sex classes involved. On one hand, We found that the adult male monkeys tend to be more aggressive than expected (P<0.01), while the adult female monkeys and immature monkeys participated in AGIII behaviors (threat) less than expected (P<0.01); On the other hand, The adult male human received more aggressive behaviors than expected (P<0.01), while the adult female human and child received less aggressive in AGIII behaviors (threat) (P<0.01). Our results provide not only a scientific basis for the management advice that adult male monkeys and adult male human should be given special attention, but also a good management model of Huangshan for other primate tourist exploring places. PMID:20740706

  2. Adrenergic responsiveness is reduced, while baseline cardiac function is preserved in old adult conscious monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, N.; Kiuchi, K.; Shen, Y. T.; Vatner, S. F.; Vatner, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    To examine the physiological deficit to adrenergic stimulation with aging, five younger adult (3 +/- 1 yr old) and nine older adult (17 +/- 1 yr old) healthy monkeys were studied after instrumentation with a left ventricular (LV) pressure gauge, aortic and left atrial catheters, and aortic flow probes to measure cardiac output directly. There were no significant changes in baseline hemodynamics in conscious older monkeys. For example, an index of contractility, the first derivative of LV pressure (LV dP/dt) was similar (3,191 +/- 240, young vs. 3,225 +/- 71 mmHg/s, old) as well as in isovolumic relaxation, tau (24.3 +/- 1.7 ms, young vs. 23.0 +/- 1.0 ms, old) was similar. However, inotropic, lusitropic, and chronotropic responses to isoproterenol (Iso; 0.1 micrograms/kg), norepinephrine (NE; 0.4 micrograms/kg), and forskolin (For; 75 nmol/kg) were significantly (P < 0.05) depressed in older monkeys. For example. Iso increased LV dP/dt by by 146 +/- 14% in younger monkeys and by only 70 +/- 5% in older monkeys. Iso also reduced tau more in younger monkeys (-28 +/- 7%) compared with older monkeys (-13 +/- 3%). Furthermore, peripheral vascular responsiveness to Iso, NE, For, and phenylephrine (PE; 5 micrograms/kg) was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in older monkeys. For example, phenylephrine (5 micrograms/kg) increased total peripheral resistence by 69 +/- 4% in younger monkeys and by only 45 +/- 3% in older monkeys. Thus in older monkeys without associated cardiovascular disease, baseline hemodynamics are preserved, but adrenergic receptor responsiveness is reduced systemically, not just in the heart.

  3. Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhenhua; Wang, Jiayin; Zhu, Wanwan; Guan, Yunqian; Zou, Chunlin; Chen, Zhiguo; Zhang, Y. Alex

    2011-12-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown potential clinical utility in cell therapy and tissue engineering, due to their ability to proliferate as well as to differentiate into multiple lineages, including osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic specifications. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the safety of MSCs while extensive expansion ex vivo is a prerequisite to obtain the cell numbers for cell transplantation. Here we show that MSCs derived from adult cynomolgus monkey can undergo spontaneous transformation following in vitro culture. In comparison with MSCs, the spontaneously transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) display significantly different growth pattern and morphology, reminiscent of the characteristics of tumor cells. Importantly, TMCs are highly tumorigenic, causing subcutaneous tumors when injected into NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, no multiple differentiation potential of TMCs is observed in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that spontaneously transformed adult stem cells may not necessarily turn into cancer stem cells. These data indicate a direct transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs into tumor cells following long-term expansion in vitro. The spontaneous transformation of the cultured cynomolgus monkey MSCs may have important implications for ongoing clinical trials and for models of oncogenesis, thus warranting a more strict assessment of MSCs prior to cell therapy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells lack multipotency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells are highly tumorigenic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells do not have the characteristics of cancer stem cells.

  4. Histological features of layers and sublayers in cortical visual areas V1 and V2 of chimpanzees, macaque monkeys, and humans

    PubMed Central

    Balaram, Pooja; Young, Nicole A.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2015-01-01

    The layers and sublayers of primary visual cortex, or V1, in primates are easily distinguishable compared to those in other cortical areas, and are especially distinct in anthropoid primates – monkeys, apes, and humans – where they also vary in histological appearance. This variation in primate-specific specialization has led to a longstanding confusion over the identity of layer 4 and its proposed sublayers in V1. As the application of different histological markers relate to the issue of defining and identifying layers and sublayers, we applied four traditional and four more recent histological markers to brain sections of V1 and adjoining secondary visual cortex (V2) in macaque monkeys, chimpanzees, and humans in order to compare identifiable layers and sublayers in both cortical areas across these species. The use of Nissl, neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN), Gallyas myelin, cytochrome oxidase (CO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), nonphosphorylated neurofilament H (SMI-32), parvalbumin (PV), and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) preparations support the conclusion that the most popular scheme of V1 lamination, that of Brodmann, misidentifies sublayers of layer 3 (3Bβ and 3C) as sublayers of layer 4 (4A and 4B), and that the specialized sublayer of layer 3 in monkeys, 3Bβ, is not present in humans. These differences in interpretation are important as they relate to the proposed functions of layer 4 in primate species, where layer 4 of V1 is a layer that receives and processes information from the visual thalamus, and layer 3 is a layer that transforms and distributes information to other cortical areas. PMID:25788835

  5. The effect of housing and environmental enrichment on stereotyped behavior of adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops).

    PubMed

    Seier, Jürgen; de Villiers, Charon; van Heerden, Joritha; Laubscher, Ria

    2011-06-21

    Little information is available on the response of vervet monkeys to different housing conditions or on the suitability of enrichment devices or methods for vervet monkeys. In this study, the authors evaluated the occurrence of stereotyped behavior in adult vervet monkeys under various conditions of housing and enrichment. The variables included cage size, cage level (upper or lower), enrichment with a foraging log, enrichment with an exercise cage and presence of a mate. The authors first determined the incidence of stereotyped behavior in captive-bred, singly housed adult female and male vervet monkeys. They then exposed monkeys to different housing and enrichment situations and compared the incidence of stereotyped behavior among the monkeys. The authors found that more females than males engaged in stereotyped behavior and that females, on average, engaged in such behavior for longer periods of time than males. Stereotyped behavior was most often associated with a small, single cage. The average amount of observed stereotyped activity in monkeys housed in a small cage was significantly lower when the monkeys had access to either a foraging log or an exercise cage. Stereotyped behavior was also lower in female monkeys that were housed (either with a male or without a male) in a larger cage. The least amount of abnormal behavior was associated with the largest, most complex and enriched housing situation. Males and females housed in cages on the lower level of two-level housing engaged in more stereotyped behavior than did monkeys housed in the upper level, regardless of the presence or type of enrichment provided.

  6. Early life stress affects cerebral glucose metabolism in adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Parr, Lisa A; Boudreau, Matthew; Hecht, Erin; Winslow, James T; Nemeroff, Charles B; Sánchez, Mar M

    2012-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for anxiety, mood disorders and alterations in stress responses. Less is known about the long-term neurobiological impact of ELS. We used [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) to assess neural responses to a moderate stress test in adult monkeys that experienced ELS as infants. Both groups of monkeys showed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress-induced activations and cardiac arousal in response to the stressor. A whole brain analysis detected significantly greater regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) in superior temporal sulcus, putamen, thalamus, and inferotemporal cortex of ELS animals compared to controls. Region of interest (ROI) analyses performed in areas identified as vulnerable to ELS showed greater activity in the orbitofrontal cortex of ELS compared to control monkeys, but greater hippocampal activity in the control compared to ELS monkeys. Together, these results suggest hyperactivity in emotional and sensory processing regions of adult monkeys with ELS, and greater activity in stress-regulatory areas in the controls. Despite these neural responses, no group differences were detected in neuroendocrine, autonomic or behavioral responses, except for a trend towards increased stillness in the ELS monkeys. Together, these data suggest hypervigilance in the ELS monkeys in the absence of immediate danger. PMID:22682736

  7. Decrease in hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r expression: a potential mechanism for fasting-induced suppression of the HPG axis in the adult male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Wahab, F; Ullah, F; Chan, Y-M; Seminara, S B; Shahab, M

    2011-02-01

    Fasting suppresses functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. In 2003, hypothalamic kisspeptin-Kiss1r signaling was discovered to play a significant role in regulating the HPG axis. We have recently shown that in adult male macaques, short-term fasting attenuates the response of the HPG axis to an exogenous kisspeptin challenge. In the present study, we explored the mechanism underlying this attenuated response by examining the modulation of the hypothalamic expression of KISS1 and KISS1R under short-term fasting and normal feeding conditions in the adult male macaques. Hypothalamic mRNA was extracted from normal fed (n=3) and 48-h fasted (n=3) monkeys. KISS1, KISS1R, and GNRH1 mRNA were quantified by reverse transcription followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, blood samples were collected for measurement of plasma concentrations of glucose, cortisol, leptin, and testosterone. In contrast to fed animals, plasma glucose, leptin, and testosterone levels decreased and cortisol levels increased in fasted animals. The hypothalamic expression of KISS1 and KISS1R mRNA was significantly lower (p<0.05) in fasted monkeys compared to fed monkeys while hypothalamic GNRH1 mRNA expression was comparable between the 2 groups. Thus, our results demonstrate that expression of hypothalamic KISS1 and KISS1R decrease after a short-term fasting in monkeys. This decrease may contribute to the suppression of the HPG axis during fasting conditions in primates. In addition, our finding of lower expression of KISS1R in fasted monkeys provides an explanation for the attenuation in the HPG axis response to peripheral kisspeptin challenge during short-term fasting.

  8. Seasonality of adult male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata): androgens and behavior in a confined troop.

    PubMed

    Rostal, D C; Glick, B B; Eaton, G G; Resko, J A

    1986-12-01

    Seasonal variations in levels of serum testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), reproductive behavior, and social behavior were investigated in 12 adult males (5 to 20+ years of age) of the Oregon troop of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). Blood samples were collected at 2- to 4-month intervals, and behaviors were monitored twice weekly over a 15-month period. Significant seasonal variations in levels of testosterone and DHT, and in frequencies of mount series, ejaculations, number of female partners, displays, courtship, and aggression were observed. Seasonal variations in reproductive and social behaviors did not correlate with seasonal variations in androgen levels because seasonal increases in these behaviors followed seasonal increases in the androgens with a 1- to 2-month delay. However, significant correlations between increased androgen levels and the onset of mating activity occur when mean monthly frequencies of mount series are shifted 1 to 2 months earlier to coincide with the rise in serum androgen levels. The frequency of adult male play and male-male mounting increased significantly when androgen levels were low. We suggest that photoperiod changes may function as a proximate cue in male Japanese macaques which induces a state of biological readiness for mating, and the behavioral consequences (i.e., mating) are then dependent upon the presence of receptive females.

  9. Cognitive control functions of anterior cingulate cortex in macaque monkeys performing a Wisconsin Card Sorting Test analog.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Masaru; Mansouri, Farshad A; Buckley, Mark J; Tanaka, Keiji

    2014-05-28

    Monkeys were trained to select one of three targets by matching in color or matching in shape to a sample. Because the matching rule frequently changed and there were no cues for the currently relevant rule, monkeys had to maintain the relevant rule in working memory to select the correct target. We found that monkeys' error commission was not limited to the period after the rule change and occasionally occurred even after several consecutive correct trials, indicating that the task was cognitively demanding. In trials immediately after such error trials, monkeys' speed of selecting targets was slower. Additionally, in trials following consecutive correct trials, the monkeys' target selections for erroneous responses were slower than those for correct responses. We further found evidence for the involvement of the cortex in the anterior cingulate sulcus (ACCs) in these error-related behavioral modulations. First, ACCs cell activity differed between after-error and after-correct trials. In another group of ACCs cells, the activity differed depending on whether the monkeys were making a correct or erroneous decision in target selection. Second, bilateral ACCs lesions significantly abolished the response slowing both in after-error trials and in error trials. The error likelihood in after-error trials could be inferred by the error feedback in the previous trial, whereas the likelihood of erroneous responses after consecutive correct trials could be monitored only internally. These results suggest that ACCs represent both context-dependent and internally detected error likelihoods and promote modes of response selections in situations that involve these two types of error likelihood.

  10. Cognitive Control Functions of Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Macaque Monkeys Performing a Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Analog

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Masaru; Mansouri, Farshad A.; Buckley, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Monkeys were trained to select one of three targets by matching in color or matching in shape to a sample. Because the matching rule frequently changed and there were no cues for the currently relevant rule, monkeys had to maintain the relevant rule in working memory to select the correct target. We found that monkeys' error commission was not limited to the period after the rule change and occasionally occurred even after several consecutive correct trials, indicating that the task was cognitively demanding. In trials immediately after such error trials, monkeys' speed of selecting targets was slower. Additionally, in trials following consecutive correct trials, the monkeys' target selections for erroneous responses were slower than those for correct responses. We further found evidence for the involvement of the cortex in the anterior cingulate sulcus (ACCs) in these error-related behavioral modulations. First, ACCs cell activity differed between after-error and after-correct trials. In another group of ACCs cells, the activity differed depending on whether the monkeys were making a correct or erroneous decision in target selection. Second, bilateral ACCs lesions significantly abolished the response slowing both in after-error trials and in error trials. The error likelihood in after-error trials could be inferred by the error feedback in the previous trial, whereas the likelihood of erroneous responses after consecutive correct trials could be monitored only internally. These results suggest that ACCs represent both context-dependent and internally detected error likelihoods and promote modes of response selections in situations that involve these two types of error likelihood. PMID:24872558

  11. Opposing effects of amygdala and orbital prefrontal cortex lesions on the extinction of instrumental responding in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Murray, Elisabeth A

    2005-11-01

    Extinction is a well-known behavioural phenomenon that allows organisms to respond flexibly to a changing environment. Although recent work implicates the amygdala and orbital prefrontal cortex (PFo) in extinction of Pavlovian conditioned fear and aversion, much less is known about the neural bases of instrumental extinction. To explore the contribution of the macaque amygdala to flexible responding in the face of changing reward contingency, we tested the effects of selective, excitotoxic lesions of the amygdala on extinction of an instrumental response. For comparison, we evaluated the effects of ablation of PFo on the same task. Amygdala lesions facilitated the extinction of instrumental responses, whereas lesions of PFo had the opposite effect.

  12. Topographically Organized Projection to Posterior Insular Cortex from the Posterior Portion of the Ventral Medial Nucleus (VMpo) in the Long-tailed Macaque Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Craig, A.D. (Bud)

    2014-01-01

    Prior anterograde tracing work identified somatotopically organized lamina I trigemino- and spino-thalamic terminations in a cytoarchitectonically distinct portion of posterolateral thalamus of the macaque monkey, named the posterior part of the ventral medial nucleus (VMpo; Craig, 2004b). Microelectrode recordings from clusters of selectively thermoreceptive or nociceptive neurons were used to guide precise micro-injections of various tracers in VMpo. A prior report (Craig and Zhang, 2006) described retrograde tracing results, which confirmed the selective lamina I input to VMpo and the antero-posterior (head to foot) topography. The present report describes the results of micro-injections of anterograde tracers placed at different levels in VMpo, based on the antero-posterior topographic organization of selectively nociceptive units and clusters over nearly the entire extent of VMpo. Each injection produced dense, patchy terminal labeling in a single coherent field within a distinct granular cortical area centered in the fundus of the superior limiting sulcus. The terminations were distributed with a consistent antero-posterior topography over the posterior half of the superior limiting sulcus. These observations demonstrate a specific VMpo projection area in dorsal posterior insular cortex that provides the basis for a somatotopic representation of selectively nociceptive lamina I spinothalamic activity. These results also identify the VMpo terminal area as the posterior half of interoceptive cortex; the anterior half receives input from the vagal-responsive and gustatory neurons in the basal part of the ventral medial nucleus (VMb). PMID:23853108

  13. Techniques for collecting saliva from awake, unrestrained, adult monkeys for cortisol assay.

    PubMed

    Lutz, C K; Tiefenbacher, S; Jorgensen, M J; Meyer, J S; Novak, M A

    2000-10-01

    Cortisol levels serve as an index of pituitary-adrenal activity in nonhuman primates. In adult monkeys, cortisol is normally measured in blood (typically requiring restraint or sedation) or urine (reflecting a state rather than point estimate). In contrast, saliva collection is less invasive than drawing blood and allows for repeated sampling within a short period of time. Although protocols exist for collecting saliva from young monkeys, these procedures are inadequate for awake, unrestrained adult animals. Our laboratory has developed two methods for collecting saliva from adult rhesus monkeys: a "screen" method, which involves licking screen-covered gauze, and a "pole" method, which involves sucking and chewing on an attached rope. Twenty-three adult male rhesus monkeys were used to evaluate these two methods. After a period of adaptation, saliva samples were collected from 21 of 23 subjects. Saliva collection was faster with the pole than with the screen method (P < 0.01), but the pole method was not suitable for some animals because of their tendency to bite off the attached rope. An analysis of 19 saliva samples revealed a mean cortisol concentration of 0.84 microg/dl (range 0.27-1.77 microg/dl). There was no statistically significant difference in cortisol value between methods used (P > 0.22). The influence of the flavoring on the cortisol assay was tested, and was found to have no significant effect (P > 0.28). Our results indicate that either technique can be used to safely collect saliva from unrestrained adult monkeys. Choice of technique will depend on the proclivities of individual monkeys.

  14. Paternal relatedness and age proximity regulate social relationships among adult female rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Widdig, A; Nürnberg, P; Krawczak, M; Streich, W J; Bercovitch, F B

    2001-11-20

    Kin selection promotes the evolution of social behavior that increases the survival and reproductive success of close relatives. Among primates, maternal kinship frequently coincides with a higher frequency of grooming and agonistic aiding, but the extent to which paternal kinship influences adult female social relationships has not yet been investigated. Here, we examine the effect of both maternal and paternal kinship, as well as age proximity, on affiliative interactions among semifree-ranging adult female rhesus macaques, Macaca mulatta. Kinship was assessed by using both microsatellites and DNA-fingerprinting. Our study confirms that the closest affiliative relationships characterize maternal half-sisters. We provide evidence that adult females are significantly more affiliative with paternal half-sisters than with nonkin. Furthermore, paternal kin discrimination was more pronounced among peers than among nonpeers, indicating that age proximity has an additional regulatory effect on affiliative interactions. We propose that kin discrimination among cercopithecine primates emerges from ontogenetic processes that involve phenotype matching based on shared behavioral traits, such as inherited personality profiles, rather than physiological or physical characteristics.

  15. Representation of Afferent Signals from Forearm Muscle and Cutaneous Nerves in the Primary Somatosensory Cortex of the Macaque Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Tomatsu, Saeka; Takei, Tomohiko; Oya, Tomomichi

    2016-01-01

    Proprioception is one’s overall sense of the relative positions and movements of the various parts of one’s body. The primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is involved in generating the proprioception by receiving peripheral sensory inputs from both cutaneous and muscle afferents. In particular, area 3a receives input from muscle afferents and areas 3b and 1 from cutaneous afferents. However, segregation of two sensory inputs to these cortical areas has not been evaluated quantitatively because of methodological difficulties in distinguishing the incoming signals. To overcome this, we applied electrical stimulation separately to two forearm nerves innervating muscle (deep radial nerve) and skin (superficial radial nerve), and examined the spatiotemporal distribution of sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in SI of anaesthetized macaques. The SEPs arising from the deep radial nerve were observed exclusively at the bottom of central sulcus (CS), which was identified as area 3a using histological reconstruction. In contrast, SEPs evoked by stimulation of the superficial radial nerve were observed in the superficial part of SI, identified as areas 3b and 1. In addition to these earlier, larger potentials, we also found small and slightly delayed SEPs evoked by cutaneous nerve stimulation in area 3a. Coexistence of the SEPs from both deep and superficial radial nerves suggests that area 3a could integrate muscle and cutaneous signals to shape proprioception. PMID:27701434

  16. No evidence for neo-oogenesis may link to ovarian senescence in adult monkey.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jihong; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Mengyuan; Mao, Jian; Yin, Yu; Ye, Xiaoying; Liu, Na; Han, Jihong; Gao, Yingdai; Cheng, Tao; Keefe, David L; Liu, Lin

    2013-11-01

    Female germline or oogonial stem cells transiently residing in fetal ovaries are analogous to the spermatogonial stem cells or germline stem cells (GSCs) in adult testes where GSCs and meiosis continuously renew. Oocytes can be generated in vitro from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, but the existence of GSCs and neo-oogenesis in adult mammalian ovaries is less clear. Preliminary findings of GSCs and neo-oogenesis in mice and humans have not been consistently reproducible. Monkeys provide the most relevant model of human ovarian biology. We searched for GSCs and neo-meiosis in ovaries of adult monkeys at various ages, and compared them with GSCs from adult monkey testis, which are characterized by cytoplasmic staining for the germ cell marker DAZL and nuclear expression of the proliferative markers PCNA and KI67, and pluripotency-associated genes LIN28 and SOX2, and lack of nuclear LAMIN A, a marker for cell differentiation. Early meiocytes undergo homologous pairing at prophase I distinguished by synaptonemal complex lateral filaments with telomere perinuclear distribution. By exhaustive searching using comprehensive experimental approaches, we show that proliferative GSCs and neo-meiocytes by these specific criteria were undetectable in adult mouse and monkey ovaries. However, we found proliferative nongermline somatic stem cells that do not express LAMIN A and germ cell markers in the adult ovaries, notably in the cortex and granulosa cells of growing follicles. These data support the paradigm that adult ovaries do not undergo germ cell renewal, which may contribute significantly to ovarian senescence that occurs with age.

  17. A Pressure Injection System for Investigating the Neuropharmacology of Information Processing in Awake Behaving Macaque Monkey Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Veith, Vera K.; Quigley, Cliodhna; Treue, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The top-down modulation of feed-forward cortical information processing is functionally important for many cognitive processes, including the modulation of sensory information processing by attention. However, little is known about which neurotransmitter systems are involved in such modulations. A practical way to address this question is to combine single-cell recording with local and temporary neuropharmacological manipulation in a suitable animal model. Here we demonstrate a technique combining acute single-cell recordings with the injection of neuropharmacological agents in the direct vicinity of the recording electrode. The video shows the preparation of the pressure injection/recording system, including preparation of the substance to be injected. We show a rhesus monkey performing a visual attention task and the procedure of single-unit recording with block-wise pharmacological manipulations. PMID:27023110

  18. A natural model of behavioral depression in postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    CHU, Xun-Xun; Rizak, Joshua Dominic; YANG, Shang-Chuan; WANG, Jian-Hong; MA, Yuan-Ye; HU, Xin-Tian

    2014-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a modified form of major depressive disorders (MDD) that can exert profound negative effects on both mothers and infants than MDD. Within the postpartum period, both mothers and infants are susceptible; but because PPD typically occurs for short durations and has moderate symptoms, there exists challenges in exploring and addressing the underlying cause of the depression. This fact highlights the need for relevant animal models. In the present study, postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) living in breeding groups were observed for typical depressive behavior. The huddle posture behavior was utilized as an indicator of behavioral depression postpartum (BDP) as it has been established as the core depressive-like behavior in primates. Monkeys were divided into two groups: A BDP group (n=6), which were found to spend more time huddling over the first two weeks postpartum than other individuals that formed a non-depression control group (n=4). The two groups were then further analyzed for locomotive activity, stressful events, hair cortisol levels and for maternal interactive behaviors. No differences were found between the BDP and control groups in locomotive activity, in the frequencies of stressful events experienced and in hair cortisol levels. These findings suggested that the postpartum depression witnessed in the monkeys was not related to external factors other than puerperium period. Interestingly, the BDP monkeys displayed an abnormal maternal relationship consisting of increased infant grooming. Taken together, these findings suggest that the adult female cynomolgus monkeys provide a natural model of behavioral postpartum depression that holds a number of advantages over commonly used rodent systems in PPD modeling. The cynomolgus monkeys have a highly-organized social hierarchy and reproductive characteristics without seasonal restriction—similar to humans—as well as much greater homology to

  19. A natural model of behavioral depression in postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Chu, Xun-Xun; Dominic Rizak, Joshua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Wang, Jian-Hong; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Hu, Xin-Tian

    2014-05-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a modified form of major depressive disorders (MDD) that can exert profound negative effects on both mothers and infants than MDD. Within the postpartum period, both mothers and infants are susceptible; but because PPD typically occurs for short durations and has moderate symptoms, there exists challenges in exploring and addressing the underlying cause of the depression. This fact highlights the need for relevant animal models. In the present study, postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) living in breeding groups were observed for typical depressive behavior. The huddle posture behavior was utilized as an indicator of behavioral depression postpartum (BDP) as it has been established as the core depressive-like behavior in primates. Monkeys were divided into two groups: A BDP group (n=6), which were found to spend more time huddling over the first two weeks postpartum than other individuals that formed a non-depression control group (n=4). The two groups were then further analyzed for locomotive activity, stressful events, hair cortisol levels and for maternal interactive behaviors. No differences were found between the BDP and control groups in locomotive activity, in the frequencies of stressful events experienced and in hair cortisol levels. These findings suggested that the postpartum depression witnessed in the monkeys was not related to external factors other than puerperium period. Interestingly, the BDP monkeys displayed an abnormal maternal relationship consisting of increased infant grooming. Taken together, these findings suggest that the adult female cynomolgus monkeys provide a natural model of behavioral postpartum depression that holds a number of advantages over commonly used rodent systems in PPD modeling. The cynomolgus monkeys have a highly-organized social hierarchy and reproductive characteristics without seasonal restriction-similar to humans-as well as much greater homology to humans

  20. Selectivity for grasp in local field potential and single neuron activity recorded simultaneously from M1 and F5 in the awake macaque monkey

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, R.L.; Kraskov, A.; Brochier, T.; Umilta, M.A.; Lemon, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    The selectivity for object-specific grasp in local field potentials (LFPs) was investigated in two awake macaque monkeys trained to observe, reach out, grasp and hold one of six objects presented in a pseudorandom order. Simultaneous, multiple electrode recordings were made from the hand representations of primary motor cortex (M1) and ventral premotor cortex (area F5). LFP activity was well developed during the observation and hold periods of the task, especially in the beta frequency range (15-30 Hz). Selectivity of LFP activity for upcoming grasp was rare in the observation period, but common during stable grasp. The majority of M1 (90/92) and F5 (81/97) sites showed selectivity for at least one frequency, which was maximal in the beta range but also present at higher frequencies (30-50 Hz). When the LFP power associated with grasp of a specific object was large in the beta frequency range it was usually of low power in the higher 30-50 Hz range, and vice-versa. Simple hook grips involving flexion of one or more fingers were associated with large beta power, while more complex grips involving the thumb (e.g. precision grip) were associated with small beta power. At many M1 sites there was a highly significant inverse relationship between the tuning of spikes (including those of identified pyramidal tract neurons) and beta range LFP for different grasps, whereas a positive correlation was found at higher frequencies (30-50 Hz). High levels of beta LFP and low pyramidal cell spike rate may reflect a common mechanism used to control motor set during different types of grasp. PMID:18945904

  1. Neurochemical phenotype of corticocortical connections in the macaque monkey: quantitative analysis of a subset of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive projection neurons in frontal, parietal, temporal, and cingulate cortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Nimchinsky, E. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The neurochemical characteristics of the neuronal subsets that furnish different types of corticocortical connections have been only partially determined. In recent years, several cytoskeletal proteins have emerged as reliable markers to distinguish subsets of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex of primates. In particular, previous studies using an antibody to nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI-32) have revealed a consistent degree of regional and laminar specificity in the distribution of a subpopulation of pyramidal cells in the primate cerebral cortex. The density of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons was shown to vary across corticocortical pathways in macaque monkeys. In the present study, we have used the antibody SMI-32 to examine further and to quantify the distribution of a subset of corticocortically projecting neurons in a series of long ipsilateral corticocortical pathways in comparison to short corticocortical, commissural, and limbic connections. The results demonstrate that the long association pathways interconnecting the frontal, parietal, and temporal neocortex have a high representation of neurofilament protein-enriched pyramidal neurons (45-90%), whereas short corticocortical, callosal, and limbic pathways are characterized by much lower numbers of such neurons (4-35%). These data suggest that different types of corticocortical connections have differential representation of highly specific neuronal subsets that share common neurochemical characteristics, thereby determining regional and laminar cortical patterns of morphological and molecular heterogeneity. These differences in neuronal neurochemical phenotype among corticocortical circuits may have considerable influence on cortical processing and may be directly related to the type of integrative function subserved by each cortical pathway. Finally, it is worth noting that neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons are dramatically affected in the course of

  2. Disability, compensatory behavior, and innovation in free-ranging adult female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Turner, Sarah E; Fedigan, Linda M; Matthews, H Damon; Nakamichi, Masayuki

    2012-09-01

    Little is known about consequences of disability in nonhuman primates, yet individuals with disabilities can reveal much about behavioral flexibility, innovation, and the capabilities of a species. The Macaca fuscata population surrounding the Awajishima Monkey Center has experienced high rates of congenital limb malformation for at least 40 years, creating a unique opportunity to examine consequences of physical impairment in situ, in a relatively large sample of free-ranging adult monkeys. Here we present behavioral data on 11 disabled adult females and 12 nondisabled controls from 279 hours of randomly ordered 30-minute focal animal follows collected during May-August in 2005, 2006, and 2007. We quantified numerous statistically significant disability-related behavioral differences among females. Disabled females spent less time begging for peanuts from tourists, and employed a behavioral variant of such peanut begging; they had a lower frequency of hand use in grooming and compensated with increased direct use of the mouth or a two-arm pinch technique; and they had a higher frequency of self-scratching, and more use of feet in self-scratching. Self-scratching against substrates was almost exclusively a disability associated behavior. Two females used habitual bipedalism. These differences not withstanding, disabled females behaved similarly to controls in many respects: overall reliance on provisioned and wild foods, time spent feeding, and feeding efficiency did not differ among females, and there was no time difference in behavior performed arboreally or terrestrially. Disabled adult females were able to compensate behaviorally to perform social and life-sustaining activities, modifying existing behaviors to suit their individual physical situations and, occasionally, inventing new ways of doing things.

  3. Disability, compensatory behavior, and innovation in free-ranging adult female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Turner, Sarah E; Fedigan, Linda M; Matthews, H Damon; Nakamichi, Masayuki

    2012-09-01

    Little is known about consequences of disability in nonhuman primates, yet individuals with disabilities can reveal much about behavioral flexibility, innovation, and the capabilities of a species. The Macaca fuscata population surrounding the Awajishima Monkey Center has experienced high rates of congenital limb malformation for at least 40 years, creating a unique opportunity to examine consequences of physical impairment in situ, in a relatively large sample of free-ranging adult monkeys. Here we present behavioral data on 11 disabled adult females and 12 nondisabled controls from 279 hours of randomly ordered 30-minute focal animal follows collected during May-August in 2005, 2006, and 2007. We quantified numerous statistically significant disability-related behavioral differences among females. Disabled females spent less time begging for peanuts from tourists, and employed a behavioral variant of such peanut begging; they had a lower frequency of hand use in grooming and compensated with increased direct use of the mouth or a two-arm pinch technique; and they had a higher frequency of self-scratching, and more use of feet in self-scratching. Self-scratching against substrates was almost exclusively a disability associated behavior. Two females used habitual bipedalism. These differences not withstanding, disabled females behaved similarly to controls in many respects: overall reliance on provisioned and wild foods, time spent feeding, and feeding efficiency did not differ among females, and there was no time difference in behavior performed arboreally or terrestrially. Disabled adult females were able to compensate behaviorally to perform social and life-sustaining activities, modifying existing behaviors to suit their individual physical situations and, occasionally, inventing new ways of doing things. PMID:22549480

  4. Photoacoustic detection of functional responses in the motor cortex of awake behaving monkey during forelimb movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheney, Paul D.; Yang, Xinmai

    2012-11-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging was applied to detect the neuronal activity in the motor cortex of an awake, behaving monkey during forelimb movement. An adult macaque monkey was trained to perform a reach-to-grasp task while PA images were acquired through a 30-mm diameter implanted cranial chamber. Increased PA signal amplitude results from an increase in regional blood volume and is interpreted as increased neuronal activity. Additionally, depth-resolved PA signals enabled the study of functional responses in deep cortical areas. The results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing PA imaging for studies of functional activation of cerebral cortex in awake monkeys performing behavioral tasks.

  5. Asthma in an Adult Female Vervet Monkey (Chlorocebus sabaeus)

    PubMed Central

    Köster, Liza S; Simon, Bradley; Rawlins, Gilda; Beierschmitt, Amy

    2016-01-01

    A 9-y-old, colony-bred, female vervet monkey (Chlorocebus sabaeus) presented with a 6-y history of open-mouth breathing, tachypnea, and sibilant wheezing. These symptoms did not significantly affect her activity or quality of life. Thoracic radiographs and results of bronchoalveolar lavage supported the diagnosis of asthma. Treatment comprising intramuscular prednisolone (tapered over 2 mo from twice daily to every other day), inhaled salmeterol–fluticasone (25 µg–250 µg per actuation twice daily) by mask, and a metered dose inhaler was successful in restoring a normal respiratory pattern. Despite the availability of several primate models of human asthma, this case represents the first report of spontaneous asthma in a NHP. PMID:26884413

  6. The Paraventricular Thalamic Nucleus: Subcortical Connections and Innervation by Serotonin, Orexin, and Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, David T.; Price, Joseph L.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examines subcortical connections of Pa, following small anterograde and retrograde tracer injections in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). An anterograde tracer injection into the dorsal midline thalamus revealed strong projections to the accumbens nucleus, basal amygdala, lateral septum, and hypothalamus. Retrograde tracer injections into these areas labeled neurons specifically in Pa. Following a retrograde tracer injection into Pa, labeled neurons were found in the hypothalamus, dorsal raphe, and periaqueductal gray. Pa contained a remarkably high density of axons and axonal varicosities immunoreactive for serotonin (5-HT) and orexin/hypocretin (ORX), as well as a moderate density of fibers immunoreactive for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). A retrograde tracer injection into Pa combined with immunohistochemistry demonstrated that ORX and 5-HT axons originate from neurons in the hypothalamus and midbrain. Pa-projecting neurons were localized in the same nuclei of the hypothalamus, amygdala, and midbrain as CRH neurons, although no double-labeling was found. The connections of Pa and its innervation by 5-HT, ORX, and CRH suggest that it may relay stress signals between the midbrain and hypothalamus with the accumbens nucleus, basal amygdala, and subgenual cortex, as part of a circuit that manages stress and possibly stress-related psychopathologies. PMID:19085970

  7. In-depth proteomic analysis of whole testis tissue from the adult rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Gaigai; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Zhang, Chao; An, Xia; Sun, Yujie; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2014-06-01

    The rhesus macaque is similar to humans both anatomically and physiologically as a primate, and has therefore been used extensively in medical and biological research, including reproductive physiology. Despite sequencing of the macaque genome, limited postgenomic studies have been performed to date. In studies aimed at characterizing spermatogenesis, we successfully identified 9078 macaque testis proteins corresponding to 8662 genes, using advanced MS and an optimized proteomics platform, indicative of complex protein compositions during macaque spermatogenesis. Immunohistochemistry analysis further revealed the presence of proteins from different types of testicular cells, including Sertoli cells, Leydig cells, and various stages of germ cells. Our data provide expression evidence at protein level of 3010 protein-coding genes in 8662 identified testis genes for the first time. We further identified 421 homologous genes from the proteome already known to be essential for male infertility in mouse. Comparative analysis of the proteome showed high similarity with the published human testis proteome, implying that macaque and human may use similar proteins to regulate spermatogenesis. Our in-depth analysis of macaque spermatogenesis provides a rich resource for further studies, and supports the utility of macaque as a suitable model for the study of human reproduction.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of isoflavones from soy infant formula in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Doerge, Daniel R; Woodling, Kellie A; Churchwell, Mona I; Fleck, Stefanie C; Helferich, William G

    2016-06-01

    Consumption of soy infant formula represents a unique exposure scenario in which developing children ingest a mixture of endocrine-active isoflavones along with a substantial portion of daily nutrition. Genistein and daidzein were administered as glucoside conjugates to neonatal rhesus monkeys in a fortified commercial soy formula at 5, 35, and 70 days after birth. A single gavage dosing with 10 mg/kg bw genistein and 6 mg/kg bw daidzein was chosen to represent the upper range of typical daily consumption and to facilitate complete pharmacokinetic measurements for aglycone and total isoflavones and equol. Adult monkeys were also gavaged with the same formula solution at 2.8 and 1.6 mg/kg bw genistein and daidzein, respectively, and by IV injection with isoflavone aglycones (5.2 and 3.2 mg/kg bw, respectively) to determine absolute bioavailability. Significant differences in internal exposure were observed between neonatal and adult monkeys, with higher values for dose-adjusted AUC and Cmax of the active aglycone isoflavones in neonates. The magnitude and frequency of equol production by the gut microbiome were also significantly greater in adults. These findings are consistent with immaturity of metabolic and/or physiological systems in developing non-human primates that reduces total clearance of soy isoflavones from the body. PMID:27084109

  9. Intracortical and Thalamocortical Connections of the Hand and Face Representations in Somatosensory Area 3b of Macaque Monkeys and Effects of Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Chand, Prem; Jain, Neeraj

    2015-09-30

    Brains of adult monkeys with chronic lesions of dorsal columns of spinal cord at cervical levels undergo large-scale reorganization. Reorganization results in expansion of intact chin inputs, which reactivate neurons in the deafferented hand representation in the primary somatosensory cortex (area 3b), ventroposterior nucleus of the thalamus and cuneate nucleus of the brainstem. A likely contributing mechanism for this large-scale plasticity is sprouting of axons across the hand-face border. Here we determined whether such sprouting takes place in area 3b. We first determined the extent of intrinsic corticocortical connectivity between the hand and the face representations in normal area 3b. Small amounts of neuroanatomical tracers were injected in these representations close to the electrophysiologically determined hand-face border. Locations of the labeled neurons were mapped with respect to the detailed electrophysiological somatotopic maps and histologically determined hand-face border revealed in sections of the flattened cortex stained for myelin. Results show that intracortical projections across the hand-face border are few. In monkeys with chronic unilateral lesions of the dorsal columns and expanded chin representation, connections across the hand-face border were not different compared with normal monkeys. Thalamocortical connections from the hand and face representations in the ventroposterior nucleus to area 3b also remained unaltered after injury. The results show that sprouting of intrinsic connections in area 3b or the thalamocortical inputs does not contribute to large-scale cortical plasticity. Significance statement: Long-term injuries to dorsal spinal cord in adult primates result in large-scale somatotopic reorganization due to which chin inputs expand into the deafferented hand region. Reorganization takes place in multiple cortical areas, and thalamic and medullary nuclei. To what extent this brain reorganization due to dorsal column injuries

  10. Intracortical and Thalamocortical Connections of the Hand and Face Representations in Somatosensory Area 3b of Macaque Monkeys and Effects of Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Chand, Prem; Jain, Neeraj

    2015-09-30

    Brains of adult monkeys with chronic lesions of dorsal columns of spinal cord at cervical levels undergo large-scale reorganization. Reorganization results in expansion of intact chin inputs, which reactivate neurons in the deafferented hand representation in the primary somatosensory cortex (area 3b), ventroposterior nucleus of the thalamus and cuneate nucleus of the brainstem. A likely contributing mechanism for this large-scale plasticity is sprouting of axons across the hand-face border. Here we determined whether such sprouting takes place in area 3b. We first determined the extent of intrinsic corticocortical connectivity between the hand and the face representations in normal area 3b. Small amounts of neuroanatomical tracers were injected in these representations close to the electrophysiologically determined hand-face border. Locations of the labeled neurons were mapped with respect to the detailed electrophysiological somatotopic maps and histologically determined hand-face border revealed in sections of the flattened cortex stained for myelin. Results show that intracortical projections across the hand-face border are few. In monkeys with chronic unilateral lesions of the dorsal columns and expanded chin representation, connections across the hand-face border were not different compared with normal monkeys. Thalamocortical connections from the hand and face representations in the ventroposterior nucleus to area 3b also remained unaltered after injury. The results show that sprouting of intrinsic connections in area 3b or the thalamocortical inputs does not contribute to large-scale cortical plasticity. Significance statement: Long-term injuries to dorsal spinal cord in adult primates result in large-scale somatotopic reorganization due to which chin inputs expand into the deafferented hand region. Reorganization takes place in multiple cortical areas, and thalamic and medullary nuclei. To what extent this brain reorganization due to dorsal column injuries

  11. Distributed but convergent ordering of corticostriatal projections: analysis of the frontal eye field and the supplementary eye field in the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, H B; Schall, J D; Graybiel, A M

    1992-11-01

    The degree of parallel processing in frontal cortex-basal ganglia circuits is a central and debated issue in research on the basal ganglia. To approach this issue directly, we analyzed and compared the corticostriatal projections of two principal oculomotor areas of the frontal lobes, the frontal eye field (FEF) and the supplementary eye field (SEF). We first identified cortical regions within or adjacent to each eye field by microstimulation in macaque monkeys and then injected each site with either 35S-methionine or WGA-HRP conjugate. We analyzed the corticostriatal projections and also the interconnections of the pairs of cortical areas. We observed major convergence of the projections of the FEF and the SEF within the striatum, principally in the caudate nucleus. In cross sections through the striatum, both projections were broken into a series of discontinuous input zones that seemed to be part of complex three-dimensional labyrinths. Where the FEF and SEF projection fields were both present, they overlapped patch for patch. Thus, both inputs were dispersed within the striatum but converged with one another. Striatal afferents from cortex adjacent to the FEF and the SEF did not show convergence with SEF and FEF inputs, but did, in part, converge with one another. For all pairs of cortical areas tested, the degree of overlap in the corticostriatal projections appeared to be directly correlated with the degree of cortical interconnectivity of the areas injected. All of the corticostriatal fiber projections observed primarily avoided immunohistochemically identified striosomes. We conclude that there is convergence of oculomotor information from two distinct regions of the frontal cortex to the striatal matrix, which is known to project into pallidonigral circuits including the striatonigrocollicular pathway of the saccadic eye movement system. Furthermore, functionally distinct premotor areas near the oculomotor fields often systematically projected to striatal

  12. Early prenatal androgenization results in diminished ovarian reserve in adult female rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dumesic, D.A.; Patankar, M.S.; Barnett, D.K.; Lesnick, T.G.; Hutcherson, B.A.; Abbott, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early prenatal androgenization (PA) accelerates follicle differentiation and impairs embryogenesis in adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) undergoing FSH therapy for IVF. To determine whether androgen excess in utero affects follicle development over time, this study examines whether PA exposure, beginning at gestational days 40–44 (early treated) or 100–115 (late treated), alters the decline in serum anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels with age in adult female rhesus monkeys and perturbs their ovarian response to recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) therapy for IVF. METHODS Thirteen normal (control), 11 early-treated and 6 late-treated PA adult female monkeys had serum AMH levels measured at random times of the menstrual cycle or anovulatory period. Using some of the same animals, basal serum AMH, gonadotrophins and steroids were also measured in six normal, five early-treated and three late-treated PA female monkeys undergoing FSH therapy for IVF during late-reproductive life (>17 years); serum AMH also was measured on day of HCG administration and at oocyte retrieval. RESULTS Serum AMH levels in early-treated PA females declined with age to levels that were significantly lower than those of normal (P ≤ 0.05) and late-treated PA females (P ≤ 0.025) by late-reproductive life. Serum AMH levels positively predicted numbers of total/mature oocytes retrieved, with early-treated PA females having the lowest serum AMH levels, fewest oocytes retrieved and lowest percentage of females with fertilized oocytes that cleaved. CONCLUSIONS Based on these animals, early PA appears to program an exaggerated decline in ovarian reserve with age, suggesting that epigenetically induced hormonal factors during fetal development may influence the cohort size of ovarian follicles after birth. PMID:19740899

  13. Strategies in Landmark Use by Children, Adults, and Marmoset Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Suzanne E.; Spetch, Marcia L.; Kelly, Debbie M.; Cheng, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Common marmosets ("Callithrix jacchus jacchus"), human children, and human adults learned to find a goal that was located in the center of a square array of four identical landmarks. The location of the landmark array and corresponding goal varied across trials, so the task could not be solved without using the landmark array. In Experiment 1, a…

  14. Social stress-associated depression in adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Shively, Carol A; Register, Thomas C; Friedman, David P; Morgan, Timothy M; Thompson, Jalonda; Lanier, Tasha

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes a behavior pattern in adult female cynomolgus monkeys that has several behavioral and physiological characteristics in common with human depression including reduced body fat, low levels of activity, high heart rate, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis disturbances, and increased mortality. Under certain circumstances, this depressive behavior appears more common in socially stressed subordinate, than dominant, females. This is the first animal model of social stress-related depression in females and the first primate model of adult depression. It is important to have a female animal model of depression because women are more likely to experience a clinically significant depression than men, and depression in women is often associated with changes in reproductive system function. This model is particularly useful because these monkeys have menstrual cycles that are similar to those of women, and those that exhibit depressive behavior have relatively low levels of ovarian steroids. These monkeys may be a useful model of reproductive system-associated mood disorders in females.

  15. Postnatal development of the hippocampus in the Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta): a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hunsaker, Michael R; Scott, Julia A; Bauman, Melissa D; Schumann, Cynthia M; Amaral, David G

    2014-07-01

    Nonhuman primates are widely used models to investigate the neural substrates of human behavior, including the development of higher cognitive and affective function. Due to their neuroanatomical and behavioral homologies with humans, the rhesus macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta) provides an excellent animal model in which to characterize the maturation of brain structures from birth through adulthood and into senescence. To evaluate hippocampal development in rhesus macaques, structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained longitudinally at 9 time points between 1 week and 260 weeks (5 years) of age on 24 rhesus macaque monkeys (12 males, 12 females). In our sample, the hippocampus reaches 50% of its adult volume by 13 weeks of age and reaches an adult volume by 52 weeks in both males and females. The hippocampus appears to be slightly larger at 3 years than at 5 years of age. Male rhesus macaques have larger hippocampi than females from 8 weeks onward by approximately 5%. Interestingly, there was increased variability in hemispheric asymmetry for hippocampus volumes at younger ages than at later ages. These data provide a comprehensive evaluation of the longitudinal development of male and female rhesus macaque hippocampus across development from 1 week to 5 years of age.

  16. Effects of Neonatal Amygdala Lesions on Fear Learning, Conditioned Inhibition, and Extinction in Adult Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Andy M.; Heuer, Eric; Davis, Michael; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    Fear conditioning studies have demonstrated the critical role played by the amygdala in emotion processing. Although all lesion studies until now investigated the effect of adult-onset damage on fear conditioning, the current study assessed fear-learning abilities, as measured by fear-potentiated startle, in adult monkeys that had received neonatal neurotoxic amygdala damage or sham-operations. After fear acquisition, their abilities to learn and use a safety cue to modulate their fear to the conditioned cue, and, finally, to extinguish their response to the fear conditioned cue were measured with the AX+/BX− Paradigm. Neonatal amygdala damage retarded, but did not completely abolish, the acquisition of a learned fear. After acquisition of the fear signal, four of the six animals with neonatal amygdala lesions discriminated between the fear and safety cues and were also able to use the safety signal to reduce the potentiated-startle response and to extinguish the fear response when the air-blast was absent. In conclusion, the present results support the critical contribution of the amygdala during the early phases of fear conditioning that leads to quick, robust responses to potentially threatening stimuli, a highly adaptive process across all species and likely to be present in early infancy. The neonatal amygdala lesions also indicated the presence of amygdala-independent alternate pathways that are capable to support fear learning in the absence of a functional amygdala. This parallel processing of fear responses within these alternate pathways was also sufficient to support the ability to flexibly modulate the magnitude of the fear responses. PMID:22642884

  17. Effects of neonatal amygdala lesions on fear learning, conditioned inhibition, and extinction in adult macaques.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Andy M; Heuer, Eric; Davis, Michael; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2012-06-01

    Fear conditioning studies have demonstrated the critical role played by the amygdala in emotion processing. Although all lesion studies until now investigated the effect of adult-onset damage on fear conditioning, the current study assessed fear-learning abilities, as measured by fear-potentiated startle, in adult monkeys that had received neonatal neurotoxic amygdala damage or sham-operations. After fear acquisition, their abilities to learn and use a safety cue to modulate their fear to the conditioned cue, and, finally, to extinguish their response to the fear conditioned cue were measured with the AX+/BX- Paradigm. Neonatal amygdala damage retarded, but did not completely abolish, the acquisition of a learned fear. After acquisition of the fear signal, four of the six animals with neonatal amygdala lesions discriminated between the fear and safety cues and were also able to use the safety signal to reduce the potentiated-startle response and to extinguish the fear response when the air-blast was absent. In conclusion, the present results support the critical contribution of the amygdala during the early phases of fear conditioning that leads to quick, robust responses to potentially threatening stimuli, a highly adaptive process across all species and likely to be present in early infancy. The neonatal amygdala lesions also indicated the presence of amygdala-independent alternate pathways that are capable to support fear learning in the absence of a functional amygdala. This parallel processing of fear responses within these alternate pathways was also sufficient to support the ability to flexibly modulate the magnitude of the fear responses.

  18. Interactions between visitors and Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis) at Shou-Shan Nature Park, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Minna J; Kao, Chien-Ching; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2009-03-01

    Ecotourism involving feeding wildlife has raised public attention and is a controversial issue, especially concerning nonhuman primates. Between July 2002 and April 2005, the behavior of monkeys and tourists was collected through scan samplings, focal samplings and behavior samplings at the Shou-Shan Nature Park located in Taiwan's second largest city--Kaohsiung. In addition, the number of tourists and monkeys was counted in different hours and places within the park. Four hundred visitors were interviewed using a questionnaire to gather data on sex, age, purpose and frequency of visit to the park. The number of tourists was significantly higher during weekends than in weekdays in all locations. Humans dominated in the initiation of interspecies interactions--the overall ratio of human-initiated and monkey-initiated interactions was 2.44:1. Human-monkey conflicts accounted for only 16.4% of the total interactions (n=2,166), and adult human males and adult male macaques participated in higher rates than other age/sex groups in these conflicts. Visitors showed more affiliative behavior (15.9%) than agonistic behavior (8%) toward the macaques. In response to visitors' threat or attack, the Formosan macaques mostly showed submissive behavior with bared teeth, squealed or ran away to avoid confrontation (69.1%)--only few responded with counteraggression (18.7%). This study for the first time provided evidence that food provisioning increased both the frequency and duration of aggression among Formosan macaques (P<0.001). During food provisioning, the average frequency and the duration of agonistic events of macaques were more than 4 times higher compared with those without food provisioning. The average frequency of food provision by tourists was 0.73 times/hr--more than twice the incident that monkeys grabbed the food from tourists (0.34 times/hr). If people refrain from feeding monkeys and destroying the city park's natural vegetation, monkeys can be used to educate

  19. The time course of follicle-stimulating hormone suppression by recombinant human inhibin A in the adult male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S; Pohl, C R; McNeilly, A S; Winters, S J; Plant, T M

    1998-08-01

    In higher primates, FSH secretion appears to be regulated by a control system consistent with that described by the classical inhibin hypothesis. The purpose of the present experiment was to examine the time course of inhibin's action to suppress FSH secretion in the intact adult male rhesus monkey. To this end, five adult males implanted with indwelling venous catheters and exhibiting typical episodic patterns of LH and testosterone (T) secretion received a 4-day i.v. infusion of recombinant human (rh) inhibin A (832 ng/h x kg) followed, after a 4-week interval, by vehicle infusion of similar duration. Changes in circulating FSH concentrations during the inhibin and vehicle infusions were determined using a sensitive homologous macaque RIA, whereas enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were employed to track inhibin A, inhibin B, and inhibin pro-alpha-C levels during the experiment. Normal pulsatile activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-Leydig cell axis was confirmed by monitoring changes in circulating concentrations of LH and T in 12-h windows of sequential blood collection (1200-2400 h; every 20 min) before, during, and after the rh inhibin A and vehicle infusions. Although infusion of rh inhibin A, which led to a 12 ng/ml square wave increment in circulating levels of this inhibin dimer, produced a marked decline in circulating FSH concentrations, significant suppression of the secretion of this gonadotropin was not manifest until 54 h after initiation of the infusion. Despite the marked decline in FSH secretion during the last 24 h of the 4-day infusion of recombinant hormone, circulating inhibin B and pro-alpha-C concentrations were maintained at preinfusion control levels (1 ng/ml). The finding that imposition of an exaggerated circulating inhibin signal led to suppression of FSH secretion in the male monkey only after 2 days of exposure to the hormone indicates that in this species the feedback action of testicular inhibin on FSH secretion is heavily lagged

  20. Macaque Monkeys Discriminate Pitch Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosch, Michael; Selezneva, Elena; Bucks, Cornelia; Scheich, Henning

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates that non-human primates can categorize the direction of the pitch change of tones in a sequence. Two "Macaca fascicularis" were trained in a positive-reinforcement behavioral paradigm in which they listened to sequences of a variable number of different acoustic items. The training of discriminating pitch direction was…

  1. Conjugated and unconjugated bilirubins in bile of humans and rhesus monkeys. Structure of adult human and rhesus-monkey bilirubins compared with dog bilirubins.

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, S G; Taggart, D B; Ikeda, R; Ruebner, B; Bergstrom, D E

    1977-01-01

    1. Bilirubin-IXalpha, -IXalpha diglucuronide, -IXalpha monoglucuronide, -IXalpha monoglucoside -IXalpha monoxyloside, a bilirubin-IXalpha diconjugate containing glucose and another unknown compound, and bilirubin-IXbeta are present in gall-bladder bile of adult human, rhesus monkey and dog. Dog bile normally also contains other bilirubin-IXalpha diconjugates, i.e. compounds containing two conjugating sugars such as glucuronic acid and glucose, glucuronic acid and xylose and glucose xylose. 2. Azopigments alphaF, alphaO, alpha2, alpha3, betax and delta derived from human and rhesus-monkey bilirubins are identical in their chemical composition with those obtained from the dog. 3. Azopigments alphaF and betax found in diazotized biles of adult humans, rhesus monkeys and dogs are products of unconjugated bilirubin-IXbeta. 4. Technical modifications of previously published procedures [Heirwegh, Fevery, Michiels, Van Hees & Compernolle, (1975) Biochem. J. 145, 185-199] were introduced which make it possible to separate the bilirubins, diazotize the separated bilirubins, extract the azopigments and chromatograph them in one working day (6-8h). Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:414741

  2. Intestinal endocellular symbiotic bacterium of the macaque louse Pedicinus obtusus: Distinct endosymbiont origins in anthropoid primate lice and the old world monkey louse.

    PubMed

    Fukatsu, Takema; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Koga, Ryuichi; Nikoh, Naruo; Kato, Takuya; Hayama, Shin-ichi; Takefushi, Haruo; Tanaka, Ichirou

    2009-06-01

    A symbiotic bacterium of the macaque louse, Pedicinus obtusus, was characterized. The symbiont constituted a gammaproteobacterial lineage distinct from the symbionts of anthropoid primate lice, localized in the midgut epithelium and the ovaries and exhibiting AT-biased genes and accelerated molecular evolution. The designation "Candidatus Puchtella pedicinophila" was proposed for it. PMID:19304816

  3. Intestinal Endocellular Symbiotic Bacterium of the Macaque Louse Pedicinus obtusus: Distinct Endosymbiont Origins in Anthropoid Primate Lice and the Old World Monkey Louse▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fukatsu, Takema; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Koga, Ryuichi; Nikoh, Naruo; Kato, Takuya; Hayama, Shin-ichi; Takefushi, Haruo; Tanaka, Ichirou

    2009-01-01

    A symbiotic bacterium of the macaque louse, Pedicinus obtusus, was characterized. The symbiont constituted a gammaproteobacterial lineage distinct from the symbionts of anthropoid primate lice, localized in the midgut epithelium and the ovaries and exhibiting AT-biased genes and accelerated molecular evolution. The designation “Candidatus Puchtella pedicinophila” was proposed for it. PMID:19304816

  4. Ocular dominance columns in the adult New World Monkey Callithrix jacchus.

    PubMed

    Chappert-Piquemal, C; Fonta, C; Malecaze, F; Imbert, M

    2001-01-01

    In the marmoset Callithrix jacchus, ocular dominance columns (ODC) have been reported to be present in young animals, but absent in adults (Spatz, 1989). We have studied in juvenile and adult animals the postnatal organization of the retino-geniculo-cortical afferents by means of transneuronal labeling. We show in the present work that ODC are present in the primary visual cortex of Callithrix jacchus, both in the adult and in the juvenile animal. The present work confirms the presence of ODC in the visual cortex of juvenile marmoset before the end of the first postnatal month. In 2-month-old animals, ODC are well demarcated in IVcalpha and IVcbeta. In the adult marmosets, the present data clearly show that the primary visual cortex is also organized with ODC. In horizontal sections, they form a mosaic through the ventral and dorsal calcarine cortex and through the dorso-lateral occipital part of the striate cortex. In frontal sections, their presence is manifest in IVcbeta within the calcarine cortex and they only faintly appear in IVcalpha. These new findings are important since they underline the usefulness of the adult New World Monkeys as a model in visual research.

  5. Neonatal Amygdala Lesions Alter Responsiveness to Objects in Juvenile Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Toscano, Jessica E.; Bauman, Melissa; Mason, William A.; Amaral, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala is widely recognized to play a central role in emotional processing. In nonhuman primates, the amygdala appears to be critical for generating appropriate behavioral responses in emotionally salient contexts. One common finding is that macaque monkeys that receive amygdala lesions as adults are behaviorally uninhibited in the presence of potentially dangerous objects. While control animals avoid these objects, amygdala-lesioned animals readily interact with them. Despite a large literature documenting the role of the amygdala in emotional processing in adult rhesus macaques, little research has assessed the role of the amygdala across the macaque neurodevelopmental trajectory. We assessed the behavioral responses of three-year-old (juvenile) rhesus macaques that received bilateral ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala or hippocampus at two weeks of age. Animals were presented with salient objects known to produce robust fear-related responses in macaques (e.g., snakes and reptile-like objects), mammal-like objects that included animal-like features (e.g., eyes and mouths) but not reptile-like features (e.g., scales), and non-animal objects. The visual complexity of objects was scaled to vary the objects' salience. In contrast to control and hippocampus-lesioned animals, amygdale-lesioned animals were uninhibited in the presence of potentially dangerous objects. They readily retrieved food rewards placed near these objects and physically explored the objects. Furthermore, while control and hippocampus-lesioned animals differentiated between levels of object complexity, amygdala-lesioned animals did not. Taken together, these findings suggest that early damage to the amygdala, like damage during adulthood, permanently compromises emotional processing. PMID:21215794

  6. A brain MRI atlas of the common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yurui; Schilling, Kurt G.; Khare, Shweta P.; Panda, Swetasudha; Choe, Ann S.; Stepniewska, Iwona; Li, Xia; Ding, Zhoahua; Anderson, Adam; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-03-01

    The common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus, is a New World monkey with functional and microstructural organization of central nervous system similar to that of humans. It is one of the most commonly used South American primates in biomedical research. Unlike its Old World macaque cousins, no digital atlases have described the organization of the squirrel monkey brain. Here, we present a multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) atlas constructed from the brain of an adult female squirrel monkey. In vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging and low resolution diffusion tensor imaging. Ex vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging and high resolution diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical regions were manually annotated on the co-registered volumes based on published histological sections.

  7. Individual differences in physical activity are closely associated with changes in body weight in adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Elinor L.; Koegler, Frank H.; Cameron, Judy L.

    2010-01-01

    The increased prevalence of overweight adults has serious health consequences. Epidemiological studies suggest an association between low activity and being over-weight; however, few studies have objectively measured activity during a period of weight gain, so it is unknown whether low activity is a cause or consequence of being overweight. To determine whether individual differences in adult weight gain are linked to an individual's activity level, we measured activity, via accelerometry, over a prolonged period (9 mo) in 18 adult female rhesus monkeys. Weight, food intake, metabolic rate, and activity were first monitored over a 3-mo period. During this period, there was mild but significant weight gain (5.5 ± 0.88%; t =−6.3, df = 17, P < 0.0001), whereas caloric intake and activity remained stable. Metabolic rate increased, as expected, with weight gain. Activity level correlated with weight gain (r = −0.52, P = 0.04), and the most active monkeys gained less weight than the least active monkeys (t = −2.74, df = 8, P = 0.03). Moreover, there was an eightfold difference in activity between the most and least active monkeys, and initial activity of each monkey was highly correlated with their activity after 9 mo (r = 0.85, P < 0.0001). In contrast, food intake did not correlate with weight gain, and there was no difference in weight gain between monkeys with the highest vs. lowest caloric intake, total metabolic rate, or basal metabolic rate. We conclude that physical activity is a particularly important factor contributing to weight change in adulthood and that there are large, but stable, differences in physical activity among individuals. PMID:16614060

  8. Abdominal Lipomatosis with Secondary Self-Strangulation of Masses in an Adult Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Chum, Helen H; Long, C Tyler; McKeon, Gabriel P; Chang, Angela G; Luong, Richard H; Albertelli, Megan A

    2014-01-01

    An 10-y-old, intact male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral scrotal swelling and a distended abdomen. A soft mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was palpated. A barium study did not reveal any gastrointestinal abnormalities. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large (1.25 kg, 15.0 × 13.0 × 9.5 cm), red and tan, soft, circumscribed, spherical mass within the greater omentum and 10 to 20 smaller (diameter, 1 to 4 cm), soft to firm masses in the mesentery and greater omentum. The resected mass was a self-strangulating abdominal lipoma, a pedunculated neoplasm composed of white adipocytes arising from peritoneal adipose tissue undergoing secondary coagulation necrosis after strangulation of the blood supply due to twisting of the mass around the peduncle. The smaller masses were histologically consistent with simple or self-strangulating pedunculated abdominal lipomas. The macaque presented again 9 mo later with a firm, 5.0-cm mass in the midabdomen, with intestinal displacement visible on radiographs. Given this animal's medical history and questionable prognosis, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed numerous, multifocal to coalescing, 1.0- to 15.0-cm, pale tan to yellow, circumscribed, soft to firm, spherical to ellipsoid, pedunculated masses that were scattered throughout the mesentery, greater omentum, lesser omentum, and serosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. All of the masses were pedunculated abdominal lipomas, and most demonstrated coagulation necrosis due to self-strangulation of the blood supply. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in a rhesus macaque. PMID:25402181

  9. Abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in an adult rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Chum, Helen H; Long, C Tyler; McKeon, Gabriel P; Chang, Angela G; Luong, Richard H; Albertelli, Megan A

    2014-10-01

    An 10-y-old, intact male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral scrotal swelling and a distended abdomen. A soft mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was palpated. A barium study did not reveal any gastrointestinal abnormalities. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large (1.25 kg, 15.0 × 13.0 × 9.5 cm), red and tan, soft, circumscribed, spherical mass within the greater omentum and 10 to 20 smaller (diameter, 1 to 4 cm), soft to firm masses in the mesentery and greater omentum. The resected mass was a self-strangulating abdominal lipoma, a pedunculated neoplasm composed of white adipocytes arising from peritoneal adipose tissue undergoing secondary coagulation necrosis after strangulation of the blood supply due to twisting of the mass around the peduncle. The smaller masses were histologically consistent with simple or self-strangulating pedunculated abdominal lipomas. The macaque presented again 9 mo later with a firm, 5.0-cm mass in the midabdomen, with intestinal displacement visible on radiographs. Given this animal's medical history and questionable prognosis, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed numerous, multifocal to coalescing, 1.0- to 15.0-cm, pale tan to yellow, circumscribed, soft to firm, spherical to ellipsoid, pedunculated masses that were scattered throughout the mesentery, greater omentum, lesser omentum, and serosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. All of the masses were pedunculated abdominal lipomas, and most demonstrated coagulation necrosis due to self-strangulation of the blood supply. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in a rhesus macaque.

  10. Risk and Resilience: Early Manipulation of Macaque Social Experience and Persistent Behavioral and Neurophysiological Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Hanna E.; Leckman, James F.; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    A literature review on macaque monkeys finds that peer rearing of young macaques and rearing of young macaques by mothers that are undergoing variable foraging conditions result in emotional and neurophysiological disturbance. Certain genotypes contribute to resilience to this disturbance. The findings have implications to child mental health and…

  11. Gonadectomy increases neurogenesis in the male adolescent rhesus macaque hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Allen, K M; Fung, S J; Rothmond, D A; Noble, P L; Weickert, C Shannon

    2014-02-01

    New neurons are continuously produced in the subgranular zone of the adult hippocampus and can modulate hippocampal plasticity across life. Adolescence is characterized by dramatic changes in sex hormone levels, and social and emotional behaviors. It is also an age for increased risk of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, which may involve altered hippocampal neurogenesis. The extent to which testosterone and other testicular hormones modulate hippocampal neurogenesis and adolescent behavioral development is unclear. This study aimed to determine if removal of testicular hormones during adolescence alters neurogenesis in the male rhesus macaque hippocampus. We used stereology to examine levels of cell proliferation, cell survival and neuronal differentiation in late adolescent male rhesus macaques (4.6-yrs old) that had previously been gonadectomized or sham operated prior to puberty (2.4-yrs old). While the absence of adolescent testicular hormones had no effect on cell proliferation, cell survival was increased by 65% and indices of immature neuronal differentiation were increased by 56% in gonadectomized monkeys compared to intact monkeys. We show for the first time that presence of circulating testicular hormones, including testosterone, may decrease neuronal survival in the primate hippocampus during adolescence. Our findings are in contrast to existing studies in adults where testosterone tends to be a pro-survival factor and demonstrate that testicular hormones may reduce hippocampal neurogenesis during the age typical of schizophrenia onset.

  12. Corticospinal neurons in macaque ventral premotor cortex with mirror properties: a potential mechanism for action suppression?

    PubMed

    Kraskov, Alexander; Dancause, Numa; Quallo, Marsha M; Shepherd, Samantha; Lemon, Roger N

    2009-12-24

    The discovery of "mirror neurons" in area F5 of the ventral premotor cortex has prompted many theories as to their possible function. However, the identity of mirror neurons remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether identified pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) in area F5 of two adult macaques exhibited "mirror-like" activity. About half of the 64 PTNs tested showed significant modulation of their activity while monkeys observed precision grip of an object carried out by an experimenter, with somewhat fewer showing modulation during precision grip without an object or grasping concealed from the monkey. Therefore, mirror-like activity can be transmitted directly to the spinal cord via PTNs. A novel finding is that many PTNs (17/64) showed complete suppression of discharge during action observation, while firing actively when the monkey grasped food rewards. We speculate that this suppression of PTN discharge might be involved in the inhibition of self-movement during action observation.

  13. Identification of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected infant and adult rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, K G; Lin, K C; Newman, J; Schauer, D; MacKey, J; Lackner, A A; Carville, A

    2001-03-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) was recognized as a common opportunistic pathogen of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with AIDS. Retrospective analysis revealed that 27 of 96 (28.1%) animals with AIDS had features of EPEC infection, and EPEC was the most frequent pathogen of the gastrointestinal tract identified morphologically. In 7.3% of animals dying with AIDS, EPEC represented the sole opportunistic agent of the gastrointestinal tract at death. In 20.8% of cases, it was seen in combination with one or more gastrointestinal pathogens, including Cryptosporidium parvum, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Mycobacterium avium, Entamoeba histolytica, Balantidium coli, Strongyloides stercoralis, cytomegalovirus, and adenovirus. Clinically, infection was associated with persistent diarrhea and wasting and was more frequent in animals that died at under 1 year of age (P < 0.001, Fisher exact test). The organism was associated with the characteristic attaching and effacing lesion in colonic tissue sections and produced a focal adherence pattern on a HEp-2 assay but was negative for Shiga toxin production as assessed by PCR and a HeLa cell cytotoxicity assay. A 2.6-kb fragment encompassing the intimin gene was amplified and sequenced and revealed 99.2% identity to sequences obtained from human isolates (GenBank AF116899) corresponding to the epsilon intimin subtype. Further investigations with rhesus macaques may offer opportunities to study the impact of EPEC on AIDS pathogenesis and gastrointestinal dysfunction. PMID:11230413

  14. The Macaque Social Responsiveness Scale (mSRS): A Rapid Screening Tool for Assessing Variability in the Social Responsiveness of Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Feczko, Eric J; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Walum, Hasse; Pruett, John R; Parr, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the biological mechanisms underlying human neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), has been hindered by the lack of a robust, translational animal model. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) display many of the same social behaviors that are affected in ASD, making them an excellent animal species in which to model social impairments. However, the social impairments associated with ASD may reflect extreme ends of a continuous distribution of traits. Thus, to validate the rhesus monkey as an animal model for studying social impairments that has strong translational relevance for ASD, researchers need an easily-implemented measurement tool that can quantify variation in social behavior dimensionally. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a 65-item survey that identifies both typical and atypical social behaviors in humans that covary with ASD symptom severity. A chimpanzee SRS has already been validated and the current study adapted this tool for use in the rhesus monkey (mSRS). Fifteen raters completed the mSRS for 105 rhesus monkeys living at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. The mSRS scores showed a unimodal distribution with a positive skew that identified 6 statistical outliers. Inter-rater reliability was very strong, but only 17 of the 36 questions showed positive intra-item reliability. The results of an exploratory factor analysis identified 3 factors that explained over 60% of the variance, with 12 items significantly loading onto the primary factor. These items reflected behaviors associated with social avoidance, social anxiety or inflexibility and social confidence. These initial findings are encouraging and suggest that variability in the social responsiveness of rhesus monkeys can be quantified using the mSRS: a tool that has strong translational relevance for human disorders. With further modification, the mSRS may provide an promising new direction for research on the biological mechanisms underlying

  15. The Macaque Social Responsiveness Scale (mSRS): A Rapid Screening Tool for Assessing Variability in the Social Responsiveness of Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Feczko, Eric J; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Walum, Hasse; Pruett, John R; Parr, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the biological mechanisms underlying human neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), has been hindered by the lack of a robust, translational animal model. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) display many of the same social behaviors that are affected in ASD, making them an excellent animal species in which to model social impairments. However, the social impairments associated with ASD may reflect extreme ends of a continuous distribution of traits. Thus, to validate the rhesus monkey as an animal model for studying social impairments that has strong translational relevance for ASD, researchers need an easily-implemented measurement tool that can quantify variation in social behavior dimensionally. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a 65-item survey that identifies both typical and atypical social behaviors in humans that covary with ASD symptom severity. A chimpanzee SRS has already been validated and the current study adapted this tool for use in the rhesus monkey (mSRS). Fifteen raters completed the mSRS for 105 rhesus monkeys living at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. The mSRS scores showed a unimodal distribution with a positive skew that identified 6 statistical outliers. Inter-rater reliability was very strong, but only 17 of the 36 questions showed positive intra-item reliability. The results of an exploratory factor analysis identified 3 factors that explained over 60% of the variance, with 12 items significantly loading onto the primary factor. These items reflected behaviors associated with social avoidance, social anxiety or inflexibility and social confidence. These initial findings are encouraging and suggest that variability in the social responsiveness of rhesus monkeys can be quantified using the mSRS: a tool that has strong translational relevance for human disorders. With further modification, the mSRS may provide an promising new direction for research on the biological mechanisms underlying

  16. The Macaque Social Responsiveness Scale (mSRS): A Rapid Screening Tool for Assessing Variability in the Social Responsiveness of Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Walum, Hasse; Pruett, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the biological mechanisms underlying human neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), has been hindered by the lack of a robust, translational animal model. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) display many of the same social behaviors that are affected in ASD, making them an excellent animal species in which to model social impairments. However, the social impairments associated with ASD may reflect extreme ends of a continuous distribution of traits. Thus, to validate the rhesus monkey as an animal model for studying social impairments that has strong translational relevance for ASD, researchers need an easily-implemented measurement tool that can quantify variation in social behavior dimensionally. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a 65-item survey that identifies both typical and atypical social behaviors in humans that covary with ASD symptom severity. A chimpanzee SRS has already been validated and the current study adapted this tool for use in the rhesus monkey (mSRS). Fifteen raters completed the mSRS for 105 rhesus monkeys living at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. The mSRS scores showed a unimodal distribution with a positive skew that identified 6 statistical outliers. Inter-rater reliability was very strong, but only 17 of the 36 questions showed positive intra-item reliability. The results of an exploratory factor analysis identified 3 factors that explained over 60% of the variance, with 12 items significantly loading onto the primary factor. These items reflected behaviors associated with social avoidance, social anxiety or inflexibility and social confidence. These initial findings are encouraging and suggest that variability in the social responsiveness of rhesus monkeys can be quantified using the mSRS: a tool that has strong translational relevance for human disorders. With further modification, the mSRS may provide an promising new direction for research on the biological mechanisms underlying

  17. Rhesus monkeys show human-like changes in gaze following across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Arre, Alyssa M; Platt, Michael L; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-05-11

    Gaze following, or co-orienting with others, is a foundational skill for human social behaviour. The emergence of this capacity scaffolds critical human-specific abilities such as theory of mind and language. Non-human primates also follow others' gaze, but less is known about how the cognitive mechanisms supporting this behaviour develop over the lifespan. Here we experimentally tested gaze following in 481 semi-free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) ranging from infancy to old age. We found that monkeys began to follow gaze in infancy and this response peaked in the juvenile period-suggesting that younger monkeys were especially attuned to gaze information, like humans. After sexual maturity, monkeys exhibited human-like sex differences in gaze following, with adult females showing more gaze following than males. Finally, older monkeys showed reduced propensity to follow gaze, just as older humans do. In a second study (n = 80), we confirmed that macaques exhibit similar baseline rates of looking upwards in a control condition, regardless of age. Our findings indicate that-despite important differences in human and non-human primate life-history characteristics and typical social experiences-monkeys undergo robust ontogenetic shifts in gaze following across early development, adulthood and ageing that are strikingly similar to those of humans.

  18. Rhesus monkeys show human-like changes in gaze following across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Arre, Alyssa M; Platt, Michael L; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-05-11

    Gaze following, or co-orienting with others, is a foundational skill for human social behaviour. The emergence of this capacity scaffolds critical human-specific abilities such as theory of mind and language. Non-human primates also follow others' gaze, but less is known about how the cognitive mechanisms supporting this behaviour develop over the lifespan. Here we experimentally tested gaze following in 481 semi-free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) ranging from infancy to old age. We found that monkeys began to follow gaze in infancy and this response peaked in the juvenile period-suggesting that younger monkeys were especially attuned to gaze information, like humans. After sexual maturity, monkeys exhibited human-like sex differences in gaze following, with adult females showing more gaze following than males. Finally, older monkeys showed reduced propensity to follow gaze, just as older humans do. In a second study (n = 80), we confirmed that macaques exhibit similar baseline rates of looking upwards in a control condition, regardless of age. Our findings indicate that-despite important differences in human and non-human primate life-history characteristics and typical social experiences-monkeys undergo robust ontogenetic shifts in gaze following across early development, adulthood and ageing that are strikingly similar to those of humans. PMID:27170712

  19. Depressive-like behavioral response of adult male rhesus monkeys during routine animal husbandry procedure

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Michael B.; McCowan, Brenda; Jiang, Jing; Capitanio, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Social isolation is a major risk factor for the development of depressive illness; yet, no practical nonhuman primate model is available for studying processes involved in this effect. In a first study, we noted that adult male rhesus monkeys housed individually indoors occasionally exhibited a hunched, depressive-like posture. Therefore, Study 2 investigated the occurrence of a hunched posture by adult males brought from outdoor social groups to indoor individual housing. We also scored two other behaviors—lying on the substrate and day time sleeping—that convey an impression of depression. During the first week of observation following individual housing, 18 of 26 adult males exhibited the hunched posture and 21 of 26 displayed at least one depressive-like behavior. Over 2 weeks, 23 of 26 males showed depressive-like behavior during a total of only 20 min observation. Further, the behavior during the first week was positively related to the level of initial response to a maternal separation procedure experienced in infancy. In Study 3, more than half of 23 adult males of a new sample displayed depressive-like behavior during 10 min of observation each of Weeks 7–14 of individual housing. The surprisingly high frequency of depressive-like behavior in Studies 2 and 3 may have been due to recording behavior via camera with no human in the room to elicit competing responses. These results suggest that a common animal husbandry procedure might provide a practical means for examining effects of social isolation on depression-related endpoints in a nonhuman primate. The findings also suggest that trait-like differences in emotional responsiveness during separation in infancy may predict differences in responsiveness during social isolation in adulthood. PMID:25249954

  20. Crossmodal integration of conspecific vocalizations in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christa; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    Crossmodal integration of audio/visual information is vital for recognition, interpretation and appropriate reaction to social signals. Here we examined how rhesus macaques process bimodal species-specific vocalizations by eye tracking, using an unconstrained preferential looking paradigm. Six adult rhesus monkeys (3M, 3F) were presented two side-by-side videos of unknown male conspecifics emitting different vocalizations, accompanied by the audio signal corresponding to one of the videos. The percentage of time animals looked to each video was used to assess crossmodal integration ability and the percentages of time spent looking at each of the six a priori ROIs (eyes, mouth, and rest of each video) were used to characterize scanning patterns. Animals looked more to the congruent video, confirming reports that rhesus monkeys spontaneously integrate conspecific vocalizations. Scanning patterns showed that monkeys preferentially attended to the eyes and mouth of the stimuli, with subtle differences between males and females such that females showed a tendency to differentiate the eye and mouth regions more than males. These results were similar to studies in humans indicating that when asked to assess emotion-related aspects of visual speech, people preferentially attend to the eyes. Thus, the tendency for female monkeys to show a greater differentiation between the eye and mouth regions than males may indicate that female monkeys were slightly more sensitive to the socio-emotional content of complex signals than male monkeys. The current results emphasize the importance of considering both the sex of the observer and individual variability in passive viewing behavior in nonhuman primate research. PMID:24236218

  1. KIR3DL01 Recognition of Bw4 Ligands in the Rhesus Macaque: Maintenance of Bw4 Specificity since the Divergence of Apes and Old World Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Jamie L.; Colantonio, Arnaud D.; Neidermyer, William J.; Dudley, Dawn M.; Connole, Michelle; O’Connor, David H.; Evans, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of MHC class I ligands for rhesus macaque KIRs is fundamental to our basic understanding of KIR and MHC class I co-evolution and to the study of NK cell responses in this non-human primate model for AIDS and other viral diseases. Here we show that Mamu-KIR3DL01, which is expressed by approximately 90% of rhesus macaques, recognizes MHC class I molecules with a Bw4 motif. Primary NK cells expressing Mamu-KIR3DL01 were identified by staining with a mAb herein shown to bind Mamu-KIR3DL01 allotypes with an aspartic acid at position 233. The cytolytic activity of Mamu-KIR3DL01+ NK cells was suppressed by cell lines expressing the Bw4 molecules Mamu-B*007:01, -B*041:01, -B*058:02, and -B*065:01. The Bw4 motif was necessary for Mamu-KIR3DL01 recognition, since substitutions in this region abrogated Mamu-KIR3DL01+ NK cell inhibition. However, the presence of a Bw4 motif was not sufficient for recognition, since another Bw4 molecule, Mamu-B*017:01, failed to suppress the cytolytic activity of these NK cells. Replacement of three residues in Mamu-B*017:01, predicted to be KIR-contacts based on the 3-dimensional structure of the human KIR3DL1-HLA-Bw4 complex, with the corresponding residues at these positions for the other Mamu-Bw4 ligands restored Mamu-KIR3DL01+ NK cell inhibition. These results define the ligand specificity of one of the most polymorphic and commonly expressed KIRs in the rhesus macaque, and reveal similarities in Bw4 recognition by Mamu-KIR3DL01 and human KIR3DL1, despite the absence of an orthologous relationship between these two KIRs or conservation of surface residues predicted to interact with MHC class I ligands. PMID:24453246

  2. Dopamine Innervation in the Thalamus: Monkey versus Rat

    PubMed Central

    García-Cabezas, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Sánchez, Patricia; Sánchez-González, Miguel Ángel; Garzón, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified the thalamic dopaminergic system in the human and macaque monkey brains, and, based on earlier reports on the paucity of dopamine in the rat thalamus, hypothesized that this dopaminergic system was particularly developed in primates. Here we test this hypothesis using immunohistochemistry against the dopamine transporter (DAT) in adult macaque and rat brains. The extent and density of DAT-immunoreactive (-ir) axons were remarkably greater in the macaque dorsal thalamus, where the mediodorsal association nucleus and the ventral motor nuclei held the densest immunolabeling. In contrast, sparse DAT immunolabeling was present in the rat dorsal thalamus; it was mainly located in the mediodorsal, paraventricular, ventral medial, and ventral lateral nuclei. The reticular nucleus, zona incerta, and lateral habenular nucleus held numerous DAT-ir axons in both species. Ultrastructural analysis in the macaque mediodorsal nucleus revealed that thalamic interneurons are a main postsynaptic target of DAT-ir axons; this suggests that the marked expansion of the dopamine innervation in the primate in comparison to the rodent thalamus may be related to the presence of a sizable interneuron population in primates. We remark that it is important to be aware of brain species differences when using animal models of human brain disease. PMID:18550594

  3. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) map number onto space.

    PubMed

    Drucker, Caroline B; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2014-07-01

    Humans map number onto space. However, the origins of this association, and particularly the degree to which it depends upon cultural experience, are not fully understood. Here we provide the first demonstration of a number-space mapping in a non-human primate. We trained four adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to select the fourth position from the bottom of a five-element vertical array. Monkeys maintained a preference to choose the fourth position through changes in the appearance, location, and spacing of the vertical array. We next asked whether monkeys show a spatially-oriented number mapping by testing their responses to the same five-element stimulus array rotated ninety degrees into a horizontal line. In these horizontal probe trials, monkeys preferentially selected the fourth position from the left, but not the fourth position from the right. Our results indicate that rhesus macaques map number onto space, suggesting that the association between number and space in human cognition is not purely a result of cultural experience and instead has deep evolutionary roots.

  4. Shape of, and body direction in, huddles of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in Arashiyama, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hideshi; Wada, Kazuo

    2011-07-01

    We studied huddles of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in the Arashiyama E troop at the "Arashiyama Monkey Park, Iwatayama" of Kyoto, central Japan. The macaques made physical contact with other individuals and formed huddles when the air was cold. The 99-101 adult females and 26-36 adult males in the study troop formed 345 huddles during 42 scan samples in the winter of 2001 and 376 huddles during 52 scan samples in the winter of 2002. The average size of huddles was 2.3 (range 2-7) individuals. Males huddled less frequently than females. Maternal kin-related dyads formed 2-female huddles more frequently than unrelated dyads. Choice of huddling partners might restrict the size of huddles. The most frequently observed 3 and 4-member huddles were triangular and diamond-shaped. Macaques usually huddled ventro-ventrally, ventro-laterally, and ventro-dorsally. A third individual frequently placed the ventral part of its body against the first individual and simultaneously put the lateral part of its body against the second individual, so that the 3 individuals formed a triangular huddle. This behaviour indicates that Japanese macaques choose their position and body direction in the huddle to reduce the area of body surface exposed to the air, thereby conserving body heat.

  5. Stimulus Similarity and Encoding Time Influence Incidental Recognition Memory in Adult Monkeys with Selective Hippocampal Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeamer, Alyson; Meunier, Martine; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Recognition memory impairment after selective hippocampal lesions in monkeys is more profound when measured with visual paired-comparison (VPC) than with delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMS). To clarify this issue, we assessed the impact of stimuli similarity and encoding duration on the VPC performance in monkeys with hippocampal lesions and…

  6. Thyroid status of female rhesus monkeys and preliminary information on impact of perchlorate administration.

    PubMed

    Ozpinar, Aysel; Golub, Mari S; Poppenga, Robert H; Blount, Benjamin C; Gillespie, Jerry R

    2011-07-01

    Thyroid status was assessed in adult female rhesus monkey breeders at the California National Primate Research Center at the beginning of the breeding season. The 95% confidence intervals for thyrotropin (TSH), thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)) (n = 66-80) were similar to those previously reported in smaller samples of macaque monkeys. Based on human criteria, 10 of 80 monkeys (12%) were hypothyroid (TSH > 2.0 µIU/mL). Because hypothyroxinaemia can be a risk factor in pregnancy, T(4) status was compared with past breeding history, breeding outcome for that season and general health records in a subset of 42 breeders. Age, weight and parity did not differ between monkeys in the lowest T(4) quartile as compared with those in the upper three quartiles. However, T(4) concentrations were significantly associated with the number of missed menstrual cycles during the previous breeding season. In additional work, three healthy lactating rhesus monkeys were given three different doses of environmental contaminant and thyroid iodine uptake inhibitor, ammonium perchlorate (0.006, 0.34, 12.8 mg/kg/day, respectively) in food for two weeks. Thyroid status variables (TSH, T(4), T(3), thyroid radioactive iodine uptake) were then measured. In the monkey receiving the highest perchlorate dose, iodine uptake was suppressed relative to baseline. The study shows the availability of tools to study thyroid status in rhesus monkeys, the variability of thyroid status in the breeder colony and the potential ability of environmental factors to influence thyroid status.

  7. Japanese macaques as laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Isa, Tadashi; Yamane, Itaru; Hamai, Miya; Inagaki, Haruhisa

    2009-10-01

    The Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata), along with rhesus and long-tailed macaques, is one of the macaca species. In Japan, it has been preferred for use as a laboratory animal, particularly in the field of neuroscience, because of its high level of intelligence and its gentle nature. In addition, the species has a relatively homogeneous genetic background and field researchers have accumulated abundant information on the social behavior of wild Japanese macaques. As future neuroscience research will undoubtedly be more focused on the higher cognitive functions of the brain, including social behavior among multiple individuals, the Japanese macaque can be expected to become even more valuable as a laboratory animal in the near future. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology has launched a National BioResource Project (NBRP) to establish a stable breeding and supply system for Japanese macaques for laboratory use. The project is in progress and should lead to the establishment of a National Primate Center in Japan, which will support the supply of monkeys as well as social outreach and handling of animal welfare issues.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of tramadol following intravenous and oral administration in male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kristi R.; Pypendop, Bruno H.; Christe, Kari L.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, tramadol and its active metabolite, O-desmethyltramadol (M1), have been studied as analgesic agents in various traditional veterinary species (e.g. dogs, cats, etc.). This study explores the pharmacokinetics of tramadol and M1 after intravenous (IV) and oral (PO) administration in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), a nontraditional veterinary species. Rhesus macaques are Old World monkeys that are commonly used in biomedical research. Effects of tramadol administration to monkeys are unknown, and research veterinarians may avoid inclusion of this drug into pain management programs due to this limited knowledge. Four healthy, socially-housed, adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were used in this study. Blood samples were collected prior to, and up to 10 h post tramadol administration. Serum tramadol and M1 were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. Tramadol clearance was 24.5 (23.4-32.7) mL/min/kg. Terminal half-life of tramadol was 111 (106-127) min IV and 133 (84.9-198) min PO. Bioavailability of tramadol was poor [3.47% (2.14-5.96%)]. Maximum serum concentration of M1 was 2.28 (1.88-2.73) ng/mL IV and 11.2 (9.37-14.9) ng/mL PO. Sedation and pruritus were observed after IV administration (180 words). PMID:25488714

  9. Single Neurons in the Insular Cortex of a Macaque Monkey Respond to Skin Brushing: Preliminary Data of the Possible Representation of Pleasant Touch.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Laura Clara; Gerbella, Marzio

    2016-01-01

    Pleasant touch may serve as a foundation for affiliative behavior, providing a mechanism for the formation and maintenance of social bonds among conspecifics. In humans, this touch is usually referred to as the caress. Dynamic caressing performed on the hairy skin with a velocity of 1-10 cm/s is perceived as being pleasant and determines positive cardio-physiological effects. Furthermore, imaging human studies show that affiliative touch activates the posterior insular cortex (pIC). Recently, it was demonstrated that pleasant touch in monkeys (i.e., sweeping in a grooming-like manner) is performed with velocities similar to those characteristics of human caress (9.31 cm/s), and causes similarly positive autonomic effects, if performed with velocity of 5 cm/s and 10 cm/s, but not lower or higher. Due to similarities between the human caress and non-human primate sweeping, we investigated for the first time whether single neurons of the perisylvian regions (secondary somatosensory cortex [SII] and pIC) of a rhesus monkey can process sweeping touch differently depending on the stimulus speed. We applied stimulation with two speeds: one that optimally induces positive cardio-physiological effects in the monkey who receives it, and includes the real speed of sweep (5-15 cm/s, sweep fast), and a non-optimal speed (1-5 cm/s, sweep slow). The results show that single neurons of insular cortex differently encode the stimulus speed. In particular, even the majority of recorded somatosensory neurons (82.96%) did not discriminate the two speeds, a small set of neurons (16.59%) were modulated just during the sweep fast. These findings represent the first evidence that single neurons of the non-human primates insular cortex can code affiliative touch, highlighting the similarity between human and non-human primates' social touch systems. This study constitutes an important starting point to carry out deeper investigation on neuronal processing of pleasant sweeping in the central

  10. Single Neurons in the Insular Cortex of a Macaque Monkey Respond to Skin Brushing: Preliminary Data of the Possible Representation of Pleasant Touch

    PubMed Central

    Grandi, Laura Clara; Gerbella, Marzio

    2016-01-01

    Pleasant touch may serve as a foundation for affiliative behavior, providing a mechanism for the formation and maintenance of social bonds among conspecifics. In humans, this touch is usually referred to as the caress. Dynamic caressing performed on the hairy skin with a velocity of 1–10 cm/s is perceived as being pleasant and determines positive cardio-physiological effects. Furthermore, imaging human studies show that affiliative touch activates the posterior insular cortex (pIC). Recently, it was demonstrated that pleasant touch in monkeys (i.e., sweeping in a grooming-like manner) is performed with velocities similar to those characteristics of human caress (9.31 cm/s), and causes similarly positive autonomic effects, if performed with velocity of 5 cm/s and 10 cm/s, but not lower or higher. Due to similarities between the human caress and non-human primate sweeping, we investigated for the first time whether single neurons of the perisylvian regions (secondary somatosensory cortex [SII] and pIC) of a rhesus monkey can process sweeping touch differently depending on the stimulus speed. We applied stimulation with two speeds: one that optimally induces positive cardio-physiological effects in the monkey who receives it, and includes the real speed of sweep (5–15 cm/s, sweep fast), and a non-optimal speed (1–5 cm/s, sweep slow). The results show that single neurons of insular cortex differently encode the stimulus speed. In particular, even the majority of recorded somatosensory neurons (82.96%) did not discriminate the two speeds, a small set of neurons (16.59%) were modulated just during the sweep fast. These findings represent the first evidence that single neurons of the non-human primates insular cortex can code affiliative touch, highlighting the similarity between human and non-human primates’ social touch systems. This study constitutes an important starting point to carry out deeper investigation on neuronal processing of pleasant sweeping in the

  11. Single Neurons in the Insular Cortex of a Macaque Monkey Respond to Skin Brushing: Preliminary Data of the Possible Representation of Pleasant Touch.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Laura Clara; Gerbella, Marzio

    2016-01-01

    Pleasant touch may serve as a foundation for affiliative behavior, providing a mechanism for the formation and maintenance of social bonds among conspecifics. In humans, this touch is usually referred to as the caress. Dynamic caressing performed on the hairy skin with a velocity of 1-10 cm/s is perceived as being pleasant and determines positive cardio-physiological effects. Furthermore, imaging human studies show that affiliative touch activates the posterior insular cortex (pIC). Recently, it was demonstrated that pleasant touch in monkeys (i.e., sweeping in a grooming-like manner) is performed with velocities similar to those characteristics of human caress (9.31 cm/s), and causes similarly positive autonomic effects, if performed with velocity of 5 cm/s and 10 cm/s, but not lower or higher. Due to similarities between the human caress and non-human primate sweeping, we investigated for the first time whether single neurons of the perisylvian regions (secondary somatosensory cortex [SII] and pIC) of a rhesus monkey can process sweeping touch differently depending on the stimulus speed. We applied stimulation with two speeds: one that optimally induces positive cardio-physiological effects in the monkey who receives it, and includes the real speed of sweep (5-15 cm/s, sweep fast), and a non-optimal speed (1-5 cm/s, sweep slow). The results show that single neurons of insular cortex differently encode the stimulus speed. In particular, even the majority of recorded somatosensory neurons (82.96%) did not discriminate the two speeds, a small set of neurons (16.59%) were modulated just during the sweep fast. These findings represent the first evidence that single neurons of the non-human primates insular cortex can code affiliative touch, highlighting the similarity between human and non-human primates' social touch systems. This study constitutes an important starting point to carry out deeper investigation on neuronal processing of pleasant sweeping in the central

  12. Effects of age on cerebrospinal fluid oxytocin levels in free-ranging adult female and infant rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Karen J.; Hoffman, Christy L.; Hyde, Shellie A.; Cummings, Carl S.; Maestripieri, Dario

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in studying oxytocin biology in the context of social functioning in human and non-human primates. Studies of human subjects are typically restricted to peripheral oxytocin assessments because opportunities to collect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are rare. A few studies have examined CSF oxytocin levels in captive adult primates, but none to our knowledge have been conducted under free-ranging conditions and inclusive of young infants. The main goal of the present study was to establish feasibility of quantifying CSF oxytocin levels in free-ranging adult female and infant rhesus monkeys living on the island of Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico. CSF oxytocin levels were examined in relation to individuals’ demographic and reproductive characteristics, as well as in relation to plasma cortisol levels. CSF oxytocin concentrations ranged from 36.02 to 134.41 pg/ml in adult females (ages 7–26 years; N = 31) and 35.94 to 77.3 pg/ml in infants (ages 38–134 days; N = 17). CSF oxytocin levels were positively correlated with adult female age and negatively correlated with infant age. The former correlation was driven by reproductive status. CSF oxytocin levels were unrelated to dominance rank or plasma cortisol levels. In contrast to a previous study of plasma oxytocin concentrations in this population, CSF oxytocin levels did not differ significantly between lactating and non-lactating females. In summary, these findings: 1) provide feasibility data for examining CSF oxytocin biology in free-ranging nonhuman primates and 2) indicate that CSF oxytocin levels may be a biomarker of age-related central nervous system changes across lifespan development. Although our study did not report significant associations between CSF oxytocin levels and socially-relevant demographic variables, the relationships between CSF oxytocin levels and assessments of social functioning warrant future investigation. PMID:20528088

  13. Macaque Cardiac Physiology Is Sensitive to the Valence of Passively Viewed Sensory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Machado, Christopher J.; Amaral, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system activity is an important component of affective experience. We demonstrate in the rhesus monkey that both the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system respond differentially to the affective valence of passively viewed video stimuli. We recorded cardiac impedance and an electrocardiogram while adult macaques watched a series of 300 30-second videos that varied in their affective content. We found that sympathetic activity (as measured by cardiac pre-ejection period) increased and parasympathetic activity (as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia) decreased as video content changes from positive to negative. These findings parallel the relationship between autonomic nervous system responsivity and valence of stimuli in humans. Given the relationship between human cardiac physiology and affective processing, these findings suggest that macaque cardiac physiology may be an index of affect in nonverbal animals. PMID:23940712

  14. Male Tibetan macaques' (Macaca thibetana) choice of infant bridging partners

    PubMed Central

    Briana, BAUER; Lori K., SHEERAN; Megan D., MATHESON; Jin-Hua, LI; R., Steven WAGNER

    2014-01-01

    Adult male Tibetan (Macaca thibetana), Barbary (M. sylvanus), and stump-tailed macaques (M. arctoides) engage in bridging, a ritualized infant-handling behavior. Previous researchers found a bias toward the use of male infants for this behavior, but its function is debated. Explanations include three hypotheses: paternal care, mating effort, and agonistic buffering. We studied a group of habituated, provisioned Tibetan macaques to test whether adult males’ affiliative relationships with females predicted their use of an infant for bridging. We also examined biases for sex, age, and individual in males’ choice of bridging infant. We collected data via all occurrences, focal animal, and scan methods, from August to September 2011 at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys, China. We found that male infants were significantly preferred over females for bridging, but of three male infants in the group, only one was used by all males, while one male infant was used less often than expected. Adult males had females they were significantly more likely to be proximate to and/or to groom, but these corresponded to the mother of the bridging infant for only one male. Our results are most consistent with the agonistic buffering hypothesis: lower-ranked males used the alpha male’s preferred bridging infant in an attempt to regulate their interactions with the alpha. PMID:24866493

  15. Possible modulation of N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid induced prolactin release by testicular steroids in the adult male rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, M.; Rizvi, S.S.R.; Jahan, S.; Zaidi, P.; Shahab, M. )

    1991-01-01

    N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid (NMA), an agonist of the neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to acutely stimulate the release of prolactin (PRL) in intact rats and monkeys. To further investigate the role of neuroexcitatory amino acids in PRL secretion, the effects of NMA administration were examined on PRL release in long term orchidectomized adult rhesus monkeys, in both the absence and presence of testosterone. Intact and long term castrated adult male monkeys weighing between 8-13 kg, were implanted with a catheter via the saphenous vein for blood withdrawal and drug infusion. Blood samples were collected at 10 min intervals for 50 min before and 70 min after administration of the drug or vehicle. Plasma PRL concentrations were estimated using radioimmunoassay. Whereas a single iv injection of NMA induced a prompt discharge of PRL in intact monkeys, an identical dose had surprisingly no effect on PRL secretion in orchidectomized animals. On the other hand, plasma PRL increases in response to a challenge dose of thyrotropin releasing hormone were similar in magnitude in the two groups of monkeys. Testosterone replacement in orchidectomized animals by parenteral administration of testosterone enanthate reinitiated the PRL responsiveness to acute NMA stimulation. These results indicate that N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) dependent drive to PRL release in the adult male rhesus monkey may be overtly influenced by the sex steroid milieu.

  16. Effect of prolonged ketamine exposure on cardiovascular physiology in pregnant and infant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Charlotte E; Wang, Cheng; Slikker, William

    2007-11-01

    Physiologic measurements in nonhuman primates usually are collected from animals that are chemically or physically restrained. Both types of restraint may affect the parameters measured, and those effects can vary with age. Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, expired CO2, blood pressure, temperature, blood glucose, hematocrit, and venous blood gasses were measured in rhesus monkeys that were either infused intravenously with ketamine for 24 h or were cage-housed and physically restrained for sample collection. The subjects were pregnant monkeys at gestational day 120 to 123, infants 5 to 6 d old, and infants 35 to 37 d old. Heart rate and blood pressure were lower in ketamine-treated monkeys than physically restrained monkeys. Heart rate was higher in infants than adults, whereas blood pressure was lower in infants. Respiratory rate was higher in infants than adults and higher in physically restrained infants than ketamine-sedated infants but was not affected by ketamine in pregnant adults. Hematocrit was decreased in older infants. In summary, both physical restraint and ketamine sedation altered several physiologic parameters in pregnant and infant rhesus macaques. Investigators should consider these effects when designing experiments and evaluating experimental outcomes in monkeys.

  17. The use of positive reinforcement training to reduce stereotypic behavior in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Kristine; Maier, Adriane

    2010-01-01

    Stereotypic behavior is a pervasive problem for captive monkeys and other animals. Once this behavior pattern has started, it can be difficult to alleviate. We tested whether or not using positive reinforcement training (PRT) can reduce this undesired behavior. Subjects for this study were 11 adult, female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with a history of locomotor stereotypy (e.g., pacing, bouncing, and somersaulting). We assessed baseline levels of stereotypic behavior and then utilized PRT to train six animals to touch a target and accept venipuncture. The other five monkeys served as controls. We assessed stereotypic behavior 1 week a month for 4 months, on days in which the monkey was not trained. Trained animals showed a significant reduction in stereotypic behavior after 1 month of training, compared to control monkeys (Mann Whitney U=28.00, P=0.02). These group differences did not persist after the first month (Month 2: Mann Whitney U=19.50, P=0.40, Month 3: Mann Whitney U=17.0, P=0.71, Month 4: Mann Whitney U=17.00, P=0.72). Still, the majority of the trained monkeys (n=4) engaged in less stereotypic behavior at the end of the study compared to baseline. Thus, training may be an effective way to reduce stereotypic behavior, at least for some individuals. PMID:20431691

  18. The use of positive reinforcement training to reduce stereotypic behavior in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Kristine; Maier, Adriane

    2010-05-01

    Stereotypic behavior is a pervasive problem for captive monkeys and other animals. Once this behavior pattern has started, it can be difficult to alleviate. We tested whether or not using positive reinforcement training (PRT) can reduce this undesired behavior. Subjects for this study were 11 adult, female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with a history of locomotor stereotypy (e.g., pacing, bouncing, and somersaulting). We assessed baseline levels of stereotypic behavior and then utilized PRT to train six animals to touch a target and accept venipuncture. The other five monkeys served as controls. We assessed stereotypic behavior 1 week a month for 4 months, on days in which the monkey was not trained. Trained animals showed a significant reduction in stereotypic behavior after 1 month of training, compared to control monkeys (Mann Whitney U=28.00, P=0.02). These group differences did not persist after the first month (Month 2: Mann Whitney U=19.50, P=0.40, Month 3: Mann Whitney U=17.0, P=0.71, Month 4: Mann Whitney U=17.00, P=0.72). Still, the majority of the trained monkeys (n=4) engaged in less stereotypic behavior at the end of the study compared to baseline. Thus, training may be an effective way to reduce stereotypic behavior, at least for some individuals.

  19. Multiple representations of body movements in mesial area 6 and the adjacent cingulate cortex: an intracortical microstimulation study in the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Luppino, G; Matelli, M; Camarda, R M; Gallese, V; Rizzolatti, G

    1991-09-22

    The mesial agranular frontal cortex that lies rostral to area 4 (F1) is formed by two distinct cytoarchitectonic areas: F3, located caudally, and F6, located rostrally. In the present experiments we investigated the organization of F3 and F6 by observing the motor responses evoked by their intracortical electrical microstimulation. Our main purpose was to find out whether the cytoarchitectonic subdivision of the mesial agranular frontal cortex into two areas has a physiological counterpart. The result showed that F3 (the caudal area) contains a complete motor representation with hindlimb movements located caudally, forelimb movements located centrally, and orofacial movements located rostrally. The great majority of limb movements involved proximal joints. With respect to F1, F3 showed the following functional characteristics: (1) lack of segregation between proximal and distal movements, (2) larger percentage of complex movements, and (3) higher excitability threshold. Movements were more difficult to elicit from F6 (the rostral area) than from F3. However, by using a longer stimulus train duration (100 ms) 39.3% of tested sites produced body movements. This percentage increased (50.5%) when the electrical stimulation was applied during monkey natural movements instead of when the monkey was still in its chair. Most of the evoked movements concerned the forelimb. More rarely, neck and upper face movements were observed. Unlike F1 and F3 where most movements were fast, slow movements were frequently observed with stimulation of F6. Many of them mimicked natural movements of the animal. Eye movements were evoked from F7 (superior area 6) but not from F6. An additional motor representation was found in the dorsocaudal part of area 24 (24d). This area is topographically organized with a forelimb representation located caudally and ventrally and a hindlimb representation located rostrally and dorsally. The excitability threshold of area 24d is higher than that of F1

  20. Endovascular ischemic stroke models of adult rhesus monkeys: a comparison of two endovascular methods

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Chen, Jian; Wang, Bincheng; Zhang, Mo; Shi, Jingfei; Ma, Yanhui; Zhu, Zixin; Yan, Feng; He, Xiaoduo; Li, Shengli; Dornbos III, David; Ding, Yuchuan; Ji, Xunming

    2016-01-01

    To further investigate and improve upon current stroke models in nonhuman primates, infarct size, neurologic function and survival were evaluated in two endovascular ischemic models in sixteen rhesus monkeys. The first method utilized a micro-catheter or an inflatable balloon to occlude the M1 segment in six monkeys. In the second model, an autologous clot was injected via a micro-catheter into the M1 segment in ten monkeys. MRI scanning was performed on all monkeys both at baseline and 3 hours after the onset of ischemia. Spetzler neurologic functions were assessed post-operatively, and selective perfusion deficits were confirmed by DSA and MRI in all monkeys. Animals undergoing micro-catheter or balloon occlusion demonstrated more profound hemiparesis, larger infarct sizes, lower Spetzler neurologic scores and increased mortality compared to the thrombus occlusion group. In animals injected with the clot, there was no evidence of dissolution, and the thrombus was either near the injection site (M1) or flushed into the superior division of the MCA (M2). All animals survived the M2 occlusion. M1 occlusion with thrombus generated 50% mortality. This study highlighted clinically important differences in these two models, providing a platform for further study of a translational thromboembolic model of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27534985

  1. The origin of projections from the posterior cingulate and retrosplenial cortices to the anterior, medial dorsal and laterodorsal thalamic nuclei of macaque monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Aggleton, John P; Saunders, Richard C; Wright, Nicholas F; Vann, Seralynne D

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between the posterior cingulate cortex (areas 23 and 31) and the retrosplenial cortex (areas 29 and 30) with the anterior, laterodorsal and dorsal medial thalamic nuclei are thought to support various aspects of cognition, including memory and spatial processing. To detail these interactions better, the present study used retrograde tracers to reveal the origins of the corticothalamic projections in two closely related monkey species (Macaca mulatta, Macaca fascicularis). The medial dorsal thalamic nucleus received only light cortical inputs, which predominantly arose from area 23. Efferents to the anterior medial thalamic nucleus also arose principally from area 23, but these projections proved more numerous than those to the medial dorsal nucleus and also involved additional inputs from areas 29 and 30. The anterior ventral and laterodorsal thalamic nuclei had similar sources of inputs from the posterior cingulate and retrosplenial cortices. For both nuclei, the densest projections arose from areas 29 and 30, with numbers of thalamic inputs often decreasing when going dorsal from area 23a to 23c and to area 31. In all cases, the corticothalamic projections almost always arose from the deepest cortical layer. The different profiles of inputs to the anterior medial and anterior ventral thalamic nuclei reinforce other anatomical and electrophysiological findings suggesting that these adjacent thalamic nuclei serve different, but complementary, functions supporting memory. While the lack of retrosplenial connections singled out the medial dorsal nucleus, the very similar connection patterns shown by the anterior ventral and laterodorsal nuclei point to common roles in cognition. PMID:24134130

  2. Effects of Aroclor 1254 reg sign on hydrocortisone levels in adult Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, J.C.K.; Tryphonas, H.; Jordan, N.; Brien, R.; Karpinski, K.R.; Arnold, D.L. )

    1989-11-01

    Researchers, using female Sprague Dawley rats, reported the effects of chronic (5-7 months) oral dosing with Aroclor 1254{reg sign} (Polychlorinated biphenyls-PCB) on the serum levels of corticosterone, the principle glucocorticoid in rats. Their findings indicated that corticosterone levels were significantly depressed at dose levels of 479 {mu}g/kg bw/day and above. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of PCB on the hydrocortisone levels in Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) serum. In the monkey the controlling hormone is hydrocortisone which is identical to that of humans.

  3. Contrasting infection susceptibility of the Japanese macaques and cynomolgus macaques to closely related malaria parasites, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium cynomolgi.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Shin-Ichiro; Kawai, Satoru; Katakai, Yuko; Takahashi, Hideo; Nakade, Toru; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Horii, Toshihiro; Tanabe, Kazuyuki

    2015-06-01

    Although the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is closely related to Asian Old World monkey malaria parasites, there are no reports of P. vivax infections in macaques. In this study, we compared the infectivity of P. vivax and Plasmodium cynomolgi in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) and in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). The Japanese macaques were highly susceptible to P. cynomolgi but not to P. vivax, whereas cynomolgus macaques showed mild/limited P. cynomolgi infection and were, also, not susceptible to P. vivax. Serotyping and amino acid sequence comparison of erythrocyte surface Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC) indicate that the Japanese macaque DARC sequence is nearly identical to that of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus macaques. This suggests that the macaques share a common mechanism for preventing P. vivax infection. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the Duffy-binding-like (DBL) domain from several different Plasmodium species suggests that P. vivax DBLs will not bind to macaque DARCs, which can explain the lack of P. vivax infectivity. The DBL sequence analyses also suggest that P. cynomolgi DBLs may target Japanese macaque erythrocytes through a DARC-independent interaction.

  4. Positive reinforcement training in squirrel monkeys using clicker training.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Timothy E; Janes, Amy C; Kaufman, Marc J

    2012-08-01

    Nonhuman primates in research environments experience regular stressors that have the potential to alter physiology and brain function, which in turn can confound some types of research studies. Operant conditioning techniques such as positive reinforcement training (PRT), which teaches animals to voluntarily perform desired behaviors, can be applied to improve behavior and reactivity. PRT has been used to train rhesus macaques, marmosets, and several other nonhuman primate species. To our knowledge, the method has yet to be used to train squirrel monkeys to perform complex tasks. Accordingly, we sought to establish whether PRT, utilizing a hand-box clicker (which emits a click sound that acts as the conditioned reinforcer), could be used to train adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis, N = 14). We developed and implemented a training regimen to elicit voluntary participation in routine husbandry, animal transport, and injection procedures. Our secondary goal was to quantify the training time needed to achieve positive results. Squirrel monkeys readily learned the connection between the conditioned reinforcer (the clicker) and the positive reinforcer (food). They rapidly developed proficiency on four tasks of increasing difficulty: target touching, hand sitting, restraint training, and injection training. All subjects mastered target touching behavior within 2 weeks. Ten of 14 subjects (71%) mastered all tasks in 59.2 ± 2.6 days (range: 50-70 days). In trained subjects, it now takes about 1.25 min per monkey to weigh and administer an intramuscular injection, one-third of the time it took before training. From these data, we conclude that clicker box PRT can be successfully learned by a majority of squirrel monkeys within 2 months and that trained subjects can be managed more efficiently. These findings warrant future studies to determine whether PRT may be useful in reducing stress-induced experimental confounds in studies involving squirrel monkeys.

  5. Positive Reinforcement Training in Squirrel Monkeys Using Clicker Training

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Timothy E.; Janes, Amy C.; Kaufman, Marc J.

    2012-01-01

    Nonhuman primates in research environments experience regular stressors that have the potential to alter physiology and brain function, which in turn can confound some types of research studies. Operant conditioning techniques such as positive reinforcement training (PRT), which teaches animals to voluntarily perform desired behaviors, can be applied to improve behavior and reactivity. PRT has been used to train rhesus macaques, marmosets, and several other nonhuman primate species. To our knowledge, the method has yet to be used to train squirrel monkeys to perform complex tasks. Accordingly, we sought to establish whether PRT, utilizing a hand-box clicker (which emits a click sound that acts as the conditioned reinforcer), could be used to train adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis, N=14). We developed and implemented a training regimen to elicit voluntary participation in routine husbandry, animal transport, and injection procedures. Our secondary goal was to quantify the training time needed to achieve positive results. Squirrel monkeys readily learned the connection between the conditioned reinforcer (the clicker) and the positive reinforcer (food). They rapidly developed proficiency on 4 tasks of increasing difficulty: target touching, hand sitting, restraint training, and injection training. All subjects mastered target touching behavior within 2 weeks. Ten of 14 subjects (71%) mastered all tasks in 59.2±2.6 days (range: 50–70 days). In trained subjects, it now takes about 1.25 minutes per monkey to weigh and administer an intramuscular injection, one-third of the time it took before training. From these data, we conclude that clicker box PRT can be successfully learned by a majority of squirrel monkeys within two months and that trained subjects can be managed more efficiently. These findings warrant future studies to determine whether PRT may be useful for reducing stress-induced experimental confounds in studies involving squirrel monkeys

  6. Social relationships of nulliparous young adult females beyond the ordinary age of the first birth in a free-ranging troop of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Katsu, Noriko; Yamada, Kazunori; Nakamichi, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    We describe the social relationships of young adult female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in a free-ranging troop in Arashiyama, Kyoto, Japan, who remained nulliparous beyond the ordinary age of first birth because of contraceptive administration. We observed 12 young nulliparous adult females (6-9 years old) for 270 h and 10 min from 2 February to 5 October 2010. The majority maintained close relationships with their mothers through proximity and grooming, whereas a few had very infrequent social interactions with their mothers. Most had asymmetrical grooming relationships; the grooming they received from unrelated adult females was less than the grooming they gave. Young adult females who had less frequent interactions with their mothers by either proximity or grooming received more grooming from a larger number of unrelated adult females than did those who had more frequent social interactions with their mothers. These results indicate that most young adult females who remained nulliparous beyond the ordinary age of first birth tended to maintain close relationships with their mothers, and their grooming relationships with unrelated adult females were inversely related to the degree of closeness with their mothers.

  7. Acute fasting-induced repression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is reversed by RF-9 administration in the adult male macaque.

    PubMed

    Batool, A; Naz, R; Wazir, M; Azam, A; Ullah, R; Wahab, F; Shahab, M

    2014-12-01

    Recently, hypothalamic RFRP-3 (a mammalian ortholog of avian GnIH) signaling has been proposed as an important negative modulator of the reproductive axis. The current study examined whether repression of reproductive hormonal expression during short-term fasting conditions in higher-order primate is influenced by altered RFRP-3 signaling. Eight intact postpubertal male macaques (Macaca mulatta) were administered a single intravenous bolus of RF-9 (n = 4), a potent and putative RFRP-3 receptor antagonist, or vehicle (n = 4) following a 48-h fasting condition. Intermittent blood samples were collected every 30 min during the 4-h post-bolus period, and blood glucose, plasma cortisol, and testosterone concentrations were measured. Relative to fed conditions, fasting reduced glucose and testosterone levels (p < 0.005) and increased cortisol levels (p < 0.05). Relative to baseline, mean testosterone levels were elevated 150 min after RF-9 (p < 0.05) but not vehicle administration. In addition, elevated mean plasma testosterone levels following RF-9 administration were equivalent to levels observed in normal fed monkeys. These results suggest an important role for RFRP-3 signaling in conveying metabolic state information to the reproductive axis in higher primates.

  8. Acute fasting-induced repression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is reversed by RF-9 administration in the adult male macaque.

    PubMed

    Batool, A; Naz, R; Wazir, M; Azam, A; Ullah, R; Wahab, F; Shahab, M

    2014-12-01

    Recently, hypothalamic RFRP-3 (a mammalian ortholog of avian GnIH) signaling has been proposed as an important negative modulator of the reproductive axis. The current study examined whether repression of reproductive hormonal expression during short-term fasting conditions in higher-order primate is influenced by altered RFRP-3 signaling. Eight intact postpubertal male macaques (Macaca mulatta) were administered a single intravenous bolus of RF-9 (n = 4), a potent and putative RFRP-3 receptor antagonist, or vehicle (n = 4) following a 48-h fasting condition. Intermittent blood samples were collected every 30 min during the 4-h post-bolus period, and blood glucose, plasma cortisol, and testosterone concentrations were measured. Relative to fed conditions, fasting reduced glucose and testosterone levels (p < 0.005) and increased cortisol levels (p < 0.05). Relative to baseline, mean testosterone levels were elevated 150 min after RF-9 (p < 0.05) but not vehicle administration. In addition, elevated mean plasma testosterone levels following RF-9 administration were equivalent to levels observed in normal fed monkeys. These results suggest an important role for RFRP-3 signaling in conveying metabolic state information to the reproductive axis in higher primates. PMID:25181419

  9. Monkey lipsmacking develops like the human speech rhythm.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Ryan J; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F; Ghazanfar, Asif A

    2012-07-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved de novo in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial expressions. We tested this idea by investigating the structure and development of macaque monkey lipsmacks and found that their developmental trajectory is strikingly similar to the one that leads from human infant babbling to adult speech. Specifically, we show that: (1) younger monkeys produce slower, more variable mouth movements and as they get older, these movements become faster and less variable; and (2) this developmental pattern does not occur for another cyclical mouth movement--chewing. These patterns parallel human developmental patterns for speech and chewing. They suggest that, in both species, the two types of rhythmic mouth movements use different underlying neural circuits that develop in different ways. Ultimately, both lipsmacking and speech converge on a ~5 Hz rhythm that represents the frequency that characterizes the speech rhythm of human adults. We conclude that monkey lipsmacking and human speech share a homologous developmental mechanism, lending strong empirical support to the idea that the human speech rhythm evolved from the rhythmic facial expressions of our primate ancestors.

  10. Rod Photoreceptors Express GPR55 in the Adult Vervet Monkey Retina

    PubMed Central

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian; Ptito, Maurice; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert their actions mainly through two receptors, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) and cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R). In recent years, the G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) was suggested as a cannabinoid receptor based on its activation by anandamide and tetrahydrocannabinol. Yet, its formal classification is still a matter of debate. CB1R and CB2R expression patterns are well described for rodent and monkey retinas. In the monkey retina, CB1R has been localized in its neural (cone photoreceptor, horizontal, bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells) and CB2R in glial components (Müller cells). The aim of this study was to determine the expression pattern of GPR55 in the monkey retina by using confocal microscopy. Our results show that GPR55 is strictly localized in the photoreceptor layer of the extrafoveal portion of the retina. Co-immunolabeling of GPR55 with rhodopsin, the photosensitive pigment in rods, revealed a clear overlap of expression throughout the rod structure with most prominent staining in the inner segments. Additionally, double-label of GPR55 with calbindin, a specific marker for cone photoreceptors in the primate retina, allowed us to exclude expression of GPR55 in cones. The labeling of GPR55 in rods was further assessed with a 3D visualization in the XZ and YZ planes thus confirming its exclusive expression in rods. These results provide data on the distribution of GPR55 in the monkey retina, different than CB1R and CB2R. The presence of GPR55 in rods suggests a function of this receptor in scotopic vision that needs to be demonstrated. PMID:24244730

  11. Sexual dimorphism of sulcal length asymmetry in the cerebrum of adult cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Imai, Noritaka; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Fukunishi, Katsuhiro; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2011-12-01

    The present study aimed to quantitatively clarify the gross anatomical asymmetry and sexual dimorphism of the cerebral hemispheres of cynomolgus monkeys. While the fronto-occipital length of the right and left cerebral hemispheres was not different between sexes, a statistically significant rightward asymmetry was detected in the cerebral width at the perisylvian region in females, but not in males (narrower width of the left side in the females). An asymmetry quotient of the sulcal lengths revealed a rightward asymmetry in the inferior occipital sulcus and a leftward asymmetry in the central and intraparietal sulci in both sexes. However, the laterality of the lengths of other sulci was different for males and females. The arcuate sulcus was directed rightward in males but there was no rightward bias in females. Interestingly, the principle sulcus and lateral fissure were left-lateralized in the males, but right-lateralized in the females. The results suggest that lateralization patterns are regionally and sexually different in the cerebrum of cynomolgus monkeys. The present results provide a reference for quantitatively evaluating the normality of the cerebral cortical morphology in cynomolgus monkeys.

  12. Reproductive toxicity of chromium in adult bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata Geoffrey). Reversible oxidative stress in the semen

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Senthivinayagam . E-mail: subbi100@yahoo.co.uk; Rajendiran, Gopalakrishnan; Sekhar, Pasupathi; Gowri, Chandrahasan; Govindarajulu, Pera; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael

    2006-09-15

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates chromium-induced reproductive toxicity. Monthly semen samples were collected from adult monkeys (Macaca radiata), which were exposed to varying doses (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) of chromium (as potassium dichromate) for 6 months through drinking water. Chromium treatment decreased sperm count, sperm forward motility and the specific activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, and the concentration of reduced glutathione in both seminal plasma and sperm in a dose- and duration-dependent manner. On the other hand, the quantum of hydrogen peroxide in the seminal plasma/sperm from monkeys exposed to chromium increased with increasing dose and duration of chromium exposure. All these changes were reversed after 6 months of chromium-free exposure period. Simultaneous supplementation of vitamin C (0.5 g/L; 1.0 g/L; 2.0 g/L) prevented the development of chromium-induced oxidative stress. Data support the hypothesis and show that chronic chromium exposure induces a reversible oxidative stress in the seminal plasma and sperm by creating an imbalance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidant system, leading to sperm death and reduced motility of live sperm.

  13. Reproductive toxicity of chromium in adult bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata Geoffrey). Reversible oxidative stress in the semen.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Senthivinayagam; Rajendiran, Gopalakrishnan; Sekhar, Pasupathi; Gowri, Chandrahasan; Govindarajulu, Pera; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael

    2006-09-15

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates chromium-induced reproductive toxicity. Monthly semen samples were collected from adult monkeys (Macaca radiata), which were exposed to varying doses (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) of chromium (as potassium dichromate) for 6 months through drinking water. Chromium treatment decreased sperm count, sperm forward motility and the specific activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, and the concentration of reduced glutathione in both seminal plasma and sperm in a dose- and duration-dependent manner. On the other hand, the quantum of hydrogen peroxide in the seminal plasma/sperm from monkeys exposed to chromium increased with increasing dose and duration of chromium exposure. All these changes were reversed after 6 months of chromium-free exposure period. Simultaneous supplementation of vitamin C (0.5 g/L; 1.0 g/L; 2.0 g/L) prevented the development of chromium-induced oxidative stress. Data support the hypothesis and show that chronic chromium exposure induces a reversible oxidative stress in the seminal plasma and sperm by creating an imbalance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidant system, leading to sperm death and reduced motility of live sperm. PMID:16678873

  14. “Subpial Fan Cell” — A Class of Calretinin Neuron in Layer 1 of Adult Monkey Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gabbott, Paul L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Layer 1 of the cortex contains populations of neurochemically distinct neurons and afferent fibers which markedly affect neural activity in the apical dendritic tufts of pyramidal cells. Understanding the causal mechanisms requires knowledge of the cellular architecture and synaptic organization of layer 1. This study has identified eight morphological classes of calretinin immunopositive (CRet+) neurons (including Cajal-Retzius cells) in layer 1 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in adult monkey (Macaca fasicularis), with a distinct class — termed “subpial fan (SPF) cell” — described in detail. SPF cells were rare horizontal unipolar CRet+ cells located directly beneath the pia with a single thick primary dendrite that branched into a characteristic fan-like dendritic tree tangential to the pial surface. Dendrites had spines, filamentous processes and thorny branchlets. SPF cells lay millimeters apart with intralaminar axons that ramified widely in upper layer 1. Such cells were GABA immunonegative (-) and occurred in areas beyond PFC. Interspersed amidst SPF cells displaying normal structural integrity were degenerating CRet+ neurons (including SPF cells) and clumps of lipofuscin-rich cellular debris. The number of degenerating SPF cells increased during adulthood. Ultrastructural analyses indicated SPF cell somata received asymmetric (A — presumed excitatory) and symmetric (S — presumed inhibitory) synaptic contacts. Proximal dendritic shafts received mainly S-type and distal shafts mostly A-type input. All dendritic thorns and most dendritic spines received both synapse types. The tangential areal density of SPF cell axonal varicosities varied radially from parent somata — with dense clusters in more distal zones. All boutons formed A-type contacts with CRet- structures. The main post-synaptic targets were dendritic shafts (67%; mostly spine-bearing) and dendritic spines (24%). SPF-SPF cell innervation was not observed. Morphometry of SPF cells

  15. Anterior hippocampal volume is reduced in behaviorally depressed female cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Willard, Stephanie L; Friedman, David P; Henkel, Craig K; Shively, Carol A

    2009-11-01

    Hippocampal (HC) function and morphology have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Reduced HC volume has been observed in depressed humans, although the effect is not always significant. Studies of functional differentiation of the HC have revealed that the anterior portion is associated with emotional and anxiety-related functioning, and the posterior portion with memory processing. As such, measuring whole HC volume may mask differences seen only in the anterior or posterior HC. We used unbiased stereology to measure whole, anterior, and posterior HC volumes in 12 adult female cynomolgus macaques, half of which exhibited spontaneously occurring depressive behavior defined as a slumped/collapsed body posture with open eyes, and a relative lack of responsivity to environmental stimuli. The two groups were otherwise matched on circulating estradiol, progesterone, and cortisol levels, social status, estimated age, and body weight. Frozen postmortem HC tissue from depressed and nondepressed monkeys was serially sectioned and thionin-stained. According to established neuroanatomical guidelines and with the aid of Neurolucida software (MBF Bioscience), every 10th section throughout the extent of the HC was manually traced and used to reconstruct the 3D models used to determine volumes. Anterior and posterior HC were delineated by the presence or absence of the uncus. No significant differences were found between depressed and nondepressed monkeys for whole or posterior HC volume, although the average HC volume was 4% smaller in depressed than nondepressed monkeys. Anterior HC volumes were significantly smaller (15.4%) in depressed compared to nondepressed monkeys. These results indicate that reduced volume in the anterior HC, an area previously implicated in emotional functioning, may be associated with a depressive phenotype in female cynomolgus macaques.

  16. Performing monkeys of Bangladesh: characterizing their source and genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M Kamrul; Feeroz, M Mostafa; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Engel, Gregory A; Akhtar, Sharmin; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Smith, David Glenn

    2016-04-01

    The acquisition and training of monkeys to perform is a centuries-old tradition in South Asia, resulting in a large number of rhesus macaques kept in captivity for this purpose. The performing monkeys are reportedly collected from free-ranging populations, and may escape from their owners or may be released into other populations. In order to determine whether this tradition involving the acquisition and movement of animals has influenced the population structure of free-ranging rhesus macaques in Bangladesh, we first characterized the source of these monkeys. Biological samples from 65 performing macaques collected between January 2010 and August 2013 were analyzed for genetic variation using 716 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA. Performing monkey sequences were compared with those of free-ranging rhesus macaque populations in Bangladesh, India and Myanmar. Forty-five haplotypes with 116 (16 %) polymorphic nucleotide sites were detected among the performing monkeys. As for the free-ranging rhesus population, most of the substitutions (89 %) were transitions, and no indels (insertion/deletion) were observed. The estimate of the mean number of pair-wise differences for the performing monkey population was 10.1264 ± 4.686, compared to 14.076 ± 6.363 for the free-ranging population. Fifteen free-ranging rhesus macaque populations were identified as the source of performing monkeys in Bangladesh; several of these populations were from areas where active provisioning has resulted in a large number of macaques. The collection of performing monkeys from India was also evident. PMID:26758818

  17. A newly-found pattern of social relationships among adults within one-male units of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxenalla) in the Qinling Mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Chengliang; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Zhao, Haitao; Li, Baoguo

    2013-12-01

    Group living provides various advantages to individuals in regards to protection avoidance, intergroup competition, productive success and social information. Stable one-male units (OMUs) consist of relationships between the adult females and the resident male as well as the relationships among adult females. Based on continuous observation of a reproductive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in the Qinling Mountains, we analyzed the relationships among adult individual dyads within 4 OMUs. The results indicated that in golden snub-nosed monkey societies, females not only had no strong tendency to build a relationship with the resident male in the OMU but also had no strong tendency to build relationships with other females in the OMU. In comparison with hamadryas (Papio hamadryas) and gelada baboons (Theropithecus gelada), the relationships within golden snub-nosed monkeys OMUs showed neither the star-shaped pattern observed in hamadryas baboons nor the net-shaped pattern observed in gelada baboons. We concluded that the relationships within golden snub-nosed monkey OMUs indicated a third pattern in nonhuman primate societies. Future research is required to determine the potential mechanisms for such a pattern.

  18. Social correlates of the dominance rank and long-term cortisol levels in adolescent and adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoli; Wu, Xujun; Morrill, Ryan J.; Li, Zhifei; Li, Chunlu; Yang, Shangchuan; Li, Zhaoxia; Cui, Ding; Lv, Longbao; Hu, Zhengfei; Zhang, Bo; Yin, Yong; Guo, Liyun; Qin, Dongdong; Hu, Xintian

    2016-01-01

    A common pattern in dominance hierarchies is that some ranks result in higher levels of psychosocial stress than others. Such stress can lead to negative health outcomes, possibly through altered levels of stress hormones. The dominance rank-stress physiology relationship is known to vary between species; sometimes dominants show higher levels of glucocorticoid stress hormones, whereas in other cases subordinates show higher levels. It is less clear how this relationship varies between groups of different ages or cultures. In this study, we used long-term cortisol measurement methods to compare the effect of rank on cortisol levels in adult and adolescent male rhesus macaques. In the adult groups, subordinates had significantly higher cortisol levels. In the adolescents, no significant correlation between cortisol and status was found. Further analysis demonstrated that the adult hierarchy was stricter than that of the adolescents. Adult subordinates received extreme aggression more frequently than dominants, and this class of behavior was positively correlated with cortisol; by contrast, adolescents showed neither trend. Together, these findings provide evidence for a cortisol-rank relationship determined by social factors, namely, despotism of the group, and highlight the importance of group-specific social analysis when comparing or combining results obtained from different groups of animals. PMID:27145729

  19. Social correlates of the dominance rank and long-term cortisol levels in adolescent and adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoli; Wu, Xujun; Morrill, Ryan J; Li, Zhifei; Li, Chunlu; Yang, Shangchuan; Li, Zhaoxia; Cui, Ding; Lv, Longbao; Hu, Zhengfei; Zhang, Bo; Yin, Yong; Guo, Liyun; Qin, Dongdong; Hu, Xintian

    2016-01-01

    A common pattern in dominance hierarchies is that some ranks result in higher levels of psychosocial stress than others. Such stress can lead to negative health outcomes, possibly through altered levels of stress hormones. The dominance rank-stress physiology relationship is known to vary between species; sometimes dominants show higher levels of glucocorticoid stress hormones, whereas in other cases subordinates show higher levels. It is less clear how this relationship varies between groups of different ages or cultures. In this study, we used long-term cortisol measurement methods to compare the effect of rank on cortisol levels in adult and adolescent male rhesus macaques. In the adult groups, subordinates had significantly higher cortisol levels. In the adolescents, no significant correlation between cortisol and status was found. Further analysis demonstrated that the adult hierarchy was stricter than that of the adolescents. Adult subordinates received extreme aggression more frequently than dominants, and this class of behavior was positively correlated with cortisol; by contrast, adolescents showed neither trend. Together, these findings provide evidence for a cortisol-rank relationship determined by social factors, namely, despotism of the group, and highlight the importance of group-specific social analysis when comparing or combining results obtained from different groups of animals. PMID:27145729

  20. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following intravenous and intramuscular administration in male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kristi R.; Pypendop, Bruno H.; Christe, Kari L.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine in conscious rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) after intravenous (IV) and intramuscular (IM) administration. Four healthy, opioid-naïve, socially-housed, adult male macaques were used. Buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg) was administered intravenously as a bolus or intramuscularly on separate occasions. Blood samples were collected prior to, and up to 24 h, post-administration. Serum buprenorphine concentrations were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed with commercially available software. Mean residence time in the IV study as compared to the IM study was 177 (159–189) minutes vs. 185 (174–214) minutes, respectively [median (range)]. In the IV study, concentration back extrapolated to time zero was found to be 33.0 (16.8–57.0) ng/mL [median (range)]. On the other hand, the maximum serum concentration found in the IM study was 11.8 (6.30–14.8) ng/mL [median (range)]. Rhesus macaques maintained concentrations greater than 0.10 ng/mL for over 24 h in the IV study and over 12 h in the IM study. Bioavailability was found to be 68.1 (59.3–71.2)% [median (range)]. No significant adverse effects were observed in the monkeys at the 0.03 mg/kg dose of buprenorphine during either study. PMID:24666428

  1. Park Rangers’ Behaviors and Their Effects on Tourists and Tibetan Macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Rie; Sheeran, Lori K.; Li, Jin-hua; Sun, Lixing; Wang, Xi; Pritchard, Alexander J.; DuVall-Lash, Alexander S.; Wagner, R. Steve

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Conflict between macaques and humans is a commonly reported problem in Asian tourism. However, without understanding how macaques are managed, the establishment of an effective management design is impracticable. This study explored how monkeys were managed and tourists were regulated at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys in Mt. Huangshan, Anhui Province, China, through a field observation. Two teams of park rangers alternated monthly and managed a group of macaques. The results suggested that undesired tourists’ interactions with monkeys were not regularly intervened by park rangers, and park rangers established dominance over the monkeys by using physical threats to manage them. Abstract Previous studies have reported the negative impacts of tourism on nonhuman primates (NHPs) and tourists and advocated the improvement of tourism management, yet what constitutes good quality management remains unclear. We explored whether rates of macaque aggression and self-directed behaviors (SDBs) differed under the supervision of two park ranger teams at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys (VWM) in Mt. Huangshan, Anhui Province, China. The two ranger teams provisioned and managed a group of macaques on an alternating monthly basis. Monkey, tourist and ranger behaviors were collected from August 16–September 30, 2012. Macaque aggression and SDB rates did not differ significantly under the management of the two teams. Overall, there was little intervention in tourist-macaque interactions by park rangers, and even when rangers discouraged tourists’ undesirable behaviors, tourist interactions with monkeys persisted. Furthermore, only one or sometimes two park rangers managed monkeys and tourists, and rangers established dominance over the monkeys to control them. In order to effectively manage tourists and monkeys by a single park ranger, we recommend that rangers: (1) prohibit tourists from feeding; (2) move around the viewing platform more frequently; and (3) limit

  2. Behavioral responses of Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) to variations in environmental conditions in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Ménard, N; Vallet, D

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the behavioral responses of Barbary macaques to seasonal and interhabitat variations in resource availability were analyzed over an entire annual cycle. Two groups, one in an evergreen cedar-oak forest (Djurdjura) and the other in a deciduous oak forest (Akfadou), were observed. In this paper, references to data on resource availability published elsewhere are made. Time budget has been studied. Variations in foraging and moving time, in day-range lengths, and in time moving in trees have been considered to estimate the variations in foraging effort and thus energy expenditure. Great monthly variations in foraging effort and other activities were observed in both habitats. In early spring, when resource availabilities were maximal, foraging effort was low while monkeys maximized their feeding time (about 5 h/day). In June, during the peak of the birth season and the rearing period, monkeys minimized their feeding time to the benefit of social interactions (to 1.6-2.7 h/day), whatever the food availability, which was low in Akfadou and high in Djurdjura. In addition, foraging effort remained low in Djurdjura, while it increased in Akfadou. Thus, at the beginning of the dry summer period, monkeys in Akfadou were in a less favorable position than those in Djurdjura. At both sites, in periods of food shortage in summer or in winter, monkeys displayed two different strategies. In the former case, their foraging effort increased, while in the second one it remained relatively low. Whatever the foraging effort, monkeys did not reach the same amount of feeding time as in early spring. In the poorest site of Akfadou, foraging effort was globally greater than in the richest site of Djurdjura, especially for adults. At both sites, adult males spent more time feeding than juveniles and less time in social interactions. Results are discussed according to rearing period, temperatures, and day length constraints. The limits of adaptability to different habitats are

  3. How monkeys see others: Discrimination and recognition of monkeys' shape.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, W

    1994-12-01

    The two experiments described in this study address the question of the perceptual basis of species discrimination and body recognition in monkeys. Longtailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were trained to discriminate line drawings of different monkey bodies. The procedure consisted of a simultaneous discrimination between four images under continuous reinforcement. Social communication between the test animal and other group members during test sessions was almost unrestricted. In the first experiment all monkeys learned, within at least 7 sessions, to discriminate one monkey from other monkeys. Discrimination was invariant against transformations of size and rotation of the stimuli. A preference test for particular features resulted in a graded estimation of particular body features. Generalisation to different views of facial stimuli was demonstrated. In the second experiment the monkeys had to relearn a new association which involved a differentiation of the previously shown stimuli. After reaching the learning criterion it was shown that the same features as in the previous experiment were evaluated differently. The experiments generally support the view that perceptual mechanisms of the signal receiver are crucial for individual recognition. Results are discussed in contrast to a 'theory of mind' approach in primate cognition.

  4. Thyroid status of female rhesus monkeys and preliminary information on impact of perchlorate administration.

    PubMed

    Ozpinar, Aysel; Golub, Mari S; Poppenga, Robert H; Blount, Benjamin C; Gillespie, Jerry R

    2011-07-01

    Thyroid status was assessed in adult female rhesus monkey breeders at the California National Primate Research Center at the beginning of the breeding season. The 95% confidence intervals for thyrotropin (TSH), thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)) (n = 66-80) were similar to those previously reported in smaller samples of macaque monkeys. Based on human criteria, 10 of 80 monkeys (12%) were hypothyroid (TSH > 2.0 µIU/mL). Because hypothyroxinaemia can be a risk factor in pregnancy, T(4) status was compared with past breeding history, breeding outcome for that season and general health records in a subset of 42 breeders. Age, weight and parity did not differ between monkeys in the lowest T(4) quartile as compared with those in the upper three quartiles. However, T(4) concentrations were significantly associated with the number of missed menstrual cycles during the previous breeding season. In additional work, three healthy lactating rhesus monkeys were given three different doses of environmental contaminant and thyroid iodine uptake inhibitor, ammonium perchlorate (0.006, 0.34, 12.8 mg/kg/day, respectively) in food for two weeks. Thyroid status variables (TSH, T(4), T(3), thyroid radioactive iodine uptake) were then measured. In the monkey receiving the highest perchlorate dose, iodine uptake was suppressed relative to baseline. The study shows the availability of tools to study thyroid status in rhesus monkeys, the variability of thyroid status in the breeder colony and the potential ability of environmental factors to influence thyroid status. PMID:21669905

  5. Diurnal pattern of pulsatile luteinizing hormone and testosterone secretion in adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): influence of the timing of daily meal intake.

    PubMed

    Mattern, L G; Helmreich, D L; Cameron, J L

    1993-03-01

    Adult male rhesus monkeys have a diurnal pattern of reproductive hormone secretion that is characterized by significantly elevated LH and testosterone secretion in the evening hours and a nadir in secretion of these hormones in the morning. To test the hypothesis that the daily pattern of food intake may play a role in regulating the diurnal pattern of reproductive hormone secretion we performed three studies. First, to determine the relationship between the timing of the diurnal rise in LH secretion and meal consumption, blood samples were collected from 13 adult male rhesus monkeys via chronically indwelling venous catheters (samples every 15-20 min from 0800-0800 h) while monkeys were maintained on the standard feeding regimen in our colony (one meal of Purina monkey chow fed between 1100 and 1200 h). On a day of normal feeding there was a significant diurnal rhythm in mean LH concentrations with elevated levels at night (nadir: 13.41 +/- 0.82 ng/ml from 0800-1100 h; peak: 21.34 +/- 1.56 ng/ml from 2000-2300 h, P < or = 0.05). The rising phase of the diurnal rhythm in LH secretion was apparent starting in the early afternoon, shortly after the daily meal, at 1400 h (5 h before lights went off at 1900 h), and the diurnal rise in LH secretion was no longer apparent by 0500 h (several hours before the lights went on at 0700 h). Second, we examined the influence of missing the daily meal on the diurnal pattern of LH and testosterone secretion. Blood samples were collected for a 24-h period on a day of fasting from 9 monkeys. On a day of fasting there was no diurnal rise in plasma LH or testosterone concentrations; plasma concentrations of these hormones remained at the low morning levels throughout the day. Third, we examined the diurnal pattern of LH and testosterone secretion after adapting 5 monkeys (for 6-8 weeks) to a new meal time that was 6 h later in the day than the standard meal time (i.e. at 1700 h). After adaptation to this later feeding time monkeys

  6. Fasting-induced suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the adult rhesus monkey: evidence for involvement of excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Shahab, M; Zaman, W; Bashir, K; Arslan, M

    1997-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine whether acute food-restriction in non-human primates, suppresses hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis via alterations in the excitatory amino acid (EAA) neurotransmitter-utilizing drive to the GnRH neuron. This was achieved indirectly by comparing the plasma testosterone (T) responses to administration of an excitatory amino acid analogue, N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid (NMA), in acutely fasted and normal fed monkeys. A set of 4 chair-restrained adult male rhesus monkeys, was assigned to the following treatments: a) normal feeding, b) one-day fasting (omission of morning and afternoon meals), c) normal feeding+NMA (15 mg/kg BW) and d) one-day fasting+NMA (15 mg/kg BW). Starting 1 h after the provision or omission of the afternoon meal, frequent blood sampling was initiated at 15-min intervals for a period of 3-h. NMA was administered as an iv bolus 1 h after start of the sampling. Secretion of T was affected (P<0.005) by the treatments. A peak in T was evident during the first h of the sampling in fed but not fasted monkeys. Mean 3-h T concentrations were suppressed (P<0.001) by the fasting. Administration of NMA in fasting conditions resulted into an acute stimulation of T secretion in 2 of the 4 monkeys. However, mean 60-min post-NMA T concentrations were greater (P<0.05) than those prevailing during the same period in fasted animals not given NMA. In contrast, all 4 fed-monkeys showed significant T elevations in plasma immediately following the NMA challenge and mean T levels during the 60-min post-NMA period were higher (P<0.05) than those in fed animals not injected with NMA, at a comparable time. Testosterone area under the curve for the 2-h post-NMA period was greater (P<0.05) in fed- than in fasted-monkeys. These results indicate that although NMA can stimulate GnRH release both in fed and short-term fasting conditions, the response appears to be suppressed in the later situation suggesting that fasting

  7. Food-snatching behavior of free-ranging Japanese macaques observed on Shodoshima Island: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Islamul; Tsuji, Yamato; Suryobroto, Bambang; Watanabe, Kunio

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the characteristics of a particular food-snatching behavior in which one individual forced another's mouth open and grabbed the food, as performed by free-ranging Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in Choshikei Monkey Park on Shodoshima Island, western Japan. We conducted a survey in late June 2012 and observed one of two monkey troops, comprising 214 monkeys. We recorded the age classes and sexes of the individuals who performed the snatching behavior and were snatched from, and examined the effects of provisioned food distribution and quantity on the frequency of snatching trials and success. During the survey, we recorded 747 snatching trials, of which 609 were successful, all of which were performed by seven individuals: one adult male and six adult females. The snatching behavior occurred only during provisioning. The target animals were primarily juveniles (650 trials, 578 successful), while cases in which food was snatched from adult females (93 trials, 30 successful) and subadult females (4 trials, 1 success) were less frequent. Among the juveniles, small juveniles had food snatched more frequently than large juveniles. The higher frequency of snatching trials against juveniles was likely due to their subordinate nature. Neither the distribution nor quantity of the provisioned foods had significant effects on the number of snatching trials and successes, while the time elapsed after provisioning had significant negative effects, attributed to a decrease in the number of wheat grains left within the mouth pouch of the potential target animals.

  8. Stone handling behavior in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), a behavioral propensity for solitary object play shared with Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Nahallage, Charmalie A D; Huffman, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Stone handling (SH) behavior was systematically studied in a captive troop of rhesus macaques housed at the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University, and compared with the results of long-term studies of this behavior in Japanese macaques, to evaluate the similarities of SH behavior in these two closely related species. Similar to Japanese macaques, rhesus macaques showed age-related differences in SH. Young animals were more active and displayed more SH patterns and bouts than did adults. Furthermore, the young displayed SH at a higher frequency and their bouts were of a shorter duration, compared to adults. Young adults were more active and displayed more patterns than did older adults. On the other hand, older adults were more conservative and displayed fewer patterns, and engaged in them for longer durations. All individuals displayed SH more frequently in relaxed environmental and social conditions. While lacking an apparent immediate adaptive value, practice of the behavior has been proposed to have long-term functional value for neural and cognitive development in the young and for the maintenance or repair of neuro-pathways in aging macaques that habitually perform the behavior. The results presented here are consistent with what we know about Japanese macaque SH. Given the uniformity of SH behavioral parameters and these two macaque species' close phylogenetic relatedness, we propose that a similar functional and adaptive value for SH can be inferred for rhesus macaques.

  9. Stone handling behavior in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), a behavioral propensity for solitary object play shared with Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Nahallage, Charmalie A D; Huffman, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Stone handling (SH) behavior was systematically studied in a captive troop of rhesus macaques housed at the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University, and compared with the results of long-term studies of this behavior in Japanese macaques, to evaluate the similarities of SH behavior in these two closely related species. Similar to Japanese macaques, rhesus macaques showed age-related differences in SH. Young animals were more active and displayed more SH patterns and bouts than did adults. Furthermore, the young displayed SH at a higher frequency and their bouts were of a shorter duration, compared to adults. Young adults were more active and displayed more patterns than did older adults. On the other hand, older adults were more conservative and displayed fewer patterns, and engaged in them for longer durations. All individuals displayed SH more frequently in relaxed environmental and social conditions. While lacking an apparent immediate adaptive value, practice of the behavior has been proposed to have long-term functional value for neural and cognitive development in the young and for the maintenance or repair of neuro-pathways in aging macaques that habitually perform the behavior. The results presented here are consistent with what we know about Japanese macaque SH. Given the uniformity of SH behavioral parameters and these two macaque species' close phylogenetic relatedness, we propose that a similar functional and adaptive value for SH can be inferred for rhesus macaques. PMID:22037669

  10. Positional behavior of free-ranging Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Chatani, Kaoru

    2003-01-01

    Positional behavior was quantitatively studied in identified free-ranging Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). Five male and 11 female adults were observed in a forested mountain habitat. Data were analyzed for proportion of bout distance, number and time of each locomotion and postural type. Japanese macaques are semiterrestrial, and mainly walk and run quadrupedally. This supports the notion that Macaca are generally quadrupeds. Sex differences in positional behavior were found in the preference of substrate and types of positional behavior. Males and females tend to be terrestrial and arboreal, respectively. Males leap more frequently and longer in distance than do females when they are feeding in trees. These sex differences are considered to be related to differences in morphology, food choice, social activity, and the nursing of infants. Frequencies of leaping and the distance covered by leaping in Japanese macaques are more than those of long-tailed macaques which are arboreal quadrupeds. However, Japanese macaques leap shorter distances at a time than do long-tailed macaques, which indicates that body size may be related to leaping distance more than the frequency of leaping and the distance covered by leaping. Japanese macaques are not as specialized for terrestrial locomotion as pig-tailed macaques. They use both terrestrial and arboreal supports, and are considered to be semi-terrestrial quadrupeds, somewhere between the arboreal long-tailed macaque and the terrestrial pig-tailed macaque.

  11. Effects of social manipulations and environmental enrichment on behavior and cell-mediated immune responses in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Schapiro, Steven J

    2002-08-01

    This paper reviews a series of studies that have examined the effects of manipulations to the social and the inanimate environments on the behavior and cell-mediated immune responses of rhesus macaques of various ages living in different settings. In general, enrichment of the inanimate environment with toys, structures, foraging devices, and/or videotapes increased the amount of species-typical behavior expressed by the monkeys, but did not affect their immune responses. Housing monkeys socially, on the other hand, not only resulted in increased time spent in species-typical activities, but also resulted in (1) decreases in time spent in abnormal behavior and (2) changes in a number of immune parameters. Additionally, attempts to directly influence the affiliative interactions of socially housed adult rhesus have resulted in systematic changes in affiliative behavior, although anticipated accompanying systematic alterations to cell-mediated immune responses have yet to be realized. The data suggest that aspects of the physical and social environments influence behavioral and immunological parameters in captive macaques in the absence of other experimental manipulations. As such, these influences need to be appropriately managed and/or controlled in order to minimize potential confounds in experimental designs.

  12. Cell Number and Neuropil Alterations in Subregions of the Anterior Hippocampus in a Female Monkey Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Stephanie L.; Riddle, David R.; Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Shively, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The anterior hippocampus is associated with emotional functioning and hippocampal volume is reduced in depression. More women are clinically depressed than men, yet the depressed female brain is little studied. We reported reduced anterior hippocampal volume in behaviorally depressed adult female cynomolgus macaques; the mechanisms contributing to that reduction are unknown. The present study represents the first systematic morphological investigation of the entire hippocampus in depressed female primates. Methods Cellular determinants of hippocampal size were examined in subregions of anterior and posterior hippocampus in antidepressant-naive, adult female monkeys characterized for behavioral depression and matched on variables that influence hippocampal size (n=8 depressed, 8 nondepressed). Unbiased stereology was used to estimate neuronal and glial numbers, neuronal soma size, and regional and layer volumes. Results Neuropil and cell layer volumes were reduced in cornu ammonis (CA)1 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the anterior but not the posterior hippocampus of depressed compared to nondepressed monkeys. Glial numbers were 30% lower in anterior CA1 and DG of depressed monkeys, with no differences observed in the posterior hippocampus. Granule neuron number tended towards a reduction in anterior DG; pyramidal neuron number was unchanged in any region. Size of pyramidal neurons and glial densities tended to be reduced throughout the whole hippocampus of depressed monkeys, whereas neuronal densities were unchanged. Conclusions The reduced size of the anterior hippocampus in depressed females appears to arise from alterations in numbers of glia and extent of neuropil, but not numbers of neurons, in CA1 and DG. PMID:23607969

  13. An experimental examination of female responses to infant face coloration in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Gerald, Melissa S; Waitt, Corri; Maestripieri, Dario

    2006-11-01

    In many primates, infants possess distinctive coloration that changes as a function of age. This colour is thought to serve the purpose of eliciting caretaking behaviour from the mother as well as other conspecifics. The present study investigated the responses of adult female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to pictures of infant faces in relation to infant age and facial coloration. Study animals were shown digitized images of neonates and 5-6-month-old infants displaying either unaltered facial colour, pink neonatal colour, or novel (green) facial colour. While infant and neonate faces of all colours elicited the attention of adult females, pink neonatal facial coloration did not appear to be especially attractive to subjects in contrast with the findings from an earlier study [Higley, J.D., Hopkins, W.D., Hirsch, R.M. Marra, L.M. Suomi S.J., 1987. Preferences of female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) for infantile coloration. Dev. Psychobiol. 20, 7-18]. The results suggest that infant facial colour is not particularly important in mediating infant attractiveness to rhesus macaque females as previously suggested or that other infantile facial characteristics might be more important than colour in eliciting caretaking behaviours amongst females. PMID:16879930

  14. Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Pig-Tailed Macaque (Macaca nemestrina) and Tiger (Panthera tigris) Populations at Tourism Venues in Thailand and Aspects of Their Welfare.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Burbach, Jan; Ronfot, Delphine; Srisangiam, Rossukon

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on determining the size and welfare aspects of Asian elephant, pig-tailed macaque and tiger populations at facilities open to tourists in Thailand. Data were gathered from 118 venues through direct observations and interviews with staff. A score sheet-based welfare assessment was used to calculate scores between 1 and 10, indicating each venue's welfare situation. Factors such as freedom of movement for the animals, access to veterinary care, environmental noise quality, hygiene standards and work intensity were included in the score sheet. 1688 elephants, 371 macaques and 621 tigers were found at the venues. 89 venues exclusively kept elephants, 9 designated 'Monkey schools' offered macaque shows, 4 venues kept primarily tigers, mostly for petting and photo opportunities, and the remaining venues kept a mix of these animals. A strong imbalance in female to male gender ratios was recorded with about 4:1 for adult elephants and 1:4 for adult macaques. Severely inadequate welfare conditions were common, with 75% of macaques and 99% of tigers being kept at venues with scores less than 5. 86% of elephants were kept in inadequate conditions at venues with scores between 3 and 5, but a significant number of venues with scores above 5 were found. 4.6% of elephants were provided commendable conditions, reaching assessment scores of 8 and above. 71% of venues did not offer any sort of education about animals to visitors. This study is the first to assess welfare aspects of captive wild animals at tourism venues across Thailand. It concludes that significant concerns exist about the welfare of wild animals in the tourism sector of Thailand. Urgent attention needs to be given to address these concerns and prevent further suffering. But also to ensure the demand for wild animals doesn't have a negative impact on wild populations.

  15. Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Pig-Tailed Macaque (Macaca nemestrina) and Tiger (Panthera tigris) Populations at Tourism Venues in Thailand and Aspects of Their Welfare

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Burbach, Jan; Ronfot, Delphine; Srisangiam, Rossukon

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on determining the size and welfare aspects of Asian elephant, pig-tailed macaque and tiger populations at facilities open to tourists in Thailand. Data were gathered from 118 venues through direct observations and interviews with staff. A score sheet-based welfare assessment was used to calculate scores between 1 and 10, indicating each venue’s welfare situation. Factors such as freedom of movement for the animals, access to veterinary care, environmental noise quality, hygiene standards and work intensity were included in the score sheet. 1688 elephants, 371 macaques and 621 tigers were found at the venues. 89 venues exclusively kept elephants, 9 designated ‘Monkey schools’ offered macaque shows, 4 venues kept primarily tigers, mostly for petting and photo opportunities, and the remaining venues kept a mix of these animals. A strong imbalance in female to male gender ratios was recorded with about 4:1 for adult elephants and 1:4 for adult macaques. Severely inadequate welfare conditions were common, with 75% of macaques and 99% of tigers being kept at venues with scores less than 5. 86% of elephants were kept in inadequate conditions at venues with scores between 3 and 5, but a significant number of venues with scores above 5 were found. 4.6% of elephants were provided commendable conditions, reaching assessment scores of 8 and above. 71% of venues did not offer any sort of education about animals to visitors. This study is the first to assess welfare aspects of captive wild animals at tourism venues across Thailand. It concludes that significant concerns exist about the welfare of wild animals in the tourism sector of Thailand. Urgent attention needs to be given to address these concerns and prevent further suffering. But also to ensure the demand for wild animals doesn’t have a negative impact on wild populations. PMID:26407173

  16. Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Pig-Tailed Macaque (Macaca nemestrina) and Tiger (Panthera tigris) Populations at Tourism Venues in Thailand and Aspects of Their Welfare.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Burbach, Jan; Ronfot, Delphine; Srisangiam, Rossukon

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on determining the size and welfare aspects of Asian elephant, pig-tailed macaque and tiger populations at facilities open to tourists in Thailand. Data were gathered from 118 venues through direct observations and interviews with staff. A score sheet-based welfare assessment was used to calculate scores between 1 and 10, indicating each venue's welfare situation. Factors such as freedom of movement for the animals, access to veterinary care, environmental noise quality, hygiene standards and work intensity were included in the score sheet. 1688 elephants, 371 macaques and 621 tigers were found at the venues. 89 venues exclusively kept elephants, 9 designated 'Monkey schools' offered macaque shows, 4 venues kept primarily tigers, mostly for petting and photo opportunities, and the remaining venues kept a mix of these animals. A strong imbalance in female to male gender ratios was recorded with about 4:1 for adult elephants and 1:4 for adult macaques. Severely inadequate welfare conditions were common, with 75% of macaques and 99% of tigers being kept at venues with scores less than 5. 86% of elephants were kept in inadequate conditions at venues with scores between 3 and 5, but a significant number of venues with scores above 5 were found. 4.6% of elephants were provided commendable conditions, reaching assessment scores of 8 and above. 71% of venues did not offer any sort of education about animals to visitors. This study is the first to assess welfare aspects of captive wild animals at tourism venues across Thailand. It concludes that significant concerns exist about the welfare of wild animals in the tourism sector of Thailand. Urgent attention needs to be given to address these concerns and prevent further suffering. But also to ensure the demand for wild animals doesn't have a negative impact on wild populations. PMID:26407173

  17. What cortisol can tell us about the costs of sociality and reproduction among free-ranging rhesus macaque females on Cayo Santiago.

    PubMed

    Maestripieri, Dario; Georgiev, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Research with the rhesus macaque population on Cayo Santiago can provide a unique perspective on the costs of sociality and reproduction in primates. Because the Cayo macaques live in unusually large groups and in a predator-free environment, in which their artificial food source lacks seasonal variation in abundance or quality, these monkeys constitute a semi-experimental study of the costs and benefits of group living. Here we review several long- and short-term studies that have focused on female life history and stress physiology. Long-term demographic data have shown that rhesus macaque females of middle- and low-ranking matrilines have lower adult survival probabilities than females of high-ranking matrilines. Costs of reproductive effort are also evident: adult females were more likely to die during the birth than during the mating season and they experienced higher cortisol levels when lactating. Lower-ranking females, in particular, experienced greater relative increase in cortisol production during lactation, in comparison to middle- and high-ranking females. Older high-ranking females had lower plasma cortisol levels than younger ones but cortisol levels were similarly high among young and old middle- and low-ranking females. Higher plasma cortisol levels and/or fecal glucocorticoid concentrations are associated with higher plasma concentrations of some proinflammatory cytokines. High cortisol, in turn, may be associated with chronic inflammation, and perhaps also with immunosuppression. In sum, the studies reviewed here provide multiple lines of evidence that sociality and reproductive effort impose measurable costs on female rhesus macaques. In line with socio-ecological theory, female dominance rank consistently emerges as an important modulator of variation in female life histories and physiology. The Cayo Santiago macaques are therefore a valuable model for elucidating the mechanisms by which within-group competition and reproduction impact health

  18. Reciprocation and interchange of grooming, agonistic support, feeding tolerance, and aggression in semi-free-ranging Barbary macaques.

    PubMed

    Carne, Charlotte; Wiper, Sue; Semple, Stuart

    2011-11-01

    Evidence from a range of primate species indicates that grooming can be exchanged either for itself or for other rank-related "commodities," such as agonistic support, feeding tolerance, or reduced aggression. Patterns of exchange behavior have been found to vary considerably between species, and understanding the causes of this variation is central to the study of the evolution of primate social systems. It is, therefore, essential that exchange behavior is examined in a wide range of species and settings. This article is the first to explore the reciprocation and interchange of grooming in the Barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus). We collected focal data on semi-free-ranging adult female Barbary macaques at Trentham Monkey Forest, England, and analyzed dyadic data using Generalized Linear Mixed Models. We found evidence for the reciprocal exchange of grooming and for the interchange of grooming for agonistic support and tolerance while feeding. There was no evidence that grooming was traded for a reduction in aggression; indeed, we found a positive relationship between aggression given and grooming received. This may reflect the "extortion" of grooming from subordinates by dominant animals. These results will facilitate comparative analyses of exchange behavior by adding to the current database a new species, characterized by a different social style from those macaque species previously investigated.

  19. Can Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Represent Invisible Displacement?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filion, Christine M.; Washburn, David A.; Gulledge, Jonathan P.

    1996-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to assess whether or not rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) could represent the unperceived movements of a stimulus. Subjects were tested on 2 computerized tasks, HOLE (monkeys) and LASER (humans and monkeys), in which subjects needed to chase or shoot at, respectively, a moving target that either remained visible or became invisible for a portion of its path of movement. Response patterns were analyzed and compared between target-visible and target-invisible conditions. Results of Experiments 1, 2, and 3 demonstrated that the monkeys are capable of extrapolating movement. That this extrapolation involved internal representation of the target's invisible movement was suggested but not confirmed. Experiment 4, however, demonstrated that the monkeys are capable of representing the invisible displacements of a stimulus.

  20. Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca Mulatta) Maintain Learning Set Despite Second-Order Stimulus-Response Spatial Discontiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beran, Michael J.; Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    2007-01-01

    In many discrimination-learning tests, spatial separation between stimuli and response loci disrupts performance in rhesus macaques. However, monkeys are unaffected by such stimulus-response spatial discontiguity when responses occur through joystick-based computerized movement of a cursor. To examine this discrepancy, five monkeys were tested on…

  1. Altered expression of glial and synaptic markers in the anterior hippocampus of behaviorally depressed female monkeys.

    PubMed

    Willard, Stephanie L; Hemby, Scott E; Register, Thomas C; McIntosh, Scot; Shively, Carol A

    2014-03-20

    The anterior hippocampus is associated with emotional functioning and hippocampal volume is reduced in depression. We reported reduced neuropil volume and number of glia in the dentate gyrus (DG) and cornu ammonis (CA)1 of the anterior hippocampus in behaviorally depressed adult female cynomolgus macaques. To determine the biochemical correlates of morphometric and behavioral differences between behaviorally depressed and nondepressed adult female monkeys, glial and synaptic transcripts and protein levels were assessed in the DG, CA3 and CA1 of the anterior hippocampus. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was increased whereas spinophilin and postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 protein were decreased in the CA1 of depressed monkeys. GFAP was reciprocally related to spinophilin and PSD-95 protein in the CA1. Gene expression of GFAP paralleled the protein changes observed in the CA1 and was inversely related to serum estradiol levels in depressed monkeys. These results suggest that behavioral depression in female primates is accompanied by astrocytic and synaptic protein alterations in the CA1. Moreover, these findings indicate a potential role for estrogen in modulating astrocyte-mediated impairments in synaptic plasticity.

  2. Altered Expression of Glial and Synaptic Markers in the Anterior Hippocampus of Behaviorally Depressed Female Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Stephanie L.; Hemby, Scott E.; Register, Thomas C.; McIntosh, Scot; Shively, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    The anterior hippocampus is associated with emotional functioning and hippocampal volume is reduced in depression. We reported reduced neuropil volume and number of glia in the dentate gyrus (DG) and cornu ammonis (CA)1 of the anterior hippocampus in behaviorally depressed adult female cynomolgus macaques. To determine the biochemical correlates of morphometric and behavioral differences between behaviorally depressed and nondepressed adult female monkeys, glial and synaptic transcripts and protein levels were assessed in the DG, CA3 and CA1 of the anterior hippocampus. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was increased whereas spinophilin and postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 protein were decreased in the CA1 of depressed monkeys. GFAP was reciprocally related to spinophilin and PSD-95 protein in the CA1. Gene expression of GFAP paralleled the protein changes observed in the CA1 and was inversely related to serum estradiol levels in depressed monkeys. These results suggest that behavioral depression in female primates is accompanied by astrocytic and synaptic protein alterations in the CA1. Moreover, these findings indicate a potential role for estrogen in modulating astrocyte-mediated impairments in synaptic plasticity. PMID:24440617

  3. Responses towards a dying adult group member in a wild New World monkey.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Bruna Martins; Keasey, Matthew Philip; Schiel, Nicola; da Silva Souto, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Compassionate caretaking behaviour towards dying adult group members has been reported as being unique to humans and chimpanzees. Here we describe in detail the reaction of a wild dominant male common marmoset, a neotropical primate, to the accidental death of the dominant female of its group. The male exhibited behaviours towards the dying female that resembled those of chimpanzees and humans. The long-term relationship between the dominant pair (which lasted at least 3.5 years) and their social status in the group may have contributed to the male's behavioural response. The male prevented young individuals from approaching the dying female, behaviour previously observed in chimpanzees. The data provide an interesting insight into compassionate caretaking behaviours in New World primates as well as the pair-bond systems of common marmosets. These are rare observations, and thus their detailed descriptions are essential if we are to create a comparative and enhanced understanding of human and nonhuman primate thanatology. PMID:24566801

  4. Responses towards a dying adult group member in a wild New World monkey.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Bruna Martins; Keasey, Matthew Philip; Schiel, Nicola; da Silva Souto, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Compassionate caretaking behaviour towards dying adult group members has been reported as being unique to humans and chimpanzees. Here we describe in detail the reaction of a wild dominant male common marmoset, a neotropical primate, to the accidental death of the dominant female of its group. The male exhibited behaviours towards the dying female that resembled those of chimpanzees and humans. The long-term relationship between the dominant pair (which lasted at least 3.5 years) and their social status in the group may have contributed to the male's behavioural response. The male prevented young individuals from approaching the dying female, behaviour previously observed in chimpanzees. The data provide an interesting insight into compassionate caretaking behaviours in New World primates as well as the pair-bond systems of common marmosets. These are rare observations, and thus their detailed descriptions are essential if we are to create a comparative and enhanced understanding of human and nonhuman primate thanatology.

  5. Persistent Effects of Peer Rearing on Abnormal and Species-Appropriate Activities but Not Social Behavior in Group-Housed Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Sharon A; Baker, Kate C

    2016-01-01

    Nursery rearing of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) alters behaviors but may be necessitated by maternal rejection or death, for research protocols, or for derivation of SPF colonies. The Tulane National Primate Research Center maintains a nursery-reared colony that is free from 9 pathogens as well as a mother-reared colony free from 4 pathogens, thus affording an opportunity to assess the outcomes of differential rearing. Nursery-reared macaques had continuous contact with 2 peers and an artificial surrogate (peer rearing). Focal sampling (432 h) was collected on the behavior of 32 peer-reared and 40 mother-reared subjects (age, 1 to 10 y; immature group, younger than 4 y; adult group 4 y or older). All animals were housed outdoors in like-reared social groups of 3 to 8 macaques. Contrary to expectation, no rearing effects on affiliative or agonistic social behaviors were detected. Compared with mother-reared subjects, peer-reared macaques in both age classes had elevated levels of abnormal appetitive, abnormal self-directed, and eating behaviors and lower levels of locomoting and vigilance (highly alert to activities in surrounding environment); a trend toward reduced foraging was detected. Immature but not adult peer-reared monkeys demonstrated more enrichment-directed behavior and drinking and a trend toward more anxiety-related behavior and inactivity. No new rearing effects were detected in adults that had not been detected in immature subjects. Results suggest that modern peer-rearing practices may not result in inevitable perturbations in aggressive, rank-related, sexual, and emotional behavior. However, abnormal behaviors may be lifelong issues once they appear. PMID:27053567

  6. Responses of neurons in the middle temporal visual area after long-standing lesions of the primary visual cortex in adult new world monkeys.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christine E; Lyon, David C; Kaas, Jon H

    2003-03-15

    The retinotopic organization of the middle temporal visual area (MT) was determined in six adult owl monkeys and one adult marmoset 69 d to 10 months after lesions of the dorsolateral primary visual cortex (V1). The lesions removed were limited to extensive parts of the representation of the lower visual quadrant in V1. Microelectrodes were used to record from neurons at numerous sites in MT to determine whether parts of MT normally devoted to the lower visual quadrant (1) were unresponsive to visual stimuli, (2) acquired responsiveness to inputs from intact portions of V1, or (3) became responsive to some other visually driven input such as a relay from the superior colliculus via the pulvinar to MT. All monkeys (n = 6) with moderate to moderately large lesions had unresponsive portions of MT even after 10 months of recovery. These unresponsive regions were retinotopically equivalent to the removed parts of V1 in normal animals. Thus, there was no evidence for an alternative source of activation. In addition, these results indicate that any retinotopic reorganization of MT based on inputs from intact portions of V1 was not extensive, yet neurons near the margins of responsive cortex may have acquired new receptive fields, and the smallest 5 degrees lesion of V1 failed to produce an unresponsive zone. Deprived portions of MT were not remarkably changed in histological appearance in cytochrome oxidase, Nissl, and Wisteria floribunda agglutinin preparations. Nevertheless, some reduction in myelin staining and other histological changes were suggested. We conclude that MT is highly dependent on V1 for activation in these monkeys, and alternative sources do not become effective over months when normal activation is absent. Additionally, remaining V1 inputs have only a limited capacity to expand their activation territory into deprived portions of MT.

  7. Waiting by mistake: symbolic representation of rewards modulates intertemporal choice in capuchin monkeys, preschool children and adult humans.

    PubMed

    Addessi, Elsa; Bellagamba, Francesca; Delfino, Alexia; De Petrillo, Francesca; Focaroli, Valentina; Macchitella, Luigi; Maggiorelli, Valentina; Pace, Beatrice; Pecora, Giulia; Rossi, Sabrina; Sbaffi, Agnese; Tasselli, Maria Isabella; Paglieri, Fabio

    2014-03-01

    In the Delay choice task subjects choose between a smaller immediate option and a larger delayed option. This paradigm, also known as intertemporal choice task, is frequently used to assess delay tolerance, interpreting a preference for the larger delayed option as willingness to wait. However, in the Delay choice task subjects face a dilemma between two preferred responses: "go for more" (i.e., selecting the larger, but delayed, option) vs. "go for sooner" (i.e., selecting the immediate, but smaller, option). When the options consist of visible food amounts, at least some of the choices of the larger delayed option might be due to a failure to inhibit a prepotent response towards the larger option rather than to a sustained delay tolerance. To disentangle this issue, we tested 10 capuchin monkeys, 101 preschool children, and 88 adult humans in a Delay choice task with food, low-symbolic tokens (objects that can be exchanged with food and have a one-to-one correspondence with food items), and high-symbolic tokens (objects that can be exchanged with food and have a one-to-many correspondence with food items). This allows evaluating how different methods of representing rewards modulate the relative contribution of the "go for more" and "go for sooner" responses. Consistently with the idea that choices for the delayed option are sometimes due to a failure at inhibiting the prepotent response for the larger quantity, we expected high-symbolic tokens to decrease the salience of the larger option, thus reducing "go for more" responses. In fact, previous findings have shown that inhibiting prepotent responses for quantity is easier when the problem is framed in a symbolic context. Overall, opting for the larger delayed option in the visible-food version of the Delay choice task seems to partially result from an impulsive preference for quantity, rather than from a sustained delay tolerance. In capuchins and children high-symbolic stimuli decreased the individual

  8. Free-field audiogram of the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Jackson, L L; Heffner, R S; Heffner, H E

    1999-11-01

    The audiograms of three Japanese macaques and seven humans were determined in a free-field environment using loudspeakers. The monkeys and humans were tested using tones ranging from 8 Hz to 40 kHz and 4 Hz to 22.4 kHz, respectively. At a level of 60 dB sound pressure level the monkeys were able to hear tones extending from 28 Hz to 37 kHz with their best sensitivity of 1 dB occurring at 4 kHz. The human 60-dB hearing range extended from 31 Hz to 17.6 kHz with a best sensitivity of -10 dB at 2 and 4 kHz. These results indicate that the Japanese macaque has low-frequency hearing equal to that of humans and better than that indicated by previous audiograms obtained using headphones.

  9. Human-wildlife conflict: proximate predictors of aggression between humans and rhesus macaques in India.

    PubMed

    Beisner, Brianne A; Heagerty, Allison; Seil, Shannon K; Balasubramaniam, Krishna N; Atwill, Edward R; Gupta, Brij K; Tyagi, Praveen C; Chauhan, Netrapal P S; Bonal, B S; Sinha, P R; McCowan, Brenda

    2015-02-01

    Macaques live in close contact with humans across South and Southeast Asia, and direct interaction is frequent. Aggressive contact is a concern in many locations, particularly among populations of rhesus and longtail macaques that co-inhabit urbanized cities and towns with humans. We investigated the proximate factors influencing the occurrence of macaque aggression toward humans as well as human aggression toward macaques to determine the extent to which human behavior elicits macaque aggression and vice versa. We conducted a 3-month study of four free-ranging populations of rhesus macaques in Dehradun, India from October-December 2012, using event sampling to record all instances of human-macaque interaction (N = 3120). Our results show that while human aggression was predicted by the potential for economic losses or damage, macaque aggression was influenced by aggressive or intimidating behavior by humans as well as recent rates of conspecific aggression. Further, adult female macaques participated in aggression more frequently than expected, whereas adult and subadult males participated as frequently as expected. Our analyses demonstrate that neither human nor macaque aggression is unprovoked. Rather, both humans and macaques are responding to one another's behavior. Mitigation of human-primate conflict, and indeed other types of human-wildlife conflict in such coupled systems, will require a holistic investigation of the ways in which each participant is responding to, and consequently altering, the behavior of the other.

  10. Protein of macaques against infection with simian type D retrovirus (SRV-1) by immunization with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the envelope glycoproteins of either SRV-1 or Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (SRV-3).

    PubMed Central

    Brody, B A; Hunter, E; Kluge, J D; Lasarow, R; Gardner, M; Marx, P A

    1992-01-01

    Rhesus macaques were immunized with live vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the envelope glycoproteins (gp70 and gp22) of simian type D retrovirus (SRV), serotype 1 or 3. All of the animals immunized with either the SRV-1 env or the SRV-3 env vaccinia virus recombinant developed neutralizing antibodies against the homologous SRV. In addition, both groups developed cross-reactive antibodies and were protected against an intravenous live-virus challenge with SRV-1. The four control animals immunized with a vaccinia virus recombinant expressing the G protein of respiratory syncytial virus were not protected against the same SRV-1 challenge. Although SRV-1 and SRV-3 immune sera showed cross-neutralization, they failed to neutralize a separate, more distantly related serotype, SRV-2, in an in vitro assay. These findings are consistent with the known degree of serologic and genetic relatedness of these three SRV strains. Images PMID:1316495

  11. Effect of Soy Isoflavones on Thyroid Hormones in Intact and Ovariectomized Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Marnie G.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Appt, Susan E.; Register, Thomas C.; Shively, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Soy isoflavones are commonly used to alleviate menopause-related symptoms. Menopausal women are at an increased risk for hypothyroidism and there are concerns that isoflavones may be detrimental to thyroid health. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of soy protein and isoflavones on thyroid function and the relationship between thyroid and ovarian function. Methods Adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were randomized to consume two diets differing only in protein source: casein-lactalbumin (n = 44) or soy protein with isoflavones (n = 41). After 34 months all animals were ovariectomized via laparotomy. Half of the monkeys from each diet treatment group continued to consume their Pre-Ovariectomy treatment phase diet (either SOY [n = 19] or CL [n = 21]) for an additional 34 months. The remaining animals did not continue their diets, and thus were not considered further. Circulating progesterone, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and thyroid stimulating hormone were measured at baseline. Thyroid hormones were remeasured during each treatment phase. Results Dietary soy increased triiodothyronine in pre-ovariectomized monkeys and prevented a decline in thyroxine following surgical menopause (both p’s < 0.05). Mean progesterone concentrations were positively correlated with triiodothyronine at baseline in pre-ovariectomized monkeys (p < 0.01). Conclusions Progesterone levels and triiodothyronine are positively correlated in macaques. Dietary soy increases triiodothyronine in pre-ovariectomized monkeys and prevents a decline in thyroxine following surgical menopause. The outcomes observed in this study suggest soy protein and isoflavone consumption does not adversely affect and may even preserve thyroid function in postmenopausal women. PMID:24618766

  12. Park Rangers' Behaviors and Their Effects on Tourists and Tibetan Macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China.

    PubMed

    Usui, Rie; Sheeran, Lori K; Li, Jin-Hua; Sun, Lixing; Wang, Xi; Pritchard, Alexander J; DuVall-Lash, Alexander S; Wagner, R Steve

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported the negative impacts of tourism on nonhuman primates (NHPs) and tourists and advocated the improvement of tourism management, yet what constitutes good quality management remains unclear. We explored whether rates of macaque aggression and self-directed behaviors (SDBs) differed under the supervision of two park ranger teams at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys (VWM) in Mt. Huangshan, Anhui Province, China. The two ranger teams provisioned and managed a group of macaques on an alternating monthly basis. Monkey, tourist and ranger behaviors were collected from August 16-September 30, 2012. Macaque aggression and SDB rates did not differ significantly under the management of the two teams. Overall, there was little intervention in tourist-macaque interactions by park rangers, and even when rangers discouraged tourists' undesirable behaviors, tourist interactions with monkeys persisted. Furthermore, only one or sometimes two park rangers managed monkeys and tourists, and rangers established dominance over the monkeys to control them. In order to effectively manage tourists and monkeys by a single park ranger, we recommend that rangers: (1) prohibit tourists from feeding; (2) move around the viewing platform more frequently; and (3) limit the number of tourists each visiting session. PMID:26480324

  13. Concealing of facial expressions by a wild Barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus).

    PubMed

    Thunström, Maria; Kuchenbuch, Paul; Young, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    Behavioural research on non-vocal communication among non-human primates and its possible links to the origin of human language is a long-standing research topic. Because human language is under voluntary control, it is of interest whether this is also true for any communicative signals of other species. It has been argued that the behaviour of hiding a facial expression with one's hand supports the idea that gestures might be under more voluntary control than facial expressions among non-human primates, and it has also been interpreted as a sign of intentionality. So far, the behaviour has only been reported twice, for single gorilla and chimpanzee individuals, both in captivity. Here, we report the first observation of concealing of facial expressions by a monkey, a Barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus), living in the wild. On eight separate occasions between 2009 and 2011 an adult male was filmed concealing two different facial expressions associated with play and aggression ("play face" and "scream face"), 22 times in total. The videos were analysed in detail, including gaze direction, hand usage, duration, and individuals present. This male was the only individual in his group to manifest this behaviour, which always occurred in the presence of a dominant male. Several possible interpretations of the function of the behaviour are discussed. The observations in this study indicate that the gestural communication and cognitive abilities of monkeys warrant more research attention.

  14. Study of the effect of 26RF- and 43RF-amides on testosterone and prolactin secretion in the adult male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Wahab, Fazal; Salahuddin, Hina; Anees, Mariam; Leprince, Jerome; Vaudry, Hubert; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Shahab, Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    RF-amides (RFa), a superfamily of evolutionary-conserved neuropeptides, are expressed in both invertebrates and vertebrates. While some endocrine functions have been attributed to these peptides in lower vertebrates and few mammalian models, not much is known about their actions in primates. Therefore, the present study was designed to examine the effects of peripheral administration of two recently cloned human RFa peptides, 26RFa and 43RFa, on testosterone and prolactin secretion in the adult male adult male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). For control purposes, a scrambled sequence of 26RFa (Sc-26RFa) and normal saline (1ml) were injected. Three different doses of 26RFa and 43RFa (19-nmol, 38-nmol and 76-nmol) and a single dose (38-nmol) of Sc-26RFa were tested. A set of four chair-restraint habituated monkeys was used. Comparison of post-treatment T levels with respective pre levels showed that none of the doses of both 26RFa and 43RFa changed T release. Similarly, Sc-26RFa and saline administration also did not affect T levels. In contrast, all doses of 26RFa and 43RFa significantly (P<0.05) stimulated prolactin secretion. 43RFa dose dependently increased prolactin secretion while dose dependency was not observed for 26RFa. Saline and Sc-26RFa injection had no effect on prolactin concentrations. Thus, present study demonstrated that peripheral administration of 26RFa and 43RFa, in the doses tested, have no effect on T secretion, suggesting possible selective lack of their neuroendocrine role in controlling hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the adult male primates. The prominent stimulation of prolactin suggests a neuroendocrine role of RFa peptides in regulation of prolactin release in primates.

  15. [Measurement and analysis of hematology and blood chemistry parameters in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina)].

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei; Lü, Long-Bao; Wang, Yun; Li, Gui; Huang, Dong-Ti; Lei, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Gao-Hong; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2013-04-01

    The pig-tailed macaque is an important non-human primate experimental animal model that has been widely used in the research of AIDS and other diseases. Pig-tailed macaques include Mentawai macaques (Macaca pagensis), Sunda pig-tailed macaques (M. nemestrina) and northern pig-tailed macaques (M. leonina). Northern pig-tailed macaques inhabit China and surrounding Southeast Asia countries. To our knowledge, no reports have been published regarding the hematology and blood chemistry parameters of northern pig-tailed macaques, which are important for the objective evaluation of experimental results. We measured and analyzed 18 hematology parameters and 13 blood chemistry parameters in juvenile (aged 2-4 years) and adult (aged 5-10 years) northern pig-tailed macaques. We found that red blood cells, hemoglobin and alkaline phosphatase values were lower in female macaques than male macaques in both juvenile and adult groups. White blood cells, lymphocyte, monocytes, platelet distribution width, cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase values were higher in juvenile macaques than adult macaques, while creatinine and triglycerides values were lower in juvenile macaques. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin and creatinine values were positively correlated with weight in juvenile groups. In adult groups, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, percentage of granulocyte, hemoglobin and creatinine were also positively correlated with weight, and lymphocyte, percentage of lymphocyte, red cell distribution width, aspartate aminotransferase and cholesterol values were negatively correlated with weight. The results suggest that age, gender and weight of northern pig-tailed macaques affected their hematology and blood chemistry parameters. This hematological and blood chemistry study has great significance in biomedical research and animal models using northern pig-tailed macaque as an experimental animal.

  16. Low circulating levels of bisphenol-A induce cognitive deficits and loss of asymmetric spine synapses in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of adult male monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Elsworth, John D; Jentsch, James D; Groman, Stephanie M; Roth, Robert H; Redmond, D. Eugene; Leranth, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is widely used in the manufacture of plastics, epoxy resins and certain paper products. A majority of the population in the developed world is routinely exposed to BPA from multiple sources and has significant circulating levels of BPA. Although BPA is categorized as an endocrine disruptor with a growing literature on adverse effects, it is uncertain whether cognitive dysfunction is induced in humans by exposure to BPA. The present study examined the impact of BPA in primate brain by exposing adult male vervet monkeys for 4 weeks continuously to circulating levels of BPA that were in the range measured in studies of humans environmentally exposed to BPA. This regimen of exposure to BPA decreased both working memory accuracy and the number of excitatory synaptic inputs on dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons in two brain regions that are necessary for working memory (prefrontal cortex and hippocampus). These observed behavioral and synaptic effects ameliorated following withdrawal from BPA. As Old world monkeys (e.g., vervets) and humans share some uniquely primate morphological, endocrine and cognitive traits, this study indicates the potential for significant cognitive disruption following exposure of humans to BPA. PMID:25557059

  17. Vicarious reinforcement in rhesus macaques (macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Chang, Steve W C; Winecoff, Amy A; Platt, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    What happens to others profoundly influences our own behavior. Such other-regarding outcomes can drive observational learning, as well as motivate cooperation, charity, empathy, and even spite. Vicarious reinforcement may serve as one of the critical mechanisms mediating the influence of other-regarding outcomes on behavior and decision-making in groups. Here we show that rhesus macaques spontaneously derive vicarious reinforcement from observing rewards given to another monkey, and that this reinforcement can motivate them to subsequently deliver or withhold rewards from the other animal. We exploited Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning to associate rewards to self (M1) and/or rewards to another monkey (M2) with visual cues. M1s made more errors in the instrumental trials when cues predicted reward to M2 compared to when cues predicted reward to M1, but made even more errors when cues predicted reward to no one. In subsequent preference tests between pairs of conditioned cues, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to M2 over cues paired with reward to no one. By contrast, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to self over cues paired with reward to both monkeys simultaneously. Rates of attention to M2 strongly predicted the strength and valence of vicarious reinforcement. These patterns of behavior, which were absent in non-social control trials, are consistent with vicarious reinforcement based upon sensitivity to observed, or counterfactual, outcomes with respect to another individual. Vicarious reward may play a critical role in shaping cooperation and competition, as well as motivating observational learning and group coordination in rhesus macaques, much as it does in humans. We propose that vicarious reinforcement signals mediate these behaviors via homologous neural circuits involved in reinforcement learning and decision-making.

  18. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the combination Zidovudine plus Lamivudine in the adult Erythrocebus patas monkey determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Divi, Rao L.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Shockley, Marie E.; St Claire, Marisa C.; Harbaugh, Jeffrey W.; Harbaugh, Steven W.; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2008-01-15

    Because of their similarity to humans, non-human primates constitute useful preclinical models in which to examine potential human drug toxicities. Antiretroviral nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) toxicity is currently under investigation in Erythrocebus patas monkeys, and whereas NRTI pharmacokinetics have been studied in other monkey species, pharmacokinetics for Zidovudine plus Lamivudine (AZT/3TC) dosing have not been reported in the patas. Here we present 24 h serum pharmacokinetic parameters after a single oral exposure to the combination of AZT (40 mg) and 3TC (24 mg), doses equivalent to a human daily dose of Combivir (registered) . The patas (n = 3) AZT/3TC pharmacokinetic profiles were similar to those seen in other primate species. Average maximum serum concentrations (C{sub max}) for AZT and 3TC were 2.35 and 2.65 {mu}g/ml, respectively, and were observed at 0.83 h (T{sub max}). C{sub max} was 13.34 {mu}g/ml for the AZT-glucuronide (AZT-G) and was 0.023 {mu}g/ml for the potentially toxic minor metabolite 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine (AMT), both occurring at about 1 h after dosing. Similar elimination half-times, 0.70 and 0.68 h{sup -1}, were found for AZT and AZT-G, respectively, while 3TC was eliminated about half as fast (0.33 h{sup -1}) resulting in AUC{sub (0-{infinity})} values of 6.97 {mu}g/ml h for 3TC, 2.99 {mu}g/ml h for AZT, 20.5 {mu}g/ml h for AZT-G and 0.002 for AMT 6.97 {mu}g/ml h. This study shows similar metabolism and pharmacokinetics for oral administration of AZT/3TC in the adult patas monkey, other primate species and humans. The data validate the use of the patas monkey for studies of NRTI toxicity.

  19. Q-ball imaging of macaque white matter architecture.

    PubMed

    Tuch, David S; Wisco, Jonathan J; Khachaturian, Mark H; Ekstrom, Leeland B; Kötter, Rolf; Vanduffel, Wim

    2005-05-29

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging holds substantial promise as a technique for non-invasive imaging of white matter (WM) axonal projections. For diffusion imaging to be capable of providing new insight into the connectional neuroanatomy of the human brain, it will be necessary to histologically validate the technique against established tracer methods such as horseradish peroxidase and biocytin histochemistry. The macaque monkey provides an ideal model for histological validation of the diffusion imaging method due to the phylogenetic proximity between humans and macaques, the gyrencephalic structure of the macaque cortex, the large body of knowledge on the neuroanatomic connectivity of the macaque brain and the ability to use comparable magnetic resonance acquisition protocols in both species. Recently, it has been shown that high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) can resolve multiple axon orientations within an individual imaging voxel in human WM. This capability promises to boost the accuracy of tract reconstructions from diffusion imaging. If the macaque is to serve as a model for histological validation of the diffusion tractography method, it will be necessary to show that HARDI can also resolve intravoxel architecture in macaque WM. The present study therefore sought to test whether the technique can resolve intravoxel structure in macaque WM. Using a HARDI method called q-ball imaging (QBI) it was possible to resolve composite intravoxel architecture in a number of anatomic regions. QBI resolved intravoxel structure in, for example, the dorsolateral convexity, the pontine decussation, the pulvinar and temporal subcortical WM. The paper concludes by reviewing remaining challenges for the diffusion tractography project.

  20. Training without reward: traditional training of pig-tailed macaques as coconut harvesters.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, M

    1967-01-27

    Macaca nemestrina, the pig-tailed macaque, is the only monkey regularly and extensively used for work. For centuries it has been trained in Southeast Asia to pick coconuts and other fruits. The training is based exclusively on punishment and avoidance of punishment.

  1. Rudimentary empathy in macaques' social decision-making.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, Sebastien; Duhamel, Jean-René

    2015-12-15

    Primates live in highly social environments, where prosocial behaviors promote social bonds and cohesion and contribute to group members' fitness. Despite a growing interest in the biological basis of nonhuman primates' social interactions, their underlying motivations remain a matter of debate. We report that macaque monkeys take into account the welfare of their peers when making behavioral choices bringing about pleasant or unpleasant outcomes to a monkey partner. Two macaques took turns in making decisions that could impact their own welfare or their partner's. Most monkeys were inclined to refrain from delivering a mildly aversive airpuff and to grant juice rewards to their partner. Choice consistency between these two types of outcome suggests that monkeys display coherent motivations in different social interactions. Furthermore, spontaneous affilitative group interactions in the home environment were mostly consistent with the measured social decisions, thus emphasizing the impact of preexisting social bonds on decision-making. Interestingly, unique behavioral markers predicted these decisions: benevolence was associated with enhanced mutual gaze and empathic eye blinking, whereas indifference or malevolence was associated with lower or suppressed such responses. Together our results suggest that prosocial decision-making is sustained by an intrinsic motivation for social affiliation and controlled through positive and negative vicarious reinforcements. PMID:26621711

  2. Rudimentary empathy in macaques' social decision-making.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, Sebastien; Duhamel, Jean-René

    2015-12-15

    Primates live in highly social environments, where prosocial behaviors promote social bonds and cohesion and contribute to group members' fitness. Despite a growing interest in the biological basis of nonhuman primates' social interactions, their underlying motivations remain a matter of debate. We report that macaque monkeys take into account the welfare of their peers when making behavioral choices bringing about pleasant or unpleasant outcomes to a monkey partner. Two macaques took turns in making decisions that could impact their own welfare or their partner's. Most monkeys were inclined to refrain from delivering a mildly aversive airpuff and to grant juice rewards to their partner. Choice consistency between these two types of outcome suggests that monkeys display coherent motivations in different social interactions. Furthermore, spontaneous affilitative group interactions in the home environment were mostly consistent with the measured social decisions, thus emphasizing the impact of preexisting social bonds on decision-making. Interestingly, unique behavioral markers predicted these decisions: benevolence was associated with enhanced mutual gaze and empathic eye blinking, whereas indifference or malevolence was associated with lower or suppressed such responses. Together our results suggest that prosocial decision-making is sustained by an intrinsic motivation for social affiliation and controlled through positive and negative vicarious reinforcements.

  3. Malaria in cynomolgus monkeys used in toxicity studies in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Etsuko; Nagayama, Yuko; Koyama, Naoki; Kakiuchi, Dai; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium spp. protozoa cause malaria and are known to infect humans and a variety of animal species including macaque monkeys. Here we report both our experience with malaria recrudescence in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in a toxicity study and the results of a survey on Plasmodium infection in cynomolgus monkeys imported to Japan for laboratory use. A cynomolgus monkey from the toxicity study presented with severe anemia and Plasmodium protozoa in erythrocytes on a thin blood smear and was subsequently diagnosed with symptomatic malaria. In this animal, congestion and accumulation of hemozoin (malaria pigment) in macrophages were noted in the enlarged and darkly discolored spleen. As a follow-up for the experience, spleen sections from 800 cynomolgus monkeys in toxicity studies conducted between 2003 and 2013 were retrospectively examined for hemozoin deposition as a marker of Plasmodium infection. The origin of the animals included Cambodia, China, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Hemozoin deposition was confirmed in 44% of all examined monkeys. Monkeys from Indonesia showed the highest incidence of hemozoin deposition (approx. 80%). A high prevalence of Plasmodium infection in laboratory monkeys was also confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using Plasmodium genus-specific primers. Although Japan is not a country with endemic malaria, it is important to be aware of the prevalence and potential impact of background infection with Plasmodium spp. and recrudescence of symptomatic malaria in imported laboratory monkeys on pharmaceutical toxicity studies.

  4. Malaria in cynomolgus monkeys used in toxicity studies in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Etsuko; Nagayama, Yuko; Koyama, Naoki; Kakiuchi, Dai; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium spp. protozoa cause malaria and are known to infect humans and a variety of animal species including macaque monkeys. Here we report both our experience with malaria recrudescence in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in a toxicity study and the results of a survey on Plasmodium infection in cynomolgus monkeys imported to Japan for laboratory use. A cynomolgus monkey from the toxicity study presented with severe anemia and Plasmodium protozoa in erythrocytes on a thin blood smear and was subsequently diagnosed with symptomatic malaria. In this animal, congestion and accumulation of hemozoin (malaria pigment) in macrophages were noted in the enlarged and darkly discolored spleen. As a follow-up for the experience, spleen sections from 800 cynomolgus monkeys in toxicity studies conducted between 2003 and 2013 were retrospectively examined for hemozoin deposition as a marker of Plasmodium infection. The origin of the animals included Cambodia, China, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Hemozoin deposition was confirmed in 44% of all examined monkeys. Monkeys from Indonesia showed the highest incidence of hemozoin deposition (approx. 80%). A high prevalence of Plasmodium infection in laboratory monkeys was also confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using Plasmodium genus-specific primers. Although Japan is not a country with endemic malaria, it is important to be aware of the prevalence and potential impact of background infection with Plasmodium spp. and recrudescence of symptomatic malaria in imported laboratory monkeys on pharmaceutical toxicity studies. PMID:26989299

  5. Sensitivity to first-order relations of facial elements in infant rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Paukner, Annika; Bower, Seth; Simpson, Elizabeth A; Suomi, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Faces are visually attractive to both human and nonhuman primates. Human neonates are thought to have a broad template for faces at birth and prefer face-like to non-face-like stimuli. To better compare developmental trajectories of face processing phylogenetically, here we investigated preferences for face-like stimuli in infant rhesus macaques using photographs of real faces. We presented infant macaques aged 15-25days with human, macaque, and abstract faces with both normal and linear arrangements of facial features, and measured infants' gaze durations, number of fixations, and latency to look to each face using eye-tracking technology. There was an overall preference for normal over linear facial arrangements for abstract and monkey faces, but not human faces. Moreover, infant macaques looked less at monkey faces than at abstract or human faces. These results suggest that species and facial configurations affect face processing in infant macaques, and we discuss potential explanations for these findings. Further, carefully controlled studies are required to ascertain whether infant macaques' face template can be considered as broad as human infants' face template. PMID:23997657

  6. Standard electrocardiographic data of young Japanese monkeys (Macaca fusucata).

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Arao; Koie, Hiroshi; Sato, Tsuneo; Kanayama, Kiichi; Taira, Masato

    2013-07-01

    The electrocardiogram of nonhuman primates is similar to that of humans because of similar intrathoracic heart position and structure. Despite the frequent use of nonhuman primates in biologic studies, few electrocardiographic studies of Japanese monkeys (Macaca fusucata) have been reported, and no reference data are available for this species. We obtained limb-lead electrocardiograms from indoor-bred and housed ketamine-sedated Japanese macaques (48 male; 56 female; mean age, 44.3 mo; mean body weight, 4.84 kg) in the dorsal recumbency. The following quantitative data was obtained: heart rate, P wave amplitude and width, R wave amplitude, QRS duration, PR interval, QT interval, T wave height, and mean electrical axis. Corrected QT intervals were calculated by using the Bazett and Fridericia formulae. Measurements were evaluated according to sex and age. The duration of the QRS complex showed moderate correlation with age in male monkeys. All parameters, except heart rate, were similar to previous reports from Japanese, cynomolgus, and other macaques. P waves, R waves and mean electrical axis did not differ significantly between humans and Japanese macaques, but the wave amplitude in macaques was half that in humans. Our electrocardiographic measurements can serve as normal reference data for sedated, young Japanese monkeys.

  7. Immunolocalization of Growth, Inhibitory, and Proliferative Factors Involved in Initial Ovarian Folliculogenesis From Adult Common Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri collinsi)

    PubMed Central

    Brito, A. B.; Domingues, S. F. S.; Santos, R. R.; Amorim, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    We performed an immunohistochemical (IHC) study to determine the follicular expression of growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF-9), anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), Kit Ligand (KL), and c-Kit in squirrel monkey ovary. Ovarian tissue fragments from 4 squirrel monkeys were collected by laparotomy and processed for classical histology and IHC. Additionally, follicle development was assessed by Ki67 immunostaining to evaluate proliferative status of granulosa cells. A total of 4025 follicles were examined (1475 for classical histology and 2550 for immunohistochemistry). More than 80% of the evaluated follicles were morphologically normal. The GDF-9 protein was detectable in oocyte cytoplasm from primordial (100%), primary (99.1%), and secondary (100%) follicles. The AMH was not expressed in primordial follicles but just in few primary follicles (13.8%). On the other hand, it was highly expressed in granulosa cells from secondary follicles (67.9%). c-Kit, KL receptor, was found in the oolemma of primordial (100%), primary (100%), and secondary (100%) follicles. The KL expression was observed in oocytes and granulosa cells from primordial (94.9%), primary (91.6%) and secondary follicles (100%). Ki67 immunostaining was observed in granulosa cells from primary (5.7%) and secondary (54.8%) follicles but not in primordial follicles. In conclusion, we described the localization of GDF-9, KL, c-Kit, and Ki67 proteins and confirmed the presence of AMH protein in preantral follicles from squirrel monkey. Our results offer contribution for understanding of folliculogenesis in neotropical nonhuman primates. Moreover, these markers can be used to assess follicular viability and functionality after cryopreservation, transplantation, or in vitro culture of ovarian tissue. PMID:24784715

  8. Kittens as therapists: social behavior sequences in isolated squirrel monkeys after exposure to young nonconspecifics.

    PubMed

    Huebner, D K; King, J E

    1984-05-01

    Squirrel monkeys that had been exposed to repeated separations from cloth surrogates were given continuous access to domestic kittens. Information-theoretic measures showed that these monkeys exerted greater constraint on behaviors of adult feral squirrel monkeys than did monkeys who had not received previous kitten exposure. The latter monkeys displayed a behavioral encapsulation characterized by increased susceptibility to the constraint imposed by their own preceding behaviors and a decreased susceptibility to constraint from other monkeys' behaviors. In addition, kitten-reared monkeys displayed a high level of positive social behaviors, particularly following noncohesive or divisive behaviors by another monkey. PMID:6724141

  9. Monkey Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwood, Christine Horvatis

    2012-01-01

    A ballerina, a gladiator, a camper, a baseball player, a surfer, and a shopper; these are just a few of the amazing monkeys that the author's seventh graders created from papier-mache. This project provided an opportunity for students to express themselves through the creation of sculptural characters based on their own interests, hobbies, and…

  10. Hair Cortisol Predicts Object Permanence Performance in Infant Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Amanda M.; Novak, Matthew F.S.X.; Novak, Melinda A.; Meyer, Jerrold S.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Although high circulating levels of glucocorticoids are associated with impaired cognitive performance in adults, less is known about this relationship in infancy. Furthermore, because studies have relied on acute cortisol measures in blood plasma or saliva, interpretation of the results may be difficult as acute measures may in part reflect emotional responses to testing procedures. In this study we examined whether hair cortisol, an integrated measure of HPA axis functioning, predicted performance of nursery-reared (NR) infant rhesus monkeys (N=32) on Piagetian object permanence tasks. Testing of NR infants began at 19.8±2.2 (mean±SE) days of age and continued for the next several months. Hair cortisol concentrations from the 32 NR monkeys were compared to those of 20 mother-peer-reared (MPR) infants. Hair was shaved at day 14, allowed to re-grow, and obtained again at month 6, thus representing integrated cortisol over a 5.5-month period of time. NR and MPR infants did not differ in month 6 hair cortisol values (t(50)=0.02, p=0.98). Linear regression revealed that hair cortisol predicted object permanence performance in the NR infants. Infants with higher hair cortisol reached criterion at later ages on the well (p<0.01), screen (p<0.05), and A-not-B (p<0.05) tasks and required more test sessions to complete the well (p<0.01) and screen tasks (p<0.05). These data are the first to implicate hair cortisol as a reliable predictor of early cognitive performance in infant macaque monkeys. PMID:19771550

  11. Variations in the Structure of the Prelunate Gyrus in Old World Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Van der Gucht, Estel; Youakim, Michele; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hof, Patrick R.; Baizer, Joan S.

    2010-01-01

    Anatomical and electrophysiological studies have revealed a complex organization in the macaque prelunate gyrus. We investigated the morphology and architecture of the prelunate gyrus in Old World monkeys. In Macaca nemestrina, we observed a sulcus crossing the prelunate gyrus within 2 mm of the vertical meridian representation. In other macaque species and other cercopithecines, we observed substantial variations in sulcal morphology across the prelunate gyrus. We did not find a sulcus in all species, and the location and depth of that indentation on the gyrus varied among species. A deep sulcus was observed in all species that emerged earlier in evolution than macaques, like guenons, baboons, and colobines. We analyzed the regional and parcellation features of the prelunate gyrus in three macaque species, M. maura, M. mulatta and M. radiata, and in Erythrocebus patas, with emphasis on the relation of structure to the distribution of prelunate visual areas. Nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein immunoreactivity permitted the delineation of a novel area in the prelunate gyrus of Old World monkeys, located around the prelunate sulcus. Species-specific patterns were also observed in the prelunate gyrus of the patas monkey, compared to macaques. These observations, as well as a cladistic analysis of the data, suggest an expanded and diversified organization of the prelunate gyrus in some cercopithecoids that may reflect adaptation to specific ecological environments. It was however progressively lost in most macaques, being retained only in species that diverged early in the evolution of the genus Macaca, such as M. nemestrina and M. maura. PMID:16779809

  12. Social relevance drives viewing behavior independent of low-level salience in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Solyst, James A.; Buffalo, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying attention to social stimuli during the viewing of complex social scenes with eye tracking has proven to be a sensitive method in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders years before average clinical diagnosis. Rhesus macaques provide an ideal model for understanding the mechanisms underlying social viewing behavior, but to date no comparable behavioral task has been developed for use in monkeys. Using a novel scene-viewing task, we monitored the gaze of three rhesus macaques while they freely viewed well-controlled composed social scenes and analyzed the time spent viewing objects and monkeys. In each of six behavioral sessions, monkeys viewed a set of 90 images (540 unique scenes) with each image presented twice. In two-thirds of the repeated scenes, either a monkey or an object was replaced with a novel item (manipulated scenes). When viewing a repeated scene, monkeys made longer fixations and shorter saccades, shifting from a rapid orienting to global scene contents to a more local analysis of fewer items. In addition to this repetition effect, in manipulated scenes, monkeys demonstrated robust memory by spending more time viewing the replaced items. By analyzing attention to specific scene content, we found that monkeys strongly preferred to view conspecifics and that this was not related to their salience in terms of low-level image features. A model-free analysis of viewing statistics found that monkeys that were viewed earlier and longer had direct gaze and redder sex skin around their face and rump, two important visual social cues. These data provide a quantification of viewing strategy, memory and social preferences in rhesus macaques viewing complex social scenes, and they provide an important baseline with which to compare to the effects of therapeutics aimed at enhancing social cognition. PMID:25414633

  13. Social relevance drives viewing behavior independent of low-level salience in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Solyst, James A; Buffalo, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying attention to social stimuli during the viewing of complex social scenes with eye tracking has proven to be a sensitive method in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders years before average clinical diagnosis. Rhesus macaques provide an ideal model for understanding the mechanisms underlying social viewing behavior, but to date no comparable behavioral task has been developed for use in monkeys. Using a novel scene-viewing task, we monitored the gaze of three rhesus macaques while they freely viewed well-controlled composed social scenes and analyzed the time spent viewing objects and monkeys. In each of six behavioral sessions, monkeys viewed a set of 90 images (540 unique scenes) with each image presented twice. In two-thirds of the repeated scenes, either a monkey or an object was replaced with a novel item (manipulated scenes). When viewing a repeated scene, monkeys made longer fixations and shorter saccades, shifting from a rapid orienting to global scene contents to a more local analysis of fewer items. In addition to this repetition effect, in manipulated scenes, monkeys demonstrated robust memory by spending more time viewing the replaced items. By analyzing attention to specific scene content, we found that monkeys strongly preferred to view conspecifics and that this was not related to their salience in terms of low-level image features. A model-free analysis of viewing statistics found that monkeys that were viewed earlier and longer had direct gaze and redder sex skin around their face and rump, two important visual social cues. These data provide a quantification of viewing strategy, memory and social preferences in rhesus macaques viewing complex social scenes, and they provide an important baseline with which to compare to the effects of therapeutics aimed at enhancing social cognition. PMID:25414633

  14. Molecular detection and prevalence of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. among long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sricharern, Wanat; Inpankaew, Tawin; Keawmongkol, Sarawan; Supanam, Juthamas; Stich, Roger W; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2016-06-01

    Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are divergent protozoal intestinal parasites that infect human beings and other animals, including non-human primates. Although long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) reside in human communities in Thailand, the prevalence of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. in these primates has not been previously investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate long-tailed macaques living near human communities as possible hosts of these intestinal parasites. In 2014, 200 fecal samples were randomly collected from long-tailed macaques living in different areas of Lopburi province, Thailand, and tested with a panel of PCR assays for Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. G. duodenalis assemblage B was most frequently detected (6%), while assemblage A and an inconclusive assemblage were detected in single samples, for a total G. duodenalis infection rate of 7%. Two samples (1%) tested positive for Cryptosporidium spp., which were both classified as monkey genotypes. No significant associations were found between G. duodenalis infection and sex or location of macaques. This study indicates that long-tailed macaques can carry G. duodenalis and, to a lesser extent, Cryptosporidium spp. monkey genotype. These results warrant education of residents and tourists to limit contact with long-tailed macaques and to take hygienic precautions to mitigate risk of zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission of these parasites between people and macaques. PMID:26892616

  15. Evaluation of endoscopic salpingectomy for sterilization of female Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis).

    PubMed

    Yu, Pin-Huan; Weng, Chia-Chun; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Chi, Chau-Hwa

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated the safety and postsurgical outcomes of endoscopic salpingectomy for sterilization of female Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis) as a method of population control. Nineteen adult female Formosan macaques were included in our study. The fallopian tubes of each anesthetized macaque were cauterized and excised endoscopically using a 2.7-mm rigid endoscope system. We recorded the complications encountered, and objectively scored the amount of hemorrhage throughout the procedure. Postoperative ovarian function was evaluated by monitoring the serum levels of sex hormones in ten of the macaques for two ovarian cycles following the salpingectomy. Two to 13 months later, eight of the 19 macaques underwent laparoscopy for the objective evaluation of inflammation at the surgical sites on the fallopian tubes. No major anesthetic- or surgical-associated complications were observed in any of the macaques. The hormonal evaluation showed cyclic ovarian function after salpingectomy in all of the ten macaques examined, and the parameters were comparable to those of other macaque species. The long-term postoperative level of inflammation at the surgical site was minimal to low, and was lower than that reported for other tubal occlusion techniques used in macaques. The use of a 2.7-mm rigid endoscope for salpingectomy in macaques is safe and efficient, with fewer postoperative complications than comparable sterilization techniques. PMID:25407314

  16. Brain abscess in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a cephalic implant.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristy; McCort, Holly; Reuter, Jon D

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of brain abscess after craniotomy and the placement of a recording chamber for electrophysiologic records in an adult rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) enrolled in visual research. Approximately 2 wk after surgery, the macaque presented with nonspecific gastrointestinal signs and showed no evidence of fever, neurologic deficits, increased intracranial pressure, suggestive alterations in the CBC, or abnormal changes in the recording chamber. The macaque responded to symptomatic and antibiotic treatment and showed no behavioral or abnormal clinical signs for 3 wk before collapsing suddenly. The macaque was euthanized, and pathologic evaluation revealed a large brain abscess immediately under the original craniotomy.

  17. Brain Abscess in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a Cephalic Implant

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristy; McCort, Holly; Reuter, Jon D

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of brain abscess after craniotomy and the placement of a recording chamber for electrophysiologic records in an adult rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) enrolled in visual research. Approximately 2 wk after surgery, the macaque presented with nonspecific gastrointestinal signs and showed no evidence of fever, neurologic deficits, increased intracranial pressure, suggestive alterations in the CBC, or abnormal changes in the recording chamber. The macaque responded to symptomatic and antibiotic treatment and showed no behavioral or abnormal clinical signs for 3 wk before collapsing suddenly. The macaque was euthanized, and pathologic evaluation revealed a large brain abscess immediately under the original craniotomy. PMID:24209974

  18. Oxytocin enhances gaze-following responses to videos of natural social behavior in adult male rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Putnam, P T; Roman, J M; Zimmerman, P E; Gothard, K M

    2016-10-01

    Gaze following is a basic building block of social behavior that has been observed in multiple species, including primates. The absence of gaze following is associated with abnormal development of social cognition, such as in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Some social deficits in ASD, including the failure to look at eyes and the inability to recognize facial expressions, are ameliorated by intranasal administration of oxytocin (IN-OT). Here we tested the hypothesis that IN-OT might enhance social processes that require active engagement with a social partner, such as gaze following. Alternatively, IN-OT may only enhance the perceptual salience of the eyes, and may not modify behavioral responses to social signals. To test this hypothesis, we presented four monkeys with videos of conspecifics displaying natural behaviors. Each video was viewed multiple times before and after the monkeys received intranasally either 50 IU of OT or saline. We found that despite a gradual decrease in attention to the repeated viewing of the same videos (habituation), IN-OT consistently increased the frequency of gaze following saccades. Further analysis confirmed that these behaviors did not occur randomly, but rather predictably in response to the same segments of the videos. These findings suggest that in response to more naturalistic social stimuli IN-OT enhances the propensity to interact with a social partner rather than merely elevating the perceptual salience of the eyes. In light of these findings, gaze following may serve as a metric for pro-social effects of oxytocin that target social action more than social perception.

  19. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion MRI investigation in a macaque model of neuro-AIDS: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunxia; Zhang, Xiaodong; Komery, Amelia; Li, Yingxia; Novembre, Francis J; Herndon, James G

    2011-09-01

    The Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected macaque model exhibits neuropathological symptoms similar to those of HIV(+) patients, and is ideal for studying cognitive impairment and neuropathological sequelae of disease in repeated measurements. The aim of this study is to use Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and perfusion MRI to longitudinally access the disease development in SIV-infected monkeys under controlled conditions and to cross-validate our finding with MRI studies in HIV(+) patients. Three adult male pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) were inoculated with the SIVsmmFGb virus. Blood was collected for enumeration of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Serial time-sensitive high-resolution T(2)- weighted structural images, Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) maps measured with the Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling (CASL) technique, and DTI images were obtained. Animals were sacrificed after 24 weeks. Cognitive behavioral tests were also carried out at each time point. Longitudinal changes in brain volume, CBF, and DTI in selected regions were analyzed statistically. In this study, CD4+ T-cell counts were found declined significantly after SIV infection in all macaques. No significant neurological behavior and brain volume changes were observed following virus inoculation. The CBF was found reduced in the caudate, inferior parietal cortex, and the prefrontal cortex. Fractional Anisotropy (FA) values in the whole brain and several Regions of Interest (ROIs) decreased significantly. These longitudinal changes in CBF and FA are correlated with CD4+ T-cell depletion and/or CD4:CD8 ratio. The MRI findings from this pilot study agree with previous results in HIV(+) patients.

  20. Precocious quantitative cognition in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Stephen; Hughes, Kelly D; Cantlon, Jessica F

    2016-02-01

    Basic quantitative abilities are thought to have an innate basis in humans partly because the ability to discriminate quantities emerges early in child development. If humans and nonhuman primates share this developmentally primitive foundation of quantitative reasoning, then this ability should be present early in development across species and should emerge earlier in monkeys than in humans because monkeys mature faster than humans. We report that monkeys spontaneously make accurate quantity choices by 1 year of age in a task that human children begin to perform only at 2.5 to 3 years of age. Additionally, we report that the quantitative sensitivity of infant monkeys is equal to that of the adult animals in their group and that rates of learning do not differ between infant and adult animals. This novel evidence of precocious quantitative reasoning in infant monkeys suggests that human quantitative reasoning shares its early developing foundation with other primates. The data further suggest that early developing components of primate quantitative reasoning are constrained by maturational factors related to genetic development as opposed to learning experience alone. PMID:26187058

  1. Precocious quantitative cognition in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Stephen; Hughes, Kelly D; Cantlon, Jessica F

    2016-02-01

    Basic quantitative abilities are thought to have an innate basis in humans partly because the ability to discriminate quantities emerges early in child development. If humans and nonhuman primates share this developmentally primitive foundation of quantitative reasoning, then this ability should be present early in development across species and should emerge earlier in monkeys than in humans because monkeys mature faster than humans. We report that monkeys spontaneously make accurate quantity choices by 1 year of age in a task that human children begin to perform only at 2.5 to 3 years of age. Additionally, we report that the quantitative sensitivity of infant monkeys is equal to that of the adult animals in their group and that rates of learning do not differ between infant and adult animals. This novel evidence of precocious quantitative reasoning in infant monkeys suggests that human quantitative reasoning shares its early developing foundation with other primates. The data further suggest that early developing components of primate quantitative reasoning are constrained by maturational factors related to genetic development as opposed to learning experience alone.

  2. Adult Cleaner Wrasse Outperform Capuchin Monkeys, Chimpanzees and Orang-utans in a Complex Foraging Task Derived from Cleaner – Client Reef Fish Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Darby; Essler, Jennifer; Pinto, Ana I.; Wismer, Sharon; Stoinski, Tara; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Bshary, Redouan

    2012-01-01

    The insight that animals' cognitive abilities are linked to their evolutionary history, and hence their ecology, provides the framework for the comparative approach. Despite primates renowned dietary complexity and social cognition, including cooperative abilities, we here demonstrate that cleaner wrasse outperform three primate species, capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and orang-utans, in a foraging task involving a choice between two actions, both of which yield identical immediate rewards, but only one of which yields an additional delayed reward. The foraging task decisions involve partner choice in cleaners: they must service visiting client reef fish before resident clients to access both; otherwise the former switch to a different cleaner. Wild caught adult, but not juvenile, cleaners learned to solve the task quickly and relearned the task when it was reversed. The majority of primates failed to perform above chance after 100 trials, which is in sharp contrast to previous studies showing that primates easily learn to choose an action that yields immediate double rewards compared to an alternative action. In conclusion, the adult cleaners' ability to choose a superior action with initially neutral consequences is likely due to repeated exposure in nature, which leads to specific learned optimal foraging decision rules. PMID:23185293

  3. Electroretinogram analysis of relative spectral sensitivity in genetically identified dichromatic macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hanazawa, Akitoshi; Mikami, Akichika; Angelika, Puti Sulistyo; Takenaka, Osamu; Goto, Shunji; Onishi, Akishi; Koike, Satoshi; Yamamori, Tetsuo; Kato, Keichiro; Kondo, Aya; Suryobroto, Bambang; Farajallah, Achmad; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2001-01-01

    The retinas of macaque monkeys usually contain three types of photopigment, providing them with trichromatic color vision homologous to that of humans. However, we recently used molecular genetic analysis to identify several macaques with a dichromatic genotype. The affected X chromosome of these animals contains a hybrid gene of long-wavelength-sensitive (L) and middle-wavelength-sensitive (M) photopigments instead of separate genes encoding L and M photopigments. The product of the hybrid gene exhibits a spectral sensitivity close to that of M photopigment; consequently, male monkeys carrying the hybrid gene are genetic protanopes, effectively lacking L photopigment. In the present study, we assessed retinal expression of L photopigment in monkeys carrying the hybrid gene. The relative sensitivities to middle-wavelength (green) and long-wavelength (red) light were measured by electroretinogram flicker photometry. We found the sensitivity to red light to be extremely low in protanopic male monkeys compared with monkeys with the normal genotype. In female heterozygotes, sensitivity to red light was intermediate between the genetic protanopes and normal monkeys. Decreased sensitivity to long wavelengths was thus consistent with genetic loss of L photopigment. PMID:11427736

  4. Hydroxymethylation and DNA methylation profiles in the prefrontal cortex of the non-human primate rhesus macaque and the impact of maternal deprivation on hydroxymethylation.

    PubMed

    Massart, R; Suderman, M; Provencal, N; Yi, C; Bennett, A J; Suomi, S; Szyf, M

    2014-05-30

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is abundant in the brain, suggesting an important role in epigenetic control of neuronal functions. In this paper, we show that 5hmC and 5-methylcytosine (5mC) levels are coordinately distributed in gene promoters of the rhesus macaque prefrontal cortex. Although promoter hydroxymethylation and methylation are overall negatively correlated with expression, a subset of highly expressed genes involved in specific cerebral functions is associated with high levels of 5mC and 5hmC. These relationships were also observed in the mouse cortex. Furthermore, we found that early-life maternal deprivation is associated, in the adult monkey cortex, with DNA hydroxymethylation changes of promoters of genes related to neurological functions and psychological disorders. These results reveal that early social adversity triggers variations in brain DNA hydroxymethylation that could be detected in adulthood.

  5. Otoacoustic Estimates of Cochlear Tuning: Testing Predictions in Macaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.; Bergevin, Christopher; Kalluri, Radha; Mc Laughlin, Myles; Michelet, Pascal; van der Heijden, Marcel; Joris, Philip X.

    2011-11-01

    Otoacoustic estimates of cochlear frequency selectivity suggest substantially sharper tuning in humans. However, the logic and methodology underlying these estimates remain untested by direct measurements in primates. We report measurements of frequency tuning in macaque monkeys, Old-World primates phylogenetically closer to humans than the small laboratory animals often taken as models of human hearing (e.g., cats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas). We find that measurements of tuning obtained directly from individual nerve fibers and indirectly using otoacoustic emissions both indicate that peripheral frequency selectivity in macaques is significantly sharper than in small laboratory animals, matching that inferred for humans at high frequencies. Our results validate the use of otoacoustic emissions for noninvasive measurement of cochlear tuning and corroborate the finding of sharper tuning in humans.

  6. Otoacoustic Estimates of Cochlear Tuning: Testing Predictions in Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Shera, Christopher A.; Bergevin, Christopher; Kalluri, Radha; Laughlin, Myles Mc; Michelet, Pascal; van der Heijden, Marcel; Joris, Philip X.

    2013-01-01

    Otoacoustic estimates of cochlear frequency selectivity suggest substantially sharper tuning in humans. However, the logic and methodology underlying these estimates remain untested by direct measurements in primates. We report measurements of frequency tuning in macaque monkeys, Old-World primates phylogenetically closer to humans than the small laboratory animals often taken as models of human hearing (e.g., cats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas). We find that measurements of tuning obtained directly from individual nerve fibers and indirectly using otoacoustic emissions both indicate that peripheral frequency selectivity in macaques is significantly sharper than in small laboratory animals, matching that inferred for humans at high frequencies. Our results validate the use of otoacoustic emissions for noninvasive measurement of cochlear tuning and corroborate the finding of sharper tuning in humans. PMID:24701000

  7. Decreased functional connectivity in dorsolateral prefrontal cortical networks in adult macaques with neonatal hippocampal lesions: Relations to visual working memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yuguang; Hu, Xiaoping; Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal hippocampal lesions in monkeys impairs normal performance on both relational and working memory tasks, suggesting that the early lesions have impacted the normal development of prefrontal-hippocampal functional interactions necessary for normal performance on these tasks. Given that working memory processes engage distributed neuronal networks associated with the prefrontal cortex, it is critical to explore the integrity of distributed neural networks of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) following neonatal hippocampal lesions in monkeys. We used resting-state functional MRI to assess functional connectivity of dlPFC networks in monkeys with neonatal neurotoxic hippocampal lesion (Neo-Hibo, n=4) and sham-operated control animals (Neo-C, n=4). Significant differences in the patterns of dlPFC functional networks were found between Groups Neo-Hibo and Neo-C. The within-group maps and the between-group comparisons yielded a highly coherent picture showing altered interactions of core regions of the working memory network (medial prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex) as well as the dorsal (fundus of superior temporal area and superior temporal cortex) and ventral (V4 and infero-temporal cortex) visual processing areas in animals with Neo-Hibo lesions. Correlations between functional connectivity changes and working memory impairment in the same animals were found only between the dlPFC and visual cortical areas (V4 and infero-temporal cortex). Thus, the impact of the neonatal hippocampal lesions extends to multiple cortical areas interconnected with the dlPFC.

  8. A restraining system for rhesus monkeys used in space research.

    PubMed

    Florence, G; Riondet, L; Malecki, H; Blanquie, J P; Martin, F; Viso, M; Milhaud, C L

    1995-02-01

    A new chronic restraining system has been designed specifically for male rhesus monkeys (8-13 kg) housed in weightlessness for scientific purposes. The restraining system consists of a coat (jacket and skirt) and a chair. The system separates the thorax from the lower part of the body, and allows large movements of the upper part of the body. The macaque can feed and groom itself, and can also sleep in close-to-normal position. PMID:8613974

  9. Model-Observer Similarity, Error Modeling and Social Learning in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Monfardini, Elisabetta; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila; Meunier, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Monkeys readily learn to discriminate between rewarded and unrewarded items or actions by observing their conspecifics. However, they do not systematically learn from humans. Understanding what makes human-to-monkey transmission of knowledge work or fail could help identify mediators and moderators of social learning that operate regardless of language or culture, and transcend inter-species differences. Do monkeys fail to learn when human models show a behavior too dissimilar from the animals’ own, or when they show a faultless performance devoid of error? To address this question, six rhesus macaques trained to find which object within a pair concealed a food reward were successively tested with three models: a familiar conspecific, a ‘stimulus-enhancing’ human actively drawing the animal’s attention to one object of the pair without actually performing the task, and a ‘monkey-like’ human performing the task in the same way as the monkey model did. Reward was manipulated to ensure that all models showed equal proportions of errors and successes. The ‘monkey-like’ human model improved the animals’ subsequent object discrimination learning as much as a conspecific did, whereas the ‘stimulus-enhancing’ human model tended on the contrary to retard learning. Modeling errors rather than successes optimized learning from the monkey and ‘monkey-like’ models, while exacerbating the adverse effect of the ‘stimulus-enhancing’ model. These findings identify error modeling as a moderator of social learning in monkeys that amplifies the models’ influence, whether beneficial or detrimental. By contrast, model-observer similarity in behavior emerged as a mediator of social learning, that is, a prerequisite for a model to work in the first place. The latter finding suggests that, as preverbal infants, macaques need to perceive the model as ‘like-me’ and that, once this condition is fulfilled, any agent can become an effective model. PMID

  10. Mirror Neurons in a New World Monkey, Common Marmoset.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Wataru; Banno, Taku; Miyakawa, Naohisa; Abe, Hiroshi; Goda, Naokazu; Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    Mirror neurons respond when executing a motor act and when observing others' similar act. So far, mirror neurons have been found only in macaques, humans, and songbirds. To investigate the degree of phylogenetic specialization of mirror neurons during the course of their evolution, we determined whether mirror neurons with similar properties to macaques occur in a New World monkey, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). The ventral premotor cortex (PMv), where mirror neurons have been reported in macaques, is difficult to identify in marmosets, since no sulcal landmarks exist in the frontal cortex. We addressed this problem using "in vivo" connection imaging methods. That is, we first identified cells responsive to others' grasping action in a clear landmark, the superior temporal sulcus (STS), under anesthesia, and injected fluorescent tracers into the region. By fluorescence stereomicroscopy, we identified clusters of labeled cells in the ventrolateral frontal cortex, which were confirmed to be within the ventrolateral frontal cortex including PMv after sacrifice. We next implanted electrodes into the ventrolateral frontal cortex and STS and recorded single/multi-units under an awake condition. As a result, we found neurons in the ventrolateral frontal cortex with characteristic "mirror" properties quite similar to those in macaques. This finding suggests that mirror neurons occur in a common ancestor of New and Old World monkeys and its common properties are preserved during the course of primate evolution.

  11. Mirror Neurons in a New World Monkey, Common Marmoset

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Wataru; Banno, Taku; Miyakawa, Naohisa; Abe, Hiroshi; Goda, Naokazu; Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    Mirror neurons respond when executing a motor act and when observing others' similar act. So far, mirror neurons have been found only in macaques, humans, and songbirds. To investigate the degree of phylogenetic specialization of mirror neurons during the course of their evolution, we determined whether mirror neurons with similar properties to macaques occur in a New World monkey, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). The ventral premotor cortex (PMv), where mirror neurons have been reported in macaques, is difficult to identify in marmosets, since no sulcal landmarks exist in the frontal cortex. We addressed this problem using “in vivo” connection imaging methods. That is, we first identified cells responsive to others' grasping action in a clear landmark, the superior temporal sulcus (STS), under anesthesia, and injected fluorescent tracers into the region. By fluorescence stereomicroscopy, we identified clusters of labeled cells in the ventrolateral frontal cortex, which were confirmed to be within the ventrolateral frontal cortex including PMv after sacrifice. We next implanted electrodes into the ventrolateral frontal cortex and STS and recorded single/multi-units under an awake condition. As a result, we found neurons in the ventrolateral frontal cortex with characteristic “mirror” properties quite similar to those in macaques. This finding suggests that mirror neurons occur in a common ancestor of New and Old World monkeys and its common properties are preserved during the course of primate evolution. PMID:26696817

  12. Social Interactions through the Eyes of Macaques and Humans

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Richard; Roebuck, Hettie; Yan, Yin; Majolo, Bonaventura; Li, Wu; Guo, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Group-living primates frequently interact with each other to maintain social bonds as well as to compete for valuable resources. Observing such social interactions between group members provides individuals with essential information (e.g. on the fighting ability or altruistic attitude of group companions) to guide their social tactics and choice of social partners. This process requires individuals to selectively attend to the most informative content within a social scene. It is unclear how non-human primates allocate attention to social interactions in different contexts, and whether they share similar patterns of social attention to humans. Here we compared the gaze behaviour of rhesus macaques and humans when free-viewing the same set of naturalistic images. The images contained positive or negative social interactions between two conspecifics of different phylogenetic distance from the observer; i.e. affiliation or aggression exchanged by two humans, rhesus macaques, Barbary macaques, baboons or lions. Monkeys directed a variable amount of gaze at the two conspecific individuals in the images according to their roles in the interaction (i.e. giver or receiver of affiliation/aggression). Their gaze distribution to non-conspecific individuals was systematically varied according to the viewed species and the nature of interactions, suggesting a contribution of both prior experience and innate bias in guiding social attention. Furthermore, the monkeys’ gaze behavior was qualitatively similar to that of humans, especially when viewing negative interactions. Detailed analysis revealed that both species directed more gaze at the face than the body region when inspecting individuals, and attended more to the body region in negative than in positive social interactions. Our study suggests that monkeys and humans share a similar pattern of role-sensitive, species- and context-dependent social attention, implying a homologous cognitive mechanism of social attention

  13. Clinical allograft of a calcaneal tendon in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Summers, Laura; Colagross-Schouten, Angela

    2014-09-01

    A 5.5-y-old male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) housed in an outdoor field cage presented for severe trauma involving the left calcaneal tendon. Part of the management of this wound included an allograft of the calcaneal tendon from an animal that was euthanized for medical reasons. This case report describes the successful medical and surgical management of a macaque with a significant void of the calcaneal tendon. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a successful tendon allograft in a rhesus macaque for clinical purposes.

  14. Cloning, sequencing, and polymorphism analysis of novel classical MHC class I alleles in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Lian, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xi-He; Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-04-01

    The northern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca leonina) has been confirmed to be an independent species from the pig-tailed macaque group of Old World monkey. We have previously reported that the northern pig-tailed macaques were also susceptible to HIV-1. Here, to make this animal a potential HIV/AIDS model and to discover the mechanism of virus control, we attempted to assess the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted immune responses to HIV-1 infection, which was associated with viral replication and disease progression. As an initial step, we first cloned and characterized the classical MHC class I gene of northern pig-tailed macaques. In this study, we identified 39 MHC class I alleles including 17 MHC-A and 22 MHC-B alleles. Out of these identified alleles, 30 were novel and 9 were identical to alleles previously reported from other macaque species. The MHC-A and MHC-B loci were both duplicates as rhesus macaques and southern pig-tailed macaques. In addition, we also detected the patterns of positive selection in northern pig-tailed macaques and revealed the existence of balance selection with 20 positive selection sites in the peptide binding region. The analysis of B and F peptide binding pockets in northern and southern pig-tailed macaques and rhesus macaques suggested that they were likely to share a few common peptides to present. Thus, this study provides important MHC immunogenetics information and adds values to northern pig-tailed macaques as a promising HIV/AIDS model.

  15. Cloning, sequencing, and polymorphism analysis of novel classical MHC class I alleles in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Lian, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xi-He; Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-04-01

    The northern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca leonina) has been confirmed to be an independent species from the pig-tailed macaque group of Old World monkey. We have previously reported that the northern pig-tailed macaques were also susceptible to HIV-1. Here, to make this animal a potential HIV/AIDS model and to discover the mechanism of virus control, we attempted to assess the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted immune responses to HIV-1 infection, which was associated with viral replication and disease progression. As an initial step, we first cloned and characterized the classical MHC class I gene of northern pig-tailed macaques. In this study, we identified 39 MHC class I alleles including 17 MHC-A and 22 MHC-B alleles. Out of these identified alleles, 30 were novel and 9 were identical to alleles previously reported from other macaque species. The MHC-A and MHC-B loci were both duplicates as rhesus macaques and southern pig-tailed macaques. In addition, we also detected the patterns of positive selection in northern pig-tailed macaques and revealed the existence of balance selection with 20 positive selection sites in the peptide binding region. The analysis of B and F peptide binding pockets in northern and southern pig-tailed macaques and rhesus macaques suggested that they were likely to share a few common peptides to present. Thus, this study provides important MHC immunogenetics information and adds values to northern pig-tailed macaques as a promising HIV/AIDS model. PMID:26782049

  16. Prevalence of enzootic simian viruses among urban performance monkeys in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Michael A; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Engel, Gregory A; Paramastri, Yasmina; Iskandar, Entang; Wilson, Brenda; Allan, Jonathan S; Kyes, Randall C; Watanabe, Robin; Grant, Richard

    2005-12-01

    Animal reservoirs are the most important sources of emerging infectious diseases that threaten human populations. Global travel and tourism bring ever-increasing numbers of humans into contact with animals, increasing the likelihood of cross species transmission of infectious agents. Non-human primates come into contact with humans in a variety of contexts and may harbor infectious agents with zoonotic potential. We investigated the prevalence of infection with enzootic simian viruses among 20 urban performance monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in Jakarta, Indonesia. This report documents for the first time evidence of infection with four simian viruses in urban performance monkeys. Simian foamy virus was detected by PCR in 52.9% of the macaques. Antibodies to simian retrovirus were detected in 10.5% of the macaques. Antibodies to Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 1, were detected in 5.3% of the macaques. Similarly, antibodies to simian T-cell lymphotropic virus were detected in 5.3% of the macaques. No evidence of infection with simian immunodeficiency virus was detected in these macaques. These results suggest that urban performance monkeys are a reservoir for enzootic simian viruses known to be capable of infecting humans.

  17. Does the Structure of Female Rhesus Macaque Coo Calls Reflect Relatedness and/or Familiarity?

    PubMed Central

    Mundry, Roger; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V.; Fischer, Julia; Widdig, Anja

    2016-01-01

    In social animals, kin relations strongly shape the social structure of a group. In female-bonded species, maternal relatedness is likely to be mediated via familiarity, but evidence is accumulating that non-human primates are able to recognize kin that they are not familiar with and adjust their behavior accordingly. In playback experiments, female rhesus macaques showed increased interest in ‘coo’ calls produced by unfamiliar paternal half-sisters compared to ‘coo’ calls produced by unfamiliar unrelated females, suggesting that these calls should have some common structural characteristics that facilitate the discrimination of kin from non-kin. Here we analyzed ‘coo’ calls of 67 adult female rhesus macaques from four groups and seven matrilines living on the island of Cayo Santiago (Puerto Rico). We tested whether the call structure of closely maternal and/or paternal related females, as determined from extensive pedigree data, differed from the call structure of unrelated females, while controlling for familiarity (i.e., group-matrilineal membership and age difference) of subjects. In contrast to our expectation, kinship did not predict similarities in ‘coo’ call structure, whereas ‘coo’ structure was more similar when produced by females of similar age as well as by females with higher familiarity, suggesting that experience is more decisive than genetic background. The high number of individuals in the analysis and the high accuracy of the assignment of calls to individuals render a lack of power as an unlikely explanation. Thus, based on the results of this study, kin recognition in rhesus monkeys does neither appear to be based on the assessment of self-similarity, nor on the comparison among related subjects (i.e., acoustic phenotype matching), but appears to be mediated by different or multiple cues. Furthermore, the results support the notion that frequent social interactions result in increasing acoustic similarity within largely

  18. Does the Structure of Female Rhesus Macaque Coo Calls Reflect Relatedness and/or Familiarity?

    PubMed

    Pfefferle, Dana; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Mundry, Roger; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V; Fischer, Julia; Widdig, Anja

    2016-01-01

    In social animals, kin relations strongly shape the social structure of a group. In female-bonded species, maternal relatedness is likely to be mediated via familiarity, but evidence is accumulating that non-human primates are able to recognize kin that they are not familiar with and adjust their behavior accordingly. In playback experiments, female rhesus macaques showed increased interest in 'coo' calls produced by unfamiliar paternal half-sisters compared to 'coo' calls produced by unfamiliar unrelated females, suggesting that these calls should have some common structural characteristics that facilitate the discrimination of kin from non-kin. Here we analyzed 'coo' calls of 67 adult female rhesus macaques from four groups and seven matrilines living on the island of Cayo Santiago (Puerto Rico). We tested whether the call structure of closely maternal and/or paternal related females, as determined from extensive pedigree data, differed from the call structure of unrelated females, while controlling for familiarity (i.e., group-matrilineal membership and age difference) of subjects. In contrast to our expectation, kinship did not predict similarities in 'coo' call structure, whereas 'coo' structure was more similar when produced by females of similar age as well as by females with higher familiarity, suggesting that experience is more decisive than genetic background. The high number of individuals in the analysis and the high accuracy of the assignment of calls to individuals render a lack of power as an unlikely explanation. Thus, based on the results of this study, kin recognition in rhesus monkeys does neither appear to be based on the assessment of self-similarity, nor on the comparison among related subjects (i.e., acoustic phenotype matching), but appears to be mediated by different or multiple cues. Furthermore, the results support the notion that frequent social interactions result in increasing acoustic similarity within largely innate call types

  19. Titration of an SIVmac251 stock by vaginal inoculation of Indian and Chinese origin rhesus macaques: transmission efficiency, viral loads, and antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Marthas, M L; Lu, D; Penedo, M C; Hendrickx, A G; Miller, C J

    2001-10-10

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether rhesus monkeys of Chinese origin are suitable for studies of mucosal lentivirus transmission by comparing the relative ability of these animals and rhesus macaques of Indian origin to become infected by vaginal (IVAG) inoculation with SIVmac251. In addition, we sought to test the hypothesis that differences in viral load during the first few weeks after inoculation were due to the relative strength of the anti-SIV immune responses in the two populations of rhesus macaques. Significant difference was not observed between the number of Indian and Chinese origin monkeys that were infected after IVAG SIV inoculation in this study. For 8-9 weeks after infection there was considerable overlap in the range of viral loads among the Indian and Chinese animals and the variation among the Indian origin animals was greater than the variation among the Chinese origin monkeys. By 6 weeks postinfection, viral loads in SIV-infected Chinese origin monkeys tended to be at the lower end of the range of viral loads observed in SIV-infected Indian origin monkeys. The strength of the anti-SIV antibody response was also more variable in the Indian origin rhesus macaques, but at 6-8 weeks postinfection, Chinese and Indian origin rhesus macaques had similar titers of anti-SIV antibodies. Microsatellite allele frequencies differed between Chinese and Indian rhesus macaques; however, the majority of alleles present in Indian-origin animals were also found in Chinese macaques. Together these results show that host factors, other than geographic origin, determine the ability of a rhesus macaque to be infected after IVAG SIV exposure and that geographic origin does not predict the viral load of SIV-infected animals during the first 8-9 weeks after IVAG inoculation.

  20. A comparison of adult body size between captive and wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus) on the island of St. Kitts.

    PubMed

    Turner, Trudy R; Cramer, Jennifer Danzy; Nisbett, Alexis; Patrick Gray, J

    2016-04-01

    Weight and 34 morphological measurements were obtained from 103 vervet monkeys living either in the wild or in captive colonies derived from the wild populations on the island of St. Kitts in the Eastern Caribbean. All measures were taken during the same week, eliminating bias that might result from changing seasonal environmental conditions. Vervets on St. Kitts are all descended from a small number of individuals brought to the island approximately 400 years ago from West Africa, thus eliminating bias that might result from subspecific size differences. We conducted a principal components analysis (PCA) and compared individual traits between captive and wild adult animals. Morphological measures such as body, arm, and leg length did not differ significantly between animals living in the wild and animals in captivity. Weight and measures indicating condition-including body mass index (BMI), chest, thigh, and upper arm girth were all higher for animals living in captivity. More consistent available food is probably the cause of differences in measures reflecting condition. PMID:26801341

  1. Ovarian hormones differentially influence immunoreactivity for dopamine beta- hydroxylase, choline acetyltransferase, and serotonin in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of adult rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kritzer, M F; Kohama, S G

    1999-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that ovariectomy reduces, and subsequent hormone replacement restores the density of axons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of adult female rhesus monkeys. The present study indicates that three additional extrathalamic frontal lobe afferents are also sensitive to changes in the ovarian hormone environment. Specifically, the combination of hormone manipulation with qualitative and quantitative analysis of immunocytochemistry for dopamine beta-hydroxylase, choline acetyltransferase, and serotonin in the primate prefrontal cortex revealed quantitative responses in both cholinergic and monoaminergic axons to changing ovarian hormone levels. However, whereas ovariectomy produced a modest net decrease in the density of fibers immunoreactive for choline acetyltransferase, this same treatment markedly increased the density of axons immunoreactive for dopamine beta-hydroxylase and for serotonin. Further, the effects of ovariectomy on these afferent systems were differentially attenuated by estrogen verses estrogen plus progesterone hormone replacement. Estrogen was as effective as estrogen plus progesterone in stimulating normal prefrontal immunoreactivity for choline acetyltransferase and dopamine beta-hydroxylase. The dual replacement of estrogen plus progesterone, however, was a much more potent influence than estrogen alone for serotonin immunoreactivity. Thus, ovarian hormones appear to provide stimulation that differentially affects each of four chemically identified extrathalamic prefrontal afferent systems examined to date, and may have roles in maintaining the normal balance and functional interactions between these neurotransmitter systems.

  2. A natural asymptomatic herpes B virus infection in a colony of laboratory brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella).

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, C; Hack, R; Seidl, J; Chudy, M; Itter, G; Plesker, R

    2004-10-01

    Herpes B virus (BV) infection of macaques persists in the natural host, but is mainly asymptomatic. However, BV can cause fatal disease in humans and in several non-macaque species such as capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). The BV infection described here in a colony of capuchin monkeys was persistent but asymptomatic. Initially the infection was detected serologically in five out of seven animals. However, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) developed specifically for BV, we found the virus in all seven clinically healthy animals. It is probable that the infection was transferred from BV-infected macaques housed in different cages but in the same room for several years. We have no evidence to indicate that similar asymptomatic infections may occur in other New World species but the possibility should not be discounted. We recommend that the housing of capuchin monkeys in close proximity to macaques should be avoided and that greater caution should be used when handling capuchin monkeys and possibly other New World species that have been in contact with macaques. All may act as a source of BV infection in humans, hence routine, repeated testing of all primates is essential.

  3. Experimental Tibetan monkey domestication and its application for intraocular pressure measurement

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yong; Zeng, Tao; Zhou, Liang; Cai, Su-Ping; Yin, Yan; Wang, Yun; Cao, Xu; Xu, Yue-Zhong; Wang, Hong-Xing; Liu, Xu-Yang

    2012-01-01

    AIM To train Tibetan monkey (Macaca thibetana) for intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement in conscious state and obtain normal IOP in conscious Tibetan Macaque. METHODS The training was based on award-conditioned behavior. Food stimulation and human-animal interaction were used in this training. RESULTS Trained Tibetan monkeys calmly accepted IOP measurement by the TonoVet® rebound tonometer without sedation or anesthesia and their IOP values were similar to other primates. CONCLUSION Human-cultivated Thibetan monkeys are tamable, and can be used for biomedical research such as ophthalmic research without anesthesia. PMID:22773972

  4. Decreased functional connectivity in dorsolateral prefrontal cortical networks in adult macaques with neonatal hippocampal lesions: Relations to visual working memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yuguang; Hu, Xiaoping; Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal hippocampal lesions in monkeys impairs normal performance on both relational and working memory tasks, suggesting that the early lesions have impacted the normal development of prefrontal-hippocampal functional interactions necessary for normal performance on these tasks. Given that working memory processes engage distributed neuronal networks associated with the prefrontal cortex, it is critical to explore the integrity of distributed neural networks of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) following neonatal hippocampal lesions in monkeys. We used resting-state functional MRI to assess functional connectivity of dlPFC networks in monkeys with neonatal neurotoxic hippocampal lesion (Neo-Hibo, n=4) and sham-operated control animals (Neo-C, n=4). Significant differences in the patterns of dlPFC functional networks were found between Groups Neo-Hibo and Neo-C. The within-group maps and the between-group comparisons yielded a highly coherent picture showing altered interactions of core regions of the working memory network (medial prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex) as well as the dorsal (fundus of superior temporal area and superior temporal cortex) and ventral (V4 and infero-temporal cortex) visual processing areas in animals with Neo-Hibo lesions. Correlations between functional connectivity changes and working memory impairment in the same animals were found only between the dlPFC and visual cortical areas (V4 and infero-temporal cortex). Thus, the impact of the neonatal hippocampal lesions extends to multiple cortical areas interconnected with the dlPFC. PMID:27063864

  5. Dietary adaptations of Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis) in limestone forests in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhonghao; Huang, Chengming; Tang, Chuangbin; Huang, Libin; Tang, Huaxing; Ma, Guangzhi; Zhou, Qihai

    2015-02-01

    Limestone hills are an unusual habitat for primates, prompting them to evolve specific behavioral adaptations to the component karst habitat. From September 2012 to August 2013, we collected data on the diet of one group of Assamese macaques living in limestone forests at Nonggang National Nature Reserve, Guangxi Province, China, using instantaneous scan sampling. Assamese macaques were primarily folivorous, young leaves accounting for 75.5% and mature leaves an additional 1.8% of their diet. In contrast, fruit accounted for only 20.1%. The young leaves of Bonia saxatilis, a shrubby, karst-endemic bamboo that is superabundant in limestone hills, comprised the bulk of the average monthly diet. Moreover, macaques consumed significantly more bamboo leaves during the season when the availability of fruit declined, suggesting that bamboo leaves are an important fallback food for Assamese macaques in limestone forests. In addition, diet composition varied seasonally. The monkeys consumed significantly more fruit and fewer young leaves in the fruit-rich season than in the fruit-lean season. Fruit consumption was positively correlated with fruit availability, indicating that fruit is a preferred food for Assamese macaques. Of seventy-eight food species, only nine contributed >0.5% of the annual diet, and together these nine foods accounted for 90.7% of the annual diet. Our results suggest that bamboo consumption represents a key factor in the Assamese macaque's dietary adaptation to limestone habitat.

  6. Neutralizing antibody prevents type D retrovirus viremia in Celebes black macaques.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B J; Shiigi, S M; Zeigler, J L; Olson, L C; Malley, A; Howard, C F

    1986-08-01

    The Celebes black macaque (Macaca nigra) colony at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center has a high incidence of simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS-RF) that may be caused by type D retrovirus type 2 (SRV-2). During the spring and autumn screening of the colony, seven monkeys previously aviremic were found to be viremic on the basis of the Raji co-culture assay. These monkeys and control groups were selected for further study, which included titration of neutralizing antibody activity and immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) activity before and at the time that the animals became viremic. Results indicated that neutralizing antibody was not present before or at the time that monkeys became viremic and that control monkeys who were IFA+ and did not become viremic had high levels of neutralizing antibody. The IFA titre did not change significantly or predictably at the time the animals became viremic.

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus non-genetic Rhesus monkey model induced by high fat and high sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuai-yao; Qi, Su-dong; Zhao, Yuan; Li, Yan-yan; Yang, Feng-mei; Yu, Wen-hai; Jin, Ma; Chen, Li-Xiong; Wang, Jun-bin; He, Zhan-long; Li, Hong-jun

    2015-01-01

    To build an ideal animal model for studying the mechanism of occurrence, developing and treating of diabetes become a more important issue, facing with the fact that the big threat of diabetes to human health has been worsen. First, we used the normal control diets or the high-fat/high-sucrose diets to feed the adult rhesus monkeys and the macaques induced by the high-fat/high-sucrose diets in the high-fat/high-sucrose group and the type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) group developed the hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia at 6 months in accordance with the precious researches that reported that minipigs, rats and mice could develop hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia and obesity after being induced with high-fat/high-carbohydrate diets. Second, the rhesus monkeys in T2DM group were injected STZ at a low dosage of 35 mg/kg BW to induce glucose persistent elevation which maintained pretty well after 12 months. Third, we took the assay of glucose tolerance test and insulin resistance index, assessed the changing tendency of serum resistin and analysed the pathological characteristics of the tissues like pancreas and liver by staining in different ways. The results indicate the rhesus monkeys in T2DM group have lots of clinical features of T2DM. The experimental non-genetic T2DM rhesus monkeys model not only contribute to simulating of clinical manifestations and pathological features of human T2DM, but also may be a good kind of model for research on the treatment of T2DM and for new drugs evaluation.

  8. The Thatcher illusion in humans and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Christoph D; Logothetis, Nikos K; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Wallraven, Christian

    2010-10-01

    Primates possess the remarkable ability to differentiate faces of group members and to extract relevant information about the individual directly from the face. Recognition of conspecific faces is achieved by means of holistic processing, i.e. the processing of the face as an unparsed, perceptual whole, rather than as the collection of independent features (part-based processing). The most striking example of holistic processing is the Thatcher illusion. Local changes in facial features are hardly noticeable when the whole face is inverted (rotated 180 degrees ), but strikingly grotesque when the face is upright. This effect can be explained by a lack of processing capabilities for locally rotated facial features when the face is turned upside down. Recently, a Thatcher illusion was described in the macaque monkey analogous to that known from human investigations. Using a habituation paradigm combined with eye tracking, we address the critical follow-up questions raised in the aforementioned study to show the Thatcher illusion as a function of the observer's species (humans and macaques), the stimulus' species (humans and macaques) and the level of perceptual expertise (novice, expert).

  9. Sequence characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 gene in the Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana).

    PubMed

    Dai, Q X; Yao, Y F; Qi, Z C; Huang, Y; Ni, Q Y; Zhang, M W; Xu, H L

    2015-03-13

    In this study, the complete coding region sequence of an innate immune-related TLR4 gene was obtained from the Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) genome via PCR and direct sequencing. The sequence had a total length of 2481 bp, contained 3 complete exons, and encoded 826 amino acids (AAs); its isoelectric point was 5.703, and the molecular weight was 94.72 kDa. The high structure prediction showed that the protein was comprised of one extracellular region, one transmembrane region, and one intracellular region. There were 48 potential functional sites in the protein, including glycosylation, phosphorylation, and acetylation sites. A homology analysis among 9 primate species, including the Tibetan macaque, human, chimpanzee, gibbon, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus monkey, pig-tailed monkey, squirrel monkey, and small-eared galago, showed that the homology of the nucleotide and AA sequences ranged from 60.9-99.5% and 51.4- 99.0%, respectively. Higher variability was identified in the extracellular region of the TLR4 protein, and its variable sites accounted for 88.79% (AA) of the total variable sites. Additionally, the number of AAs at the 3' end of the intracellular region was notably different among the primate lineages. The phylogenetic tree based on TLR4 gene exons of 9 primate species showed that the Tibetan macaque clustered with the rhesus macaque, cynomolgus monkey, and pig-tailed monkey; it was most distant from the small-eared galago. This study will provide an important basis for further study on the expression, regulation, and polymorphism of the TLR4 gene and the relationship between polymorphisms and host disease susceptibility.

  10. Effects of unilateral motor cortex lesion on ipsilesional hand's reach and grasp performance in monkeys: relationship with recovery in the contralesional hand.

    PubMed

    Kaeser, Mélanie; Wyss, Alexander F; Bashir, Shahid; Hamadjida, Adjia; Liu, Yu; Bloch, Jocelyne; Brunet, Jean-François; Belhaj-Saif, Abderaouf; Rouiller, Eric M

    2010-03-01

    Manual dexterity, a prerogative of primates, is under the control of the corticospinal (CS) tract. Because 90-95% of CS axons decussate, it is assumed that this control is exerted essentially on the contralateral hand. Consistently, unilateral lesion of the hand representation in the motor cortex is followed by a complete loss of dexterity of the contralesional hand. During the months following lesion, spontaneous recovery of manual dexterity takes place to a highly variable extent across subjects, although largely incomplete. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that after a significant postlesion period, manual performance in the ipsilesional hand is correlated with the extent of functional recovery in the contralesional hand. To this aim, ten adult macaque monkeys were subjected to permanent unilateral motor cortex lesion. Monkeys' manual performance was assessed for each hand during several months postlesion, using our standard behavioral test (modified Brinkman board task) that provides a quantitative measure of reach and grasp ability. The ipsilesional hand's performance was found to be significantly enhanced over the long term (100-300 days postlesion) in six of ten monkeys, with the six exhibiting the best, though incomplete, recovery of the contralesional hand. There was a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.932; P < 0.001) between performance in the ipsilesional hand after significant postlesion period and the extent of recovery of the contralesional hand. This observation is interpreted in terms of different possible mechanisms of recovery, dependent on the recruitment of motor areas in the lesioned and/or intact hemispheres.

  11. A photogrammetric method to evaluate nutritional status without capture in habituated free-ranging Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Hiroyuki; Suzumura, Takafumi; Kanchi, Fujio; Hamada, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of nutritional status (e.g., total body fat) of animals is difficult, because the linear dimension (body length) required for the calculation of proxy parameters, such as the physique or body mass indices, cannot be measured without capture. One solution is photogrammetry of body length, provided the following two criteria are met: (1) the camera axes and subject are oriented vertically, and (2) anatomical landmarks are easily identified with low measurement error. By modifying Mori's (Primates 20:371-397, 1979) approach, we devised an accurate photogrammetric method that uses a horizontal bar with an attached ruler for the monkey to traverse, and the anatomical landmarks of the eye and upper border of the ischial callosity to measure body length. We tested the applicability of this method on 11 adult female, habituated, free-ranging Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). Somatometric body length (crown-rump length and anterior trunk length) was statistically compared with the body length obtained using photogrammetry. The significant correlation of the photogrammetric body length with each somatometric measurement verified that the former could be employed to calculate various indices that are used to characterize fat mass (nutritional status) in Japanese macaques. The advantages and disadvantages of photogrammetry are also discussed.

  12. Mapping visual cortex in monkeys and humans using surface-based atlases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, D. C.; Lewis, J. W.; Drury, H. A.; Hadjikhani, N.; Tootell, R. B.; Bakircioglu, M.; Miller, M. I.

    2001-01-01

    We have used surface-based atlases of the cerebral cortex to analyze the functional organization of visual cortex in humans and macaque monkeys. The macaque atlas contains multiple partitioning schemes for visual cortex, including a probabilistic atlas of visual areas derived from a recent architectonic study, plus summary schemes that reflect a combination of physiological and anatomical evidence. The human atlas includes a probabilistic map of eight topographically organized visual areas recently mapped using functional MRI. To facilitate comparisons between species, we used surface-based warping to bring functional and geographic landmarks on the macaque map into register with corresponding landmarks on the human map. The results suggest that extrastriate visual cortex outside the known topographically organized areas is dramatically expanded in human compared to macaque cortex, particularly in the parietal lobe.

  13. Seroprevalence of Japanese encephalitis virus infection in captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Hiroshi; Saito, Akatsuki; Noguchi, Keita; Terada, Yutaka; Kuwata, Ryusei; Akari, Hirofumi; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Maeda, Ken

    2014-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which is transmitted by mosquitoes, infects many animal species and causes serious acute encephalitis in humans and horses. In this study, a serosurvey of JEV in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) reared in Aichi Prefecture was conducted using purified JEV as an antigen for ELISA. The results revealed that 146 of 332 monkeys (44 %) were seropositive for JEV. In addition, 35 of 131 monkeys (27 %) born in the facility were seropositive, and the annual infection rate in the facility was estimated as 13 %. Our results provide evidence of the frequent exposure of many Japanese macaques to JEV, suggesting that there is a risk of JEV transmission to humans by mosquitoes.

  14. Acrylamide effects on the macaque visual system. I. Psychophysics and electrophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Merigan, W.H.; Barkdoll, E.; Maurissen, J.P.J.; Eskin, T.A.; Lapham, L.W.

    1985-03-01

    Oral acrylamide produces axonal swelling and later degeneration and gliosis in the distal optic tract, especially within the lateral geniculate nucleus, of macaque monkeys. Measures of visual thresholds and cortical-evoked potentials were used to study the time course of visual changes during exposure to acrylamide in macaque monkeys. Contrast sensitivity, visual acuity, and flicker fusion frequency were reduced during exposure, and only flicker fusion recovered rapidly and completely after exposure. Pattern-reversal-evoked responses exhibited increased latency and reduced amplitude during dosing but substantially recovered after exposure. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity for high spatial frequencies were decreased throughout the 140 days of testing after dosing. These results suggest an acute general depression of visual capacities as the initial effect of acrylamide exposure, whereas later effects were confined to high spatial frequencies. 29 references, 6 figures.

  15. Operant discrimination of an interoceptive stimulus in rhesus monkeys1

    PubMed Central

    Slucki, Henry; Adam, Gyorgi; Porter, Robert W.

    1965-01-01

    Five rhesus macaques monkeys surgically prepared with Thiry small intestinal (jejunum) loops and implanted brain electrodes were restrained in primate chairs and kept on 23-hr deprivation-feeding cycle. After being trained to press a lever for sugar pills on an FR 25 schedule of reinforcement, a discrimination training procedure was established. Lever presses were reinforced during the SD—a non-aversive mechanical stimulus applied to the internal walls of the Thiry loop by rhythmic inflation-deflation of a small latex balloon by air at the rate of one cycle per sec at 100 mm Hg pressure. The SΔ was the absence of the visceral stimulation. The monkeys successfully discriminated between presence and absence of the internal stimulus. A discrimination reversal was attempted and completed on one monkey. The results clearly show operant discrimination based on an interoceptive stimulus. Cortical and subcortical EEG records reflected the onset but not termination of the visceral stimulation. PMID:4954822

  16. Peripubertal refinement of the intrinsic and associational circuitry in monkey prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Woo, T U; Pucak, M L; Kye, C H; Matus, C V; Lewis, D A

    1997-10-01

    The peripubertal elimination of axospinous synapses and dendritic spines in monkey prefrontal cortex suggests that this region undergoes substantial reorganization during late postnatal development. Understanding the functional impact of these maturational refinements requires knowledge of the specific presynaptic elements involved in these changes. Two potential sources of these presynaptic terminals are the intrinsic axon collaterals furnished by pyramidal cells within a region and the associational axons that arise from pyramidal neurons in other cortical regions in the same hemisphere. In the adult, both of these types of axon terminals form synapses predominantly with dendritic spines on other pyramidal neurons, and thus they may be preferentially involved in the peripubertal pruning of axospinous synapses and dendritic spines. In order to test this hypothesis, iontophoretic injections of the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine were made into the superficial layers of areas 9 or 46 of the prefrontal cortex of four prepubertal juvenile (14.9-21.5 months old) and three young adult macaque monkeys. Tangential reconstructions revealed a stripe-like pattern of labeled terminals for intrinsic and associational projections in both juvenile and adult animals. During puberty, the intrinsic circuitry underwent extensive topographic refinement, as demonstrated by a 42.7% decrease in stripe area and a 28.0% increase in gap distance between stripes. Furthermore, the mediolateral tangential spread of labeled stripes around the injection site decreased by 27.0%. In contrast, topographic refinement was not evident in the associational circuitry. In both layers 1 and 3, the densities of varicosities and branch points on labeled axons decreased by about 50% in intrinsic stripes during puberty, but only by approximately 30% in associational stripes. These findings suggest that the spatial form and magnitude of peripubertal refinements in prefrontal cortical

  17. Macacine Herpesvirus 1 in Long-Tailed Macaques, Malaysia, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Ho; Rostal, Melinda K.; Hughes, Tom; Sitam, Frankie; Lee, Chee-Yen; Japning, Jeffrine; Harden, Mallory E.; Griffiths, Anthony; Basir, Misliah; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Daszak, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Macacine herpesvirus 1 (MaHV1; B virus) naturally infects macaques (Macaca spp.) and can cause fatal encephalitis in humans. In Peninsular Malaysia, wild macaques are abundant, and translocation is used to mitigate human–macaque conflict. Most adult macaques are infected with MaHV1, although the risk for transmission to persons who handle them during capture and translocation is unknown. We investigated MaHV1 shedding among 392 long-tailed macaques (M. fascicularis) after capture and translocation by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks in Peninsular Malaysia, during 2009–2011. For detection of MaHV1 DNA, PCR was performed on urogenital and oropharyngeal swab samples. Overall, 39% of macaques were shedding MaHV1 DNA; rates of DNA detection did not differ between sample types. This study demonstrates that MaHV1 was shed by a substantial proportion of macaques after capture and transport and suggests that persons handling macaques under these circumstances might be at risk for exposure to MaHV1. PMID:26080081

  18. Macacine Herpesvirus 1 in Long-Tailed Macaques, Malaysia, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Ho; Rostal, Melinda K; Hughes, Tom; Sitam, Frankie; Lee, Chee-Yen; Japning, Jeffrine; Harden, Mallory E; Griffiths, Anthony; Basir, Misliah; Wolfe, Nathan D; Epstein, Jonathan H; Daszak, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Macacine herpesvirus 1 (MaHV1; B virus) naturally infects macaques (Macaca spp.) and can cause fatal encephalitis in humans. In Peninsular Malaysia, wild macaques are abundant, and translocation is used to mitigate human-macaque conflict. Most adult macaques are infected with MaHV1, although the risk for transmission to persons who handle them during capture and translocation is unknown. We investigated MaHV1 shedding among 392 long-tailed macaques (M. fascicularis) after capture and translocation by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks in Peninsular Malaysia, during 2009-2011. For detection of MaHV1 DNA, PCR was performed on urogenital and oropharyngeal swab samples. Overall, 39% of macaques were shedding MaHV1 DNA; rates of DNA detection did not differ between sample types. This study demonstrates that MaHV1 was shed by a substantial proportion of macaques after capture and transport and suggests that persons handling macaques under these circumstances might be at risk for exposure to MaHV1.

  19. Geographical, genetic and functional diversity of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kono, Ken; Nomaguchi, Masako; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Akio; Shioda, Tatsuo; Akari, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Emi E

    2012-03-01

    The antiretroviral factor tripartite motif protein 5 (TRIM5) gene-derived isoform (TRIMCyp) has been found in at least three species of Old World monkey: rhesus (Macaca mulatta), pig-tailed (Macaca nemestrina) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques. Although the frequency of TRIMCyp has been well studied in rhesus and pig-tailed macaques, the frequency and prevalence of TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques remain to be definitively elucidated. Here, the geographical and genetic diversity of TRIM5α/TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques was studied in comparison with their anti-lentiviral activity. It was found that the frequency of TRIMCyp in a population in the Philippines was significantly higher than those in Indonesian and Malaysian populations. Major and minor haplotypes of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the cyclophilin A domain were also found. The functional significance of the polymorphism in TRIMCyp was examined, and it was demonstrated that the major haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) but not HIV-2, whilst the minor haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed HIV-2 but not HIV-1. The major haplotype of TRIMCyp did not restrict a monkey-tropic HIV-1 clone, NL-DT5R, which contains a capsid with the simian immunodeficiency virus-derived loop between α-helices 4 and 5 and the entire vif gene. These results indicate that polymorphisms of TRIMCyp affect its anti-lentiviral activity. Overall, the results of this study will help our understanding of the genetic background of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp, as well as the host factors composing species barriers of primate lentiviruses.

  20. Temperament in rhesus, long-tailed, and pigtailed macaques varies by species and sex.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Adrienne F; Ha, James C; Bentson, Kathy L; Crockett, Carolyn M

    2013-04-01

    Temperament differs among individuals both within and between species. Evidence suggests that differences in temperament of group members may parallel differences in social behavior among groups or between species. Here, we compared temperament between three closely related species of monkey-rhesus (Macaca mulatta), long-tailed (M. fascicularis), and pigtailed (M. nemestrina) macaques-using cage-front behavioral observations of individually housed monkeys at a National Primate Research Center. Frequencies of 12 behaviors in 899 subjects were analyzed using a principal components analysis to identify temperament components. The analysis identified four components, which we interpreted as Sociability toward humans, Cautiousness, Aggressiveness, and Fearfulness. Species and sexes differed in their average scores on these components, even after controlling for differences in age and early-life experiences. Our results suggest that rhesus macaques are especially aggressive and unsociable toward humans, long-tailed macaques are more cautious and fearful, and pigtailed macaques are more sociable toward humans and less aggressive than the other species. Pigtailed males were notably more sociable than any other group. The differences observed are consistent with reported variation in these species' social behaviors, as rhesus macaques generally engage in more social aggression and pigtailed macaques engage in more male-male affiliative behaviors. Differences in predation risks are among the socioecological factors that might make these species-typical behaviors adaptive. Our results suggest that adaptive species-level social differences may be encoded in individual-level temperaments, which are manifested even outside of a social context. Am. J. Primatol. 75:303-313, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Development and Characterization of a Macaque Model of Focal Internal Capsular Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Yumi; Higo, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have used macaque monkeys with lesions induced in the primary motor cortex (M1) to investigate the recovery of motor function after brain damage. However, in human stroke patients, the severity and outcome of motor impairments depend on the degree of damage to the white matter, especially that in the posterior internal capsule, which carries corticospinal tracts. To bridge the gap between results obtained in M1-lesioned macaques and the development of clinical intervention strategies, we established a method of inducing focal infarcts at the posterior internal capsule of macaque monkeys by injecting endothelin-1 (ET-1), a vasoconstrictor peptide. The infarcts expanded between 3 days and 1 week after ET-1 injection. The infarct volume in each macaque was negatively correlated with precision grip performance 3 days and 1 week after injection, suggesting that the degree of infarct expansion may have been a cause of the impairment in hand movements during the early stage. Although the infarct volume decreased and gross movement improved, impairment of dexterous hand movements remained until the end of the behavioral and imaging experiments at 3 months after ET-1 injection. A decrease in the abundance of large neurons in M1, from which the descending motor tracts originate, was associated with this later-stage impairment. The present model is useful not only for studying neurological changes underlying deficits and recovery but also for testing therapeutic interventions after white matter infarcts in primates. PMID:27149111

  2. [The protease inhibitor system of macaques. The identification of alleles using isoelectric focusing and family analysis].

    PubMed

    Samil'chuk, E I

    1989-01-01

    Five alpha-1-antitrypsin (alpha-1-AT) phenotypes have been revealed by isoelectrofocusing (IEF) in sera of 215 crab-eating macaques. Alpha-1-AT was monomorphic in sera of 250 Rhesus monkeys. A new allele of macaque Pi-system, designated as B' was postulated in addition to existing two (B and C) on the basis of IEF data. The above conclusion was supported by family analysis, based on 35 monkey birth cases. Alpha-1-AT phenotype frequencies were in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equation both in wild and capture born crab-eating macaques. Alpha-1-AT was found to be microheterogeneous: several zones of the protein were revealed by IEF and Western blotting with anti human alpha-1-AT serum. The pregnancy caused a sharp increase of one band. This may lead to false identification of alpha-1-AT phenotypes, particularly when acid starch gel electrophoresis is used for alpha-1-AT identification. Such misinterpretation during alpha-1-AT phenotyping may explain the disagreement with Hardy-Weinberg equation described earlier for crab-eating macaques. PMID:2788967

  3. Comment to: "Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro" by Z. Ren et al. Exp. Cell Res. 317 (2011) 2950-2957: spontaneous transformation of mesenchymal stem cells in culture: facts or fiction?

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Anja; Røsland, Gro V; Bjerkvig, Rolf

    2012-03-10

    There is at present a controversy in the literature whether MSCs are susceptible to spontaneous in vitro transformation or not. Several groups have reported spontaneous transformation of MSCs from various species. However, some of these reports were not true transformations and later proven to be due to cross-contaminating cancer cells. To date there is no solid evidence that MSCs can undergo spontaneous transformation in culture. Only two groups used DNA fingerprinting to authenticate their transformed cells, and both groups later showed cross-contamination of cancer cells in their cultures. In this commentary, we address the paper "Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro" by Z. Ren et al. Exp. Cell Res. 317 (2011) 2950-2957. In this article the authors characterize the transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) and claim to have verified their origin. We question the authentication of the TMCs made by the authors and we also believe it is in the interest of the scientific community, that a highly controversial finding, such as spontaneous transformation of MSCs, should be properly verified by stringent methods, preferably DNA fingerprinting, in order to validate if an actual transformation event has occurred.

  4. [Recent advances in social neuroscience research using macaques].

    PubMed

    Isoda, Masaki

    2013-06-01

    The last decade has seen a surge of interest in the study of social brain functions. Research in this field, called social neuroscience, has been mostly carried out on human subjects by using a functional neuroimaging technique. This is largely because of the fact that humans have sophisticated social abilities and are capable of performing various demanding tasks in a scanner. However, given the limited spatiotemporal resolution inherent in the methodology, a systems neuroscience approach using macaque monkeys may provide a useful platform that promotes the understanding of social brain functions at the cellular level, thereby complementing neuroimaging techniques. Recently, it has been demonstrated to be technically feasible to train macaque monkeys to perform socially oriented behavioral tasks and directly examine cellular activity in their brains. In this paper, we review the literature on this new branch of social neuroscience. Emerging evidence now suggests that diverse aspects of social cognition, such as social valuation, gaze following, joint attention, monitoring of other's behavior, and social comparison are implemented by distributed neuronal networks, including the orbital, lateral, and medial sectors of the prefrontal cortex, premotor cortex, posterior parietal cortex, amygdala, and superior temporal sulcus. Continuing efforts in this research direction could uncover the neural basis whereby primates have become such successful social beings in the animal kingdom.

  5. A chronic neural interface to the macaque dorsal column nuclei.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew G; Weigand, Pauline K; Sritharan, Srihari Y; Lucas, Timothy H

    2016-05-01

    The dorsal column nuclei (DCN) of the brain stem contain secondary afferent neurons, which process ascending somatosensory information. Most of the known physiology of the DCN in primates has been acquired in acute experiments with anesthetized animals. Here, we developed a technique to implant a multielectrode array (MEA) chronically in the DCN of macaque monkeys to enable experiments with the animals awake. Two monkeys were implanted with brain-stem MEAs for 2-5 mo with no major adverse effects. Responses of the cuneate and gracile nuclei were quantified at the level of both field potentials and single units. Tactile receptive fields (RFs) were identified for 315 single units. A subset of these units had very regular spiking patterns with spike frequencies predominantly in the alpha band (8-14 Hz). The stability of the neuronal recordings was assessed with a novel analysis that identified units by their mean spike waveform and by the spike-triggered average of activity on all other electrodes in the array. Fifty-six identified neurons were observed over two or more sessions and in a few cases for as long as 1 mo. RFs of stable neurons were largely consistent across days. The results demonstrate that a chronic DCN implant in a macaque can be safe and effective, yielding high-quality unit recording for several months. The unprecedented access to these nuclei in awake primates should lead to a better understanding of their role in sensorimotor behavior. PMID:26912601

  6. Role of vocal tract characteristics in individual discrimination by Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)

    PubMed Central

    Furuyama, Takafumi; Kobayasi, Kohta I.; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) exhibits a species-specific communication sound called the “coo call” to locate group members and maintain within-group contact. Monkeys have been demonstrated to be capable of discriminating between individuals based only on their voices, but there is still debate regarding how the fundamental frequencies (F0) and filter properties of the vocal tract characteristics (VTC) contribute to individual discrimination in nonhuman primates. This study was performed to investigate the acoustic keys used by Japanese macaques in individual discrimination. Two animals were trained with standard Go/NoGo operant conditioning to distinguish the coo calls of two unfamiliar monkeys. The subjects were required to continue depressing a lever until the stimulus changed from one monkey to the other. The test stimuli were synthesized by combining the F0s and VTC from each individual. Both subjects released the lever when the VTC changed, whereas they did not when the F0 changed. The reaction times to the test stimuli were not significantly different from that to the training stimuli that shared the same VTC. Our data suggest that vocal tract characteristics are important for the identification of individuals by Japanese macaques. PMID:27550840

  7. Role of vocal tract characteristics in individual discrimination by Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Furuyama, Takafumi; Kobayasi, Kohta I; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi

    2016-08-23

    The Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) exhibits a species-specific communication sound called the "coo call" to locate group members and maintain within-group contact. Monkeys have been demonstrated to be capable of discriminating between individuals based only on their voices, but there is still debate regarding how the fundamental frequencies (F0) and filter properties of the vocal tract characteristics (VTC) contribute to individual discrimination in nonhuman primates. This study was performed to investigate the acoustic keys used by Japanese macaques in individual discrimination. Two animals were trained with standard Go/NoGo operant conditioning to distinguish the coo calls of two unfamiliar monkeys. The subjects were required to continue depressing a lever until the stimulus changed from one monkey to the other. The test stimuli were synthesized by combining the F0s and VTC from each individual. Both subjects released the lever when the VTC changed, whereas they did not when the F0 changed. The reaction times to the test stimuli were not significantly different from that to the training stimuli that shared the same VTC. Our data suggest that vocal tract characteristics are important for the identification of individuals by Japanese macaques.

  8. Role of vocal tract characteristics in individual discrimination by Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Furuyama, Takafumi; Kobayasi, Kohta I; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) exhibits a species-specific communication sound called the "coo call" to locate group members and maintain within-group contact. Monkeys have been demonstrated to be capable of discriminating between individuals based only on their voices, but there is still debate regarding how the fundamental frequencies (F0) and filter properties of the vocal tract characteristics (VTC) contribute to individual discrimination in nonhuman primates. This study was performed to investigate the acoustic keys used by Japanese macaques in individual discrimination. Two animals were trained with standard Go/NoGo operant conditioning to distinguish the coo calls of two unfamiliar monkeys. The subjects were required to continue depressing a lever until the stimulus changed from one monkey to the other. The test stimuli were synthesized by combining the F0s and VTC from each individual. Both subjects released the lever when the VTC changed, whereas they did not when the F0 changed. The reaction times to the test stimuli were not significantly different from that to the training stimuli that shared the same VTC. Our data suggest that vocal tract characteristics are important for the identification of individuals by Japanese macaques. PMID:27550840

  9. Evaluation of bendectin embryotoxicity in nonhuman primates: I. Ventricular septal defects in prenatal macaques and baboon.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, A G; Cukierski, M; Prahalada, S; Janos, G; Rowland, J

    1985-10-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys, rhesus monkeys and baboons were administered 10 to 40 times the human dose equivalent of Bendectin throughout the major period of organogenesis (22(+/-3)-50 days of gestation). In animals examined prenatally (100 +/- 2 days gestation) the total incidence of ventricular septal defects (VSD) was 40% in cynomolgus monkeys, 18% in rhesus monkeys, and 23% in baboons. The majority of VSD involved the muscular portion of the septum. No dose response was evident and there were no other cardiac or extracardiac defects found except for one baboon fetus with multiple defects. No defects were observed in cynomolgus monkeys administered Bendectin for 4-day periods between 22 and 41 days of gestation. There was no association of Bendectin treatment with any noncardiac defect. In cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys examined at term there was one mitral valve defect and no incidence of VSD. The increased incidence of VSD observed prenatally in all three species and the absence of defects in macaques at term suggests a delay in closure of the ventricular septum in treated animals. The Bendectin-treated monkey may be a suitable model for the study of the pathogenesis of VSD and the mechanism of spontaneous closure of the defect.

  10. Dengue virus type 1 DNA vaccine induces protective immune responses in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Raviprakash, K; Porter, K R; Kochel, T J; Ewing, D; Simmons, M; Phillips, I; Murphy, G S; Weiss, W R; Hayes, C G

    2000-07-01

    A candidate DNA vaccine expressing dengue virus type 1 pre-membrane and envelope proteins was used to immunize rhesus macaques. Monkeys were immunized intramuscularly (i.m.) or intradermally (i.d.) by three or four 1 mg doses of vaccine, respectively. Monkeys that were inoculated i.m. seroconverted more quickly and had higher antibody levels than those that were inoculated i.d. The sera exhibited virus-neutralizing activity, which declined over time. Four of the eight i.m.-inoculated monkeys were protected completely from developing viraemia when challenged 4 months after the last dose with homologous dengue virus. The other four monkeys had reduced viraemia compared with the control immunized monkeys. The i.d. -inoculated monkeys showed no reduction in viraemia when challenged with the virus. All vaccinated monkeys showed an anamnestic antibody response, indicating that they had established immunological memory. Vaccine-induced antibody had an avidity index similar to that of antibody induced by virus infection; however, no clear correlation was apparent between antibody avidity and virus neutralization titres.

  11. Grooming reciprocity in male Tibetan macaques.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dong-Po; Li, Jin-Hua; Garber, Paul A; Matheson, Megan D; Sun, Bing-Hua; Zhu, Yong

    2013-10-01

    In several primate species, adult males are reported to compete for access to reproductive partners as well as forming affiliative and cohesive social bonds based on the exchange of goods or services. We hypothesized that among a broad set of fitness-maximizing strategies, grooming can be used by individual adult males to enhance social relationships through reciprocity and/or through the interchange of grooming for a different but equivalent good or service. We used focal animal sampling and continuously recorded dyadic grooming and agonistic interactions to test a series of predictions regarding male social interactions in a free-ranging group of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Huangshan, China. During the non-mating season or between males of similar rank throughout the year, grooming effort given was matched by grooming effort received. However, lower ranking males groomed higher ranking males at a greater rate and/or for a longer duration during both the mating and non-mating periods. We found that higher ranking males directed less aggression towards males with whom they formed a frequent grooming partnership, indicating that grooming received was interchanged for increased social tolerance. These data suggest that individual male Tibetan macaques employ alternative social strategies associated with grooming reciprocity or interchange depending on dominance rank and rates of aggression, and highlight the importance of both biological markets and grooming reciprocity as behavioral mechanisms used by resident adult males to form and maintain affiliative social bonds.

  12. A simpler primate brain: the visual system of the marmoset monkey

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Samuel G.; Rosa, Marcello G. P.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are diurnal primates with high visual acuity at the center of gaze. Although primates share many similarities in the organization of their visual centers with other mammals, and even other species of vertebrates, their visual pathways also show unique features, particularly with respect to the organization of the cerebral cortex. Therefore, in order to understand some aspects of human visual function, we need to study non-human primate brains. Which species is the most appropriate model? Macaque monkeys, the most widely used non-human primates, are not an optimal choice in many practical respects. For example, much of the macaque cerebral cortex is buried within sulci, and is therefore inaccessible to many imaging techniques, and the postnatal development and lifespan of macaques are prohibitively long for many studies of brain maturation, plasticity, and aging. In these and several other respects the marmoset, a small New World monkey, represents a more appropriate choice. Here we review the visual pathways of the marmoset, highlighting recent work that brings these advantages into focus, and identify where additional work needs to be done to link marmoset brain organization to that of macaques and humans. We will argue that the marmoset monkey provides a good subject for studies of a complex visual system, which will likely allow an important bridge linking experiments in animal models to humans. PMID:25152716

  13. Usefulness of the monkey model to investigate the role soy in postmenopausal women's health.

    PubMed

    Appt, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    Some of the important health issues for postmenopausal women include cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, breast cancer, and relief of menopausal symptoms. Ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) have many strengths as models for research in this area including a close phylogenetic relationship to humans, similarities in lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and coronary artery anatomy, similar skeletal anatomical and morphological characteristics, mammary glands with similar pathophysiological characteristics, and a 28-day menstrual cycle with similar hormonal fluctuations. Monkeys (macaques) also experience declining ovarian function and irregular menstrual cycles (natural menopause) when they approach 24 to 29 yr of age. However, because of their very short life span after natural menopause, ovariectomized macaques are used to model postmenopausal women. The cynomolgus monkey model has been useful in defining the potential cardiovascular benefits of soy foods and soy supplements; however, it remains unclear whether the observations are generalizable to all women or only to those who, like cynomolgus monkeys, convert the soy isoflavone daidzein to the metabolite equol. Particularly important has been the use of the cynomolgus monkey model to understand the effects of soy on breast health. There is evidence from a cynomolgus monkey trial to suggest that soy/soy phytoestrogens have no estrogen agonist effects for breast. Finally, soy/soy phytoestrogens do not appear to be an adequate alternative to postmenopausal hormone therapy. Nevertheless, important attributes of soy have been identified, and it may have potential as a complementary component to hormone therapy.

  14. Retinohypothalamic connections in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chijuka, John C.

    Previous studies of retinohypothalamic projections in macaques were performed with anterograde degeneration or autoradiographic techniques that were not sufficiently sensitive to fully define these projections. Results of studies in non-primates using sensitive tracers have revealed more extensive retinohypothalamic projection than previously seen. We hypothesize that there are more extensive retinohypothalamic projections in the higher primate, macaque monkey. Thus, the primary goal of this investigation was to characterize the retinohypothalamic projections in the macaque monkey using the more sensitive tract tracer, cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) unilaterally injected intravitreally. Secondary goals were to determine: (1) whether there is a retinal projection to the sleep-related ventrolateral preoptic area of the hypothalamus; (2) whether there are direct retinal projections to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the hypothalamus; and (3) whether any retinally-projecting hypothalamic neurons can be retrogradely labeled by intravitreal CTB injections. Our results confirmed our hypothesis that there are more extensive projections to the central targets. We found that, in addition to the well-described retinal projection to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a number of other hypothalamic areas were labeled. We observed projections to the medial and lateral preoptic areas, including the sleep-related ventrolateral preoptic area. A number of retinal fibers terminated immediately dorsal to the supraoptic nucleus (SO), with a few fibers penetrating and terminating within the nucleus. A few fibers continued laterally beyond the SO into the substantia innominata immediately ventral to the nucleus basalis of Meynert. In addition, a dense plexus of CTB-labeled, retinal fibers were present in the subventricular nucleus and adjacent subventricular area. Some of these fibers coursed dorsally from this region to penetrate the ependyma lining the third ventricle and apparently

  15. The human homologue of macaque area V6A.

    PubMed

    Pitzalis, S; Sereno, M I; Committeri, G; Fattori, P; Galati, G; Tosoni, A; Galletti, C

    2013-11-15

    In macaque monkeys, V6A is a visuomotor area located in the anterior bank of the POs, dorsal and anterior to retinotopically-organized extrastriate area V6 (Galletti et al., 1996). Unlike V6, V6A represents both contra- and ipsilateral visual fields and is broadly retinotopically organized (Galletti et al., 1999b). The contralateral lower visual field is over-represented in V6A. The central 20°-30° of the visual field is mainly represented dorsally (V6Ad) and the periphery ventrally (V6Av), at the border with V6. Both sectors of area V6A contain arm movement-related cells, active during spatially-directed reaching movements (Gamberini et al., 2011). In humans, we previously mapped the retinotopic organization of area V6 (Pitzalis et al., 2006). Here, using phase-encoded fMRI, cortical surface-based analysis and wide-field retinotopic mapping, we define a new cortical region that borders V6 anteriorly and shows a clear over-representation of the contralateral lower visual field and the periphery. As with macaque V6A, the eccentricity increases moving ventrally within the area. The new region contains a non-mirror-image representation of the visual field. Functional mapping reveals that, as in macaque V6A, the new region, but not the nearby area V6, responds during finger pointing and reaching movements. Based on similarity in position, retinotopic properties, functional organization and relationship with the neighboring extrastriate visual areas, we propose that the new cortical region is the human homologue of macaque area V6A.

  16. Decrease in phosphocreatine level in skeletal muscle of SIV-infected rhesus macaques correlates with decrease in intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Hack, V; Gross, A; Böhme, A; Stahl-Hennig, C; Dröge, W

    1997-09-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle tissue (cachexia) is one of the hallmarks of HIV infection. It has been found (1) that creatine kinase, i.e., an enzyme of pivotal importance in muscular mitochondrial energy metabolism, is inhibited by oxidative glutathiolation, and (2) that reduced glutathione (GSH) is decreased in skeletal muscle of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys. We, therefore, have studied the phosphocreatine (P-Cr) levels. Muscle tissue from SIV-infected macaques showed significantly decreased P-Cr but normal creatine (Cr), ATP, and ADP when compared with uninfected macaques. Individual P-Cr levels were significantly correlated with GSH. Our findings may explain the dysregulation of energy metabolism in cachexia.

  17. Seasonal variation in the feeding behavior and diet of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui) in lowland forest of Yakushima.

    PubMed

    Hill, D A

    1997-01-01

    The feeding behavior of the southern subspecies of Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata yakui) was studied over a period of 18 months in warm temperate broad-leaved forest on the island of Yakushima, Japan. Focal animal data were collected for the eight adults in the troop. Over a full annual cycle, 35.0% of foraging on identified foods was on leaves and shoots, 30.2% on fleshy fruit, 13.2% on seeds, and 5.5% on flowers. Invertebrates and other animal matter accounted for 10.3% of foraging and fungi for 4.6%. There was marked seasonal variation in the use of different food categories, and seeds, leaves, fleshy fruit, and animal matter were each predominant at different times of year. There was also evidence of annual cyclicity in patterns of foraging on all major food types. The monkeys spent less time moving and ate a greater variety of foods when feeding on leaves than when feeding on fruit and seeds, or on insects. Time spent foraging was positively correlated with diversity of the diet, but there was no simple relationship between time spent foraging and the predominant food type. This suggests that a wide variety of foods takes longer to harvest and process, irrespective of the food type. The diet of the study troop was flexible and could not be assigned to a simple dietary category, such as frugivorous or folivorous. If these data are representative of the subspecies, the Yakushima macaque is much more of a dietary generalist than most primates for which there are adequate data.

  18. Coprophagy-related interspecific nocturnal interactions between Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui) and sika deer (Cervus nippon yakushimae).

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Mari; Mochida, Koji

    2010-04-01

    The influence of sympatric large animals on the sleeping behavior of primates in the wild is still largely unknown. In this study, we observed behaviors of wild Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui) at their sleeping sites, using a highly sensitive video camera. We found evidence of nocturnal interspecific interactions, such as agonistic interactions, between Japanese macaques and sika deer (Cervus nippon yakushimae). Deer approached sleeping clusters of macaques, which slept on the ground, to eat their feces or unidentified materials near the sleeping clusters, and as a result, the macaques were often quickly displaced from their sleeping site. There was a significant difference in the occurrence of macaque-deer agonistic interactions between seasons. Our results suggested that the size of the sleeping cluster, the number of adult macaques in the cluster, and the existence of adult males in the cluster did not influence the occurrence of the agonistic interactions. Finally, we discuss the influence of this interaction on macaques and speculate on the influential factors leading to nocturnal coprophagy of macaques' feces by deer.

  19. Mimetic Muscles in a Despotic Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Differ from Those in a Closely Related Tolerant Macaque (M. nigra).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Anne M; Waller, Bridget M; Micheletta, Jérôme

    2016-10-01

    Facial displays (or expressions) are a primary means of visual communication among conspecifics in many mammalian orders. Macaques are an ideal model among primates for investigating the co-evolution of facial musculature, facial displays, and social group size/behavior under the umbrella of "ecomorphology". While all macaque species share some social behaviors, dietary, and ecological parameters, they display a range of social dominance styles from despotic to tolerant. A previous study found a larger repertoire of facial displays in tolerant macaque species relative to despotic species. The present study was designed to further explore this finding by comparing the gross morphological features of mimetic muscles between the Sulawesi macaque (Macaca nigra), a tolerant species, and the rhesus macaque (M. mulatta), a despotic species. Five adult M. nigra heads were dissected and mimetic musculature was compared to those from M. mulatta. Results showed that there was general similarity in muscle presence/absence between the species as well as muscle form except for musculature around the external ear. M. mulatta had more musculature around the external ear than M. nigra. In addition, M. nigra lacked a zygomaticus minor while M. mulatta is reported to have one. These morphological differences match behavioral observations documenting a limited range of ear movements used by M. nigra during facial displays. Future studies focusing on a wider phylogenetic range of macaques with varying dominance styles may further elucidate the roles of phylogeny, ecology, and social variables in the evolution of mimetic muscles within Macaca Anat Rec, 299:1317-1324, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mimetic Muscles in a Despotic Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Differ from Those in a Closely Related Tolerant Macaque (M. nigra).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Anne M; Waller, Bridget M; Micheletta, Jérôme

    2016-10-01

    Facial displays (or expressions) are a primary means of visual communication among conspecifics in many mammalian orders. Macaques are an ideal model among primates for investigating the co-evolution of facial musculature, facial displays, and social group size/behavior under the umbrella of "ecomorphology". While all macaque species share some social behaviors, dietary, and ecological parameters, they display a range of social dominance styles from despotic to tolerant. A previous study found a larger repertoire of facial displays in tolerant macaque species relative to despotic species. The present study was designed to further explore this finding by comparing the gross morphological features of mimetic muscles between the Sulawesi macaque (Macaca nigra), a tolerant species, and the rhesus macaque (M. mulatta), a despotic species. Five adult M. nigra heads were dissected and mimetic musculature was compared to those from M. mulatta. Results showed that there was general similarity in muscle presence/absence between the species as well as muscle form except for musculature around the external ear. M. mulatta had more musculature around the external ear than M. nigra. In addition, M. nigra lacked a zygomaticus minor while M. mulatta is reported to have one. These morphological differences match behavioral observations documenting a limited range of ear movements used by M. nigra during facial displays. Future studies focusing on a wider phylogenetic range of macaques with varying dominance styles may further elucidate the roles of phylogeny, ecology, and social variables in the evolution of mimetic muscles within Macaca Anat Rec, 299:1317-1324, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27343148

  1. Persistent rhinitis and epithelial remodeling induced by cyclic ozone exposure in the nasal airways of infant monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ballinger, Carol A.; Plopper, Charles G.; McDonald, Ruth J.; Bartolucci, Alfred A.; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Harkema, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Children chronically exposed to high levels of ozone (O3), the principal oxidant pollutant in photochemical smog, are more vulnerable to respiratory illness and infections. The specific factors underlying this differential susceptibility are unknown but may be related to air pollutant-induced nasal alterations during postnatal development that impair the normal physiological functions (e.g., filtration and mucociliary clearance) serving to protect the more distal airways from inhaled xenobiotics. In adult animal models, chronic ozone exposure is associated with adaptations leading to a decrease in airway injury. The purpose of our study was to determine whether cyclic ozone exposure induces persistent morphological and biochemical effects on the developing nasal airways of infant monkeys early in life. Infant (180-day-old) rhesus macaques were exposed to 5 consecutive days of O3 [0.5 parts per million (ppm), 8 h/day; “1-cycle”] or filtered air (FA) or 11 biweekly cycles of O3 (FA days 1–9; 0.5 ppm, 8 h/day on days 10–14; “11-cycle”). The left nasal passage was processed for light microscopy and morphometric analysis. Mucosal samples from the right nasal passage were processed for GSH, GSSG, ascorbate (AH2), and uric acid (UA) concentration. Eleven-cycle O3 induced persistent rhinitis, squamous metaplasia, and epithelial hyperplasia in the anterior nasal airways of infant monkeys, resulting in a 39% increase in the numeric density of epithelial cells. Eleven-cycle O3 also induced a 65% increase in GSH concentrations at this site. The persistence of epithelial hyperplasia was positively correlated with changes in GSH. These results indicate that early life ozone exposure causes persistent nasal epithelial alterations in infant monkeys and provide a potential mechanism for the increased susceptibility to respiratory illness exhibited by children in polluted environments. PMID:21131400

  2. Age class differences in the feeding behavior of captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscataia) in the forested and nonvegetated enclosure groups.

    PubMed

    Jaman, M Firoj; Huffman, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Age class differences in feeding behavior of primates are affected by many factors, including feeding competition, foraging skills, habitat type, food abundance and distribution, body mass, and food types. Two captive groups of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata), one housed in a forested enclosure and the other in a nonvegetated enclosure, were studied to examine the effect of environmental enrichment on age class differences in feeding behavior. Although there was no significant age class difference in time spent feeding on provisioned foods in either enclosure, the feeding rate (intake of unit food/minute) of adults consuming provisioned monkey chow was significantly higher than that of immatures in both enclosures, and was faster for both age groups in the nonvegetated than in the forested enclosure. Overall, feeding time was greatly extended for individuals of both age classes in the forested enclosure compared with their counterparts in the nonvegetated enclosure. Immatures in the forested enclosure utilized a significantly greater number of plant species and food items, exploiting many food items available among the terminal branches, and spent significantly more time feeding than adults. Perhaps constrained by larger body size, adults fed more often on the ground or middle height of the trees, likely reducing competition over plant food resources between adults and immatures. The natural vegetation played an important role in extending feeding time and segregating substrate use during feeding by adults and immatures. This study revealed the benefits concerning environmental enrichment of a naturally forested enclosure, which provides captive primates the opportunity to exhibit age class and species-typical feeding behaviors of importance for their dietary maintenance and general health.

  3. Performance Monitoring in Monkey Frontal Eye Field

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dian; Ferrera, Vincent P.

    2014-01-01

    The frontal eye fields (FEF) are thought to mediate response selection during oculomotor decision tasks. In addition, many FEF neurons have robust postsaccadic responses, but their role in postchoice evaluative processes (online performance monitoring) is only beginning to become apparent. Here we report error-related neural activity in FEF while monkeys performed a biased speed-categorization task that enticed the animals to make impulsive errors. Twenty-three percent of cells in macaque FEF coded an internally generated error-related signal, and many of the same cells also coded task difficulty. The observed responses are primarily consistent with three related concepts that have been associated with performance monitoring: (1) response conflict; (2) uncertainty; and (3) reward prediction. Overall, our findings suggest a novel role for the FEF as part of the neural network that evaluates the preceding choice to optimize behavior in the future. PMID:24478349

  4. The penetration enhancer SEPA augments stimulation of scalp hair growth by topical minoxidil in the balding stumptail macaque.

    PubMed

    Diani, A R; Shull, K L; Zaya, M J; Brunden, M N

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the penetration enhancer SEPA (2-n-nonyl-1,3-dioxolane) would augment the scalp hair growth effects of topical minoxidil in the balding stumptail macaque. A 1-in2 area on the balding scalp of 40 adult female monkeys (four drug-treated and four vehicle-treated groups of 5 monkeys each) was topically treated 5 days/week, q.d. or b.i.d., with approximately 250 microliters of minoxidil-SEPA (2.5% minoxidil, weight/volume in 10% SEPA, 25% propylene glycol and 65% isopropyl alcohol), Rogaine topical solution (TS, 2% minoxidil, weight/volume in 20% propylene glycol, 60% ethanol and 20% water) or respective vehicles (without drug) for 16 weeks via paintbrush application. Scalp hair was collected by shaving and vacuuming the dosed area at baseline and at 4-week intervals. The shaved hair was filtered, weighed and recorded as the change from baseline. The q.d. and b.i.d. minoxidil-SEPA groups displayed a significant increase in hair weight compared to their respective vehicles at week 4 whereas q.d. and b.i.d. Rogaine TS groups were not active until week 8 and 12, respectively. Both minoxidil-SEPA treatments produced significantly greater cumulative hair weight over the entire 16-week study compared to either of the Rogaine TS treatments. Comparable increases in cumulative hair weight were evident between q.d. and b.i.d. minoxidil-SEPA groups and between q.d. and b.i.d. Rogaine TS groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8527153

  5. Oral squamous cell carcinoma in a pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina).

    PubMed

    Stockinger, Diane E; Fong, Derek L; Vogel, Keith W; Durning, W McIntyre; Torrence, Anne E; Rose, Timothy M; Staheli, Jeannette P; Baldessari, Audrey; Murnane, Robert D; Hukkannen, Renee R

    2014-06-01

    An adult, gravid, female pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) presented for facial swelling centered on the left mandible that was approximately 5 cm wide. Differential diagnoses included infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic origins. Definitive antemortem diagnosis was not possible, and the macaque's condition worsened despite supportive care. Necropsy findings included a mandibular mass that was locally invasive and expansile, encompassing approximately 80% of the left mandibular bone. The mass replaced portions of the soft palate, hard palate, sinuses, ear canal, and the caudal-rostral calvarium and masseter muscle. Histologically, the mass was a neoplasm that was poorly circumscribed, unencapsulated, and infiltrative invading regional bone and soft tissue. The mass consisted of polygonal squamous epithelial cells with intercellular bridging that breached the epithelial basement membrane and formed invasive nests, cords, and trabeculae. The mitotic rate averaged 3 per 400× field of view, with occasional bizarre mitotic figures. Epithelial cells often exhibited dyskeratosis, and the nests often contained compact lamellated keratin (keratin pearls). The neoplasm was positive via immunohistochemistry for pancytokeratin, variably positive for S100, and negative for vimentin, smooth muscle actin, and desmin. The gross, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with an aggressive oral squamous cell carcinoma. The neoplasm was negative via PCR for papilloma virus. In general, neoplasia in macaques is rare. Although squamous cell carcinomas are one of the most common oral neoplasia in many species, to our knowledge this case represents the first reported oral squamous cell carcinoma in a pigtailed macaque.

  6. Is male rhesus macaque red color ornamentation attractive to females?

    PubMed Central

    Dubuc, Constance; Allen, William L.; Maestripieri, Dario; Higham, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Male sexually-selected traits can evolve through different mechanisms: conspicuous and colorful ornaments usually evolve through inter-sexual selection, while weapons usually evolve through intra-sexual selection. Male ornaments are rare among mammals in comparison to birds, leading to the notion that female mate choice generally plays little role in trait evolution in this taxon. Supporting this view, when ornaments are present in mammals they typically indicate social status and are products of male-male competition. This general mammalian pattern, however, may not apply to rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Males of this species display conspicuous skin coloration, but this expression is not correlated to dominance rank, and is therefore unlikely to have evolved due to male-male competition. Here, we investigate whether male color expression influences female proceptivity towards males in the Cayo Santiago free-ranging rhesus macaque population. We collected face images of 24 adult males varying in dominance rank and age at the peak of the mating season, and modeled these to rhesus macaque visual perception. We also recorded female socio-sexual behaviors towards these males. Results show that dark red males received more sexual solicitations, by more females, than pale pink ones. Together with previous results, our study suggests that male color ornaments are more likely to be a product of inter- rather than intra-sexual selection. This may especially be the case in rhesus macaques due to the particular characteristics of male-male competition in this species. PMID:25246728

  7. fMRI of the face-processing network in the ventral temporal lobe of awake and anesthetized macaques.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shih-Pi; Tolias, Andreas S; Logothetis, Nikos K; Goense, Jozien

    2011-04-28

    The primate brain features specialized areas devoted to processing of faces, which human imaging studies localized in the superior temporal sulcus (STS) and ventral temporal cortex. Studies in macaque monkeys, in contrast, revealed face selectivity predominantly in the STS. While this discrepancy could result from a true species difference, it may simply be the consequence of technical difficulties in obtaining high-quality MR images from the ventral temporal lobe. By using an optimized fMRI protocol we here report face-selective areas in ventral TE, the parahippocampal cortex, the entorhinal cortex, and the hippocampus of awake macaques, in addition to those already known in the STS. Notably, the face-selective activation of these memory-related areas was observed although the animals were passively viewing and it was preserved even under anesthesia. These results point to similarly extensive cortical networks for face processing in humans and monkeys and highlight potential homologs of the human fusiform face area.

  8. Effects of ovariectomy on GnRH neuronal morphology in rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Witkin, J W

    1996-08-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are typically simple, fusiform cells; however, over the course of prepubertal development increasing numbers take on a 'spiny' appearance. Following gonadectomy there is a decrease in the frequency of these spiny GnRH neurons. These observations which were made in the rat suggest that GnRH neurons are directly affected by the gonadal steroid milieu, though they do not themselves contain receptors for these steroidal hormones. In that there are important species differences in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis between rats and primates, the present study was undertaken to determine whether a reduction in ovarian hormones would produce similar changes in the morphology of GnRH neurons in the monkey. A further aim was to determine whether such changes were localized to a specific brain region. Immunocytochemically defined GnRH neurons were compared in adult rhesus macaques which had been ovariectomized for 6 weeks to 2 years (n = 7) and intact, cycling animals (n = 8). Within the intact group, there were significantly more spiny GnRH neurons in the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) than in the preoptic area (POA) (about 50% of the total in the MBH compared to 33% in the POA). Following ovariectomy the frequency of spiny cells in the MBH dropped to less than 30%, but was not significantly reduced in the POA. These results suggest that changes in systemic gonadal steroid levels result in changes in the morphology of GnRH neurons preferentially in the MBH, a region that is considered critical in the generation of GnRH pulsatile release in the monkey.

  9. Early experience affects the intergenerational transmission of infant abuse in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Maestripieri, Dario

    2005-01-01

    Maternal abuse of offspring in macaque monkeys shares some similarities with child maltreatment in humans, including its transmission across generations. This study used a longitudinal design and a cross-fostering experiment to investigate whether abusive parenting in rhesus macaques is transmitted from mothers to daughters and whether transmission occurs through genetic or experiential factors. Nine of 16 females who were abused by their mothers in their first month of life, regardless of whether they were reared by their biological mothers or by foster mothers, exhibited abusive parenting with their firstborn offspring, whereas none of the females reared by nonabusive mothers did. These results suggest that the intergenerational transmission of infant abuse in rhesus monkeys is the result of early experience and not genetic inheritance. The extent to which the effects of early experience on the intergenerational transmission of abusive parenting are mediated by social learning or experience-induced physiological alterations remains to be established. PMID:15983367

  10. Early experience affects the intergenerational transmission of infant abuse in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Maestripieri, Dario

    2005-07-01

    Maternal abuse of offspring in macaque monkeys shares some similarities with child maltreatment in humans, including its transmission across generations. This study used a longitudinal design and a cross-fostering experiment to investigate whether abusive parenting in rhesus macaques is transmitted from mothers to daughters and whether transmission occurs through genetic or experiential factors. Nine of 16 females who were abused by their mothers in their first month of life, regardless of whether they were reared by their biological mothers or by foster mothers, exhibited abusive parenting with their firstborn offspring, whereas none of the females reared by nonabusive mothers did. These results suggest that the intergenerational transmission of infant abuse in rhesus monkeys is the result of early experience and not genetic inheritance. The extent to which the effects of early experience on the intergenerational transmission of abusive parenting are mediated by social learning or experience-induced physiological alterations remains to be established.

  11. Chronic, constant-rate, gastric drug infusion in nontethered rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Strait, Karen R; Orkin, Jack L; Anderson, Daniel C; Muly, E Chris

    2010-03-01

    As part of a study of antipsychotic drug treatment in monkeys, we developed a technique to provide chronic, constant-rate, gastric drug infusion in nontethered rhesus macaques. This method allowed us to mimic the osmotic release oral delivery system currently used in humans for continuous enteral drug delivery. Rhesus macaques (n = 5) underwent gastric catheter placement by laparotomy. After the catheters were secured to the stomach, the remaining catheter length was exited through the lateral abdomen, tunneled subcutaneously along the back, and connected to a 2-mL osmotic pump enclosed in a subcutaneous pocket. Osmotic pumps were changed every 2 to 4 wk for 1 y and remained patent for the duration of the study. Four complications (including cutting of the catheter, incisional dehiscence at the pump site, and loss of 1 catheter into the abdominal cavity requiring catheter replacement) occurred among the 80 pump changes performed during the year-long study. At necropsy, histopathologic examination of the catheter implant sites revealed mild changes consistent with a foreign-body reaction. Our results indicate that the gastric catheter and osmotic pump system was well tolerated in rhesus macaques for as long as 12 mo after placement and suggest that this system will be an attractive option for use in studies that require chronic, constant-rate, gastric drug infusion in nontethered monkeys. PMID:20353697

  12. Individual and social learning processes involved in the acquisition and generalization of tool use in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Macellini, S.; Maranesi, M.; Bonini, L.; Simone, L.; Rozzi, S.; Ferrari, P. F.; Fogassi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Macaques can efficiently use several tools, but their capacity to discriminate the relevant physical features of a tool and the social factors contributing to their acquisition are still poorly explored. In a series of studies, we investigated macaques' ability to generalize the use of a stick as a tool to new objects having different physical features (study 1), or to new contexts, requiring them to adapt the previously learned motor strategy (study 2). We then assessed whether the observation of a skilled model might facilitate tool-use learning by naive observer monkeys (study 3). Results of study 1 and study 2 showed that monkeys trained to use a tool generalize this ability to tools of different shape and length, and learn to adapt their motor strategy to a new task. Study 3 demonstrated that observing a skilled model increases the observers' manipulations of a stick, thus facilitating the individual discovery of the relevant properties of this object as a tool. These findings support the view that in macaques, the motor system can be modified through tool use and that it has a limited capacity to adjust the learnt motor skills to a new context. Social factors, although important to facilitate the interaction with tools, are not crucial for tool-use learning. PMID:22106424

  13. Distributions of Cells and Neurons across the Cortical Sheet in Old World Macaques.

    PubMed

    Turner, Emily C; Young, Nicole A; Reed, Jamie L; Collins, Christine E; Flaherty, David K; Gabi, Mariana; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-01

    According to previous research, cell and neuron densities vary across neocortex in a similar manner across primate taxa. Here, we provide a more extensive examination of this effect in macaque monkeys. We separated neocortex from the underlying white matter in 4 macaque monkey hemispheres (1 Macaca nemestrina, 2 Macaca radiata, and 1 Macaca mulatta), manually flattened the neocortex, and divided it into smaller tissue pieces for analysis. The number of cells and neurons were determined for each piece across the cortical sheet using flow cytometry. Primary visual cortex had the most densely packed neurons and primary motor cortex had the least densely packed neurons. With respect to differences in brain size between cases, there was little variability in the total cell and neuron numbers within specific areas, and overall trends were similar to what has been previously described in Old World baboons and other primates. The average hemispheric total cell number per hemisphere ranged from 2.9 to 3.7 billion, while the average total neuron number ranged from 1.3 to 1.7 billion neurons. The visual cortex neuron densities were predictably higher, ranging from 18.2 to 34.7 million neurons/cm2 in macaques, in comparison to a range of 9.3-17.7 million neurons/cm2 across cortex as a whole. The results support other evidence that neuron surface densities vary across the cortical sheet in a predictable pattern within and across primate taxa. PMID:27547956

  14. A primate genesis model of focal dystonia and repetitive strain injury: I. Learning-induced dedifferentiation of the representation of the hand in the primary somatosensory cortex in adult monkeys.

    PubMed

    Byl, N N; Merzenich, M M; Jenkins, W M

    1996-08-01

    In this study we tested a neuroplasticity/learning origins hypothesis for repetitive strain injuries (RSIs), including occupationally induced focal dystonia. Repetitive movements produced in a specific form and in an appropriate behavioral context cause a degradation of the sensory feedback information controlling fine motor movements, resulting in the "learned" genesis of RSIs. Two adult New World owl monkeys were trained at a behavioral task that required them to maintain an attended grasp on a hand grip that repetitively and rapidly (20 msec) opened and closed over short distances. The monkeys completed 300 behavioral trials per day (1,100 to 3,000 movement events) with an accuracy of 80 to 90%. A movement control disorder was recorded in both monkeys. Training was continued until the performance accuracy dropped to below 50%. We subsequently conducted an electrophysiologic mapping study of the representations of the hand within the primary somatosensory (SI) cortical zone. The hand representation in the true primary somatosensory cortical field, SI area 3b, was found to be markedly degraded in these monkeys, as characterized by (1) a dedifferentiation of cortical representations of the skin of the hand manifested by receptive fields that were 10 to 20 times larger than normal, (2) the emergence of many receptive fields that covered the entire glabrous surface of individual digits or that extended across the surfaces of two or more digits, (3) a breakdown of the normally sharply segregated area 3b representations of volar glabrous and dorsal hairy skin of the hand, and (4) a breakdown of the local shifted-overlap receptive field topography of area 3b, with many digital receptive fields overlapping the fields of neurons sampled in cortical penetrations up to more than four times farther apart than normal. Thus, rapid, repetitive, highly stereotypic movements applied in a learning context can actively degrade cortical representations of sensory information guiding

  15. Independent evolution of an antiviral TRIMCyp in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sam J; Webb, Benjamin L J; Ylinen, Laura M J; Verschoor, Ernst; Heeney, Jonathan L; Towers, Greg J

    2008-03-01

    The antiretroviral restriction factor TRIM5 has recently emerged as an important mediator of innate immunity and species-specific inhibition of retroviral replication in mammals. Selection pressure from pathogenic infection has driven rapid evolution of TRIM5 genes, leading to the antiviral specificities we see today. Remarkably, the New World owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus) encodes a TRIM5 protein in which the antiviral determinants in the B30.2 domain have been replaced by cyclophilin A (CypA) encoded by a retrotransposed cDNA. The owl monkey TRIMCyp protein restricts infection by a subset of lentiviruses that recruit CypA to their capsids, including HIV-1 and feline immunodeficiency virus. Here, we show that the Old World monkey, rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), also encodes a TRIMCyp protein that has arisen independently from that in owl monkeys. The rhesus TRIMCyp is encoded by a single, but common, allele (Mamu7) of the rhesus TRIM5 gene, among at least six further alleles that encode full-length TRIM5 proteins with no homology to CypA. The antiviral specificity of the rhesus TRIMCyp is distinct, restricting infection of HIV-2 and feline immunodeficiency virus but not HIV-1. Restriction by rhesus TRIMCyp is before reverse transcription and inhibited by blocking CypA binding, with cyclosporine A, or by mutation of the capsid CypA binding site. These observations suggest a mechanism of restriction that is conserved between TRIMCyp proteins. The lack of activity against HIV-1 suggests that Mamu7 homozygous animals will be null for TRIM5-mediated restriction of HIV-1 and could contribute to improved animal models for HIV/AIDS. PMID:18287035

  16. Monkey Able After Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    On May 28, 1959, a Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by a U.S. Army team in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, A South American squirrel monkey and Able, An American-born rhesus monkey. This photograph shows Able after recovery of the nose cone of the Jupiter rocket by U.S.S. Kiowa.

  17. Monkey Retardate Learning Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamove, A. S.; Molinaro, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Seven rhesus monkeys reared on diets high in phenylalanine to induce phenylketonuria (PKU--a metabolic disorder associated with mental retardation if untreated) were compared with normal, pair-fed, and younger controls; frontal brain-lesioned monkeys; and those raised on high-tryptophan diets in three object discrimination tasks. (Author)

  18. Animal cognition: monkey meteorology.

    PubMed

    Platt, Michael

    2006-06-20

    Mangabey monkeys have been shown to rely on memory of recent trends in temperature and solar radiation to decide whether to feed on a particular patch of fruit. These observations reveal a rich mental representation of the physical environment in monkeys and suggest foraging may have been an important selective pressure in primate cognitive evolution.

  19. Bipedal locomotion of bonnet macaques after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Babu, Rangasamy Suresh; Anand, P; Jeraud, Mathew; Periasamy, P; Namasivayam, A

    2007-10-01

    Experimental studies concerning the analysis of locomotor behavior in spinal cord injury research are widely performed in rodent models. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the degree of functional recovery in reflex components and bipedal locomotor behavior of bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata) after spinal contusive injury. Six monkeys were tested for various reflex components (grasping, righting, hopping, extension withdrawal) and were trained preoperatively to walk in bipedal fashion on the simple and complex locomotor runways (narrow beam, grid, inclined plane, treadmill) of this investigation. The overall performance of the animals'motor behavior and the functional status of limb movements during bipedal locomotion were graded by the Combined Behavioral Score (CBS) system. Using the simple Allen weight-drop technique, a contusive injury was produced by dropping a 13-g weight from a height of 30 cm to the exposed spinal cord at the T12-L1 vertebral level of the trained monkeys. All the monkeys showed significant impairments in every reflex activity and in walking behavior during the early part of the postoperative period. In subsequent periods, the animals displayed mild alterations in certain reflex responses, such as grasping, extension withdrawal, and placing reflexes, which persisted through a 1-year follow-up. The contused animals traversed locomotor runways--narrow beam, incline plane, and grid runways--with more steps and few errors, as evaluated with the CBS system. Eventually, the behavioral performance of all spinal-contused monkeys recovered to near-preoperative level by the fifth postoperative month. The findings of this study reveal the recovery time course of various reflex components and bipedal locomotor behavior of spinal-contused macaques on runways for a postoperative period of up to 1 year. Our spinal cord research in primates is advantageous in understanding the characteristics of hind limb functions only, which possibly

  20. Quantifying food intake in socially housed monkeys: social status effects on caloric consumption.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark E; Fisher, Jeff; Fischer, Andrew; Lee, Vanessa; Harris, Ruth B; Bartness, Timothy J

    2008-07-01

    Obesity results from a number of factors including socio-environmental influences and rodent models show that several different stressors increase the preference for calorically dense foods leading to an obese phenotype. We present here a non-human primate model using socially housed adult female macaques living in long-term stable groups given access to diets of different caloric density. Consumption of a low fat (LFD; 15% of calories from fat) and a high fat diet (HFD; 45% of calories from fat) was quantified by means of a custom-built, automated feeder that dispensed a pellet of food when activated by a radiofrequency chip implanted subcutaneously in the animal's wrist. Socially subordinate females showed indices of chronic psychological stress having reduced glucocorticoid negative feedback and higher frequencies of anxiety-like behavior. Twenty-four hour intakes of both the LFD and HFD were significantly greater in subordinates than dominates, an effect that persisted whether standard monkey chow (13% of calories from fat) was present or absent. Furthermore, although dominants restricted their food intake to daylight, subordinates continued to feed at night. Total caloric intake was significantly correlated with body weight change. Collectively, these results show that food intake can be reliably quantified in non-human primates living in complex social environments and suggest that socially subordinate females consume more calories, suggesting this ethologically relevant model may help understand how psychosocial stress changes food preferences and consumption leading to obesity.

  1. Spatial and temporal vision of macaques after central retinal lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Merigan, W.H.; Pasternak, T.; Zehl, D.

    1981-07-01

    Spatial contrast and temporal modulation sensitivity of two macaque monkeys were measured at three luminance levels before and after binocular laser coagulation of the fovea. The radius of the lesions ranged from 1.6 to 2.2 degree from the center of the fovea. After placement of the lesions, the visibility of high spatial frequencies was greatly reduced, although sensitivity at middle and low spatial frequencies was unaffected. No loss of spatial resolution was found at the lowest luminance tested. When temporal modulation sensitivity was tested with 4 deg targets, foveal lesions had no effect at any temporal frequency or luminance. However, with a 0.57 degree target, sensitivity to lower temporal frequencies was impaired. Thus visual loss after destruction of the fovea is limited to high luminance, small targets, and the resolution of fine detail.

  2. State dependence of noise correlations in macaque primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Alexander S.; Berens, Philipp; Cotton, R. James; Subramaniyan, Manivannan; Denfield, George H.; Cadwell, Cathryn R.; Smirnakis, Stelios M.; Bethge, Matthias; Tolias, Andreas S.

    2014-01-01

    Shared, trial-to-trial variability in neuronal populations has a strong impact on the accuracy of information processing in the brain. Estimates of the level of such noise correlations are diverse, ranging from 0.01 to 0.4, with little consensus on which factors account for these differences. Here we addressed one important factor that varied across studies, asking how anesthesia affects the population activity structure in macaque primary visual cortex. We found that under opioid anesthesia, activity was dominated by strong coordinated fluctuations on a timescale of 1–2 Hz, which were mostly absent in awake, fixating monkeys. Accounting for these global fluctuations markedly reduced correlations under anesthesia, matching those observed during wakefulness and reconciling earlier studies conducted under anesthesia and in awake animals. Our results show that internal signals, such as brain state transitions under anesthesia, can induce noise correlations, but can also be estimated and accounted for based on neuronal population activity. PMID:24698278

  3. Medial Axis Shape Coding in Macaque Inferotemporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chia-Chun; Carlson, Eric T.; Connor, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The basic, still unanswered question about visual object representation is this: what specific information is encoded by neural signals? Theorists have long predicted that neurons would encode medial axis or skeletal object shape, yet recent studies reveal instead neural coding of boundary or surface shape. Here, we addressed this theoretical/experimental disconnect, using adaptive shape sampling to demonstrate for the first time explicit coding of medial axis shape in high-level object cortex (macaque monkey inferotemporal cortex or IT). Our metric shape analyses revealed a coding continuum, along which most neurons represent a configuration of both medial axis and surface components. Thus IT response functions embody a rich basis set for simultaneously representing skeletal and external shape of complex objects. This would be especially useful for representing biological shapes, which are often characterized by both complex, articulated skeletal structure and specific surface features. PMID:22726839

  4. Viral outcome of simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-89.6P adapted to cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Borsetti, A; Baroncelli, S; Maggiorella, M T; Bellino, S; Moretti, S; Sernicola, L; Belli, R; Ridolfi, B; Farcomeni, S; Negri, D R M; Cafaro, A; Ensoli, B; Titti, F

    2008-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6P is considered to be one of the most pathogenic chimeric viruses in rhesus macaques. However, when crossing from one to another species of monkeys the pathogenicity of this virus may be affected. By using SHIV-89.6P(cy243), a virus obtained by passaging SHIV-89.6P in cynomolgus macaques, we investigated the dynamics of viral replication and the impact of the inoculum size (from 10 up to 50 monkey infectious dose) on the progression of the infection in 22 cynomolgus macaques. SHIV-89.6P(cy243 )caused massive depletion of CD4+ T-cells within 4 weeks of the inoculum, followed by an irreversible immune deficiency in a high proportion of the infected monkeys. This study demonstrates that SHIV-89.6P(cy243) is pathogenic in cynomolgus macaques and that the dynamics of the viral replication and the rate of clinical progression depend on the size of the inoculum. Our findings provide unique and relevant data, particularly with regard to the value of the in vivo titration used to select the most appropriate infectious dose to study the "virus-host" interplay.

  5. Effects of Transportation on Antioxidant Status in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Pan, Xueying; Lu, Liang; Zeng, Xiancheng; Chang, Yan; Hua, Xiuguo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of transportation on oxidative stress in cynomolgus monkeys, we measured serum levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl (PC) and the activities of total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase in cynomolgus macaques before transportation (day 0), on the day of arrival (day 1), and on days 7, 14, and 21 after transportation. Compared with that on day 0, TAOC and catalase activities on days 1, 7, and 14 after transportation were significantly decreased, reached their nadirs on day 7, and increased thereafter to reach their pretransportation levels by day 21 after transportation. Compared with day 0 levels, mean SOD activity and GSH concentration were decreased significantly on day 1; they thereafter increased to reach their pretransportation measures by day 7 after transportation. In contrast, PC and malondialdehyde concentrations in serum and the activity of GSH-Px were increased on day 1 compared with day 0 and thereafter decreased to reach their pretransportation levels by day 14 after transportation. In summary, GSH, TAOC, catalase, and SOD levels decreased and malondialdehyde, PC, and GSH-Px concentrations increased in cynomolgus macaques after transportation. These results suggest that transportation might imbalance oxidant and antioxidant levels to create excess oxidative stress in cynomolgus macaques. Therefore, cynomolgus macaques should have at least 21 d to recover after transportation and regain their healthy status. PMID:27657707

  6. Inefficient use of inverted pendulum mechanism during quadrupedal walking in the Japanese macaque.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Naomichi; Makishima, Haruyuki; Hirasaki, Eishi; Nakatsukasa, Masato

    2012-01-01

    In animal walking, the gravitational potential and kinetic energy of the center of mass (COM) fluctuates out-of-phase to reduce the energetic cost of locomotion via an inverted pendulum mechanism, and, in canine quadrupedal walking, up to 70% of the mechanical energy can be recovered. However, the rate of energy recovery for quadrupedal walking in primates has been reported to be comparatively lower. The present study analyzed fluctuations in the potential and kinetic energy of the COM during quadrupedal walking in the Japanese macaque to clarify the mechanisms underlying this inefficient utilization of the inverted pendulum mechanism in primates. Monkeys walked on a wooden walkway at a self-selected speed, and ground reaction forces were measured, using a force platform, to calculate patterns of mechanical energy fluctuation and rates of energy recovery. Our results demonstrated that rates of energy recovery for quadrupedal walking in Japanese macaques were approximately 30-50%, much smaller than those reported for dogs. Comparisons of the patterns of mechanical energy fluctuation suggested that the potential and kinetic energies oscillated relatively more in-phase, and amplitudes did not attain near equality during quadrupedal walking in Japanese macaques, possibly because of greater weight support (reaction force) of the hindlimbs and more protracted forelimbs at touchdown in the Japanese macaque, two of the three commonly accepted locomotor characteristics distinguishing primates from non-primate mammals.

  7. Categorical perception of conspecific communication sounds by Japanese macaques, Macaca fuscata.

    PubMed

    May, B; Moody, D B; Stebbins, W C

    1989-02-01

    Field studies indicate that Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) communication signals vary with the social situation in which they occur [S. Green, "Variation of vocal pattern with social situation in the Japanese monkey (Macaca fuscata): A field study," in Primate Behavior, edited by L. A. Rosenblum (Academic, New York, 1975), Vol. 4]. A significant acoustic property of the contact calls produced by these primates is the temporal position of a frequency peak within the vocalization, that is, an inflection from rising to falling frequency [May et al., "Significant features of Japanese macaque communication sounds: A psychophysical study," Anim. Behav. 36, 1432-1444 (1988)]. The experiments reported here are based on the hypothesis that Japanese macaques derive meaning from this temporally graded feature by parceling the acoustic variation inherent in natural contact calls into two functional categories, and thus exhibit behavior that is analogous to the categorical perception of speech sounds by humans. To test this hypothesis, Japanese macaques were trained to classify natural contact calls by performing operant responses that signified either an early or late frequency peak position. Then, the subjects were tested in a series of experiments that required them to generalize this behavior to synthetic calls representing a continuum of peak positions. Demonstration of the classical perceptual effects noted for human listeners suggests that categorical perception reflects a principle of auditory information processing that influences the perception of sounds in the communication systems not only of humans, but of animals as well.

  8. Methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin formation due to benzocaine and lidocaine in macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Woodard, C.L.; Gold, M.B.; Watson, C.E.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine (BNZ) and lidocaine (LC) are commonly used topical (spray) anesthetics approved for use in humans. BNZ has structural similarities to methemoglobin (MHb) forming drugs that are current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis, while LC has been reported to increase MHb in man. We therefore, compared MHb and sulfhemoglobin (SHb) production in three groups of Macaques (Macaca mulata, Chinese rhesus and Indian rhesus, and Macaca nemistrina, Pig-tailed Macaques) after exposure to BNZ and LC. Formation of SHb, unlike MHb, is not thought to be reversible and is considered to be toxic. MHb and SHb levels were measured periodically on a CO-Oximeter. All rhesus (n=8) were dosed intratrachealy/intranasaly with 56 mg and 280 mg BNZ and with 40 mg of LC in a randomized cross-over design. Pig-tailed macaques (n=6) were dosed with BNZ intranasaly 56 mg and with 40 mg of LC. Since no differences in the peak MHb or time to peak (mean +/- SD) were observed among the three macaque subspecies, the data were pooled. LC did not cause MHb or SHb formation above baseline in any monkey.

  9. MHC class I A region diversity and polymorphism in macaque species

    PubMed Central

    de Vos-Rouweler, Annemiek J. M.; Heijmans, Corrine M. C.; de Groot, Natasja G.; Doxiadis, Gaby G. M.; Bontrop, Ronald E.

    2007-01-01

    The HLA-A locus represents a single copy gene that displays abundant allelic polymorphism in the human population, whereas, in contrast, a nonhuman primate species such as the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) possesses multiple HLA-A-like (Mamu-A) genes, which parade varying degrees of polymorphism. The number and combination of transcribed Mamu-A genes present per chromosome display diversity in a population of Indian animals. At present, it is not clearly understood whether these different A region configurations are evolutionarily stable entities. To shed light on this issue, rhesus macaques from a Chinese population and a panel of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were screened for various A region-linked variations. Comparisons demonstrated that most A region configurations are old entities predating macaque speciation, whereas most allelic variation (>95%) is of more recent origin. The latter situation contrasts the observations of the major histocompatibility complex class II genes in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques, which share a high number of identical alleles (>30%) as defined by exon 2 sequencing. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00251-007-0201-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17334754

  10. Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar infections in captive macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Windell L; Yason, John Anthony D L; Adao, Davin Edric V

    2010-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that infects man and animals. This parasite has a global distribution and the disease it causes is usually characterized by diarrhea. In order to detect the parasite, it is necessary to differentiate it from Entamoeba dispar. E. dispar appears morphologically similar to E. histolytica but does not cause disease and tissue invasion. This study reports on the prevalence of E. histolytica and E. dispar among captive macaques in a primate facility in the Philippines. PCR was used to correctly identify both Entamoeba species. Indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) was also performed to determine the seroprevalence of amebiasis in the captive macaques. Based on PCR targeting of the peroxiredoxin gene, of the 96 stool samples collected, 23 (24%) contained E. histolytica while 32 (33%) contained E. dispar. IFAT revealed 26 (27%) serum samples positive for antibodies against E. histolytica. Sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene showed that the 23 E. histolytica isolates were identical to human E. histolytica isolates deposited in the GenBank and not Entamoeba nuttalli as found in macaques in other recent reports. The Philippines is a major exporter of monkeys for biomedical research purposes, so screening animals before transporting them to other locations lessens the risk of spreading zoonoses to a wider area. This is the first report of the molecular detection of E. histolytica and E. dispar among macaques in the Philippines. This study complements the limited information available on the animal hosts of E. histolytica in the Philippines.

  11. Decoding Target Distance and Saccade Amplitude from Population Activity in the Macaque Lateral Intraparietal Area (LIP)

    PubMed Central

    Bremmer, Frank; Kaminiarz, Andre; Klingenhoefer, Steffen; Churan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Primates perform saccadic eye movements in order to bring the image of an interesting target onto the fovea. Compared to stationary targets, saccades toward moving targets are computationally more demanding since the oculomotor system must use speed and direction information about the target as well as knowledge about its own processing latency to program an adequate, predictive saccade vector. In monkeys, different brain regions have been implicated in the control of voluntary saccades, among them the lateral intraparietal area (LIP). Here we asked, if activity in area LIP reflects the distance between fovea and saccade target, or the amplitude of an upcoming saccade, or both. We recorded single unit activity in area LIP of two macaque monkeys. First, we determined for each neuron its preferred saccade direction. Then, monkeys performed visually guided saccades along the preferred direction toward either stationary or moving targets in pseudo-randomized order. LIP population activity allowed to decode both, the distance between fovea and saccade target as well as the size of an upcoming saccade. Previous work has shown comparable results for saccade direction (Graf and Andersen, 2014a,b). Hence, LIP population activity allows to predict any two-dimensional saccade vector. Functional equivalents of macaque area LIP have been identified in humans. Accordingly, our results provide further support for the concept of activity from area LIP as neural basis for the control of an oculomotor brain-machine interface.

  12. High prevalence of infection with Entamoeba dispar, but not E. histolytica, in captive macaques.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, H; Cheng, X J; Kobayashi, S; Matsubayashi, N; Gotoh, S; Matsubayashi, K

    2001-01-01

    A total of 268 nonhuman primates (20 species) kept in the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan, were surveyed for intestinal amebas. Total positive rates as based on the presence of cysts in the stool following formalin-ether sedimentation were as follows: Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, 53%; E. coli, 34%; E. hartmanni, 34%; Iodamoeba buetschlii, 25%; Endolimax nana, 8%; and E. chattoni, 3%. Positive rates were higher in Old World monkeys and lower in New World monkeys. All the 141 E. histolytica/E. dispar-positive animals were Macaca monkeys. The E. histolytica/E. dispar-positive samples were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for identification of E. histolytica and E. dispar. E. dispar DNA was detected in 137 samples, whereas no E. histolytica DNA was seen. Zymodeme analysis and reactivity to monoclonal antibodies of cultured trophozoites also supported the presence of E. dispar and the absence of E. histolytica. When the sera of 93 macaques were examined by an indirect fluorescent antibody test, only 3 animals proved to be positive for E. histolytica, showing the lowest titer. These results demonstrate that infection with E. dispar, but not E. histolytica, is predominant in macaques. PMID:11199843

  13. Decoding Target Distance and Saccade Amplitude from Population Activity in the Macaque Lateral Intraparietal Area (LIP)

    PubMed Central

    Bremmer, Frank; Kaminiarz, Andre; Klingenhoefer, Steffen; Churan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Primates perform saccadic eye movements in order to bring the image of an interesting target onto the fovea. Compared to stationary targets, saccades toward moving targets are computationally more demanding since the oculomotor system must use speed and direction information about the target as well as knowledge about its own processing latency to program an adequate, predictive saccade vector. In monkeys, different brain regions have been implicated in the control of voluntary saccades, among them the lateral intraparietal area (LIP). Here we asked, if activity in area LIP reflects the distance between fovea and saccade target, or the amplitude of an upcoming saccade, or both. We recorded single unit activity in area LIP of two macaque monkeys. First, we determined for each neuron its preferred saccade direction. Then, monkeys performed visually guided saccades along the preferred direction toward either stationary or moving targets in pseudo-randomized order. LIP population activity allowed to decode both, the distance between fovea and saccade target as well as the size of an upcoming saccade. Previous work has shown comparable results for saccade direction (Graf and Andersen, 2014a,b). Hence, LIP population activity allows to predict any two-dimensional saccade vector. Functional equivalents of macaque area LIP have been identified in humans. Accordingly, our results provide further support for the concept of activity from area LIP as neural basis for the control of an oculomotor brain-machine interface. PMID:27630547

  14. Decoding Target Distance and Saccade Amplitude from Population Activity in the Macaque Lateral Intraparietal Area (LIP).

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Frank; Kaminiarz, Andre; Klingenhoefer, Steffen; Churan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Primates perform saccadic eye movements in order to bring the image of an interesting target onto the fovea. Compared to stationary targets, saccades toward moving targets are computationally more demanding since the oculomotor system must use speed and direction information about the target as well as knowledge about its own processing latency to program an adequate, predictive saccade vector. In monkeys, different brain regions have been implicated in the control of voluntary saccades, among them the lateral intraparietal area (LIP). Here we asked, if activity in area LIP reflects the distance between fovea and saccade target, or the amplitude of an upcoming saccade, or both. We recorded single unit activity in area LIP of two macaque monkeys. First, we determined for each neuron its preferred saccade direction. Then, monkeys performed visually guided saccades along the preferred direction toward either stationary or moving targets in pseudo-randomized order. LIP population activity allowed to decode both, the distance between fovea and saccade target as well as the size of an upcoming saccade. Previous work has shown comparable results for saccade direction (Graf and Andersen, 2014a,b). Hence, LIP population activity allows to predict any two-dimensional saccade vector. Functional equivalents of macaque area LIP have been identified in humans. Accordingly, our results provide further support for the concept of activity from area LIP as neural basis for the control of an oculomotor brain-machine interface. PMID:27630547

  15. Experimental transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to cynomolgus macaques, a non-human primate.

    PubMed

    Ono, Fumiko; Terao, Keiji; Tase, Naomi; Hiyaoka, Akio; Ohyama, Atsushi; Tezuka, Yukio; Wada, Naomi; Kurosawa, Asuka; Sato, Yuko; Tobiume, Minoru; Hagiwara, Ken'ichi; Yamakawa, Yoshio; Sata, Tetsutaro

    2011-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was transmitted to three macaques by intracerebral inoculation of a brain homogenate from affected cattle detected in Japan. All monkeys developed abnormal behavioral signs, such as intermittent anorexia and hyperekplexia, around 24 months after inoculation. Neuronal symptoms, such as tremor, myoclonic jerking, and paralysis, appeared 27-44 months after inoculation. These symptoms worsened and total paralysis ensued within a year after onset. The disease duration was approximately 8-12 months. Both the incubation period and the duration of disease were shortened in the secondary transmission experiment to macaques. Heavy accumulation of disease-causing conformer(s) of prion protein (PrP(Sc)), with a similar glycoform profile to the PrP(Sc) contained in the inoculum, and severe spongiform changes in the histology of the brain, confirmed the successful transmission of BSE to monkeys. Florid plaques, a characteristic histological hallmark of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, were prominent in the cerebral cortex, in which a prion antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). PrP(Sc) was mostly confined to the central nervous system, although small amounts of PrP(Sc) accumulated in the peripheral nerves of monkeys, as detected by Western blotting (WB). Neither IHC nor WB detected PrP(Sc) in the lymphatic organs/tissues, such as the tonsils, spleen, and appendix.

  16. Cortical representation of ipsilateral arm movements in monkey and man

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Karunesh; Secundo, Lavi; Ranade, Gireeja; Orsborn, Amy; Chang, Edward F.; Dimitrov, Dragan F.; Wallis, Jonathan D.; Barbaro, Nicholas M.; Knight, Robert T.; Carmena, Jose M.

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental organizational principle of the primate motor system is cortical control of contralateral limb movements. Motor areas also appear to play a role in the control of ipsilateral limb movements. Several studies in monkeys have shown that individual neurons in primary motor cortex (M1) may represent, on average, the direction of movements of the ipsilateral arm. Given the increasing body of evidence demonstrating that neural ensembles can reliably represent information with a high temporal resolution, here we characterize the distributed neural representation of ipsilateral upper limb kinematics in both monkey and man. In two macaque monkeys trained to perform center-out reaching movements, we found that the ensemble spiking activity in M1 could continuously represent ipsilateral limb position. Interestingly, this representation was more correlated with joint angles than hand position. Using bilateral EMG recordings, we excluded the possibility that postural or mirror movements could exclusively account for these findings. In addition, linear methods could decode limb position from cortical field potentials in both monkeys. We also found that M1 spiking activity could control a biomimetic brain-machine interface reflecting ipsilateral kinematics. Finally, we recorded cortical field potentials from three human subjects and also consistently found evidence of a neural representation for ipsilateral movement parameters. Together, our results demonstrate the presence of a high-fidelity neural representation for ipsilateral movement and illustrates that it can be successfully incorporated into a brain-machine interface. PMID:19828809

  17. Systematic identification and evolutionary features of rhesus monkey small nucleolar RNAs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated that non-protein-coding RNAs (npcRNAs/ncRNAs) play important roles during eukaryotic development, species evolution, and in the etiology of disease. Rhesus macaques are the most widely used primate model in both biomedical research and primate evolutionary studies. However, most reports on these animals focus on the functional roles of protein-coding sequences, whereas very little is known about macaque ncRNAs. Results In the present study, we performed the first systematic profiling of intermediate-size ncRNAs (50 to 500 nt) from the rhesus monkey by constructing a cDNA library. We identified 117 rhesus monkey ncRNAs, including 80 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), 29 other types of known RNAs (snRNAs, Y RNA, and others), and eight unclassified ncRNAs. Comparative genomic analysis and northern blot hybridizations demonstrated that some snoRNAs were lineage- or species-specific. Paralogous sequences were found for most rhesus monkey snoRNAs, the expression of which might be attributable to extensive duplication within the rhesus monkey genome. Further investigation of snoRNA flanking sequences showed that some rhesus monkey snoRNAs are retrogenes derived from L1-mediated integration. Finally, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that birds and primates share some snoRNAs and host genes thereof, suggesting that both the relevant host genes and the snoRNAs contained therein may be inherited from a common ancestor. However, some rhesus monkey snoRNAs hosted by non-ribosome-related genes appeared after the evolutionary divergence between birds and mammals. Conclusions We provide the first experimentally-derived catalog of rhesus monkey ncRNAs and uncover some interesting genomic and evolutionary features. These findings provide important information for future functional characterization of snoRNAs during primate evolution. PMID:20100322

  18. Repeated exposure of rhesus macaques to low doses of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) did not protect them against the consequences of a high-dose SIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, U; Stahl-Hennig, C; Coulibaly, C; Nisslein, T; Lüke, W; Fuchs, D; Bodemer, W; Petry, H; Hunsmann, G

    1995-06-01

    As part of an in vivo titration study of the macaque simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac) strain 251/spl, macaques were inoculated intravenously with various dilutions of this infectious SIVmac. Seven animals received dilutions from 10(-3) to 10(-6) of SIVmac251/spl. Two monkeys infected with the 10(-3) dilution of SIVmac exhibited a productive infection as indicated by seroconversion, detection of genomic RNA and proviral DNA and positive virus isolation. These animals showed a cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response against different SIVmac proteins without any measurable T cell proliferation. The five macaques receiving higher virus dilutions did not seroconvert and were negative for both viral RNA and for infectious virus, although proviral DNA was detected in their peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In contrast to the animals receiving the 10(-3) virus dilution, these five silently infected monkeys developed an SIV-specific proliferative T cell response but SIV-specific CTL could not be observed. The SIV-specific T cell proliferation of the silently infected animals could be boosted by a second low-dose exposure with a 10(-4) or 10(-5) dilution of SIVmac251/spl. The virological status of the animals was not changed following this second virus inoculation. Four months later these macaques were challenged intravenously with 2 ml of a 10(-4) dilution of SIVmac251/32H containing 10 monkey ID50. After this challenge all SIV-pre-exposed animals and three naive controls became productively infected. In addition, all infected animals developed typical signs of an immunodeficiency within 6 months after infection. These observations indicate that macaques infected silently by a low-dose exposure to infectious virus generated a virus-specific cellular immune response. However, SIV-specific T cell proliferation alone could not protect the monkeys against an intravenous challenge with SIVmac and the subsequent development of AIDS-like symptoms.

  19. Looking Ahead? Computerized Maze Task Performance by Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta), Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella), and Human Children (Homo sapiens)

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Michael J.; Parrish, Audrey E.; Futch, Sara E.; Evans, Theodore A.; Perdue, Bonnie M.

    2015-01-01

    Human and nonhuman primates are not mentally constrained to the present. They can remember the past and – at least to an extent – anticipate the future. Anticipation of the future ranges from long-term prospection such as planning for retirement to more short-term future oriented cognition such as planning a route through a maze. Here we tested a great ape species (chimpanzees), an Old World monkey species (rhesus macaques) a New World monkey species (capuchin monkeys) and human children on a computerized maze task. All subjects had to move a cursor through a maze to reach a goal at the bottom of the screen. For best performance on the task, subjects had to “plan ahead” to the end of the maze to move the cursor in the correct direction, avoid traps, and reverse directions if necessary. Mazes varied in difficulty. Chimpanzees were better than both monkey species, and monkeys showed a particular deficit when moving away from the goal or changing directions was required. Children showed a similar pattern to monkeys regarding the effects of reversals and moves away from the goal, but their overall performance in terms of correct maze completion was similar to the chimpanzees. The results highlight similarities as well as differences in planning across species and the role that inhibitory control may play in future oriented cognition in primates. PMID:25798793

  20. Looking ahead? Computerized maze task performance by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella), and human children (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Beran, Michael J; Parrish, Audrey E; Futch, Sara E; Evans, Theodore A; Perdue, Bonnie M

    2015-05-01

    Human and nonhuman primates are not mentally constrained to the present. They can remember the past and-at least to an extent-anticipate the future. Anticipation of the future ranges from long-term prospection such as planning for retirement to more short-term future-oriented cognition such as planning a route through a maze. Here we tested a great ape species (chimpanzees), an Old World monkey species (rhesus macaques), a New World monkey species (capuchin monkeys), and human children on a computerized maze task. All subjects had to move a cursor through a maze to reach a goal at the bottom of the screen. For best performance on the task, subjects had to "plan ahead" to the end of the maze to move the cursor in the correct direction, avoid traps, and reverse directions if necessary. Mazes varied in difficulty. Chimpanzees were better than both monkey species, and monkeys showed a particular deficit when moving away from the goal or changing directions was required. Children showed a similar pattern to monkeys regarding the effects of reversals and moves away from the goal, but their overall performance in terms of correct maze completion was similar to the chimpanzees. The results highlight similarities as well as differences in planning across species and the role that inhibitory control may play in future-oriented cognition in primates. PMID:25798793

  1. Looking ahead? Computerized maze task performance by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella), and human children (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Beran, Michael J; Parrish, Audrey E; Futch, Sara E; Evans, Theodore A; Perdue, Bonnie M

    2015-05-01

    Human and nonhuman primates are not mentally constrained to the present. They can remember the past and-at least to an extent-anticipate the future. Anticipation of the future ranges from long-term prospection such as planning for retirement to more short-term future-oriented cognition such as planning a route through a maze. Here we tested a great ape species (chimpanzees), an Old World monkey species (rhesus macaques), a New World monkey species (capuchin monkeys), and human children on a computerized maze task. All subjects had to move a cursor through a maze to reach a goal at the bottom of the screen. For best performance on the task, subjects had to "plan ahead" to the end of the maze to move the cursor in the correct direction, avoid traps, and reverse directions if necessary. Mazes varied in difficulty. Chimpanzees were better than both monkey species, and monkeys showed a particular deficit when moving away from the goal or changing directions was required. Children showed a similar pattern to monkeys regarding the effects of reversals and moves away from the goal, but their overall performance in terms of correct maze completion was similar to the chimpanzees. The results highlight similarities as well as differences in planning across species and the role that inhibitory control may play in future-oriented cognition in primates.

  2. Single-neuron and genetic correlates of autistic behavior in macaque

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kyoko; Go, Yasuhiro; Kushima, Itaru; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Imai, Hiroo; Saito, Nobuhito; Iriki, Atsushi; Ozaki, Norio; Isoda, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Atypical neurodevelopment in autism spectrum disorder is a mystery, defying explanation despite increasing attention. We report on a Japanese macaque that spontaneously exhibited autistic traits, namely, impaired social ability as well as restricted and repetitive behaviors, along with our single-neuron and genomic analyses. Its social ability was measured in a turn-taking task, where two monkeys monitor each other’s actions for adaptive behavioral planning. In its brain, the medial frontal neurons responding to others’ actions, abundant in the controls, were almost nonexistent. In its genes, whole-exome sequencing and copy number variation analyses identified rare coding variants linked to human neuropsychiatric disorders in 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C (HTR2C) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–binding cassette subfamily A13 (ABCA13). This combination of systems neuroscience and cognitive genomics in macaques suggests a new, phenotype-to-genotype approach to studying mental disorders. PMID:27679817

  3. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids modulate large-scale systems organization in the rhesus macaque brain.

    PubMed

    Grayson, David S; Kroenke, Christopher D; Neuringer, Martha; Fair, Damien A

    2014-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for healthy brain and retinal development and have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. This study used resting-state functional connectivity MRI to define the large-scale organization of the rhesus macaque brain and changes associated with differences in lifetime ω-3 fatty acid intake. Monkeys fed docosahexaenoic acid, the long-chain ω-3 fatty acid abundant in neural membranes, had cortical modular organization resembling the healthy human brain. In contrast, those with low levels of dietary ω-3 fatty acids had decreased functional connectivity within the early visual pathway and throughout higher-order associational cortex and showed impairment of distributed cortical networks. Our findings illustrate the similarity in modular cortical organization between the healthy human and macaque brain and support the notion that ω-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in developing and/or maintaining distributed, large-scale brain systems, including those essential for normal cognitive function.

  4. Single-neuron and genetic correlates of autistic behavior in macaque

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kyoko; Go, Yasuhiro; Kushima, Itaru; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Imai, Hiroo; Saito, Nobuhito; Iriki, Atsushi; Ozaki, Norio; Isoda, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Atypical neurodevelopment in autism spectrum disorder is a mystery, defying explanation despite increasing attention. We report on a Japanese macaque that spontaneously exhibited autistic traits, namely, impaired social ability as well as restricted and repetitive behaviors, along with our single-neuron and genomic analyses. Its social ability was measured in a turn-taking task, where two monkeys monitor each other’s actions for adaptive behavioral planning. In its brain, the medial frontal neurons responding to others’ actions, abundant in the controls, were almost nonexistent. In its genes, whole-exome sequencing and copy number variation analyses identified rare coding variants linked to human neuropsychiatric disorders in 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C (HTR2C) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–binding cassette subfamily A13 (ABCA13). This combination of systems neuroscience and cognitive genomics in macaques suggests a new, phenotype-to-genotype approach to studying mental disorders.

  5. Enclosure environment affects the activity budgets of captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Jaman, M Firoj; Huffman, Michael A

    2008-12-01

    Individuals adapt to changes in their environment, such as food availability and temperature, by adjusting the amount of time spent in different behavioral activities. These adjustments in behavior should vary across age-sex class according to specific physiological and social needs. We studied the activity budgets of three social Japanese macaque groups inhabiting either vegetated or nonvegetated enclosures in order to compare the effects of access with vegetation, as both food and substrate on resting, feeding, grooming and moving activities over a 12-month period. Daily access to natural foods for monkeys in the vegetated enclosure seems to be largely responsible for the differences in daily time budgets of these three groups. Resting time in all three groups was longer than the time devoted to other activities. Resting and moving time in the two nonvegetated enclosures was significantly longer than in the vegetated enclosure. In contrast, feeding and grooming time was significantly longer in the vegetated enclosure. Seasonal variation in time spent feeding, resting and grooming was significantly effected by enclosure type. In all three enclosures, immatures, particularly females, spent more time feeding and moving, whereas adults spent more time resting. Significant monthly variation in time spent by age-sex class was noted only for feeding and resting. Interestingly, in the vegetated enclosure, time spent feeding on natural vegetation was equal to the amount of time spent feeding on provisioned food. This suggests that factors other than energetic and nutritional needs may be important determinants of the activity budget of the species. These results have important implications for the enrichment of captive primates and our understanding of the maintenance of activity patterns by primates in the wild.

  6. Glial cell morphological and density changes through the lifespan of rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Katelyn N; Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; MacLean, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    How aging impacts the central nervous system (CNS) is an area of intense interest. Glial morphology is known to affect neuronal and immune function as well as metabolic and homeostatic balance. Activation of glia, both astrocytes and microglia, occurs at several stages during development and aging. The present study analyzed changes in glial morphology and density through the entire lifespan of rhesus macaques, which are physiologically and anatomically similar to humans. We observed apparent increases in gray matter astrocytic process length and process complexity as rhesus macaques matured from juveniles through adulthood. These changes were not attributed to cell enlargement because they were not accompanied by proportional changes in soma or process volume. There was a decrease in white matter microglial process length as rhesus macaques aged. Aging was shown to have a significant effect on gray matter microglial density, with a significant increase in aged macaques compared with adults. Overall, we observed significant changes in glial morphology as macaques age indicative of astrocytic activation with subsequent increase in microglial density in aged macaques. PMID:26851132

  7. Topography-specific seed dispersal by Japanese macaques in a lowland forest on Yakushima Island, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Riyou; Yumoto, Takakazu

    2009-01-01

    1. We investigated patterns of seed dispersal (i.e. dispersal distances and topography of seed-deposition sites) via the cheek pouches of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui) during three seasons in a lowland forest on Yakushima Island, Japan. 2. The mean seed-dispersal distances were 16.7, 26.1, 41.8, and 32.4 m from the trunks of mother trees of Myrica rubra, Persea thunbergii, Neolitsea sericea, and Litsea acuminata, respectively. 3. We assessed the possible effect of macaque foraging patterns and the spatial distribution of fruiting trees on topography-specific seed dispersal. The topography of the locations of macaques differed across seasons, likely because the spatial distribution of fruiting trees determined the seasonal foraging patterns of macaques. 4. In early summer, macaques foraged on a ridge and fed on fruits of M. rubra and P. thunbergii, which were primarily distributed and dispersed within this area. In contrast, during the winter, macaques foraged within a valley and fed on fruits of L. acuminata, which were chiefly distributed and dispersed within the valley. 5. Seeds of M. rubra, P. thunbergii, and L. acuminata were directly dispersed to the specific topographic areas in which adult trees were distributed and in which juveniles have a predictably high probability of survival relative to random sites.

  8. Monkeys fail to reciprocate in an exchange task.

    PubMed

    Pelé, Marie; Thierry, Bernard; Call, Josep; Dufour, Valérie

    2010-09-01

    Exchanges form the basis of human economies. Animals too can engage in reciprocal interactions but they do not barter goods like humans, which raises the question of the abilities necessary for trading to occur. Previous studies have shown that non-human primates can exchange food with human partners. Here, we tested the ability of brown capuchin monkeys and Tonkean macaques to reciprocate in a task requiring two conspecifics to exchange tokens in order to obtain rewards from an experimenter. We recorded 56 transfers between subjects in capuchin monkeys and 10 in Tonkean macaques. All transfers were passive in both species. Capuchins preferentially picked up tokens valuable for them in the partner's compartment. They tended to manipulate the partner-valued tokens more often than the no-value ones, leading to more opportunities for these tokens to end up within reach of the partner. Despite optimal conditions where values of goods were defined and known by partners, however, none of the pairs tested engaged in short-term reciprocal interactions. These results indicate that calculated reciprocity was difficult if not impossible in the animals tested. PMID:20473699

  9. Monkeys fail to reciprocate in an exchange task.

    PubMed

    Pelé, Marie; Thierry, Bernard; Call, Josep; Dufour, Valérie

    2010-09-01

    Exchanges form the basis of human economies. Animals too can engage in reciprocal interactions but they do not barter goods like humans, which raises the question of the abilities necessary for trading to occur. Previous studies have shown that non-human primates can exchange food with human partners. Here, we tested the ability of brown capuchin monkeys and Tonkean macaques to reciprocate in a task requiring two conspecifics to exchange tokens in order to obtain rewards from an experimenter. We recorded 56 transfers between subjects in capuchin monkeys and 10 in Tonkean macaques. All transfers were passive in both species. Capuchins preferentially picked up tokens valuable for them in the partner's compartment. They tended to manipulate the partner-valued tokens more often than the no-value ones, leading to more opportunities for these tokens to end up within reach of the partner. Despite optimal conditions where values of goods were defined and known by partners, however, none of the pairs tested engaged in short-term reciprocal interactions. These results indicate that calculated reciprocity was difficult if not impossible in the animals tested.

  10. Neural representations of faces and body parts in macaque and human cortex: a comparative FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Mark A; Arcaro, Michael; Weiner, Kevin S; Kalkus, Jan F; Inati, Souheil J; Gross, Charles G; Kastner, Sabine

    2009-05-01

    Single-cell studies in the macaque have reported selective neural responses evoked by visual presentations of faces and bodies. Consistent with these findings, functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in humans and monkeys indicate that regions in temporal cortex respond preferentially to faces and bodies. However, it is not clear how these areas correspond across the two species. Here, we directly compared category-selective areas in macaques and humans using virtually identical techniques. In the macaque, several face- and body part-selective areas were found located along the superior temporal sulcus (STS) and middle temporal gyrus (MTG). In the human, similar to previous studies, face-selective areas were found in ventral occipital and temporal cortex and an additional face-selective area was found in the anterior temporal cortex. Face-selective areas were also found in lateral temporal cortex, including the previously reported posterior STS area. Body part-selective areas were identified in the human fusiform gyrus and lateral occipitotemporal cortex. In a first experiment, both monkey and human subjects were presented with pictures of faces, body parts, foods, scenes, and man-made objects, to examine the response profiles of each category-selective area to the five stimulus types. In a second experiment, face processing was examined by presenting upright and inverted faces. By comparing the responses and spatial relationships of the areas, we propose potential correspondences across species. Adjacent and overlapping areas in the macaque anterior STS/MTG responded strongly to both faces and body parts, similar to areas in the human fusiform gyrus and posterior STS. Furthermore, face-selective areas on the ventral bank of the STS/MTG discriminated both upright and inverted faces from objects, similar to areas in the human ventral temporal cortex. Overall, our findings demonstrate commonalities and differences in the wide-scale brain organization between

  11. Comparative Efficacies of Two Antimony Regimens To Treat Leishmania braziliensis-Induced Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)▿

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, G.; Porrozzi, R.; Friedrich, K.; Teva, A.; Marchevsky, R. S.; Vieira, F.; Miekeley, N.; Paumgartten, F. J. R.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the efficacies of two N-methylglucomine antimoniate (MA) dose regimens for treating macaques with Leishmania braziliensis-induced chronic skin disease. Whereas all animals treated with the full dose (20 mg MA/kg/day) were cured, 50% of the monkeys receiving a low-dose regimen (5 mg MA/kg/day) relapsed. The antimony concentrations in macaque plasma and tissue samples were greater in the full-dose group than in that receiving a subtherapeutic MA regimen. Our data also suggest the presence of drug-induced hepatic pathology. PMID:19822700

  12. Congenital malformations in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) at Takasakiyama.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yukimaru; Kurita, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Kimoto, Satoshi; Egawa, Junko

    2014-04-01

    From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, many congenitally malformed infants were born into provisioned Japanese macaque troops. Although the exact cause of this problem was not determined, the occurrence of malformations decreased thereafter. We examined possible factors such as total population size, number of adult females, birth rate, and volume of provisioned food. Agrichemicals attached to provisioned food are suspected as the main cause, as other factors were found to have no influence. Many more malformations were seen in males compared with females, in feet compared with hands, and in the fourth compared with other digits. We confirmed that the frequency of congenital malformation was high during the 1960s through to the mid-1970s when increased levels of provisioned food were given and that the incidence of congenital malformations was also elevated among wild macaques during this time.

  13. Premenstrual Dysphoria and Luteal Stress in Dominant-Social-Status Female Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Mingqi; Zhao, Qitao; Wei, Sheng; Zhang, Huiyun; Wang, Haijun

    2013-01-01

    The current study aims to extend our previous work to develop nonhuman primate model for prospectively studying the mechanism underlying premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Thirty young dominant-status female monkeys were randomly divided into the control group, the model group, and JQP group. For two consecutive menstrual cycles, from day 18 to 22, monkeys in the model and JQP groups were housed and immobilized singly in specially designed isolation cages for 5-6 hours per day. At the same time, the pharmaceutical interference effect of jingqianping (JQP) granule, a traditional Chinese medicine specifically used to cure PMDD patients, was tested using monkeys in the JQP group. The behavior and facial expressions of monkeys were photographed with an automatic vidicon and were quantitatively analyzed by “the emotion evaluation scale of female experimental macaque.” Changes in serum level of progesterone and estradiol were measured with RIA, and serum level of 5-HT, noradrenaline, and dopamine were measured with HPLC. After experiencing mentioned above stress, 70% of monkeys of model group showed PMDD symptoms during three consecutive menstrual cycles. Estradiol and progesterone serum level decreased (P < 0.01). Moreover, the peak value of secreted hormones in their follicular phase did not occur. Serum level of 5-HT and dopamine were significantly lower (P < 0.01), but the serum noradrenaline level was higher (P < 0.01). Moreover, in monkeys administered by JQP granule, both PMDD symptoms and the anormal serum level of neurotransmitters could be obviously reversed. This special luteal-phase treatment on dominant-social-status monkeys might be a feasible way to create models mimicking PMDD. PMID:24371458

  14. Premenstrual dysphoria and luteal stress in dominant-social-status female macaques.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Mingqi; Zhao, Qitao; Wei, Sheng; Zhang, Huiyun; Wang, Haijun

    2013-01-01

    The current study aims to extend our previous work to develop nonhuman primate model for prospectively studying the mechanism underlying premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Thirty young dominant-status female monkeys were randomly divided into the control group, the model group, and JQP group. For two consecutive menstrual cycles, from day 18 to 22, monkeys in the model and JQP groups were housed and immobilized singly in specially designed isolation cages for 5-6 hours per day. At the same time, the pharmaceutical interference effect of jingqianping (JQP) granule, a traditional Chinese medicine specifically used to cure PMDD patients, was tested using monkeys in the JQP group. The behavior and facial expressions of monkeys were photographed with an automatic vidicon and were quantitatively analyzed by "the emotion evaluation scale of female experimental macaque." Changes in serum level of progesterone and estradiol were measured with RIA, and serum level of 5-HT, noradrenaline, and dopamine were measured with HPLC. After experiencing mentioned above stress, 70% of monkeys of model group showed PMDD symptoms during three consecutive menstrual cycles. Estradiol and progesterone serum level decreased (P < 0.01). Moreover, the peak value of secreted hormones in their follicular phase did not occur. Serum level of 5-HT and dopamine were significantly lower (P < 0.01), but the serum noradrenaline level was higher (P < 0.01). Moreover, in monkeys administered by JQP granule, both PMDD symptoms and the anormal serum level of neurotransmitters could be obviously reversed. This special luteal-phase treatment on dominant-social-status monkeys might be a feasible way to create models mimicking PMDD. PMID:24371458

  15. Oestradiol modulation of cognition in adult female marmosets (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Lacreuse, A; Chang, J; Metevier, C M; LaClair, M; Meyer, J S; Ferris, C M

    2014-05-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) provides many advantages over traditional rodent and macaque species as a model for human ageing and may be very useful for studying the effects of sex steroids on cognitive and brain ageing. We present the first study examining the effects of oestrogens on cognitive function in female marmosets. Adult monkeys (3-5 years of age) were trained to a specific learning criterion on a battery of cognitive tasks preoperatively (object discrimination, delayed response with increasing delays and detour reaching with opaque box) and were tested on different versions of these tasks (object reversals, delayed response with randomised delays and detour reaching with clear box) after ovariectomy and simultaneous implantation with 17β-oestradiol (E2 ) (n = 6) or blank (n = 6) Silastic capsules. Acquisition of a delayed matching-to-position task with a 1-s delay was also administered after completion of these tests. E2 -treated monkeys were significantly impaired on the second reversal and showed an increase in perseverative responding from reversals 1-3. Their performance also tended to be worse than that of control monkeys on the delayed response task. Performance acquisition on the delayed matching-to-position tended to be better in E2 -treated relative to control monkeys, although the group difference did not reach statistical significance. No effect of treatment was detected for detour reaching or affiliative behaviours. Overall, the findings indicate that E2 compromises performance on prefrontally-mediated tasks. The suggestion that E2 may improve acquisition on tasks dependent on the hippocampus will require further validation. These results are discussed in the context of dopaminergic and serotonergic signalling. We conclude that the marmoset is a useful new primate model for examining the effects of oestrogens on cognitive function.

  16. Oestradiol modulation of cognition in adult female marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Lacreuse, Agnès; Chang, Jeemin; Metevier, Christina M.; LaClair, Matthew; Meyer, Jerrold S.; Ferris, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) provides many advantages over traditional rodent and macaque species as a model for human aging and may be very valuable to study the effects of sex steroids on cognitive and brain aging. We present the first study examining the effects of oestrogens on cognitive function in female marmosets. Adult monkeys (3-5 years of age) were trained to a specific learning criterion on a battery of cognitive tasks preoperatively (object discrimination, delayed response with increasing delays and detour reaching with opaque box) and tested on different versions of these tasks (object reversals, delayed response with randomised delays and detour reaching with clear box) following ovariectomy and simultaneous implantation with 17β-oestradiol (E2, n=6) or blank (n=6) Silastic capsules. Acquisition of a delayed matching-to-position task with a 1s delay was also administered following completion of these tests. E2-treated monkeys were significantly impaired on the second Reversal and showed an increase in perseverative responding from Reversals 1 to 3. Their performance also tended to be worse than that of control monkeys on the Delayed Response task. Performance acquisition on the DMP tended to be better in E2-treated relative to control monkeys, but the group difference did not reach statistical significance. No effect of treatment was detected for Detour Reaching or affiliative behaviours. Overall, the findings indicate that E2 compromises performance on prefrontally-mediated tasks. The suggestion that E2 may improve acquisition on tasks dependent on the hippocampus will require further validation. These results are discussed in the context of dopaminergic and serotonergic signaling. We conclude that the marmoset is a useful new primate model to examine the effects of oestrogens on cognitive function. PMID:24617856

  17. Gonadal steroid modulation of the limbic-hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (LHPA) axis is influenced by social status in female rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark E; Legendre, Ariadne; Pazol, Karen; Fisher, Jeffrey; Chikazawa, Kathy

    2005-03-01

    Chronic stress can have a deleterious effect on the re-productive axis that, for females, is manifested in an increased incidence of infertility. However, gonadal steroids may, in turn, affect a female's response to stress as measured by activity within the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (LHPA) axis. What is not clear is whether a history of exposure to stress modifies the effect of gonadal steroids on LHPA responsivity. Rhesus monkeys present a unique opportunity to assess LHPA responsivity when housed socially in groups. Under these situations, monkeys exhibit a rich network of affiliation and have established social status hierarchies. Previous work indicates that socially subordinate macaque females are hypercortisolemic due to diminished gluco-corticoid negative feedback. The present study tested the hypothesis that estradiol (E2) would decrease gluco-corticoid negative feedback, assessed from a dexamethasone (DEX) suppression test, and increase the response to corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and that these effects would be attenuated by co-treatment with P4. In addition, we also determined whether E2 and P4 would differentially affect LHPA responsiveness to pharmacological challenge in socially dominant compared with subordinate females. Endogenous gonadal hormone secretion in female rhesus monkeys (n = 7) was suppressed by continuous treatment with a sustained release formulation of the GnRH analog leuprolide acetate (Lupron Depot). The response to a combined DEX suppression-CRF stimulation test was assessed using a counterbalanced design during a placebo (control) treatment condition and during E2, P4, and E2 + P4 re-placement therapy. Females who were members of a large breeding group of 140 adults and juveniles of both sexes, were classified as dominant (n = 4) or subordinate (n = 3) based on the relative social dominance positions within the group. Plasma levels of cortisol were significantly higher during E2 replacement compared to the other

  18. An update of the macaque testis proteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Zhou, Zuomin; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of rhesus macaque is a draft version with many errors and is lack of Y chromosome annotation. In the present dataset, we reanalyzed the previously published macaque testis proteome. We searched for refined protein sequences, potential Y chromosome proteins and transcripts predicted proteins in addition to the latest Ensembl protein sequences of macaque. A total of 74,433 peptides corresponding to 9247 protein groups were identified, and the data are supplied in this paper. The updated version of macaque testis proteome provided evidences for predicted genes or transcripts at the peptide level. It can be used for further in-depth proteogenomic annotation of macaque genome and is useful for studying the mechanisms of macaque spermatogenesis. PMID:26484360

  19. Short-term costs and benefits of grooming in Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Schino, Gabriele; Alessandrini, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the short-term consequences of giving grooming in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in order to obtain information on its immediate costs and benefits. Giving grooming was associated with increased aggression received from groomees and decreased aggression received from third parties (but only as long as the groomer maintained proximity to the groomee). Grooming was also associated with decreased scratching rates. These results emphasize the unpredictable outcome of individual grooming interactions and the difficulties of social decision-making for monkeys living in despotic societies.

  20. Impact of caloric restriction on health and survival in rhesus monkeys: the NIA study

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Julie A.; Roth, George S.; Beasley, T. Mark; Tilmont, Edward M.; Handy, April H.; Herbert, Richard L.; Longo, Dan L.; Allison, David B.; Young, Jennifer E.; Bryant, Mark; Barnard, Dennis; Ward, Walter F.; Qi, Wenbo; Ingram, Donald K.; de Cabo, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Life extension by calorie restriction (CR) has been widely reported in a variety of species and remains on the forefront of anti-aging intervention studies. We report healthspan and survival effects of CR from a 23-year study in rhesus macaques conducted at the National Institute on Aging (NIA). CR initiated at older ages did not increase survival relative to Controls; however, CR monkeys demonstrated an improved metabolic profile and may have less oxidative stress as indicated by plasma isoprostane levels. When initiated in young monkeys, there was a trend (p=0.06) for a delay in age-associated disease onset in CR monkeys; but again, survival curves were not improved, in contrast to another study reported in the literature. This suggests that the effects of CR in a long-lived animal are complex and likely dependent on a variety of environmental, nutritional, and genetic factors. PMID:22932268

  1. Training rhesus macaques for venipuncture using positive reinforcement techniques: a comparison with chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Kristine; Pranger, Lindsay; Maier, Adriane; Lambeth, Susan P; Perlman, Jaine E; Thiele, Erica; Schapiro, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    As more emphasis is placed on enhancing the psychological well-being of nonhuman primates, many research facilities have started using positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques to train primates to voluntarily participate in husbandry and research procedures. PRT increases the animal's control over its environment and desensitizes the animal to stressful stimuli. Blood draw is a common husbandry and research procedure that can be particularly stressful for nonhuman primate subjects. Although studies have demonstrated that chimpanzees can be trained for in-cage venipuncture using PRT only, fewer studies have demonstrated success using similar techniques to train macaques. It is often assumed that macaques cannot be trained in the same manner as apes. In this study, we compare PRT data from singly housed adult rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta; n = 8) with data from group-housed adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes; n = 4). All subjects were trained to place an arm in a 'blood sleeve' and remain stationary for venipuncture. Both facilities used similar PRT techniques. We were able to obtain repeated blood samples from 75% of the macaques and all of the chimpanzees. The training time did not differ significantly between the 2 species. These data demonstrate that macaques can be trained for venipuncture in a manner similar to that used for chimpanzees.

  2. Training Rhesus Macaques for Venipuncture Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques: A Comparison with Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Kristine; Pranger, Lindsay; Maier, Adriane; Lambeth, Susan P; Perlman, Jaine E; Thiele, Erica; Schapiro, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    As more emphasis is placed on enhancing the psychological well-being of nonhuman primates, many research facilities have started using positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques to train primates to voluntarily participate in husbandry and research procedures. PRT increases the animal's control over its environment and desensitizes the animal to stressful stimuli. Blood draw is a common husbandry and research procedure that can be particularly stressful for nonhuman primate subjects. Although studies have demonstrated that chimpanzees can be trained for in-cage venipuncture using PRT only, fewer studies have demonstrated success using similar techniques to train macaques. It is often assumed that macaques cannot be trained in the same manner as apes. In this study, we compare PRT data from singly housed adult rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta; n = 8) with data from group-housed adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes; n = 4). All subjects were trained to place an arm in a ‘blood sleeve’ and remain stationary for venipuncture. Both facilities used similar PRT techniques. We were able to obtain repeated blood samples from 75% of the macaques and all of the chimpanzees. The training time did not differ significantly between the 2 species. These data demonstrate that macaques can be trained for venipuncture in a manner similar to that used for chimpanzees. PMID:18210997

  3. X-ray crystallographic characterization of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*02 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Youjun; Qi, Jianxun; Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Jinzi; Liu, Jinhua; Jiang, Fan; Gao, Feng

    2006-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic characterization of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*02 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the rhesus macaque is regarded as a classic animal model, playing a crucial role in HIV vaccine strategies and therapeutics by characterizing various cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in macaque monkeys. However, the availability of well documented structural reports focusing on rhesus macaque major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules remains extremely limited. Here, a complex of the rhesus macaque MHC I molecule (Mamu-A*02) with human β{sub 2}m and an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide, GESNLKSLY (GY9), has been crystallized. The crystal diffracts X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution and belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.11, b = 110.45, c = 100.06 Å, and contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The availability of the structure, which is being solved by molecular replacement, will provide new insights into rhesus macaque MHC I (Mamu-A*02) presenting pathogenic SIV peptides.

  4. Characterization of single-nucleotide variation in Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhesus macaques are the most widely utilized nonhuman primate model in biomedical research. Previous efforts have validated fewer than 900 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in this species, which limits opportunities for genetic studies related to health and disease. Extensive information about SNPs and other genetic variation in rhesus macaques would facilitate valuable genetic analyses, as well as provide markers for genome-wide linkage analysis and the genetic management of captive breeding colonies. Results We used the available rhesus macaque draft genome sequence, new sequence data from unrelated individuals and existing published sequence data to create a genome-wide SNP resource for Indian-origin rhesus monkeys. The original reference animal and two additional Indian-origin individuals were resequenced to low coverage using SOLiD™ sequencing. We then used three strategies to validate SNPs: comparison of potential SNPs found in the same individual using two different sequencing chemistries, and comparison of potential SNPs in different individuals identified with either the same or different sequencing chemistries. Our approach validated approximately 3 million SNPs distributed across the genome. Preliminary analysis of SNP annotations suggests that a substantial number of these macaque SNPs may have functional effects. More than 700 non-synonymous SNPs were scored by Polyphen-2 as either possibly or probably damaging to protein function and these variants now constitute potential models for studying functional genetic variation relevant to human physiology and disease. Conclusions Resequencing of a small number of animals identified greater than 3 million SNPs. This provides a significant new information resource for rhesus macaques, an important research animal. The data also suggests that overall genetic variation is high in this species. We identified many potentially damaging non-synonymous coding SNPs, providing new opportunities to

  5. Macaques at the margins: the biogeography and extinction of Macaca sylvanus in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elton, Sarah; O'Regan, Hannah J.

    2014-07-01

    The genus Macaca (Primates: Cercopithecidae) originated in Africa, dispersed into Europe in the Late Miocene and resided there until the Late Pleistocene. In this contribution, we provide an overview of the evolutionary history of Macaca in Europe, putting it into context with the wider late Miocene, Pliocene and Pleistocene European monkey fossil record (also comprising Mesopithecus, Paradolichopithecus, Dolichopithecus and Theropithecus). The Pliocene and Pleistocene European Macaca fossil material is largely regarded as Macaca sylvanus, the same species as the extant Barbary macaque in North Africa. The M. sylvanus specimens found at West Runton in Norfolk (53°N) during the Middle Pleistocene are among the most northerly euprimates ever discovered. Our simple time-budget model indicates that short winter day lengths would have imposed a significant constraint on activity at such relatively high latitudes, so macaque populations in Britain may have been at the limit of their ecological tolerance. Two basic models using climatic and topographic data for the Last Interglacial and the Last Glacial Maximum alongside Middle and Late Pleistocene fossil distributions indicate that much of Europe may have been suitable habitat for macaques. The models also indicate that areas of southern Europe in the present day have a climate that could support macaque populations. However, M. sylvanus became locally extinct in the Late Pleistocene, possibly at a similar time as the straight-tusked elephant, Palaeoloxodon antiquus, and narrow-nosed rhinoceros, Stephanorhinus hemitoechus. Its extinction may be related to vegetation change or increased predation from Homo, although other factors (such as stochastic factors occurring as a result of small population sizes) cannot be ruled out. Notwithstanding the cause of extinction, the European macaque may thus be a previously overlooked member of the Late Pleistocene faunal turnover.

  6. Hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone expression in female monkeys with different sensitivity to stress.

    PubMed

    Centeno, M-L; Sanchez, R L; Cameron, J L; Bethea, C L

    2007-08-01

    Psychosocial stress, combined with mild dieting and moderate exercise, are observed in women seeking treatment for hypothalamic amenorrhea. Using female cynomolgus macaques, we previously reported that the same combination of mild stresses suppressed reproductive hormone secretion and menstrual cycles in some individuals (stress-sensitive, SS), but not in others (highly stress-resilient, HSR). Compared to HSR monkeys, SS monkeys exhibited lower oestradiol and progesterone levels at the midcycle peak and decreased gene expression in the central serotonergic system during nonstressed cycles. Because steroids and serotonin impinge upon the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, we hypothesised that the differences between SS and HSR monkeys in the sensitivity of the HPG axis to stress may ultimately manifest in differences in the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) system. GnRH in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry were performed with hypothalamic sections from SS and HSR animals, euthanised in the early follicular phase of a nonstressed menstrual cycle. Compared to HSR monkeys, SS monkeys exhibited a significantly higher number and density of GnRH cell bodies, as well as a higher number of soma with extremely robust expression of GnRH mRNA, but SS monkeys exhibited a lower density of immunostained GnRH fibres in the median eminence. We suggest that neuronal mechanisms involved in the control of GnRH synthesis, transport and release differ in SS compared to HSR animals.

  7. The African green monkey as an alternate primate host for studying Machupo virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wagner, F S; Eddy, G A; Brand, O M

    1977-01-01

    African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) are highly susceptible to Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF). Six monkeys were inoculated with 1,000 plague-forming units of Machupo virus, the etiologic agent of BHF. They were observed and monitored for clinical signs, body temperature, viremia, hematologic changes, and virus neutralizing antibody. Onset of fever, anorexia, and depression was noted on days 3 to 6 postinoculation. These and other signs increased in severity and all monkeys died: 5 of 6 died by day 13 and one survived until day 24. The median time to death for the group was 12.5 days. The mean value for hematocrit determinations gradually decreased to 30 on day 10 but subsequently increased. Mean neutrophil and lymphocyte values increased slightly until day 3, and then decreased to minimal values of 3,000 and 2,000, respectively, on day 10. Four monkeys were viremic by day 7 and all were viremic on day 10. The monkey that survived until day 24 had a neutralizing antibody titer of 1:32 on day 14 and appeared to recover from the initial acute illness by day 16. It died following onset of severe neurologic signs on day 23. BHF in the African green monkey is similar to the disease described in two species of macaques.

  8. Comparison of Object Recognition Behavior in Human and Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Rajalingham, Rishi; Schmidt, Kailyn

    2015-01-01

    further the goal of the field of translating knowledge gained from animal models to humans. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first systematic attempt at comparing a high-level visual behavior of humans and macaque monkeys. PMID:26338324

  9. Long-term effects of differential early rearing in rhesus macaques: behavioral reactivity in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Christopher A; Pierre, Peter J; Haddad, Tyler; Bice, Christina; Suomi, Stephen J; Grant, Kathleen A; Friedman, David P; Bennett, Allyson J

    2012-07-01

    Adverse early experiences are associated with a range of deleterious health outcomes in humans, including higher risk for affective disorders. Studies using a long-standing model of nonhuman primate model of early adversity have demonstrated that nursery-reared (NR) monkeys exhibit alterations in multiple aspects of biobehavioral development; however, few studies have evaluated the persistence of socioaffective behavioral changes through adulthood. We evaluated the effects of early rearing experience on adult animals' response to a well-validated assessment of anxiety-like behavior, the human intruder paradigm (HIP). We tested 22 rhesus monkeys who were either nursery-reared (NR) or reared with their mothers (mother-reared; MR). NR monkeys were inhibited in their behavior compared to MR monkeys, with reduced locomotion and exploratory behaviors. NR animals showed a marginal increase in freezing. Together these findings demonstrate that the consequences of differential infant rearing experience on socioaffective behavior persist into adulthood, with evidence of greater inhibition in NR monkeys.

  10. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  11. Vaccine-induced virus-neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T cells do not protect macaques from experimental infection with simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac32H (J5).

    PubMed Central

    Hulskotte, E G; Geretti, A M; Siebelink, K H; van Amerongen, G; Cranage, M P; Rud, E W; Norley, S G; de Vries, P; Osterhaus, A D

    1995-01-01

    To gain further insight into the ability of subunit vaccines to protect monkeys from experimental infection with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), two groups of cynomolgus macaques were immunized with either recombinant SIVmac32H-derived envelope glycoproteins (Env) incorporated into immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms) (group A) or with these SIV Env iscoms in combination with p27gag iscoms and three Nef lipopeptides (group B). Four monkeys immunized with recombinant feline immunodeficiency virus Env iscoms served as controls (group C). Animals were immunized intramuscularly at weeks 0, 4, 10, and 16. Two weeks after the last immunization, monkeys were challenged intravenously with 50 monkey 50% infectious doses of virus derived from the J5 molecular clone of SIVmac32H propagated in monkey peripheral blood mononuclear cells. High titers of SIV-neutralizing antibodies were induced in the monkeys of groups A and B. In addition, p27gag-specific antibodies were detected in the monkeys of group B. Vaccine-induced cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte precursors against Env, Gag, and Nef were detected on the day of challenge in the monkeys of group B. Env-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte precursors were detected in one monkey from group A. In spite of the observed antibody and T-cell responses, none of the monkeys was protected from experimental infection. In addition, longitudinal determination of cell-associated virus loads at weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 postchallenge revealed no significant differences between vaccinated and control monkeys. These findings illustrate the need to clarify the roles of the different arms of the immune system in conferring protection against primate lentivirus infections. PMID:7666529

  12. Influence of sexual competition and social context on homosexual behavior in adolescent female Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Gunst, Noëlle; Leca, Jean-Baptiste; Vasey, Paul L

    2015-05-01

    We explored the role that sexual and social partners play in the expression of female homosexual behavior among adolescent female Japanese macaques at Arashiyama, Japan. Our data fully or partially supported all the predictions related to four non-mutually exclusive hypotheses, namely the "adult male disinterest in adolescent females" hypothesis, the "numerous homosexual adult females" hypothesis, the "safer homosexual interactions" hypothesis and the "same-sex sexual interactions" hypothesis. Our results show that both sexual context (e.g., lack of adolescent female attractivity toward adult males, presence of motivated same-sex sexual partners), and social context (e.g., risk of aggression) help explain the high frequency and prevalence of homosexual behavior in adolescent females in the Arashiyama group of Japanese macaques. As with adult females, whose homosexual consortships do not reflect generalized patterns of social affiliation or kinship, we found that adolescent females' same-sex sexual partners were neither kin, nor were they non-kin individuals with whom adolescent females were closely affiliated outside of a consortship context. Our study furthers the growing database of female homosexual behavior in Japanese macaques and provides additional evidence that homosexual behavior as expressed by adolescent female Japanese macaques is, like heterosexual behavior, sexual in nature. We discuss the relevance of our findings to a broader comparative approach that may shed light upon the development and evolution of human homosexuality.

  13. Functional MRI of the vocalization-processing network in the macaque brain

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Rios, Michael; Kuśmierek, Paweł; DeWitt, Iain; Archakov, Denis; Azevedo, Frederico A. C.; Sams, Mikko; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P.; Keliris, Georgios A.; Rauschecker, Josef P.

    2015-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake behaving monkeys we investigated how species-specific vocalizations are represented in auditory and auditory-related regions of the macaque brain. We found clusters of active voxels along the ascending auditory pathway that responded to various types of complex sounds: inferior colliculus (IC), medial geniculate nucleus (MGN), auditory core, belt, and parabelt cortex, and other parts of the superior temporal gyrus (STG) and sulcus (STS). Regions sensitive to monkey calls were most prevalent in the anterior STG, but some clusters were also found in frontal and parietal cortex on the basis of comparisons between responses to calls and environmental sounds. Surprisingly, we found that spectrotemporal control sounds derived from the monkey calls (“scrambled calls”) also activated the parietal and frontal regions. Taken together, our results demonstrate that species-specific vocalizations in rhesus monkeys activate preferentially the auditory ventral stream, and in particular areas of the antero-lateral belt and parabelt. PMID:25883546

  14. Depressive-like behavioral profiles in captive-bred single- and socially-housed rhesus and cynomolgus macaques: a species comparison

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Sandrine M. J.; Rochais, Céline; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Li, Qin; Hausberger, Martine; Bezard, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    Background: To unravel the causes of major depressive disorder (MDD), the third leading cause of disease burden around the world, ethological animal models have recently been proposed. Our previous studies highlighted a depressive-like profile among single- and socially-housed farm-bred cynomolgus macaques. Although phylogenetically close, cynomolgus and rhesus macaques, the two most commonly used macaque species in biomedical research, differ on several levels such as patterns of aggression, reconciliation, temperament, or dominance styles. The question of whether one captive macaque species was more vulnerable than another in the development of a pathological profile reminiscent of MDD symptoms was explored. Methods: Behavioral data (including body postures, orientations, gaze directions, inter-individual distances, and locations in the cage) were collected in farming conditions. Using an unbiased validated ethological scan-sampling method, followed by multiple correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses, 40 single- and 35 socially-housed rhesus macaques were assessed. Independently, for each housing condition, inter-species comparisons were made with previously acquired data on farm-bred cynomolgus monkeys. Results: Consistent with our previous studies, we found depressive-like characteristics (e.g., inactivity, low level of investigation and maintenance, long time spent inactive while facing the wall) among single- and socially-housed rhesus macaques. Species-specificities were reported in non-depressive time budgets and in the prevalence of the pathological profiles. Conclusions: Our results suggest that rhesus may be more vulnerable to developing a despair-like state than cynomolgus macaques, both in single- and in social-housing conditions. Therefore, rhesus macaques are more suitable for use as a “spontaneous” model of depressive disorders. PMID:24600363

  15. Long-Term Immunogenicity Studies of Formalin-Inactivated Enterovirus 71 Whole-Virion Vaccine in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Chyi; Hwang, Chyi-Sing; Yang, Wun-Syue; Tsai, Dan-Chin; Wu, Sze-Hsien; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Chow, Yen-Hung; Wu, Suh-Chin; Wang, Jen-Ren; Chiang, Jen-Ron; Huang, Chin-Cheng; Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Chong, Pele

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has caused epidemics of hand, foot and mouth diseases in Asia during the past decades and no vaccine is available. A formalin-inactivated EV71 candidate vaccine (EV71vac) based on B4 subgenotype has previously been developed and found to elicit strong neutralizing antibody responses in mice and humans. In this study, we evaluated the long-term immunogenicity and safety of this EV71vac in a non-human primate model. Juvenile macaques were immunized at 0, 3 and 6 weeks either with 10 or 5 µg doses of EV71vac formulated with AlPO4 adjuvant, or PBS as control. During the 56 weeks of studies, no fever nor local redness and swelling at sites of injections was observed in the immunized macaques. After single immunization, 100% seroconversion based on 4-fold increased in neutralization titer (Nt) was detected in EV71vac immunized monkeys but not PBS controls. A dose-dependent IgG antibody response was observed in monkeys receiving EV71vac immunization. The Nt of EV71vac immunized macaques had reached the peak after 3 vaccinations, then decreased gradually; however, the GMT of neutralizing antibody in the EV71vac immunized macaques were still above 100 at the end of the study. Correspondingly, both dose- and time-dependent interferon-γ and CD4+ T cell responses were detected in monkeys receiving EV71vac. Interestingly, similar to human responses, the dominant T cell epitopes of macaques were identified mainly in VP2 and VP3 regions. In addition, strong cross-neutralizing antibodies against most EV71 subgenotypes except some C2 and C4b strains, and Coxsackievirus A16 were observed. In summary, our results indicate that EV71vac elicits dose-dependent T-cell and antibody responses in macaques that could be a good animal model for evaluating the long-term immune responses elicited by EV71 vaccines. PMID:25197967

  16. Predation of wild spider monkeys at La Macarena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ikki; Izawa, Kosei

    2008-01-01

    The killing of an adult male spider monkey (Ateles belzebuth ) by a jaguar (Panthera onca) and a predation attempt by a puma (Felis concolor) on an adult female spider monkey have been observed at the CIEM (Centro de Investigaciones Ecológicas La Macarena), La Macarena, Colombia. These incidents occurred directly in front of an observer, even though it is said that predation under direct observation on any type of primate rarely occurs. On the basis of a review of the literature, and the observations reported here, we suggest that jaguars and pumas are likely to be the only significant potential predators on adult spider monkeys, probably because of their large body size.

  17. Insect-foraging in captive owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae).

    PubMed

    Wolovich, Christy K; Rivera, Jeanette; Evans, Sian

    2010-08-01

    Whereas the diets of diurnal primate species vary greatly, almost all nocturnal primate species consume insects. Insect-foraging has been described in nocturnal prosimians but has not been investigated in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.). We studied 35 captive owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae) in order to describe their foraging behavior and to determine if there were any age or sex differences in their ability to capture insect prey. Because owl monkeys cooperate in parental care and in food-sharing, we expected social interactions involving insect prey. We found that owl monkeys most often snatched flying insects from the air and immobilized crawling insects against a substrate using their hands. Immatures and adult female owl monkeys attempted to capture prey significantly more often than did adult males; however, there was no difference in the proportion of attempts that resulted in capture. Social interactions involving prey appeared similar to those with provisioned food, but possessors of prey resisted begging attempts more so than did possessors of other food. Owl monkeys attempted to capture prey often (mean = 9.5 +/- 5.8 attempts/h), and we speculate that the protein and lipid content of captured prey is important for meeting the metabolic demands for growth and reproduction.

  18. Insect-foraging in captive owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae).

    PubMed

    Wolovich, Christy K; Rivera, Jeanette; Evans, Sian

    2010-08-01

    Whereas the diets of diurnal primate species vary greatly, almost all nocturnal primate species consume insects. Insect-foraging has been described in nocturnal prosimians but has not been investigated in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.). We studied 35 captive owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae) in order to describe their foraging behavior and to determine if there were any age or sex differences in their ability to capture insect prey. Because owl monkeys cooperate in parental care and in food-sharing, we expected social interactions involving insect prey. We found that owl monkeys most often snatched flying insects from the air and immobilized crawling insects against a substrate using their hands. Immatures and adult female owl monkeys attempted to capture prey significantly more often than did adult males; however, there was no difference in the proportion of attempts that resulted in capture. Social interactions involving prey appeared similar to those with provisioned food, but possessors of prey resisted begging attempts more so than did possessors of other food. Owl monkeys attempted to capture prey often (mean = 9.5 +/- 5.8 attempts/h), and we speculate that the protein and lipid content of captured prey is important for meeting the metabolic demands for growth and reproduction. PMID:20523055

  19. Meningoencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes in a pregnant rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Lemoy, Marie-Josee M F; Lopes, Danielle A; Reader, J Rachel; Westworth, Diccon R; Tarara, Ross P

    2012-10-01

    We here report a spontaneous case of meningoencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes in an adult primiparous rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) during an outbreak of listeriosis in an outdoor enclosure. Clinical signs included tremors, abnormal posture, and altered mental status. Hematology and analyses of cerebrospinal fluid were consistent with bacterial infection. Pure cultures of L. monocytogenes were recovered from the placenta-abortus, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain tissue. The macaque did not respond to treatment and was euthanized. Histopathologic examination of the brain revealed acute meningoencephalitis. This case represents an unusual clinical and pathologic presentation of listeriosis in a nonhuman primate in which the dam and fetus both were affected.

  20. Identification of Owl Monkey CD4 Receptors Broadly Compatible with Early-Stage HIV-1 Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Nicholas R.; Sharma, Amit; Wilkerson, Gregory K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most HIV-1 variants isolated from early-stage human infections do not use nonhuman primate versions of the CD4 receptor for cellular entry, or they do so poorly. We and others have previously shown that CD4 has experienced strong natural selection over the course of primate speciation, but it is unclear whether this selection has influenced the functional characteristics of CD4 as an HIV-1 receptor. Surprisingly, we find that selection on CD4 has been most intense in the New World monkeys, animals that have never been found to harbor lentiviruses related to HIV-1. Based on this, we sampled CD4 genetic diversity within populations of individuals from seven different species, including five species of New World monkeys. We found that some, but not all, CD4 alleles found in Spix's owl monkeys (Aotus vociferans) encode functional receptors for early-stage human HIV-1 isolates representing all of the major group M clades (A, B, C, and D). However, only some isolates of HIV-1 subtype C can use the CD4 receptor encoded by permissive Spix's owl monkey alleles. We characterized the prevalence of functional CD4 alleles in a colony of captive Spix's owl monkeys and found that 88% of surveyed individuals are homozygous for permissive CD4 alleles, which encode an asparagine at position 39 of the receptor. We found that the CD4 receptors encoded by two other species of owl monkeys (Aotus azarae and Aotus nancymaae) also serve as functional entry receptors for early-stage isolates of HIV-1. IMPORTANCE Nonhuman primates, particularly macaques, are used for preclinical evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates. However, a significant limitation of the macaque model is the fact that most circulating HIV-1 variants cannot use the macaque CD4 receptor to enter cells and have to be adapted to these species. This is particularly true for viral variants from early stages of infection, which represent the most relevant vaccine targets. In this study, we found that some individuals

  1. Enriched Expression of Serotonin 1B and 2A Receptor Genes in Macaque Visual Cortex and their Bidirectional Modulatory Effects on Neuronal Responses

    PubMed Central

    Watakabe, Akiya; Komatsu, Yusuke; Sadakane, Osamu; Shimegi, Satoshi; Takahata, Toru; Higo, Noriyuki; Tochitani, Shiro; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Naito, Tomoyuki; Osaki, Hironobu; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Ayako; Hara, Shin-ichiro; Akasaki, Takafumi; Sato, Hiromichi

    2009-01-01

    To study the molecular mechanism how cortical areas are specialized in adult primates, we searched for area-specific genes in macaque monkeys and found striking enrichment of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 1B receptor mRNA, and to a lesser extent, of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA, in the primary visual area (V1). In situ hybridization analyses revealed that both mRNA species were highly concentrated in the geniculorecipient layers IVA and IVC, where they were coexpressed in the same neurons. Monocular inactivation by tetrodotoxin injection resulted in a strong and rapid (<3 h) downregulation of these mRNAs, suggesting the retinal activity dependency of their expression. Consistent with the high expression level in V1, clear modulatory effects of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receptor agonists on the responses of V1 neurons were observed in in vivo electrophysiological experiments. The modulatory effect of the 5-HT1B agonist was dependent on the firing rate of the recorded neurons: The effect tended to be facilitative for neurons with a high firing rate, and suppressive for those with a low firing rate. The 5-HT2A agonist showed opposite effects. These results suggest that this serotonergic system controls the visual response in V1 for optimization of information processing toward the incoming visual inputs. PMID:19056862

  2. Retinal, functional, and morphological comparisons of two different macaque species, Macaca mulatta and Macaca fasicularis, for models of laser eye injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Hacker, Henry D.; Brown, Araceli; Cheramie, Rachael; Martinsen, Gary L.; Rockwell, Benjamin; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2005-04-01

    The past several years has seen a severe shortage of pathogen-free Indian origin rhesus macaques due to the increased requirement for this model in retroviral research. With greater than 30 years of research data accumulated using the Rhesus macaque as the model for laser eye injury there exists a need to bridge to a more readily available nonhuman primate model. Much of the data previously collected from the Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) provided the basis for the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards for laser safety. Currently a Tri-service effort is underway to utilize the Cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fasicularis) as a replacement for the Rhesus macaque. Preliminary functional and morphological baseline data collected from multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and retinal cell counts were compared from a small group of monkeys and tissues to determine if significant differences existed between the species. Initial functional findings rom mfERG yielded only one difference for the n2 amplitude value which was greater in the Cynomolgus monkey. No significant differences were seen in retinal and foveal thickness, as determined by OCT scans and no significant differences were seen in ganglion cell and inner nuclear cell nuclei counts. A highly significant difference was seen in the numbers of photoreceptor nuclei with greater numbers in the Rhesus macaque. This indicates more studies should be performed to determine the impact that a model change would have on the laser bioeffects community and their ability to continue to provide minimal visible lesion data for laser safety standards. The continued goal of this project will be to provide that necessary baseline information for a seamless transition to a more readily available animal model.

  3. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jeffrey W. Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  4. Pulse register phonation in Diana monkey alarm calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riede, Tobias; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    The adult male Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) produce predator-specific alarm calls in response to two of their predators, the crowned eagles and the leopards. The acoustic structure of these alarm calls is remarkable for a number of theoretical and empirical reasons. First, although pulsed phonation has been described in a variety of mammalian vocalizations, very little is known about the underlying production mechanism. Second, Diana monkey alarm calls are based almost exclusively on this vocal production mechanism to an extent that has never been documented in mammalian vocal behavior. Finally, the Diana monkeys' pulsed phonation strongly resembles the pulse register in human speech, where fundamental frequency is mainly controlled by subglottal pressure. Here, we report the results of a detailed acoustic analysis to investigate the production mechanism of Diana monkey alarm calls. Within calls, we found a positive correlation between the fundamental frequency and the pulse amplitude, suggesting that both humans and monkeys control fundamental frequency by subglottal pressure. While in humans pulsed phonation is usually considered pathological or artificial, male Diana monkeys rely exclusively on pulsed phonation, suggesting a functional adaptation. Moreover, we were unable to document any nonlinear phenomena, despite the fact that they occur frequently in the vocal repertoire of humans and nonhumans, further suggesting that the very robust Diana monkey pulse production mechanism has evolved for a particular functional purpose. We discuss the implications of these findings for the structural evolution of Diana monkey alarm calls and suggest that the restricted variability in fundamental frequency and robustness of the source signal gave rise to the formant patterns observed in Diana monkey alarm calls, used to convey predator information.

  5. Pulse register phonation in Diana monkey alarm calls.

    PubMed

    Riede, Tobias; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    The adult male Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) produce predator-specific alarm calls in response to two of their predators, the crowned eagles and the leopards. The acoustic structure of these alarm calls is remarkable for a number of theoretical and empirical reasons. First, although pulsed phonation has been described in a variety of mammalian vocalizations, very little is known about the underlying production mechanism. Second, Diana monkey alarm calls are based almost exclusively on this vocal production mechanism to an extent that has never been documented in mammalian vocal behavior. Finally, the Diana monkeys' pulsed phonation strongly resembles the pulse register in human speech, where fundamental frequency is mainly controlled by subglottal pressure. Here, we report the results of a detailed acoustic analysis to investigate the production mechanism of Diana monkey alarm calls. Within calls, we found a positive correlation between the fundamental frequency and the pulse amplitude, suggesting that both humans and monkeys control fundamental frequency by subglottal pressure. While in humans pulsed phonation is usually considered pathological or artificial, male Diana monkeys rely exclusively on pulsed phonation, suggesting a functional adaptation. Moreover, we were unable to document any nonlinear phenomena, despite the fact that they occur frequently in the vocal repertoire of humans and nonhumans, further suggesting that the very robust Diana monkey pulse production mechanism has evolved for a particular functional purpose. We discuss the implications of these findings for the structural evolution of Diana monkey alarm calls and suggest that the restricted variability in fundamental frequency and robustness of the source signal gave rise to the formant patterns observed in Diana monkey alarm calls, used to convey predator information.

  6. Do monkeys think in metaphors? Representations of space and time in monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Dustin J; Casasanto, Daniel; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2010-11-01

    Research on the relationship between the representation of space and time has produced two contrasting proposals. ATOM posits that space and time are represented via a common magnitude system, suggesting a symmetrical relationship between space and time. According to metaphor theory, however, representations of time depend on representations of space asymmetrically. Previous findings in humans have supported metaphor theory. Here, we investigate the relationship between time and space in a nonverbal species, by testing whether non-human primates show space-time interactions consistent with metaphor theory or with ATOM. We tested two rhesus monkeys and 16 adult humans in a nonverbal task that assessed the influence of an irrelevant dimension (time or space) on a relevant dimension (space or time). In humans, spatial extent had a large effect on time judgments whereas time had a small effect on spatial judgments. In monkeys, both spatial and temporal manipulations showed large bi-directional effects on judgments. In contrast to humans, spatial manipulations in monkeys did not produce a larger effect on temporal judgments than the reverse. Thus, consistent with previous findings, human adults showed asymmetrical space-time interactions that were predicted by metaphor theory. In contrast, monkeys showed patterns that were more consistent with ATOM.

  7. A Naturally Occurring Outbreak of Tuberculosis in a Group of Imported Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Panarella, Matthew L; Bimes, Randy S

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis of tuberculosis (caused primarily by Mycobacterium bovis) in a group of newly imported Chinese origin cynomolgus monkeys. We also describe the use of sedation to enhance the accuracy of evaluation of the intrapalpebral tuberculin skin test using the mammalian old tuberculin reagent and report the first known diagnosis of Mycobacterium paraffinicum in a nonhuman primate. By 48 h after injection during the second tuberculin skin test, 6 of the 80 macaques had developed eyelid reactions ranging from mild (grade 1) to severe (grade 4). Given the range and severity of reactions, we suspected an outbreak of tuberculosis in the group. Because of the nature of the reactions, we sedated the animals at the 72-h evaluation to more closely observe and then palpate the injected eyelid. Evaluation of unsedated animals revealed 22 with a reaction to mammalian old tuberculin. We confirmed these 22 cases and identified an additional 11 animals with reactions when the monkeys were sedated. Mycobacterial culture of tissue from 6 macaques with reactions confirmed M. bovis in 3 animals. In addition, 1 of these 3 animals was culture-positive for both M. bovis and M. paraffinicum, and another was culture-positive for M. avium complex only. The addition of sedation to facilitate visual inspection and then palpation of the injected eyelid of these macaques increased the accuracy of evaluation and understanding of the number and severity of reactions to tuberculin skin testing. PMID:20353699

  8. Visual responses of ganglion cells of a New-World primate, the capuchin monkey, Cebus apella

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L; Yamada, Elizabeth S; Hunt, David M; Kremers, Jan; Martin, Paul R; Troy, John B; da Silva-Filho, Manoel

    2000-01-01

    The genetic basis of colour vision in New-World primates differs from that in humans and other Old-World primates. Most New-World primate species show a polymorphism; all males are dichromats and most females trichromats. In the retina of Old-World primates such as the macaque, the physiological correlates of trichromacy are well established. Comparison of the retinae in New- and Old-World species may help constrain hypotheses as to the evolution of colour vision and the pathways associated with it. Ganglion cell behaviour was recorded from trichromatic and dichromatic members of a New-World species (the capuchin monkey, Cebus apella) and compared with macaque data. Despite some differences in quantitative detail (such as a temporal response extended to higher frequencies), results from trichromatic animals strongly resembled those from the macaque. In particular, cells of the parvocellular (PC) pathway showed characteristic frequency-dependent changes in responsivity to luminance and chromatic modulation, cells of the magnocellular (MC) pathway showed frequency-doubled responses to chromatic modulation, and the surround of MC cells received a chromatic input revealed on changing the phase of heterochromatically modulated lights. Ganglion cells of dichromats were colour-blind versions of those of trichromats. This strong physiological homology is consistent with a common origin of trichromacy in New- and Old-World monkeys; in the New-World primate the presence of two pigments in the middle-to-long wavelength range permits full expression of the retinal mechanisms of trichromatic vision. PMID:11432364

  9. Variations in fundamental frequency peak position in Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) coo calls.

    PubMed

    Owren, M J; Casale, T M

    1994-09-01

    Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) produce coo calls whose use in various contexts is correlated with differences in the relative temporal position of the peak value of a call's fundamental frequency (Green, 1975). Studies have produced conflicting results about both the location of the category boundary between smooth early high and smooth late high coo subtypes and macaques' perceptual sensitivity to variations in peak position. In this study, fundamental frequency peak positions were measured in 578 coos produced by 8 captive adult female Japanese macaques in order to test whether calls with peak positions close to either of 2 hypothesized boundaries occurred at low rates. Overall, such calls were found to occur at rate equal to or higher than predicted by chance. Peak position varied more consistently between animals than by behavioral context. The results may indicate that peak position in coos does not form 2 distinct categories.

  10. Pregnancy diagnosis by laparoscopy in free range rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, V.; Raj, A.; Kumar, P.

    2011-01-01

    The present study involved 50 adult female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) of age ranging between 4 to 15 years. Pregnancy diagnosis was done by using laparoscopic method. Anesthesia was achieved by using xylazine (2mg/kg) and ketamine (10mg/kg) intramuscularly. The gravid uterus was located close to the urinary bladder in early pregnancy and in abdominal cavity in the mid and late stage of pregnancy. The procedure was completed within 10 - 12 minutes. There were no complications after the surgery and recovery of animal was smooth and uneventful. The results of this study showed that laparoscopic method is also one of the methods of pregnancy diagnosis in rhesus macaques and it can be a precise and a reliable method of pregnancy diagnosis in rhesus macaques. PMID:26623277

  11. The first observation of seasonal affective disorder symptoms in Rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Qin, Dongdong; Chu, Xunxun; Feng, Xiaoli; Li, Zhifei; Yang, Shangchuan; Lü, Longbao; Yang, Qing; Pan, Lei; Yin, Yong; Li, Jiali; Xu, Lin; Chen, Lin; Hu, Xintian

    2015-10-01

    Diurnal animals are a better model for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) than nocturnal ones. Previous work with diurnal rodents demonstrated that short photoperiod conditions brought about depression-like behavior. However, rodents are at a large phylogenetic distance from humans. In contrast, nonhuman primates are closely similar to humans, making them an excellent candidate for SAD model. This study made the first attempt to develop SAD in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and it was found that short photoperiod conditions could lead monkeys to display depressive-like huddling behavior, less spontaneous locomotion, as well as less reactive locomotion. In addition to these depression-related behavioral changes, the physiological abnormalities that occur in patients with SAD, such as weight loss, anhedonia and hypercortisolism, were also observed in those SAD monkeys. Moreover, antidepressant treatment could reverse all of the depression-related symptoms, including depressive-like huddling behavior, less spontaneous locomotion, less reactive locomotion, weight loss, anhedonia and hypercortisolism. For the first time, this study observed the SAD symptoms in rhesus macaque, which would provide an important platform for the understanding of the etiology of SAD as well as developing novel therapeutic interventions in the future.

  12. Dissociable effects of subtotal lesions within the macaque orbital prefrontal cortex on reward-guided behavior.

    PubMed

    Rudebeck, Peter H; Murray, Elisabeth A

    2011-07-20

    The macaque orbital prefrontal cortex (PFo) has been implicated in a wide range of reward-guided behaviors essential for efficient foraging. The PFo, however, is not a homogeneous structure. Two major subregions, distinct by their cytoarchitecture and connections to other brain structures, compose the PFo. One subregion encompasses Walker's areas 11 and 13 and the other centers on Walker's area 14. Although it has been suggested that these subregions play dissociable roles in reward-guided behavior, direct neuropsychological evidence for this hypothesis is limited. To explore the independent contributions of PFo subregions to behavior, we studied rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with restricted excitotoxic lesions targeting either Walker's areas 11/13 or area 14. The performance of these two groups was compared to that of a group of unoperated controls on a series of reward-based tasks that has been shown to be sensitive to lesions of the PFo as a whole (Walker's areas 11, 13, and 14). Lesions of areas 11/13, but not area 14, disrupted the rapid updating of object value during selective satiation. In contrast, lesions targeting area 14, but not areas 11/13, impaired the ability of monkeys to learn to stop responding to a previously rewarded object. Somewhat surprisingly, neither lesion disrupted performance on a serial object reversal learning task, although aspiration lesions of the entire PFo produce severe deficits on this task. Our data indicate that anatomically defined subregions within macaque PFo make dissociable contributions to reward-guided behavior.

  13. Planar covariation of limb elevation angles during bipedal walking in the Japanese macaque.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Naomichi; Kikuchi, Takeo; Ishiguro, Yutaro; Makishima, Haruyuki; Nakatsukasa, Masato

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the planar covariation of lower limb segment elevation angles during bipedal walking in macaques to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the origin and evolution of the planar law in human walking. Two Japanese macaques and four adult humans walking on a treadmill were recorded, and the time course of the elevation angles at the thigh, shank and foot segments relative to the vertical axis were calculated. Our analyses indicated that the planar law also applies to macaque bipedal walking. However, planarity was much lower in macaques, and orientations of the plane differed between the two species because of differences in the foot elevation angle. The human foot is rigidly structured to form a longitudinal arch, whereas the macaque's foot is more flexible and bends at the midtarsal region in the stance phase. This difference in midfoot flexibility between the two species studied was the main source of the difference in the planar law. Thus, the evolution of a stable midfoot in early hominins may have preceded the acquisition of the strong planar intersegmental coordination and possibly facilitated the subsequent emergence of habitual bipedal walking in the human lineage.

  14. A coprological survey of parasites of wild mantled howling monkeys, Alouatta palliata palliata.

    PubMed

    Stuart, M D; Greenspan, L L; Glander, K E; Clarke, M R

    1990-10-01

    Fecal samples from 155 mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata palliata) examined at Centro Ecologico La Pacifica, Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica, revealed 75 (48%) had parasitic infections. A sampling of nine howling monkeys from Santa Rosa National Park. Costa Rica indicated only one infected animal (11%). Only three of 19 (16%) spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) also from Santa Rosa were infected. Controrchis biliophilus, Trypanoxyuris minutus, unidentified strongylid eggs and Isospora sp. oocysts were found. Three monkeys from La Pacifica died and were examined for adult helminths. They were infected with Ascaris lumbricoides, C. biliophilus and T. minutus.

  15. Geographic distribution and habitat diversity of the Barbary Macaque sylvanus L.

    PubMed

    Taub, D M

    1977-01-01

    During a 15-month behavioral study in Morocco and a 3-month survey in Morocco and Algeria, the present distribution of the Barbary macaque was determined. In Algeria, monkeys are found in seven constricted and disjunct localities in the Grande and Petite Kabylie mountain ranges. These localities are severely restricted in space and are located in remote or inaccessible areas which support only small populations. Their habitats include mixed cedar and holm oak forests, humid Portuguese and cork oak mixes and gorges dominated by scrub vegetation. In only two regions (Guerrouch and Agfadou) can population of reasonable size be found; even there they do not approach the abundance found in the central Middle Atlas zone of Morocco. Distribution was more extensive earlier in this century and some areas have become unoccupied within the past 15 years. Today, their absolute numbers and population densities are low in all but two locations. Algeria contains approximately 23% (5,500 maximum) of the total number of surviving Barbary macaques in North Africa. About 77% of the total number of Barbary macaques occur in Morocco. Moroccan habitats include high cedar forests, cedar/holm-oak mixtures and pure holm oak forests. Macaque distribution in the High Atlas is restricted to the Ourika valley where only a small relict population survives. There are between five and eight small, disjunct forest pockets in the Rif which support small groups of monkeys. In the Middle Atlas, monkeys are found in high numbers and in relatively wide stretches of distribution, although there are constricted areas of low densities in this region also. 65% (14,000 maximum) of the animals and their highest densities occur in the high mixed cedar forests of the Central zone, and mixed cedar forest appears to be the preferred habitat for the species. With the exception of the Central zone, their remaining distribution is typically disjunct and constricted, and population densities aer low. As in Algeria

  16. Severe Acquired Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia in a Female Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Parrula, Cecilia M; Mysore, Jagannatha; Burr, Holly; Freebern, Wendy; Neef, Natasha

    2015-06-01

    A 4-y-old female cynomolgus macaque presented for veterinary evaluation prior to placement in a preclinical study showed markedly low platelet counts that continued to decrease over time. Physical examination over the next several days showed areas of pale red discoloration in forelimbs, anterior thorax, and inguinal area and multifocal pinpoint areas of erythema or scabs. An area of dark red discoloration approximately 2 cm in diameter on the dorsal surface of the tongue was discovered on day 9. The macaque was euthanized, and histopathologic evaluation showed multifocal, ulcerative or erosive, hemorrhagic, lymphohistiocytic and neutrophilic glossitis and tonsillitis. The lesions on the tongue were associated with opportunistic fungi consistent with Candida albicans. The bone marrow showed megakaryocytic hyperplasia. There was no evidence of increased consumption of platelets, sequestration of platelets, or bone marrow suppression. The monkey was serologically negative for simian retrovirus, SIV, and simian T-lymphotropic virus. In light of cases reported in humans, immune-mediated destruction of platelets due to autoantibodies secondary to Candida albicans infection was considered. However, we were unable to detect antiplatelet antibodies on the platelet surface or in serum to support this etiology; therefore idiopathic thrombocytopenia was diagnosed. To our knowledge, this case represents the second reported observation of acquired thrombocytopenia in a nonhuman primate and the first reported observation in a cynomolgus macaque.

  17. Use-Wear Patterns on Wild Macaque Stone Tools Reveal Their Behavioural History

    PubMed Central

    Haslam, Michael; Gumert, Michael D.; Biro, Dora; Carvalho, Susana; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2013-01-01

    Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea) are one of a limited number of wild animal species to use stone tools, with their tool use focused on pounding shelled marine invertebrates foraged from intertidal habitats. These monkeys exhibit two main styles of tool use: axe hammering of oysters, and pound hammering of unattached encased foods. In this study, we examined macroscopic use-wear patterns on a sample of 60 wild macaque stone tools from Piak Nam Yai Island, Thailand, that had been collected following behavioural observation, in order to (i) quantify the wear patterns in terms of the types and distribution of use-damage on the stones, and (ii) develop a Use-Action Index (UAI) to differentiate axe hammers from pound hammers by wear patterns alone. We used the intensity of crushing damage on differing surface zones of the stones, as well as stone weight, to produce a UAI that had 92% concordance when compared to how the stones had been used by macaques, as observed independently prior to collection. Our study is the first to demonstrate that quantitative archaeological use-wear techniques can accurately reconstruct the behavioural histories of non-human primate stone tools. PMID:23977365

  18. Using Porches to Decrease Feces Painting in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Daniel H; O'Connor, Jillann Rawlins; Coleman, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the efficacy of a porch in decreasing feces painting in captive rhesus macaques. The porch is a small extension that is hung on the outside of a monkey's primary home cage. Porches provide many potential benefits to indoor-housed macaques, including opportunities to perch above the ground, additional space, and increased field of view. Rates of feces painting, an abnormal behavior in which the animal smears or rubs feces on a surface, were compared in 3 situations: with porch enrichment, with ‘smear board’ enrichment (a foraging device commonly used to decrease feces painting), and without either enrichment item. Feces painting was evaluated daily by using a 5-point scale that ranged from 0, no feces present, to 4, multiple large areas of feces. We found that subjects received significantly lower feces painting scores when given porch enrichment or smear board enrichment compared with baseline. Furthermore, subjects received significantly lower feces painting scores with porch enrichment than smear board enrichment. These results demonstrate that the porch is an effective tool to decrease feces painting in captive macaques. PMID:25650971

  19. Experimental Infection of Rhesus Macaques and Common Marmosets with a European Strain of West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Verstrepen, Babs E.; Fagrouch, Zahra; van Heteren, Melanie; Buitendijk, Hester; Haaksma, Tom; Beenhakker, Niels; Palù, Giorgio; Richner, Justin M.; Diamond, Michael S.; Bogers, Willy M.; Barzon, Luisa; Chabierski, Stefan; Ulbert, Sebastian; Kondova, Ivanela; Verschoor, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that infects humans and other mammals. In some cases WNV causes severe neurological disease. During recent years, outbreaks of WNV are increasing in worldwide distribution and novel genetic variants of the virus have been detected. Although a substantial amount of data exists on WNV infections in rodent models, little is known about early events during WNV infection in primates, including humans. To gain a deeper understanding of this process, we performed experimental infections of rhesus macaques and common marmosets with a virulent European WNV strain (WNV-Ita09) and monitored virological, hematological, and biochemical parameters. WNV-Ita09 productively infected both monkey species, with higher replication and wider tissue distribution in common marmosets compared to rhesus macaques. The animals in this study however, did not develop clinical signs of WNV disease, nor showed substantial deviations in clinical laboratory parameters. In both species, the virus induced a rapid CD56dimCD16bright natural killer response, followed by IgM and IgG antibody responses. The results of this study show that healthy rhesus macaques and common marmosets are promising animal models to study WNV-Ita09 infection. Both models may be particularly of use to evaluate potential vaccine candidates or to investigate WNV pathogenesis. PMID:24743302

  20. Using porches to decrease feces painting in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Daniel H; O'Connor, Jillann Rawlins; Coleman, Kristine

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the efficacy of a porch in decreasing feces painting in captive rhesus macaques. The porch is a small extension that is hung on the outside of a monkey's primary home cage. Porches provide many potential benefits to indoor-housed macaques, including opportunities to perch above the ground, additional space, and increased field of view. Rates of feces painting, an abnormal behavior in which the animal smears or rubs feces on a surface, were compared in 3 situations: with porch enrichment, with 'smear board' enrichment (a foraging device commonly used to decrease feces painting), and without either enrichment item. Feces painting was evaluated daily by using a 5-point scale that ranged from 0, no feces present, to 4, multiple large areas of feces. We found that subjects received significantly lower feces painting scores when given porch enrichment or smear board enrichment compared with baseline. Furthermore, subjects received significantly lower feces painting scores with porch enrichment than smear board enrichment. These results demonstrate that the porch is an effective tool to decrease feces painting in captive macaques.

  1. Dry bedding provides cost-effective enrichment for group-housed rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Doane, Cynthia J; Andrews, Kirk; Schaefer, Laura Jane; Morelli, Nathan; McAllister, Shannon; Coleman, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    Dry bedding has been shown to be an effective enrichment strategy for small groups of captive nonhuman primates housed in cages or in small enclosures with concrete flooring. However, dry bedding is used infrequently for large groups because of the perception that its use is time- and resource-intensive. We investigated the cost-effectiveness of this enrichment strategy in large groups (30 to 50 subjects) of rhesus macaques. Macaques were housed under 3 comparison conditions for 4 wk: pine shavings (n = 4), aspen and pine shaving mixture (n = 4), and nonbedded control (n = 4). As measures of resource consumption, husbandry tasks were documented by using time-in-motion methodology, and water usage was determined. In addition, groups underwent behavioral observations to assess the effect of dry bedding. The time required to care for units did not differ between bedded and nonbedded units. However, significantly less water was used for sanitization of bedded compared with nonbedded units. Monkeys housed in bedded units showed more foraging (13.8% ± 1.6% of time in bedded compared with 4.0% ± 0.3% of time in nonbedded units) and less aggression and self-grooming. Dry bedding benefited the macaques, reduced water usage and costs, and did not affect human resources.

  2. Constitutive release of IFNγ and IL2 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) infected with simian T-lymphotropic virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Yee, JoAnn L; Montiel, Nestor A; Ardeshir, Amir; Ardeshr, Amir; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2013-01-01

    Simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses (STLV), the nonhuman primate counterparts of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV), are endemic in many populations of African and Asian monkeys and apes. Although an etiologic link between STLV1 infection and lymphoproliferative disorders such as malignant lymphomas has been suggested in some nonhuman primate species, most STLV infections are inapparent, and infected animals remain clinically healthy. The retroviral transactivator, tax, is well known to increase transcription of viral and cellular genes, resulting in altered cytokine profiles. This study compared the cytokine profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures from 25 STLV1-seropositive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with those of age- and sex-matched seronegative controls. IFNγ, TNFα, IL10, and IL2 levels in unstimulated PBMC culture supernatants were measured at 24, 48, and 72 h by using enzyme immunoassays. IFNγ concentrations were found significantly higher in the supernatants of PBMC cultures of seropositive monkeys as compared with seronegative controls. In addition, although IL2 concentrations were not significantly elevated in the supernatants of PBMC cultures of all seropositive monkeys as compared with all seronegative controls, IL2 levels were increased in a subset of 5 pairs. Increased constitutive cytokine release occurred in the absence of spontaneous proliferation. The increased constitutive release of IFNγ and IL2 suggests that STLV1 alters immune functions in infected but clinically healthy rhesus macaques and further characterizes STLV1 infection of rhesus macaques as a potential model for human HTLV1 infection. PMID:24326227

  3. Constitutive Release of IFNγ and IL2 from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Infected with Simian T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Yee, JoAnn L; Montiel, Nestor A; Ardeshr, Amir; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2013-01-01

    Simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses (STLV), the nonhuman primate counterparts of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV), are endemic in many populations of African and Asian monkeys and apes. Although an etiologic link between STLV1 infection and lymphoproliferative disorders such as malignant lymphomas has been suggested in some nonhuman primate species, most STLV infections are inapparent, and infected animals remain clinically healthy. The retroviral transactivator, tax, is well known to increase transcription of viral and cellular genes, resulting in altered cytokine profiles. This study compared the cytokine profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures from 25 STLV1-seropositive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with those of age- and sex-matched seronegative controls. IFNγ, TNFα, IL10, and IL2 levels in unstimulated PBMC culture supernatants were measured at 24, 48, and 72 h by using enzyme immunoassays. IFNγ concentrations were found significantly higher in the supernatants of PBMC cultures of seropositive monkeys as compared with seronegative controls. In addition, although IL2 concentrations were not significantly elevated in the supernatants of PBMC cultures of all seropositive monkeys as compared with all seronegative controls, IL2 levels were increased in a subset of 5 pairs. Increased constitutive cytokine release occurred in the absence of spontaneous proliferation. The increased constitutive release of IFNγ and IL2 suggests that STLV1 alters immune functions in infected but clinically healthy rhesus macaques and further characterizes STLV1 infection of rhesus macaques as a potential model for human HTLV1 infection. PMID:24326227

  4. Mamu-DQA1 allele and genotype frequencies in a randomly sampled breeding colony of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Rolfs, B K; Lorenz, J G; Wu, C C; Lerche, N W; Smith, D G

    2001-04-01

    We studied the allelic and genotypic distribution of the major histocompatibility class-II locus DQA1 observed in a random sample of Indian rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) from a major breeding facility in the United States. The DNA was isolated from whole blood samples collected between 1991 and 1994 from 65 Indian rhesus monkeys. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PCR-RFLP), which involves use of specific amplification of DQA1 exon 2 and subsequent restriction digestion of the 242-base pair fragment, was used to genotype the animals for the 20 known macaque (Mamu)-DQA1 alleles. Frequencies for four alleles (DQA1*240x, *2502, *2503 and *0102) differed significantly from those reported in a smaller sample of rhesus macaques from the German Primate Center. The modest genetic survey of Mamu-DQA1 genotypes presented here will be particularly useful in designing epidemiologic studies that investigate associations between immunogenetic background and disease susceptibility in macaque models of human disease.

  5. Male-directed infanticide in spider monkeys (Ateles spp.).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Sara; Di Fiore, Anthony; Champion, Jane; Pavelka, Mary Susan; Páez, Johanna; Link, Andrés

    2015-04-01

    Infanticide is considered a conspicuous expression of sexual conflict amongst mammals, including at least 35 primate species. Here we describe two suspected and one attempted case of intragroup infanticide in spider monkeys that augment five prior cases of observed or suspected infanticide in this genus. Contrary to the typical pattern of infanticide seen in most primate societies, where infants are killed by conspecifics independent of their sex, all eight cases of observed or suspected infanticide in spider monkeys have been directed toward male infants within their first weeks of life. Moreover, although data are still scant, infanticides seem to be perpetrated exclusively by adult males against infants from their own social groups and are not associated with male takeovers or a sudden rise in male dominance rank. Although the slow reproductive cycles of spider monkeys might favor the presence of infanticide because of the potential to shorten females' interbirth intervals, infanticide is nonetheless uncommon among spider monkeys, and patterns of male-directed infanticide are not yet understood. We suggest that given the potentially close genetic relationships among adult males within spider monkey groups, and the need for males to cooperate with one another in territorial interactions with other groups of related males, infanticide may be expected to occur primarily where the level of intragroup competition among males outweighs that of competition between social groups. Finally, we suggest that infanticide in spider monkeys may be more prevalent than previously thought, given that it may be difficult for observers to witness cases of infanticide or suspected infanticide that occur soon after birth in taxa that are characterized by high levels of fission-fusion dynamics. Early, undetected, male-biased infanticide could influence the composition of spider monkey groups and contribute to the female-biased adult sex ratios often reported for this genus.

  6. Serotonin shapes risky decision making in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Platt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Some people love taking risks, while others avoid gambles at all costs. The neural mechanisms underlying individual variation in preference for risky or certain outcomes, however, remain poorly understood. Although behavioral pathologies associated with compulsive gambling, addiction and other psychiatric disorders implicate deficient serotonin signaling in pathological decision making, there is little experimental evidence demonstrating a link between serotonin and risky decision making, in part due to the lack of a good animal model. We used dietary rapid tryptophan depletion (RTD) to acutely lower brain serotonin in three macaques performing a simple gambling task for fluid rewards. To confirm the efficacy of RTD experiments, we measured total plasma tryptophan using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection. Reducing brain serotonin synthesis decreased preference for the safe option in a gambling task. Moreover, lowering brain serotonin function significantly decreased the premium required for monkeys to switch their preference to the risky option, suggesting that diminished serotonin signaling enhances the relative subjective value of the risky option. These results implicate serotonin in risk-sensitive decision making and, further, suggest pharmacological therapies for treating pathological risk preferences in disorders such as problem gambling and addiction. PMID:19553236

  7. Recombinant Receptor Binding Domain Protein Induces Partial Protective Immunity in Rhesus Macaques Against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Challenge☆

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jiaming; Yao, Yanfeng; Deng, Yao; Chen, Hong; Lu, Guangwen; Wang, Wen; Bao, Linlin; Deng, Wei; Wei, Qiang; Gao, George F.; Qin, Chuan; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Background Development an effective vaccine against Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is urgent and limited information is available on vaccination in nonhuman primate (NHP) model. We herein report of evaluating a recombinant receptor-binding domain (rRBD) protein vaccine in a rhesus macaque model. Methods Nine monkeys were randomly assigned to high-dose, low-dose and mock groups,which were immunized with different doses of rRBD plus alum adjuvant or adjuvant alone at different time points (0, 8, 25 weeks). Immunological analysis was conducted after each immunisation. Monkeys were challenged with MERS-CoV at 14 days after the final immunisation followed by observation for clinical signs and chest X-rays. Nasal, oropharyngeal and rectal swabs were also collected for analyses. Monkeys were euthanized 3 days after challenge and multiple specimens from tissues were collected for pathological, virological and immunological tests. Conclusion Robust and sustained immunological responses (including neutralisation antibody) were elicited by the rRBD vaccination. Besides, rRBD vaccination alleviated pneumonia with evidence of reduced tissue impairment and clinical manifestation in monkeys. Furthermore, the rRBD vaccine decreased viral load of lung, trachea and oropharyngeal swabs of monkeys. These data in NHP paves a way for further development of an effective human vaccine against MERS-CoV infection. PMID:26629538

  8. Muscle dimensions in the Japanese macaque hand.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Naomichi; Oishi, Motoharu

    2012-10-01

    Macaques have been used as an important paradigm for understanding the neural control mechanisms of human precision grip capabilities. Therefore, we dissected the forearms and hands of two male Japanese macaques to systematically record the muscle mass, fascicle length and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA). Comparisons of the mass fractions and PCSA fractions of the hand musculature among the Japanese macaque, chimpanzee, and human demonstrated that the sizes of the thenar and hypothenar eminence muscle groups are more balanced in the macaque and chimpanzee, but those of the thenar eminence group are much larger in the human, indicating that the capacity to generate force at the tip of the thumb is more restricted in macaques, despite their high manual dexterity. In the macaque, however, the extrinsic flexor muscles are much larger, possibly to facilitate weight bearing by the forelimbs in pronograde quadrupedal locomotion and forceful grasping of arboreal supports in gap-crossing movements such as leaping. Taking such anatomical differences imposed on the hand musculoskeletal system into consideration seems to be an important method of clarifying the mechanisms of precision grip in macaques.

  9. Aging increases mitochondrial DNA damage and oxidative stress in liver of rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Castro, María del R.; Suarez, Edu; Kraiselburd, Edmundo; Isidro, Angel; Paz, José; Ferder, León; Ayala-Torres, Sylvette

    2013-01-01

    While the mechanisms of cellular aging remain controversial, a leading hypothesis is that mitochondrial oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a critical role in this process. Here, we provide data in aging rhesus macaques supporting the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress is a major characteristic of aging and may be responsible for the age-associated increase in mitochondrial dysfunction. We measured mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage by quantitative PCR in liver and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of young, middle age, and old monkeys and show that older monkeys have increases in the number of mtDNA lesions. There was a direct correlation between the amount of mtDNA lesions and age, supporting the role of mtDNA damage in the process of aging. Liver from older monkeys showed significant increases in lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylations and reduced antioxidant enzyme activity. Similarly, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the middle age group showed increased levels in carbonylated proteins, indicative of high levels of oxidative stress. Together, these results suggest that the aging process is associated with defective mitochondria, where increased production of reactive oxygen species results in extensive damage at the mtDNA and protein levels. This study provides valuable data based on the rhesus macaque model further validating age-related mitochondrial functional decline with increasing age and suggesting that mtDNA damage might be a good biomarker of aging. PMID:22027539

  10. Monkey drumming reveals common networks for perceiving vocal and nonvocal communication sounds.

    PubMed

    Remedios, Ryan; Logothetis, Nikos K; Kayser, Christoph

    2009-10-20

    Salient sounds such as those created by drumming can serve as means of nonvocal acoustic communication in addition to vocal sounds. Despite the ubiquity of drumming across human cultures, its origins and the brain regions specialized in processing such signals remain unexplored. Here, we report that an important animal model for vocal communication, the macaque monkey, also displays drumming behavior, and we exploit this finding to show that vocal and nonvocal communication sounds are represented by overlapping networks in the brain's temporal lobe. Observing social macaque groups, we found that these animals use artificial objects to produce salient periodic sounds, similar to acoustic gestures. Behavioral tests confirmed that these drumming sounds attract the attention of listening monkeys similarly as conspecific vocalizations. Furthermore, in a preferential looking experiment, drumming sounds influenced the way monkeys viewed their conspecifics, suggesting that drumming serves as a multimodal signal of social dominance. Finally, by using high-resolution functional imaging we identified those brain regions preferentially activated by drumming sounds or by vocalizations and found that the representations of both these communication sounds overlap in caudal auditory cortex and the amygdala. The similar behavioral responses to drumming and vocal sounds, and their shared neural representation, suggest a common origin of primate vocal and nonvocal communication systems and support the notion of a gestural origin of speech and music. PMID:19805199

  11. Functions of an unreported "rocking-embrace" gesture between female Japanese Macaques (Macaca fuscata) in Kinkazan Island, Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimooka, Yukiko; Nakagawa, Naofumi

    2014-04-01

    Recently, research has focused on the effects of the concurrence of multimodal signals and their efficacy and meaning. We observed an unreported behaviour, a ventro-ventral "rocking-embrace" gesture that is always accompanied by lip smacking as the facial expression and sometimes by a girney call, in wild Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) living in Kinkazan Island, northern Japan. This study examined the form and contexts of the occurrence of such multimodal signals in order to elucidate its functions. Eighty-eight cases of rocking embrace were recorded during 183 h of observation over 22 days. Adult females were involved in all of the cases. Of the 71 cases between adult females in which behaviours prior to the rocking embrace could be identified, 13 cases were allogrooming interruptions, 11 were aggression, and 42 were approaches, most of which occurred between non-kin grooming partners. The rocking embrace was often followed by allogrooming. This suggests that rocking embraces occur under stressful conditions and may function to reduce tensions. This conclusion is consistent with the contexts and functions of lip smacking and girneys shown in previous studies. In contrast with lip smacking and girneys, neither a rocking embrace nor a ventro-ventral embrace (without rocking) between anoestrous adult females has been previously shown in Japanese macaques. In other macaque species, however, the latter gesture is often observed as an affiliative behaviour that immediately follows conflict; it functions to reconcile or as a greeting when it occurs immediately after an approach. Rocking embraces among the Kinkazan macaques occur in contexts similar to, and have a similar function to, the ancestral gesture of ventro-ventral embracing (which is hidden in Japanese macaques) and the ancestral display of lip smacking (which is still observed in Japanese macaques). The ventro-ventral embrace as a tactile signal might have been hidden since it was made redundant by the

  12. Behavioral and neurobiological characteristics influencing social hierarchy formation in female cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Riddick, N V; Czoty, P W; Gage, H D; Kaplan, J R; Nader, S H; Icenhower, M; Pierre, P J; Bennett, A; Garg, P K; Garg, S; Nader, M A

    2009-02-18

    Socially housed monkeys have been used as a model to study human diseases. The present study examined behavioral, physiological and neurochemical measures as predictors of social rank in 16 experimentally naïve, individually housed female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). The two behavioral measures examined were novel object reactivity (NOR), as determined by latency to touch an opaque acrylic box placed in the home cage, and locomotor activity assessed in a novel open-field apparatus. Serum cortisol concentrations were evaluated three times per week for four consecutive weeks, and stress reactivity was assessed on one occasion by evaluating the cortisol response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) following dexamethasone suppression. Measures of serotonin (5-HT) function included whole blood 5-HT (WBS) concentrations, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the 5-HT metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and brain 5-HT transporter (SERT) availability obtained using positron emission tomography (PET). After baseline measures were obtained, monkeys were assigned to four social groups of four monkeys per group. The two measures that correlated with eventual social rank were CSF 5-HIAA concentrations, which were significantly higher in the animals who eventually became subordinate, and latency to touch the novel object, which was significantly lower in eventual subordinate monkeys. Measures of 5-HT function did not change as a consequence of social rank. These data suggest that levels of central 5-HIAA and measures of novel object reactivity may be trait markers that influence eventual social rank in female macaques. PMID:19059311

  13. Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy develop tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, P; Cervenak, J; Yakovleva, O; Gregori, L; Pomeroy, K; Cook, A; Muhammad, F S; Seuberlich, T; Cervenakova, L; Asher, D M

    2012-07-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) were infected experimentally with the agent of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Two to four years later, six of the monkeys developed alterations in interactive behaviour and cognition and other neurological signs typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). At necropsy examination, the brains from all of the monkeys showed pathological changes similar to those described in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) of man, except that the squirrel monkey brains contained no PrP-amyloid plaques typical of that disease. Constant neuropathological features included spongiform degeneration, gliosis, deposition of abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) and many deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein (p-Tau) in several areas of the cerebrum and cerebellum. Western blots showed large amounts of proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the central nervous system. The striking absence of PrP plaques (prominent in brains of cynomolgus macaques [Macaca fascicularis] with experimentally-induced BSE and vCJD and in human patients with vCJD) reinforces the conclusion that the host plays a major role in determining the neuropathology of TSEs. Results of this study suggest that p-Tau, found in the brains of all BSE-infected monkeys, might play a role in the pathogenesis of TSEs. Whether p-Tau contributes to development of disease or appears as a secondary change late in the course of illness remains to be determined.

  14. Early Predictors of Impaired Social Functioning in Male Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, Laura A.; Seil, Shannon K.; Calonder, Laura A.; Madrid, Jesus E.; Bone, Kyle J.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Garner, Joseph P.; Capitanio, John P.; Parker, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by social cognition impairments but its basic disease mechanisms remain poorly understood. Progress has been impeded by the absence of animal models that manifest behavioral phenotypes relevant to ASD. Rhesus monkeys are an ideal model organism to address this barrier to progress. Like humans, rhesus monkeys are highly social, possess complex social cognition abilities, and exhibit pronounced individual differences in social functioning. Moreover, we have previously shown that Low-Social (LS) vs. High-Social (HS) adult male monkeys exhibit lower social motivation and poorer social skills. It is not known, however, when these social deficits first emerge. The goals of this study were to test whether juvenile LS and HS monkeys differed as infants in their ability to process social information, and whether infant social abilities predicted later social classification (i.e., LS vs. HS), in order to facilitate earlier identification of monkeys at risk for poor social outcomes. Social classification was determined for N = 25 LS and N = 25 HS male monkeys that were 1–4 years of age. As part of a colony-wide assessment, these monkeys had previously undergone, as infants, tests of face recognition memory and the ability to respond appropriately to conspecific social signals. Monkeys later identified as LS vs. HS showed impairments in recognizing familiar vs. novel faces and in the species-typical adaptive ability to gaze avert to scenes of conspecific aggression. Additionally, multivariate logistic regression using infant social ability measures perfectly predicted later social classification of all N = 50 monkeys. These findings suggest that an early capacity to process important social information may account for differences in rhesus monkeys’ motivation and competence to establish and maintain social relationships later in life. Further development of this model will facilitate identification of novel biological targets

  15. Macaque-human interactions and the societal perceptions of macaques in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Sha, John Chih Mun; Gumert, Michael D; Lee, Benjamin P Y-H; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Chan, Sharon; Fuentes, Agustín

    2009-10-01

    Humans and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) interface in several locations in Singapore. We investigated six of these interface zones to assess the level of conflict between the two species. We observed macaque-to-human interactions and distributed questionnaires to residents and visitors of nature reserves. We observed an average of two macaque-to-human interactions per hour at the sites, which included affiliative or submissive behaviors (46.9%), aggression (19.1%), taking food and other items (18.5%) searching bins, cars, and houses (13.4%), and nonaggressive contact (2.1%). Two-thirds of interactions occurred when a human was carrying food or food cues, and one-quarter occurred when a human provoked macaques. Only 8% of interactions occurred without a clear human-triggered context. Our interview showed one-third of respondents experienced nuisance problems from macaques. They had items taken from them (50.5%) and received threats (31.9%). Residents reported more nuisance problems than visitors, and their perceptions toward macaques differed. Residents were more aware of the consequences of food provisioning and that there were regulations against feeding. Residents fed macaques less and held more negative sentiments toward macaques. Nearly half of the interviewed people held neutral attitudes toward macaques and only 26.2% of respondents thought conflict with macaques warranted urgent action. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents supported education programs to ameliorate human-macaque conflict, and less than 15% supported removing or eradicating macaques. 87.6% felt that it is importance to conserve and protect macaques. Our results show that human-macaque conflict exists in Singapore, but that it may not be severe. Human behavior is largely responsible for macaque-to-human interactions, and thus could be lessened with management of human behavior in interface zones (i.e. restrict food carrying and provocation). Moreover, our interviews shows people

  16. Macaque-human interactions and the societal perceptions of macaques in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Sha, John Chih Mun; Gumert, Michael D; Lee, Benjamin P Y-H; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Chan, Sharon; Fuentes, Agustín

    2009-10-01

    Humans and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) interface in several locations in Singapore. We investigated six of these interface zones to assess the level of conflict between the two species. We observed macaque-to-human interactions and distributed questionnaires to residents and visitors of nature reserves. We observed an average of two macaque-to-human interactions per hour at the sites, which included affiliative or submissive behaviors (46.9%), aggression (19.1%), taking food and other items (18.5%) searching bins, cars, and houses (13.4%), and nonaggressive contact (2.1%). Two-thirds of interactions occurred when a human was carrying food or food cues, and one-quarter occurred when a human provoked macaques. Only 8% of interactions occurred without a clear human-triggered context. Our interview showed one-third of respondents experienced nuisance problems from macaques. They had items taken from them (50.5%) and received threats (31.9%). Residents reported more nuisance problems than visitors, and their perceptions toward macaques differed. Residents were more aware of the consequences of food provisioning and that there were regulations against feeding. Residents fed macaques less and held more negative sentiments toward macaques. Nearly half of the interviewed people held neutral attitudes toward macaques and only 26.2% of respondents thought conflict with macaques warranted urgent action. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents supported education programs to ameliorate human-macaque conflict, and less than 15% supported removing or eradicating macaques. 87.6% felt that it is importance to conserve and protect macaques. Our results show that human-macaque conflict exists in Singapore, but that it may not be severe. Human behavior is largely responsible for macaque-to-human interactions, and thus could be lessened with management of human behavior in interface zones (i.e. restrict food carrying and provocation). Moreover, our interviews shows people

  17. Oxytocin enhances attention to the eye region in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, Olga; Noble, Pamela L.; Costa, Vincent D.; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2014-01-01

    Human and non-human primates rely on the ability to perceive and interpret facial expressions to guide effective social interactions. The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has been shown to have a critical role in the perception of social cues, and in humans to increase the number of saccades to the eye region. To develop a useful primate model for the effects of OT on information processing, we investigated the influence of OT on gaze behavior during face processing in rhesus macaques. Forty-five minutes after a single intranasal dose of either 24IU OT or saline, monkeys completed a free-viewing task during which they viewed pictures of conspecifics displaying one of three facial expressions (neutral, open-mouth threat or bared-teeth) for 5 s. The monkey was free to explore the face on the screen while the pattern of eye movements was recorded. OT did not increase overall fixations to the face compared to saline. Rather, when monkeys freely viewed conspecific faces, OT increased fixations to the eye region relative to the mouth region. This effect of OT was particularly pronounced when face position on the screen was manipulated so that the eye region was not the first facial feature seen by the monkeys. Together these findings are consistent with prior evidence in humans that intranasal administration of OT specifically enhances visual attention to the eye region compared to other informative facial features, thus validating the use of non-human primates to mechanistically explore how OT modulates social information processing and behavior. PMID:24624055

  18. Self-Injurious Behavior Secondary to Cytomegalovirus-Induced Neuropathy in an SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Clemmons, Elizabeth A; Gumber, Sanjeev; Strobert, Elizabeth; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Jean, Sherrie M

    2015-01-01

    A 3.5-y-old, female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) inoculated with SIVmac239 presented 8 mo later for inappetence and facial bruising. Physical examination revealed a superficial skin abrasion below the left eye, bruising below the left brow, and epistaxis of the left nostril. There were no significant findings on CBC, serum chemistry, urinalysis, or radiographs. Differential diagnoses included infectious etiologies, self-injurious behavior, immune-mediated dermatitis, and neoplasia. Lack of response to antibiotic and analgesic therapy and observations of the macaque made it apparent that the skin lesions were self-inflicted. The excoriations rapidly progressed to extend over the nose, and the left palpebrae became edematous. Euthanasia was elected because the macaque appeared to be experiencing continued discomfort despite analgesic therapy. Histopathologic examination revealed systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection involving the facial nerves, periocular nerves, meninges, and perimesenteric lymph nodes. CMV is a common infection in macaques, with adult seroprevalence close to 100% in most colonies. Infection in immunocompetent animals is usually asymptomatic but can cause significant clinical disease in immunodeficient hosts. CMV is associated with a painful peripheral neuropathy in human AIDS patients, and analgesic treatment is often unsatisfactory. Peripheral neuropathy secondary to CMV should be considered as an underlying cause of self-injurious behavior in SIV-infected macaques. Macaques affected by other diseases and disorders may also be at risk for development of painful peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26141451

  19. Self-Injurious Behavior Secondary to Cytomegalovirus-Induced Neuropathy in an SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Clemmons, Elizabeth A; Gumber, Sanjeev; Strobert, Elizabeth; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Jean, Sherrie M

    2015-06-01

    A 3.5-y-old, female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) inoculated with SIVmac239 presented 8 mo later for inappetence and facial bruising. Physical examination revealed a superficial skin abrasion below the left eye, bruising below the left brow, and epistaxis of the left nostril. There were no significant findings on CBC, serum chemistry, urinalysis, or radiographs. Differential diagnoses included infectious etiologies, self-injurious behavior, immune-mediated dermatitis, and neoplasia. Lack of response to antibiotic and analgesic therapy and observations of the macaque made it apparent that the skin lesions were self-inflicted. The excoriations rapidly progressed to extend over the nose, and the left palpebrae became edematous. Euthanasia was elected because the macaque appeared to be experiencing continued discomfort despite analgesic therapy. Histopathologic examination revealed systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection involving the facial nerves, periocular nerves, meninges, and perimesenteric lymph nodes. CMV is a common infection in macaques, with adult seroprevalence close to 100% in most colonies. Infection in immunocompetent animals is usually asymptomatic but can cause significant clinical disease in immunodeficient hosts. CMV is associated with a painful peripheral neuropathy in human AIDS patients, and analgesic treatment is often unsatisfactory. Peripheral neuropathy secondary to CMV should be considered as an underlying cause of self-injurious behavior in SIV-infected macaques. Macaques affected by other diseases and disorders may also be at risk for development of painful peripheral neuropathies.

  20. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California National Primate Research Center (1992-2014).

    PubMed

    Reader, J Rachel; Canfield, Don R; Lane, Jennifer F; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Ardeshir, Amir; Allen, A Mark; Tarara, Ross P

    2016-04-01

    Necropsy records and associated clinical histories from the rhesus macaque colony at the California National Primate Research Center were reviewed to identify mortality related to cardiac abnormalities involving left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Over a 21-y period, 162 cases (female, 90; male, 72) of idiopathic LVH were identified. Macaques presented to necropsy with prominent concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle associated with striking reduction of the ventricular lumen. Among all LVH cases, 74 macaques (female, 39; male, 35), mostly young adults, presented for spontaneous (sudden) death; more than 50% of these 74 cases were associated with a recent history of sedation or intraspecific aggression. The risk of sudden death in the 6- to 9-y-old age group was significantly higher in male macaques. Subtle histologic cardiac lesions included karyomegaly and increased cardiac myocyte diameter. Pedigree analyses based on rhesus macaque LVH probands suggested a strong genetic predisposition for the condition. In humans, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, associated with diverse clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic disease to sudden death. Although the overall risk of disease complications such as sudden death, end-stage heart failure, and stroke is low (1% to 2%) in patients with HCM, the absolute risk can vary dramatically. Prima facie comparison of HCM and LVH suggest that further study may allow the development of spontaneously occurring LVH in rhesus macaques as a useful model of HCM, to better understand the pathogenesis of this remarkably heterogeneous disease.

  1. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California National Primate Research Center (1992–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Reader, J Rachel; Canfield, Don R; Lane, Jennifer F; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Ardeshir, Amir; Allen, A Mark; Tarara, Ross P

    2016-01-01

    Necropsy records and associated clinical histories from the rhesus macaque colony at the California National Primate Research Center were reviewed to identify mortality related to cardiac abnormalities involving left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Over a 21-y period, 162 cases (female, 90; male, 72) of idiopathic LVH were identified. Macaques presented to necropsy with prominent concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle associated with striking reduction of the ventricular lumen. Among all LVH cases, 74 macaques (female, 39; male, 35), mostly young adults, presented for spontaneous (sudden) death; more than 50% of these 74 cases were associated with a recent history of sedation or intraspecific aggression. The risk of sudden death in the 6- to 9-y-old age group was significantly higher in male macaques. Subtle histologic cardiac lesions included karyomegaly and increased cardiac myocyte diameter. Pedigree analyses based on rhesus macaque LVH probands suggested a strong genetic predisposition for the condition. In humans, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, associated with diverse clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic disease to sudden death. Although the overall risk of disease complications such as sudden death, end-stage heart failure, and stroke is low (1% to 2%) in patients with HCM, the absolute risk can vary dramatically. Prima facie comparison of HCM and LVH suggest that further study may allow the development of spontaneously occurring LVH in rhesus macaques as a useful model of HCM, to better understand the pathogenesis of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. PMID:27053572

  2. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California National Primate Research Center (1992-2014).

    PubMed

    Reader, J Rachel; Canfield, Don R; Lane, Jennifer F; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Ardeshir, Amir; Allen, A Mark; Tarara, Ross P

    2016-04-01

    Necropsy records and associated clinical histories from the rhesus macaque colony at the California National Primate Research Center were reviewed to identify mortality related to cardiac abnormalities involving left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Over a 21-y period, 162 cases (female, 90; male, 72) of idiopathic LVH were identified. Macaques presented to necropsy with prominent concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle associated with striking reduction of the ventricular lumen. Among all LVH cases, 74 macaques (female, 39; male, 35), mostly young adults, presented for spontaneous (sudden) death; more than 50% of these 74 cases were associated with a recent history of sedation or intraspecific aggression. The risk of sudden death in the 6- to 9-y-old age group was significantly higher in male macaques. Subtle histologic cardiac lesions included karyomegaly and increased cardiac myocyte diameter. Pedigree analyses based on rhesus macaque LVH probands suggested a strong genetic predisposition for the condition. In humans, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, associated with diverse clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic disease to sudden death. Although the overall risk of disease complications such as sudden death, end-stage heart failure, and stroke is low (1% to 2%) in patients with HCM, the absolute risk can vary dramatically. Prima facie comparison of HCM and LVH suggest that further study may allow the development of spontaneously occurring LVH in rhesus macaques as a useful model of HCM, to better understand the pathogenesis of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. PMID:27053572

  3. The Mammary Glands of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Cline, J. Mark; Wood, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    This review describes the normal biology and physiology of the mammary gland in macaques, including the typical histologic appearance across the life span (development, reproductive maturity, lactation, and senescence). The molecular events regulating breast morphogenesis are described, as well as systemic and local hormonal regulators of mammary gland proliferation, differentiation, and function. Similarities and differences to the human breast are described. Regulatory events are illuminated by discussion of genetically modified mouse models. Tissue response markers, including immunohistochemical markers of proliferation and other hormonally induced changes and studies to date, regarding the effects of exogenous hormones, are briefly summarized. In general, estrogens stimulate progesterone receptor expression and proliferation in the mammary gland, and combinations of estrogens and progestogens cause greater proliferation than estrogens alone. Evaluation of novel chemical agents in macaques requires careful evaluation of age and hormonal context to avoid the confounding effects of mammary gland development, past reproductive history, and other influences on mammary gland morphology. The expression of proliferation markers and progesterone receptors may be used as biomarkers to measure chemically induced hormonal effects. PMID:21475638

  4. Spontaneous voice–face identity matching by rhesus monkeys for familiar conspecifics and humans

    PubMed Central

    Sliwa, Julia; Duhamel, Jean-René; Pascalis, Olivier; Wirth, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of a particular individual occurs when we reactivate links between current perceptual inputs and the previously formed representation of that person. This recognition can be achieved by identifying, separately or simultaneously, distinct elements such as the face, silhouette, or voice as belonging to one individual. In humans, those different cues are linked into one complex conceptual representation of individual identity. Here we tested whether rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) also have a cognitive representation of identity by evaluating whether they exhibit cross-modal individual recognition. Further, we assessed individual recognition of familiar conspecifics and familiar humans. In a free preferential looking time paradigm, we found that, for both species, monkeys spontaneously matched the faces of known individuals to their voices. This finding demonstrates that rhesus macaques possess a cross-modal cognitive representation of individuals that extends from conspecifics to humans, revealing the adaptive potential of identity recognition for individuals of socioecological relevance. PMID:21220340

  5. Sequence of the rhesus monkey T-cell receptor {beta} chain diversity and joining loci

    SciTech Connect

    Cheynier, R.; Henrichwark, S.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1996-06-01

    Rhesus monkeys are frequently used as animal models for human diseases, most noticeably for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and simian AIDS. An analysis of HIV proviruses and HIV-specific cytotoxic T cells in splenic white pulps relied heavily on the analysis of rearranged TCRBV sequences. The spleens were derived from patients with drug-insensitive idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura and frequently taken at an advanced stage of disease. In order to obtain some insight into the balance of forces between the virus and the immune system during earlier stages of infection, one must inevitably turn to the SIV/macaque AIDS model. As a prerequisite to undertaking similar virological and immunological studies the nucleotide sequence of the macaque TCRBJ loci had to be established. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Measurement of chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys using human-specific short tandem repeat-based assay.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Edip; Keary, Jodie M; Kurlander, Roger; Hale, Douglas A

    2005-01-27

    Preclinical testing of a mixed chimerism mediated organ transplant tolerance strategy, in a cynomolgus macaque model, would be facilitated by the establishment of a reliable technique for quantitative assessment of chimerism. Among various techniques used for measurement of chimerism in humans, microsatellite DNA profiling has been considered the most versatile one that can discriminate between two individuals. We adopted a commercially available short tandem repeat profiling methodology to cynomolgus monkeys using two human specific alleles, TPOX and CSF1PO. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify these alleles, and the analysis of the PCR products was performed by capillary electrophoresis. Of 54 cynomolgus macaques investigated, only one pair with the same ABO blood type demonstrated identity at both alleles. This implies that this technique should interfere minimally with the assignment of donor-recipient pairs based upon molecular tissue typing or mixed lymphocyte cultures.

  7. Frustrative nonreward and pituitary-adrenal activity in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lyons, D M; Fong, K D; Schrieken, N; Levine, S

    2000-12-01

    Little is known about frustration-induced changes in stress physiology in humans and nonhuman primates. Here we assess in two experiments with squirrel monkeys plasma levels of pituitary-adrenal stress hormones in conditions designed to provoke frustrative nonreward. In the first experiment 18 prepubertal monkeys were trained to feed from one of eight sites, and then tested without food at any of the sites. These monkeys responded with significant increases in cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). In the second experiment 18 adult monkeys were trained to feed from one of eight sites, and then tested after food was moved to a different foraging site. Nine monkeys found food at the relocated site, discontinued foraging at the previously baited site, and responded with decreases in cortisol. The other nine monkeys failed to find the relocated site, initially increased their visits to the previously baited site, and responded with elevations in cortisol and ACTH. In keeping with comparable findings in rats, our observations indicate that frustrative nonreward elicits ACTH-stimulated secretion of cortisol in primates. PMID:11239675

  8. Divergent Simian Arteriviruses Cause Simian Hemorrhagic Fever of Differing Severities in Macaques