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Sample records for adult mammalian cns

  1. BMP3 expression in the adult rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kanna; Mikawa, Sumiko; Sato, Kohji

    2016-07-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein-3 (BMP3) is a very unique member of the TGF-β superfamily, because it functions as an antagonist to both the canonical BMP and activin pathways and plays important roles in multiple biological events. Although BMP3 expression has been described in the early development of the kidney, intestine and bone, little information is available for BMP3 expression in the central nervous system (CNS). We, thus, investigated BMP3 expression in the adult rat CNS using immunohistochemistry. BMP3 was intensely expressed in most neurons and their axons. Furthermore, we found that astrocytes and ependymal cells also express BMP3 protein. These data indicate that BMP3 is widely expressed throughout the adult CNS, and its abundant expression in the adult brain strongly supports the idea that BMP3 plays important roles in the adult brain. PMID:27130896

  2. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. PMID:27382491

  3. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. PMID:27382491

  4. Mammalian CNS barosensitivity: studied by brain-stem auditory-evoked potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruiyong; Xiao, Weibing; Li, Jun; He, Jia; Chen, Haiting

    2012-01-01

    High pressure nervous syndrome (HPNS) is an instinctive response of mammalian high-class nervous functions to increased hydrostatic pressure. Electrophysiological activity of mammalian central nervous system (CNS), including brainstem auditory-evoked potential (BAEP), has characteristic changes under pressure. Here we recorded BAEP of 63 mice exposed to 0-4.0 MPa. The results showed that interpeak latencies between wave I and wave IV (IPL1-4) and their changes under pressures (deltaIPL1-4) responded to increasing pressure in a biphase pattern, shortened under pressure from 0 to 0.7MPa, then prolonged later. There were significantly negative correlations between base IPL1-4s and deltaIPL1-4s (p < 0.01). Individual IPL1-4s were supposed to respond to increasing pressure in a relative steady pattern in accordance with its base IPL1-4s. Those with shorter-base IPL1-4 presented direct increases in IPL1-4. However, those with longer-base IPL1-4 had a decreased IPL1-4 under small to moderate pressure then rebounded later. Our results suggested that mammalian CNS functions were susceptible to small to moderate pressure, as well as a higher pressure than 1.0MPa. Mice, as a statistical mass, had an "optimum" pressure about 0.7MPa, rather than atmospheric pressure, referred as shortest IPL1-4s. An individual's response to high pressure might be relied on his base biological condition. Our results highlighted a new approach to investigate a practical strategy to medical selecting barotolerant candidates for deep divers. Diversity of individual susceptibility to hydrostatic pressure was under discussed. Underlying mechanisms of the "optimum" pressure for CNS function and its significance to neurophysiology remain open to further exploration. PMID:22400446

  5. Noncanonical Sites of Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, David M; Bordey, Angélique; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) populate some regions of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), deep knowledge has been accumulated on their capacity to generate new neurons in the adult brain. This constitutive adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life primarily within remnants of the embryonic germinal layers known as "neurogenic sites." Nevertheless, some processes of neurogliogenesis also occur in the CNS parenchyma commonly considered as "nonneurogenic." This "noncanonical" cell genesis has been the object of many claims, some of which turned out to be not true. Indeed, it is often an "incomplete" process as to its final outcome, heterogeneous by several measures, including regional location, progenitor identity, and fate of the progeny. These aspects also strictly depend on the animal species, suggesting that persistent neurogenic processes have uniquely adapted to the brain anatomy of different mammals. Whereas some examples of noncanonical neurogenesis are strictly parenchymal, others also show stem cell niche-like features and a strong link with the ventricular cavities. This work will review results obtained in a research field that expanded from classic neurogenesis studies involving a variety of areas of the CNS outside of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ). It will be highlighted how knowledge concerning noncanonical neurogenic areas is still incomplete owing to its regional and species-specific heterogeneity, and to objective difficulties still hampering its full identification and characterization. PMID:26384869

  6. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  7. Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Hippocampus: Why the Dentate Gyrus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity…

  8. Enhancing Psychosocial Outcomes for Young Adult Childhood CNS Cancer Survivors: Importance of Addressing Vocational Identity and Community Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauser, David R.; Wagner, Stacia; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between vocational identity, community integration, positive and negative affect, and satisfaction with life in a group of young adult central nervous system (CNS) cancer survivors. Participants in this study included 45 young adult CNS cancer survivors who ranged in age from 18 to 30 years…

  9. Single Cell Electroporation Method for Mammalian CNS Neurons in Organotypic Slice Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Naofumi; Hayano, Yasufumi; Yamada, Akito; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko

    Axon tracing is an essential technique to study the projection pattern of neurons in the CNS. Horse radish peroxidase and lectins have contributed to revealing many neural connection patterns in the CNS (Itaya and van Hoesen, 1982; Fabian and Coulter, 1985; Yoshihara, 2002). Moreover, a tracing method with fluorescent dye has enabled the observation of growing axons in living conditions, and demon strated a lot of developmental aspects in axon growth and guidance (Harris et al., 1987; O'Rourke and Fraser, 1990; Kaethner and Stuermer, 1992; Halloran and Kalil, 1994; Yamamoto et al., 1997). More recently, genetically encoded fluores cent proteins can be used as a powerful tool to observe various biological events. Several gene transfer techniques such as microinjection, biolistic gene gun, viral infection, lipofection and transgenic technology have been developed (Feng et al., 2000; Ehrengruber et al., 2001; O'Brien et al., 2001; Ma et al., 2002; Sahly et al., 2003). In particular, the electroporation technique was proved as a valuable tool, since it can be applied to a wide range of tissues and cell types with little toxicity and can be performed with relative technical easiness. Most methods, including a stand ard electroporation technique, are suitable for gene transfer to a large number of cells. However, this is not ideal for axonal tracing, because observation of individ ual axons is occasionally required. To overcome this problem, we have developed an electroporation method using glass micropipettes containing plasmid solutions and small current injection. Here we introduce the method in detail and exemplified results with some example applications and discuss its usefulness.

  10. Intrinsic electrical properties of mammalian neurons and CNS function: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2014-01-01

    This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons. It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function. The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function. PMID:25408634

  11. Organotypic Cultures as a Model to Study Adult Neurogenesis in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, Fabio; Benito-Muñoz, Monica; Matute, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neural regeneration resides in certain specific regions of adult CNS. Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life, especially from the subgranular zone of hippocampus and the subventricular zone, and can be modulated in physiological and pathological conditions. Numerous techniques and animal models have been developed to demonstrate and observe neural regeneration but, in order to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms and to characterize multiple types of cell populations involved in the activation of neurogenesis and gliogenesis, investigators have to turn to in vitro models. Organotypic cultures best recapitulate the 3D organization of the CNS and can be explored taking advantage of many techniques. Here, we review the use of organotypic cultures as a reliable and well defined method to study the mechanisms of neurogenesis under normal and pathological conditions. As an example, we will focus on the possibilities these cultures offer to study the pathophysiology of diseases like Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral ischemia. PMID:27127518

  12. Organotypic Cultures as a Model to Study Adult Neurogenesis in CNS Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Fabio; Benito-Muñoz, Monica; Matute, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neural regeneration resides in certain specific regions of adult CNS. Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life, especially from the subgranular zone of hippocampus and the subventricular zone, and can be modulated in physiological and pathological conditions. Numerous techniques and animal models have been developed to demonstrate and observe neural regeneration but, in order to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms and to characterize multiple types of cell populations involved in the activation of neurogenesis and gliogenesis, investigators have to turn to in vitro models. Organotypic cultures best recapitulate the 3D organization of the CNS and can be explored taking advantage of many techniques. Here, we review the use of organotypic cultures as a reliable and well defined method to study the mechanisms of neurogenesis under normal and pathological conditions. As an example, we will focus on the possibilities these cultures offer to study the pathophysiology of diseases like Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral ischemia. PMID:27127518

  13. Altered differentiation of CNS neural progenitor cells after transplantation into the injured adult rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Onifer, S M; Cannon, A B; Whittemore, S R

    1997-01-01

    Denervation of CNS neurons and peripheral organs is a consequence of traumatic SCI. Intraspinal transplantation of embryonic CNS neurons is a potential strategy for reinnervating these targets. Neural progenitor cell lines are being investigated as alternates to embryonic CNS neurons. RN33B is an immortalized neural progenitor cell line derived from embryonic rat raphe nuclei following infection with a retrovirus encoding the temperature-sensitive mutant of SV40 large T-antigen. Transplantation studies have shown that local epigenetic signals in intact or partially neuron-depleted adult rat hippocampal formation or striatum direct RN33B cell differentiation to complex multipolar morphologies resembling endogenous neurons. After transplantation into neuron-depleted regions of the hippocampal formation or striatum, RN33B cells were relatively undifferentiated or differentiated with bipolar morphologies. The present study examines RN33B cell differentiation after transplantation into normal spinal cord and under different lesion conditions. Adult rats underwent either unilateral lesion of lumbar spinal neurons by intraspinal injection of kainic acid or complete transection at the T10 spinal segment. Neonatal rats underwent either unilateral lesion of lumbar motoneurons by sciatic nerve crush or complete transection at the T10 segment. At 2 or 6-7 wk postinjury, lacZ-labeled RN33B cells were transplanted into the lumbar enlargement of injured and age-matched normal rats. At 2 wk posttransplantation, bipolar and some multipolar RN33B cells were found throughout normal rat gray matter. In contrast, only bipolar RN33B cells were seen in gray matter of kainic acid lesioned, sciatic nerve crush, or transection rats. These observations suggest that RN33B cell multipolar morphological differentiation in normal adult spinal cord is mediated by direct cell-cell interaction through surface molecules on endogenous neurons and may be suppressed by molecules released after SCI

  14. Region-specific radiotherapy and neuropsychological outcomes in adult survivors of childhood CNS malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Gregory T.; Jain, Neelam; Liu, Wei; Merchant, Thomas E.; Stovall, Marilyn; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Gurney, James G.; Packer, Roger J.; Robison, Leslie L.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors exposed to CNS irradiation are at increased risk for neurocognitive deficits; however, limited data exist linking outcomes with region-specific exposure to CNS irradiation. We report associations between region-specific radiation dose and self-reported neurocognitive and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes in 818 adult survivors of childhood central nervous system (CNS) malignancies from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Survivors were compared with a sibling group and national normative samples to calculate standardized scores. Cumulative radiation dose was calculated for 4 specific brain regions. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between radiation dose to specific brain regions and outcome measures of functional impairment adjusted for clinical and demographic factors, including sex and age at diagnosis. High radiation dose levels to temporal regions were associated with a higher risk for memory impairment (radiation doses ≥30 to <50 Gy: OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.01–3.78; dose ≥50 Gy: OR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.25–4.39) compared with those with no radiation exposure. No such association was seen with radiation exposure to other regions. Exposure to temporal regions was associated with more social and general health problems, whereas exposure to frontal regions was associated with general health problems and physical performance limitations. Adult survivors of childhood CNS malignancies report higher rates of neuropsychological and HRQOL outcomes, which vary as a function of dose to specific neuroanatomical regions. Survivors with a history of radiation exposure to temporal brain regions are at increased risk for impairment in memory and social functioning. PMID:20716593

  15. Promoting axon regeneration in the adult CNS by modulation of the melanopsin/GPCR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songshan; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuejie; Liu, Wen; Wang, Yuqi; Jiang, Songshan; Wong, Yung Hou; Zhang, Yifeng; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Cell-type–specific G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling regulates distinct neuronal responses to various stimuli and is essential for axon guidance and targeting during development. However, its function in axonal regeneration in the mature CNS remains elusive. We found that subtypes of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in mice maintained high mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) levels after axotomy and that the light-sensitive GPCR melanopsin mediated this sustained expression. Melanopsin overexpression in the RGCs stimulated axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush by up-regulating mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). The extent of the regeneration was comparable to that observed after phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) knockdown. Both the axon regeneration and mTOR activity that were enhanced by melanopsin required light stimulation and Gq/11 signaling. Specifically, activating Gq in RGCs elevated mTOR activation and promoted axonal regeneration. Melanopsin overexpression in RGCs enhanced the amplitude and duration of their light response, and silencing them with Kir2.1 significantly suppressed the increased mTOR signaling and axon regeneration that were induced by melanopsin. Thus, our results provide a strategy to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury by modulating neuronal activity through GPCR signaling. PMID:26831088

  16. Towards regenerating the mammalian heart: challenges in evaluating experimentally induced adult mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zebrowski, David C; Becker, Robert; Engel, Felix B

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in research aimed at regenerating the mammalian heart by promoting endogenous cardiomyocyte proliferation. Despite many encouraging successes, it remains unclear if we are any closer to achieving levels of mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation for regeneration as seen during zebrafish regeneration. Furthermore, current cardiac regenerative approaches do not clarify whether the induced cardiomyocyte proliferation is an epiphenomena or responsible for the observed improvement in cardiac function. Moreover, due to the lack of standardized protocols to determine cardiomyocyte proliferation in vivo, it remains unclear if one mammalian regenerative factor is more effective than another. Here, we discuss current methods to identify and evaluate factors for the induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation and challenges therein. Addressing challenges in evaluating adult cardiomyocyte proliferation will assist in determining 1) which regenerative factors should be pursued in large animal studies; 2) if a particular level of cell cycle regulation presents a better therapeutic target than another (e.g., mitogenic receptors vs. cyclins); and 3) which combinatorial approaches offer the greatest likelihood of success. As more and more regenerative studies come to pass, progress will require a system that not only can evaluate efficacy in an objective manner but can also consolidate observations in a meaningful way. PMID:26921436

  17. Adult neurogenesis in the mammalian hippocampus: Why the dentate gyrus?

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity after the perinatal period suggests that unique aspects of the structure and function of DG and olfactory bulb circuits allow them to benefit from the adult generation of neurons. In this review, we consider the distinctive features of the DG that may account for it being able to profit from this singular form of neural plasticity. Approaches to the problem of neurogenesis are grouped as “bottom-up,” where the phenotype of adult-born granule cells is contrasted to that of mature developmentally born granule cells, and “top-down,” where the impact of altering the amount of neurogenesis on behavior is examined. We end by considering the primary implications of these two approaches and future directions. PMID:24255101

  18. Epicardial FSTL1 reconstitution regenerates the adult mammalian heart

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ke; Serpooshan, Vahid; Hurtado, Cecilia; Diez-Cuñado, Marta; Zhao, Mingming; Maruyama, Sonomi; Zhu, Wenhong; Fajardo, Giovanni; Noseda, Michela; Nakamura, Kazuto; Tian, Xueying; Liu, Qiaozhen; Wang, Andrew; Matsuura, Yuka; Bushway, Paul; Cai, Wenqing; Savchenko, Alex; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Schneider, Michael D.; van den Hoff, Maurice J. B.; Butte, Manish J.; Yang, Phillip C.; Walsh, Kenneth; Zhou, Bin; Bernstein, Daniel; Mercola, Mark; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The elucidation of factors that activate the regeneration of the adult mammalian heart is of major scientific and therapeutic importance. Here we found that epicardial cells contain a potent cardiogenic activity identified as follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1). Epicardial Fstl1 declines following myocardial infarction and is replaced by myocardial expression. Myocardial Fstl1 does not promote regeneration, either basally or upon transgenic overexpression. Application of the human Fstl1 protein (FSTL1) via an epicardial patch stimulates cell cycle entry and division of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, improving cardiac function and survival in mouse and swine models of myocardial infarction. The data suggest that the loss of epicardial FSTL1 is a maladaptive response to injury, and that its restoration would be an effective way to reverse myocardial death and remodelling following myocardial infarction in humans. PMID:26375005

  19. Epicardial FSTL1 reconstitution regenerates the adult mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ke; Serpooshan, Vahid; Hurtado, Cecilia; Diez-Cuñado, Marta; Zhao, Mingming; Maruyama, Sonomi; Zhu, Wenhong; Fajardo, Giovanni; Noseda, Michela; Nakamura, Kazuto; Tian, Xueying; Liu, Qiaozhen; Wang, Andrew; Matsuura, Yuka; Bushway, Paul; Cai, Wenqing; Savchenko, Alex; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Schneider, Michael D; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Butte, Manish J; Yang, Phillip C; Walsh, Kenneth; Zhou, Bin; Bernstein, Daniel; Mercola, Mark; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2015-09-24

    The elucidation of factors that activate the regeneration of the adult mammalian heart is of major scientific and therapeutic importance. Here we found that epicardial cells contain a potent cardiogenic activity identified as follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1). Epicardial Fstl1 declines following myocardial infarction and is replaced by myocardial expression. Myocardial Fstl1 does not promote regeneration, either basally or upon transgenic overexpression. Application of the human Fstl1 protein (FSTL1) via an epicardial patch stimulates cell cycle entry and division of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, improving cardiac function and survival in mouse and swine models of myocardial infarction. The data suggest that the loss of epicardial FSTL1 is a maladaptive response to injury, and that its restoration would be an effective way to reverse myocardial death and remodelling following myocardial infarction in humans. PMID:26375005

  20. Antibodies to MOG in adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Woodhall, Mark R.; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kim, Seong-Joon; Park, Kyung Seok; Vincent, Angela; Lee, Kwang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical relevance of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG-Ab) in a cohort of adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease (IDD) of the CNS. Methods: Live cell-based assays for MOG-Ab (IgG1 subset) and antibody to aquaporin-4 (AQP4-Ab) were performed in a cohort of 270 adult patients with IDD and 72 controls. Patients were first grouped by positive antibody result as MOG-Ab or AQP4-Ab, and the remainder were grouped by published diagnostic criteria. Results: Seventeen patients with IDD (6.3%) had MOG-Abs and 49 patients (18.1%) had AQP4-Abs; none had both antibodies. The MOG-Ab patients predominantly manifested with isolated symptoms of optic neuritis (83%). One-third of these patients experienced relapses, which involved only the optic nerve, and all relapsed within 1 year of disease onset. At onset, MRI in the MOG-Ab group uniquely demonstrated perineural enhancement, extending to the soft tissues around the optic nerves (33%). Although about 30% of MOG-Ab patients had brain MRI lesions, they had fewer periventricular lesions than the 26 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS); none of these lesions were ovoid or perpendicular to the ventricle. Moreover, MOG-Ab patients did not meet the diagnostic criteria for definite neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and had less spinal cord involvement than the AQP4-Ab group. Four patients (23.5%) had poor visual outcomes (<0.2) or paraplegia. Conclusions: MOG-Abs may be a disease-specific biomarker in adult patients with IDD who have a disease distinct from NMO or MS. The radiologic as well as clinical manifestations of MOG-Ab patients can be useful in their differential diagnosis. PMID:26516628

  1. Role of ERK1/2 MAPK Signaling in the Maintenance of Myelin and Axonal Integrity in the Adult CNS

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Akihiro; Furusho, Miki; Dupree, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes form myelin during postnatal development and then maintain a functional myelin sheath throughout adult life. While many regulators of developmental myelination have been identified, the signal transduction mechanisms that regulate oligodendrocyte functions in adulthood are not well understood. The extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2), downstream mediators of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), have emerged as prominent regulators of myelin formation. Here, we investigated whether these signaling molecules are also required for myelin maintenance in the adult CNS. Inducible conditional ablation of Erk1/2 in oligodendrocytes of the adult CNS resulted in a downregulation of myelin gene expression. Although myelin thickness was reduced and some axons were demyelinated, the majority of axons were wrapped by intact myelin sheaths that appeared structurally normal. However, late onset of progressive axonal degeneration, accompanied by astrogliosis, microglial activation, partial loss of oligodendrocytes, and functional impairment, occurred in the adult mice lacking ERK1/2 activity. Conditional ablation of Fibroblast Growth Factor receptors-1 and -2 (FGFR1/2) in oligodendrocytes also resulted in downregulation of myelin gene expression and development of axonal degeneration as the mice aged. Further, the level of the key transcription factor myelin gene regulatory factor (Myrf) was downregulated or upregulated in mice with genetic loss or gain of ERK1/2 function, respectively. Together, our studies demonstrate that ERK1/2-MAPK signaling is required for the long-term maintenance of myelin and axonal integrity in the adult CNS and suggest that FGFR1/2 and Myrf may, in part, contribute to signaling upstream and downstream of ERK1/2 in maintaining these oligodendrocyte functions during adulthood. PMID:25429144

  2. Role of ERK1/2 MAPK signaling in the maintenance of myelin and axonal integrity in the adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Akihiro; Furusho, Miki; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Bansal, Rashmi

    2014-11-26

    Oligodendrocytes form myelin during postnatal development and then maintain a functional myelin sheath throughout adult life. While many regulators of developmental myelination have been identified, the signal transduction mechanisms that regulate oligodendrocyte functions in adulthood are not well understood. The extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2), downstream mediators of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), have emerged as prominent regulators of myelin formation. Here, we investigated whether these signaling molecules are also required for myelin maintenance in the adult CNS. Inducible conditional ablation of Erk1/2 in oligodendrocytes of the adult CNS resulted in a downregulation of myelin gene expression. Although myelin thickness was reduced and some axons were demyelinated, the majority of axons were wrapped by intact myelin sheaths that appeared structurally normal. However, late onset of progressive axonal degeneration, accompanied by astrogliosis, microglial activation, partial loss of oligodendrocytes, and functional impairment, occurred in the adult mice lacking ERK1/2 activity. Conditional ablation of Fibroblast Growth Factor receptors-1 and -2 (FGFR1/2) in oligodendrocytes also resulted in downregulation of myelin gene expression and development of axonal degeneration as the mice aged. Further, the level of the key transcription factor myelin gene regulatory factor (Myrf) was downregulated or upregulated in mice with genetic loss or gain of ERK1/2 function, respectively. Together, our studies demonstrate that ERK1/2-MAPK signaling is required for the long-term maintenance of myelin and axonal integrity in the adult CNS and suggest that FGFR1/2 and Myrf may, in part, contribute to signaling upstream and downstream of ERK1/2 in maintaining these oligodendrocyte functions during adulthood. PMID:25429144

  3. Hereditary leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids: a spectrum of phenotypes from CNS vasculitis to parkinsonism in an adult onset leukodystrophy series

    PubMed Central

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Phadke, Rahul; Brandner, Sebastian; Milonas, Ionnis; Dean, Andrew; Bajaj, Nin; McNicholas, Nuala; Costello, Daniel; Cronin, Simon; McGuigan, Chris; Rossor, Martin; Fox, Nick; Murphy, Elaine; Chataway, Jeremy; Houlden, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids (HDLS) is a hereditary, adult onset leukodystrophy which is characterised by the presence of axonal loss, axonal spheroids and variably present pigmented macrophages on pathological examination. It most frequently presents in adulthood with dementia and personality change. HDLS has recently been found to be caused by mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. Methods In this study, we sequenced the CSF1R gene in a cohort of 48 patients from the UK, Greece and Ireland with adult onset leukodystrophy of unknown cause. Results Five pathogenic mutations were found, including three novel mutations. The presentations ranged from suspected central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis to extrapyramidal to cognitive phenotypes. The case histories and imaging are presented here, in addition to neuropathological findings from two cases with novel mutations. Conclusion We estimate that CSF1R mutations account for 10% of idiopathic adult onset leukodystrophies and that genetic testing for CSF1R mutations is essential in adult patients presenting with undefined CNS vasculitis or a leukodystrophy with prominent neuropsychiatric signs or dementia. PMID:25935893

  4. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Cara M; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal(-/-)) at 1 × 10(11) or 3 × 10(11) vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36-76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75-86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 10(11) vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 10(11) vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316-576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250-264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  5. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Weismann, Cara M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M.; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A.; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal−/−) at 1 × 1011 or 3 × 1011 vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36–76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75–86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 1011 vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 1011 vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316–576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250–264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  6. The Social Environment and Neurogenesis in the Adult Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis – the formation of new neurons in adulthood – has been shown to be modulated by a variety of endogenous (e.g., trophic factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones) as well as exogenous (e.g., physical activity and environmental complexity) factors. Research on exogenous regulators of adult neurogenesis has focused primarily on the non-social environment. More recently, however, evidence has emerged suggesting that the social environment can also affect adult neurogenesis. The present review details the effects of adult–adult (e.g., mating and chemosensory interactions) and adult–offspring (e.g., gestation, parenthood, and exposure to offspring) interactions on adult neurogenesis. In addition, the effects of a stressful social environment (e.g., lack of social support and dominant–subordinate interactions) on adult neurogenesis are reviewed. The underlying hormonal mechanisms and potential functional significance of adult-generated neurons in mediating social behaviors are also discussed. PMID:22586385

  7. CNS development: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowakowski, R. S.; Hayes, N. L.

    1999-01-01

    The basic principles of the development of the central nervous system (CNS) are reviewed, and their implications for both normal and abnormal development of the brain are discussed. The goals of this review are (a) to provide a set of concepts to aid in understanding the variety of complex processes that occur during CNS development, (b) to illustrate how these concepts contribute to our knowledge of the normal anatomy of the adult brain, and (c) to provide a basis for understanding how modifications of normal developmental processes by traumatic injury, by environmental or experiential influences, or by genetic variations may lead to modifications in the resultant structure and function of the adult CNS.

  8. Long-term, stable differentiation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursors grafted into the adult mammalian neostriatum.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor; Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Xu, Leyan; Hatfield, Glen; Cummings, Brian J; Eberhart, Charles; Ryugo, David K; Maric, Dragan; Bar, Eli; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2009-10-01

    Stem cell grafts have been advocated as experimental treatments for neurological diseases by virtue of their ability to offer trophic support for injured neurons and, theoretically, to replace dead neurons. Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) are a rich source of neural precursors (NPs) for grafting, but have been questioned for their tendency to form tumors. Here we studied the ability of HESC-derived NP grafts optimized for cell number and differentiation stage prior to transplantation, to survive and stably differentiate and integrate in the basal forebrain (neostriatum) of young adult nude rats over long periods of time (6 months). NPs were derived from adherent monolayer cultures of HESCs exposed to noggin. After transplantation, NPs showed a drastic reduction in mitotic activity and an avid differentiation into neurons that projected via major white matter tracts to a variety of forebrain targets. A third of NP-derived neurons expressed the basal forebrain-neostriatal marker dopamine-regulated and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein. Graft-derived neurons formed mature synapses with host postsynaptic structures, including dendrite shafts and spines. NPs inoculated in white matter tracts showed a tendency toward glial (primarily astrocytic) differentiation, whereas NPs inoculated in the ventricular epithelium persisted as nestin(+) precursors. Our findings demonstrate the long-term ability of noggin-derived human NPs to structurally integrate tumor-free into the mature mammalian forebrain, while maintaining some cell fate plasticity that is strongly influenced by particular central nervous system (CNS) niches. PMID:19609935

  9. Long-Term, Stable Differentiation Of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursors Grafted Into The Adult Mammalian Neostriatum

    PubMed Central

    Nasonkin, I.; Mahairaki, V.; Xu, L.; Hatfield, G.; Cummings, B.J.; Eberhart, C.; Ryugo, D.; Maric, D.; Bar, E.; Koliatsos, V.E.

    2010-01-01

    Stem-cell grafts have been advocated as experimental treatments for neurological diseases by virtue of their ability to offer trophic support for injured neurons and, theoretically, to replace dead neurons. Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) are a rich source of neural precursors (NPs) for grafting, but have been questioned for their tendency to form tumors. Here we studied the ability of HESC-derived NP grafts optimized for cell number and differentiation stage prior to transplantation, to survive and stably differentiate and integrate in the basal forebrain (neostriatum) of young adult nude rats over long periods of time (6 months). NPs were derived from adherent monolayer cultures of HESCs exposed to noggin. After transplantation, NPs showed a drastic reduction in mitotic activity and an avid differentiation into neurons that projected via major white matter tracts to a variety of forebrain targets. A third of NP-derived neurons expressed the basal forebrain-neostriatal marker Dopamine- and cyclic AMP-Regulated Phosphoprotein. Graft-derived neurons formed mature synapses with host post-synaptic structures, including dendrite shafts and spines. NPs inoculated in white matter tracts showed a tendency towards glial (primarily astrocytic) differentiation, whereas NPs inoculated in the ventricular epithelium persisted as nestin (+) precursors. Our findings demonstrate the long-term ability of noggin-derived human NPs to structurally integrate tumor-free into the mature mammalian forebrain, while maintaining some cell fate plasticity that is strongly influenced by particular CNS niches. PMID:19609935

  10. Potential for neural regeneration after neurotoxic injury in the adult mammalian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooto, Sotaro; Akagi, Tadamichi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Akita, Joe; Mandai, Michiko; Honda, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Masayo

    2004-09-01

    It has long been believed that the retina of mature mammals is incapable of regeneration. In this study, using the N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotoxicity model of adult rat retina, we observed that some Müller glial cells were stimulated to proliferate in response to a toxic injury and produce bipolar cells and rod photoreceptors. Although these newly produced neurons were limited in number, retinoic acid treatment promoted the number of regenerated bipolar cells. Moreover, misexpression of basic helix-loop-helix and homeobox genes promoted the induction of amacrine, horizontal, and rod photoreceptor specific phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that retinal neurons regenerated even in adult mammalian retina after toxic injury. Furthermore, we could partially control the fate of the regenerated neurons with extrinsic factors or intrinsic genes. The Müller glial cells constitute a potential source for the regeneration of adult mammalian retina and can be a target for drug delivery and gene therapy in retinal degenerative diseases.

  11. Evidence for an Age-Dependent Decline in Axon Regeneration in the Adult Mammalian Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Cédric G; Hilton, Brett J; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Zheng, Binhai

    2016-04-12

    How aging impacts axon regeneration after CNS injury is not known. We assessed the impact of age on axon regeneration induced by Pten deletion in corticospinal and rubrospinal neurons, two neuronal populations with distinct innate regenerative abilities. As in young mice, Pten deletion in older mice remains effective in preventing axotomy-induced decline in neuron-intrinsic growth state, as assessed by mTOR activity, neuronal soma size, and axonal growth proximal to a spinal cord injury. However, axonal regeneration distal to injury is greatly diminished, accompanied by increased expression of astroglial and inflammatory markers at the injury site. Thus, the mammalian CNS undergoes an age-dependent decline in axon regeneration, as revealed when neuron-intrinsic growth state is elevated. These results have important implications for developing strategies to promote axonal repair after CNS injuries or diseases, which increasingly affect middle-aged to aging populations. PMID:27050519

  12. Genetic Pharmacotherapy as an Early CNS Drug Development Strategy: Testing Glutaminase Inhibition for Schizophrenia Treatment in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mingote, Susana; Masson, Justine; Gellman, Celia; Thomsen, Gretchen M.; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Merker, Robert J.; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna; Wang, Yvonne; Ernst, Rachel; Hen, René; Rayport, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genetic pharmacotherapy is an early drug development strategy for the identification of novel CNS targets in mouse models prior to the development of specific ligands. Here for the first time, we have implemented this strategy to address the potential therapeutic value of a glutamate-based pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia involving inhibition of the glutamate recycling enzyme phosphate-activated glutaminase. Mice constitutively heterozygous for GLS1, the gene encoding glutaminase, manifest a schizophrenia resilience phenotype, a key dimension of which is an attenuated locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. If resilience is due to glutaminase deficiency in adulthood, then glutaminase inhibitors should have therapeutic potential. However, this has been difficult to test given the dearth of neuroactive glutaminase inhibitors. So, we used genetic pharmacotherapy to ask whether adult induction of GLS1 heterozygosity would attenuate amphetamine responsiveness. We generated conditional floxGLS1 mice and crossed them with global CAGERT2cre∕+ mice to produce GLS1 iHET mice, susceptible to tamoxifen induction of GLS1 heterozygosity. One month after tamoxifen treatment of adult GLS1 iHET mice, we found a 50% reduction in GLS1 allelic abundance and glutaminase mRNA levels in the brain. While GLS1 iHET mice showed some recombination prior to tamoxifen, there was no impact on mRNA levels. We then asked whether induction of GLS heterozygosity would attenuate the locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. Before tamoxifen, control and GLS1 iHET mice did not differ in their response to amphetamine. One month after tamoxifen treatment, amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion was blocked in GLS1 iHET mice. The block was largely maintained after 5 months. Thus, a genetically induced glutaminase reduction—mimicking pharmacological inhibition—strongly attenuated the response to a propsychotic challenge, suggesting that glutaminase may be a novel

  13. In Vivo Reprogramming for CNS Repair: Regenerating Neurons from Endogenous Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hedong; Chen, Gong

    2016-08-17

    Neuroregeneration in the CNS has proven to be difficult despite decades of research. The old dogma that CNS neurons cannot be regenerated in the adult mammalian brain has been overturned; however, endogenous adult neurogenesis appears to be insufficient for brain repair. Stem cell therapy once held promise for generating large quantities of neurons in the CNS, but immunorejection and long-term functional integration remain major hurdles. In this Perspective, we discuss the use of in vivo reprogramming as an emerging technology to regenerate functional neurons from endogenous glial cells inside the brain and spinal cord. Besides the CNS, in vivo reprogramming has been demonstrated successfully in the pancreas, heart, and liver and may be adopted in other organs. Although challenges remain for translating this technology into clinical therapies, we anticipate that in vivo reprogramming may revolutionize regenerative medicine by using a patient's own internal cells for tissue repair. PMID:27537482

  14. Adult DRG Stem/Progenitor Cells Generate Pericytes in the Presence of Central Nervous System (CNS) Developmental Cues, and Schwann Cells in Response to CNS Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marie; Maniglier, Madlyne; Deboux, Cyrille; Bachelin, Corinne; Zujovic, Violetta; Baron-Van Evercooren, Anne

    2015-06-01

    It has been proposed that the adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) harbor neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the neural crest. However, the thorough characterization of their stemness and differentiation plasticity was not addressed. In this study, we investigated adult DRG-NPC stem cell properties overtime, and their fate when ectopically grafted in the central nervous system. We compared them in vitro and in vivo to the well-characterized adult spinal cord-NPCs derived from the same donors. Using micro-dissection and neurosphere cultures, we demonstrate that adult DRG-NPCs have quasi unlimited self-expansion capacities without compromising their tissue specific molecular signature. Moreover, they differentiate into multiple peripheral lineages in vitro. After transplantation, adult DRG-NPCs generate pericytes in the developing forebrain but remyelinating Schwann cells in response to spinal cord demyelination. In addition, we show that axonal and endothelial/astrocytic factors as well astrocytes regulate the fate of adult DRG-NPCs in culture. Although the adult DRG-NPC multipotency is restricted to the neural crest lineage, their dual responsiveness to developmental and lesion cues highlights their impressive adaptive and repair potentials making them valuable targets for regenerative medicine. PMID:25786382

  15. Insights into the physiological role of CNS regeneration inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Katherine T.; Giger, Roman J.

    2015-01-01

    The growth inhibitory nature of injured adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) tissue constitutes a major barrier to robust axonal outgrowth and functional recovery following trauma or disease. Prototypic CNS regeneration inhibitors are broadly expressed in the healthy and injured brain and spinal cord and include myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), the reticulon family member NogoA, oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). These structurally diverse molecules strongly inhibit neurite outgrowth in vitro, and have been most extensively studied in the context of nervous system injury in vivo. The physiological role of CNS regeneration inhibitors in the naïve, or uninjured, CNS remains less well understood, but has received growing attention in recent years and is the focus of this review. CNS regeneration inhibitors regulate myelin development and axon stability, consolidate neuronal structure shaped by experience, and limit activity-dependent modification of synaptic strength. Altered function of CNS regeneration inhibitors is associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, suggesting crucial roles in brain development and health. PMID:26113809

  16. Proliferating subventricular zone cells in the adult mammalian forebrain can differentiate into neurons and glia.

    PubMed Central

    Lois, C; Alvarez-Buylla, A

    1993-01-01

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) cells proliferate spontaneously in vivo in the telencephalon of adult mammals. Several studies suggest that SVZ cells do not differentiate after mitosis into neurons or glia but die. In the present work, we show that SVZ cells labeled in the brains of adult mice with [3H]thymidine differentiate directly into neurons and glia in explant cultures. In vitro labeling with [3H]thymidine shows that 98% of the neurons that differentiate from the SVZ explants are derived from precursor cells that underwent their last division in vivo. This report identifies the SVZ cells as neuronal precursors in an adult mammalian brain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8446631

  17. Activation of adult rat CNS endothelial cells by opioid-induced toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling induces proinflammatory, biochemical, morphological, and behavioral sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Peter M.; Ramos, Khara M.; Rodgers, Krista M.; Wang, Xiaohui; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Lewis, Makenzie T.; Morgan, Kelly N.; Kroll, Juliet L.; Taylor, Frederick R.; Strand, Keith A.; Zhang, Yingning; Berkelhammer, Debra; Huey, Madeline G.; Greene, Lisa I.; Cochran, Thomas A.; Yin, Hang; Barth, Daniel S.; Johnson, Kirk W.; Rice, Kenner; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    CNS immune signaling contributes to deleterious opioid effects including hyperalgesia, tolerance, reward, and dependence/withdrawal. Such effects are mediated by opioid signaling at TLR4, presumptively of glial origin. Whether CNS endothelial cells express TLR4 is controversial. If so, they would be well positioned for activation by blood-borne opioids, contributing to opioid-induced pro-inflammatory responses. These studies examined adult primary rat CNS endothelial cell responses to (-)-morphine or its mu-opioid receptor (MOR) inactive metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), both known TLR4 agonists. We demonstrate that adult rat CNS endothelial cells express functional TLR4. M3G activated NFκB, increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) mRNAs, and released prostaglandin E2 from these cells. (-)-Morphine-induced upregulation of TNFα mRNA and prostaglandin E2 release were unmasked by pre-treatment with nalmefene, a MOR antagonist without TLR4 activity (unlike CTAP, shown to have both MOR- and TLR4-activity), suggestive of an interplay between MOR and TLR4 co-activation by (-)-morphine. In support, MOR-dependent Protein Kinase A (PKA) opposed TLR4 signaling, as PKA inhibition (H-89) also unmasked (-)-morphine-induced TNFα and COX2 mRNA upregulation. Intrathecal injection of CNS endothelial cells, stimulated in vitro with M3G, produced TLR4-dependent tactile allodynia. Further, cortical suffusion with M3G in vivo induced TLR4-dependent vasodilation. Finally, endothelial cell TLR4 activation by lipopolysaccharide and/or M3G was blocked by the glial inhibitors AV1013 and propentofylline, demonstrating endothelial cells as a new target of such drugs. These data indicate that (-)-morphine and M3G can activate CNS endothelial cells via TLR4, inducing proinflammatory, biochemical, morphological, and behavioral sequalae. CNS endothelial cells may have previously unanticipated roles in opioid-induced effects, in phenomena blocked by

  18. Control of adult neurogenesis by programmed cell death in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Hong, Caroline Jeeyeon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Sun, Woong; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-01-01

    The presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) and the production of new neurons in the adult brain have received great attention from scientists and the public because of implications to brain plasticity and their potential use for treating currently incurable brain diseases. Adult neurogenesis is controlled at multiple levels, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and programmed cell death (PCD). Among these, PCD is the last and most prominent process for regulating the final number of mature neurons integrated into neural circuits. PCD can be classified into apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death and emerging evidence suggests that all three may be important modes of cell death in neural stem/progenitor cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate PCD and thereby impact the intricate balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during adult neurogenesis are not well understood. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the extent, mechanism, and biological significance of PCD for the control of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the regulation of PCD at the molecular and systems levels is also discussed. Adult neurogenesis is a dynamic process, and the signals for differentiation, proliferation, and death of neural progenitor/stem cells are closely interrelated. A better understanding of how adult neurogenesis is influenced by PCD will help lead to important insights relevant to brain health and diseases. PMID:27098178

  19. Regulation of neonatal and adult mammalian heart regeneration by the miR-15 family

    PubMed Central

    Porrello, Enzo R.; Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; Simpson, Emma; Johnson, Brett A.; Grinsfelder, David; Canseco, Diana; Mammen, Pradeep P.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Olson, Eric N.; Sadek, Hesham A.

    2013-01-01

    We recently identified a brief time period during postnatal development when the mammalian heart retains significant regenerative potential after amputation of the ventricular apex. However, one major unresolved question is whether the neonatal mouse heart can also regenerate in response to myocardial ischemia, the most common antecedent of heart failure in humans. Here, we induced ischemic myocardial infarction (MI) in 1-d-old mice and found that this results in extensive myocardial necrosis and systolic dysfunction. Remarkably, the neonatal heart mounted a robust regenerative response, through proliferation of preexisting cardiomyocytes, resulting in full functional recovery within 21 d. Moreover, we show that the miR-15 family of microRNAs modulates neonatal heart regeneration through inhibition of postnatal cardiomyocyte proliferation. Finally, we demonstrate that inhibition of the miR-15 family from an early postnatal age until adulthood increases myocyte proliferation in the adult heart and improves left ventricular systolic function after adult MI. We conclude that the neonatal mammalian heart can regenerate after myocardial infarction through proliferation of preexisting cardiomyocytes and that the miR-15 family contributes to postnatal loss of cardiac regenerative capacity. PMID:23248315

  20. Altered self-perception in adult survivors treated for a CNS tumor in childhood or adolescence: population-based outcomes compared with the general population

    PubMed Central

    Hörnquist, Lina; Rickardsson, Jenny; Lannering, Birgitta; Gustafsson, Göran; Boman, Krister K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk for persistent tumor/treatment-related morbidity, physical disability and social consequences that may alter self-perception, vital for self-identity, mental health and quality of survival. We studied the long-term impact of childhood CNS tumors and their treatment on the self-perception of adult survivors and compared outcomes with those of the general population. Methods The cohort included 697 Swedish survivors diagnosed with a primary CNS tumor during 1982–2001. Comparison data were randomly collected from a stratified general population sample. Survivors and general population individuals were compared as regards self-perception in 5 domains: body image, sports/physical activities, peers, work, and family, and with a global self-esteem index. Within the survivor group, determinants of impact on self-perception were identified. Results The final analyzed sample included 528 survivors, 75.8% of the entire national cohort. The control sample consisted of 995, 41% of 2500 addressed. Survivors had significantly poorer self-perception outcomes in domains of peers, work, body image, and sports/physical activities, and in the global self-perception measure, compared with those of the general population (all P < .001). Within the survivor group, female gender and persistent visible physical sequelae predicted poorer outcomes in several of the studied domains. Tumor type and a history of cranial radiation therapy were associated with outcomes. Conclusion An altered self-perception is a potential late effect in adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumors. Self-perception and self-esteem are significant elements of identity, mental health and quality of survival. Therefore, care and psychosocial follow-up of survivors should include measures for identifying disturbances and for assessing the need for psychosocial intervention. PMID:25332406

  1. The neonate versus adult mammalian immune system in cardiac repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Susanne; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    The immune system is a crucial player in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. A sophisticated cascade of events triggered upon injury ensures protection from infection and initiates and orchestrates healing. While the neonatal mammal can readily regenerate damaged tissues, adult regenerative capacity is limited to specific tissue types, and in organs such as the heart, adult wound healing results in fibrotic repair and loss of function. Growing evidence suggests that the immune system greatly influences the balance between regeneration and fibrotic repair. The neonate mammalian immune system has impaired pro-inflammatory function, is prone to T-helper type 2 responses and has an immature adaptive immune system skewed towards regulatory T cells. While these characteristics make infants susceptible to infection and prone to allergies, it may also provide an immunological environment permissive of regeneration. In this review we will give a comprehensive overview of the immune cells involved in healing and regeneration of the heart and explore differences between the adult and neonate immune system that may explain differences in regenerative ability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26801961

  2. [Proliferation of adult mammalian ventricular cardiomyocytes: a sporadic but feasible phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Vargas-González, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of adult mammalian ventricular cardiomyocytes has been ruled out by some researchers, who have argued that these cells are terminally differentiated; however, this dogma has been rejected because other researchers have reported that these cells can present the processes necessary to proliferate, that is, DNA synthesis, mitosis and cytokinesis when the heart is damaged experimentally through pharmacological and surgical strategies or due to pathological conditions concerning the cardiovascular system. This review integrates some of the available works in the literature evaluating the DNA synthesis, mitosis and cytokinesis in these myocytes, when the myocardium is damaged, with the purpose of knowing if their proliferation can be considered as a feasible phenomenon. The review is concluded with a reflection about the perspectives of the knowledge generated in this area. PMID:24792902

  3. Chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans for CNS homeostasis-implications for material design.

    PubMed

    Karumbaiah, Lohitash; Saxena, Tarun; Betancur, Martha; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2014-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are complex biomolecules that are known to facilitate patterning of axonal direction and cell migration during the early growth and development phase of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). In adults, they continue to control neuronal plasticity as major constituents of the "peri-neuronal nets" (PNNs) that surround adult CNS neurons. CSPGs are also barrier-forming molecules that are selectively upregulated by invading reactive astroglia after injury to the CNS, and are responsible for the active repulsion of regenerating neurons post-injury. Recent evidence however suggests that the diverse sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains attached to CSPGs are key components that play paradoxical roles in influencing nerve regeneration post-injury to the CNS. Sulfated GAG repeats attached to the CSPG core protein help mediate cell migration, neuritogenesis, axonal pathfinding, and axonal repulsion by directly trapping and presenting a whole host of growth factors to cells locally, or by binding to specific membrane bound proteins on the cell surface to influence cellular function. In this review, we will present the current gamut of interventional strategies used to bridge CNS deficits, and discuss the potential advantages of using sulfated GAG based biomaterials to facilitate the repair and regeneration of the injured CNS. PMID:25139544

  4. A Novel Biopsy Method for Isolating Neural Stem Cells from the Subventricular Zone of the Adult Rat Brain for Autologous Transplantation in CNS Injuries.

    PubMed

    Aligholi, Hadi; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Gorji, Ali; Azari, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Despite all attempts the problem of regeneration in damaged central nervous system (CNS) has remained challenging due to its cellular complexity and highly organized and sophisticated connections. In this regard, stem cell therapy might serve as a viable therapeutic approach aiming either to support the damaged tissue and hence to reduce the subsequent neurological dysfunctions and impairments or to replace the lost cells and re-establish damaged circuitries. Adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) are one of the outstanding cell sources that can be isolated from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles. These cells can differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Implanting autologous NS/PCs will greatly benefit the patients by avoiding immune rejection after implantation, better survival, and integration with the host tissue. Developing safe and efficient methods in small animal models will provide us with the opportunity to optimize procedures required to achieve successful human autologous NS/PC transplantation in near future. In this chapter, a highly controlled and safe biopsy method for harvesting stem cell containing tissue from the SVZ of adult rat brain is introduced. Then, isolation and expansion of NS/PCs from harvested specimen as well as the techniques to verify proliferation and differentiation capacity of the resulting NS/PCs are discussed. Finally, a method for assessing the biopsy lesion volume in the brain is described. This safe biopsy method in rat provides a unique tool to study autologous NS/PC transplantation in different CNS injury models. PMID:27604747

  5. Sensory Response of Transplanted Astrocytes in Adult Mammalian Cortex In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuan; Chen, Chunhai; Yang, Zhiqi; He, Wenjing; Liao, Xiang; Ma, Qinlong; Deng, Ping; Lu, Jian; Li, Jingcheng; Wang, Meng; Li, Mingli; Zheng, Lianghong; Zhou, Zhuan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Liting; Jia, Hongbo; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Chen, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    Glial precursor transplantation provides a potential therapy for brain disorders. Before its clinical application, experimental evidence needs to indicate that engrafted glial cells are functionally incorporated into the existing circuits and become essential partners of neurons for executing fundamental brain functions. While previous experiments supporting for their functional integration have been obtained under in vitro conditions using slice preparations, in vivo evidence for such integration is still lacking. Here, we utilized in vivo two-photon Ca(2+) imaging along with immunohistochemistry, fluorescent indicator labeling-based axon tracing and correlated light/electron microscopy to analyze the profiles and the functional status of glial precursor cell-derived astrocytes in adult mouse neocortex. We show that after being transplanted into somatosensory cortex, precursor-derived astrocytes are able to survive for more than a year and respond with Ca(2+) signals to sensory stimulation. These sensory-evoked responses are mediated by functionally-expressed nicotinic receptors and newly-established synaptic contacts with the host cholinergic afferents. Our results provide in vivo evidence for a functional integration of transplanted astrocytes into adult mammalian neocortex, representing a proof-of-principle for sensory cortex remodeling through addition of essential neural elements. Moreover, we provide strong support for the use of glial precursor transplantation to understand glia-related neural development in vivo. PMID:27405333

  6. Sensory Response of Transplanted Astrocytes in Adult Mammalian Cortex In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuan; Chen, Chunhai; Yang, Zhiqi; He, Wenjing; Liao, Xiang; Ma, Qinlong; Deng, Ping; Lu, Jian; Li, Jingcheng; Wang, Meng; Li, Mingli; Zheng, Lianghong; Zhou, Zhuan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Liting; Jia, Hongbo; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Chen, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Glial precursor transplantation provides a potential therapy for brain disorders. Before its clinical application, experimental evidence needs to indicate that engrafted glial cells are functionally incorporated into the existing circuits and become essential partners of neurons for executing fundamental brain functions. While previous experiments supporting for their functional integration have been obtained under in vitro conditions using slice preparations, in vivo evidence for such integration is still lacking. Here, we utilized in vivo two-photon Ca2+ imaging along with immunohistochemistry, fluorescent indicator labeling-based axon tracing and correlated light/electron microscopy to analyze the profiles and the functional status of glial precursor cell-derived astrocytes in adult mouse neocortex. We show that after being transplanted into somatosensory cortex, precursor-derived astrocytes are able to survive for more than a year and respond with Ca2+ signals to sensory stimulation. These sensory-evoked responses are mediated by functionally-expressed nicotinic receptors and newly-established synaptic contacts with the host cholinergic afferents. Our results provide in vivo evidence for a functional integration of transplanted astrocytes into adult mammalian neocortex, representing a proof-of-principle for sensory cortex remodeling through addition of essential neural elements. Moreover, we provide strong support for the use of glial precursor transplantation to understand glia-related neural development in vivo. PMID:27405333

  7. Anaerobic function of CNS white matter declines with age.

    PubMed

    Hamner, Margaret A; Möller, Thomas; Ransom, Bruce R

    2011-04-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is generally believed to be completely dependent on the presence of oxygen (O(2)) to maintain energy levels necessary for excitability. However, previous studies on CNS white matter (WM) have shown that a large subset of CNS-myelinated axons of mice aged 4 to 6 weeks remains excitable in the absence of O(2). We investigated whether this surprising WM tolerance to anoxia varied with age. Acutely isolated mouse optic nerve (MON), a purely myelinated WM tract, was studied electrophysiologically. Excitability in the MONs from 1-month-, 4-month-, and 8-month-old mice was assessed quantitatively as the area under the supramaximal compound action potential (CAP). Anoxia-resistant WM function declined with age. After 60  minutes of anoxia, ∼23% of the CAP remained in 1-month-old mice, 8% in 4-month-old mice, and ∼0 in the 8-month-old group. Our results indicated that although some CNS axons function anaerobically in young adult animals, they lose this ability in later adulthood. This finding may help explain the clinical impression that favorable outcome after stroke and other brain injuries declines with age. PMID:21179073

  8. AAV9 supports wide-scale transduction of the CNS and TDP-43 disease modeling in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dayton, Robert D; Klein, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    AAV9 has emerged as an efficient adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype for gene transfer to the central nervous system. We have used this technique to study aspects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by administering AAV encoding the ALS-related gene transactive response DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) to neonatal rats. However, inducing the expression in adult subjects would be preferable to mimic the adult onset of symptoms in ALS. We expressed either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or TDP-43 in adult rats after an intravenous (i.v.) route of administration to attempt wide-scale transduction of the spinal cord for disease modeling. In order to optimize the gene transfer, we made comparisons of efficiency by age, gender, and across several AAV serotypes (AAV1, AAV8, AAV9, and AAV10). The data indicate more efficient neuronal transduction in neonates, with little evidence of glial transduction at either age, no gender-related differences in transduction, and that AAV9 was efficient in adults relative to the other serotypes tested. Based on these data, AAV9 TDP-43 was expressed at three vector doses in adult female rats yielding highly consistent, dose-dependent motor deficits. AAV9 can be delivered i.v. to adult rats to achieve consistent pathophysiological changes and a relevant adult-onset system for disease modeling. PMID:26445725

  9. Regeneration strategies after the adult mammalian central nervous system injury—biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yudan; Yang, Zhaoyang; Li, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has very restricted intrinsic regeneration ability under the injury or disease condition. Innovative repair strategies, therefore, are urgently needed to facilitate tissue regeneration and functional recovery. The published tissue repair/regeneration strategies, such as cell and/or drug delivery, has been demonstrated to have some therapeutic effects on experimental animal models, but can hardly find clinical applications due to such methods as the extremely low survival rate of transplanted cells, difficulty in integrating with the host or restriction of blood–brain barriers to administration patterns. Using biomaterials can not only increase the survival rate of grafts and their integration with the host in the injured CNS area, but also sustainably deliver bioproducts to the local injured area, thus improving the microenvironment in that area. This review mainly introduces the advances of various strategies concerning facilitating CNS regeneration. PMID:27047678

  10. Seasonal regulation of structural plasticity and neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain: focus on the sheep hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Migaud, Martine; Butrille, Lucile; Batailler, Martine

    2015-04-01

    To cope with variations in the environment, most mammalian species exhibit seasonal cycles in physiology and behaviour. Seasonal plasticity during the lifetime contributes to seasonal physiology. Over the years, our ideas regarding adult brain plasticity and, more specifically, hypothalamic plasticity have greatly evolved. Along with the two main neurogenic regions, namely the hippocampal subgranular and lateral ventricle subventricular zones, the hypothalamus, which is the central homeostatic regulator of numerous physiological functions that comprise sexual behaviours, feeding and metabolism, also hosts neurogenic niches. Both endogenous and exogenous factors, including the photoperiod, modulate the hypothalamic neurogenic capacities. The present review describes the effects of season on adult morphological plasticity and neurogenesis in seasonal species, for which the photoperiod is a master environmental cue for the successful programming of seasonal functions. In addition, the potential functional significance of adult neurogenesis in the mediation of the seasonal control of reproduction and feeding is discussed. PMID:25462590

  11. Adult stem cells and mammalian epimorphic regeneration-insights from studying annual renewal of deer antlers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyi; Yang, Fuhe; Sheppard, Allan

    2009-09-01

    Mammalian organ regeneration is the "Holy Grail" of modern regenerative biology and medicine. The most dramatic organ replacement is known as epimorphic regeneration. To date our knowledge of epimorphic regeneration has come from studies of amphibians. Notably, these animals have the ability to reprogram phenotypically committed cells at the amputation plane toward an embryonic-like cell phenotype (dedifferentiation). The capability of mammals to initiate analogous regeneration, and whether similar mechanisms would be involved if it were to occur, remain unclear. Deer antlers are the only mammalian appendages capable of full renewal, and therefore offer a unique opportunity to explore how nature has solved the problem of mammalian epimorphic regeneration. Following casting of old hard antlers, new antlers regenerate from permanent bony protuberances, known as pedicles. Studies through morphological and histological examinations, tissue deletion and transplantation, and cellular and molecular techniques have demonstrated that antler renewal is markedly different from that of amphibian limb regeneration (dedifferentiation-based), being a stem cell-based epimorphic process. Antler stem cells reside in the pedicle periosteum. We envisage that epimorphic regeneration of mammalian appendages, other than antler, could be made possible by recreating comparable milieu to that which supports the elaboration of that structure from the pedicle periosteum. PMID:19492976

  12. Mammalian Fetal Cardiac Regeneration Following Myocardial Infarction is Associated with Differential Gene Expression Compared to the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Zgheib, Carlos; Allukian, Myron W.; Xu, Junwang; Morris, Michael W.; Caskey, Robert C.; Herdrich, Benjamin J.; Hu, Junyi; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Liechty, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Background In adults, MI results in a brisk inflammatory response, myocardium loss and scar formation. We have recently reported the first mammalian large animal model of cardiac regeneration following MI in fetal sheep. We hypothesize that the fetus ability to regenerate functional myocardium following MI is due to differential gene expression regulating the response to MI in the fetus compared to the adult. Methods MI was created in adult (n=4) or early gestation fetal (n=4) sheep. Tissue harvested after 3 or 30 days, RNA extracted for microarray, followed by PCA and global gene expression analysis for the gene ontology (GO) terms: “response to wounding”, “inflammatory response”, “extracellular matrix”, “cell cycle”, “cell migration”, “cell proliferation” and “apoptosis”. Results PCA demonstrated that the global gene expression pattern in adult infarcts was distinctly different from uninfarcted region at 3 days and remained different 30 days post-MI. In contrast, gene expression in the fetal infarct was different from the uninfarcted region at 3 days, but by 30 days it returned to a baseline expression pattern similar to the uninfarcted region. 3 days post-MI there was an increase in the expression of genes related to all GO terms in fetal and adult infarcts, but this increase was much more pronounced in adults. By 30 days, the fetal gene expression returned to baseline, whereas in the adult remained significantly elevated. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the global gene expression pattern is dramatically different in the fetal regenerative response to MI compared to the adult response and may partly be responsible for the regeneration. PMID:24792251

  13. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Its Role in Early Neural Development and in Adult and Aged Brain Function.

    PubMed

    Garza-Lombó, Carla; Gonsebatt, María E

    2016-01-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates signals triggered by energy, stress, oxygen levels, and growth factors. It regulates ribosome biogenesis, mRNA translation, nutrient metabolism, and autophagy. mTOR participates in various functions of the brain, such as synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, memory, and learning. mTOR is present during early neural development and participates in axon and dendrite development, neuron differentiation, and gliogenesis, among other processes. Furthermore, mTOR has been shown to modulate lifespan in multiple organisms. This protein is an important energy sensor that is present throughout our lifetime its role must be precisely described in order to develop therapeutic strategies and prevent diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to present our current understanding of the functions of mTOR in neural development, the adult brain and aging. PMID:27378854

  14. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Its Role in Early Neural Development and in Adult and Aged Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Lombó, Carla; Gonsebatt, María E.

    2016-01-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates signals triggered by energy, stress, oxygen levels, and growth factors. It regulates ribosome biogenesis, mRNA translation, nutrient metabolism, and autophagy. mTOR participates in various functions of the brain, such as synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, memory, and learning. mTOR is present during early neural development and participates in axon and dendrite development, neuron differentiation, and gliogenesis, among other processes. Furthermore, mTOR has been shown to modulate lifespan in multiple organisms. This protein is an important energy sensor that is present throughout our lifetime its role must be precisely described in order to develop therapeutic strategies and prevent diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to present our current understanding of the functions of mTOR in neural development, the adult brain and aging. PMID:27378854

  15. Effects of low-energy He-Ne laser irradiation on posttraumatic degeneration of adult rabbit optic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.; Doron, A.; Erlich, M.; Lavie, V.; Benbasat, S.; Belkin, M.; Rochkind, S.

    1987-01-01

    Axons of the mammalian peripheral and central nervous systems degenerate after nerve injury. We have recently found that He-Ne laser irradiation may prevent some of the consequences of the injury in peripheral nerves of mammals. In the present study, the efficacy of the laser in treating injured neurons of the mammalian CNS was tested. Optic nerves of adult rabbits were exposed daily for 8-14 days to He-Ne laser irradiation (14 min, 15 mW) through the overlying muscles and skin. As a result of this treatment, the injured nerves maintained their histological integrity, which is invariably lost in injured mammalian CNS neurons.

  16. Dynamics and mechanisms of CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Bercury, Kathryn K; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-02-23

    Vertebrate myelination is an evolutionary advancement essential for motor, sensory, and higher-order cognitive function. CNS myelin, a multilamellar differentiation of the oligodendrocyte plasma membrane, ensheaths axons to facilitate electrical conduction. Myelination is one of the most pivotal cell-cell interactions for normal brain development, involving extensive information exchange between differentiating oligodendrocytes and axons. The molecular mechanisms of myelination are discussed, along with new perspectives on oligodendrocyte plasticity and myelin remodeling of the developing and adult CNS. PMID:25710531

  17. TOPP in the CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, R. L.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Jahreiss, H.; Bucciarelli, B.; Massone, G.

    2006-08-01

    Introduction: We present the Torino Observatory Parallax Program (TOPP) results for 22 candidates for the Catalog of Nearby Stars (CNS). Methods: Observations were made with the Torino OTAP 1.05m telescope over the period 1996-2001. Results: For the 22 objects examined 12 are within the CNS limit. Discussion: We discuss at length the objects out side the CNS limits which are either misclassified or objects with incorrect trigonometric parallaxes.

  18. Robust Axonal Regeneration Occurs in the Injured CAST/Ei Mouse CNS.

    PubMed

    Omura, Takao; Omura, Kumiko; Tedeschi, Andrea; Riva, Priscilla; Painter, Michio W; Rojas, Leticia; Martin, Joshua; Lisi, Véronique; Huebner, Eric A; Latremoliere, Alban; Yin, Yuqin; Barrett, Lee B; Singh, Bhagat; Lee, Stella; Crisman, Tom; Gao, Fuying; Li, Songlin; Kapur, Kush; Geschwind, Daniel H; Kosik, Kenneth S; Coppola, Giovanni; He, Zhigang; Carmichael, S Thomas; Benowitz, Larry I; Costigan, Michael; Woolf, Clifford J

    2015-06-01

    Axon regeneration in the CNS requires reactivating injured neurons' intrinsic growth state and enabling growth in an inhibitory environment. Using an inbred mouse neuronal phenotypic screen, we find that CAST/Ei mouse adult dorsal root ganglion neurons extend axons more on CNS myelin than the other eight strains tested, especially when pre-injured. Injury-primed CAST/Ei neurons also regenerate markedly in the spinal cord and optic nerve more than those from C57BL/6 mice and show greater sprouting following ischemic stroke. Heritability estimates indicate that extended growth in CAST/Ei neurons on myelin is genetically determined, and two whole-genome expression screens yield the Activin transcript Inhba as most correlated with this ability. Inhibition of Activin signaling in CAST/Ei mice diminishes their CNS regenerative capacity, whereas its activation in C57BL/6 animals boosts regeneration. This screen demonstrates that mammalian CNS regeneration can occur and reveals a molecular pathway that contributes to this ability. PMID:26004914

  19. Mutations in mammalian tolloid-like 1 gene detected in adult patients with ASD

    PubMed Central

    Stańczak, Paweł; Witecka, Joanna; Szydło, Anna; Gutmajster, Ewa; Lisik, Małgorzata; Auguściak-Duma, Aleksandra; Tarnowski, Maciej; Czekaj, Tomasz; Czekaj, Hanna; Sieroń, Aleksander L

    2009-01-01

    Atrial septal defect (ASD) is an incomplete septation of atria in human heart causing circulatory problems. Its frequency is estimated at one per 10 000. Actions of numerous genes have been linked to heart development. However, no single gene defect causing ASD has yet been identified. Incomplete heart septation similar to ASD was reported in transgenic mice with both inactive alleles of gene encoding mammalian zinc metalloprotease a mammalian tolloid-like 1 (tll1). Here, we have screened 19 ASD patients and 15 healthy age-matched individuals for mutations in TLL1 gene. All 22 exons were analyzed exon by exon for heteroduplex formation. Subsequently, DNA fragments forming heteroduplexes were sequenced. In four nonrelated patients, three missense mutations in coding sequence, and one single base change in the 5′UTR have been detected. Two mutations (Met182Leu, and Ala238Val) were detected in ASD patients with the same clinical phenotype. As the second mutation locates immediately upstream of the catalytic zinc-binding signature, it might change the enzyme substrate specificity. The third change, Leu627Val in the CUB3 domain, has been found in an ASD patient with interatrial septum aneurysm in addition to ASD. The CUB3 domain is important for substrate-specific recognition. In the remaining 15 patients as well as in 15 reference samples numerous base substitutions, deletions, and insertions have been detected, but no mutations changing the coding sequence have been found. Lack of mutations in relation to ASD of these patients could possibly be because of genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome. PMID:18830233

  20. A simple assessment model to quantifying the dynamic hippocampal neurogenic process in the adult mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minee L; Begeti, Faye; Barker, Roger A; Kim, Namho

    2016-04-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a highly dynamic process in which new cells are born, but only some of which survive. Of late it has become clear that these surviving newborn neurons have functional roles, most notably in certain forms of memory. Conventional methods to look at adult neurogenesis are based on the quantification of the number of newly born neurons using a simple cell counting methodology. However, this type of approach fails to capture the dynamic aspects of the neurogenic process, where neural proliferation, death and differentiation take place continuously and simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a simple mathematical approach to better understand the adult neurogenic process in the hippocampus which in turn will allow for a better analysis of this process in disease states and following drug therapies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26443687

  1. Novel Action of FSH on Stem Cells in Adult Mammalian Ovary Induces Postnatal Oogenesis and Primordial Follicle Assembly.

    PubMed

    Bhartiya, Deepa; Parte, Seema; Patel, Hiren; Sriraman, Kalpana; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Adult mammalian ovary has been under the scanner for more than a decade now since it was proposed to harbor stem cells that undergo postnatal oogenesis during reproductive period like spermatogenesis in testis. Stem cells are located in the ovary surface epithelium and exist in adult and menopausal ovary as well as in ovary with premature failure. Stem cells comprise two distinct populations including spherical, very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs which express nuclear OCT-4 and other pluripotent and primordial germ cells specific markers) and slightly bigger ovarian germ stem cells (OGSCs with cytoplasmic OCT-4 which are equivalent to spermatogonial stem cells in the testes). These stem cells have the ability to spontaneously differentiate into oocyte-like structures in vitro and on exposure to a younger healthy niche. Bone marrow may be an alternative source of these stem cells. The stem cells express FSHR and respond to FSH by undergoing self-renewal, clonal expansion, and initiating neo-oogenesis and primordial follicle assembly. VSELs are relatively quiescent and were recently reported to survive chemotherapy and initiate oogenesis in mice when exposed to FSH. This emerging understanding and further research in the field will help evolving novel strategies to manage ovarian pathologies and also towards oncofertility. PMID:26635884

  2. Novel Action of FSH on Stem Cells in Adult Mammalian Ovary Induces Postnatal Oogenesis and Primordial Follicle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bhartiya, Deepa; Parte, Seema; Patel, Hiren; Sriraman, Kalpana; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Adult mammalian ovary has been under the scanner for more than a decade now since it was proposed to harbor stem cells that undergo postnatal oogenesis during reproductive period like spermatogenesis in testis. Stem cells are located in the ovary surface epithelium and exist in adult and menopausal ovary as well as in ovary with premature failure. Stem cells comprise two distinct populations including spherical, very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs which express nuclear OCT-4 and other pluripotent and primordial germ cells specific markers) and slightly bigger ovarian germ stem cells (OGSCs with cytoplasmic OCT-4 which are equivalent to spermatogonial stem cells in the testes). These stem cells have the ability to spontaneously differentiate into oocyte-like structures in vitro and on exposure to a younger healthy niche. Bone marrow may be an alternative source of these stem cells. The stem cells express FSHR and respond to FSH by undergoing self-renewal, clonal expansion, and initiating neo-oogenesis and primordial follicle assembly. VSELs are relatively quiescent and were recently reported to survive chemotherapy and initiate oogenesis in mice when exposed to FSH. This emerging understanding and further research in the field will help evolving novel strategies to manage ovarian pathologies and also towards oncofertility. PMID:26635884

  3. Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Two Distinct Classes of Erythroblastic Island Isolated from Adult Mammalian Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jia Hao; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Fraser, Stuart T

    2016-04-01

    Erythroblastic islands are multicellular clusters in which a central macrophage supports the development and maturation of red blood cell (erythroid) progenitors. These clusters play crucial roles in the pathogenesis observed in animal models of hematological disorders. The precise structure and function of erythroblastic islands is poorly understood. Here, we have combined scanning electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of surface proteins to develop a better understanding of the ultrastructure of these multicellular clusters. The erythroid-specific surface antigen Ter-119 and the transferrin receptor CD71 exhibited distinct patterns of protein sorting during erythroid cell maturation as detected by immuno-gold labeling. During electron microscopy analysis we observed two distinct classes of erythroblastic islands. The islands varied in size and morphology, and the number and type of erythroid cells interacting with the central macrophage. Assessment of femoral marrow isolated from a cavid rodent species (guinea pig, Cavis porcellus) and a marsupial carnivore species (fat-tailed dunnarts, Sminthopsis crassicaudata) showed that while the morphology of the central macrophage varied, two different types of erythroblastic islands were consistently identifiable. Our findings suggest that these two classes of erythroblastic islands are conserved in mammalian evolution and may play distinct roles in red blood cell production. PMID:26898901

  4. Adult mammalian stem cells: the role of Wnt, Lgr5 and R-spondins.

    PubMed

    Schuijers, Jurian; Clevers, Hans

    2012-06-13

    After its discovery as oncogen and morphogen, studies on Wnt focused initially on its role in animal development. With the finding that the colorectal tumour suppressor gene APC is a negative regulator of the Wnt pathway in (colorectal) cancer, attention gradually shifted to the study of the role of Wnt signalling in the adult. The first indication that adult Wnt signalling controls stem cells came from a Tcf4 knockout experiment: mutant mice failed to build crypt stem cell compartments. This observation was followed by similar findings in multiple other tissues. Recent studies have indicated that Wnt agonists of the R-spondin family provide potent growth stimuli for crypts in vivo and in vitro. Independently, Lgr5 was found as an exquisite marker for these crypt stem cells. The story has come full circle with the finding that the stem cell marker Lgr5 constitutes the receptor for R-spondins and occurs in complex with Frizzled/Lrp. PMID:22617424

  5. Staging Primary CNS Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... large vein near the heart. Having a weakened immune system may increase the risk of developing primary CNS ... immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or other disorders of the immune system or who have had a kidney transplant . For ...

  6. Distribution, recognition and regulation of non-CpG methylation in the adult mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Junjie U.; Su, Yijing; Shin, Joo Heon; Shin, Jaehoon; Li, Hongda; Xie, Bin; Zhong, Chun; Hu, Shaohui; Le, Thuc; Fan, Guoping; Zhu, Heng; Chang, Qiang; Gao, Yuan; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation plays critical roles in the nervous system and has been traditionally considered to be restricted to CpG dinucleotides in metazoan genomes. Here we show that the single-base resolution DNA methylome from adult mouse dentate neurons consists of both CpG (~75%) and CpH (~25%) methylation (H = A/C/T). Neuronal CpH methylation is conserved in human brains, enriched in low CpG-density regions, depleted at protein-DNA interaction sites, and anti-correlated with gene expression. Functionally, both mCpGs and mCpHs can repress transcription in vitro and are recognized by MeCP2 in neurons in vivo. Unlike most CpG methylation, CpH methylation is established de novo during neuronal maturation and requires DNMT3A for active maintenance in post-mitotic neurons. These characteristics of CpH methylation suggest a significantly expanded proportion of the neuronal genome under cytosine methylation regulation and provide a new foundation for understanding the role of this key epigenetic modification in the nervous system. PMID:24362762

  7. Estrogen and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampus: complexity of steroid hormone-growth factor interactions in the adult CNS.

    PubMed Central

    Scharfman, Helen E.; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2007-01-01

    In the CNS, there are widespread and diverse interactions between growth factors and estrogen. Here we examine the interactions of estrogen and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), two molecules that have historically been studied separately, despite the fact that they seem to share common targets, effects, and mechanisms of action. The demonstration of an estrogen-sensitive response element on the BDNF gene provided an impetus to explore a direct relationship between estrogen and BDNF, and predicted that the effects of estrogen, at least in part, might be due to the induction of BDNF. This hypothesis is discussed with respect to the hippocampus, where substantial evidence has accumulated in favor of it, but alternate hypotheses are also raised. It is suggested that some of the interactions between estrogen and BDNF, as well as the controversies and implications associated with their respective actions, may be best appreciated in light of the ability of BDNF to induce neuropeptide Y (NPY) synthesis in hippocampal neurons. Taken together, this tri-molecular cascade, estrogen-BDNF-NPY, may be important in understanding the hormonal regulation of hippocampal function. It may also be relevant to other regions of the CNS where estrogen is known to exert profound effects, such as amygdala and hypothalamus; and may provide greater insight into neurological disorders and psychiatric illness, including Alzheimer’s disease, depression and epilepsy. PMID:17055560

  8. Endogenous neurogenic cell response in the mature mammalian brain following traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In the mature mammalian brain, new neurons are generated throughout life in the neurogenic regions of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. Over the past two decades, extensive studies have examined the extent of adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and DG, the role of the adult generated new neurons in normal brain function and the underlying mechanisms regulating the process of adult neurogenesis. The extent and the function of adult neurogenesis under neuropathological conditions have also been explored in varying types of disease models in animals. Increasing evidence has indicated that these endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells may play regenerative and reparative roles in response to CNS injuries or diseases. This review will discuss the potential functions of adult neurogenesis in the injured brain and will describe the recent development of strategies aimed at harnessing this neurogenic capacity in order to repopulate and repair the injured brain following trauma. PMID:25936874

  9. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A; Toprak, Umut H; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C; Pajtler, Kristian W; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, André O; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S; Taylor, Michael D; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; Ellison, David W; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-02-25

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of institutionally diagnosed CNS-PNETs display molecular profiles indistinguishable from those of various other well-defined CNS tumor entities, facilitating diagnosis and appropriate therapy for patients with these tumors. From the remaining fraction of CNS-PNETs, we identify four new CNS tumor entities, each associated with a recurrent genetic alteration and distinct histopathological and clinical features. These new molecular entities, designated "CNS neuroblastoma with FOXR2 activation (CNS NB-FOXR2)," "CNS Ewing sarcoma family tumor with CIC alteration (CNS EFT-CIC)," "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with MN1 alteration (CNS HGNET-MN1)," and "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with BCOR alteration (CNS HGNET-BCOR)," will enable meaningful clinical trials and the development of therapeutic strategies for patients affected by poorly differentiated CNS tumors. PMID:26919435

  10. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination. PMID:27572856

  11. c-JUN-like immunoreactivity in the CNS of the adult rat: basal and transynaptically induced expression of an immediate-early gene.

    PubMed

    Herdegen, T; Leah, J D; Manisali, A; Bravo, R; Zimmermann, M

    1991-01-01

    An immunocytochemical study of dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord and medulla oblongata was performed with antisera against the c-jun proto-oncogene encoded protein. The c-JUN-like immunoreactivity was restricted to the cell nucleus. In the CNS of untreated rats a basal c-JUN-like immunoreactivity was present in the nuclei of two types of neurons: motor and autonomic. Labelled nuclei could be seen in many motoneurons of the ventral horn of the entire length of spinal cord and the lower medulla oblongata, as well as in the area of the nucleus hypoglossus, the dorsal motor nucleus of nucleus vagus, nucleus ambiguus, nucleus facialis, nucleus abducens and motor nucleus of nucleus trigeminus. Additionally, labelled nuclei were found in the preganglionic sympathetic and preganglionic parasympathetic cells of the nucleus intermediolateralis and nucleus intercalatus in the spinal cord. In the medulla oblongata we found a cluster of cells with c-JUN-like immunoreactivity in an area between the dorsomedial part of the oral nucleus spinalis trigeminalis and the lateral border of the knee of facial nerve. Additionally, a second cluster of c-JUN-like immunoreactivity cells was visible between the ventromedial part of the oral nucleus spinalis trigeminalis and the lateral border of the rostral nucleus facialis. Examination of the characteristics of all cell groups with a basal c-JUN-like immunoreactivity in the spinal cord and lower brainstem revealed an overlapping distribution with cholinergic cell groups. Basal c-JUN-like immunoreactivity was also seen in the dorsal root ganglion cells. We examined the factors which can effect the expression of the c-JUN protein. Maximal expression of c-JUN-like immunoreactivity was observed after electrical stimulation of primary afferents. Stimulation of sciatic nerve at a strength sufficient to recruit A delta- and C-fibres produced c-JUN-like immunoreactivity in many nuclei of the ipsilateral dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord. c

  12. Antiretroviral therapy CNS penetration and HIV-1–associated CNS disease

    PubMed Central

    Winston, A.; Walsh, J.; Post, F.; Porter, K.; Gazzard, B.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Pillay, D.; Hill, T.; Johnson, M.; Gilson, R.; Anderson, J.; Easterbrook, P.; Bansi, L.; Orkin, C.; Ainsworth, J.; Palfreeman, A.; Gompels, M.; Phillips, A.N.; Sabin, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The impact of different antiretroviral agents on the risk of developing or surviving CNS disease remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether using antiretroviral regimens with higher CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) scores was associated with reduced incidence of CNS disease and improved survival in the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) Study. Methods: Adults without previous CNS disease, who commenced combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) between 1996 and 2008, were included (n = 22,356). Initial and most recent cART CPE scores were calculated. CNS diseases were HIV encephalopathy (HIVe), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), cerebral toxoplasmosis (TOXO), and cryptococcal meningitis (CRYPTO). Incidence rates and overall survival were stratified by CPE score. A multivariable Poisson regression model was used to identify independent associations. Results: The median (interquartile range) CPE score for initial cART regimen increased from 7 (5–8) in 1996–1997 to 9 (8–10) in 2000–2001 and subsequently declined to 6 (7–8) in 2006–2008. Differences in gender, HIV acquisition risk group, and ethnicity existed between CPE score strata. A total of 251 subjects were diagnosed with a CNS disease (HIVe 80; TOXO 59; CRYPTO 56; PML 54). CNS diseases occurred more frequently in subjects prescribed regimens with CPE scores ≤4, and less frequently in those with scores ≥10; however, these differences were nonsignificant. Initial and most recent cART CPE scores ≤4 were independently associated with increased risk of death. Conclusion: Clinical status at time of commencing cART influences antiretroviral selection and CPE score. This information should be considered when utilizing CPE scores for retrospective analyses. PMID:21339496

  13. CNS Diseases and Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Pia; Rissotto, Roberto; Herbort, Carl P.; Murialdo, Ugo

    2011-01-01

    A number of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic and idiopathic disorders affect the eye and the central nervous system (CNS) concurrently or at different time frames. These conditions pose a diagnostic challenge to the clinician since they may present with similar ocular and neurological manifestations. The purpose of this review is to describe major neurological syndromes including multiple sclerosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, other autoimmune syndromes, and several infectious diseases which may affect the eye. This article may serve as a guide for the diagnosis and treatment of such disorders. It should be noted that these conditions have been viewed from a neurologist’s perspective thereby neurologic involvement is stressed. PMID:22454751

  14. CNS diseases and uveitis.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Pia; Rissotto, Roberto; Herbort, Carl P; Murialdo, Ugo

    2011-10-01

    A number of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic and idiopathic disorders affect the eye and the central nervous system (CNS) concurrently or at different time frames. These conditions pose a diagnostic challenge to the clinician since they may present with similar ocular and neurological manifestations. The purpose of this review is to describe major neurological syndromes including multiple sclerosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, other autoimmune syndromes, and several infectious diseases which may affect the eye. This article may serve as a guide for the diagnosis and treatment of such disorders. It should be noted that these conditions have been viewed from a neurologist's perspective thereby neurologic involvement is stressed. PMID:22454751

  15. STARs in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Ingrid; Fort, Philippe; Elliott, David J

    2016-08-15

    STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) proteins regulate splicing of target genes that have roles in neural connectivity, survival and myelination in the vertebrate nervous system. These regulated splicing targets include mRNAs such as the Neurexins (Nrxn), SMN2 (survival of motor neuron) and MAG (myelin-associated glycoprotein). Recent work has made it possible to identify and validate STAR protein splicing targets in vivo by using genetically modified mouse models. In this review, we will discuss the importance of STAR protein splicing targets in the CNS (central nervous system). PMID:27528753

  16. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase HmLAR1 is up-regulated in the CNS of the adult medicinal leech following injury and is required for neuronal sprouting and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Jasmine; Zhao, Bailey; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Salzet, Michel; Macagno, Eduardo R; Baker, Michael W

    2010-12-01

    LAR-like receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), which are abundantly expressed in the nervous systems of most if not all bilaterian animals thus far examined, have been implicated in regulating a variety of critical neuronal processes. These include neuronal pathfinding, adhesion and synaptogenesis during development and, in adult mammals, neuronal regeneration. Here we explored a possible role of a LAR-like RPTP (HmLAR1) in response to mechanical trauma in the adult nervous system of the medicinal leech. In situ hybridization and QPCR analyses of HmLAR1 expression in individual segmental ganglia revealed a significant up-regulation in receptor expression following CNS injury, both in situ and following a period in vitro. Furthermore, we observed up-regulation in the expression of the leech homologue of the Abelson tyrosine kinase, a putative signaling partner to LAR receptors, but not among other tyrosine kinases. The effects on neuronal regeneration were assayed by comparing growth across a nerve crush by projections of individual dorsal P neurons (P(D)) following single-cell injection of interfering RNAs against the receptor or control RNAs. Receptor RNAi led to a significant reduction in HmLAR1 expression by the injected cells and resulted in a significant decrease in sprouting and regenerative growth at the crush site relative to controls. These studies extend the role of the HmLARs from leech neuronal development to adult neuronal regeneration and provide a platform to investigate neuronal regeneration and gene regulation at the single cell level. PMID:20708686

  17. Axonal injury and regeneration in the adult brain of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Derya; Leyssen, Maarten; Koch, Marta; Yan, Jiekun; Srahna, Mohammed; Sheeba, Vasu; Fogle, Keri J.; Holmes, Todd C.; Hassan, Bassem A.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a leading genetic model system in nervous system development and disease research. Using the power of fly genetics in traumatic axonal injury research will significantly speed up the characterization of molecular processes that control axonal regeneration in the Central Nervous System (CNS). We developed a versatile and physiologically robust preparation for the long-term culture of the whole Drosophila brain. We use this method to develop a novel Drosophila model for CNS axonal injury and regeneration. We first show that, similar to mammalian CNS axons, injured adult wild type fly CNS axons fail to regenerate, whereas adult-specific enhancement of Protein Kinase A activity increases the regenerative capacity of lesioned neurons. Combined, these observations suggest conservation of neuronal regeneration mechanisms following injury. We next exploit this model to explore pathways that induce robust regeneration and find that adult-specific activation of JNK signalling is sufficient for de novo CNS axonal regeneration after injury, including the growth of new axons past the lesion site and into the normal target area. PMID:18524906

  18. Mammalian sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  19. Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation to Treat CNS Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Muhammad O.; Moore, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field. PMID:27582692

  20. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Molecular Switches Regulating CNS Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Kundi, Sarina; Ahmed, Zubair

    2012-01-01

    The poor or lack of injured adult central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration results in devastating consequences and poor functional recovery. The interplay between the intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributes to robust inhibition of axon regeneration of injured CNS neurons. The insufficient or lack of trophic support for injured neurons is considered as one of the major obstacles contributing to their failure to survive and regrow their axons after injury. In the CNS, many of the signalling pathways associated with neuronal survival and axon regeneration are regulated by several classes of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) that respond to a variety of ligands. This paper highlights and summarises the most relevant recent findings pertinent to different classes of the RTK family of molecules, with a particular focus on elucidating their role in CNS axon regeneration. PMID:22848811

  1. Pushing Forward: Remyelination as the New Frontier in CNS Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kremer, David; Göttle, Peter; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Küry, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The evolutionary acquisition of myelin sheaths around large caliber axons in the central nervous system (CNS) represented a milestone in the development of vertebrate higher brain function. Myelin ensheathment of axons enabled saltatory conduction and thus accelerated information processing. However, a number of CNS diseases harm or destroy myelin and oligodendrocytes (myelin-producing cells), ultimately resulting in demyelination. In the adult CNS, new oligodendrocytes can be generated from a quiescent pool of precursor cells, which - upon differentiation - can replace lost myelin sheaths. The efficiency of this spontaneous regeneration is limited, which leads to incomplete remyelination and residual clinical symptoms. Here, we discuss CNS pathologies characterized by white matter degeneration and regeneration and highlight drugs that could potentially serve as remyelination therapies. PMID:26964504

  2. AAV-mediated gene transfer to the mouse CNS

    PubMed Central

    Stoica, Lorelei; Ahmed, Seemin S.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno associated virus (rAAV) vectors are great tools for gene transfer due to their ability to mediate long-term gene expression. Recombinant AAVs have been used at various ages of development with no apparent toxicity. There are multiple ways of delivering AAV vectors to the CNS, depending on the stage of development of the mouse. In neonates, intravascular injections into the facial vein are often used. In adults, direct injections into target regions of the brain are achieved with great spatiotemporal control through stereotaxic surgeries. Recently, discoveries of new AAV vectors with the ability to cross the blood brain barrier have made it possible to also target the adult CNS by intravascular injections. rAAVs have been successfully used as gene transfer vehicles in multiple animal models of CNS disorders, and several clinical trials are currently underway. PMID:23686825

  3. In Vivo Neural Tissue Engineering: Cylindrical Biocompatible Hydrogels That Create New Neural Tracts in the Adult Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Clark, Amanda R; Carter, Arrin B; Hager, Lydia E; Price, Elmer M

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with neurodegenerative disorders or brain injury have few treatment options and it has been proposed that endogenous adult neural stem cells can be harnessed to repopulate dysfunctional nonneurogenic regions of the brain. We have accomplished this through the development of rationally designed hydrogel implants that recruit endogenous cells from the adult subventricular zone to create new relatively long tracts of neuroblasts. These implants are biocompatible and biodegradable cylindrical hydrogels consisting of fibrin and immobilized neurotrophic factors. When implanted into rat brain such that the cylinder intersected the migratory path of endogenous neural progenitors (the rostral migratory stream) and led into the nonneurogenic striatum, we observed a robust neurogenic response in the form of migrating neuroblasts with long (>100 μm) complex neurites. The location of these new neural cells in the striatum was directly coincident with the original track of the fibrin implant, which itself had completely degraded, and covered a significant area and distance (>2.5 mm). We also observed a significant number of neuroblasts in the striatal region between the implant track and the lateral ventricle. When these fibrin cylinders were implanted into hemiparkinson rats, correction of parkinsonian behavior was observed. There were no obvious behavioral, inflammatory or tumorigenic sequelae as a consequence of the implants. In conclusion, we have successfully engineered neural tissue in vivo, using neurogenic biomaterials cast into a unique cylindrical architecture. These results represent a novel approach to efficiently induce neurogenesis in a controlled and targeted manner, which may lead toward a new therapeutic modality for neurological disorders. PMID:27295980

  4. Potential of adult mammalian lumbosacral spinal cord to execute and acquire improved locomotion in the absence of supraspinal input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Prober, R. J.; de Guzman, C. P.; de Leon, R.

    1992-01-01

    The neural circuitry of the lumbar spinal cord can generate alternating extension and flexion of the hindlimbs. The hindlimbs of adult cats with complete transection of the spinal cord at a low thoracic level (T12-T13) can perform full weight-supporting locomotion on a treadmill belt moving at a range of speeds. Some limitations in the locomotor capacity can be associated with a deficit in the recruitment level of the fast extensors during the stance phase and the flexors during the swing phase of a step cycle. The level of locomotor performance, however, can be enhanced by daily training on a treadmill while emphasizing full weight-support stepping and by providing appropriately timed sensory stimulation, loading, and/or pharmacologic stimulation of the hindlimb neuromuscular apparatus. Furthermore, there appears to be an interactive effect of these interventions. For example, the maximum treadmill speed that a spinal adult cat can attain and maintain is significantly improved with daily full weight-supporting treadmill training, but progressive recruitment of fast extensors becomes apparent only when the hindlimbs are loaded by gently pulling down on the tail during the stepping. Stimulation of the sural nerve at the initiation of the flexion phase of the step cycle can likewise markedly improve the locomotor capability. Administration of clonidine, in particular in combination with an elevated load, resulted in the most distinct and consistent alternating bursts of electromyographic activity during spinal stepping. These data indicate that the spinal cord has the ability to execute alternating activation of the extensor and flexor musculature of the hindlimbs (stepping) and that this ability can be improved by several interventions such as training, sensory stimulation, and use of some pharmacologic agents. Thus, it appears that the spinal cord, without supraspinal input, is highly plastic and has the potential to "learn," that is, to acquire and improve its

  5. Identification of the role of C/EBP in neurite regeneration following microarray analysis of a L. stagnalis CNS injury model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuronal regeneration in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is severely compromised due to the presence of extrinsic inhibitory signals and a reduced intrinsic regenerative capacity. In contrast, the CNS of adult Lymnaea stagnalis (L. stagnalis), a freshwater pond snail, is capable of spontaneous regeneration following neuronal injury. Thus, L. stagnalis has served as an animal model to study the cellular mechanisms underlying neuronal regeneration. However, the usage of this model has been limited due to insufficient molecular tools. We have recently conducted a partial neuronal transcriptome sequencing project and reported over 10,000 EST sequences which allowed us to develop and perform a large-scale high throughput microarray analysis. Results To identify genes that are involved in the robust regenerative capacity observed in L. stagnalis, we designed the first gene chip covering ~15, 000 L. stagnalis CNS EST sequences. We conducted microarray analysis to compare the gene expression profiles of sham-operated (control) and crush-operated (regenerative model) central ganglia of adult L. stagnalis. The expression levels of 348 genes were found to be significantly altered (p < 0.05) following nerve injury. From this pool, 67 sequences showed a greater than 2-fold change: 42 of which were up-regulated and 25 down-regulated. Our qPCR analysis confirmed that CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) was up-regulated following nerve injury in a time-dependent manner. In order to test the role of C/EBP in regeneration, C/EBP siRNA was applied following axotomy of cultured Lymnaea PeA neurons. Knockdown of C/EBP following axotomy prevented extension of the distal, proximal and intact neurites. In vivo knockdown of C/EBP postponed recovery of locomotory activity following nerve crush. Taken together, our data suggest both somatic and local effects of C/EBP are involved in neuronal regeneration. Conclusions This is the first high-throughput microarray

  6. AUTOLOGOUS HAEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR NON-HODGKIN LYMPHOMA WITH SECONDARY CNS INVOLVEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Maziarz, Richard T.; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Bolwell, Brian J.; Chen, Andy I.; Fenske, Timothy S.; Freytes, Cesar O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gibson, John; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon M.; Holmberg, Leona; Inwards, David J.; Isola, Luis M.; Khoury, H. Jean; Lewis, Victor A.; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Munker, Reinhold; Phillips, Gordon L.; Rizzieri, David A.; Rowlings, Philip A.; Saber, Wael; Satwani, Prakash; Waller, Edmund K.; Maloney, David G.; Montoto, Silvia; Laport, Ginna G.; Vose, Julie M.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Pre-existing central nervous system (CNS) involvement may influence referral for autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) for patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The outcomes of 151 adult patients with NHL with prior secondary CNS involvement (CNS+) receiving an AHCT were compared to 4688 patients without prior CNS lymphoma (CNS−). There were significant baseline differences between the cohorts. CNS+ patients were more likely to be younger, have lower performance scores, higher age-adjusted international prognostic index scores, more advanced disease stage at diagnosis, more aggressive histology, more sites of extranodal disease, and a shorter interval between diagnosis and AHCT. However, no statistically significant differences were identified between the two groups by analysis of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. A matched pair comparison of the CNS+ group with a subset of CNS− patients matched on propensity score also showed no differences in outcomes. Patients with active CNS lymphoma at the time of AHCT (n=55) had a higher relapse rate and diminished PFS and OS compared with patients whose CNS lymphoma was in remission (n=96) at the time of AHCT. CNS+ patients can achieve excellent long-term outcomes with AHCT. Active CNS lymphoma at transplant confers a worse prognosis. PMID:23829536

  7. NF-KappaB in Long-Term Memory and Structural Plasticity in the Adult Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Kaltschmidt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) is a well-known regulator of inflammation, stress, and immune responses as well as cell survival. In the nervous system, NF-κB is one of the crucial components in the molecular switch that converts short- to long-term memory—a process that requires de novo gene expression. Here, the researches published on NF-κB and downstream target genes in mammals will be reviewed, which are necessary for structural plasticity and long-term memory, both under normal and pathological conditions in the brain. Genetic evidence has revealed that NF-κB regulates neuroprotection, neuronal transmission, and long-term memory. In addition, after genetic ablation of all NF-κB subunits, a severe defect in hippocampal adult neurogenesis was observed during aging. Proliferation of neural precursors is increased; however, axon outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and tissue homeostasis of the dentate gyrus are hampered. In this process, the NF-κB target gene PKAcat and other downstream target genes such as Igf2 are critically involved. Therefore, NF-κB activity seems to be crucial in regulating structural plasticity and replenishment of granule cells within the hippocampus throughout the life. In addition to the function of NF-κB in neurons, we will discuss on a neuroinflammatory role of the transcription factor in glia. Finally, a model for NF-κB homeostasis on the molecular level is presented, in order to explain seemingly the contradictory, the friend or foe, role of NF-κB in the nervous system. PMID:26635522

  8. A Common Phenotype Polymorphism in Mammalian Brains Defined by Concomitant Production of Prolactin and Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Daude, Nathalie; Lee, Inyoul; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Janus, Christopher; Glaves, John Paul; Gapeshina, Hristina; Yang, Jing; Sykes, Brian D.; Carlson, George A.; Hood, Leroy E.; Westaway, David

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary Prolactin (PRL) and Growth Hormone (GH) are separately controlled and sub-serve different purposes. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that extra-pituitary expression in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is coordinated at mRNA and protein levels. However this was not a uniform effect within populations, such that wide inter-individual variation was superimposed on coordinate PRL/GH expression. Up to 44% of individuals in healthy cohorts of mice and rats showed protein levels above the norm and coordinated expression of PRL and GH transcripts above baseline occurred in the amygdala, frontal lobe and hippocampus of 10% of human subjects. High levels of PRL and GH present in post mortem tissue were often presaged by altered responses in fear conditioning and stress induced hyperthermia behavioral tests. Our data define a common phenotype polymorphism in healthy mammalian brains, and, given the pleiotropic effects known for circulating PRL and GH, further consequences of coordinated CNS over-expression may await discovery. PMID:26894278

  9. A Common Phenotype Polymorphism in Mammalian Brains Defined by Concomitant Production of Prolactin and Growth Hormone.

    PubMed

    Daude, Nathalie; Lee, Inyoul; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Janus, Christopher; Glaves, John Paul; Gapeshina, Hristina; Yang, Jing; Sykes, Brian D; Carlson, George A; Hood, Leroy E; Westaway, David

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary Prolactin (PRL) and Growth Hormone (GH) are separately controlled and sub-serve different purposes. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that extra-pituitary expression in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is coordinated at mRNA and protein levels. However this was not a uniform effect within populations, such that wide inter-individual variation was superimposed on coordinate PRL/GH expression. Up to 44% of individuals in healthy cohorts of mice and rats showed protein levels above the norm and coordinated expression of PRL and GH transcripts above baseline occurred in the amygdala, frontal lobe and hippocampus of 10% of human subjects. High levels of PRL and GH present in post mortem tissue were often presaged by altered responses in fear conditioning and stress induced hyperthermia behavioral tests. Our data define a common phenotype polymorphism in healthy mammalian brains, and, given the pleiotropic effects known for circulating PRL and GH, further consequences of coordinated CNS over-expression may await discovery. PMID:26894278

  10. Mammalian pheromones.

    PubMed

    Liberles, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  11. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  12. Glial Development: The Crossroads of Regeneration and Repair in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Vittorio; Deneen, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Given the complexities of the mammalian CNS, its regeneration is viewed as the holy grail of regenerative medicine. Extraordinary efforts have been made to understand developmental neurogenesis, with the hopes of clinically applying this knowledge. CNS regeneration also involves glia, which comprises at least 50% of the cellular constituency of the brain, and is involved in all forms of injury and disease response, recovery and regeneration. Recent developmental studies have given us unprecedented insight into the processes that regulate the generation of CNS glia. Because restorative processes often parallel those found in development, we will peer through the lens of developmental gliogenesis to gain a clearer understanding of the processes that underlie glial regeneration under pathological conditions. Specifically, this review will focus on key signaling pathways that regulate astrocyte and oligodendrocyte development, and describe how these mechanisms are reutilized in these populations during regeneration and repair after CNS injury. PMID:25033178

  13. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  14. Nicotinic ACh receptors as therapeutic targets in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Dineley, Kelly T; Pandya, Anshul A; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2015-02-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can regulate neuronal excitability by acting on the cys-loop cation-conducting ligand-gated nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) channels. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS), being expressed on neurons and non-neuronal cells, where they participate in a variety of physiological responses such as anxiety, the central processing of pain, food intake, nicotine seeking behavior, and cognitive functions. In the mammalian brain, nine different subunits have been found thus far, which assemble into pentameric complexes with much subunit diversity; however, the α7 and α4β2 subtypes predominate in the CNS. Neuronal nAChR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders. Here we will briefly discuss the functional makeup and expression of the nAChRs in mammalian brain, and their role as targets in neurodegenerative diseases (in particular Alzheimer's disease, AD), neurodevelopmental disorders (in particular autism and schizophrenia), and neuropathic pain. PMID:25639674

  15. Ontogeny and functions of CNS macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Katsumoto, Atsuko; Lu, Haiyan; Miranda, Aline S.; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia, the only non-neuroepithelial cells found in the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS), originate during embryogenesis from the yolk sac and enter the CNS quite early (embryonic day 9.5-10 in mice). Thereafter, microglia are maintained independently of any input from the blood and in particular do not require hematopoietic stem cells as a source of replacement for senescent cells. Monocytes are hematopoietic cells, derived from bone marrow. The ontogeny of microglia and monocytes is important for understanding CNS pathologies. Microglial functions are distinct from those of blood-derived monocytes, which invade the CNS only under pathological conditions. Recent data reveal that microglia play an important role in managing neuronal cell death, neurogenesis and synaptic interactions. Here we discuss physiology of microglia and the functions of monocytes in CNS pathology. We address the roles of microglia and monocytes in neurodegenerative diseases as an example of CNS pathology. PMID:25193935

  16. Animal models of CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is intense interest in the development and application of animal models of CNS disorders to explore pathology and molecular mechanisms, identify potential biomarkers, and to assess the therapeutic utility, estimate safety margins and establish pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters of new chemical entities (NCEs). This is a daunting undertaking, due to the complex and heterogeneous nature of these disorders, the subjective and sometimes contradictory nature of the clinical endpoints and the paucity of information regarding underlying molecular mechanisms. Historically, these models have been invaluable in the discovery of therapeutics for a range of disorders including anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. Recently, however, they have been increasingly criticized in the wake of numerous clinical trial failures of NCEs with promising preclinical profiles. These failures have resulted from a number of factors including inherent limitations of the models, over-interpretation of preclinical results and the complex nature of clinical trials for CNS disorders. This review discusses the rationale, strengths, weaknesses and predictive validity of the most commonly used models for psychiatric, neurodegenerative and neurological disorders as well as critical factors that affect the variability and reproducibility of these models. It also addresses how progress in molecular genetics and the development of transgenic animals has fundamentally changed the approach to neurodegenerative disorder research. To date, transgenic animal models\\have not been the panacea for drug discovery that many had hoped for. However continual refinement of these models is leading to steady progress with the promise of eventual therapeutic breakthroughs. PMID:23811310

  17. The neonatal CNS is not conducive for encephalitogenic Th1 T cells and B cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to be a CD4+ T cell mediated autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that is rarely diagnosed during infancy. Cellular and molecular mechanisms that confer disease resistance in this age group are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that a differential composition of immune cells within the CNS modulates age-associated susceptibility to CNS autoimmune disease. C57BL/6 mice younger than eight weeks were resistant to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) following active immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p) 35–55. Neonates also developed milder EAE after transfer of adult encephalitogenic T cells primed by adult or neonate antigen presenting cells (APC). There was a significant increase in CD45+ hematopoietic immune cells and CD45+ high side scatter granulocytes in the CNS of adults, but not in neonates. Within the CD45+ immune cell compartment of adults, the accumulation of CD4+ T cells, Gr-1+ and Gr-1- monocytes and CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) was identified. A significantly greater percentage of CD19+ B cells in the adult CNS expressed MHC II than neonate CNS B cells. Only in the adult CNS could IFNγ transcripts be detected 10 days post immunization for EAE. IFNγ is highly expressed by adult donor CD4+ T cells that are adoptively transferred but not by transferred neonate donor cells. In contrast, IL-17 transcripts could not be detected in adult or neonate CNS in this EAE model, and neither adult nor neonate donor CD4+ T cells expressed IL-17 at the time of adoptive transfer. PMID:23705890

  18. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M.; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) results in oligodendrocyte cell death and progressive demyelination. Demyelinated axons undergo considerable physiological changes and molecular reorganizations that collectively result in axonal dysfunction, degeneration and loss of sensory and motor functions. Endogenous adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neural stem/progenitor cells contribute to the replacement of oligodendrocytes, however, the extent and quality of endogenous remyelination is suboptimal. Emerging evidence indicates that optimal remyelination is restricted by multiple factors including (i) low levels of factors that promote oligodendrogenesis; (ii) cell death among newly generated oligodendrocytes, (iii) inhibitory factors in the post-injury milieu that impede remyelination, and (iv) deficient expression of key growth factors essential for proper re-construction of a highly organized myelin sheath. Considering these challenges, over the past several years, a number of cell-based strategies have been developed to optimize remyelination therapeutically. Outcomes of these basic and preclinical discoveries are promising and signify the importance of remyelination as a mechanism for improving functions in CNS injuries. In this review, we provide an overview on: (1) the precise organization of myelinated axons and the reciprocal axo-myelin interactions that warrant properly balanced physiological activities within the CNS; (2) underlying cause of demyelination and the structural and functional consequences of demyelination in axons following injury and disease; (3) the endogenous mechanisms of oligodendrocyte replacement; (4) the modulatory role of reactive astrocytes and inflammatory cells in remyelination; and (5) the current status of cell-based therapies for promoting remyelination. Careful elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of demyelination in the pathologic CNS is a key to better understanding the impact of remyelination for

  19. Applications of Genomic Sequencing in Pediatric CNS Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bavle, Abhishek A; Lin, Frank Y; Parsons, D Williams

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in genome-scale sequencing methods have resulted in a significant increase in our understanding of the biology of human cancers. When applied to pediatric central nervous system (CNS) tumors, these remarkable technological breakthroughs have facilitated the molecular characterization of multiple tumor types, provided new insights into the genetic basis of these cancers, and prompted innovative strategies that are changing the management paradigm in pediatric neuro-oncology. Genomic tests have begun to affect medical decision making in a number of ways, from delineating histopathologically similar tumor types into distinct molecular subgroups that correlate with clinical characteristics, to guiding the addition of novel therapeutic agents for patients with high-risk or poor-prognosis tumors, or alternatively, reducing treatment intensity for those with a favorable prognosis. Genomic sequencing has also had a significant impact on translational research strategies in pediatric CNS tumors, resulting in wide-ranging applications that have the potential to direct the rational preclinical screening of novel therapeutic agents, shed light on tumor heterogeneity and evolution, and highlight differences (or similarities) between pediatric and adult CNS tumors. Finally, in addition to allowing the identification of somatic (tumor-specific) mutations, the analysis of patient-matched constitutional (germline) DNA has facilitated the detection of pathogenic germline alterations in cancer genes in patients with CNS tumors, with critical implications for genetic counseling and tumor surveillance strategies for children with familial predisposition syndromes. As our understanding of the molecular landscape of pediatric CNS tumors continues to advance, innovative applications of genomic sequencing hold significant promise for further improving the care of children with these cancers. PMID:27188671

  20. Astrocytic TIMP-1 Promotes Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Enhances CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Craig S.; Milner, Richard; Nishiyama, Akiko; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Serwanski, David R.; Pagarigan, Roberto R.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Miller, Robert H.; Crocker, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) is an extracellular protein and endogenous regulator of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) secreted by astrocytes in response to CNS myelin injury. We have previously reported that adult TIMP-1KO mice exhibit poor myelin repair following demyelinating injury. This observation led us to hypothesize a role for TIMP-1 in oligodendrogenesis and CNS myelination. Herein, we demonstrate that compact myelin formation is significantly delayed in TIMP-1KO mice which coincided with dramatically reduced numbers of white matter astrocytes in the developing CNS. Analysis of differentiation in CNS progenitor cells (neurosphere) cultures from TIMP-1KO mice revealed a specific deficit of NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Application of rmTIMP-1 to TIMP-1KO neurosphere cultures evoked a dose-dependent increase in NG2+ cell numbers, while treatment with GM6001, a potent broad spectrum MMP inhibitor did not. Similarly, administration of recombinant murine TIMP-1 (rmTIMP-1) to A2B5+ immunopanned oligodendrocyte progenitors significantly increased the number of differentiated O1+ oligodendrocytes, while antisera to TIMP-1 reduced oligodendrocyte numbers. We also determined that A2B5+ oligodendrocyte progenitors grown in conditioned media derived from TIMP-1KO primary glial cultures resulted in reduced differentiation of mature O1+ oligodendrocytes. Finally, we report that addition of rmTIMP-1 to primary glial cultures resulted in a dose-dependent proliferative response of astrocytes. Together, these findings describe a previously uncharacterized role for TIMP-1 in the regulation of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes during development and provide a novel function for TIMP-1 on myelination in the developing CNS. PMID:21508247

  1. Dissection of larval CNS in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hafer, Nathaniel; Schedl, Paul

    2006-12-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) of Drosophila larvae is complex and poorly understood. One way to investigate the CNS is to use immunohistochemistry to examine the expression of various novel and marker proteins. Staining of whole larvae is impractical because the tough cuticle prevents antibodies from penetrating inside the body cavity. In order to stain these tissues it is necessary to dissect the animal prior to fixing and staining. In this article we demonstrate how to dissect Drosophila larvae without damaging the CNS. Begin by tearing the larva in half with a pair of fine forceps, and then turn the cuticle "inside-out" to expose the CNS. If the dissection is performed carefully the CNS will remain attached to the cuticle. We usually keep the CNS attached to the cuticle throughout the fixation and staining steps, and only completely remove the CNS from the cuticle just prior to mounting the samples on glass slides. We also show some representative images of a larval CNS stained with Eve, a transcription factor expressed in a subset of neurons in the CNS. The article concludes with a discussion of some of the practical uses of this technique and the potential difficulties that may arise. PMID:18704179

  2. Mammalian aromatases.

    PubMed

    Conley, A; Hinshelwood, M

    2001-05-01

    Aromatase is the enzyme complex that catalyses the synthesis of oestrogens from androgens, and therefore it has unique potential to influence the physiological balance between the sex steroid hormones. Both aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom) and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (reductase), the two essential components of the enzyme complex, are highly conserved among mammals and vertebrates. Aromatase expression occurs in the gonads and brain, and is essential for reproductive development and fertility. Of interest are the complex mechanisms involving alternative promoter utilization that have evolved to control tissue-specific expression in these tissues. In addition, in a number of species, including humans, expression of aromatase has a broader tissue distribution, including placenta, adipose and bone. The relevance of oestrogen synthesis and possibly androgen metabolism in these peripheral sites of expression is now becoming clear from studies in P450arom knockout (ArKO) mice and from genetic defects recognized recently in both men and women. Important species differences in the physiological roles of aromatase expression are also likely to emerge, despite the highly conserved nature of the enzyme system. The identification of functionally distinct, tissue-specific isozymes of P450arom in at least one mammal, pigs, and several species of fish indicates that there are additional subtle, but physiologically significant, species-specific roles for aromatase. Comparative studies of mammalian and other vertebrate aromatases will expand understanding of the role played by this ancient enzyme system in the evolution of reproduction and the adaptive influence of oestrogen synthesis on general health and well being. PMID:11427156

  3. CNS: sex steroids and SERMs.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, F; Pluchino, N; Stomati, M; Pieri, M; Genazzani, A R

    2003-11-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is one of the main target tissues for sex steroid hormones, which act both through genomic mechanisms, modulating synthesis, release, and metabolism of many neuropeptides and neurotransmitters, and through nongenomic mechanisms, influencing electrical excitability, synaptic function, and morphological features. The identification of the brain as a de novo source of neurosteroids modulating cerebral function, suggests that the modifications in mood and cognitive performances occurring in postmenopausal women could also be related to a modification in the levels of neurosteroids, particularly allopregnanolone and DHEA, GABA-A agonist, and antagonist, respectively. The selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are compounds that activate the estrogen receptors with different estrogenic and antiestrogenic tissue-specific effects. In addition to the effects of the classic steroid hormones on the CNS, the study of selective estrogen receptor modulators impact on the neuroendocrine system has recently provided encouraging results, indicating that raloxifene analog LY 117018 and the new generation SERM EM-652 have an estrogen-like action on beta-endorphin and on allopregnanolone in ovariectomized rats, while they exert an anti-estrogenic effect in fertile rats and in ovariectomized rats treated with estrogens. In addition, raloxifene administration in postmenopausal women plays an estrogen-like effect on circulating beta-EP and allopregnanolone levels, and it restores the response of beta-EP and allopregnanolone to neuroendocrine tests. In conclusion, the positive effects of HRT on mood and cognition in postmenopausal women occur via the modulation of neuroendocrine pathways and probably also of neurosteroidogenesis. The effects of raloxifene on mood and cognition encourage the efforts in the research of an ideal estrogen replacement therapy, showing all the positive effects of estrogens and fewer side effects. PMID:14644845

  4. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What are adult brain ...

  5. Adult myelination: wrapping up neuronal plasticity

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Megan; Gasperini, Robert; Young, Kaylene M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we outline the major neural plasticity mechanisms that have been identified in the adult central nervous system (CNS), and offer a perspective on how they regulate CNS function. In particular we examine how myelin plasticity can operate alongside neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity to influence information processing and transfer in the mature CNS. PMID:25221576

  6. Revisiting the Mechanisms of CNS Immune Privilege.

    PubMed

    Louveau, Antoine; Harris, Tajie H; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    Whereas the study of the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) has often focused on pathological conditions, the importance of neuroimmune communication in CNS homeostasis and function has become clear over that last two decades. Here we discuss the progression of our understanding of the interaction between the peripheral immune system and the CNS. We examine the notion of immune privilege of the CNS in light of both earlier findings and recent studies revealing a functional meningeal lymphatic system that drains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the deep cervical lymph nodes, and consider the implications of a revised perspective on the immune privilege of the CNS on the etiology and pathology of different neurological disorders. PMID:26431936

  7. CNS disease triggering Takotsubo stress cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Wahbi, Karim

    2014-12-15

    There are a number of hereditary and non-hereditary central nervous system (CNS) disorders, which directly or indirectly affect the heart (brain-heart disorders). The most well-known of these CNS disorders are epilepsy, stroke, infectious or immunological encephalitis/meningitis, migraine, and traumatic brain injury. In addition, a number of hereditary and non-hereditary neurodegenerative disorders may impair cardiac functions. Affection of the heart may manifest not only as arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, autonomic impairment, systolic dysfunction/heart failure, arterial hypertension, or pulmonary hypertension, but also as stress cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo syndrome, TTS). CNS disease triggering TTS includes subarachnoid bleeding, epilepsy, ischemic stroke, intracerebral bleeding, migraine, encephalitis, traumatic brain injury, PRES syndrome, or ALS. Usually, TTS is acutely precipitated by stress triggered by various different events. TTS is one of the cardiac abnormalities most frequently induced by CNS disorders. Appropriate management of TTS from CNS disorders is essential to improve the outcome of affected patients. PMID:25213573

  8. The allometry of CNS size and consequences of miniaturization in orb-weaving and cleptoparasitic spiders.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Rosannette; Triana, Emilia; Vargas, Gloria; Douglass, John K; Seid, Marc A; Niven, Jeremy E; Eberhard, William G; Wcislo, William T

    2011-11-01

    Allometric studies of the gross neuroanatomy of adults from nine species of spiders from six web-weaving families (Orbicularia), and nymphs from six of these species, show that very small spiders resemble other small animals in having disproportionately larger central nervous systems (CNSs) relative to body mass when compared with large-bodied forms. Small spiderlings and minute adult spiders have similar relative CNS volumes. The relatively large CNS of a very small spider occupies up to 78% of the cephalothorax volume. The CNSs of very small spiders extend into their coxae, occupying as much as 26% of the profile area of the coxae of an Anapisona simoni spiderling (body mass < 0.005 mg). Such modifications occur both in species with minute adults, and in tiny spiderlings of species with large-bodied adults. In at least one such species, Leucauge mariana, the CNS of the spiderling extends into a prominent ventral bulge of the sternum. Tiny spiders also have reduced neuronal cell body diameters. The adults of nearly all orbicularian spiders weave prey capture webs, as do the spiderlings, beginning with second instar nymphs. Comparable allometric relations occur in adults of both orb-weaving and cleptoparasitic species, indicating that this behavioral difference is not reflected in differences in gross CNS allometry. PMID:22036838

  9. From fish to man: understanding endogenous remyelination in CNS demyelinating diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Dalcq, Monique; Williams, Anna; Stadelmann, Christine; Stankoff, Bruno; Zalc, Bernard; Lubetzki, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS) of man, evolutionary pressure has preserved some capability for remyelination while axonal regeneration is very limited. In contrast, two efficient programmes of regeneration exist in the adult fish CNS, neurite regrowth and remyelination. The rapidity of CNS remyelination is critical since it not only restores fast conduction of nerve impulses but also maintains axon integrity. If myelin repair fails, axons degenerate, leading to increased disability. In the human CNS demyelinating disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS), remyelination often takes place in the midst of inflammation. Here, we discuss recent studies that address the innate repair capabilities of the axon-glia unit from fish to man. We propose that expansion of this research field will help find ways to maintain or enhance spontaneous remyelination in man. PMID:18474520

  10. CNS myelin wrapping is driven by actin disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zuchero, J Bradley; Fu, Meng-Meng; Sloan, Steven A; Ibrahim, Adiljan; Olson, Andrew; Zaremba, Anita; Dugas, Jason C; Wienbar, Sophia; Caprariello, Andrew V; Kantor, Christopher; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Leonoudakus, Dmitri; Lariosa-Willingham, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo; Gertz, Karen; Soderling, Scott H; Miller, Robert H; Barres, Ben A

    2015-07-27

    Myelin is essential in vertebrates for the rapid propagation of action potentials, but the molecular mechanisms driving its formation remain largely unknown. Here we show that the initial stage of process extension and axon ensheathment by oligodendrocytes requires dynamic actin filament assembly by the Arp2/3 complex. Unexpectedly, subsequent myelin wrapping coincides with the upregulation of actin disassembly proteins and rapid disassembly of the oligodendrocyte actin cytoskeleton and does not require Arp2/3. Inducing loss of actin filaments drives oligodendrocyte membrane spreading and myelin wrapping in vivo, and the actin disassembly factor gelsolin is required for normal wrapping. We show that myelin basic protein, a protein essential for CNS myelin wrapping whose role has been unclear, is required for actin disassembly, and its loss phenocopies loss of actin disassembly proteins. Together, these findings provide insight into the molecular mechanism of myelin wrapping and identify it as an actin-independent form of mammalian cell motility. PMID:26166300

  11. Gene-Silencing Screen for Mammalian Axon Regeneration Identifies Inpp5f (Sac2) as an Endogenous Suppressor of Repair after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yixiao; Stagi, Massimiliano; Wang, Xingxing; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Siegel, Chad S.; Nakatsu, Fubito; Cafferty, William B. J.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal growth and neuronal rewiring facilitate functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Known interventions that promote neural repair remain limited in their functional efficacy. To understand genetic determinants of mammalian CNS axon regeneration, we completed an unbiased RNAi gene-silencing screen across most phosphatases in the genome. We identified one known and 17 previously unknown phosphatase suppressors of injury-induced CNS axon growth. Silencing Inpp5f (Sac2) leads to robust enhancement of axon regeneration and growth cone reformation. Results from cultured Inpp5f−/− neurons confirm lentiviral shRNA results from the screen. Consistent with the nonoverlapping substrate specificity between Inpp5f and PTEN, rapamycin does not block enhanced regeneration in Inpp5f−/− neurons, implicating mechanisms independent of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. Inpp5f−/− mice develop normally, but show enhanced anatomical and functional recovery after mid-thoracic dorsal hemisection injury. More serotonergic axons sprout and/or regenerate caudal to the lesion level, and greater numbers of corticospinal tract axons sprout rostral to the lesion. Functionally, Inpp5f-null mice exhibit enhanced recovery of motor functions in both open-field and rotarod tests. This study demonstrates the potential of an unbiased high-throughput functional screen to identify endogenous suppressors of CNS axon growth after injury, and reveals Inpp5f (Sac2) as a novel suppressor of CNS axon repair after spinal cord injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The extent of axon regeneration is a critical determinant of neurological recovery from injury, and is extremely limited in the adult mammalian CNS. We describe an unbiased gene-silencing screen that uncovered novel molecules suppressing axonal regeneration. Inpp5f (Sac2) gene deletion promoted recovery from spinal cord injury with no side effects. The mechanism of action is distinct from another lipid phosphatase implicated in regeneration

  12. Clitoria ternatea and the CNS.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neeti N; Ohal, C C; Shroff, S K; Bhutada, R H; Somani, R S; Kasture, V S; Kasture, S B

    2003-06-01

    The present investigation was aimed at determining the spectrum of activity of the methanolic extract of Clitoria ternatea (CT) on the CNS. The CT was studied for its effect on cognitive behavior, anxiety, depression, stress and convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) and maximum electroshock (MES). To explain these effects, the effect of CT was also studied on behavior mediated by dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, serotonin and acetylcholine. The extract decreased time required to occupy the central platform (transfer latency, TL) in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and increased discrimination index in the object recognition test, indicating nootropic activity. The extract was more active in the object recognition test than in the EPM. The extract increased occupancy in the open arm of EPM by 160% and in the lit box of the light/dark exploration test by 157%, indicating its anxiolytic activity. It decreased the duration of immobility in tail suspension test (suggesting its antidepressant activity), reduced stress-induced ulcers and reduced the convulsing action of PTZ and MES. The extract exhibited tendency to reduce the intensity of behavior mediated via serotonin and acetylcholine. The effect on DA- and noradrenaline-mediated behavior was not significant. In conclusion, the extract was found to possess nootropic, anxiolytic, antidepressant, anticonvulsant and antistress activity. Further studies are necessary to isolate the active principle responsible for the activities and to understand its mode of action. PMID:12895670

  13. CNS development under altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.

    The future of space exploration depends on a solid understanding of the developmental process under microgravity. In furtherance of this goal, the present studies assessed the impact of altered gravity on the developing rat cerebellum. Specifically, the expression of selected cerebellar proteins and corresponding genes was compared in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity (1.5G) from embryonic day (E) 11 to postnatal day (P) 6 and P9 against their expression in rat neonates developing under normal gravity. Cerebellar proteins were analyzed by quantitative western blots of cerebellar homogenates; RNA analysis was performed in the same samples using ribonuclease protection assay (RPA). Densitometric analysis of western blots suggested 21% to 31% reduction in neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and 31% to 45% reduction in glial acidic protein (GFAP). RPA results suggested a small reduction (<10%) in NCAM mRNA and a moderate reduction (<25%) in GFAP mRNA. These data indicate that the expression of selected cerebellar proteins may be affected at both the transcriptional and translational/postranslational level. Furthermore, these results suggest that changes in expression of selected genes may underlie hypergravity's effect on the developing CNS. (Supported by NASA grant NCC2-1042 and BWH Psychiatry Fund).

  14. The role of the blood-CNS barrier in CNS disorders and their treatment.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Alan M

    2010-01-01

    The physical barrier between blood and the CNS (the blood-brain barrier, the blood-spinal cord barrier and the blood-CSF barrier) protects the CNS from both toxic and pathogenic agents in the blood. It is now clear that disruption of the blood-CNS barrier plays a key role in a number of CNS disorders, particularly those associated with neurodegeneration. Such disruption is inevitably accompanied by inflammatory change, as immune cells and immune mediators gain access to the brain or spinal cord. The blood-CNS barrier also presents a major obstacle for potential CNS medicines. Robust methods to assess CNS permeation are therefore essential for CNS drug discovery, particularly when brain pharmacokinetics are taken into account and especially when such measures are linked to neurochemical, physiological, behavioural or neuroimaging readouts of drug action. Drug candidates can be successfully designed to cross the blood-CNS barrier, but for those that can't there is the possibility of entry with a delivery system that facilitates the movement of drug candidate across the blood-CNS barrier. PMID:19664711

  15. Nicotinic ACh Receptors as Therapeutic Targets in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dineley, Kelly T.; Pandya, Anshul A.; Yakel, Jerrel L.

    2015-01-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can regulate neuronal excitability by acting on the cys-loop cation-conducting ligand-gated nicotinic ACh receptor channels (nAChRs). These receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system, being expressed on neurons and non-neuronal cells, where they participate in a variety of physiological responses such as anxiety, the central processing of pain, food intake, nicotine seeking behavior, and cognitive functions. In the mammalian brain, nine different subunits have been found thus far, which assemble into pentameric complexes with much subunit diversity; however the α7 and α4β2 subtypes predominate in the CNS. Neuronal nAChR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders. Here we will briefly discuss the functional makeup and expression of the nAChRs in the mammalian brain, and their role as targets in neurodegenerative diseases (in particular Alzheimer’s disease), neurodevelopmental disorders (in particular autism and schizophrenia), and neuropathic pain. PMID:25639674

  16. Clinical Applications Involving CNS Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Boris; McCown, Thomas; Leone, Paola; Gray, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) have traditionally been the most difficult to treat by traditional pharmacological methods, due mostly to the blood–brain barrier and the difficulties associated with repeated drug administration targeting the CNS. Viral vector gene transfer represents a way to permanently provide a therapeutic protein within the nervous system after a single administration, whether this be a gene replacement strategy for an inherited disorder or a disease-modifying protein for a disease such as Parkinson's. Gene therapy approaches for CNS disorders has evolved considerably over the last two decades. Although a breakthrough treatment has remained elusive, current strategies are now considerably safer and potentially much more effective. This chapter will explore the past, current, and future status of CNS gene therapy, focusing on clinical trials utilizing adeno-associated virus and lentiviral vectors. PMID:25311921

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Primary CNS Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... large vein near the heart. Having a weakened immune system may increase the risk of developing primary CNS ... immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or other disorders of the immune system or who have had a kidney transplant . For ...

  18. Treatment Options for Primary CNS Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... large vein near the heart. Having a weakened immune system may increase the risk of developing primary CNS ... immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or other disorders of the immune system or who have had a kidney transplant . For ...

  19. Air Pollution: Mechanisms of Neuroinflammation & CNS Disease

    PubMed Central

    Block, Michelle L.; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates air pollution as a chronic source of neuroinflammation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and neuropathology instigating central nervous system (CNS) disease. Stroke incidence, and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease pathology are linked to air pollution. Recent reports reveal that air pollution components reach the brain. Further, systemic effects known to impact lung and cardiovascular disease also impinge upon CNS health. While mechanisms driving air pollution-induced CNS pathology are poorly understood, new evidence suggests that activation of microglia and changes in the blood brain barrier may be key to this process. Here, we summarize recent findings detailing the mechanisms through which air pollution reaches the brain and activates the resident innate immune response to become a chronic source of pro-inflammatory factors and ROS culpable in CNS disease. PMID:19716187

  20. Neurotrauma and Inflammation: CNS and PNS Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mietto, Bruno Siqueira; Mostacada, Klauss; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the central nervous system (CNS) or the peripheral nervous system (PNS) triggers a cascade of events which culminate in a robust inflammatory reaction. The role played by inflammation in the course of degeneration and regeneration is not completely elucidated. While, in peripheral nerves, the inflammatory response is assumed to be essential for normal progression of Wallerian degeneration and regeneration, CNS trauma inflammation is often associated with poor recovery. In this review, we discuss key mechanisms that trigger the inflammatory reaction after nervous system trauma, emphasizing how inflammations in both CNS and PNS differ from each other, in terms of magnitude, cell types involved, and effector molecules. Knowledge of the precise mechanisms that elicit and maintain inflammation after CNS and PNS tissue trauma and their effect on axon degeneration and regeneration is crucial for the identification of possible pharmacological drugs that can positively affect the tissue regenerative capacity. PMID:25918475

  1. CNS toxoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Rajoo; Radhan, Prabhu; Anand, Rajamani; Subramanian, Ilanchezhian; Santosham, Roy; Sai, Venakata

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a serious and life-threatening disease in humans with a high prevalence in immunocompromised persons. The disease has a wide spectrum, depending on the immune status of the person. A CNS manifestation of toxoplasmosis in an immunocompetent person is very rare and often undetected. Our case of CNS toxoplasmosis in an immunocompetent person emphasizes the radiological diagnosis, which was further confirmed by advanced microbiology technique. PMID:27141248

  2. Differential Stability of PNS and CNS Nodal Complexes When Neuronal Neurofascin Is Lost

    PubMed Central

    Desmazieres, Anne; Zonta, Barbara; Zhang, Ao; Wu, Lai-Man N.; Sherman, Diane L.

    2014-01-01

    Fast, saltatory conduction in myelinated nerves requires the clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) at nodes of Ranvier in a nodal complex. The Neurofascin (Nfasc) gene encodes neuronal Neurofascin 186 (Nfasc186) at the node and glial Neurofascin 155 at the paranode, and these proteins play a key role in node assembly. However, their role in the maintenance and stability of the node is less well understood. Here we show that by inducible ablation of Nfasc in neurons in adult mice, Nfasc186 expression is reduced by >99% and 94% at PNS and CNS nodes, respectively. Gliomedin and NrCAM at PNS and brevican at CNS nodes are largely lost with neuronal neurofascin; however, Nav at nodes of Ranvier persist, albeit with ∼40% reduction in expression levels. βIV Spectrin, ankyrin G, and, to a lesser extent, the β1 subunit of the sodium channel, are less affected at the PNS node than in the CNS. Nevertheless, there is a 38% reduction in PNS conduction velocity. Loss of Nfasc186 provokes CNS paranodal disorganization, but this does not contribute to loss of Nav. These results show that Nav at PNS nodes are still maintained in a nodal complex when neuronal neurofascin is depleted, whereas the retention of nodal Nav in the CNS, despite more extensive dissolution of the complex, suggests a supportive role for the partially disrupted paranodal axoglial junction in selectively maintaining Nav at the CNS node. PMID:24719087

  3. Differential stability of PNS and CNS nodal complexes when neuronal neurofascin is lost.

    PubMed

    Desmazieres, Anne; Zonta, Barbara; Zhang, Ao; Wu, Lai-Man N; Sherman, Diane L; Brophy, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    Fast, saltatory conduction in myelinated nerves requires the clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) at nodes of Ranvier in a nodal complex. The Neurofascin (Nfasc) gene encodes neuronal Neurofascin 186 (Nfasc186) at the node and glial Neurofascin 155 at the paranode, and these proteins play a key role in node assembly. However, their role in the maintenance and stability of the node is less well understood. Here we show that by inducible ablation of Nfasc in neurons in adult mice, Nfasc186 expression is reduced by >99% and 94% at PNS and CNS nodes, respectively. Gliomedin and NrCAM at PNS and brevican at CNS nodes are largely lost with neuronal neurofascin; however, Nav at nodes of Ranvier persist, albeit with ∼40% reduction in expression levels. βIV Spectrin, ankyrin G, and, to a lesser extent, the β1 subunit of the sodium channel, are less affected at the PNS node than in the CNS. Nevertheless, there is a 38% reduction in PNS conduction velocity. Loss of Nfasc186 provokes CNS paranodal disorganization, but this does not contribute to loss of Nav. These results show that Nav at PNS nodes are still maintained in a nodal complex when neuronal neurofascin is depleted, whereas the retention of nodal Nav in the CNS, despite more extensive dissolution of the complex, suggests a supportive role for the partially disrupted paranodal axoglial junction in selectively maintaining Nav at the CNS node. PMID:24719087

  4. Knowledge-Based, Central Nervous System (CNS) Lead Selection and Lead Optimization for CNS Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Arup K; Herbertz, Torsten; Hudkins, Robert L; Dorsey, Bruce D; Mallamo, John P

    2012-01-18

    The central nervous system (CNS) is the major area that is affected by aging. Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), brain cancer, and stroke are the CNS diseases that will cost trillions of dollars for their treatment. Achievement of appropriate blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration is often considered a significant hurdle in the CNS drug discovery process. On the other hand, BBB penetration may be a liability for many of the non-CNS drug targets, and a clear understanding of the physicochemical and structural differences between CNS and non-CNS drugs may assist both research areas. Because of the numerous and challenging issues in CNS drug discovery and the low success rates, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to deprioritize their drug discovery efforts in the CNS arena. Prompted by these challenges and to aid in the design of high-quality, efficacious CNS compounds, we analyzed the physicochemical property and the chemical structural profiles of 317 CNS and 626 non-CNS oral drugs. The conclusions derived provide an ideal property profile for lead selection and the property modification strategy during the lead optimization process. A list of substructural units that may be useful for CNS drug design was also provided here. A classification tree was also developed to differentiate between CNS drugs and non-CNS oral drugs. The combined analysis provided the following guidelines for designing high-quality CNS drugs: (i) topological molecular polar surface area of <76 Å(2) (25-60 Å(2)), (ii) at least one (one or two, including one aliphatic amine) nitrogen, (iii) fewer than seven (two to four) linear chains outside of rings, (iv) fewer than three (zero or one) polar hydrogen atoms, (v) volume of 740-970 Å(3), (vi) solvent accessible surface area of 460-580 Å(2), and (vii) positive QikProp parameter CNS. The ranges within parentheses may be used during lead optimization. One violation to this proposed profile may be acceptable. The

  5. Knowledge-Based, Central Nervous System (CNS) Lead Selection and Lead Optimization for CNS Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is the major area that is affected by aging. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), brain cancer, and stroke are the CNS diseases that will cost trillions of dollars for their treatment. Achievement of appropriate blood–brain barrier (BBB) penetration is often considered a significant hurdle in the CNS drug discovery process. On the other hand, BBB penetration may be a liability for many of the non-CNS drug targets, and a clear understanding of the physicochemical and structural differences between CNS and non-CNS drugs may assist both research areas. Because of the numerous and challenging issues in CNS drug discovery and the low success rates, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to deprioritize their drug discovery efforts in the CNS arena. Prompted by these challenges and to aid in the design of high-quality, efficacious CNS compounds, we analyzed the physicochemical property and the chemical structural profiles of 317 CNS and 626 non-CNS oral drugs. The conclusions derived provide an ideal property profile for lead selection and the property modification strategy during the lead optimization process. A list of substructural units that may be useful for CNS drug design was also provided here. A classification tree was also developed to differentiate between CNS drugs and non-CNS oral drugs. The combined analysis provided the following guidelines for designing high-quality CNS drugs: (i) topological molecular polar surface area of <76 Å2 (25–60 Å2), (ii) at least one (one or two, including one aliphatic amine) nitrogen, (iii) fewer than seven (two to four) linear chains outside of rings, (iv) fewer than three (zero or one) polar hydrogen atoms, (v) volume of 740–970 Å3, (vi) solvent accessible surface area of 460–580 Å2, and (vii) positive QikProp parameter CNS. The ranges within parentheses may be used during lead optimization. One violation to this proposed profile may be acceptable. The

  6. An overview of mammalian pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Yamauchi, Takayoshi; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-05-15

    Mammalian pluripotency is the ability to give rise to all somatic cells as well as the germ cells of an adult mammal. It is a unique feature of embryonic epiblast cells, existing only transiently, as cells pass through early developmental stages. By contrast, pluripotency can be captured and stabilized indefinitely in cell culture and can also be reactivated in differentiated cells via nuclear reprogramming. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are the in vitro carriers of pluripotency and they can inhabit discrete pluripotent states depending on the stage at which they were derived and their culture conditions. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide a summary of mammalian pluripotency both in vivo and in vitro, and highlight recent and future applications of PSCs for basic and translational research. PMID:27190034

  7. Mammalian Carboxylesterase 5: Comparative Biochemistry and Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Roger S; Cox, Laura A; VandeBerg, John L

    2008-01-01

    Carboxylesterase 5 (CES5) (also called cauxin or CES7) is one of at least five mammalian CES gene families encoding enzymes of broad substrate specificity and catalysing hydrolytic and transesterification reactions. In silico methods were used to predict the amino acid sequences, secondary structures and gene locations for CES5 genes and gene products. Amino acid sequence alignments of mammalian CES5 enzymes enabled identification of key CES sequences previously reported for human CES1, as well as other sequences that are specific to the CES5 gene family, which were consistent with being monomeric in subunit structure and available for secretion into body fluids. Predicted secondary structures for mammalian CES5 demonstrated significant conservation with human CES1 as well as distinctive mammalian CES5 like structures. Mammalian CES5 genes are located in tandem with the CES1 gene(s), are transcribed on the reverse strand and contained 13 exons. CES5 has been previously reported in high concentrations in the urine (cauxin) of adult male cats, and within a protein complex of mammalian male epididymal fluids. Roles for CES5 may include regulating urinary levels of male cat pheromones; catalysing lipid transfer reactions within mammalian male reproductive fluids; and protecting neural tissue from drugs and xenobiotics. PMID:19727319

  8. Risk of CNS dissemination in extranodal lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2014-04-01

    Extranodal lymphomas constitute a heterogeneous group of malignancies, accounting for roughly 60% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The extranodal organ where lymphomas arise is an important determining factor of biological, molecular, and aetio-pathogenic features, and of presentation, dissemination pattern, and outcome. An increased risk of CNS involvement, an uncommon but lethal event, has been suggested in some extranodal lymphomas, but the absolute risk is still debatable for most of these malignancies. This debate is because of the presence of selection biases and other confounding factors in related literature, which inevitably has led to conflicting recommendations. The identification of extranodal lymphomas at increased risk of CNS dissemination is an important unmet clinical need; affected patients could benefit from early CNS assessment by neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis and adequate CNS prophylaxis, avoiding unnecessary prophylaxis and related toxicity in low-risk patients. This Review discusses relevant confounding factors and identifies high-risk extranodal lymphomas analysing histopathological category, involved organ, and other specific risk factors, which could be helpful for result interpretation and patient stratification in future clinical trials. Finally, a recommendation is provided for CNS-directed management of high-risk extranodal lymphoma patients in daily practice. PMID:24694639

  9. Growth factor enhanced retroviral gene transfer to the adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    King, L A; Mitrophanous, K A; Clark, L A; Kim, V N; Rohll, J B; Kingsman, A J; Colello, R J

    2000-07-01

    The use of viral vectors for gene delivery into mammalian cells provides a new approach in the treatment of many human diseases. The first viral vector approved for human clinical trials was murine leukemia virus (MLV), which remains the most commonly used vector in clinical trials to date. However, the application of MLV vectors is limited since MLV requires cells to be actively dividing in order for transduction and therefore gene delivery to occur. This limitation precludes the use of MLV for delivering genes to the adult CNS, where very little cell division is occurring. However, we speculated that this inherent limitation of ML V may be overcome by utilizing the known mitogenic effect of growth factors on cells of the CNS. Specifically, an in vivo application of growth factor to the adult brain, if able to induce cell division, could enhance MLV-based gene transfer to the adult brain. We now show that an exogenous application of basic fibroblast growth factor induces cell division in vivo. Under these conditions, where cells of the adult brain are stimulated to divide, MLV-based gene transfer is significantly enhanced. This novel approach precludes any vector modifications and provides a simple and effective way of delivering genes to cells of the adult brain utilizing MLV-based retroviral vectors. PMID:10918476

  10. Neurosteroid regulation of CNS development

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Synthia H.

    2007-01-01

    Neurosteroids are a relatively new class of neuroactive compounds, brought to prominence in the past two decades. Despite knowing of their presence in the nervous system of various species for over twenty years and knowing of their functions as GABAA and NMDA ligands, new and unexpected functions of these compounds are continuously being identified. Absence or reduced concentrations of neurosteroids during development and in adults may be associated with neurodevelopmental, psychiatric, or behavioral disorders. Treatment with physiologic or pharmacologic concentrations of these compounds may also promote neurogenesis, neuronal survival, myelination, increased memory, and reduced neurotoxicity. This review highlights what is currently known about the neurodevelopmental functions and mechanisms of action of four distinct neurosteroids – pregnenolone, progesterone, allopregnanolone and dehydroepiandrosterone. PMID:17651807

  11. N-Acetylaspartate in the CNS: From Neurodiagnostics to Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, John R.; Ross, Brian; Arun, Peethambaran; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N.; Namboodiri, M. A. A.

    2007-01-01

    The brain is unique among organs in many respects, including its mechanisms of lipid synthesis and energy production. The nervous system-specific metabolite N-acetylaspartate (NAA), which is synthesized from aspartate and acetyl-coenzyme A in neurons, appears to be a key link in these distinct biochemical features of CNS metabolism. During early postnatal CNS development, the expression of lipogenic enzymes in oligodendrocytes, including the NAA-degrading enzyme aspartoacylase (ASPA), is increased along with increased NAA production in neurons. NAA is transported from neurons to the cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes, where ASPA cleaves the acetate moiety for use in fatty acid and steroid synthesis. The fatty acids and steroids produced then go on to be used as building blocks for myelin lipid synthesis. Mutations in the gene for ASPA result in the fatal leukodystrophy Canavan disease, for which there is currently no effective treatment. Once postnatal myelination is completed, NAA may continue to be involved in myelin lipid turnover in adults, but it also appears to adopt other roles, including a bioenergetic role in neuronal mitochondria. NAA and ATP metabolism appear to be linked indirectly, whereby acetylation of aspartate may facilitate its removal from neuronal mitochondria, thus favoring conversion of glutamate to alpha ketoglutarate which can enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle for energy production. In its role as a mechanism for enhancing mitochondrial energy production from glutamate, NAA is in a key position to act as a magnetic resonance spectroscopy marker for neuronal health, viability and number. Evidence suggests that NAA is a direct precursor for the enzymatic synthesis of the neuron specific dipeptide N-acetylaspartylglutamate, the most concentrated neuropeptide in the human brain. Other proposed roles for NAA include neuronal osmoregulation and axon-glial signaling. We propose that NAA may also be involved in brain nitrogen balance. Further research

  12. CNS involvement in small noncleaved-cell lymphoma: is CNS disease per se a poor prognostic sign?

    PubMed

    Haddy, T B; Adde, M A; Magrath, I T

    1991-11-01

    Of 120 patients with small noncleaved-cell lymphoma who were entered sequentially on four National Cancer Institute (NCI) protocols, 29 (24%) had CNS involvement at some time in their clinical course. Seventeen had initial CNS involvement, and 12 developed CNS involvement at the time of first relapse. All 29 patients had extensive disease at presentation. The median serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels at presentation were 1,150 IU/L for patients with initial CNS involvement and 1,083 IU/L for patients with CNS involvement at relapse. CNS disease was significantly associated with serum LDH levels (P less than .0001), bone marrow involvement (P less than .0001), and jaw involvement (P = .018), but not involvement of the abdomen. There were nine long-term survivors among the 29 patients (31%). CNS disease did not appear to confer a worse prognosis on these patients than on patients without CNS involvement who had similar degrees of serum LDH elevation or who had bone marrow involvement, suggesting that extensive disease rather than CNS involvement was responsible for the poor prognosis. Event-free survival for patients with serum LDH levels above 500 IU/L was not different whether CNS disease was present or not (P = .29), nor was event-free survival different for patients with stage IV disease, whether CNS disease was present or not (P = .92). Although some patients had CNS radiation, there was no evidence that this was of therapeutic benefit. Intrathecal (IT) chemoprophylaxis effectively prevented spread to the CNS in patients without initial CNS involvement. Five of 18 patients (28%) who received no IT prophylaxis had CNS relapse (four isolated to the CNS), but only seven of the 85 patients (8%) who received IT prophylaxis had CNS relapse (two isolated to the CNS). The differences in overall and isolated CNS relapse rates were statistically significant (P = .034 and P = .008, respectively). PMID:1941056

  13. CNS stimulants and the look-alike drugs.

    PubMed

    Lake, C R; Quirk, R S

    1984-12-01

    Abuse of amphetamine and especially the stimulant look-alikes represent a serious problem in the United States. The danger of amphetamine lies in its ability to produce tolerance, psychological addiction, psychosis, hypertensive crisis, and major depression following withdrawal after long-term use. The danger of the look-alikes is of a psychosocial nature and has less to do with the physical properties of the drugs. Easy availability and a casual attitude toward these drugs may introduce children and young adults to the concept of recreational use of drugs at an early age. Look-alikes also divert the efforts of law enforcement officials whose time is better spent on efforts to control illegal distribution of controlled substances. However, look-alikes do produce severe to life-threatening effects including seizures, hypertensive crises, and psychoses. Unfortunately, there are no fast and easy solutions to the stimulant drug abuse problem. Abuse of CNS stimulants has a long history. Effective approaches must involve greater education about the dangers of these drugs and improved recognition among medical professionals of trends in CNS stimulant abuse in order to better diagnose and treat resulting problems. It is unlikely that federal controls on amphetamine production can be increased. The OTC drugs, such as PPA, caffeine, and ephedrine could be moved to prescription-only status to emphasize their potential for abuse and for producing adverse reactions, but this approach is counter to society's current trend toward self-medication. PMID:6151645

  14. mRNA distribution analysis of human TRPC family in CNS and peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Antonio; Medhurst, Andrew D; Mattei, Cesar; Kelsell, Rosemary E; Calver, Andrew R; Randall, Andrew D; Benham, Christopher D; Pangalos, Menelas N

    2002-12-30

    The mammalian homologues of the Drosophila transient receptor potential (TRP) channel are plasma membrane proteins involved in the regulation of cellular Ca(2+) influx. These ion channels can be activated subsequent to either depletion of Ca(2+) from internal stores or through receptor-mediated processes. The mRNA expression patterns of several individual mammalian short transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) have been described. Cross-comparisons between these data, however, are at best difficult predominantly due to the non-quantitative methods used. Furthermore there is limited data on the expression of TRPC family members in human tissues. In the present study we used a single technique, namely TaqMan real-time quantitative RT-PCR, to investigate the mRNA distribution of human TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6 and TRPC7 (hTRPCs) in discrete human brain areas, peripheral tissues as well as a panel of cell-lines. All hTRPCs studied were widely expressed within CNS and significant peripheral expression was often observed. Despite this, each channel exhibited a distinctive hallmark distribution profile. hTRPC1 was widely expressed in CNS and peripheral tissues, whereas hTRPC3 and hTRPC5 were predominantly expressed in tissues of CNS. hTRPC4 mRNA was detected in CNS and certain peripheral tissues such as bone, heart and prostate. hTRPC6 was homogeneously expressed throughout the CNS and peripheral tissues with the highest levels in placenta and lung. hTRPC7 mRNA was also broadly expressed in CNS as well as some peripheral tissues. The pattern of expression of the TRPCs was quite different in the various cell lines examined. TRPC3 and TRPC6 were selectively present in HEK-293 cells whilst TRPC1 was broadly distributed in the cell lines analyzed. In contrast TRPC4 and TRPC5 mRNAs were predominantly expressed in HK-2 and HEK-293 cell lines respectively. TRPC7 was selectively expressed in COS-1, COS-7 and HK-2 cell lines. These results show tissue- and cell

  15. Preparation of embryonic retinal explants to study CNS neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Hanea, Sonia T; Shanmugalingam, Ushananthini; Fournier, Alyson E; Smith, Patrice D

    2016-05-01

    This protocol outlines the preparation of embryonic mouse retinal explants, which provides an effective technique to analyze neurite outgrowth in central nervous system (CNS) neurons. This validated ex vivo system, which displays limited neuronal death, is highly reproducible and particularly amenable to manipulation. Our previously published studies involving embryonic chick or adult mouse retinal explants were instrumental in the preparation of this protocol; aspects of these previous techniques were combined, adopted and optimized. This protocol thus permits more efficient analysis of neurite growth. Briefly, the retina is dissected from the embryonic mouse eye using precise techniques that take into account the small size of the embryonic eye. The approach applied ensures that the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer faces the adhesion substrate on coated cover slips. Neurite growth is clear, well-delineated and readily quantifiable. These retinal explants can therefore be used to examine the neurite growth effects elicited by potential therapeutic agents. PMID:27072342

  16. Chemokines in the balance: maintenance of homeostasis and protection at CNS barriers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica L.; Holman, David W.; Klein, Robyn S.

    2014-01-01

    In the adult central nervous system (CNS), chemokines and their receptors are involved in developmental, physiological and pathological processes. Although most lines of investigation focus on their ability to induce the migration of cells, recent studies indicate that chemokines also promote cellular interactions and activate signaling pathways that maintain CNS homeostatic functions. Many homeostatic chemokines are expressed on the vasculature of the blood brain barrier (BBB) including CXCL12, CCL19, CCL20, and CCL21. While endothelial cell expression of these chemokines is known to regulate the entry of leukocytes into the CNS during immunosurveillance, new data indicate that CXCL12 is also involved in diverse cellular activities including adult neurogenesis and neuronal survival, having an opposing role to the homeostatic chemokine, CXCL14, which appears to regulate synaptic inputs to neural precursors. Neuronal expression of CX3CL1, yet another homeostatic chemokine that promotes neuronal survival and communication with microglia, is partly regulated by CXCL12. Regulation of CXCL12 is unique in that it may regulate its own expression levels via binding to its scavenger receptor CXCR7/ACKR3. In this review, we explore the diverse roles of these and other homeostatic chemokines expressed within the CNS, including the possible implications of their dysfunction as a cause of neurologic disease. PMID:24920943

  17. Primary Central Nervous System (CNS) Lymphoma B Cell Receptors Recognize CNS Proteins.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Purschke, Frauke G; Brunn, Anna; May, Caroline; Nordhoff, Eckhard; Marcus, Katrin; Deckert, Martina

    2015-08-01

    Primary lymphoma of the CNS (PCNSL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma confined to the CNS. To elucidate its peculiar organ tropism, we generated recombinant Abs (recAbs) identical to the BCR of 23 PCNSLs from immunocompetent patients. Although none of the recAbs showed self-reactivity upon testing with common autoantigens, they recognized 1547 proteins present on a large-scale protein microarray, indicating polyreactivity. Interestingly, proteins (GRINL1A, centaurin-α, BAIAP2) recognized by the recAbs are physiologically expressed by CNS neurons. Furthermore, 87% (20/23) of the recAbs, including all Abs derived from IGHV4-34 using PCNSL, recognized galectin-3, which was upregulated on microglia/macrophages, astrocytes, and cerebral endothelial cells upon CNS invasion by PCNSL. Thus, PCNSL Ig may recognize CNS proteins as self-Ags. Their interaction may contribute to BCR signaling with sustained NF-κB activation and, ultimately, may foster tumor cell proliferation and survival. These data may also explain, at least in part, the affinity of PCNSL cells for the CNS. PMID:26116512

  18. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.; Pearson, J.

    2006-11-01

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O(α,p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  19. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  20. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  1. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.

    2006-11-02

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O({alpha},p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  2. Agile delivery of protein therapeutics to CNS.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2014-09-28

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. PMID:24956489

  3. Histamine and Immune Biomarkers in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Torrellas, Clara; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; López-Muñoz, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimmune dysregulation is a common phenomenon in different forms of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Cross-links between central and peripheral immune mechanisms appear to be disrupted as reflected by a series of immune markers (CD3, CD4, CD7, HLA-DR, CD25, CD28, and CD56) which show variability in brain disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, migraine, epilepsy, vascular dementia, mental retardation, cerebrovascular encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, cranial nerve neuropathies, mental retardation, and posttraumatic brain injury. Histamine (HA) is a pleiotropic monoamine involved in several neurophysiological functions, neuroimmune regulation, and CNS pathogenesis. Changes in brain HA show an age- and sex-related pattern, and alterations in brain HA levels are present in different CNS regions of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain HA in neuronal and nonneuronal compartments plays a dual role (neurotrophic versus neurotoxic) in a tissue-specific manner. Pathogenic mechanisms associated with neuroimmune dysregulation in AD involve HA, interleukin-1β, and TNF-α, whose aberrant expression contributes to neuroinflammation as an aggravating factor for neurodegeneration and premature neuronal death. PMID:27190492

  4. Agile Delivery of Protein Therapeutics to CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S.; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. PMID:24956489

  5. Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-12-18

    With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

  6. Lipid oxidation and peroxidation in CNS health and disease: from molecular mechanisms to therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna; Hatcher, James Franklin

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced at low levels in mammalian cells by various metabolic processes, such as oxidative phosphorylation by the mitochondrial respiratory chain, NAD(P)H oxidases, and arachidonic acid oxidative metabolism. To maintain physiological redox balance, cells have endogenous antioxidant defenses regulated at the transcriptional level by Nrf2/ARE. Oxidative stress results when ROS production exceeds the cell's ability to detoxify ROS. Overproduction of ROS damages cellular components, including lipids, leading to decline in physiological function and cell death. Reaction of ROS with lipids produces oxidized phospholipids, which give rise to 4-hydroxynonenal, 4-oxo-2-nonenal, and acrolein. The brain is susceptible to oxidative damage due to its high lipid content and oxygen consumption. Neurodegenerative diseases (AD, ALS, bipolar disorder, epilepsy, Friedreich's ataxia, HD, MS, NBIA, NPC, PD, peroxisomal disorders, schizophrenia, Wallerian degeneration, Zellweger syndrome) and CNS traumas (stroke, TBI, SCI) are problems of vast clinical importance. Free iron can react with H(2)O(2) via the Fenton reaction, a primary cause of lipid peroxidation, and may be of particular importance for these CNS injuries and disorders. Cholesterol is an important regulator of lipid organization and the precursor for neurosteroid biosynthesis. Atherosclerosis, the major risk factor for ischemic stroke, involves accumulation of oxidized LDL in the arteries, leading to foam cell formation and plaque development. This review will discuss the role of lipid oxidation/peroxidation in various CNS injuries/disorders. PMID:19624272

  7. The role of the NG2 proteoglycan in OPC and CNS network function.

    PubMed

    Sakry, Dominik; Trotter, Jacqueline

    2016-05-01

    In the normal mammalian CNS, the NG2 proteoglycan is expressed by oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) but not by any other neural cell-type. NG2 is a type-1 membrane protein, exerting multiple roles in the CNS including intracellular signaling within the OPC, with effects on migration, cytoskeleton interaction and target gene regulation. It has been recently shown that the extracellular region of NG2, in addition to an adhesive function, acts as a soluble ECM component with the capacity to alter defined neuronal network properties. This region of NG2 is thus endowed with neuromodulatory properties. In order to generate biologically active fragments yielding these properties, the sequential cleavage of the NG2 protein by α- and γ-secretases occurs. The basal level of constitutive cleavage is stimulated by neuronal network activity. This processing leads to 4 major NG2 fragments which all have been associated with distinct biological functions. Here we summarize these functions, focusing on recent discoveries and their implications for the CNS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:NG2-glia(Invited only). PMID:26100334

  8. Assessment of Vascular Regeneration in the CNS Using the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Miloudi, Khalil; Dejda, Agnieszka; Binet, François; Lapalme, Eric; Cerani, Agustin; Sapieha, Przemyslaw

    2014-01-01

    The rodent retina is perhaps the most accessible mammalian system in which to investigate neurovascular interplay within the central nervous system (CNS). It is increasingly being recognized that several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis present elements of vascular compromise. In addition, the most prominent causes of blindness in pediatric and working age populations (retinopathy of prematurity and diabetic retinopathy, respectively) are characterized by vascular degeneration and failure of physiological vascular regrowth. The aim of this technical paper is to provide a detailed protocol to study CNS vascular regeneration in the retina. The method can be employed to elucidate molecular mechanisms that lead to failure of vascular growth after ischemic injury. In addition, potential therapeutic modalities to accelerate and restore healthy vascular plexuses can be explored. Findings obtained using the described approach may provide therapeutic avenues for ischemic retinopathies such as that of diabetes or prematurity and possibly benefit other vascular disorders of the CNS. PMID:24998265

  9. Development of the Mammalian Kidney.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The basic unit of kidney function is the nephron. In the mouse, around 14,000 nephrons form in a 10-day period extending into early neonatal life, while the human fetus forms the adult complement of nephrons in a 32-week period completed prior to birth. This review discusses our current understanding of mammalian nephrogenesis: the contributing cell types and the regulatory processes at play. A conceptual developmental framework has emerged for the mouse kidney. This framework is now guiding studies of human kidney development enabled in part by in vitro systems of pluripotent stem cell-seeded nephrogenesis. A near future goal will be to translate our developmental knowledge-base to the productive engineering of new kidney structures for regenerative medicine. PMID:26969971

  10. Differential properties of type I and type II benzodiazepine receptors in mammalian CNS neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Shirasaki, T.; Munakata, M.; Hirata, A.; Akaike, N.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) partial agonists, Y-23684 and CL218,872, were compared with its full agonist, diazepam, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current (ICl) in acutely dissociated rat cerebral cortex (CTX), cerebellar Purkinje (CPJ) and spinal ventral horn (SVH) neurones, by the whole-cell mode patch-clamp technique. 2. The GABA-induced responses were essentially the same in both SVH and CPJ neurones, but the KD value of the GABA response in CTX neurone was lower than those in the other two brain regions. 3. Enhancement of the GABA response by the two partial agonists was about one-third of that by diazepam in the SVH neurones (where type II subtype of BZR, BZ2, is predominant), whereas these partial agonists potentiated the GABA response as much as diazepam in CPJ neurones (where the type I subtype of BZR, BZ1, is predominant). In CTX neurones where both type I and II variants are expressed, the augmentation ratio of the GABA response by diazepam was between the values in CPJ and SVH neurones. 4. In concentration-response relationships of BZR partial agonists, the threshold concentrations, KD values and maximal augmentation ratio of the GABA response were similar in all CTX, CPJ and SVH neurones. Also, in all preparations, the threshold concentration and KD values of diazepam action were 10 fold less than those induced by partial agonists. 5. All BZR agonists shifted the concentration-response relationship for GABA to the left without changing the maximum current amplitude, indicating that activation of both BZ1 and BZ2 increase the affinity of the GABAA receptor for GABA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8395299

  11. The role of oligodendrocytes and oligodendrocyte progenitors in CNS remyelination.

    PubMed

    Keirstead, H S; Blakemore, W F

    1999-01-01

    Remyelination enables restoration of saltatory conduction and a return of normal function lost during demyelination. Unfortunately, remyelination is often incomplete in the adult human central nervous system (CNS) and this failure of remyelination is one of the main reasons for clinical deficits in demyelinating disease. An understanding of the failure of remyelination in demyelinating diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis depends upon the elucidation of cellular events underlying successful remyelination. Although the potential for remyelination of the adult CNS has been well established, there is still some dispute regarding the origin of the remyelinating cell population. The literature variously reports that remyelinating oligodendrocytes arise from dedifferentiation and/or proliferation of mature oligodendrocytes, or are generated solely from proliferation and differentiation of glial progenitor cells. This review focuses on studies carried out on remyelinating lesions in the adult rat spinal cord produced by injection of antibodies to galactocerebroside plus serum complement that demonstrate: 1) oligodendrocytes which survive within an area of demyelination do not contribute to remyelination, 2) remyelination is carried out by oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, 3) recruitment of oligodendrocyte progenitors to an area of demyelination is a local response, and 4) division of oligodendrocyte progenitors is symmetrical and results in chronic depletion of the oligodendrocyte progenitor population in the normal white matter around an area of remyelination. These results suggest that failure of remyelination may be contributed to by a depletion of oligodendrocyte progenitors especially following repeated episodes of demyelination. Remyelination allows the return of saltatory conduction (Smith et al., 1979) and the functional recovery of demyelination-induced deficits (Jeffery et al., 1997). Findings such as these have encouraged research aimed at enhancing the limited

  12. Glia in mammalian development and disease.

    PubMed

    Zuchero, J Bradley; Barres, Ben A

    2015-11-15

    Glia account for more than half of the cells in the mammalian nervous system, and the past few decades have witnessed a flood of studies that detail novel functions for glia in nervous system development, plasticity and disease. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we review the origins of glia and discuss their diverse roles during development, in the adult nervous system and in the context of disease. PMID:26577203

  13. Immunohistological localization of serotonin in the CNS and feeding system of the stable fly stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera: muscidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), plays critical roles as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator that control or modulate many behaviors in insects, such as feeding. Neurons immunoreactive (IR)to 5-HT were detected in the central nervous system (CNS) of the larval and adult stages of the stab...

  14. Growth Arrest Specific 1 (GAS1) Is Abundantly Expressed in the Adult Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zarco, Natanael; Bautista, Elizabeth; Cuéllar, Manola; Vergara, Paula; Flores-Rodriguez, Paola; Aguilar-Roblero, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Growth arrest specific 1 (GAS1) is a pleiotropic protein that induces apoptosis and cell arrest in different tumors, but it is also involved in the development of the nervous system and other tissues and organs. This dual ability is likely caused by its capacity to interact both by inhibiting the intracellular signaling cascade induced by glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor and by facilitating the activity of the sonic hedgehog pathway. The presence of GAS1 mRNA has been described in adult mouse brain, and here we corroborated this observation. We then proceeded to determine the distribution of the protein in the adult central nervous system (CNS). We detected, by western blot analysis, expression of GAS1 in olfactory bulb, caudate-putamen, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, mesencephalon, medulla oblongata, cerebellum, and cervical spinal cord. To more carefully map the expression of GAS1, we performed double-label immunohistochemistry and noticed expression of GAS1 in neurons in all brain areas examined. We also observed expression of GAS1 in astroglial cells, albeit the pattern of expression was more restricted than that seen in neurons. Briefly, in the present article, we report the widespread distribution and cellular localization of the GAS1 native protein in adult mammalian CNS. PMID:23813868

  15. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 and synaptic function in the mammalian central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Andrew D; Kurihara, Mai; Brandon, Nicholas J; Brown, Jon T

    2014-01-01

    The disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene is found at the breakpoint of an inherited chromosomal translocation, and segregates with major mental illnesses. Its potential role in central nervous system (CNS) malfunction has triggered intensive investigation of the biological roles played by DISC1, with the hope that this may shed new light on the pathobiology of psychiatric disease. Such work has ranged from investigations of animal behavior to detailed molecular-level analysis of the assemblies that DISC1 forms with other proteins. Here, we discuss the evidence for a role of DISC1 in synaptic function in the mammalian CNS. PMID:24712987

  16. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 and synaptic function in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Randall, Andrew D; Kurihara, Mai; Brandon, Nicholas J; Brown, Jon T

    2014-04-01

    The disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene is found at the breakpoint of an inherited chromosomal translocation, and segregates with major mental illnesses. Its potential role in central nervous system (CNS) malfunction has triggered intensive investigation of the biological roles played by DISC1, with the hope that this may shed new light on the pathobiology of psychiatric disease. Such work has ranged from investigations of animal behavior to detailed molecular-level analysis of the assemblies that DISC1 forms with other proteins. Here, we discuss the evidence for a role of DISC1 in synaptic function in the mammalian CNS. PMID:24712987

  17. Histamine pharmacology and new CNS drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tiligada, Ekaterini; Kyriakidis, Konstantinos; Chazot, Paul L; Passani, M Beatrice

    2011-12-01

    During the last decade, the identification of a number of novel drug targets led to the development of promising new compounds which are currently under evaluation for their therapeutic prospective in CNS related disorders. Besides the established pleiotropic regulatory functions in the periphery, the interest in the potential homeostatic role of histamine in the brain was revived following the identification of H(3) and H(4) receptors some years ago. Complementing classical CNS pharmacology, the development of selective histamine receptor agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists provides the lead for the potential exploitation of the histaminergic system in the treatment of brain pathologies. Although no CNS disease entity has been associated directly to brain histamine dysfunction until now, the H(3) receptor is recognized as a drug target for neuropathic pain, sleep-wake disorders, including narcolepsy, and cognitive impairment associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, or Parkinson's disease, while the first H(3) receptor ligands have already entered phase I-III clinical trials. Interestingly, the localization of the immunomodulatory H(4) receptor in the nervous system exposes attractive perspectives for the therapeutic exploitation of this new drug target in neuroimmunopharmacology. This review focuses on a concise presentation of the current "translational research" approach that exploits the latest advances in histamine pharmacology for the development of beneficial drug targets for the treatment of neuronal disorders, such as neuropathic pain, cognitive, and sleep-wake pathologies. Furthermore, the role of the brain histaminergic system(s) in neuroprotection and neuroimmunology/inflammation remains a challenging research area that is currently under consideration. PMID:22070192

  18. A β-Lactam Antibiotic Dampens Excitotoxic Inflammatory CNS Damage in a Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Salazar, Delany; Bittner, Stefan; Zozulya, Alla L.; Weidenfeller, Christian; Kotsiari, Alexandra; Stangel, Martin; Fahlke, Christoph; Wiendl, Heinz

    2008-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), impairment of glial “Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters” (EAATs) together with an excess glutamate-release by invading immune cells causes excitotoxic damage of the central nervous system (CNS). In order to identify pathways to dampen excitotoxic inflammatory CNS damage, we assessed the effects of a β-lactam antibiotic, ceftriaxone, reported to enhance expression of glial EAAT2, in “Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein” (MOG)-induced EAE. Ceftriaxone profoundly ameliorated the clinical course of murine MOG-induced EAE both under preventive and therapeutic regimens. However, ceftriaxone had impact neither on EAAT2 protein expression levels in several brain areas, nor on the radioactive glutamate uptake capacity in a mixed primary glial cell-culture and the glutamate-induced uptake currents in a mammalian cell line mediated by EAAT2. Moreover, the clinical effect of ceftriaxone was preserved in the presence of the EAAT2-specific transport inhibitor, dihydrokainate, while dihydrokainate alone caused an aggravated EAE course. This demonstrates the need for sufficient glial glutamate uptake upon an excitotoxic autoimmune inflammatory challenge of the CNS and a molecular target of ceftriaxone other than the glutamate transporter. Ceftriaxone treatment indirectly hampered T cell proliferation and proinflammatory INFγ and IL17 secretion through modulation of myelin-antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) e.g. dendritic cells (DCs) and reduced T cell migration into the CNS in vivo. Taken together, we demonstrate, that a β-lactam antibiotic attenuates disease course and severity in a model of autoimmune CNS inflammation. The mechanisms are reduction of T cell activation by modulation of cellular antigen-presentation and impairment of antigen-specific T cell migration into the CNS rather than or modulation of central glutamate homeostasis. PMID:18773080

  19. Mammalian cardiolipin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Edgard M; Nguyen, Hieu; Hatch, Grant M

    2014-04-01

    Cardiolipin is a major phospholipid in mitochondria and is involved in the generation of cellular energy in the form of ATP. In mammalian and eukaryotic cells it is synthesized via the cytidine-5'-diphosphate-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol phosphate pathway. This brief review will describe some of the more recent studies on mammalian cardiolipin biosynthesis and provide an overview of regulation of cardiolipin biosynthesis. In addition, the important role that this key phospholipid plays in disease processes including heart failure, diabetes, thyroid hormone disease and the genetic disease Barth Syndrome will be discussed. PMID:24144810

  20. Identification of Radial Glia Progenitors in the Developing and Adult Retina of Sharks

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Farías, Nuria; Candal, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells give rise to transient progenitors termed neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and radial glial cells (RGCs). RGCs represent the major source of neurons, glia and adult stem cells in several regions of the central nervous system (CNS). RGCs are mostly transient in mammals, but they are widely maintained in the adult CNS of fishes, where they continue to be morphologically similar to RGCs in the mammalian brain and fulfill similar roles as progenitors and guide for migrating neurons. The retina of fishes offers an exceptional model to approach the study of adult neurogenesis because of the presence of constitutive proliferation from the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), containing NECs, and from adult glial cells with radial morphology (the Müller glia). However, the cellular hierarchies and precise contribution of different types of progenitors to adult neurogenesis remain unsolved. We have analyzed the transition from NECs to RGCs and RGC differentiation in the retina of the cartilaginous fish Scyliorhinus canicula, which offers a particularly good spatial and temporal frame to investigate this process. We have characterized progenitor and adult RGCs by immunohistochemical detection of glial markers as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamine synthetase (GS). We have compared the emergence and localization of glial markers with that of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, a proliferation maker) and Doublecortin (DCX, which increases at early stages of neuronal differentiation). During retinal development, GFAP-immunoreactive NECs located in the most peripheral CMZ (CMZp) codistribute with DCX-immunonegative cells. GFAP-immunoreactive RGCs and Müller cells are located in successive more central parts of the retina and codistribute with DCX- and DCX/GS-immunoreactive cells, respectively. The same types of progenitors are found in juveniles, suggesting that the contribution of the CMZ to adult neurogenesis implies a transition through the

  1. Impact of Cranial Irradiation Added to Intrathecal Conditioning in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Central Nervous System Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mayadev, Jyoti S.; Douglas, James G.; Storer, Barry E.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storb, Rainer

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Neither the prognostic importance nor the appropriate management of central nervous system (CNS) involvement is known for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We examined the impact of a CNS irradiation boost to standard intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC). Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2005, a total of 648 adult AML patients received a myeloablative HCT: 577 patients were CNS negative (CNS-), and 71 were CNS positive (CNS+). Of the 71 CNS+ patients, 52 received intrathecal chemotherapy alone (CNS+ITC), and 19 received ITC plus an irradiation boost (CNS+RT). Results: The CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT patients had 1- and 5-year relapse-free survivals (RFS) of 43% and 35%, 15% and 6%, and 37% and 32%, respectively. CNS+ITC patients had a statistically significant worse RFS compared with CNS- patients (hazard ratio [HR], 2.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-3.6; p < 0.0001). CNS+RT patients had improved relapse free survival over that of CNS+ITC patients (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p = 0.01). The 1- and 5-year overall survivals (OS) of patients with CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT, were 50% and 38%, 21% and 6%, and 53% and 42%, respectively. The survival of CNS+RT were significantly better than CNS+ITC patients (p = 0.004). After adjusting for known risk factors, CNS+RT patients had a trend toward lower relapse rates and reduced nonrelapse mortality. Conclusions: CNS+ AML is associated with a poor prognosis. The role of a cranial irradiation boost to intrathecal chemotherapy appears to mitigate the risk of CNS disease, and needs to be further investigated to define optimal treatment strategies.

  2. CNS Myelination Requires Cytoplasmic Dynein Function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Michele L.; Shin, Jimann; Kearns, Christina A.; Langworthy, Melissa M.; Snell, Heather; Walker, Macie B.; Appel, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytoplasmic dynein provides the main motor force for minus-end-directed transport of cargo on microtubules. Within the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS), proliferation, neuronal migration and retrograde axon transport are among the cellular functions known to require dynein. Accordingly, mutations of DYNC1H1, which encodes the heavy chain subunit of cytoplasmic dynein, have been linked to developmental brain malformations and axonal pathologies. Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating glial cell type of the CNS, migrate from their origins to their target axons and subsequently extend multiple long processes that ensheath axons with specialized insulating membrane. These processes are filled with microtubules, which facilitate molecular transport of myelin components. However, whether oligodendrocytes require cytoplasmic dynein to ensheath axons with myelin is not known. Results We identified a mutation of zebrafish dync1h1 in a forward genetic screen that caused a deficit of oligodendrocytes. Using in vivo imaging and gene expression analyses, we additionally found evidence that dync1h1 promotes axon ensheathment and myelin gene expression. Conclusions In addition to its well known roles in axon transport and neuronal migration, cytoplasmic dynein contributes to neural development by promoting myelination. PMID:25488883

  3. Mammalian development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  4. ED-12WIDESPREAD SYSTEMIC METASTASES FROM MEDULLOBLASTOMA WITHOUT EVIDENCE OF ACTIVE CNS INVOLVEMENT: A CASE SERIES

    PubMed Central

    Kumthekar, Priya; Singh, Simran; Smiley, Natasha Pillay; Lulla, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    This case series describes two patients with previously treated medulloblastoma who present with systemic metastases without evidence of central nervous system (CNS) disease. Patient #1 is male who presented at age 29 with pathology confirmed medulloblastoma treated with complete surgical resection followed by radiation (36 Gy craniospinal plus posterior fossa boost). Subsequently, he received cisplatin, cytoxan, and vincristine. One year later, he developed back pain and urinary retention. Imaging of his spine showed widespread bony metastases without parenchymal CNS disease. Biopsy of the left acetabulum confirmed metastatic medulloblastoma. He is currently enrolled on study with LDE225 versus temozolomide. Surveillance imaging to date is negative for intracranial metastasis, but does show extensive bony metastases involving the total spine, pelvis, ribs, sternum, clavicles, humeri, and femurs. Patient #2 is a female who presented at 32 years with severe headaches, nausea and vomiting found to have pathology confirmed medulloblastoma. She was lost to follow up temporarily, but presented again months later with headaches. She had a recurrent mass and underwent repeat resection. MRI of the spine showed nodular enhancement of the sacral nerve roots compatible with leptomeningeal spread. She underwent craniospinal radiation 36 Gy with a boost to the lumbar region and posterior fossa. One year after initial diagnosis, she presented with hypotension, tachycardia, and fatigue. Neuroimaging showed improved enhancement of the sacral nerve roots and brain imaging showed stable postsurgical changes. Systemic imaging, however, revealed widespread metastatic disease in the lymphatic system, liver, lung, and bones. The patient passed away a few months later. Medulloblastoma can metastasize outside the central nervous system (CNS), however typically does so concurrently with CNS progression. Here we present two adult patients with widely metastatic medulloblastoma systemically

  5. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  6. Exclusion of Integrins from CNS Axons Is Regulated by Arf6 Activation and the AIS

    PubMed Central

    Franssen, Elske H. P.; Zhao, Rong-Rong; Koseki, Hiroaki; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are adhesion and survival molecules involved in axon growth during CNS development, as well as axon regeneration after injury in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Adult CNS axons do not regenerate after injury, partly due to a low intrinsic growth capacity. We have previously studied the role of integrins in axon growth in PNS axons; in the present study, we investigate whether integrin mechanisms involved in PNS regeneration may be altered or lacking from mature CNS axons by studying maturing CNS neurons in vitro. In rat cortical neurons, we find that integrins are present in axons during initial growth but later become restricted to the somato-dendritic domain. We investigated how this occurs and whether it can be altered to enhance axonal growth potential. We find a developmental change in integrin trafficking; transport becomes predominantly retrograde throughout axons, but not dendrites, as neurons mature. The directionality of transport is controlled through the activation state of ARF6, with developmental upregulation of the ARF6 GEF ARNO enhancing retrograde transport. Lowering ARF6 activity in mature neurons restores anterograde integrin flow, allows transport into axons, and increases axon growth. In addition, we found that the axon initial segment is partly responsible for exclusion of integrins and removal of this structure allows integrins into axons. Changing posttranslational modifications of tubulin with taxol also allows integrins into the proximal axon. The experiments suggest that the developmental loss of regenerative ability in CNS axons is due to exclusion of growth-related molecules due to changes in trafficking. PMID:26019348

  7. Plant sterols: Friend or foe in CNS disorders?

    PubMed

    Vanmierlo, Tim; Bogie, Jeroen F J; Mailleux, Jo; Vanmol, Jasmine; Lütjohann, Dieter; Mulder, Monique; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, the central nervous system (CNS) is the most cholesterol rich organ by weight. Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated in the CNS and all cholesterol available is synthesized in situ. Deficits in cholesterol homeostasis at the level of synthesis, transport, or catabolism result in severe disorders featured by neurological disability. Recent studies indicate that a disturbed cholesterol metabolism is involved in CNS disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In contrast to circulating cholesterol, dietary plant sterols, can cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the membranes of CNS cells. Plant sterols are well-known for their ability to lower circulating cholesterol levels. The finding that they gain access to the CNS has fueled research focusing on the physiological roles of plant sterols in the healthy and diseased CNS. To date, both beneficial and detrimental effects of plant sterols on CNS disorders are defined. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding the impact of plant sterols on homeostatic and pathogenic processes in the CNS, and elaborate on the therapeutic potential of plant sterols in CNS disorders. PMID:25623279

  8. Gene therapy for CNS diseases - Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV) alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases. PMID:27525222

  9. Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Modeling CNS Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, David H.; Parada, Luis F.; Silva, Alcino J.; Ratner, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the most common monogenic disorder in which individuals manifest central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities. Affected individuals develop glial neoplasms (optic gliomas, malignant astrocytomas) and neuronal dysfunction (learning disabilities, attention deficits). Nf1 genetically-engineered mouse models have revealed the molecular and cellular underpinnings of gliomagenesis, attention deficit, and learning problems with relevance to basic neurobiology. Using NF1 as a model system, these studies have revealed critical roles for the NF1 gene in non-neoplastic cells in the tumor microenvironment, the importance of brain region heterogeneity, novel mechanisms of glial growth regulation, the neurochemical bases for attention deficit and learning abnormalities, and new insights into neural stem cell function. Here we review recent studies, presented at a symposium at the 2012 Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, that highlight unexpected cell biology insights into RAS and cyclic AMP pathway effects on neural progenitor signaling, neuronal function, and oligodendrocyte lineage differentiation. PMID:23055477

  10. Engineering the CNS stem cell microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cicely A; Lavik, Erin B

    2010-01-01

    The loss of neural tissue underlies the symptomatology of several neurological insults of disparate etiology, including trauma, cerebrovascular insult and neurodegenerative disease. Restoration of damaged neural tissue through the use of exogenous or endogenous neural stem or progenitor cells is an enticing therapeutic option provided one can control their proliferation, migration and differentiation. Initial attempts at CNS tissue engineering relied on the intrinsic cellular properties of progenitor cells; however, it is now appreciated that the microenvironment surrounding the cells plays an indispensible role in regulating stem cell behavior. This article focuses on attempts to engineer the neural stem cell microenvironment by utilizing the major cellular components of the niche (endothelial cells, astrocytes and ependymal cells) and the extracellular matrix in which they are embedded. PMID:19903005

  11. CNS active O-linked glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Evan M.; Polt, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring glycopeptides and glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes. Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in vivo. Glycopeptides are involved in cell signaling and sorting, providing cell surface markers for recognition. From the drug design and synthesis perspective, modification of a peptide through glycosylation results in increased bioavailability and bioactivity of glycopeptides in living systems with negligible toxicity of degradation products. Glycopeptide synthesis can be accomplished through incorporation of a glycosylated amino acid in solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) to form the desired peptide, or via incorporation of sugar-amino acid moieties. Additionally, research indicates that glycosylation increases penetration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by peptides, which may lead to novel therapeutics for neurological disorders. Recent applications of glycopeptides have focused on the in vivo central nervous system (CNS) effects after peripheral administration of centrally active peptides modified with various carbohydrates. PMID:26157795

  12. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Induces Expression of a Novel Intergenic Long Noncoding RNA in Adult rat Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2016-02-01

    Around 90% of the mammalian genome undergoes pervasive transcription into various types of small and long regulatory noncoding RNAs, whereas only ∼ 1.5% codes for proteins. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) constitute diverse classes of sense- and antisense transcripts that are abundantly expressed in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) in cell type- and developmental stage-specific manners. They are implicated in brain development, differentiation, neuronal plasticity, and other cognitive functions. Mammalian brain requires the vitamin A metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) for its normal development, differentiation, and cell-fate determination. However, its role in adult brain function is less understood. Here, we report atRA-mediated transcriptional upregulation of endogenous expression of a novel long intergenic noncoding RNA-rat brain expressed (LINC-RBE) in cultured primary hippocampal neurons from adult rat. We have previously reported LINC-RBE as an intergenic, simple repeat sequence containing lncRNA highly expressed in the rat brain. This is a first-time report of involvement of atRA in transcriptional upregulation of lncRNA expression in rat hippocampal neurons. Therefore, it may be involved in regulation of brain function and disease. PMID:26572536

  13. CNS myelination and PLP gene dosage.

    PubMed

    Woodward, K; Malcolm, S

    2001-08-01

    The phenomenon of gene dosage effects demonstrates that the mechanisms of some genetic diseases are best recognised at the genomic level. Classical gene mutation screening approaches utilising PCR are unsuccessful in unravelling the basis of disease because the gene sequence is unaltered and only the copy number is different. Techniques for detecting DNA dosage are required. Examples of haploinsufficiency and gene deletions are well documented, but increased gene dosage is also an important genetic mechanism in disorders involving myelin proteins in the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we review the dosage effects and mutations of the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene that causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) and spastic paraplegia Type 2 (SPG2) disorders of CNS myelination. Similarities are drawn with the peripheral neuropathies Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1 (CMT1A) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) that are also caused by dosage effects and mutations in a single myelin protein gene (peripheral myelin protein 22, PMP-22). We compare the different mutational mechanisms in man and analogous mouse models that suggest a function for PLP beyond its structural role in myelin. We focus on the increased dosage of the PLP gene that is the major cause of PMD and results from a submicroscopic duplication of Xq22. Other clinical phenotypes may arise from gene dosage imbalance with the potential effect of submicroscopic duplications and deletions of the genome being underestimated. Genome sequencing may identify intrinsic structural properties of the DNA with greater susceptibility to these rearrangements and thereby reflect structural changes in the genome. PMID:11535114

  14. Uric acid as a CNS antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Gene L; Shannon, Jackilen; Frei, Balz; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Quinn, Joseph F

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage is a consistent finding in a number of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Uric acid (UA) is a potent hydrophilic antioxidant that is modified by diet and drug. Several lines of evidence suggest that plasma UA may modulate outcomes in neurologic disease, but little attention has been paid to CNS levels of UA. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) UA is determined by plasma UA, modified by blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and associated with rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Also, since UA and ascorbic acid may act as antioxidants for one another, we also explored a potential interaction between them in the brain. Thirty-two patients with mild to moderate AD (Mini-Mental Status Exam 19 +/- 5) participated in a longitudinal biomarker study for one year involving standardized clinical assessments. CSF and blood were collected at baseline for UA, ascorbic acid, and albumin. Cognitive measures were collected at baseline and again one year later. CSF UA was independent of age, gender, and AD severity. CSF and plasma UA were positively correlated (r=0.669, p=0.001) and BBB impairment was associated with higher CSF levels of UA (p=0.028). Neither plasma nor CSF UA reached significant association with rates of cognitive decline over 1 year. CSF UA and CSF ascorbic acid were positively correlated (r=0.388, p=0.001). The hypothesis that CSF UA is determined by plasma UA and BBB integrity is supported, as is the hypothesis that UA and ascorbic acid are associated in CSF but not plasma. Adequately powered prospective studies would help assess any role for UA in primary and secondary prevention of AD. PMID:20061611

  15. Quantitative autoradiography of TRH receptors in discrete brain regions of different mammalian species

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    The results clearly show marked heterogeneity and ubiquity of the CNS distribution of TRH receptors across several mammalian species including man. The use of high resolution autoradiography coupled with image analysis has permitted the visualization and quantification of TRH receptor density in even very small regions and nuclei of the CNS. This technique will undoubtedly help elucidate the other areas of TRH receptor localization that have thus far escaped detection in mammals and that are yet to be studied in lower vertebrates. Although an attempt has been made to correlate the presence of the peptide, its receptors, and its possible physiological functions, only further detailed physiological/behavioral investigations will ultimately unravel and support the diverse neurotransmitter and trophic roles of TRH in CNS and endocrine function. 130 references.

  16. Mammalian Septins Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Macara, Ian G.; Baldarelli, Richard; Field, Christine M.; Glotzer, Michael; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Kennedy, Mary B.; Kinoshita, Makoto; Longtine, Mark; Low, Claudia; Maltais, Lois J.; McKenzie, Louise; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Nishikawa, Toru; Noda, Makoto; Petty, Elizabeth M.; Peifer, Mark; Pringle, John R.; Robinson, Phillip J.; Roth, Dagmar; Russell, S.E. Hilary; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Tanaka, Manami; Tanaka, Tomoo; Trimble, William S.; Ware, Jerry; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.; Zieger, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    There are 10 known mammalian septin genes, some of which produce multiple splice variants. The current nomenclature for the genes and gene products is very confusing, with several different names having been given to the same gene product and distinct names given to splice variants of the same gene. Moreover, some names are based on those of yeast or Drosophila septins that are not the closest homologues. Therefore, we suggest that the mammalian septin field adopt a common nomenclature system, based on that adopted by the Mouse Genomic Nomenclature Committee and accepted by the Human Genome Organization Gene Nomenclature Committee. The human and mouse septin genes will be named SEPT1–SEPT10 and Sept1–Sept10, respectively. Splice variants will be designated by an underscore followed by a lowercase “v” and a number, e.g., SEPT4_v1. PMID:12475938

  17. Mammalian sweet taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G; Hoon, M A; Chandrashekar, J; Zhang, Y; Ryba, N J; Zuker, C S

    2001-08-10

    The sense of taste provides animals with valuable information about the quality and nutritional value of food. Previously, we identified a large family of mammalian taste receptors involved in bitter taste perception (the T2Rs). We now report the characterization of mammalian sweet taste receptors. First, transgenic rescue experiments prove that the Sac locus encodes T1R3, a member of the T1R family of candidate taste receptors. Second, using a heterologous expression system, we demonstrate that T1R2 and T1R3 combine to function as a sweet receptor, recognizing sweet-tasting molecules as diverse as sucrose, saccharin, dulcin, and acesulfame-K. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the patterns of expression of T1Rs and T2Rs, thus providing a view of the representation of sweet and bitter taste at the periphery. PMID:11509186

  18. Maternal immune activation and abnormal brain development across CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Knuesel, Irene; Chicha, Laurie; Britschgi, Markus; Schobel, Scott A; Bodmer, Michael; Hellings, Jessica A; Toovey, Stephen; Prinssen, Eric P

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a clear association between maternal infection and schizophrenia or autism in the progeny. Animal models have revealed maternal immune activation (mIA) to be a profound risk factor for neurochemical and behavioural abnormalities in the offspring. Microglial priming has been proposed as a major consequence of mIA, and represents a critical link in a causal chain that leads to the wide spectrum of neuronal dysfunctions and behavioural phenotypes observed in the juvenile, adult or aged offspring. Such diversity of phenotypic outcomes in the mIA model are mirrored by recent clinical evidence suggesting that infectious exposure during pregnancy is also associated with epilepsy and, to a lesser extent, cerebral palsy in children. Preclinical research also suggests that mIA might precipitate the development of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Here, we summarize and critically review the emerging evidence that mIA is a shared environmental risk factor across CNS disorders that varies as a function of interactions between genetic and additional environmental factors. We also review ongoing clinical trials targeting immune pathways affected by mIA that may play a part in disease manifestation. In addition, future directions and outstanding questions are discussed, including potential symptomatic, disease-modifying and preventive treatment strategies. PMID:25311587

  19. Rheotaxis guides mammalian sperm

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Kiyoshi; Clapham, David E

    2013-01-01

    Background In sea urchins, spermatozoan motility is altered by chemotactic peptides, giving rise to the assumption that mammalian eggs also emit chemotactic agents that guide spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract to the mature oocyte. Mammalian spermatozoa indeed undergo complex adaptations within the female (the process of capacitation) that are initiated by agents ranging from pH to progesterone, but these factors are not necessarily taxic. Currently, chemotaxis, thermotaxis, and rheotaxis have not been definitively established in mammals. Results Here, we show that positive rheotaxis, the ability of organisms to orient and swim against the flow of surrounding fluid, is a major taxic factor for mouse and human sperm. This flow is generated within 4 hours of sexual stimulation and coitus in female mice; prolactin-triggered oviductal fluid secretion clears the oviduct of debris, lowers viscosity, and generates the stream that guides sperm migration in the oviduct. Rheotaxic movement is demonstrated in capacitated and uncapacitated spermatozoa in low and high viscosity medium. Finally, we show that a unique sperm motion we quantify using the sperm head's rolling rate reflects sperm rotation that generates essential force for positioning the sperm in the stream. Rotation requires CatSper channels, presumably by enabling Ca2+ influx. Conclusions We propose that rheotaxis is a major determinant of sperm guidance over long distances in the mammalian female reproductive tract. Coitus induces fluid flow to guide sperm in the oviduct. Sperm rheotaxis requires rotational motion during CatSper channel-dependent hyperactivated motility. PMID:23453951

  20. Leptomeningeal metastasis of primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Engelhard, Herbert H; Corsten, Luke A

    2005-01-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of primary CNS tumors varies widely by histologic subtype. In certain tumors including medulloblastoma, ependymoma, germ cell tumors, and primary CNS lymphoma, seeding of the cerebrospinal fluid space is a critical factor in determining stage, prognosis and appropriate therapy. Other tumor types, such as glioma, may have radiographic evidence of leptomeningeal metastases without clear impact on prognosis or therapy. PMID:16211884

  1. Microbial Induction of Vascular Pathology in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Silvia S.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a finely tuned organ that participates in nearly every aspect of our day-to-day function. Neurons lie at the core of this functional unit and maintain an active dialogue with one another as well as their fellow CNS residents (e.g. astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia). Because of this complex dialogue, it is essential that the CNS milieu be tightly regulated in order to permit uninterrupted and efficient neural chemistry. This is accomplished in part by anatomical barriers that segregate vascular components from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and brain parenchyma. These barriers impede entry of noxious materials and enable the CNS to maintain requisite protein and ionic balances for constant electrochemical signaling. Under homeostatic conditions, the CNS is protected by the presence of specialized endothelium/epithelium, the blood brain barrier (BBB), and the blood-CSF barrier. However, following CNS infection these protective barriers can be comprised, sometimes resulting in severe neurological complications triggered by an imbalance or blockage of neural chemistry. In some instances, these disruptions are severe enough to be fatal. This review focuses on a selection of microbes (both viruses and parasites) that compromise vascular barriers and induce neurological complications upon gaining access to the CNS. Emphasis is placed on CNS diseases that result from a pathogenic interplay between host immune defenses and the invading microbe. PMID:20401700

  2. Mechanisms of Hypothermia, Delayed Hyperthermia and Fever Following CNS Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage is often associated with robust body temperature changes, such as hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia. Hypothermia is one of the most common body temperature changes to CNS insults in rodents and is often associated with improved outcome. Alth...

  3. CNS Involvement in AML Patient Treated with 5-Azacytidine

    PubMed Central

    Vasilatou, Diamantina; Papageorgiou, Sotirios; Bazani, Efthymia; Prasouli, Athina; Economopoulou, Christina; Roumpakis, Christoforos; Karakitsos, Petros; Dimitriadis, George; Pappa, Vasiliki

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare complication of the disease and is associated with poor prognosis. Sometimes the clinical presentation can be unspecific and the diagnosis can be very challenging. Here we report a case of CNS infiltration in a patient suffering from AML who presented with normal complete blood count and altered mental status. PMID:25197583

  4. CNS Involvement in AML Patient Treated with 5-Azacytidine.

    PubMed

    Vasilatou, Diamantina; Papageorgiou, Sotirios; Bazani, Efthymia; Prasouli, Athina; Economopoulou, Christina; Roumpakis, Christoforos; Karakitsos, Petros; Dimitriadis, George; Pappa, Vasiliki

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare complication of the disease and is associated with poor prognosis. Sometimes the clinical presentation can be unspecific and the diagnosis can be very challenging. Here we report a case of CNS infiltration in a patient suffering from AML who presented with normal complete blood count and altered mental status. PMID:25197583

  5. The role of dendritic cells in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Alla L.; Clarkson, Benjamin D.; Ortler, Sonja; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated, central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease. Clinical and histopathological features suggest an inflammatory etiology involving resident CNS innate cells as well as invading adaptive immune cells. Encephalitogenic myelin-reactive T cells have been implicated in the initiation of an inflammatory cascade, eventually resulting in demyelination and axonal damage (the histological hallmarks of MS). Dendritic cells (DC) have recently emerged as key modulators of this immunopathological cascade, as supported by studies in humans and experimental disease models. In one such model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), CNS microvessel-associated DC have been shown to be essential for local antigen recognition by myelin-reactive T cells. Moreover, the functional state and compartmental distribution of DC derived from CNS and associated lymphatics seem to be limiting factors in both the induction and effector phases of EAE. Moreover, DC modulate and balance the recruitment of encephalitogenic and regulatory T cells into CNS tissue. This capacity is critically influenced by DC surface expression of co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory molecules. The fact that DC accumulate in the CNS before T cells and can direct T-cell responses suggests that they are key determinants of CNS autoimmune outcomes. Here we provide a comprehensive review of recent advances in our understanding of CNS-derived DC and their relevance to neuroinflammation. PMID:20217033

  6. Cognitive Impairment and Persistent CNS Injury in Treated HIV.

    PubMed

    Chan, Phillip; Hellmuth, Joanna; Spudich, Serena; Valcour, Victor

    2016-08-01

    The implementation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has changed HIV infection into a chronic illness, conveying extensive benefits, including greater longevity and advantages for the central nervous system (CNS). However, studies increasingly confirm that the CNS gains are incomplete, with reports of persistent immune activation affecting the CNS despite suppression of plasma HIV RNA. The rate of cognitive impairment is unchanged, although severity is generally milder than in the pre-cART era. In this review, we discuss cognitive outcomes from recently published clinical HIV studies, review observations on HIV biomarkers for cognitive change, and emphasize longitudinal imaging findings. Additionally, we summarize recent studies on CNS viral invasion, CD8 encephalitis, and how CNS involvement during the earliest stages of infection may set the stage for later cognitive manifestations. PMID:27188299

  7. PPAR Regulation of Inflammatory Signaling in CNS Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bright, John J.; Kanakasabai, Saravanan; Chearwae, Wanida; Chakraborty, Sharmistha

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) is an immune privileged site, nevertheless inflammation associates with many CNS diseases. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a family of nuclear hormone receptors that regulate immune and inflammatory responses. Specific ligands for PPARα, γ, and δ isoforms have proven effective in the animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and trauma/stroke, suggesting their use in the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases. The activation of NF-κB and Jak-Stat signaling pathways and secretion of inflammatory cytokines are critical in the pathogenesis of CNS diseases. Interestingly, PPAR agonists mitigate CNS disease by modulating inflammatory signaling network in immune cells. In this manuscript, we review the current knowledge on how PPARs regulate neuroinflammatory signaling networks in CNS diseases. PMID:18670616

  8. Mechanisms underlying sexual and affiliative behaviors of mice: relation to generalized CNS arousal

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, Deborah N.; Choleris, Elena; Kavaliers, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The field of social neuroscience has grown dramatically in recent years and certain social responses have become amenable to mechanistic investigations. Toward that end, there has been remarkable progress in determining mechanisms for a simple sexual behavior, lordosis behavior. This work has proven that specific hormone-dependent biochemical reactions in specific parts of the mammalian brain regulate a biologically important behavior. On one hand, this sex behavior depends on underlying mechanisms of CNS arousal. On the other hand, it serves as a prototypical social behavior. The same sex hormones and the genes that encode their receptors as are involved in lordosis, also affect social recognition. Here we review evidence for a micronet of genes promoting social recognition in mice and discuss their biological roles. PMID:18985112

  9. Animal Models of CNS Viral Disease: Examples from Borna Disease Virus Models

    PubMed Central

    Solbrig, Marylou V.

    2010-01-01

    Borna disease (BD), caused by the neurotropic RNA virus, Borna Disease virus, is an affliction ranging from asymptomatic to fatal meningoencephalitis across naturally and experimentally infected warmblooded (mammalian and bird) species. More than 100 years after the first clinical descriptions of Borna disease in horses and studies beginning in the 1980's linking Borna disease virus to human neuropsychiatric diseases, experimentally infected rodents have been used as models for examining behavioral, neuropharmacological, and neurochemical responses to viral challenge at different stages of life. These studies have contributed to understanding the role of CNS viral injury in vulnerability to behavioral, developmental, epileptic, and neurodegenerative diseases and aided evaluation of the proposed and still controversial links to human disease. PMID:20204069

  10. NMDA-induced rhythmical activity in XII nerve of isolated CNS from newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Katakura, N; Jia, L; Nakamura, Y

    1995-03-01

    We tried to induce rhythmical oro-facial motor activities in an isolated brain stem-spinal cord preparation from newborn rats. Neural activities were monitored from the hypoglossal nerve (XII N) and the ventral roots of the cervical cord. Bath application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) as well as glutamate induced rhythmical burst activity in XII N distinct from and much faster than respiratory rhythm. This NMDA-induced rhythmical activity was blocked by simultaneous application of 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5). The results demonstrate that NMDA receptor activation can induce rhythmical XII N activity different from respiration in an isolated mammalian CNS. This preparation will be useful for the investigation of neural mechanisms underlying the central generation of food ingestive movements. PMID:7605909

  11. Target Identification for CNS Diseases by Transcriptional Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Altar, C Anthony; Vawter, Marquis P; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression changes in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, and gene responses to therapeutic drugs, provide new ways to identify central nervous system (CNS) targets for drug discovery. This review summarizes gene and pathway targets replicated in expression profiling of human postmortem brain, animal models, and cell culture studies. Analysis of isolated human neurons implicates targets for Alzheimer’s disease and the cognitive decline associated with normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. In addition to τ, amyloid-β precursor protein, and amyloid-β peptides (Aβ), these targets include all three high-affinity neurotrophin receptors and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system, synapse markers, glutamate receptors (GluRs) and transporters, and dopamine (DA) receptors, particularly the D2 subtype. Gene-based candidates for Parkinson’s disease (PD) include the ubiquitin–proteosome system, scavengers of reactive oxygen species, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its receptor, TrkB, and downstream target early growth response 1, Nurr-1, and signaling through protein kinase C and RAS pathways. Increasing variability and decreases in brain mRNA production from middle age to old age suggest that cognitive impairments during normal aging may be addressed by drugs that restore antioxidant, DNA repair, and synaptic functions including those of DA to levels of younger adults. Studies in schizophrenia identify robust decreases in genes for GABA function, including glutamic acid decarboxylase, HINT1, glutamate transport and GluRs, BDNF and TrkB, numerous 14-3-3 protein family members, and decreases in genes for CNS synaptic and metabolic functions, particularly glycolysis and ATP generation. Many of these metabolic genes are increased by insulin and muscarinic agonism, both of which are therapeutic in psychosis. Differential genomic signals are relatively sparse in bipolar disorder, but include deficiencies in the expression of 14

  12. A Philosophy for CNS Radiotracer Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test–retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods

  13. Secreted semaphorins control spine distribution and morphogenesis in the postnatal CNS.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tracy S; Rubio, Maria E; Clem, Roger L; Johnson, Dontais; Case, Lauren; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Huganir, Richard L; Ginty, David D; Kolodkin, Alex L

    2009-12-24

    The majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian CNS (central nervous system) are formed on dendritic spines, and spine morphology and distribution are critical for synaptic transmission, synaptic integration and plasticity. Here, we show that a secreted semaphorin, Sema3F, is a negative regulator of spine development and synaptic structure. Mice with null mutations in genes encoding Sema3F, and its holoreceptor components neuropilin-2 (Npn-2, also known as Nrp2) and plexin A3 (PlexA3, also known as Plxna3), exhibit increased dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell (GC) and cortical layer V pyramidal neuron spine number and size, and also aberrant spine distribution. Moreover, Sema3F promotes loss of spines and excitatory synapses in dissociated neurons in vitro, and in Npn-2(-/-) brain slices cortical layer V and DG GCs exhibit increased mEPSC (miniature excitatory postsynaptic current) frequency. In contrast, a distinct Sema3A-Npn-1/PlexA4 signalling cascade controls basal dendritic arborization in layer V cortical neurons, but does not influence spine morphogenesis or distribution. These disparate effects of secreted semaphorins are reflected in the restricted dendritic localization of Npn-2 to apical dendrites and of Npn-1 (also known as Nrp1) to all dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons. Therefore, Sema3F signalling controls spine distribution along select dendritic processes, and distinct secreted semaphorin signalling events orchestrate CNS connectivity through the differential control of spine morphogenesis, synapse formation, and the elaboration of dendritic morphology. PMID:20010807

  14. Viscoelastic properties of individual glial cells and neurons in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yun-Bi; Franze, Kristian; Seifert, Gerald; Steinhäuser, Christian; Kirchhoff, Frank; Wolburg, Hartwig; Guck, Jochen; Janmey, Paul; Wei, Er-Qing; Käs, Josef; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2006-11-21

    One hundred fifty years ago glial cells were discovered as a second, non-neuronal, cell type in the central nervous system. To ascribe a function to these new, enigmatic cells, it was suggested that they either glue the neurons together (the Greek word "gammalambdaiotaalpha" means "glue") or provide a robust scaffold for them ("support cells"). Although both speculations are still widely accepted, they would actually require quite different mechanical cell properties, and neither one has ever been confirmed experimentally. We investigated the biomechanics of CNS tissue and acutely isolated individual neurons and glial cells from mammalian brain (hippocampus) and retina. Scanning force microscopy, bulk rheology, and optically induced deformation were used to determine their viscoelastic characteristics. We found that (i) in all CNS cells the elastic behavior dominates over the viscous behavior, (ii) in distinct cell compartments, such as soma and cell processes, the mechanical properties differ, most likely because of the unequal local distribution of cell organelles, (iii) in comparison to most other eukaryotic cells, both neurons and glial cells are very soft ("rubber elastic"), and (iv) intriguingly, glial cells are even softer than their neighboring neurons. Our results indicate that glial cells can neither serve as structural support cells (as they are too soft) nor as glue (because restoring forces are dominant) for neurons. Nevertheless, from a structural perspective they might act as soft, compliant embedding for neurons, protecting them in case of mechanical trauma, and also as a soft substrate required for neurite growth and facilitating neuronal plasticity. PMID:17093050

  15. Fate Mapping Mammalian Corneal Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Alexander; Wakefield, Denis; Di Girolamo, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The anterior aspect of the cornea consists of a stratified squamous epithelium, thought to be maintained by a rare population of stem cells (SCs) that reside in the limbal transition zone. Although migration of cells that replenish the corneal epithelium has been studied for over a century, the process is still poorly understood and not well characterized. Numerous techniques have been employed to examine corneal epithelial dynamics, including visualization by light microscopy, the incorporation of vital dyes and DNA labels, and transplantation of genetically marked cells that have acted as cell and lineage beacons. Modern-day lineage tracing utilizes molecular methods to determine the fate of a specific cell and its progeny over time. Classically employed in developmental biology, lineage tracing has been used more recently to track the progeny of adult SCs in a number of organs to pin-point their location and understand their movement and influence on tissue regeneration. This review highlights key discoveries that have led researchers to develop cutting-edge genetic tools to effectively and more accurately monitor turnover and displacement of cells within the mammalian corneal epithelium. Collating information on the basic biology of SCs will have clinical ramifications in furthering our knowledge of the processes that govern their role in homeostasis, wound-healing, transplantation, and how we can improve current unsatisfactory SC-based therapies for patients suffering blinding corneal disease. PMID:26774909

  16. Therapeutic challenges in primary CNS lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Morris, Patrick G; Abrey, Lauren E

    2009-06-01

    Optimum treatment for patients with primary CNS lymphoma remains challenging because there have not been any large randomised clinical trials of this rare tumour. Drugs used in treating systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma have mostly proven ineffective because of difficulties crossing the blood-brain barrier. The recognition of the efficacy of high-dose methotrexate was a substantial therapeutic breakthrough and further advances, such as the development of polychemotherapy regimens, have built on this. Whole-brain radiotherapy can consolidate response to chemotherapy, but the associated toxic effects of chemoradiation can be unacceptable. Other effective approaches include disruption of the blood-brain barrier and the use of high-dose chemotherapy. Recently, there have been attempts to optimise multi-drug chemotherapy regimens by focusing on improving survival and reducing toxic effects. A promising area of research is the incorporation of novel targeted drugs into standard treatment frameworks. In the future, greater cooperation between research groups should hopefully lead to further therapeutic advances. PMID:19446277

  17. Sentinel lesions of primary CNS lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, L; Fetell, M R; Sisti, M; Hochberg, F; Cohen, M; Louis, D N

    1996-01-01

    Some patients ultimately diagnosed with primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) have transient symptomatic contrast enhancing lesions. These "sentinel lesions" of PCNSL recede spontaneously or with corticosteroid treatment and present an important diagnostic dilemma because they show variable, but non-diagnostic histopathological features. Four previously healthy, immunocompetent patients aged 49 to 58 years had contrast enhancing intraparenchymal brain lesions. Before biopsy, three of the four were treated with corticosteroids. Initial biopsies showed demyelination with axonal sparing in two, non-specific inflammation in one, and normal brain in one. Infiltrating lymphocytes predominantly expressed T cell markers with rare B cells. All four patients recovered within two to four weeks after the initial biopsy and imaging studies showed resolution of the lesions. The CSF was normal in three of the four patients tested; oligoclonal bands were absent in both of the two tested. After seven to 11 months, each patient developed new symptomatic lesions in a different region of the brain, biopsy of which showed a B cell PCNSL. The mechanism of spontaneous involution of sentinel lesions is not understood, but may represent host immunity against the tumour. Sentinel lesions of PCNSL should be considered in patients with contrast enhancing focal parenchymal lesions that show non-specific or demyelinative histopathological changes. Close clinical and radiographic follow up is essential if PCNSL is to be diagnosed early in such patients. Images PMID:8558135

  18. Clinical Potential of Neurosteroids for CNS Disorders.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba; Estes, William A

    2016-07-01

    Neurosteroids are key endogenous molecules in the brain that affect many neural functions. We describe here recent advances in US National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored and other clinical studies of neurosteroids for CNS disorders. The neuronal GABA-A receptor chloride channel is one of the prime molecular targets of neurosteroids. Allopregnanolone-like neurosteroids are potent allosteric agonists as well as direct activators of both synaptic and extrasynaptic GABA-A receptors. Hence, neurosteroids can maximally enhance synaptic phasic and extrasynaptic tonic inhibition. The resulting chloride current conductance generates a form of shunting inhibition that controls network excitability, seizures, and behavior. Such mechanisms of neurosteroids are providing innovative therapies for epilepsy, status epilepticus (SE), traumatic brain injury (TBI), fragile X syndrome (FXS), and chemical neurotoxicity. The neurosteroid field has entered a new era, and many compounds have reached advanced clinical trials. Synthetic analogs have several advantages over natural neurosteroids for clinical use because of their superior bioavailability and safety trends. PMID:27156439

  19. More Than Cholesterol Transporters: Lipoprotein Receptors in CNS Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney E.; Philips, Gary T.; Herz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Members of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family have a diverse set of biological functions that transcend lipid metabolism. Lipoprotein receptors have broad effects in both the developing and adult brain and participate in synapse development, cargo trafficking, and signal transduction. In addition, several family members play key roles in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role lipoprotein receptors play in CNS function and AD pathology, with a special emphasis on amyloid-independent roles in endocytosis and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25144875

  20. Decreased thyroid hormone signaling accelerates the reinnervation of the optic tectum following optic nerve crush in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bhumika, Stitipragyan; Lemmens, Kim; Vancamp, Pieter; Moons, Lieve; Darras, Veerle M

    2015-09-01

    The regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is poor and finding ways to stimulate long distance axonal regeneration in humans remains a challenge for neuroscientists. Thyroid hormones, well known for their key function in CNS development and maturation, more recently also emerged as molecules influencing regeneration. While several studies investigated their influence on peripheral nerve regeneration, in vivo studies on their role in adult CNS regeneration remain scarce. We therefore investigated the effect of lowering T3 signaling on the regeneration of the optic nerve (ON) following crush in zebrafish, a species where full recovery occurs spontaneously. Adult zebrafish were exposed to iopanoic acid (IOP), which lowered intracellular 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) availability, or to the thyroid hormone receptor β antagonist methylsulfonylnitrobenzoate (C1). Both treatments accelerated optic tectum (OT) reinnervation. At 7days post injury (7dpi) there was a clear increase in the biocytin labeled area in the OT following anterograde tracing as well as an increased immunostaining of Gap43, a protein expressed in outgrowing axons. This effect was attenuated by T3 supplementation to IOP-treated fish. ON crush induced very limited cell death and proliferation at the level of the retina in control, IOP- and C1-treated fish. The treatments also had no effect on the mRNA upregulation of the regeneration markers gap43, tub1a, and socs3b at the level of the retina at 4 and 7dpi. We did, however, find a correlation between the accelerated OT reinnervation and a more rapid resolution of microglia/macrophages in the ON and the OT of IOP-treated fish. Taken together these data indicate that lowering T3 signaling accelerates OT reinnervation following ON crush in zebrafish and that this is accompanied by a more rapid resolution of the inflammatory response. PMID:25913150

  1. CNS GLP-1 Regulation of Peripheral Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Darleen

    2008-01-01

    Current models hold that peripheral and CNS GLP-1 signaling operate as distinct systems whereby CNS GLP-1 regulates food intake and circulating GLP-1 regulates glucose homeostasis. There is accumulating evidence that the arcuate nucleus, an area of the CNS that regulates energy homeostasis, responds to hormones and nutrients to regulate glucose homeostasis as well. Recent data suggest that GLP-1 may be another signal acting on the arcuate to regulate glucose homeostasis challenging the conventional model of GLP-1 physiology. This review discusses the peripheral and central GLP-1 systems and presents a model whereby these systems are integrated in regulation of glucose homeostasis. PMID:18508100

  2. A Distinct Population of Microglia Supports Adult Neurogenesis in the Subventricular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Xavier, Anna L.; Kress, Benjamin T.; Goldman, Steven A.; Lacerda de Menezes, João R.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are involved in synaptic pruning both in development and in the mature CNS. In this study, we investigated whether microglia might further contribute to circuit plasticity by modulating neuronal recruitment from the neurogenic subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult mouse striatum. We found that microglia residing in the SVZ and adjacent rostral migratory stream (RMS) comprise a morphologically and antigenically distinct phenotype of immune effectors. Whereas exhibiting characteristics of alternatively activated microglia, the SVZ/RMS microglia were clearly distinguished by their low expression of purinoceptors and lack of ATP-elicitable chemotaxis. Furthermore, the in vivo depletion of these microglia hampered the survival and migration of newly generated neuroblasts through the RMS to the olfactory bulb. SVZ and RMS microglia thus appear to comprise a functionally distinct class that is selectively adapted to the support and direction of neuronal integration into the olfactory circuitry. Therefore, this unique microglial subpopulation may serve as a novel target with which to modulate cellular addition from endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells of the adult brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Microglial cells are a specialized population of macrophages in the CNS, playing key roles as immune mediators. As integral components in the CNS, the microglia stand out for using the same mechanisms, phagocytosis and cytochemokine release, to promote homeostasis, synaptic pruning, and neural circuitry sculpture. Here, we addressed microglial functions in the subventricular zone (SVZ), the major postnatal neurogenic niche. Our results depict microglia as a conspicuous component of SVZ and its anterior extension, the rostral migratory stream, a pathway used by neuroblasts during their transit toward olfactory bulb layers. In addition to other unique populations residing in the SVZ niche, microglia display distinct morphofunctional properties that boost neuronal

  3. Mammalian Endogenous Retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Mager, Dixie L; Stoye, Jonathan P

    2015-02-01

    Over 40% of mammalian genomes comprise the products of reverse transcription. Among such retrotransposed sequences are those characterized by the presence of long terminal repeats (LTRs), including the endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), which are inherited genetic elements closely resembling the proviruses formed following exogenous retrovirus infection. Sequences derived from ERVs make up at least 8 to 10% of the human and mouse genomes and range from ancient sequences that predate mammalian divergence to elements that are currently still active. In this chapter we describe the discovery, classification and origins of ERVs in mammals and consider cellular mechanisms that have evolved to control their expression. We also discuss the negative effects of ERVs as agents of genetic disease and cancer and review examples of ERV protein domestication to serve host functions, as in placental development. Finally, we address growing evidence that the gene regulatory potential of ERV LTRs has been exploited multiple times during evolution to regulate genes and gene networks. Thus, although recently endogenized retroviral elements are often pathogenic, those that survive the forces of negative selection become neutral components of the host genome or can be harnessed to serve beneficial roles. PMID:26104559

  4. Neurocognitive Status in Long-Term Survivors of Childhood CNS Malignancies: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellenberg, Leah; Liu, Qi; Gioia, Gerard; Yasui, Yutaka; Packer, Roger J.; Mertens, Ann; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Stovall, Marilyn; Kadan-Lottick, Nina; Armstrong, Gregory; Robison, Leslie L.; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2009-01-01

    irradiation, with smaller effect sizes (.49 and .43, respectively). Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement was associated with small deficits on the same scales (Effect sizes: Task Efficiency .26, Memory .32). Female gender predicted a greater likelihood of impaired scores on 2 scales, with small effect sizes (Task Efficiency .38, Emotional Regulation .45), while diagnosis before age 2 years resulted in less likelihood of reported impairment on the Memory factor with a moderate effect size (.64). CNS malignancy survivors with more impaired CCSS-NCQ scores demonstrated significantly lower educational attainment (p<.01), less household income (p<.001) and less full time employment (p<.001). Conclusions Survivors of childhood CNS malignancy are at significant risk for impairment in neurocognitive functioning in adulthood, particularly if they have received cranial radiation, had a VP shunt placed, suffered a cerebrovascular incident or are left with hearing or motor impairments. Reported neurocognitive impairment adversely affected important adult outcomes, including education, employment, income and marital status. PMID:19899829

  5. Microglial P2 Purinergic Receptor and Immunomodulatory Gene Transcripts Vary By Region, Sex, and Age in the Healthy Mouse CNS

    PubMed Central

    Crain, Jessica M.; Watters, Jyoti J.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory damage in many neurodegenerative diseases is restricted to certain regions of the CNS, and while microglia have long been implicated in the pathology of many of these disorders, information comparing their gene expression in different CNS regions is lacking. Here we tested the hypothesis that the expression of purinergic receptors, estrogen receptors and other neuroprotective and pro-inflammatory genes differed among CNS regions in healthy mice. Because neurodegenerative diseases vary in incidence by sex and age, we also examined the regional distribution of these genes in male and female mice of four different ages between 21 days and 12 months. We postulated that pro-inflammatory gene expression would be higher in older animals, and lower in young adult females. We found that microglial gene expression differed across the CNS. Estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1) mRNA levels were often lower in microglia from the brainstem/spinal cord than from the cortex, whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnfα) expression was several times higher. In addition, the regional pattern of gene expression often changed with animal age; for example, no regional differences in P2X7 mRNA levels were detected in 21 day-old animals, but at 7 weeks and older, expression was highest in cerebellar microglia. Lastly, the expression of some genes was sexually dimorphic. In microglia from 12 month-old animals, mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase, but not Tnfα, were higher in females than males. These data suggest that microglial gene expression is not uniformly more pro-inflammatory in males or older animals. Moreover, microglia from CNS regions in which neuronal damage predominates in neurodegenerative disease do not generally express more pro-inflammatory genes than microglia from regions less frequently affected. This study provides an in-depth assessment of regional-, sex- and age-dependent differences in key microglial transcripts from the healthy mouse CNS. PMID

  6. Early CNS neurodegeneration in radiologically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Overton, Eve; Khadka, Sankalpa; Buckley, Jessica; Liu, Shuang; Sampat, Mehul; Kantarci, Orhun; Lebrun Frenay, Christine; Siva, Aksel; Okuda, Darin T.; Pelletier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Increasing evidence indicates that the thalamus may be a location of early neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). Our objective was to identify the presence of gray matter volume loss and thinning in patients with radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). Methods: Sixty-three participants were included in this case-control study. Twenty-one patients with RIS were age- and sex-matched to 42 healthy controls in a 1:2 ratio. All participants underwent brain MRIs on a single 3T scanner. After lesion segmentation and inpainting, 1 mm3-isometric T1-weighted images were submitted to FreeSurfer (v5.2). Normalized cortical and deep gray matter volumes were compared between patients with RIS and controls using t tests, and thalamic volumes were correlated with white matter lesion volumes using Pearson correlation. Exploratory cortical thickness maps were created. Results: Although traditional normalized total gray and white matter volumes were not statistically different between patients with RIS and controls, normalized left (0.0046 ± 0.0005 vs 0.0049 ± 0.0004, p = 0.006), right (0.0045 ± 0.0005 vs 0.0048 ± 0.0004, p = 0.008), and mean (0.0045 ± 0.0005 vs 0.0049 ± 0.0004, p = 0.004) thalamic volumes were significantly lower in patients with RIS (n = 21, mean age 41.9 ± 12.7 years) than in controls (n = 42, mean age 41.4 ± 11.2 years). Thalamic volumes correlated modestly with white matter lesion volumes (range: r = −0.35 to −0.47). Conclusion: Our data provide novel evidence of thalamic atrophy in RIS and are consistent with previous reports in early MS stages. Thalamic volume loss is present early in CNS demyelinating disease and should be further investigated as a metric associated with neurodegeneration. PMID:25884012

  7. The Processing of Airspace Concept Evaluations Using FASTE-CNS as a Pre- or Post-Simulation CNS Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mainger, Steve

    2004-01-01

    As NASA speculates on and explores the future of aviation, the technological and physical aspects of our environment increasing become hurdles that must be overcome for success. Research into methods for overcoming some of these selected hurdles have been purposed by several NASA research partners as concepts. The task of establishing a common evaluation environment was placed on NASA's Virtual Airspace Simulation Technologies (VAST) project (sub-project of VAMS), and they responded with the development of the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES). As one examines the ACES environment from a communication, navigation or surveillance (CNS) perspective, the simulation parameters are built with assumed perfection in the transactions associated with CNS. To truly evaluate these concepts in a realistic sense, the contributions/effects of CNS must be part of the ACES. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has supported the Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) project through the continued development of CNS models and analysis capabilities which supports the ACES environment. NASA GRC initiated the development a communications traffic loading analysis tool, called the Future Aeronautical Sub-network Traffic Emulator for Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (FASTE-CNS), as part of this support. This tool allows for forecasting of communications load with the understanding that, there is no single, common source for loading models used to evaluate the existing and planned communications channels; and that, consensus and accuracy in the traffic load models is a very important input to the decisions being made on the acceptability of communication techniques used to fulfill the aeronautical requirements. Leveraging off the existing capabilities of the FASTE-CNS tool, GRC has called for FASTE-CNS to have the functionality to pre- and post-process the simulation runs of ACES to report on instances when traffic density, frequency congestion or aircraft spacing

  8. Cellular and Molecular Characterization of Multipolar Map5-Expressing Cells: A Subset of Newly Generated, Stage-Specific Parenchymal Cells in the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Conte, Daniele; Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although extremely interesting in adult neuro-glio-genesis and promising as an endogenous source for repair, parenchymal progenitors remain largely obscure in their identity and physiology, due to a scarce availability of stage-specific markers. What appears difficult is the distinction between real cell populations and various differentiation stages of the same population. Here we focused on a subset of multipolar, polydendrocyte-like cells (mMap5 cells) expressing the microtubule associated protein 5 (Map5), which is known to be present in most neurons. We characterized the morphology, phenotype, regional distribution, proliferative dynamics, and stage-specific marker expression of these cells in the rabbit and mouse CNS, also assessing their existence in other mammalian species. mMap5 cells were never found to co-express the Ng2 antigen. They appear to be a population of glial cells sharing features but also differences with Ng2+progenitor cells. We show that mMap5 cells are newly generated, postmitotic parenchymal elements of the oligodendroglial lineage, thus being a stage-specific population of polydendrocytes. Finally, we report that the number of mMap5 cells, although reduced within the brain of adult/old animals, can increase in neurodegenerative and traumatic conditions. PMID:23667595

  9. Human African trypanosomiasis of the CNS: current issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Peter G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa. Current therapy with melarsoprol for CNS HAT has unacceptable side-effects with an overall mortality of 5%. This review discusses the issues of diagnosis and staging of CNS disease, its neuropathogenesis, and the possibility of new therapies for treating late-stage disease. PMID:14966556

  10. Global Epigenomic Reconfiguration During Mammalian Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Joseph R.; Urich, Mark; Puddifoot, Clare A.; Johnson, Nicholas D.; Lucero, Jacinta; Huang, Yun; Dwork, Andrew J.; Schultz, Matthew D.; Yu, Miao; Tonti-Filippini, Julian; Heyn, Holger; Hu, Shijun; Wu, Joseph C.; Rao, Anjana; Esteller, Manel; He, Chuan; Haghighi, Fatemeh G.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Behrens, M. Margarita; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is implicated in mammalian brain development and plasticity underlying learning and memory. We report the genome-wide composition, patterning, cell specificity, and dynamics of DNA methylation at single-base resolution in human and mouse frontal cortex throughout their lifespan. Widespread methylome reconfiguration occurs during fetal to young adult development, coincident with synaptogenesis. During this period, highly conserved non-CG methylation (mCH) accumulates in neurons, but not glia, to become the dominant form of methylation in the human neuronal genome. Moreover, we found an mCH signature that identifies genes escaping X-chromosome inactivation. Last, whole-genome single-base resolution 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC) maps revealed that hmC marks fetal brain cell genomes at putative regulatory regions that are CG-demethylated and activated in the adult brain and that CG demethylation at these hmC-poised loci depends on Tet2 activity. PMID:23828890

  11. The mammalian blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Stephen R; de Barros, Flavia R O; Rossant, Janet; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2016-01-01

    The blastocyst is a mammalian invention that carries the embryo from cleavage to gastrulation. For such a simple structure, it exhibits remarkable diversity in its mode of formation, morphology, longevity, and intimacy with the uterine endometrium. This review explores this diversity in the light of the evolution of viviparity, comparing the three main groups of mammals: monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians. The principal drivers in blastocyst evolution were loss of yolk coupled with evolution of the placenta. An important outcome of blastocyst development is differentiation of two extraembryonic lineages (trophoblast and hypoblast) that contribute to the placenta. While in many species trophoblast segregation is often coupled with blastocyst formation, in marsupials and at least some Afrotherians, these events do not coincide. Thus, many questions regarding the conservation of molecular mechanisms controlling these events are of great interest but currently unresolved. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26799266

  12. Mammalian phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) converts phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) and diacylglycerol (DAG). DAG and IP(3) each control diverse cellular processes and are also substrates for synthesis of other important signaling molecules. PLC is thus central to many important interlocking regulatory networks. Mammals express six families of PLCs, each with both unique and overlapping controls over expression and subcellular distribution. Each PLC also responds acutely to its own spectrum of activators that includes heterotrimeric G protein subunits, protein tyrosine kinases, small G proteins, Ca(2+), and phospholipids. Mammalian PLCs are autoinhibited by a region in the catalytic TIM barrel domain that is the target of much of their acute regulation. In combination, the PLCs act as a signaling nexus that integrates numerous signaling inputs, critically governs PIP(2) levels, and regulates production of important second messengers to determine cell behavior over the millisecond to hour timescale. PMID:23140367

  13. CNS-related side-effects with metoprolol and atenolol.

    PubMed

    Cove-Smith, J R; Kirk, C A

    1985-01-01

    Vivid and bizarre dreams, hallucinations, sleep disturbance and psychosis have all been described following treatment with beta-blockers. It has been suggested that these central nervous system (CNS) side-effects are related to the degree of lipophilicity of the beta-blocker. A randomized double-blind crossover study was performed to compare the incidence of CNS side-effects with atenolol and metoprolol in hypertensive patients who had reported CNS side-effects with lipophilic beta-blockers. Eleven women and six men completed the study, in which a 30-item psychiatric questionnaire was used to detect changes in psychological status and possible CNS side-effects. Discontinuation of the original lipophilic beta-blocker produced a significant improvement in quality of sleep, dreams, concentration, memory, energy, and anxiety. No significant CNS side-effects were reported with atenolol, but introduction of metoprolol caused a significant increase in the incidence of sleep disturbance (p less than 0.01) and restless nights (p less than 0.05), as well as failure to achieve satisfactory sexual intercourse (p less than 0.05). When compared with atenolol, metoprolol was associated with a significantly higher incidence of restless disturbed nights (p less than 0.05). Blood pressure control was identical for both beta-blockers. This study appears to confirm the association between CNS-related side-effects and the lipophilicity of beta-blockers. PMID:4054193

  14. A Dramatic Increase of C1q Protein in the CNS during Normal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Daniel V.; Mateos, José María; Fraser, Deborah A.; Lovelett, Emilie A.; Coutellier, Laurence; Kim, Leo; Tsai, Hui-Hsin; Huang, Eric J.; Rowitch, David H.; Berns, Dominic S.; Tenner, Andrea J.; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Barres, Ben A.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of cognitive function has emerged as one of the greatest health threats of old age. Age-related cognitive decline is caused by an impacted neuronal circuitry, yet the molecular mechanisms responsible are unknown. C1q, the initiating protein of the classical complement cascade and powerful effector of the peripheral immune response, mediates synapse elimination in the developing CNS. Here we show that C1q protein levels dramatically increase in the normal aging mouse and human brain, by as much as 300-fold. This increase was predominantly localized in close proximity to synapses and occurred earliest and most dramatically in certain regions of the brain, including some but not all regions known to be selectively vulnerable in neurodegenerative diseases, i.e., the hippocampus, substantia nigra, and piriform cortex. C1q-deficient mice exhibited enhanced synaptic plasticity in the adult and reorganization of the circuitry in the aging hippocampal dentate gyrus. Moreover, aged C1q-deficient mice exhibited significantly less cognitive and memory decline in certain hippocampus-dependent behavior tests compared with their wild-type littermates. Unlike in the developing CNS, the complement cascade effector C3 was only present at very low levels in the adult and aging brain. In addition, the aging-dependent effect of C1q on the hippocampal circuitry was independent of C3 and unaccompanied by detectable synapse loss, providing evidence for a novel, complement- and synapse elimination-independent role for C1q in CNS aging. PMID:23946404

  15. Zebrafish as a model to investigate CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Preston, Marnie A; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-02-01

    Myelin plays a critical role in proper neuronal function by providing trophic and metabolic support to axons and facilitating energy-efficient saltatory conduction. Myelination is influenced by numerous molecules including growth factors, hormones, transmembrane receptors and extracellular molecules, which activate signaling cascades that drive cellular maturation. Key signaling molecules and downstream signaling cascades controlling myelination have been identified in cell culture systems. However, in vitro systems are not able to faithfully replicate the complex in vivo signaling environment that occurs during development or following injury. Currently, it remains time-consuming and expensive to investigate myelination in vivo in rodents, the most widely used model for studying mammalian myelination. As such, there is a need for alternative in vivo myelination models, particularly ones that can test molecular mechanisms without removing oligodendrocyte lineage cells from their native signaling environment or disrupting intercellular interactions with other cell types present during myelination. Here, we review the ever-increasing role of zebrafish in studies uncovering novel mechanisms controlling vertebrate myelination. These innovative studies range from observations of the behavior of single cells during in vivo myelination as well as mutagenesis- and pharmacology-based screens in whole animals. Additionally, we discuss recent efforts to develop novel models of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death in adult zebrafish for the study of cellular behavior in real time during repair and regeneration of damaged nervous systems. PMID:25263121

  16. Expression of the small heat shock protein family in the mouse CNS: differential anatomical and biochemical compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Quraishe, S; Asuni, A; Boelens, W C; O'Connor, V; Wyttenbach, A

    2008-05-01

    The small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are a family of molecular chaperones defined by an alpha-crystallin domain that is important for sHsps oligomerization and chaperone activity. sHsps perform many physiological functions including the maintenance of the cellular cytoskeleton, the regulation of protein aggregation and modulate cell survival in a number of cell types including glial and neuronal cells. Many of these functions have been implicated in disease processes in the CNS and indeed sHsps are considered targets for disease therapy. Despite this, there is no study that systematically and comparatively characterized sHsps expression in the CNS. In the present study we have analyzed the expression of this gene family in the mouse brain by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization and Western blotting. Gene expression analysis of the 10 known members of mammalian sHsps confirms the presence of 5 sHsps in the CNS. A distinct white matter specific expression pattern for HspB5 and overlapping expression of HspB1 and HspB8 in the lateral and dorsal ventricles of the brain is observed. We confirm protein expression of HspB1, HspB5, HspB6 and HspB8 in the brain. Further subcellular fractionation of brain and synaptosomes details a distinct subcompartment-specific association and detergent solubility of sHsps. This biochemical signature is indicative of an association with synaptic and other neural specializations. This observation will help one understand the functional role played by sHsps during physiology and pathology in the CNS. PMID:18384969

  17. Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), Concept Simulations using Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don

    2006-01-01

    Project Objectives include: a) CNS Model Development; b Design/Integration of baseline set of CNS Models into ACES; c) Implement Enhanced Simulation Capabilities in ACES; d) Design and Integration of Enhanced (2nd set) CNS Models; and e) Continue with CNS Model Integration/Concept evaluations.

  18. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  19. Triptans and CNS side-effects: pharmacokinetic and metabolic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dodick, D W; Martin, V

    2004-06-01

    Triptans are the treatment of choice for acute migraine. While seemingly a homogenous group of drugs, results from a meta-analysis reveal significant differences in efficacy and tolerability among oral triptans. The incidence of drug-related central nervous system (CNS) side-effects with some triptans is as high as 15% and may be associated with functional impairment and reduced productivity. The occurrence of adverse events associated with triptans in general, and CNS side-effects in particular, may lead to a delay in initiating or even avoidance of an otherwise effective treatment. Potential explanations for differences among triptans in the incidence of CNS side-effects may relate to pharmacological and pharmacokinetic differences, including receptor binding, lipophilicity, and the presence of active metabolites. Of the triptans reviewed, at clinically relevant doses, almotriptan 12.5 mg, naratriptan 2.5 mg and sumatriptan 50 mg had the lowest incidence of CNS side-effects, while eletriptan 40 and 80 mg, rizatriptan 10 mg and zolmitriptan 2.5 and 5 mg had the highest incidence. The most likely explanations for the differences in CNS side-effects among triptans are the presence of active metabolites and high lipophilicity of the parent compound and active metabolites. Eletriptan, rizatriptan and zolmitriptan have active metabolites, while lipophilicity is lowest for almotriptan and sumatriptan. If CNS side-effects are a clinically relevant concern in the individual patient, use of a triptan with a low incidence of CNS side-effects may offer the potential for earlier initiation of treatment and more effective outcomes. PMID:15154851

  20. Actuarial risk of isolated CNS involvement in Ewing's sarcoma following prophylactic cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Trigg, M.E.; Makuch, R.; Glaubiger, D.

    1985-04-01

    Records of 154 patients with Ewing's sarcoma treated at the National Cancer Institute were reviewed to assess the incidence and risk of developing isolated central nervous system (CNS) Ewing's sarcoma. Sixty-two of the 154 patients had received CNS irradiation and intrathecal (i.t.) methotrexate as part of their initial therapy to prevent the occurrence of isolated CNS Ewing's sarcoma. The risk of developing isolate CNS Ewing's sarcoma was greatest within the first two years after diagnosis and was approximately 10%. The overall risk of CNS recurrence in the group of patients receiving DNS treatment was similar to the group receiving no therapy directed to the CNS. The occurrence of isolated CNS involvement was not prevented by the use of CNS irradiation and i.t. methotrexate. Because of a lack of efficacy to the CNS irradiation regimen, current treatment regimens do not include therapy directed to CNS.

  1. Mammalian Wax Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jeffrey B.; Russell, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Wax monoesters are synthesized by the esterification of fatty alcohols and fatty acids. A mammalian enzyme that catalyzes this reaction has not been isolated. We used expression cloning to identify cDNAs encoding a wax synthase in the mouse preputial gland. The wax synthase gene is located on the X chromosome and encodes a member of the acyltransferase family of enzymes that synthesize neutral lipids. Expression of wax synthase in cultured cells led to the formation of wax monoesters from straight chain saturated, unsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty alcohols and acids. Polyisoprenols also were incorporated into wax monoesters by the enzyme. The wax synthase had little or no ability to synthesize cholesteryl esters, diacylglycerols, or triacylglycerols, whereas other acyltransferases, including the acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 and 2 enzymes and the acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 and 2 enzymes, exhibited modest wax monoester synthesis activities. Confocal light microscopy indicated that the wax synthase was localized in membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Wax synthase mRNA was abundant in tissues rich in sebaceous glands such as the preputial gland and eyelid and was present at lower levels in other tissues. Coexpression of cDNAs specifying fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 and wax synthase led to the synthesis of wax monoesters. The data suggest that wax monoester synthesis in mammals involves a two step biosynthetic pathway catalyzed by fatty acyl-CoA reductase and wax synthase enzymes. PMID:15220349

  2. Structure of mammalian metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Kaegi, J.H.R.; Vasak, M.; Lerch, K.; Gilg, D.E.O.; Hunziker, P.; Bernhard, W.R.; Good, M.

    1984-03-01

    All mammalian metallothioneins characterized contain a single polypeptide chain of 61 amino acid residues, among them 20 cysteines providing the ligands for seven metal-binding sites. Native metallothioneins are usually heterogeneous in metal composition, with Zn, Cd, and Cu occurring in varying proportions. However, forms containing only a single metal species, i.e., Zn, Cd, Ni, Co, Hg, Pb, Bi, have now been prepared by in vitro reconstitution from the metal-free apoprotein. By spectroscopic analysis of such derivatives it was established that all cysteine residues participate in metal binding, that each metal ion is bound to four thiolate ligands, and that the symmetry of each complex is close to that of a tetrahedron. To satisfy the requirements of the overall Me/sub 7/(Cys/sup -/)/sub 20/ stoichiometry, the complexes must be combined to form metal-thiolate cluster structures. The actual spatial organization of the clusters and the polypeptide chain remains to be established. An attractive possibility is the arrangement of the tetrahedral metal-thiolates in adamantane-like structures surrounded by properly folded segments of the chain providing the ligands. /sup 1/H-NMR data and infrared absorption measurements are consistent with a tightly folded structure rich in ..beta..-type conformation. 79 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  3. Aberrant Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Increased Adult Neurogenesis in Mice Lacking Chromatin Protein HMGB2

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Avanish S.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Aguirre, Adan; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) are distinct groups of cells found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Previously we determined that members of the High Mobility Group (HMG) B family of chromatin structural proteins modulate NSC proliferation and self-renewal. Among them HMGB2 was found to be dynamically expressed in proliferating and differentiating NSCs, suggesting that it may regulate NSC maintenance. We report now that Hmgb2−/− mice exhibit SVZ hyperproliferation, increased numbers of SVZ NSCs, and a trend towards aberrant increases in newly born neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) granule cell layer. Increases in the levels of the transcription factor p21 and the Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), along with down-regulation of the transcription/pluripotency factor Oct4 in the Hmgb2−/− SVZ point to a possible pathway for this increased proliferation/differentiation. Our findings suggest that HMGB2 functions as a modulator of neurogenesis in young adult mice through regulation of NSC proliferation, and identify a potential target via which CNS repair could be amplified following trauma or disease-based neuronal degeneration. PMID:24391977

  4. Mammalian Sirtuins and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoling; Kazgan, Nevzat

    2011-01-01

    Sirtuins are highly conserved NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases and/or ADP-ribosyltransferases that can extend the lifespan of several lower model organisms including yeast, worms and flies. The seven mammalian sirtuins, SIRT1 to SIRT7, have emerged as key metabolic sensors that directly link environmental signals to mammalian metabolic homeostasis and stress response. Recent studies have shed light on the critical roles of sirtuins in mammalian energy metabolism in response to nutrient signals. This review focuses on the involvement of two nuclear sirtuins, SIRT1 and SIRT6, and three mitochondrial sirtuins, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5, in regulation of diverse metabolic processes. PMID:21614150

  5. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper.

    PubMed

    Levin, Victor A; Tonge, Peter J; Gallo, James M; Birtwistle, Marc R; Dar, Arvin C; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J; Heffron, Timothy P; Elmquist, William F; Lachowicz, Jean E; Johnson, Ted W; White, Forest M; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y; Berry, Donald A; Petter, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric "Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors," further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward. PMID:26403167

  6. Nanotechnological advances for the delivery of CNS therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ho Lun; Wu, Xiao Yu; Bendayan, Reina

    2012-05-15

    Effective non-invasive treatment of neurological diseases is often limited by the poor access of therapeutic agents into the central nervous system (CNS). The majority of drugs and biotechnological agents do not readily permeate into brain parenchyma due to the presence of two anatomical and biochemical dynamic barriers: the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Therefore, one of the most significant challenges facing CNS drug development is the availability of effective brain targeting technology. Recent advances in nanotechnology have provided promising solutions to this challenge. Several nanocarriers ranging from the more established systems, e.g. polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, liposomes, micelles to the newer systems, e.g. dendrimers, nanogels, nanoemulsions and nanosuspensions have been studied for the delivery of CNS therapeutics. Many of these nanomedicines can be effectively transported across various in vitro and in vivo BBB models by endocytosis and/or transcytosis, and demonstrated early preclinical success for the management of CNS conditions such as brain tumors, HIV encephalopathy, Alzheimer's disease and acute ischemic stroke. Future development of CNS nanomedicines need to focus on increasing their drug-trafficking performance and specificity for brain tissue using novel targeting moieties, improving their BBB permeability and reducing their neurotoxicity. PMID:22100125

  7. B4GALT6 regulates astrocyte activation during CNS inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Lior; Trauger, Sunia A.; Blain, Manon; Nadeau, Meghan; Patel, Bonny; Alvarez, Jorge I.; Mascanfroni, Ivan D.; Yeste, Ada; Kivisäkk, Pia; Kallas, Keith; Ellezam, Benjamin; Bakshi, Rohit; Prat, Alexandre; Antel, Jack P.; Weiner, Howard L.; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes play complex roles in the response to trauma, infection or inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, it is important to characterize the mechanisms regulating astrocyte function, as well as potential targets for the therapeutic modulation of astrocyte activity. Here we report that lactosylceramide (LacCer) levels are up-regulated in the CNS during chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental model of multiple sclerosis (MS). We found that LacCer synthesized by β-1,4-galactosyltransferase 6 (B4GALT6) in astrocytes acts in an autocrine manner to trigger transcriptional programs that promote the recruitment and activation of CNS-infiltrating monocytes and microglia, and neurodegeneration. We also detected increased B4GALT6 expression and LacCer levels in CNS MS lesions. Finally, the inhibition of LacCer synthesis suppressed local CNS innate immunity and neurodegeneration in EAE, and interfered with the activation of human astrocytes in vitro. Thus, B4GALT6 is a potential therapeutic target for MS and other neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:25216636

  8. Amyloid-β efflux from the CNS into the plasma

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kaleigh Filisa; Elbert, Donald L.; Kasten, Tom P.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Sigurdson, Wendy C.; Connors, Rose E.; Ovod, Vitaliy; Munsell, Ling Y.; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Miller-Thomas, Michelle M.; Moran, Christopher J.; Cross, Dewitte T.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to measure the flux of amyloid-β (Aβ) across the human cerebral capillary bed in order to determine if transport into the blood is a significant mechanism of clearance for Aβ produced in the central nervous system (CNS). Methods Time-matched blood samples were simultaneously collected from a cerebral vein (including the sigmoid sinus, inferior petrosal sinus, and the internal jugular vein), femoral vein, and radial artery of patients undergoing Inferior Petrosal Sinus Sampling (IPSS). For each plasma sample, Aβ concentration was assessed by three assays and the venous to arterial Aβ concentration ratios were determined. Results Aβ concentration was increased by ~7.5% in venous blood leaving the CNS capillary bed compared to arterial blood, indicating efflux from the CNS into the peripheral blood (p < 0.0001). There was no difference in peripheral venous Aβ concentration compared to arterial blood concentration. Interpretation Our results are consistent with clearance of CNS-derived Aβ into the venous blood supply with no increase from a peripheral capillary bed. Modeling these results suggests that direct transport of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier accounts for ~25% of Aβ clearance, and reabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid Aβ accounts for ~25% of the total CNS Aβ clearance in humans. PMID:25205593

  9. Bovine-associated CNS species resist phagocytosis differently

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) cause usually subclinical or mild clinical bovine mastitis, which often remains persistent. Symptoms are usually mild, mostly only comprising slight changes in the appearance of milk and possibly slight swelling. However, clinical mastitis with severe signs has also been reported. The reasons for the differences in clinical expression are largely unknown. Macrophages play an important role in the innate immunity of the udder. This study examined phagocytosis and killing by mouse macrophage cells of three CNS species: Staphylococcus chromogenes (15 isolates), Staphylococcus agnetis (6 isolates) and Staphylococcus simulans (15 isolates). Staphylococcus aureus (7 isolates) was also included as a control. Results All the studied CNS species were phagocytosed by macrophages, but S. simulans resisted phagocytosis more effectively than the other CNS species. Only S. chromogenes was substantially killed by macrophages. Significant variations between isolates were seen in both phagocytosis and killing by macrophages and were more common in the killing assays. Significant differences between single CNS species and S. aureus were observed in both assays. Conclusion This study demonstrated that differences in the phagocytosis and killing of mastitis-causing staphylococci by macrophages exist at both the species and isolate level. PMID:24207012

  10. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  11. Mammalian Interphase Cdks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) drive cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes. Yeasts have a single major Cdk that mediates distinct cell cycle transitions via association with different cyclins. The closest homolog in mammals, Cdk1, drives mitosis. Mammals have additional Cdks—Cdk2, Cdk4, and Cdk6—that represent the major Cdks activated during interphase (iCdks). A large body of evidence has accrued that suggests that activation of iCdks dictates progression though interphase. In apparent contradiction, deficiency in each individual iCdk, respectively, in knockout mice proved to be compatible with live birth and in some instances fertility. Moreover, murine embryos could be derived with Cdk1 as the only functional Cdk. Thus, none of the iCdks is strictly essential for mammalian cell cycle progression, raising the possibility that Cdk1 is the dominant regulator in interphase. However, an absence of iCdks has been accompanied by major shifts in cyclin association to Cdk1, suggesting gain in function. After considerable tweaking, a chemical genetic approach has recently been able to examine the impact of acute inhibition of Cdk2 activity without marked distortion of cyclin/Cdk complex formation. The results suggest that, when expressed at its normal levels, Cdk2 performs essential roles in driving human cells into S phase and maintaining genomic stability. These new findings appear to have restored order to the cell cycle field, bringing it full circle to the view that iCdks indeed play important roles. They also underscore the caveat in knockdown and knockout approaches that protein underexpression can significantly perturb a protein interaction network. We discuss the implications of the new synthesis for future cell cycle studies and anti–Cdk-based therapy of cancer and other diseases. PMID:23634250

  12. Isotope Labeling in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arpana; Saxena, Krishna; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Isotope labeling of proteins represents an important and often required tool for the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure and dynamics of proteins. Mammalian expression systems have conventionally been considered to be too weak and inefficient for protein expression. However, recent advances have significantly improved the expression levels of these systems. Here, we provide an overview of some of the recent developments in expression strategies for mammalian expression systems in view of NMR investigations. PMID:22167668

  13. Disruption of Microtubule Integrity Initiates Mitosis during CNS Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S.; Fischer, Bettina; Russell, Steven; Shepherd, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mechanisms of CNS repair have vital medical implications. We show that traumatic injury to the ventral midline of the embryonic Drosophila CNS activates cell divisions to replace lost cells. A pilot screen analyzing transcriptomes of single cells during repair pointed to downregulation of the microtubule-stabilizing GTPase mitochondrial Rho (Miro) and upregulation of the Jun transcription factor Jun-related antigen (Jra). Ectopic Miro expression can prevent midline divisions after damage, whereas Miro depletion destabilizes cortical β-tubulin and increases divisions. Disruption of cortical microtubules, either by chemical depolymerization or by overexpression of monomeric tubulin, triggers ectopic mitosis in the midline and induces Jra expression. Conversely, loss of Jra renders midline cells unable to replace damaged siblings. Our data indicate that upon injury, the integrity of the microtubule cytoskeleton controls cell division in the CNS midline, triggering extra mitosis to replace lost cells. The conservation of the identified molecules suggests that similar mechanisms may operate in vertebrates. PMID:22841498

  14. NanoART, neuroAIDS and CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nowacek, Ari; Gendelman, Howard E

    2009-01-01

    A broad range of nanomedicines is being developed to improve drug delivery for CNS disorders. The structure of the blood–brain barrier (BBB), the presence of efflux pumps and the expression of metabolic enzymes pose hurdles for drug-brain entry. Nanoformulations can circumvent the BBB to improve CNS-directed drug delivery by affecting such pumps and enzymes. Alternatively, they can be optimized to affect their size, shape, and protein and lipid coatings to facilitate drug uptake, release and ingress across the barrier. This is important as the brain is a sanctuary for a broad range of pathogens including HIV-1. Improved drug delivery to the CNS would affect pharmacokinetic and drug biodistribution properties. This article focuses on how nanotechnology can serve to improve the delivery of antiretroviral medicines, termed nanoART, across the BBB and affect the biodistribution and clinical benefit for HIV-1 disease. PMID:19572821

  15. How Do Meningeal Lymphatic Vessels Drain the CNS?

    PubMed

    Raper, Daniel; Louveau, Antoine; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    The many interactions between the nervous and the immune systems, which are active in both physiological and pathological states, have recently become more clearly delineated with the discovery of a meningeal lymphatic system capable of carrying fluid, immune cells, and macromolecules from the central nervous system (CNS) to the draining deep cervical lymph nodes. However, the exact localization of the meningeal lymphatic vasculature and the path of drainage from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the lymphatics remain poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential differences between peripheral and CNS lymphatic vessels and examine the purported mechanisms of CNS lymphatic drainage, along with how these may fit into established patterns of CSF flow. PMID:27460561

  16. Therapeutic immune clearance of rabies virus from the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, D Craig; Roy, Anirban; Kean, Rhonda B; Phares, Timothy W; Barkhouse, Darryll A

    2011-01-01

    The long-held concept that rabies infection is lethal in humans once the causative rabies virus has reached the CNS has been called into question by the recent survival of a number of patients with clinical rabies. Studies in animal models provide insight into why survival from a rabies virus infection that has spread to the CNS is possible and the immune mechanisms involved. In the CNS, both innate mechanisms capable of inhibiting virus replication and the activity of infiltrating rabies virus-specific T and B cells with the capacity to clear the virus are required. Deficiencies in the induction of either aspect of rabies immunity can lead to lethal consequences but may be overcome by novel approaches to active and passive immunization. PMID:21686076

  17. Viscoelastic properties of individual glial cells and neurons in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yun-Bi; Franze, Kristian; Seifert, Gerald; Steinhäuser, Christian; Kirchhoff, Frank; Wolburg, Hartwig; Guck, Jochen; Janmey, Paul; Wei, Er-Qing; Käs, Josef; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    One hundred fifty years ago glial cells were discovered as a second, non-neuronal, cell type in the central nervous system. To ascribe a function to these new, enigmatic cells, it was suggested that they either glue the neurons together (the Greek word “γλια” means “glue”) or provide a robust scaffold for them (“support cells”). Although both speculations are still widely accepted, they would actually require quite different mechanical cell properties, and neither one has ever been confirmed experimentally. We investigated the biomechanics of CNS tissue and acutely isolated individual neurons and glial cells from mammalian brain (hippocampus) and retina. Scanning force microscopy, bulk rheology, and optically induced deformation were used to determine their viscoelastic characteristics. We found that (i) in all CNS cells the elastic behavior dominates over the viscous behavior, (ii) in distinct cell compartments, such as soma and cell processes, the mechanical properties differ, most likely because of the unequal local distribution of cell organelles, (iii) in comparison to most other eukaryotic cells, both neurons and glial cells are very soft (“rubber elastic”), and (iv) intriguingly, glial cells are even softer than their neighboring neurons. Our results indicate that glial cells can neither serve as structural support cells (as they are too soft) nor as glue (because restoring forces are dominant) for neurons. Nevertheless, from a structural perspective they might act as soft, compliant embedding for neurons, protecting them in case of mechanical trauma, and also as a soft substrate required for neurite growth and facilitating neuronal plasticity. PMID:17093050

  18. Human C-reactive protein impedes entry of leptin into the CNS and attenuates its physiological actions in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Wei, Dong; McCrory, Mark A; Szalai, Alexander J; Yang, Gangyi; Li, Ling; Li, Fanghong; Zhao, Allan Z

    2016-05-01

    Defective central leptin signalling and impaired leptin entry into the CNS (central nervous system) represent two important aspects of leptin resistance in obesity. In the present study, we tested whether circulating human CRP (C-reactive protein) not only diminishes signalling of leptin within the CNS, but also impedes this adipokine's access to the CNS. Peripheral infusion of human CRP together with co-infused human leptin was associated with significantly decreased leptin content in the CSF of ob/ob mice. Furthermore, following peripheral infusion of human leptin, the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) concentration of leptin in transgenic mice overexpressing human CRP was sharply lower than that achieved in similarly infused wild-type mice. Administration of LPS (lipopolysaccharide) to human CRP-transgenic mice dramatically elevated the concentrations of human CRP in the CSF. The i.c.v. (intracerebroventricular) delivery of human CRP into the lateral ventricles of ob/ob mice blocked the satiety and weight-reducing actions of human leptin, but not those of mouse leptin. I.c.v. injection of human CRP abolished hypothalamic signalling by human leptin, and ameliorated the effects of leptin on the expression of NPY (neuropeptide Y), AgRP (Agouti-related protein), POMC (pro-opiomelanocortin) and SOCS-3 (suppressor of cytokine signalling 3). Human CRP can impede the access of leptin to the CNS, and elevation of human CRP within the CNS can have a negative impact on the physiological actions of leptin. PMID:26933237

  19. ICAM-1 induction in the mouse CNS following irradiation.

    PubMed

    Olschowka, J A; Kyrkanides, S; Harvey, B K; O'Banion, M K; Williams, J P; Rubin, P; Hansen, J T

    1997-12-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) results in inflammation, increased trafficking of leukocytes into the CNS, induction of cytokines, and exacerbation of the primary injury. The increased trafficking of neutrophils into the CNS has been described following a number of injury models including stab, stroke, and excitotoxin-induced injury. This enhanced trafficking has largely been ascribed to the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54). In the current study, we wished to determine if the inflammation caused by irradiation of the CNS resulted in a similar induction of ICAM-1. C3H/HeJ mice were irradiated using gamma irradiation aimed over the right cerebral hemisphere. The relative induction of ICAM-1 mRNA levels was determined using quantitative RT-PCR 6 hours following irradiation with either 0, 5, 15, 25 or 35 Gy. ICAM-1 message was seen to exhibit a normal dose response curve with increasing mRNA levels seen at 15 Gy and higher. To determine the cellular distribution of the ICAM-1 protein following irradiation, mice were sacrificed at 4 hrs, 24 hrs, 48 hrs and 7 days following 25 Gy irradiation and the tissue was processed for ICAM-1 immunocytochemistry. ICAM-1 staining was seen to increase in both endothelial cells and astrocytes beginning as early as 4 hrs. The staining intensity continued to increase throughout the 7 day period observed. Together, these results suggest that irradiation of the CNS causes a rapid induction of both ICAM-1 mRNA and protein. This suggests that increased leukocyte trafficking into the CNS may exacerbate the inflammation induced by radiation injury. PMID:9512815

  20. Compartmental Intrathecal Radioimmunotherapy: Results for Treatment for Metastatic CNS Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Kim; Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Smith-Jones, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat; Humm, John L.; Xu, Hong; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Souweidane, Mark M.; Larson, Steven M.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the management of brain metastases is needed. We evaluated the addition of compartmental intrathecal antibody-based radioimmunotherapy (cRIT) in patients with recurrent metastatic central nervous system (CNS) neuroblastoma following surgery, craniospinal irradiation, and chemotherapy. 21 patients treated for recurrent neuroblastoma metastatic to the CNS received a cRIT-containing salvage regimen incorporating intrathecal 131I-monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) targeting GD2 or B7H3 following surgery and radiation. Most patients also received outpatient craniospinal irradiation, 3F8/GMCSF immunotherapy, 13-cis-retinoic acid and oral temozolomide for systemic control. Seventeen of 21 cRIT-salvage patients are alive 7-74 months (median 33) since CNS relapse, with all 17 remaining free of CNS neuroblastoma. One patient died of infection at 22 months with no evidence of disease at autopsy, and one of lung and bone marrow metastases at 15 months, and one of progressive bone marrow disease at 30 months. The cRIT-salvage regimen was well tolerated, notable for myelosuppression minimized by stem cell support (n=5), and biochemical hypothyroidism (n=5). One patient with a 7-year history of metastatic neuroblastoma is in remission from MLL-associated secondary leukemia. This is significantly improved to published results with non-cRIT based where relapsed CNS NB has a median time to death of approximately 6 months. The cRIT-salvage regimen for CNS metastases was well tolerated by young patients, despite their prior history of intensive cytotoxic therapies. It has the potential to increase survival with better than expected quality of life. PMID:19890606

  1. Matrix metalloproteinases as promising regulators of axonal regrowth in the injured adult zebrafish retinotectal system.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Kim; Bollaerts, Ilse; Bhumika, Stitipragyan; de Groef, Lies; Van Houcke, Jessie; Darras, Veerle M; Van Hove, Inge; Moons, Lieve

    2016-05-01

    Overcoming the failure of axon regeneration in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) after injury remains a major challenge, which makes the search for proregenerative molecules essential. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in axonal outgrowth during CNS development and show increased expression levels during vertebrate CNS repair. In mammals, MMPs are believed to alter the suppressive extracellular matrix to become more permissive for axon regrowth. We investigated the role of MMPs in axonal regeneration following optic nerve crush (ONC) in adult zebrafish, which fully recover from such injuries due to a high intrinsic axon growth capacity and a less inhibitory environment. Lowering general retinal MMP activity through intravitreal injections of GM6001 after ONC strongly reduced retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axonal regrowth, without influencing RGC survival. Based on a recently performed transcriptome profiling study, the expression pattern of four MMPs after ONC was determined via combined use of western blotting and immunostainings. Mmp-2 and -13a were increasingly present in RGC somata during axonal regrowth. Moreover, Mmp-2 and -9 became upregulated in regrowing RGC axons and inner plexiform layer (IPL) synapses, respectively. In contrast, after an initial rise in IPL neurites and RGC axons during the injury response, Mmp-14 expression decreased during regeneration. Altogether, a phase-dependent expression pattern for each specific MMP was observed, implicating them in axonal regrowth and inner retina remodeling after injury. In conclusion, these data suggest a novel, neuron-intrinsic function for multiple MMPs in axon regrowth that is distinct from breaking down environmental barriers. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1472-1493, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26509469

  2. Toll-like Receptor 4 in CNS Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Madison M.; Hutchinson, Mark; Watkins, Linda R.; Yin, Hang

    2010-01-01

    The responses of the brain to infection, ischemia and trauma share remarkable similarities. These and other conditions of the CNS coordinate an innate immune response marked by activation of microglia, the macrophage-like cells of the nervous system. An important contributor to microglial activation is toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor known to initiate an inflammatory cascade in response to various CNS stimuli. The present review traces new efforts to characterize and control the contribution of TLR4 to inflammatory etiologies of the nervous system. PMID:20402965

  3. Myelin-Associated Inhibitors in Axonal Growth After CNS Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Cédric G.; Zheng, Binhai

    2014-01-01

    There are multiple barriers to axonal growth after CNS injury. Myelin-associated inhibitors represent one group of barriers extrinsic to the injured neurons. Nogo, MAG and OMgp are three prototypical myelin inhibitors that signal through multiple neuronal receptors to exert growth inhibition. Targeting myelin inhibition alone modulates the compensatory sprouting of uninjured axons but the effect on the regeneration of injured axons is limited. Meanwhile, modulating sprouting, a naturally occurring repair mechanism, may be a more attainable therapeutic goal for promoting functional repair after CNS injury in the near term. PMID:24608164

  4. Presynaptic Inputs to Any CNS Projection Neuron Identified by Dual Recombinant Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, João M.; Wang, Fan; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2015-01-01

    Although neuroanatomical tracing studies have defined the origin and targets of major projection neurons (PN) of the central nervous system (CNS), there is much less information about the circuits that influence these neurons. Recently, genetic approaches that use Cre recombinase-dependent viral vectors have greatly facilitated such circuit analysis, but these tracing approaches are limited by the availability of Cre-expressing mouse lines and the difficulty in restricting Cre expression to discrete regions of the CNS. Here, we illustrate an alternative approach to drive Cre expression specifically in defined subsets of CNS projection neurons, so as to map both direct and indirect presynaptic inputs to these cells. The method involves a combination of Cre-dependent transneuronal viral tracers that can be used in the adult and that does not require genetically modified mice. To trigger Cre-expression we inject a Cre-expressing adenovirus that is retrogradely transported to the projection neurons of interest. The region containing the retrogradely labeled projection neurons is next injected with Cre-dependent pseudorabies or rabies vectors, which results in labeling of poly- and monosynaptic neuronal inputs, respectively. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used this novel tracing system to study the circuits that engage projection neurons of the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, neurons of the parabrachial nucleus of the dorsolateral pons that project to the amygdala and cortically-projecting neurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Importantly, because this dual viral tracing method does not require genetically derived Cre-expressing mouse lines, inputs to almost any projection system can be studied and the analysis can be performed in larger animals, such as the rat. PMID:26470056

  5. Graft/host relationships in the developing and regenerating CNS of mammals.

    PubMed

    Ourednik, Václav; Ourednik, Jitka

    2005-05-01

    A new light was shed on the utility of neural grafts when it was recognized that donor tissues and cells offer more than a source of immature progenitors potentially capable of cell replacement: First, they have the inherent capacity to produce multiple trophic and tropic factors promoting cell survival and tissue plasticity often characteristic of the immature central nervous system (CNS). Second, by their interaction with the host microenvironment via cell/cell and cell/ECM interactions, these grafts are capable of re-establishing homeostasis, which can be, for example, reflected in rescue and protection of host elements from harmful influences. This second capacity of donor cells relies, in part, also on a "dormant" but still present regenerative capacity of mature or even aged CNS and on the possibility of its mobilization in the damaged nervous system by neural grafts. For this to occur efficiently after transplantation, a bi-directional dialogue between donor and host cells must gradually be established, in which both "partners" transmit signals (cell/cell contact, molecular messengers), "listen to" and "understand" each other and are able to react by modifying their own plasticity- and development-related programs. Thus, for the best possible recovery of functionality in the injured adult and aged nervous system, neurotransplantation must always try to find optimal conditions for all three of the mentioned qualities of neural grafts, especially for the protection and/or reactivation of neural circuitry embedded in non-neurogenic CNS areas. Once fully understood, this newly recognized aspect of neurotransplantation (and topic of this review) might, someday, even allow the recovery of systems that would otherwise be doomed, such as cognition- and experience-related circuitry. PMID:15965116

  6. Axonal Localization of Integrins in the CNS Is Neuronal Type and Age Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Soleman, Sara; Mason, Matthew R. J.; Verhaagen, Joost; Bensadoun, Jean-Charles; Aebischer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The regenerative ability of CNS axons decreases with age, however, this ability remains largely intact in PNS axons throughout adulthood. These differences are likely to correspond with age-related silencing of proteins necessary for axon growth and elongation. In previous studies, it has been shown that reintroduction of the α9 integrin subunit (tenascin-C receptor, α9) that is downregulated in adult CNS can improve neurite outgrowth and sensory axon regeneration after a dorsal rhizotomy or a dorsal column crush spinal cord lesion. In the current study, we demonstrate that virally expressed integrins (α9, α6, or β1 integrin) in the adult rat sensorimotor cortex and adult red nucleus are excluded from axons following neuronal transduction. Attempts to stimulate transport by inclusion of a cervical spinal injury and thus an upregulation of extracellular matrix molecules at the lesion site, or cotransduction with its binding partner, β1 integrin, did not induce integrin localization within axons. In contrast, virally expressed α9 integrin in developing rat cortex (postnatal day 5 or 10) demonstrated clear localization of integrins in cortical axons revealed by the presence of integrin in the axons of the corpus callosum and internal capsule, as well as in the neuronal cell body. Furthermore, examination of dorsal root ganglia neurons and retinal ganglion cells demonstrated integrin localization both within peripheral nerve as well as dorsal root axons and within optic nerve axons, respectively. Together, our results suggest a differential ability for in vivo axonal transport of transmembrane proteins dependent on neuronal age and subtype.

  7. Axonal Localization of Integrins in the CNS Is Neuronal Type and Age Dependent.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Melissa R; Soleman, Sara; Cheah, Menghon; Tumbarello, David A; Mason, Matthew R J; Moloney, Elizabeth; Verhaagen, Joost; Bensadoun, Jean-Charles; Schneider, Bernard; Aebischer, Patrick; Fawcett, James W

    2016-01-01

    The regenerative ability of CNS axons decreases with age, however, this ability remains largely intact in PNS axons throughout adulthood. These differences are likely to correspond with age-related silencing of proteins necessary for axon growth and elongation. In previous studies, it has been shown that reintroduction of the α9 integrin subunit (tenascin-C receptor, α9) that is downregulated in adult CNS can improve neurite outgrowth and sensory axon regeneration after a dorsal rhizotomy or a dorsal column crush spinal cord lesion. In the current study, we demonstrate that virally expressed integrins (α9, α6, or β1 integrin) in the adult rat sensorimotor cortex and adult red nucleus are excluded from axons following neuronal transduction. Attempts to stimulate transport by inclusion of a cervical spinal injury and thus an upregulation of extracellular matrix molecules at the lesion site, or cotransduction with its binding partner, β1 integrin, did not induce integrin localization within axons. In contrast, virally expressed α9 integrin in developing rat cortex (postnatal day 5 or 10) demonstrated clear localization of integrins in cortical axons revealed by the presence of integrin in the axons of the corpus callosum and internal capsule, as well as in the neuronal cell body. Furthermore, examination of dorsal root ganglia neurons and retinal ganglion cells demonstrated integrin localization both within peripheral nerve as well as dorsal root axons and within optic nerve axons, respectively. Together, our results suggest a differential ability for in vivo axonal transport of transmembrane proteins dependent on neuronal age and subtype. PMID:27570822

  8. The Intrinsic Electrophysiological Properties of Mammalian Neurons: Insights into Central Nervous System Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo R.

    1988-12-01

    This article reviews the electroresponsive properties of single neurons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). In some of these cells the ionic conductances responsible for their excitability also endow them with autorhythmic electrical oscillatory properties. Chemical or electrical synaptic contacts between these neurons often result in network oscillations. In such networks, autorhytmic neurons may act as true oscillators (as pacemakers) or as resonators (responding preferentially to certain firing frequencies). Oscillations and resonance in the CNS are proposed to have diverse functional roles, such as (i) determining global functional states (for example, sleep-wakefulness or attention), (ii) timing in motor coordination, and (iii) specifying connectivity during development. Also, oscillation, especially in the thalamo-cortical circuits, may be related to certain neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review proposes that the autorhythmic electrical properties of central neurons and their connectivity form the basis for an intrinsic functional coordinate system that provides internal context to sensory input.

  9. CNS Multiparameter Optimization Approach: Is it in Accordance with Occam's Razor Principle?

    PubMed

    Raevsky, Oleg A

    2016-04-01

    A detailed analysis of the possibility of using the Multiparameter Optimization approach (MPO) for CNS/non-CNS classification of drugs was carried out. This work has shown that MPO descriptors are able to describe only part of chemical transport in the CNS connected with transmembrane diffusion. Hence the "intuitive" CNS MPO approach with arbitrary selection of descriptors and calculations of score functions, search of thresholds of classification, and absence of any chemometric procedures, leads to rather modest accuracy of CNS/non-CNS classification models. PMID:27491918

  10. Role of resident CNS cell populations in HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lepoutre, Veronique; Jain, Pooja; Quann, Kevin; Wigdahl, Brian; Khan, Zafar K

    2009-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the etiologic agent for a number of disorders; the two most common pathologies include adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and a progressive demyelinating neuroinflammatory disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The neurologic dysfunction associated with HAM/TSP is a result of viral intrusion into the central nervous system (CNS) and the generation of a hyperstimulated host response within the peripheral and central nervous system that includes expanded populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This robust, yet detrimental immune response likely contributes to the death of myelin producing oligodendrocytes and degeneration of neuronal axons. The mechanisms of neurological degeneration in HAM/TSP have yet to be fully delineated in vivo and may involve the immunogenic properties of the HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax. This comprehensive review characterizes the available knowledge to date concerning the effects of HTLV-1 on CNS resident cell populations with emphasis on both viral and host factors contributing to the genesis of HAM/TSP. PMID:19273122

  11. Cell Therapy From Bench to Bedside Translation in CNS Neurorestoratology Era

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongyun; Chen, Lin; Sanberg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in cell biology, neural injury and repair, and the progress towards development of neurorestorative interventions are the basis for increased optimism. Based on the complexity of the processes of demyelination and remyelination, degeneration and regeneration, damage and repair, functional loss and recovery, it would be expected that effective therapeutic approaches will require a combination of strategies encompassing neuroplasticity, immunomodulation, neuroprotection, neurorepair, neuroreplacement, and neuromodulation. Cell-based restorative treatment has become a new trend, and increasing data worldwide have strongly proven that it has a pivotal therapeutic value in CNS disease. Moreover, functional neurorestoration has been achieved to a certain extent in the CNS clinically. Up to now, the cells successfully used in preclinical experiments and/or clinical trial/treatment include fetal/embryonic brain and spinal cord tissue, stem cells (embryonic stem cells, neural stem/progenitor cells, hematopoietic stem cells, adipose-derived adult stem/precursor cells, skin-derived precursor, induced pluripotent stem cells), glial cells (Schwann cells, oligodendrocyte, olfactory ensheathing cells, astrocytes, microglia, tanycytes), neuronal cells (various phenotypic neurons and Purkinje cells), mesenchymal stromal cells originating from bone marrow, umbilical cord, and umbilical cord blood, epithelial cells derived from the layer of retina and amnion, menstrual blood-derived stem cells, Sertoli cells, and active macrophages, etc. Proof-of-concept indicates that we have now entered a new era in neurorestoratology. PMID:21359168

  12. Employment of adult mammalian primary cells in toxicology: In vivo and in vitro genotoxic effects of environmentally significant N-nitrosodialkylamines in cells of the liver, lung, and kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, B.L.; Brendler, S.Y.; Liegibel, U.M.; Schmezer, P. ); Tompa, A. )

    1990-01-01

    This report focuses on the use of freshly isolated primary mammalian cells from different tissues and organs of the rat for the rapid and efficient analysis of toxic and genotoxic chemicals. The cells are either treated in vitro or they are isolated from treated animals. Viability by trypan blue exclusion and DNA damage as single-strand breaks are monitored in either case. Therefore, it is possible to compare in vitro and in vivo results directly. N-nitrosamines with unique organ-specific modes in carcinogenesis were studied in vitro using hepatocytes derived from three species (rat, hamster, and pig) and in rat lung and kidney cells. The sensitive detection of all carcinogenic nitrosamines was achieved, although a pattern of cell-specific activation was not observable. The new modification of the in vivo approach allowed the sensitive detection of NDMA genotoxicity in hepatic and in extrahepatic tissues. It is important to point out that the method is an efficient tool for toxicokinetic studies with genotoxic carcinogens in vivo.

  13. CaMKIIβ regulates oligodendrocyte maturation and CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Waggener, Christopher T; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Elgersma, Ype; Fuss, Babette

    2013-06-19

    CNS myelination and the maturation of the myelinating cells of the CNS, namely oligodendrocytes, are thought to be regulated by molecular mechanisms controlling the actin cytoskeleton. However, the exact nature of these mechanisms is currently only poorly understood. Here we assessed the role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase type II (CaMKII), in particular CaMKIIβ, in oligodendrocyte maturation and CNS myelination. Using in vitro culture studies, our data demonstrate that CaMKIIβ is critical for the proper morphological maturation of differentiating oligodendrocytes, an aspect of oligodendrocyte maturation that is mediated to a large extent by changes in the cellular cytoskeleton. Furthermore, our data provide evidence for an actin-cytoskeleton-stabilizing role of CaMKIIβ in differentiating oligodendrocytes. Using Camk2b knock-out and Camk2b(A303R) mutant mice, our data revealed an in vivo functional role of CaMKIIβ in regulating myelin thickness that may be mediated by a non-kinase-catalytic activity. Our data point toward a critical role of CaMKIIβ in regulating oligodendrocyte maturation and CNS myelination via an actin-cytoskeleton-regulatory mechanism. PMID:23785157

  14. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can create oxidative stress (OS)-mediated inflammatory changes upon impact. The oxidative burst signals the activation of phage-lineage cells such as peripheral macrophages, Kupffer cells and CNS microgl...

  15. Sirtuins: Guardians of Mammalian Healthspan

    PubMed Central

    Giblin, William; Skinner, Mary E.; Lombard, David B.

    2014-01-01

    The first link between sirtuins and longevity was made 15 years ago in yeast. These initial studies sparked efforts by many laboratories working in diverse model organisms to elucidate the relationships between sirtuins, lifespan, and age-associated dysfunction. Here we discuss the current understanding of how sirtuins relate to aging. We focus primarily on mammalian sirtuins SIRT1, SIRT3, and SIRT6, the three sirtuins for which the most relevant data are available. Strikingly, a large body of evidence now indicates that these and other mammalian sirtuins suppress a variety of age-related pathologies and promote healthspan. Moreover, increased expression of SIRT1 or SIRT6 extends mouse lifespan. Overall, these data point to important roles for sirtuins in promoting mammalian health, and perhaps in modulating the aging process. PMID:24877878

  16. Electroporation into Cultured Mammalian Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masanori; Osumi, Noriko

    Over the last century, mammalian embryos have been used extensively as a common animal model to investigate fundamental questions in the field of developmental biology. More recently, the establishment of transgenic and gene-targeting systems in laboratory mice has enabled researchers to unveil the genetic mechanisms under lying complex developmental processes (Mak, 2007). However, our understanding of cell—cell interactions and their molecular basis in the early stages of mammalian embryogenesis is still very fragmentary. One of the major problems is the difficulty of precise manipulation and limited accessibility to mammalian embryos via uterus wall. Unfortunately, existing tissue and organotypic culture systems per se do not fully recapitulate three-dimensional, dynamic processes of organogenesis observed in vivo. Although transgenic animal technology and virus-mediated gene delivery are useful to manipulate gene expression, these techniques take much time and financial costs, which limit their use.

  17. Mammalian homologues of the Drosophila eye specification genes.

    PubMed

    Hanson, I M

    2001-12-01

    The Drosophila compound eye is specified by the simultaneous and interdependent activity of transcriptional regulatory genes from four families: PAX6 (eyeless, twin of eyeless, eyegone), EYA (eyes absent), SIX (sine oculis, Optix) and DACH (dachshund). Mammals have homologues of all these genes, and many of them are expressed in the embryonic or adult eye, but the functional relationships between them are currently much less clear than in Drosophila. Nevertheless, mutations in the mammalian genes highlight their requirement both within and outside the eye in embryos and adults, and emphasize that they can be deployed in many different contexts. PMID:11735383

  18. Elucidating the Role of Injury-Induced Electric Fields (EFs) in Regulating the Astrocytic Response to Injury in the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Matthew L.; Henderson, Scott C.; Colello, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) induces astrocytes to change their morphology, to increase their rate of proliferation, and to display directional migration to the injury site, all to facilitate repair. These astrocytic responses to injury occur in a clear temporal sequence and, by their intensity and duration, can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the repair of damaged CNS tissue. Studies on highly regenerative tissues in non-mammalian vertebrates have demonstrated that the intensity of direct-current extracellular electric fields (EFs) at the injury site, which are 50–100 fold greater than in uninjured tissue, represent a potent signal to drive tissue repair. In contrast, a 10-fold EF increase has been measured in many injured mammalian tissues where limited regeneration occurs. As the astrocytic response to CNS injury is crucial to the reparative outcome, we exposed purified rat cortical astrocytes to EF intensities associated with intact and injured mammalian tissues, as well as to those EF intensities measured in regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, to determine whether EFs may contribute to the astrocytic injury response. Astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with uninjured tissue showed little change in their cellular behavior. However, astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with injured tissue showed a dramatic increase in migration and proliferation. At EF intensities associated with regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, these cellular responses were even more robust and included morphological changes consistent with a regenerative phenotype. These findings suggest that endogenous EFs may be a crucial signal for regulating the astrocytic response to injury and that their manipulation may be a novel target for facilitating CNS repair. PMID:26562295

  19. Elucidating the Role of Injury-Induced Electric Fields (EFs) in Regulating the Astrocytic Response to Injury in the Mammalian Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Baer, Matthew L; Henderson, Scott C; Colello, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) induces astrocytes to change their morphology, to increase their rate of proliferation, and to display directional migration to the injury site, all to facilitate repair. These astrocytic responses to injury occur in a clear temporal sequence and, by their intensity and duration, can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the repair of damaged CNS tissue. Studies on highly regenerative tissues in non-mammalian vertebrates have demonstrated that the intensity of direct-current extracellular electric fields (EFs) at the injury site, which are 50-100 fold greater than in uninjured tissue, represent a potent signal to drive tissue repair. In contrast, a 10-fold EF increase has been measured in many injured mammalian tissues where limited regeneration occurs. As the astrocytic response to CNS injury is crucial to the reparative outcome, we exposed purified rat cortical astrocytes to EF intensities associated with intact and injured mammalian tissues, as well as to those EF intensities measured in regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, to determine whether EFs may contribute to the astrocytic injury response. Astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with uninjured tissue showed little change in their cellular behavior. However, astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with injured tissue showed a dramatic increase in migration and proliferation. At EF intensities associated with regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, these cellular responses were even more robust and included morphological changes consistent with a regenerative phenotype. These findings suggest that endogenous EFs may be a crucial signal for regulating the astrocytic response to injury and that their manipulation may be a novel target for facilitating CNS repair. PMID:26562295

  20. Oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the mouse juvenile and adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sueli; Zeisel, Amit; Codeluppi, Simone; van Bruggen, David; Mendanha Falcão, Ana; Xiao, Lin; Li, Huiliang; Häring, Martin; Hochgerner, Hannah; Romanov, Roman A; Gyllborg, Daniel; Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B; La Manno, Gioele; Lönnerberg, Peter; Floriddia, Elisa M; Rezayee, Fatemah; Ernfors, Patrik; Arenas, Ernest; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Harkany, Tibor; Richardson, William D; Linnarsson, Sten; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo

    2016-06-10

    Oligodendrocytes have been considered as a functionally homogeneous population in the central nervous system (CNS). We performed single-cell RNA sequencing on 5072 cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage from 10 regions of the mouse juvenile and adult CNS. Thirteen distinct populations were identified, 12 of which represent a continuum from Pdgfra(+) oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to distinct mature oligodendrocytes. Initial stages of differentiation were similar across the juvenile CNS, whereas subsets of mature oligodendrocytes were enriched in specific regions in the adult brain. Newly formed oligodendrocytes were detected in the adult CNS and were responsive to complex motor learning. A second Pdgfra(+) population, distinct from OPCs, was found along vessels. Our study reveals the dynamics of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation, uncoupling them at a transcriptional level and highlighting oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the CNS. PMID:27284195

  1. Evolution of the mammalian dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hevner, Robert F

    2016-02-15

    The dentate gyrus (DG), a part of the hippocampal formation, has important functions in learning, memory, and adult neurogenesis. Compared with homologous areas in sauropsids (birds and reptiles), the mammalian DG is larger and exhibits qualitatively different phenotypes: 1) folded (C- or V-shaped) granule neuron layer, concave toward the hilus and delimited by a hippocampal fissure; 2) nonperiventricular adult neurogenesis; and 3) prolonged ontogeny, involving extensive abventricular (basal) migration and proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs). Although gaps remain, available data indicate that these DG traits are present in all orders of mammals, including monotremes and marsupials. The exception is Cetacea (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which DG size, convolution, and adult neurogenesis have undergone evolutionary regression. Parsimony suggests that increased growth and convolution of the DG arose in stem mammals concurrently with nonperiventricular adult hippocampal neurogenesis and basal migration of NSPCs during development. These traits could all result from an evolutionary change that enhanced radial migration of NSPCs out of the periventricular zones, possibly by epithelial-mesenchymal transition, to colonize and maintain nonperiventricular proliferative niches. In turn, increased NSPC migration and clonal expansion might be a consequence of growth in the cortical hem (medial patterning center), which produces morphogens such as Wnt3a, generates Cajal-Retzius neurons, and is regulated by Lhx2. Finally, correlations between DG convolution and neocortical gyrification (or capacity for gyrification) suggest that enhanced abventricular migration and proliferation of NSPCs played a transformative role in growth and folding of neocortex as well as archicortex. PMID:26179319

  2. Active mechanistic target of rapamycin plays an ancillary rather than essential role in zebrafish CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Diekmann, Heike; Kalbhen, Pascal; Fischer, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    The developmental decrease of the intrinsic regenerative ability of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is associated with reduced activity of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in mature neurons such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). While mTOR activity is further decreased upon axonal injury, maintenance of its pre-injury level, for instance by genetic deletion of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), markedly promotes axon regeneration in mammals. The current study now addressed the question whether active mTOR might generally play a central role in axon regeneration by analyzing its requirement in regeneration-competent zebrafish. Remarkably, regulation of mTOR activity after optic nerve injury in zebrafish is fundamentally different compared to mammals. Hardly any activity was detected in naïve RGCs, whereas it was markedly increased upon axotomy in vivo as well as in dissociated cell cultures. After a short burst, mTOR activity was quickly attenuated, which is contrary to the requirements for axon regeneration in mammals. Surprisingly, mTOR activity was not essential for axonal growth per se, but correlated with cytokine- and PTEN inhibitor-induced neurite extension in vitro. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR using rapamycin significantly reduced axon regeneration in vivo and compromised functional recovery after optic nerve injury. Therefore, axotomy-induced mTOR activity is involved in CNS axon regeneration in zebrafish similar to mammals, although it plays an ancillary rather than essential role in this regeneration-competent species. PMID:26217179

  3. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis protects against central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity and increases CXCL12 expression in the inflamed CNS.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Andre Michael; Yoon, Bo Hyung; Sadiq, Saud Ahmed

    2014-08-15

    Hyaluronan (HA) may have proinflammatory roles in the context of CNS autoimmunity. It accumulates in demyelinated multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, promotes antigen presentation, and enhances T-cell activation and proliferation. HA facilitates lymphocyte binding to vessels and CNS infiltration at the CNS vascular endothelium. Furthermore, HA signals through Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 to stimulate inflammatory gene expression. We assessed the role of HA in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS by administration of 4-methylumbelliferone (4MU), a well established inhibitor of HA synthesis. 4MU decreased hyaluronan synthesis in vitro and in vivo. It was protective in active EAE of C57Bl/6 mice, decreased spinal inflammatory infiltrates and spinal infiltration of Th1 cells, and increased differentiation of regulatory T-cells. In adoptive transfer EAE, feeding of 4MU to donor mice significantly decreased the encephalitogenicity of lymph node cells. The transfer of proteolipid protein (PLP)-stimulated lymph node cells to 4MU-fed mice resulted in a delayed EAE onset and delayed spinal T-cell infiltration. Expression of CXCL12, an anti-inflammatory chemokine, is reduced in MS patients in CSF cells and in spinal cord tissue during EAE. Hyaluronan suppressed production of CXCL12, whereas 4MU increased spinal CXCL12 in naive animals and during neuroinflammation. Neutralization of CXCR4, the most prominent receptor of CXCL12, by administration of AMD3100 diminished the protective impact of 4MU in adoptive transfer EAE. In conclusion, hyaluronan exacerbates CNS autoimmunity, enhances encephalitogenic T-cell responses, and suppresses the protective chemokine CXCL12 in CNS tissue. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis with 4MU protects against an animal model of MS and may represent an important therapeutic option in MS and other neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:24973214

  4. Recombinant adeno-associated virus vector: use for transgene expression and anterograde tract tracing in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlin, Nancy L.; Du, Bin; de Lacalle, Sonsoles; Saper, Clifford B.

    2016-01-01

    We used a recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (AAV) to deliver a foreign gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), into mature neurons in adult rat CNS in vivo. Microinjections of AAV as small as 50 nl transduced hundreds of neurons at the injection site. There was virtually no retrograde transport as fewer than one neuron per brain was found distant from the injection site that exhibited GFP immunoreactivity. The gene product, GFP, filled the entire neuronal cytoplasmic compartment; GFP immunoreactivity was robust in cell bodies, axons, and nerve terminals. There was no tissue damage at the injection sites or pathogenicity indicated by changes in astrocytic or microglial markers. There was no inflammatory response as judged by leukocytic invasion. Gene expression in transduced cells was robust and apparently permanent: there was no evidence of phenotypic reversion up to 12 weeks following infection. AAV is an excellent vector for introducing foreign genes into mature CNS neurons. Not only might it be an ideal vehicle for gene therapy, but also the GFP-containing AAV presents a new strategy for tracing long axonal pathways in the CNS, which is difficult with current tracers (PHAL, biotinylated dextrans). PMID:9630611

  5. ssiRNA Induced Gene Silencing is Transmitted Between Cells From the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tian-Yong; Zou, Shi-Ping; Alimova, Yelena V.; Wang, Guoying; Hauser, Kurt F.; Ghandour, M. Said; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2014-01-01

    Although siRNA induced gene silencing can be transmitted between cells in plants and in C. elegans, this phenomenon has been barely studied in mammalian cells. Both immortalized oligodendrocytes and SNB-19 glioblastoma cells were transfected with siRNA constructs for PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) or Akt (Akt/protein kinase B). Co-cultures were established between silenced cells and non-silenced cells which were hygromycin resistant and/or expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP). After fluorescence sorting or hygromycin selection to remove the silenced cells, the expression of PTEN or Akt genes in the originally unsilenced cells was in all cases significantly decreased. Importantly, silencing did not occur in transwell culture studies, suggesting that transmission of the silencing signal requires a close association between cells. These results provide the first direct demonstration that an siRNA induced silencing signal can be transmitted between mammalian central nervous system (CNS) cells. PMID:16923165

  6. DNA repair in mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Jaroudi, Souraya; SenGupta, Sioban

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells have developed complex mechanisms to identify DNA damage and activate the required response to maintain genome integrity. Those mechanisms include DNA damage detection, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which operate together to protect the conceptus from DNA damage originating either in parental gametes or in the embryo's somatic cells. DNA repair in the newly fertilized preimplantation embryo is believed to rely entirely on the oocyte's machinery (mRNAs and proteins deposited and stored prior to ovulation). DNA repair genes have been shown to be expressed in the early stages of mammalian development. The survival of the embryo necessitates that the oocyte be sufficiently equipped with maternal stored products and that embryonic gene expression commences at the correct time. A Medline based literature search was performed using the keywords 'DNA repair' and 'embryo development' or 'gametogenesis' (publication dates between 1995 and 2006). Mammalian studies which investigated gene expression were selected. Further articles were acquired from the citations in the articles obtained from the preliminary Medline search. This paper reviews mammalian DNA repair from gametogenesis to preimplantation embryos to late gestational stages. PMID:17141556

  7. Autoradiographic visualization of CNS receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.M.; Moody, T.W.

    1986-03-01

    Receptors for VIP were characterized in the rat CNS. /sup 125/I-VIP bound with high affinity to rat brain slices. Binding was time dependent and specific. Pharmacology studies indicated that specific /sup 125/I-VIP binding was inhibited with high affinity by VIP and low affinity by secretin and PHI. Using in vitro autoradiographic techniques high grain densities were present in the dentate gyrus, pineal gland, supraoptic and suprachiasmatic nuclei, superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and the area postrema. Moderate grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, cerebral cortex, nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, interstitial nucleus of the stria terminalis, paraventricular thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, subiculum and the medial geniculate nucleus. Grains were absent in the corpus callosum and controls treated with 1 microM unlabeled VIP. The discrete regional distribution of VIP receptors suggest that it may function as an important modulator of neural activity in the CNS.

  8. Histone Regulation in the CNS: Basic Principles of Epigenetic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Maze, Ian; Noh, Kyung-Min; Allis, C David

    2013-01-01

    Postmitotic neurons are subject to a vast array of environmental influences that require the nuclear integration of intracellular signaling events to promote a wide variety of neuroplastic states associated with synaptic function, circuit formation, and behavioral memory. Over the last decade, much attention has been paid to the roles of transcription and chromatin regulation in guiding fundamental aspects of neuronal function. A great deal of this work has centered on neurodevelopmental and adulthood plasticity, with increased focus in the areas of neuropharmacology and molecular psychiatry. Here, we attempt to provide a broad overview of chromatin regulation, as it relates to central nervous system (CNS) function, with specific emphasis on the modes of histone posttranslational modifications, chromatin remodeling, and histone variant exchange. Understanding the functions of chromatin in the context of the CNS will aid in the future development of pharmacological therapeutics aimed at alleviating devastating neurological disorders. PMID:22828751

  9. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-03-03

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications. Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.

  10. slc7a6os Gene Plays a Critical Role in Defined Areas of the Developing CNS in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Benini, Anna; Cignarella, Francesca; Calvarini, Laura; Mantovanelli, Silvia; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Zizioli, Daniela; Borsani, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to shed light on the functional role of slc7a6os, a gene highly conserved in vertebrates. The Danio rerio slc7a6os gene encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with 46% identity to human SLC7A6OS and 14% to Saccharomyces cerevisiae polypeptide Iwr1. Yeast Iwr1 specifically binds RNA pol II, interacts with the basal transcription machinery and regulates the transcription of specific genes. In this study we investigated for the first time the biological role of SLC7A6OS in vertebrates. Zebrafish slc7a6os is a maternal gene that is expressed throughout development, with a prevalent localization in the developing central nervous system (CNS). The gene is also expressed, although at different levels, in various tissues of the adult fish. To determine the functional role of slc7a6os during zebrafish development, we knocked-down the gene by injecting a splice-blocking morpholino. At 24 hpf morphants show morphological defects in the CNS, particularly the interface between hindbrain and midbrain is not well-defined. At 28 hpf the morpholino injected embryos present an altered somite morphology and appear partially or completely immotile. At this stage the midbrain, hindbrain and cerebellum are compromised and not well defined compared with control embryos. The observed alterations persist at later developmental stages. Consistently, the expression pattern of two markers specifically expressed in the developing CNS, pax2a and neurod, is significantly altered in morphants. The co-injection of embryos with synthetic slc7a6os mRNA, rescues the morphant phenotype and restores the wild type expression pattern of pax2a and neurod. Our data suggest that slc7a6os might play a critical role in defined areas of the developing CNS in vertebrates, probably by regulating the expression of key genes. PMID:25803583

  11. Cranial radiation necessary for CNS prophylaxis in pediatric NHL

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, L.R.; Wollner, N.; Fuks, Z.

    1987-03-01

    The records of 95 consecutive children less than or equal to 21 years of age with previously untreated diffuse histology NHL registered in our protocols from 1978 to 1983 were reviewed. Seventy-nine patients were considered eligible for analysis. The histologic subtypes represented included lymphoblastic (LB) 37%; histiocytic (DHL) 29%; undifferentiated (DU) 19%; poorly differentiated (DPDL) 9%; and unclassified (UNHL) 6%. Distribution of the patients according to stage showed Stage I, 0%; Stage II, 11%; Stage III, 53%; Stage IV, 36%. Four different Memorial Hospital protocols for systemic chemotherapy were used (LSA2L2 73%; L10 9%; L17 10%; L17M 8%); however, the IT (intrathecal) chemotherapy was uniform (Methotrexate: 6.0-6.25 mg/M2 per treatment course) and was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was not included in the CNS prophylaxis program. The overall median time of follow-up was 43 months. The overall CNS relapse rate was 6.3%; however, the incidence of CNS lymphoma presenting as the first isolated site of relapse in patients in otherwise complete remission (minimum follow-up of 19 months with 97% of patients off treatment) was only 1/58 (1.7%). Our data suggest that IT chemotherapy when given in combination with modern aggressive systemic combination chemotherapy, and without cranial radiation appears to be a highly effective modality for CNS prophylaxis regardless of stage, histology, or bone marrow or mediastinal involvement. (Abstract Truncated)

  12. Pannexin 2 protein expression is not restricted to the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Le Vasseur, Maxence; Lelowski, Jonathan; Bechberger, John F.; Sin, Wun-Chey; Naus, Christian C.

    2014-01-01

    Pannexins (Panx) are proteins homologous to the invertebrate gap junction proteins called innexins (Inx) and are traditionally described as transmembrane channels connecting the intracellular and extracellular compartments. Three distinct Panx paralogs (Panx1, Panx2 and Panx3) have been identified in vertebrates but previous reports on Panx expression and functionality focused primarily on Panx1 and Panx3 proteins. Several gene expression studies reported that Panx2 transcript is largely restricted to the central nervous system (CNS) hence suggesting that Panx2 might serve an important role in the CNS. However, the lack of suitable antibodies prevented the creation of a comprehensive map of Panx2 protein expression and Panx2 protein localization profile is currently mostly inferred from the distribution of its transcript. In this study, we characterized novel commercial monoclonal antibodies and surveyed Panx2 expression and distribution at the mRNA and protein level by real-time qPCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Panx2 protein levels were readily detected in every tissue examined, even when transcriptional analysis predicted very low Panx2 protein expression. Furthermore, our results indicate that Panx2 transcriptional activity is a poor predictor of Panx2 protein abundance and does not correlate with Panx2 protein levels. Despite showing disproportionately high transcript levels, the CNS expressed less Panx2 protein than any other tissues analyzed. Additionally, we showed that Panx2 protein does not localize at the plasma membrane like other gap junction proteins but remains confined within cytoplasmic compartments. Overall, our results demonstrate that the endogenous expression of Panx2 protein is not restricted to the CNS and is more ubiquitous than initially predicted. PMID:25505382

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's biomarker profiles in CNS infections.

    PubMed

    Krut, Jan Jessen; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Cinque, Paola; Hagberg, Lars; Price, Richard W; Studahl, Marie; Gisslén, Magnus

    2013-02-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker profile in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by decreased beta amyloid (Aβ(1-42)), increased total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau, respectively), which is a useful diagnostic tool and gives insight in the pathogenesis of AD. It is of importance to study how these biomarkers react in other CNS diseases; therefore, we decided to analyse amyloid and tau biomarkers in different CNS infections. We also included analysis of soluble amyloid precursor proteins (sAPPα and -β). CSF Aβ(1-42), sAPPα and -β, t-tau and p-tau were analysed in bacterial meningitis (n = 12), Lyme neuroborreliosis (n = 13), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (n = 10), HIV-associated dementia (HAD) (n = 21), AD (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 42). Concurrent with AD, Aβ(1-42) was decreased in all groups except neuroborreliosis compared to controls. HSV-1 encephalitis, bacterial meningitis and HAD showed lower concentrations of sAPPα and -β compared to AD. T-tau was increased in AD and HSV-1 encephalitis compared to all other groups. P-tau was higher in AD and HSV-1 encephalitis compared to bacterial meningitis, HAD and control. Decreased CSF Aβ(1-42), sAPPα and -β in various CNS infections imply an effect of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism which is similar in regard to AD concerning Aβ(1-42), but differs concerning sAPPα and -β. These results clearly indicate different pathologic pathways in AD and infectious CNS disease and may provide help in the differential biomarker diagnostics. Increased p-tau in HSV-1 encephalitis probably reflect acute neuronal damage and necrosis. PMID:23052602

  14. Hyperactivated Stat3 boosts axon regeneration in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Saloni T; Luo, Xueting; Park, Kevin K; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2016-06-01

    Axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is intrinsically and extrinsically inhibited by multiple factors. One major factor contributing to intrinsic regeneration failure is the inability of mature neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) to activate regeneration-associated transcription factors (TFs) post-injury. A prior study identified TFs overexpressed in neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) compared to the CNS; some of these could be involved in the ability of PNS neurons to regenerate. Of these, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), as well its downstream regeneration-associated targets, showed a significant upregulation in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons, and a constitutively active variant of Stat3 (Stat3CA) promoted neurite growth when expressed in cerebellar neurons (Lerch et al., 2012; Smith et al., 2011). To further enhance STAT3's neurite outgrowth enhancing activity, Stat3CA was fused with a viral activation domain (VP16). VP16 hyperactivates TFs by recruiting transcriptional co-factors to the DNA binding domain (Hirai et al., 2010). Overexpression of this VP16-Stat3CA chimera in primary cortical neurons led to a significant increase of neurite outgrowth as well as Stat3 transcriptional activity in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo transduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) with AAV constructs expressing VP16-Stat3CA resulted in regeneration of optic nerve axons after injury, to a greater degree than for those expressing Stat3CA alone. These findings confirm and extend the concept that overexpression of hyperactivated transcription factors identified as functioning in PNS regeneration can promote axon regeneration in the CNS. PMID:27060489

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning protects rats against CNS oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Arieli, Yehuda; Kotler, Doron; Eynan, Mirit; Hochman, Ayala

    2014-06-15

    We examined the hypothesis that repeated exposure to non-convulsive hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) as preconditioning provides protection against central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT). Four groups of rats were used in the study. Rats in the control and the negative control (Ctl-) groups were kept in normobaric air. Two groups of rats were preconditioned to non-convulsive HBO at 202 kPa for 1h once every other day for a total of three sessions. Twenty-four hours after preconditioning, one of the preconditioned groups and the control rats were exposed to convulsive HBO at 608 kPa, and latency to CNS-OT was measured. Ctl- rats and the second preconditioned group (PrC-) were not subjected to convulsive HBO exposure. Tissues harvested from the hippocampus and frontal cortex were evaluated for enzymatic activity and nitrotyrosine levels. In the group exposed to convulsive oxygen at 608 kPa, latency to CNS-OT increased from 12.8 to 22.4 min following preconditioning. A significant decrease in the activity of glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and a significant increase in glutathione peroxidase activity, was observed in the hippocampus of preconditioned rats. Nitrotyrosine levels were significantly lower in the preconditioned animals, the highest level being observed in the control rats. In the cortex of the preconditioned rats, a significant increase was observed in glutathione S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase activity. Repeated exposure to non-convulsive HBO provides protection against CNS-OT. The protective mechanism involves alterations in the enzymatic activity of the antioxidant system and lower levels of peroxynitrite, mainly in the hippocampus. PMID:24675062

  16. Nanotechnology for CNS Delivery of Bio-Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Lipa; Yadav, Sunita; Amiji, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    The current therapeutic strategies are not efficient in treating disorders related to the central nervous system (CNS) and have only shown partial alleviation of symptoms, as opposed to, disease modifying effects. With change in population demographics, the incidence of CNS disorders, especially neurodegenerative diseases, is expected to rise dramatically. Current treatment regimens are associated with severe side-effects, especially given that most of these are chronic therapies and involve elderly population. In this review, we highlight the challenges and opportunities in delivering newer and more effective bio-therapeutic agents for the treatment of CNS disorders. Bio-therapeutics like proteins, peptides, monoclonal antibodies, growth factors, and nucleic acids are thought to have a profound effect on halting the progression of neurodegenerative disorders and also provide a unique function of restoring damaged cells. We provide a review of the nano-sized formulation-based drug delivery systems and alternate modes of delivery, like the intranasal route, to carry bio-therapeutics effectively to the brain. PMID:23894728

  17. PPAR agonists as therapeutics for CNS trauma and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mandrekar-Colucci, Shweta; Sauerbeck, Andrew; Popovich, Phillip G.; McTigue, Dana M.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury or disease of the spinal cord and brain elicits multiple cellular and biochemical reactions that together cause or are associated with neuropathology. Specifically, injury or disease elicits acute infiltration and activation of immune cells, death of neurons and glia, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the secretion of substrates that inhibit axon regeneration. In some diseases, inflammation is chronic or non-resolving. Ligands that target PPARs (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors), a group of ligand-activated transcription factors, are promising therapeutics for neurologic disease and CNS injury because their activation affects many, if not all, of these interrelated pathologic mechanisms. PPAR activation can simultaneously weaken or reprogram the immune response, stimulate metabolic and mitochondrial function, promote axon growth and induce progenitor cells to differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. PPAR activation has beneficial effects in many pre-clinical models of neurodegenerative diseases and CNS injury; however, the mechanisms through which PPARs exert these effects have yet to be fully elucidated. In this review we discuss current literature supporting the role of PPAR activation as a therapeutic target for treating traumatic injury and degenerative diseases of the CNS. PMID:24215544

  18. Primary CNS lymphoproliferative disease, mycophenolate and calcineurin inhibitor usage

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Powell, Helen; Kostadinov, Rumen; Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Rifkin, Dena E.; Burger, Peter C.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppression for solid organ transplantation increases lymphoproliferative disease risk. While central nervous system (CNS) involvement is more rare, we noticed an increase in primary CNS (PCNS) disease. To investigate a potential association with the immunosuppressive regimen we identified all post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) cases diagnosed over a 28-year period at our institution (174 total, 29 PCNS) and all similar cases recorded in a United Network for Organ Sharing-Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (UNOS-OPTN) data file. While no PCNS cases were diagnosed at our institution between 1986 and 1997, they comprised 37% of PTLD cases diagnosed from 2011–2014. PCNS disease was more often associated with renal vs. other organ transplant, Epstein-Barr virus, large B-cell morphology and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as compared to PTLD that did not involve the CNS. Calcineurin inhibitors were protective against PCNS disease when given alone or in combination with MMF. A multivariate analysis of a larger UNOS-OPTN dataset confirmed these findings, where both MMF and lack of calcineurin inhibitor usage were independently associated with risk for development of PCNS PTLD. These findings have significant implications for the transplant community, particularly given the introduction of new regimens lacking calcineurin inhibitors. Further investigation into these associations is warranted. PMID:26460822

  19. Primary CNS lymphoproliferative disease, mycophenolate and calcineurin inhibitor usage.

    PubMed

    Crane, Genevieve M; Powell, Helen; Kostadinov, Rumen; Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Rifkin, Dena E; Burger, Peter C; Ambinder, Richard F; Swinnen, Lode J; Borowitz, Michael J; Duffield, Amy S

    2015-10-20

    Immunosuppression for solid organ transplantation increases lymphoproliferative disease risk. While central nervous system (CNS) involvement is more rare, we noticed an increase in primary CNS (PCNS) disease. To investigate a potential association with the immunosuppressive regimen we identified all post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) cases diagnosed over a 28-year period at our institution (174 total, 29 PCNS) and all similar cases recorded in a United Network for Organ Sharing-Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (UNOS-OPTN) datafile. While no PCNS cases were diagnosed at our institution between 1986 and 1997, they comprised 37% of PTLD cases diagnosed from 2011-2014. PCNS disease was more often associated with renal vs. other organ transplant, Epstein-Barr virus, large B-cell morphology and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as compared to PTLD that did not involve the CNS. Calcineurin inhibitors were protective against PCNS disease when given alone or in combination with MMF. A multivariate analysis of a larger UNOS-OPTN dataset confirmed these findings, where both MMF and lack of calcineurin inhibitor usage were independently associated with risk for development of PCNS PTLD. These findings have significant implications for the transplant community, particularly given the introduction of new regimens lacking calcineurin inhibitors. Further investigation into these associations is warranted. PMID:26460822

  20. Nanotechnology for CNS delivery of bio-therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Shah, Lipa; Yadav, Sunita; Amiji, Mansoor

    2013-08-01

    The current therapeutic strategies are not efficient in treating disorders related to the central nervous system (CNS) and have only shown partial alleviation of symptoms, as opposed to, disease modifying effects. With change in population demographics, the incidence of CNS disorders, especially neurodegenerative diseases, is expected to rise dramatically. Current treatment regimens are associated with severe side-effects, especially given that most of these are chronic therapies and involve elderly population. In this review, we highlight the challenges and opportunities in delivering newer and more effective bio-therapeutic agents for the treatment of CNS disorders. Bio-therapeutics like proteins, peptides, monoclonal antibodies, growth factors, and nucleic acids are thought to have a profound effect on halting the progression of neurodegenerative disorders and also provide a unique function of restoring damaged cells. We provide a review of the nano-sized formulation-based drug delivery systems and alternate modes of delivery, like the intranasal route, to carry bio-therapeutics effectively to the brain. PMID:23894728

  1. Origin, fate and dynamics of macrophages at CNS interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, Tobias; Jordão, Marta Joana Costa; Wieghofer, Peter; Prutek, Fabiola; Hagemeyer, Nora; Frenzel, Kathrin; Staszewski, Ori; Kierdorf, Katrin; Amann, Lukas; Krueger, Martin; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Hochgarner, Hannah; Zeiser, Robert; Epelman, Slava; Geissmann, Frederic; Priller, Josef; Rossi, Fabio; Bechmann, Ingo; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Linnarsson, Sten; Jung, Steffen; Prinz, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular, meningeal and choroid plexus macrophages are non-parenchymal macrophages that mediate immune responses at brain boundaries. Although the origin of parenchymal microglia has recently been elucidated, much less is known about the precursors, the underlying transcriptional program and the dynamics of the other macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS). It has been assumed that they have a high turnover with blood-borne monocytes. However, large scale single-cell RNA-sequencing reveals a striking molecular overlap between perivascular macrophages and microglia but not monocytes. Using several fate mapping approaches and parabiosis we demonstrate that CNS macrophages arise from yolk sac precursors during embryonic development and remain a stable population. Notably, the generation of CNS macrophages relies on the transcription factor Pu.1 whereas myb, Batf3 and Nr4a1 are not required. Upon autoimmune inflammation, macrophages undergo extensive self-renewal by local proliferation. Our data provide challenging new insights into brains innate immune system. PMID:27135602

  2. When Herbivores Eat Predators: Predatory Insects Effectively Avoid Incidental Ingestion by Mammalian Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Matan; Inbar, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The direct trophic links between mammalian herbivores and plant-dwelling insects have been practically ignored. Insects are ubiquitous on plants consumed by mammalian herbivores and are thus likely to face the danger of being incidentally ingested by a grazing mammal. A few studies have shown that some herbivorous hemipterans are able to avoid this peril by dropping to the ground upon detecting the heat and humidity on the mammal's breath. We hypothesized that if this risk affects the entire plant-dwelling insect community, other insects that share this habitat are expected to develop similar escape mechanisms. We assessed the ability of three species (adults and larvae) of coccinellid beetles, important aphid predators, to avoid incidental ingestion. Both larvae and adults were able to avoid incidental ingestion effectively by goats by dropping to the ground, demonstrating the importance of this behavior in grazed habitats. Remarkably, all adult beetles escaped by dropping off the plant and none used their functional wings to fly away. In controlled laboratory experiments, we found that human breath caused 60–80% of the beetles to drop. The most important component of mammalian herbivore breath in inducing adult beetles and larvae to drop was the combination of heat and humidity. The fact that the mechanism of dropping in response to mammalian breath developed in distinct insect orders and disparate life stages accentuates the importance of the direct influence of mammalian herbivores on plant-dwelling insects. This direct interaction should be given its due place when discussing trophic interactions. PMID:23424674

  3. Microtubule-Targeting Agents Enter the Central Nervous System (CNS): Double-edged Swords for Treating CNS Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules have been among the most successful targets in anticancer therapy and a large number of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are in various stages of clinical development for the treatment of several malignancies. Given that injury and diseases in the central nervous system (CNS) are accompanied by acute or chronic disruption of the structural integrity of neurons and that microtubules provide structural support for the nervous system at cellular and intracellular levels, microtubules are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for treating CNS disorders. It has been postulated that exogenous application of MTAs might prevent the breakdown or degradation of microtubules after injury or during neurodegeneration, which will thereby aid in preserving the structural integrity and function of the nervous system. Here we review recent evidence that supports this notion and also discuss potential risks of targeting microtubules as a therapy for treating nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25558415

  4. Mechanisms of mammalian iron homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pantopoulos, Kostas; Porwal, Suheel Kumar; Tartakoff, Alan; Devireddy, L.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is vital for almost all organisms because of its ability to donate and accept electrons with relative ease. It serves as a cofactor for many proteins and enzymes necessary for oxygen and energy metabolism, as well as for several other essential processes. Mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to acquire iron. Disruption of iron homeostasis is associated with various human diseases: iron deficiency resulting from defects in acquisition or distribution of the metal causes anemia; whereas iron surfeit resulting from excessive iron absorption or defective utilization causes abnormal tissue iron deposition, leading to oxidative damage. Mammals utilize distinct mechanisms to regulate iron homeostasis at the systemic and cellular levels. These involve the hormone hepcidin and iron regulatory proteins, which collectively ensure iron balance. This review outlines recent advances in iron regulatory pathways, as well as in mechanisms underlying intracellular iron trafficking, an important but less-studied area of mammalian iron homeostasis. PMID:22703180

  5. Effect of adult onset hypothyroidism on behavioral parameters and acetylcholinesterase isoforms activity in specific brain regions of male mice.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Giompres, Panagiotis; Margarity, Marigoula

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal development and function of mammalian central nervous system (CNS); TH dysregulation has been implicated in several cognitive and behavioral deficits related to dysfunctions of neurotransmitter systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adult onset hypothyroidism on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and on related behavioral parameters. For this purpose we used adult male Balb/cJ mice that were divided randomly into euthyroid and hypothyroid animal groups. Animals were rendered hypothyroid through administration of 1% w/v KClO4 in their drinking water for 8weeks. At the end of the treatment, learning/memory procedures were examined through step-through passive avoidance task while fear/anxiety was assessed using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically in two different fractions, salt-soluble fraction (SS) (containing mainly the G1 isoform) and detergent-soluble fraction (DS) (containing mainly the G4 isoform) in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, midbrain, hippocampus and striatum. Our results indicate that adult onset hypothyroidism caused significant memory impairment and increased fear/anxiety. Moreover, the activity of both isoforms of AChE was reduced in all brain regions examined in a brain region- and isoform-specific manner. PMID:27317840

  6. Olfactory sensitivity in mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Wackermannová, M; Pinc, L; Jebavý, L

    2016-07-18

    Olfaction enables most mammalian species to detect and discriminate vast numbers of chemical structures called odorants and pheromones. The perception of such chemical compounds is mediated via two major olfactory systems, the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal system, as well as minor systems, such as the septal organ and the Grueneberg ganglion. Distinct differences exist not only among species but also among individuals in terms of their olfactory sensitivity; however, little is known about the mechanisms that determine these differences. In research on the olfactory sensitivity of mammals, scientists thus depend in most cases on behavioral testing. In this article, we reviewed scientific studies performed on various mammalian species using different methodologies and target chemical substances. Human and non-human primates as well as rodents and dogs are the most frequently studied species. Olfactory threshold studies on other species do not exist with the exception of domestic pigs. Olfactory testing performed on seals, elephants, and bats focused more on discriminative abilities than on sensitivity. An overview of olfactory sensitivity studies as well as olfactory detection ability in most studied mammalian species is presented here, focusing on comparable olfactory detection thresholds. The basics of olfactory perception and olfactory sensitivity factors are also described. PMID:27070753

  7. Motor axon exit from the mammalian spinal cord is controlled by the homeodomain protein Nkx2.9 via Robo-Slit signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Ambrosio, Arlene; Mastick, Grant; Kaprielian, Zaven

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian motor circuits control voluntary movements by transmitting signals from the central nervous system (CNS) to muscle targets. To form these circuits, motor neurons (MNs) must extend their axons out of the CNS. Although exit from the CNS is an indispensable phase of motor axon pathfinding, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we present the first identification of a genetic pathway that regulates motor axon exit from the vertebrate spinal cord, utilizing spinal accessory motor neurons (SACMNs) as a model system. SACMNs are a homogeneous population of spinal MNs with axons that leave the CNS through a discrete lateral exit point (LEP) and can be visualized by the expression of the cell surface protein BEN. We show that the homeodomain transcription factor Nkx2.9 is selectively required for SACMN axon exit and identify the Robo2 guidance receptor as a likely downstream effector of Nkx2.9; loss of Nkx2.9 leads to a reduction in Robo2 mRNA and protein within SACMNs and SACMN axons fail to exit the spinal cord in Robo2-deficient mice. Consistent with short-range interactions between Robo2 and Slit ligands regulating SACMN axon exit, Robo2-expressing SACMN axons normally navigate through LEP-associated Slits as they emerge from the spinal cord, and fail to exit in Slit-deficient mice. Our studies support the view that Nkx2.9 controls SACMN axon exit from the mammalian spinal cord by regulating Robo-Slit signaling. PMID:22399681

  8. Quantitative evaluation of mammalian skeletal muscle as a heterologous protein expression system.

    PubMed

    DiFranco, Marino; Neco, Patricia; Capote, Joana; Meera, Pratap; Vergara, Julio L

    2006-05-01

    The production of mammalian proteins in sufficient quantity and quality for structural and functional studies is a major challenge in biology. Intrinsic limitations of yeast and bacterial expression systems preclude their use for the synthesis of a significant number of mammalian proteins. This creates the necessity of well-identified expression systems based on mammalian cells. In this paper, we demonstrate that adult mammalian skeletal muscle, transfected in vivo by electroporation with DNA plasmids, is an excellent heterologous mammalian protein expression system. By using the fluorescent protein EGFP as a model, it is shown that muscle fibers express, during the course of a few days, large amounts of authentic replicas of transgenic proteins. Yields of approximately 1mg/g of tissue were obtained, comparable to those of other expression systems. The involvement of adult mammalian cells assures an optimal environment for proper protein folding and processing. All these advantages complement a methodology that is universally accessible to biomedical investigators and simple to implement. PMID:16325422

  9. Differential, regional, and cellular expression of the stathmin family transcripts in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ozon, S; El Mestikawy, S; Sobel, A

    1999-06-01

    Stathmin is a ubiquitous cytosolic phosphoprotein, preferentially expressed in the nervous system, and previously described as a relay integrating diverse intracellular signaling pathways. Stathmin is the generic element of a mammalian protein family including SCG10, SCLIP, and RB3 with its splice variants RB3' and RB3". In contrast with stathmin, SCG10, SCLIP, and RB3/RB3'/RB3" are exclusively expressed in the nervous system, stathmin and SCG10 being mostly expressed during cell proliferation and differentiation, and SCLIP and RB3 rather in mature neural cells. To further understand their specific roles in the CNS, we compared the localization of the stathmin, SCG10, SCLIP, and RB3 transcripts in adult rat brain. Northern blot analysis as well as in situ hybridization experiments showed that all stathmin-related mRNAs are expressed in a wide range of adult rat brain areas. At a regional level, SCG10 and SCLIP appear generally distributed similarly except in a few areas. The pattern of expression of the RB3 transcript is very different from that of the three other members of the stathmin family. Furthermore, unlike SCG10 and SCLIP, which were detected only in neurons, but like stathmin, RB3 was detected in neurons and also in glial cells of the white matter. Altogether, our results suggest distinct roles for each member of the stathmin-related phosphoprotein family, in regard to their specific regional and cellular localization in the rat brain. PMID:10369222

  10. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Luarte, Alejandro; Bátiz, Luis Federico; Wyneken, Ursula; Lafourcade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future. PMID:27195011

  11. Adult Neurogenesis: An Evolutionary Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kempermann, Gerd

    2016-02-01

    When adult neurogenesis was discovered in the mammalian brain it was often considered an atavism and, even today, many people are convinced that there has been a "phylogenetic reduction" away from lifelong neurogenesis, favoring stability for complex brains. Adult neurogenesis is found throughout the animal kingdom but varies to a large extent. Mammals might have fewer neurogenic zones than, for example, fish, but within their remaining neurogenic zones, the new neurons are highly functional. Especially, humans have very substantial quantities of neurogenesis in their hippocampus. At least for the mammalian dentate gyrus, one can thus argue that there has been evolution toward neurogenesis-based plasticity rather than away from it. PMID:26684183

  12. New perspectives on using brain imaging to study CNS stimulants.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Scott E

    2014-12-01

    While the recent application of brain imaging to study CNS stimulants has offered new insights into the fundamental factors that contribute to their use and abuse, many gaps remain. Brain circuits that mediate pleasure, dependence, craving and relapse are anatomically, neurophysiologically and neurochemically distinct from one another, which has guided the search for correlates of stimulant-seeking and taking behavior. However, unlike other drugs of abuse, metrics for tolerance and physical dependence on stimulants are not obvious. The dopamine theory of stimulant abuse does not sufficiently explain this disorder as serotonergic, GABAergic and glutamagergic circuits are clearly involved in stimulant pharmacology and so tracking the source of the "addictive" processes must adopt a more multimodal, multidisciplinary approach. To this end, both anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MR spectroscopy (MRS) and positron emission tomography (PET) are complementary and have equally contributed to our understanding of how stimulants affect the brain and behavior. New vistas in this area include nanotechnology approaches to deliver small molecules to receptors and use MRI to resolve receptor dynamics. Anatomical and blood flow imaging has yielded data showing that cognitive enhancers might be useful adjuncts in treating CNS stimulant dependence, while MRS has opened opportunities to examine the brain's readiness to accept treatment as GABA tone normalizes after detoxification. A desired outcome of the above approaches is being able to offer evidence-based rationales for treatment approaches that can be implemented in a more broad geographic area, where access to brain imaging facilities may be limited. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. PMID:25080072

  13. CNS intraoperative consultation: a survival guide for non-neuropathologists.

    PubMed

    Kresak, Jesse Lee; Rivera-Zengotita, Marie; Foss, Robin M; Yachnis, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative consultations for central nervous system disease may be challenging due to limitations of sample size, lack of familiarity with neurosurgical procedures, or poor access to neuroimaging studies. Despite these challenges, the surgical pathologist is charged with determining if the tissue sample is representative of the pathologic process while ensuring that enough diagnostic tissue has been retained for routine histology, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, molecular testing, and in some cases, tissue banking. Here, we present basic methods and a practical approach for CNS intraoperative consultation including critical pre-analytic considerations that promote optimal tissue management. PMID:25015160

  14. Kynurenines in CNS disease: regulation by inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Brian M; Charych, Erik; Lee, Anna W; Möller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolizes the essential amino acid tryptophan and generates a number of neuroactive metabolites collectively called the kynurenines. Segregated into at least two distinct branches, often termed the "neurotoxic" and "neuroprotective" arms of the KP, they are regulated by the two enzymes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase and kynurenine aminotransferase, respectively. Interestingly, several enzymes in the pathway are under tight control of inflammatory mediators. Recent years have seen a tremendous increase in our understanding of neuroinflammation in CNS disease. This review will focus on the regulation of the KP by inflammatory mediators as it pertains to neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24567701

  15. CNS depressant activities of roots of Coccos nucifera in mice.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Gain, Sumanta; Jana, Sandip; Mandal, Soumit

    2011-01-01

    The ethanol extract of Coccos nucifera (EECN) was tested for possible pharmacological effects on experimental animals. EECN significantly potentiated the sleeping time of mice induced by standard hypnotics viz. pentobarbital sodium, diazepam, and meprobamate in a dose dependent manner. EECN showed significant analgesic properties as evidenced by the significant reduction in the number of writhes and stretches induced in mice by 1.2% acetic acid solution. It also potentiated analgesia induced by morphine and pethidine in mice. Pretreatment with EECN caused significant protection against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions. The behavioral studies on mice indicate CNS depressant activity of the ethanol extract of C. nucifera. PMID:21485298

  16. Migration of bone marrow progenitor cells in the adult brain of rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Dennie, Donnahue; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2016-04-26

    Neurogenesis takes place in the adult mammalian brain in three areas: Subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG); subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle; olfactory bulb. Different molecular markers can be used to characterize the cells involved in adult neurogenesis. It has been recently suggested that a population of bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells may migrate to the brain and differentiate into neuronal lineage. To explore this hypothesis, we injected recombinant SV40-derived vectors into the BM and followed the potential migration of the transduced cells. Long-term BM-directed gene transfer using recombinant SV40-derived vectors leads to expression of the genes delivered to the BM firstly in circulating cells, then after several months in mature neurons and microglial cells, and thus without central nervous system (CNS) lesion. Most of transgene-expressing cells expressed NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Thus, BM-derived cells may function as progenitors of CNS cells in adult animals. The mechanism by which the cells from the BM come to be neurons remains to be determined. Although the observed gradual increase in transgene-expressing neurons over 16 mo suggests that the pathway involved differentiation of BM-resident cells into neurons, cell fusion as the principal route cannot be totally ruled out. Additional studies using similar viral vectors showed that BM-derived progenitor cells migrating in the CNS express markers of neuronal precursors or immature neurons. Transgene-positive cells were found in the subgranular zone of the DG of the hippocampus 16 mo after intramarrow injection of the vector. In addition to cells expressing markers of mature neurons, transgene-positive cells were also positive for nestin and doublecortin, molecules expressed by developing neuronal cells. These cells were actively proliferating, as shown by short term BrdU incorporation studies. Inducing seizures by using kainic acid increased the number of BM progenitor cells

  17. Migration of bone marrow progenitor cells in the adult brain of rats and rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dennie, Donnahue; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis takes place in the adult mammalian brain in three areas: Subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG); subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle; olfactory bulb. Different molecular markers can be used to characterize the cells involved in adult neurogenesis. It has been recently suggested that a population of bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells may migrate to the brain and differentiate into neuronal lineage. To explore this hypothesis, we injected recombinant SV40-derived vectors into the BM and followed the potential migration of the transduced cells. Long-term BM-directed gene transfer using recombinant SV40-derived vectors leads to expression of the genes delivered to the BM firstly in circulating cells, then after several months in mature neurons and microglial cells, and thus without central nervous system (CNS) lesion. Most of transgene-expressing cells expressed NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Thus, BM-derived cells may function as progenitors of CNS cells in adult animals. The mechanism by which the cells from the BM come to be neurons remains to be determined. Although the observed gradual increase in transgene-expressing neurons over 16 mo suggests that the pathway involved differentiation of BM-resident cells into neurons, cell fusion as the principal route cannot be totally ruled out. Additional studies using similar viral vectors showed that BM-derived progenitor cells migrating in the CNS express markers of neuronal precursors or immature neurons. Transgene-positive cells were found in the subgranular zone of the DG of the hippocampus 16 mo after intramarrow injection of the vector. In addition to cells expressing markers of mature neurons, transgene-positive cells were also positive for nestin and doublecortin, molecules expressed by developing neuronal cells. These cells were actively proliferating, as shown by short term BrdU incorporation studies. Inducing seizures by using kainic acid increased the number of BM progenitor cells

  18. Evolutionary paths to mammalian cochleae.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A

    2012-12-01

    Evolution of the cochlea and high-frequency hearing (>20 kHz; ultrasonic to humans) in mammals has been a subject of research for many years. Recent advances in paleontological techniques, especially the use of micro-CT scans, now provide important new insights that are here reviewed. True mammals arose more than 200 million years (Ma) ago. Of these, three lineages survived into recent geological times. These animals uniquely developed three middle ear ossicles, but these ossicles were not initially freely suspended as in modern mammals. The earliest mammalian cochleae were only about 2 mm long and contained a lagena macula. In the multituberculate and monotreme mammalian lineages, the cochlea remained relatively short and did not coil, even in modern representatives. In the lineage leading to modern therians (placental and marsupial mammals), cochlear coiling did develop, but only after a period of at least 60 Ma. Even Late Jurassic mammals show only a 270 ° cochlear coil and a cochlear canal length of merely 3 mm. Comparisons of modern organisms, mammalian ancestors, and the state of the middle ear strongly suggest that high-frequency hearing (>20 kHz) was not realized until the early Cretaceous (~125 Ma). At that time, therian mammals arose and possessed a fully coiled cochlea. The evolution of modern features of the middle ear and cochlea in the many later lineages of therians was, however, a mosaic and different features arose at different times. In parallel with cochlear structural evolution, prestins in therian mammals evolved into effective components of a new motor system. Ultrasonic hearing developed quite late-the earliest bat cochleae (~60 Ma) did not show features characteristic of those of modern bats that are sensitive to high ultrasonic frequencies. PMID:22983571

  19. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully. PMID:25892619

  20. fMRI reveals distinct CNS processing during symptomatic and recovered complex regional pain syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Lebel, A; Becerra, L; Wallin, D; Moulton, E A; Morris, S; Pendse, G; Jasciewicz, J; Stein, M; Aiello-Lammens, M; Grant, E; Berde, C; Borsook, D

    2008-07-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in paediatric patients is clinically distinct from the adult condition in which there is often complete resolution of its signs and symptoms within several months to a few years. The ability to compare the symptomatic and asymptomatic condition in the same individuals makes this population interesting for the investigation of mechanisms underlying pain and other symptoms of CRPS. We used fMRI to evaluate CNS activation in paediatric patients (9-18 years) with CRPS affecting the lower extremity. Each patient underwent two scanning sessions: once during an active period of pain (CRPS(+)), and once after symptomatic recovery (CRPS(-)). In each session, mechanical (brush) and thermal (cold) stimuli were applied to the affected region of the involved limb and the corresponding mirror region of the unaffected limb. Two fundamental fMRI analyses were performed: (i) within-group analysis for CRPS(+) state and CRPS(-) state for brush and cold for the affected and unaffected limbs in each case; (ii) between-group (contrast) analysis for activations in affected and unaffected limbs in CRPS or post-CRPS states. We found: (i) in the CRPS(+) state, stimuli that evoked mechanical or cold allodynia produced patterns of CNS activation similar to those reported in adult CRPS; (ii) in the CRPS(+) state, stimuli that evoked mechanical or cold allodynia produced significant decreases in BOLD signal, suggesting pain-induced activation of endogenous pain modulatory systems; (iii) cold- or brush-induced activations in regions such as the basal ganglia and parietal lobe may explain some CNS-related symptoms in CRPS, including movement disorders and hemineglect/inattention; (iv) in the CRPS(-) state, significant activation differences persisted despite nearly complete elimination of evoked pain; (v) although non-noxious stimuli to the unaffected limb were perceived as equivalent in CRPS(+) and CRPS(-) states, the same stimulus produced different

  1. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  2. CNS effects of sumatriptan and rizatriptan in healthy female volunteers.

    PubMed

    van der Post, J; Schram, M T; Schoemaker, R C; Pieters, M S M; Fuseau, E; Pereira, A; Baggen, S; Cohen, A F; van Gerven, J M A

    2002-05-01

    This study investigates the CNS effects of sumatriptan and rizatriptan, with temazepam as an active comparator, in healthy female volunteers. Sixteen volunteers completed a randomized, double-blind, crossover study and on four separate occasions received either 100 mg sumatriptan, 20 mg rizatriptan or 20 mg temazepam. The main parameters were eye movements, EEG, body sway, visual analogue scales and a cognitive test battery. Rizatriptan and sumatriptan decreased saccadic peak velocity by 18.3 (95% CI: 5.7, 30.8) and 15.0 (2.2, 27.9) degrees/sec, respectively, about half the decrease induced by temazepam (35.0 (22.1, 47.8) degrees/sec). Body sway increased (30% for rizatriptan (16%, 45%) and 14% for sumatriptan (1%, 27%), respectively). Temazepam caused larger, similar effects. In contrast to temazepam, sumatriptan and rizatriptan decreased reaction times of recognition tasks and increased EEG alpha power (significant for sumatriptan, 0.477 (0.02, 0.935). Therapeutic doses of sumatriptan and rizatriptan caused CNS effects indicative of mild sedation. For EEG and recognition reaction times the effects were opposite to temazepam, indicating central stimulation. PMID:12100089

  3. MicroRNAs as biomarkers for CNS disease

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pooja; Benito, Eva; Fischer, André

    2013-01-01

    For many neurological diseases, the efficacy and outcome of treatment depend on early detection. Diagnosis is currently based on the detection of symptoms and neuroimaging abnormalities, which appear at relatively late stages in the pathogenesis. However, the underlying molecular responses to genetic and environmental insults begin much earlier and non-coding RNA networks are critically involved in these cellular regulatory mechanisms. Profiling RNA expression patterns could thus facilitate presymptomatic disease detection. Obtaining indirect readouts of pathological processes is particularly important for brain disorders because of the lack of direct access to tissue for molecular analyses. Living neurons and other CNS cells secrete microRNA and other small non-coding RNA into the extracellular space packaged in exosomes, microvesicles, or lipoprotein complexes. This discovery, together with the rapidly evolving massive sequencing technologies that allow detection of virtually all RNA species from small amounts of biological material, has allowed significant progress in the use of extracellular RNA as a biomarker for CNS malignancies, neurological, and psychiatric diseases. There is also recent evidence that the interactions between external stimuli and brain pathological processes may be reflected in peripheral tissues, facilitating their use as potential diagnostic markers. In this review, we explore the possibilities and challenges of using microRNA and other small RNAs as a signature for neurodegenerative and other neuropsychatric conditions. PMID:24324397

  4. Oligodendrocyte death results in immune-mediated CNS demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Traka, Maria; Podojil, Joseph R; McCarthy, Derrick P; Miller, Stephen D; Popko, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Although multiple sclerosis is a common neurological disorder, the origin of the autoimmune response against myelin, which is the characteristic feature of the disease, remains unclear. To investigate whether oligodendrocyte death could cause this autoimmune response, we examined the oligodendrocyte ablation Plp1-CreERT;ROSA26-eGFP-DTA (DTA) mouse model. Approximately 30 weeks after recovering from oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination, DTA mice develop a fatal secondary disease characterized by extensive myelin and axonal loss. Strikingly, late-onset disease was associated with increased numbers of T lymphocytes in the CNS and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-specific T cells in lymphoid organs. Transfer of T cells derived from DTA mice to naive recipients resulted in neurological defects that correlated with CNS white matter inflammation. Furthermore, immune tolerization against MOG ameliorated symptoms. Overall, these data indicate that oligodendrocyte death is sufficient to trigger an adaptive autoimmune response against myelin, suggesting that a similar process can occur in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26656646

  5. Overview of Transgenic Glioblastoma and Oligoastrocytoma CNS Models and Their Utility in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fuyi; Becker, Albert; LoTurco, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Many animal models have been developed to investigate the sources of central nervous system (CNS) tumor heterogeneity. Reviewed in this unit is a recently developed CNS tumor model using the piggyBac transposon system delivered by in utero electroporation, in which sources of tumor heterogeneity can be conveniently studied. Their applications for studying CNS tumors and drug discovery are also reviewed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26995546

  6. Functions of mature mammalian astrocytes: a current view.

    PubMed

    Kimelberg, Harold K

    2010-02-01

    Before the roles of normal, mature astrocytes in the mammalian CNS can be discussed, we first need to define these cells. A definition proposed here is that such a class is best defined as consisting of the protoplasmic and fibrous astrocytes of the gray and white matter, respectively, the Bergmann glia of the molecular layer of the cerebellum, and the Muller cells of the retina. It is concluded that the established properties and functions of these mature astrocytes are essential support for neuronal activity, in the sense of Claude Bernard's principle of maintaining "la fixité du milieu intérieur." This milieu would be the extracellular space common to astrocytes and neurons. More specialized roles, such as the recently described "light guides" for retinal Muller cells can also be viewed as support and facilitation. The ECS is also, of course, common to all other neural cells, but here, I limit the discussion to perturbations of the ECS caused only by neuronal activities and the resolution of these perturbations by astrocytes, such as control of increases in extracellular K(+), uptake of excitatory amino acids, and alterations in blood vessel diameter and therefore blood flow. It is also proposed how this fits into the current morphological picture for the protoplasmic astrocytes as having small cell bodies with up to 100,000 process endings that occupy separate territories on which the processes of neighboring astrocytes scarcely intrude. PMID:20236950

  7. Mottled Mice and Non-Mammalian Models of Menkes Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Krzeptowski, Wojciech; Lipiński, Paweł; Grzmil, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał; Pierzchała, Olga; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2015-01-01

    Menkes disease is a multi-systemic copper metabolism disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked ATP7A gene and characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and severe connective tissue defects. The ATP7A protein is a copper (Cu)-transporting ATPase expressed in all tissues and plays a critical role in the maintenance of copper homeostasis in cells of the whole body. ATP7A participates in copper absorption in the small intestine and in copper transport to the central nervous system (CNS) across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Cu is essential for synaptogenesis and axonal development. In cells, ATP7A participates in the incorporation of copper into Cu-dependent enzymes during the course of its maturation in the secretory pathway. There is a high degree of homology (>80%) between the human ATP7A and murine Atp7a genes. Mice with mutations in the Atp7a gene, called mottled mutants, are well-established and excellent models of Menkes disease. Mottled mutants closely recapitulate the Menkes phenotype and are invaluable for studying Cu-metabolism. They provide useful models for exploring and testing new forms of therapy in Menkes disease. Recently, non-mammalian models of Menkes disease, Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio mutants were used in experiments which would be technically difficult to carry out in mammals. PMID:26732058

  8. Developmental hyperbilirubinemia and CNS toxicity in mice humanized with the UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) locus.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ryoichi; Nguyen, Nghia; Chen, Shujuan; Tukey, Robert H

    2010-03-16

    High levels of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) in newborn children is associated with a reduction in hepatic UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 activity that can lead to CNS toxicity, brain damage, and even death. Little is known regarding those events that lead to UCB accumulation in brain tissue, and therefore, we sought to duplicate this condition in mice. The human UGT1 locus, encoding all 9-UGT1A genes including UGT1A1, was expressed in Ugt1(-/-) mice. Because the most common clinical condition associated with jaundice in adults is Gilbert's syndrome, which is characterized by an allelic polymorphism in the UGT1A1 promoter, hyperbilirubinemia was monitored in humanized UGT1 mice that expressed either the Gilbert's UGT1A1*28 allele [Tg(UGT1(A1*28))Ugt1(-/-) mice] or the normal UGT1A1*1 allele [Tg(UGT1(A1*1))Ugt1(-/-) mice]. Adult Tg(UGT1(A1*28))Ugt1(-/-) mice expressed elevated levels of total bilirubin (TB) compared with Tg(UGT1(A1*1))Ugt1(-/-) mice, confirming that the promoter polymorphism associated with the UGT1A1*28 allele contributes to hyperbilirubinemia in mice. However, TB accumulated to near toxic levels during neonatal development, a finding that is independent of the Gilbert's UGT1A1*28 promoter polymorphism. Whereas serum TB levels eventually returned to adult levels, TB clearance in neonatal mice was not associated with hepatic UGT1A1 expression. In approximately 10% of the humanized UGT1 mice, peak TB levels culminated in seizures followed by death. UCB deposition in brain tissue and the ensuing seizures were associated with developmental milestones and can be prevented by enhancing regulation of the UGT1A1 gene in neonatal mice. PMID:20194756

  9. Immature astrocytes promote CNS axonal regeneration when combined with chondroitinase ABC

    PubMed Central

    Filous, Angela R.; Miller, Jared H.; Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M.; Horn, Kevin P.; Alilain, Warren J.; Silver, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration of injured adult CNS axons is inhibited by formation of a glial scar. Immature astrocytes are able to support robust neurite outgrowth and reduce scarring, therefore, we tested whether these cells would have this effect if transplanted into brain injuries. Utilizing an in vitro spot gradient model that recreates the strongly inhibitory proteoglycan environment of the glial scar we found that, alone, immature, but not mature, astrocytes had a limited ability to form bridges across the most inhibitory outer rim. In turn, the astrocyte bridges could promote adult sensory axon re-growth across the gradient. The use of selective enzyme inhibitors revealed that MMP-2 enables immature astrocytes to cross the proteoglycan rim. The bridge-building process and axon regeneration across the immature glial bridges were greatly enhanced by chondroitinase ABC pre-treatment of the spots. We used microlesions in the cingulum of the adult rat brains to test the ability of matrix modification and immature astrocytes to form a bridge for axon regeneration in vivo. Injured axons were visualized via p75 immunolabeling and the extent to which these axons regenerated was quantified. Immature astrocytes co-injected with chondroitinase ABC induced axonal regeneration beyond the distal edge of the lesion. However, when used alone, neither treatment was capable of promoting axonal regeneration. Our findings indicate that when faced with a minimal lesion, neurons of the basal forebrain can regenerate in the presence of a proper bridge across the lesion and when levels of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the glial scar are reduced. PMID:20629049

  10. Mast cells in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Dropp, J J

    1976-01-01

    Mast cells, which had until recently been believed to be not present in the mammalian brain, were studied in the brains of 29 mammalian species. Although there was considerable intraspecific and interspecific variation, mast cells were most numerous within the leptomeninges (especially in those overlying the cerebrum and the dorsal thalamus - most rodents, most carnivores, chimpanzees, squirrel monkeys and elephant), the cerebral cortex (most rodents, tiger, fox, chimpanzee, tarsier, and elephant) and in many nuclei of the dorsal thalamus (most rodents, tiger, lion, and fox). In some mammals, mast cells were also numerous in the stroma of the telencephalic choroid plexuses (chimpanzee, squirrel monkey), the putamen and the claustrum (chimpanzee), the subfornical organ (pack rat, tiger, chimpanzee), the olfactory peduncles (hooded rat, albino rat), the stroma of the diencephalic choroid plexus (lion, chimpanzee, squirrel monkey), the pineal organ (chimpanzee, squirrel monkey), some nuclei of the hypothalamus (tiger), the infundibulum (hooded rat, tiger, fox) the area postrema (pack rat, chinchilla, lion, spider monkey, chimpanzee, fox) and some nuclei and tracts of the metencephalon and the myelencephalon (tiger). Neither the sex of the animal nor electrolytic lesions made in the brains of some of the animals at various times prior to sacrifice appeared to effect the number and the distribution of mast cells. Age-related changes in mast cell number and distribution were detected in the albino rat. PMID:961335

  11. DNA modifications in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaehoon; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a crucial epigenetic mark in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-inactivation, chromosomal stability and suppressing parasitic DNA elements. DNA methylation in neurons has also been suggested to play important roles for mammalian neuronal functions, and learning and memory. In this review, we first summarize recent discoveries and fundamental principles of DNA modifications in the general epigenetics field. We then describe the profiles of different DNA modifications in the mammalian brain genome. Finally, we discuss roles of DNA modifications in mammalian brain development and function. PMID:25135973

  12. Suprasellar Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Espino Barros Palau, Angelina; Khan, Khurrum; Morgan, Michael L; Powell, Suzanne Z; Lee, Andrew G

    2016-09-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) of the central nervous system (CNS) are a heterogeneous group of embryonal malignancies that are composed of undifferentiated or poorly differentiated neuroepithelial cells. Supratentorial PNET is the second most common CNS embryonal malignancy in children, but it is rare in adults. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman with bilateral vision loss and a bitemporal hemianopia. Neuroimaging revealed a suprasellar mass, and pathology was consistent with PNET. After surgical debulking of the tumor followed by radiation therapy and chemotherapy, the patient had significant visual recovery and remained stable over 14 months of follow-up. PMID:26517622

  13. Genome exposure and regulation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Webb, P; Johnson, R

    1998-09-01

    A method of measurement of exposed DNA (i.e. hypersensitive to DNase I hydrolysis) as opposed to sequestered (hydrolysis resistant) DNA in isolated nuclei of mammalian cells is described. While cell cultures exhibit some differences in behavior from day to day, the general pattern of exposed and sequestered DNA is satisfactorily reproducible and agrees with results previously obtained by other methods. The general pattern of DNA hydrolysis exhibited by all cells tested consists of a curve which at first rises sharply with increasing DNase I, and then becomes almost horizontal, indicating that roughly about half of the nuclear DNA is highly sequestered. In 4 cases where transformed cells (Raszip6, CHO, HL60 and PC12) were compared, each with its more normal homolog (3T3, and the reverse transformed versions of CHO, HL60 and PC12, achieved by dibutyryl cyclic AMP [DBcAMP], retinoic acid, and nerve growth factor [NGF] respectively), the transformed form displayed less genome exposure than the nontransformed form at every DNase I dose tested. When Ca++ was excluded from the hydrolysis medium in both the Raszip6-3T3 and the CHO-DBcAMP systems, the normal cell forms lost their increased exposure reverting to that of the transformed forms. Therefore Ca++ appears necessary for maintenance of the DNA in the more highly exposed state characteristic of the nontransformed phenotype. LiCl increases the DNA exposure of all transformed cells tested. Dextran sulfate and heparin each can increase the DNA exposure of several different cancers. Colcemid prevents the increase of exposure of CHO by DBcAMP but it must be administered before or simultaneously with the latter compound. Measurements on mouse biopsies reveal large differences in exposure in different normal tissues. Thus, the exposure from adult liver cells was greater than that of adult brain, but both fetal liver and fetal brain had significantly greater exposure than their adult counterparts. Exposure in normal human

  14. Enhanced Neurite Growth from Mammalian Neurons in Three-Dimensional Salmon Fibrin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yo-El; Janmey, Paul A.; McCormick, Margaret; Sawyer, Evelyn S.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional fibrin matrices have been used as cellular substrates in vitro and as bridging materials for central nervous system repair. Cells can be embedded within fibrin gels since the polymerization process is non-toxic, making fibrin an attractive scaffold for transplanted cells. Most studies have utilized fibrin prepared from human or bovine blood proteins. However, fish fibrin may be well suited for neuronal growth since fish undergo remarkable central nervous system regeneration and molecules implicated in this process are present in fibrin. We assessed the growth of mammalian central nervous system neurons in bovine, human, and salmon fibrin and found that salmon fibrin gels encouraged the greatest degree of neurite (dendrite and axon) growth and were the most resistant to degradation by cellular proteases. The neurite growth-promoting effect was not due to the thrombin used to polymerize the gels or to any copurifying plasminogen. Co-purified fibronectin partially accounted for the effect on neurites, and blockade of fibrinogen/fibrin-binding integrins markedly decreased neurite growth. Anion exchange chromatography revealed different elution profiles for salmon and mammalian fibrinogens. These data demonstrate that salmon fibrin encourages the growth of neurites from mammalian neurons and suggest that salmon fibrin may be a beneficial scaffold for neuronal regrowth after CNS injury. PMID:17258313

  15. Functional Zonation of the Adult Mammalian Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, Gavin P.

    2016-01-01

    The standard model of adrenocortical zonation holds that the three main zones, glomerulosa, fasciculata, and reticularis each have a distinct function, producing mineralocorticoids (in fact just aldosterone), glucocorticoids, and androgens respectively. Moreover, each zone has its specific mechanism of regulation, though ACTH has actions throughout. Finally, the cells of the cortex originate from a stem cell population in the outer cortex or capsule, and migrate centripetally, changing their phenotype as they progress through the zones. Recent progress in understanding the development of the gland and the distribution of steroidogenic enzymes, trophic hormone receptors, and other factors suggests that this model needs refinement. Firstly, proliferation can take place throughout the gland, and although the stem cells are certainly located in the periphery, zonal replenishment can take place within zones. Perhaps more importantly, neither the distribution of enzymes nor receptors suggest that the individual zones are necessarily autonomous in their production of steroid. This is particularly true of the glomerulosa, which does not seem to have the full suite of enzymes required for aldosterone biosynthesis. Nor, in the rat anyway, does it express MC2R to account for the response of aldosterone to ACTH. It is known that in development, recruitment of stem cells is stimulated by signals from within the glomerulosa. Furthermore, throughout the cortex local regulatory factors, including cytokines, catecholamines and the tissue renin-angiotensin system, modify and refine the effects of the systemic trophic factors. In these and other ways it more and more appears that the functions of the gland should be viewed as an integrated whole, greater than the sum of its component parts. PMID:27378832

  16. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  17. Bortezomib-related neuropathy may mask CNS relapse in multiple myeloma: A call for diligence

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Muhammad Bilal; De Mel, Sanjay; Abid, Muhammad Abbas; Tan, Kong Bing; Chng, Wee Joo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Neuropathy is a common adverse effect of bortezomib. Isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse in MM remains exceedingly rare and carries a dismal prognosis. We present an unusual case of bortezomib related neuropathy masking a CNS relapse of MM. Case presentation: A 57-year-old female was diagnosed with standard-risk MM with clinical and cytogenetic features not typically associated with CNS involvement. She was treated with 4 cycles of bortezomib/cyclophosphamide/dexamethasone (VCD) and achieved a VGPR, after which she underwent an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) followed by bortezomib maintenance. Six months after ASCT she developed symptoms suggestive of peripheral neuropathy which was attributed to bortezomib. However the symptoms persisted despite discontinuation of bortezomib. Imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis subsequently confirmed a CNS relapse. Discussion: CNS involvement in MM (CNS-MM) is uncommon and is considered an aggressive disease. Recently published literature has reported biomarkers with prognostic potential. However, isolated CNS relapse is even less common; an event which carries a very poor prognosis. Given the heterogeneous neurologic manifestations associated with MM, clinical suspicion may be masked by confounding factors such as bortezomib-based therapy. The disease may further remain incognito if the patient does not exhibit any of the high risk features and biomarkers associated with CNS involvement. Conclusion: In the era of proteasome inhibitor (PtdIns)/immunomodulator (IMID)-based therapy for MM which carries neurologic adverse effects, it is prudent to consider CNS relapse early. This case further highlights the need for more robust biomarkers to predict CNS relapse and use of newer novel agents which demonstrate potential for CNS penetration. PMID:27105248

  18. Autoimmune control of lesion growth in CNS with minimal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathankumar, R.; Mohan, T. R. Krishna

    2013-07-01

    Lesions in central nervous system (CNS) and their growth leads to debilitating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's etc. We developed a model earlier [1, 2] which shows how the lesion growth can be arrested through a beneficial auto-immune mechanism. We compared some of the dynamical patterns in the model with different facets of MS. The success of the approach depends on a set of control parameters and their phase space was shown to have a smooth manifold separating the uncontrolled lesion growth region from the controlled. Here we show that an optimal set of parameter values exist in the model which minimizes system damage while, at once, achieving control of lesion growth.

  19. Gene therapy for CNS diseases – Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV) alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases. PMID:27525222

  20. Viral vectors and delivery strategies for CNS gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Steven J; Woodard, Kenton T; Samulski, R Jude

    2015-01-01

    This review aims to provide a broad overview of the targets, challenges and potential for gene therapy in the CNS, citing specific examples. There are a broad range of therapeutic targets, with very different requirements for a suitable viral vector. By utilizing different vector tropisms, novel routes of administration and engineered promoter control, transgenes can be targeted to specific therapeutic applications. Viral vectors have proven efficacious in preclinical models for several disease applications, spurring several clinical trials. While the field has pushed the limits of existing adeno-associated virus-based vectors, a next generation of vectors based on rational engineering of viral capsids should expand the application of gene therapy to be more effective in specific therapeutic applications. PMID:22833965

  1. Inhibition of C5a receptor alleviates experimental CNS lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Alexander; Hack, Bradley; Bai, Tao; Brorson, James R.; Quigg, Richard J.; Alexander, Jessy J.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the role of C5a generated on complement activation in brain, the lupus model, MRL/lpr mice were treated with C5a receptor(R) antagonist (ant). Neutrophil infiltration, ICAM, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression, neuronal apoptosis and the expression of p-JNK, pSTAT1 and p-Erk were reduced and p-Akt increased on C5aR inhibition in MRL/lpr brains. MRL/lpr serum caused increased apoptosis in neurons showing that lupus had a direct effect on these cells. C5aRant pretreatment prevented the lupus serum induced loss of neuronal cells. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that C5a/C5aR signaling plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CNS lupus. PMID:20207017

  2. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  3. Body Size in Mammalian Paleobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damuth, John; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    1990-11-01

    This valuable collection of essays presents and evaluates techniques of body-mass estimation and reviews current and potential applications of body-size estimates in paleobiology. Papers discuss explicitly the errors and biases of various regression techniques and predictor variables, and the identification of functionally similar groups of species for improving the accuracy of estimates. At the same time other chapters review and discuss the physiological, ecological, and behavioral correlates of body size in extant mammals; the significance of body-mass distributions in mammalian faunas; and the ecology and evolution of body size in particular paleofaunas. Coverage is particularly detailed for carnivores, primates, and ungulates, but information is also presented on marsupials, rodents, and proboscideans.

  4. Determinants of Mammalian Nucleolar Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Katherine I.; Surovtseva, Yulia; Merkel, Janie; Baserga, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is responsible for the production of ribosomes, essential machines which synthesize all proteins needed by the cell. The structure of human nucleoli is highly dynamic and is directly related to its functions in ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of this organelle, the intricate relationship between nucleolar structure and function remains largely unexplored. How do cells control nucleolar formation and function? What are the minimal requirements for making a functional nucleolus? Here we review what is currently known regarding mammalian nucleolar formation at nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), which can be studied by observing the dissolution and reformation of the nucleolus during each cell division. Additionally, the nucleolus can be examined by analyzing how alterations in nucleolar function manifest in differences in nucleolar architecture. Furthermore, changes in nucleolar structure and function are correlated with cancer, highlighting the importance of studying the determinants of nucleolar formation. PMID:25670395

  5. CNS Myelin Sheath Lengths Are an Intrinsic Property of Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bechler, Marie E.; Byrne, Lauren; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Summary Since Río-Hortega’s description of oligodendrocyte morphologies nearly a century ago, many studies have observed myelin sheath-length diversity between CNS regions [1–3]. Myelin sheath length directly impacts axonal conduction velocity by influencing the spacing between nodes of Ranvier. Such differences likely affect neural signal coordination and synchronization [4]. What accounts for regional differences in myelin sheath lengths is unknown; are myelin sheath lengths determined solely by axons or do intrinsic properties of different oligodendrocyte precursor cell populations affect length? The prevailing view is that axons provide molecular cues necessary for oligodendrocyte myelination and appropriate sheath lengths. This view is based upon the observation that axon diameters correlate with myelin sheath length [1, 5, 6], as well as reports that PNS axonal neuregulin-1 type III regulates the initiation and properties of Schwann cell myelin sheaths [7, 8]. However, in the CNS, no such instructive molecules have been shown to be required, and increasing in vitro evidence supports an oligodendrocyte-driven, neuron-independent ability to differentiate and form initial sheaths [9–12]. We test this alternative signal-independent hypothesis—that variation in internode lengths reflects regional oligodendrocyte-intrinsic properties. Using microfibers, we find that oligodendrocytes have a remarkable ability to self-regulate the formation of compact, multilamellar myelin and generate sheaths of physiological length. Our results show that oligodendrocytes respond to fiber diameters and that spinal cord oligodendrocytes generate longer sheaths than cortical oligodendrocytes on fibers, co-cultures, and explants, revealing that oligodendrocytes have regional identity and generate different sheath lengths that mirror internodes in vivo. PMID:26320951

  6. Novel approaches and challenges to treatment of CNS viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Avindra; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Existing and emerging viral CNS infections are major sources of human morbidity and mortality. Treatments of proven efficacy are currently limited predominantly to herpesviruses and human immunodeficiency virus. Development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal model systems for some important viruses and by the difficulty in conducting human clinical trials for diseases that may be rare, or in the case of arboviral infections, often have variable seasonal and geographic incidence. Nonetheless, many novel approaches to antiviral therapy are available including candidate thiazolide and purazinecarboxamide derivatives with potential broad-spectrum antiviral efficacy. New herpesvirus drugs include viral helicase-primase and terminase inhibitors. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and other strategies to interfere with viral RNA translation has shown efficacy in experimental models of CNS viral disease. Identifying specific molecular targets within viral replication cycles has led to many existing antivirals and will undoubtedly continue to be the basis of future drug design. A promising new area of research involves therapies based on enhanced understanding of host antiviral immune responses. Toll-like receptor agonists, and drugs that inhibit specific cytokines as well as interferon preparations have all shown potential therapeutic efficacy. Passive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes have been used in humans and may provide an effective therapies for some herpesvirus infections and potentially for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Humanized monoclonal antibodies directed against specific viral proteins have been developed and in several cases evaluated in humans in settings including West Nile virus and HIV infection and in pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies. PMID:23913580

  7. Evolution of the CNS myelin gene regulatory program.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiliang; Richardson, William D

    2016-06-15

    Myelin is a specialized subcellular structure that evolved uniquely in vertebrates. A myelinated axon conducts action potentials many times faster than an unmyelinated axon of the same diameter; for the same conduction speed, the unmyelinated axon would need a much larger diameter and volume than its myelinated counterpart. Hence myelin speeds information transfer and saves space, allowing the evolution of a powerful yet portable brain. Myelination in the central nervous system (CNS) is controlled by a gene regulatory program that features a number of master transcriptional regulators including Olig1, Olig2 and Myrf. Olig family genes evolved from a single ancestral gene in non-chordates. Olig2, which executes multiple functions with regard to oligodendrocyte identity and development in vertebrates, might have evolved functional versatility through post-translational modification, especially phosphorylation, as illustrated by its evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine phospho-acceptor sites and its accumulation of serine residues during more recent stages of vertebrate evolution. Olig1, derived from a duplicated copy of Olig2 in early bony fish, is involved in oligodendrocyte development and is critical to remyelination in bony vertebrates, but is lost in birds. The origin of Myrf orthologs might be the result of DNA integration between an invading phage or bacterium and an early protist, producing a fusion protein capable of self-cleavage and DNA binding. Myrf seems to have adopted new functions in early vertebrates - initiation of the CNS myelination program as well as the maintenance of mature oligodendrocyte identity and myelin structure - by developing new ways to interact with DNA motifs specific to myelin genes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26474911

  8. Adult Neurogenesis in Fish.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Julia; Brand, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Teleost fish have a remarkable neurogenic and regenerative capacity in the adult throughout the rostrocaudal axis of the brain. The distribution of proliferation zones shows a remarkable conservation, even in distantly related teleost species, suggesting a common teleost ground plan of proliferation zones. There are different progenitor populations in the neurogenic niches-progenitors positive for radial glial markers (dorsal telencephalon, hypothalamus) and progenitors with neuroepithelial-like characteristics (ventral telencephalon, optic tectum, cerebellum). Definition of these progenitors has allowed studying their role in normal growth of the adult brain, but also when challenged following a lesion. From these studies, important roles have emerged for intrinsic mechanisms and extrinsic signals controlling the activation of adult neurogenesis that enable regeneration of the adult brain to occur, opening up new perspectives on rekindling regeneration also in the context of the mammalian brain. PMID:26747664

  9. Recent advances in mammalian protein production

    PubMed Central

    Bandaranayake, Ashok D.; Almo, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian protein production platforms have had a profound impact in many areas of basic and applied research, and an increasing number of blockbuster drugs are recombinant mammalian proteins. With global sales of these drugs exceeding US$120 billion per year, both industry and academic research groups continue to develop cost effective methods for producing mammalian proteins to support preclinical and clinical evaluations of potential therapeutics. While a wide range of platforms have been successfully exploited for laboratory use, the bulk of recent biologics have been produced in mammalian cell lines due to the requirement for post translational modification and the biosynthetic complexity of the target proteins. In this review we highlight the range of mammalian expression platforms available for recombinant protein production, as well as advances in technologies for the rapid and efficient selection of highly productive clones. PMID:24316512

  10. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  11. New tools for studying microglia in the mouse and human CNS

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, F. Chris; Liddelow, Shane A.; Ajami, Bahareh; Zamanian, Jennifer L.; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B.; Mulinyawe, Sara B.; Bohlen, Christopher J.; Adil, Aykezar; Tucker, Andrew; Weissman, Irving L.; Chang, Edward F.; Li, Gordon; Grant, Gerald A.; Hayden Gephart, Melanie G.; Barres, Ben A.

    2016-01-01

    The specific function of microglia, the tissue resident macrophages of the brain and spinal cord, has been difficult to ascertain because of a lack of tools to distinguish microglia from other immune cells, thereby limiting specific immunostaining, purification, and manipulation. Because of their unique developmental origins and predicted functions, the distinction of microglia from other myeloid cells is critically important for understanding brain development and disease; better tools would greatly facilitate studies of microglia function in the developing, adult, and injured CNS. Here, we identify transmembrane protein 119 (Tmem119), a cell-surface protein of unknown function, as a highly expressed microglia-specific marker in both mouse and human. We developed monoclonal antibodies to its intracellular and extracellular domains that enable the immunostaining of microglia in histological sections in healthy and diseased brains, as well as isolation of pure nonactivated microglia by FACS. Using our antibodies, we provide, to our knowledge, the first RNAseq profiles of highly pure mouse microglia during development and after an immune challenge. We used these to demonstrate that mouse microglia mature by the second postnatal week and to predict novel microglial functions. Together, we anticipate these resources will be valuable for the future study and understanding of microglia in health and disease. PMID:26884166

  12. Proteolipid Protein Is Required for Transport of Sirtuin 2 into CNS Myelin

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Hauke B.; Kuhlmann, Katja; Shen, Siming; Uecker, Marina; Schardt, Anke; Dimova, Kalina; Orfaniotou, Foteini; Dhaunchak, Ajit; Brinkmann, Bastian G.; Möbius, Wiebke; Guarente, Lenny; Casaccia-Bonnefil, Patrizia; Jahn, Olaf; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2009-01-01

    Mice lacking the expression of proteolipid protein (PLP)/DM20 in oligodendrocytes provide a genuine model for spastic paraplegia (SPG-2). Their axons are well myelinated but exhibit impaired axonal transport and progressive degeneration, which is difficult to attribute to the absence of a single myelin protein. We hypothesized that secondary molecular changes in PLPnull myelin contribute to the loss of PLP/DM20-dependent neuroprotection and provide more insight into glia-axonal interactions in this disease model. By gel-based proteome analysis, we identified >160 proteins in purified myelin membranes, which allowed us to systematically monitor the CNS myelin proteome of adult PLPnull mice, before the onset of disease. We identified three proteins of the septin family to be reduced in abundance, but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) was virtually absent. SIRT2 is expressed throughout the oligodendrocyte lineage, and immunoelectron microscopy revealed its association with myelin. Loss of SIRT2 in PLPnull was posttranscriptional, suggesting that PLP/DM20 is required for its transport into the myelin compartment. Because normal SIRT2 activity is controlled by the NAD+/NADH ratio, its function may be coupled to the axo-glial metabolism and the long-term support of axons by oligodendrocytes. PMID:17634366

  13. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James T; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell-mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4-producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4-deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4-deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell-derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration. PMID:25607842

  14. Expression of α5 integrin rescues fibronectin responsiveness in NT2N CNS neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Meland, Marit N.; Herndon, Mary E.; Stipp, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular matrix protein fibronectin is implicated in neuronal regeneration in the peripheral nervous system. In the central nervous system (CNS), fibronectin is upregulated at sites of penetrating injuries and stroke; however, CNS neurons downregulate the fibronectin receptor, α5β1 integrin, during differentiation and generally respond poorly to fibronectin. NT2N CNS neuron-like cells (derived from NT2 precursor cells) have been used in pre-clinical and clinical studies for treatment of stroke and a variety of CNS injury and disease models. Here we show that, like primary CNS neurons, NT2N cells downregulate α5β1 integrin during differentiation and respond poorly to fibronectin. The poor neurite outgrowth by NT2N cells on fibronectin can be rescued by transducing NT2 precursors with a retroviral vector expressing α5 integrin under the control of the Murine Stem Cell Virus 5′ long terminal repeat. Sustained α5 integrin expression is compatible with the CNS-like neuronal differentiation of NT2N cells and does not prevent robust neurite outgrowth on other integrin ligands. Thus, α5 integrin expression in CNS neuronal precursor cells may provide a strategy for enhancing the outgrowth and survival of implanted cells in cell replacement therapies for CNS injury and disease. PMID:19598247

  15. Safety Evaluation of CNS Administered Biologics-Study Design, Data Interpretation, and Translation to the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Vuillemenot, Brian R; Korte, Sven; Wright, Teresa L; Adams, Eric L; Boyd, Robert B; Butt, Mark T

    2016-07-01

    Many central nervous system (CNS) diseases are inadequately treated by systemically administered therapies due to the blood brain barrier (BBB), which prevents achieving adequate drug concentrations at sites of action. Due to the increasing prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases and the inability of most systemically administered therapies to cross the BBB, direct CNS delivery will likely play an increasing role in treatment. Administration of large molecules, cells, viral vectors, oligonucleotides, and other novel therapies directly to the CNS via the subarachnoid space, ventricular system, or parenchyma overcomes this obstacle. Clinical experience with direct CNS administration of small molecule therapies suggests that this approach may be efficacious for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders using biological therapies. Risks of administration into the brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid include local damage from implantation of the delivery system and/or administration of the therapeutic and reactions affecting the CNS. Preclinical safety studies on CNS administered compounds must differentiate between the effects of the test article, the delivery device, and/or the vehicle, and assess exacerbations of reactions due to combinations of effects. Animal models characterized for safety assessment of CNS administered therapeutics have enabled human trials, but interpretation can be challenging. This manuscript outlines the challenges of preclinical intrathecal/intracerebroventricular/intraparenchymal studies, evaluation of results, considerations for special endpoints, and translation of preclinical findings to enable first-in-human trials. Recommendations will be made based on the authors' collective experience with conducting these studies to enable clinical development of CNS-administered biologics. PMID:27354708

  16. CNS species and antimicrobial resistance in clinical and subclinical bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Waller, K Persson; Aspán, A; Nyman, A; Persson, Y; Andersson, U Grönlund

    2011-08-26

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are often associated with bovine mastitis. Knowledge about the relative importance of specific CNS species in different types of mastitis, and differences in antimicrobial resistance among CNS species is, however, scarce. Therefore, the aims of this study were to compare prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of CNS species in clinical and subclinical mastitis using material from two national surveys. Overall, Staphylococcus chromogenes and Staphylococcus epidermidis were the most common CNS species found followed by Staphylococcus simulans and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. S. epidermidis was significantly more prevalent in subclinical than in clinical mastitis, and a similar trend was observed for Staphylococcus saprophyticus, while Staphylococcus hyicus was significantly more common in clinical mastitis. The prevalence of β-lactamase producing isolates varied markedly between CNS species, and was significantly higher in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus (∼ 40%), than in S. simulans and S. chromogenes where none or a few of the isolates produced β-lactamase. Resistance to more than one antimicrobial substance occurred in 9% and 7% of the clinical and subclinical isolates, respectively. In conclusion, the distribution of CNS species differed between clinical and subclinical mastitis indicating inter-species variation of pathogenicity and epidemiology. Overall, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance was low, but some variation between CNS species was observed. PMID:21561725

  17. [MicroRNAs in microglia polarization and CNS diseases: mechanism and functions].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xue; Tan, Wei-Xing; He, Cheng; Cao, Li

    2015-02-25

    Microglia are resident macrophages of central nervous system (CNS), and thus act as the crucial stuff of immune response and play very important roles in the progress of various CNS diseases. There are two different polarization statuses of activated microglia, M1 and M2 phenotypes. M1 polarized microglia are important for eradicating bacterial and promoting inflammation, whereas M2 cells are characterized by anti-inflammation and tissue remodeling. Recently, more and more evidence indicated that different polarized microglia showed diverse microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles. MiRNAs regulate microglia polarization, and thus affect the progress of CNS diseases. Fully exploring the polarization status of microglia during CNS diseases and the role of miRNAs in microglia polarization will be very helpful for a deep understanding of the roles of microglia in immunopathologic mechanism of different CNS diseases and offer the theoretical foundation of searching more effective therapies for these disorders. PMID:25672624

  18. Current approaches to enhance CNS delivery of drugs across the brain barriers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Wong, Ho Lun; Cai, Jun; Peng, Lei; Tian, Xin-Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Although many agents have therapeutic potentials for central nervous system (CNS) diseases, few of these agents have been clinically used because of the brain barriers. As the protective barrier of the CNS, the blood–brain barrier and the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier maintain the brain microenvironment, neuronal activity, and proper functioning of the CNS. Different strategies for efficient CNS delivery have been studied. This article reviews the current approaches to open or facilitate penetration across these barriers for enhanced drug delivery to the CNS. These approaches are summarized into three broad categories: noninvasive, invasive, and miscellaneous techniques. The progresses made using these approaches are reviewed, and the associated mechanisms and problems are discussed. PMID:24872687

  19. Neuron-specific SALM5 limits inflammation in the CNS via its interaction with HVEM

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuwen; Yao, Sheng; Augustine, Mathew M.; Xu, Haiying; Wang, Jun; Sun, Jingwei; Broadwater, Megan; Ruff, William; Luo, Liqun; Zhu, Gefeng; Tamada, Koji; Chen, Lieping

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immune-privileged organ with the capacity to prevent excessive inflammation. Aside from the blood-brain barrier, active immunosuppressive mechanisms remain largely unknown. We report that a neuron-specific molecule, synaptic adhesion-like molecule 5 (SALM5), is a crucial contributor to CNS immune privilege. We found that SALM5 suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in the CNS and that a SALM-specific monoclonal antibody promoted inflammation in the CNS, and thereby aggravated clinical symptoms of mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, we identified herpes virus entry mediator as a functional receptor that mediates SALM5’s suppressive function. Our findings reveal a molecular link between the neuronal system and the immune system, and provide potential therapeutic targets for the control of CNS diseases. PMID:27152329

  20. Ontogenetic development of the mammalian circadian system.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ontogenetic development of the circadian system in mammals. The developmental changes of overt rhythms are discussed, although the main focus of the review is the underlying neuronal and molecular mechanisms. In addition, the review describes ontogenetic development, not only as a process of morpho-functional maturation. The need of repeated adaptations and readaptations due to changing developmental stage and environmental conditions is also considered. The review analyzes mainly rodent data, obtained from the literature and from the author's own studies. Results from other species, including humans, are presented to demonstrate common features and species-dependent differences. The review first describes the development of the suprachiasmatic nuclei as the central pacemaker system and shows that intrinsic circadian rhythms are already generated in the mammalian fetus. As in adult organisms, the period length is different from 24 h and needs continuous correction by environmental periodicities, or zeitgebers. The investigation of the ontogenetic development of the mechanisms of entrainment reveals that, at prenatal and early postnatal stages, non-photic cues deriving from the mother are effective. Light-dark entrainment develops later. At a certain age, both photic and non-photic zeitgebers may act in parallel, even though the respective time information is 12 h out of phase. That leads to a temporary internal desynchronization. Because rhythmic information needs to be transferred to effector organs, the corresponding neural and humoral signalling pathways are also briefly described. Finally, to be able to transform a rhythmic signal into an overt rhythm, the corresponding effector organs must be functionally mature. As many of these organs are able to generate their own intrinsic rhythms, another aspect of the review is dedicated to the development of peripheral oscillators and mechanisms of their entrainment

  1. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases. PMID:26853282

  2. Proliferation, neurogenesis and regeneration in the non-mammalian vertebrate brain.

    PubMed

    Kaslin, Jan; Ganz, Julia; Brand, Michael

    2008-01-12

    Post-embryonic neurogenesis is a fundamental feature of the vertebrate brain. However, the level of adult neurogenesis decreases significantly with phylogeny. In the first part of this review, a comparative analysis of adult neurogenesis and its putative roles in vertebrates are discussed. Adult neurogenesis in mammals is restricted to two telencephalic constitutively active zones. On the contrary, non-mammalian vertebrates display a considerable amount of adult neurogenesis in many brain regions. The phylogenetic differences in adult neurogenesis are poorly understood. However, a common feature of vertebrates (fish, amphibians and reptiles) that display a widespread adult neurogenesis is the substantial post-embryonic brain growth in contrast to birds and mammals. It is probable that the adult neurogenesis in fish, frogs and reptiles is related to the coordinated growth of sensory systems and corresponding sensory brain regions. Likewise, neurons are substantially added to the olfactory bulb in smell-oriented mammals in contrast to more visually oriented primates and songbirds, where much fewer neurons are added to the olfactory bulb. The second part of this review focuses on the differences in brain plasticity and regeneration in vertebrates. Interestingly, several recent studies show that neurogenesis is suppressed in the adult mammalian brain. In mammals, neurogenesis can be induced in the constitutively neurogenic brain regions as well as ectopically in response to injury, disease or experimental manipulations. Furthermore, multipotent progenitor cells can be isolated and differentiated in vitro from several otherwise silent regions of the mammalian brain. This indicates that the potential to recruit or generate neurons in non-neurogenic brain areas is not completely lost in mammals. The level of adult neurogenesis in vertebrates correlates with the capacity to regenerate injury, for example fish and amphibians exhibit the most widespread adult neurogenesis

  3. Mammalian reproduction: an ecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Bronson, F H

    1985-02-01

    The objectives of this paper are to organize our concepts about the environmental regulation of reproduction in mammals and to delineate important gaps in our knowledge of this subject. The environmental factors of major importance for mammalian reproduction are food availability, ambient temperature, rainfall, the day/night cycle and a variety of social cues. The synthesis offered here uses as its core the bioenergetic control of reproduction. Thus, for example, annual patterns of breeding are viewed as reflecting primarily the caloric costs of the female's reproductive effort as they relate to the energetic costs and gains associated with her foraging effort. Body size of the female is an important consideration since it is correlated with both potential fat reserves and life span. Variation in nutrient availability may or may not be an important consideration. The evolutionary forces that have shaped the breeding success of males usually are fundamentally different from those acting on females and, by implication, the environmental controls governing reproduction probably also often differ either qualitatively or quantitatively in the two sexes. Mammals often live in habitats where energetic and nutrient challenges vary seasonally, even in the tropics. When seasonal breeding is required, a mammal may use a predictor such as photoperiod or a secondary plant compound to prepare metabolically for reproduction. A reasonable argument can be made, however, that opportunistic breeding, unenforced by a predictor, may be the most prevalent strategy extant among today's mammals. Social cues can have potent modulating actions. They can act either via discrete neural and endocrine pathways to alter specific processes such as ovulation, or they can induce nonspecific emotional states that secondarily affect reproduction. Many major gaps remain in our knowledge about the environmental regulation of mammalian reproduction. For one, we have a paucity of information about the

  4. Mapping and Application of Enhancer-trap Flippase Expression in Larval and Adult Drosophila CNS

    PubMed Central

    Fore, Taylor R.; Ojwang, Audrey A.; Warner, Margaret L.; Peng, Xinyun; Bohm, Rudolf A.; Welch, William P.; Goodnight, Lindsey K.; Bao, Hong; Zhang, Bing

    2011-01-01

    The Gal4/ UAS binary method is powerful for gene and neural circuitry manipulation in Drosophila. For most neurobiological studies, however, Gal4 expression is rarely tissue-specific enough to allow for precise correlation of the circuit with behavioral readouts. To overcome this major hurdle, we recently developed the FINGR method to achieve a more restrictive Gal4 expression in the tissue of interest. The FINGR method has three components: 1) the traditional Gal4/UAS system; 2) a set of FLP/FRT-mediated Gal80 converting tools; and 3) enhancer-trap FLP (ET-FLP). Gal4 is used to define the primary neural circuitry of interest. Paring the Gal4 with a UAS-effector, such as UAS-MJD78Q or UAS-Shits, regulates the neuronal activity, which is in turn manifested by alterations in the fly behavior. With an additional UAS-reporter such as UAS-GFP, the neural circuit involved in the specific behavior can be simultaneously mapped for morphological analysis. For Gal4 lines with broad expression, Gal4 expression can be restricted by using two complementary Gal80-converting tools: tubP>Gal80> ('flip out') and tubP>stop>Gal80 ('flip in'). Finally, investigators can turn Gal80 on or off, respectively, with the help of tissue-specific ET-FLP. In the flip-in mode, Gal80 will repress Gal4 expression wherever Gal4 and ET-FLP intersect. In the flip-out mode, Gal80 will relieve Gal4 repression in cells in which Gal4 and FLP overlap. Both approaches enable the restriction of the number of cells in the Gal4-defined circuitry, but in an inverse pattern. The FINGR method is compatible with the vast collection of Gal4 lines in the fly community and highly versatile for traditional clonal analysis and for neural circuit mapping. In this protocol, we demonstrate the mapping of FLP expression patterns in select ET-FLPx2 lines and the effectiveness of the FINGR method in photoreceptor cells. The principle of the FINGR method should also be applicable to other genetic model organisms in which Gal4/UAS, Gal80, and FLP/FRT are used. PMID:21673643

  5. Modern cerebrospinal fluid analyses for the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Schroers, Roland

    2014-01-01

    CNS lymphomas represent rare and aggressive variants of extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, which may present with diverse neurological symptoms and are often diagnostically challenging. Primary CNS lymphomas develop within the CNS and characteristically involve the brain, leptomeninges, eyes and, in rare cases, spinal cord. Secondary CNS lymphomas are characterized by expansion of systemic lymphomas to the CNS. Multimodal investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comprises an important component of the diagnostic work-up for patients with suspected CNS lymphomas. Cytopathological examination of the CSF is still regarded as the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of leptomeningeal malignant disease. However, cytopathology has only a low sensitivity in detecting leptomeningeal lymphoma involvement. Modern technologies including proteochemical and immunophenotypic studies by flow cytometry, and molecular genetic analyses of CSF may increase sensitivity and specificity, therefore, facilitating the diagnosis of CNS lymphomas. This review gives an overview and discussion of the current aspects of CSF analyses in CNS lymphomas. PMID:25054902

  6. Possible mechanisms of mammalian immunocontraception.

    PubMed

    Barber, M R; Fayrer-Hosken, R A

    2000-03-01

    Ecological and conservation programs in ecosystems around the world have experienced varied success in population management. One of the greatest problems is that human expansion has led to the shrinking of wildlife habitat and, as a result, the overpopulation of many different species has occurred. The pressures exerted by the increased number of animals has caused environmental damage. The humane and practical control of these populations has solicited the scientific community to arrive at a safe, effective, and cost-efficient means of population control. Immunocontraception using zona pellucida antigens, specifically porcine zona pellucida (pZP), has become one of the most promising population control tools in the world today, with notable successes in horses and elephants. A conundrum has risen where pZP, a single vaccine, successfully induces an immunocontraceptive effect in multiple species of mammals. This review describes the most current data pertaining to the mammalian zona pellucida and immunocontraception, and from these studies, we suggest several potential mechanisms of immunocontraception. PMID:10706942

  7. Mammalian cell cultivation in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmünder, Felix K.; Suter, Robert N.; Kiess, M.; Urfer, R.; Nordau, C.-G.; Cogoli, A.

    Equipment used in space for the cultivation of mammalian cells does not meet the usual standard of earth bound bioreactors. Thus, the development of a space worthy bioreactor is mandatory for two reasons: First, to investigate the effect on single cells of the space environment in general and microgravity conditions in particular, and second, to provide researchers on long term missions and the Space Station with cell material. However, expertise for this venture is not at hand. A small and simple device for animal cell culture experiments aboard Spacelab (Dynamic Cell Culture System; DCCS) was developed. It provides 2 cell culture chambers, one is operated as a batch system, the other one as a perfusion system. The cell chambers have a volume of 200 μl. Medium exchange is achieved with an automatic osmotic pump. The system is neither mechanically stirred nor equipped with sensors. Oxygen for cell growth is provided by a gas chamber that is adjacent to the cell chambers. The oxygen gradient produced by the growing cells serves to maintain the oxygen influx by diffusion. Hamster kidney cells growing on microcarriers were used to test the biological performance of the DCCS. On ground tests suggest that this system is feasible.

  8. Mammalian mitochondrial beta-oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, S; Bartlett, K; Pourfarzam, M

    1996-01-01

    The enzymic stages of mammalian mitochondrial beta-oxidation were elucidated some 30-40 years ago. However, the discovery of a membrane-associated multifunctional enzyme of beta-oxidation, a membrane-associated acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and characterization of the carnitine palmitoyl transferase system at the protein and at the genetic level has demonstrated that the enzymes of the system itself are incompletely understood. Deficiencies of many of the enzymes have been recognized as important causes of disease. In addition, the study of these disorders has led to a greater understanding of the molecular mechanism of beta-oxidation and the import, processing and assembly of the beta-oxidation enzymes within the mitochondrion. The tissue-specific regulation, intramitochondrial control and supramolecular organization of the pathway is becoming better understood as sensitive analytical and molecular techniques are applied. This review aims to cover enzymological and organizational aspects of mitochondrial beta-oxidation together with the biochemical aspects of inherited disorders of beta-oxidation and the intrinsic control of beta-oxidation. PMID:8973539

  9. Cell death in mammalian development.

    PubMed

    Penaloza, C; Orlanski, S; Ye, Y; Entezari-Zaher, T; Javdan, M; Zakeri, Z

    2008-01-01

    During embryogenesis there is an exquisite orchestration of cellular division, movement, differentiation, and death. Cell death is one of the most important aspects of organization of the developing embryo, as alteration in timing, level, or pattern of cell death can lead to developmental anomalies. Cell death shapes the embryo and defines the eventual functions of the organs. Cells die using different paths; understanding which path a dying cell takes helps us define the signals that regulate the fate of the cell. Our understanding of cell death in development stems from a number of observations indicating genetic regulation of the death process. With today's increased knowledge of the pathways of cell death and the identification of the genes whose products regulate the pathways we know that, although elimination of some of these gene products has no developmental phenotype, alteration of several others has profound effects. In this review we discuss the types and distributions of cell death seen in developing mammalian embryos as well as the gene products that may regulate the process. PMID:18220829

  10. Pharmacology of Glutamate Transport in the CNS: Substrates and Inhibitors of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAATs) and the Glutamate/Cystine Exchanger System x c -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Richard J.; Patel, Sarjubhai A.

    As the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, l-glutamate participates not only in standard fast synaptic communication, but also contributes to higher order signal processing, as well as neuropathology. Given this variety of functional roles, interest has been growing as to how the extracellular concentrations of l-glutamate surrounding neurons are regulated by cellular transporter proteins. This review focuses on two prominent systems, each of which appears capable of influencing both the signaling and pathological actions of l-glutamate within the CNS: the sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) and the glutamate/cystine exchanger, system x c - (Sx c -). While the family of EAAT subtypes limit access to glutamate receptors by rapidly and efficiently sequestering l-glutamate in neurons and glia, Sxc - provides a route for the export of glutamate from cells into the extracellular environment. The primary intent of this work is to provide an overview of the inhibitors and substrates that have been developed to delineate the pharmacological specificity of these transport systems, as well as be exploited as probes with which to selectively investigate function. Particular attention is paid to the development of small molecule templates that mimic the structural properties of the endogenous substrates, l-glutamate, l-aspartate and l-cystine and how strategic control of functional group position and/or the introduction of lipophilic R-groups can impact multiple aspects of the transport process, including: subtype selectivity, inhibitory potency, and substrate activity.

  11. Characterization and immune function of two intracellular sensors, HmTLR1 and HmNLR, in the injured CNS of an invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Slomianny, Christian; Salzet, Michel; Tasiemski, Aurélie

    2011-02-01

    Unlike mammals, the CNS of the medicinal leech can regenerate damaged neurites, thus restoring neural functions. Our group recently demonstrated that the injured leech nerve cord is able to mount an immune response, which promotes the regenerative processes. This defense mechanism is microorganism-specific, suggesting that the leech CNS is able to discriminate among microbial components. We report here the characterization of two receptors potentially implicated in this detection: HmTLR1 and HmNLR. Interestingly, HmTLR1 presents an endosomal distribution in neurons and appears as a chimera combining the mammalian intraendosomal domain of TLR3 and the cytoplasmic section of TLR13, while HmNLR is cytosolic and has the highest homology to NLRC3 receptors. Both receptors show patterns of induction upon stimulation that suggest their involvement in the leech neuroimmune response. This work constitutes the first demonstration in an invertebrate of (i) an intracellular TLR and (ii) a cytosolic PRR related to the NLR family. PMID:20920526

  12. Ghrelin Receptors in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered 3 years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates. PMID:23882259

  13. GLT-1-Dependent Disruption of CNS Glutamate Homeostasis and Neuronal Function by the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    David, Clément N; Frias, Elma S; Szu, Jenny I; Vieira, Philip A; Hubbard, Jacqueline A; Lovelace, Jonathan; Michael, Marena; Worth, Danielle; McGovern, Kathryn E; Ethell, Iryna M; Stanley, B Glenn; Korzus, Edward; Fiacco, Todd A; Binder, Devin K; Wilson, Emma H

    2016-06-01

    The immune privileged nature of the CNS can make it vulnerable to chronic and latent infections. Little is known about the effects of lifelong brain infections, and thus inflammation, on the neurological health of the host. Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that can infect any mammalian nucleated cell with average worldwide seroprevalence rates of 30%. Infection by Toxoplasma is characterized by the lifelong presence of parasitic cysts within neurons in the brain, requiring a competent immune system to prevent parasite reactivation and encephalitis. In the immunocompetent individual, Toxoplasma infection is largely asymptomatic, however many recent studies suggest a strong correlation with certain neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a significant reduction in the primary astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1, following infection with Toxoplasma. Using microdialysis of the murine frontal cortex over the course of infection, a significant increase in extracellular concentrations of glutamate is observed. Consistent with glutamate dysregulation, analysis of neurons reveal changes in morphology including a reduction in dendritic spines, VGlut1 and NeuN immunoreactivity. Furthermore, behavioral testing and EEG recordings point to significant changes in neuronal output. Finally, these changes in neuronal connectivity are dependent on infection-induced downregulation of GLT-1 as treatment with the ß-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone, rescues extracellular glutamate concentrations, neuronal pathology and function. Altogether, these data demonstrate that following an infection with T. gondii, the delicate regulation of glutamate by astrocytes is disrupted and accounts for a range of deficits observed in chronic infection. PMID:27281462

  14. BRAIN-SPECIFIC CARNITINE PALMITOYLTRANSFERASE-1C: ROLE IN CNS FATTY ACID METABOLISM, FOOD INTAKE AND BODY WEIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Cha, Seung Hun; Millington, David S.; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Kurama, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    While the brain does not utilize fatty acids as a primary energy source, recent evidence shows that intermediates of fatty acid metabolism serve as hypothalamic sensors of energy status. Increased hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, an intermediate in fatty acid synthesis, is indicative of energy surplus and leads to the suppression of food intake and increased energy expenditure. Malonyl-CoA functions as an inhibitor of CPT1, a mitochondrial outer membrane enzyme that initiates translocation of fatty acids into mitochondria for oxidation. The mammalian brain expresses a unique homologous CPT1, CPT1c, that binds malonyl-CoA tightly but does not support fatty acid oxidation in vivo, in hypothalamic explants or in heterologous cell culture systems. CPT1c KO mice under fasted or refed conditions do not exhibit an altered CNS transcriptome of genes known to be involved in fatty acid metabolism. CPT1c KO mice exhibit normal levels of metabolites and of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and fatty acyl-CoA levels either in the fasted or refed states. However, CPT1c KO mice exhibit decreased food intake and lower body weight than WT littermates. In contrast, CPT1c KO mice gain excessive body weight and body fat when fed a high-fat diet while maintaining lower or equivalent food intake. Heterozygous mice display an intermediate phenotype. These findings provide further evidence that CPT1c plays a role in maintaining energy homeostasis, but not through altered fatty acid oxidation. PMID:18248603

  15. GLT-1-Dependent Disruption of CNS Glutamate Homeostasis and Neuronal Function by the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    David, Clément N.; Frias, Elma S.; Szu, Jenny I.; Vieira, Philip A.; Hubbard, Jacqueline A.; Lovelace, Jonathan; Michael, Marena; Worth, Danielle; McGovern, Kathryn E.; Ethell, Iryna M.; Stanley, B. Glenn; Korzus, Edward; Fiacco, Todd A.; Binder, Devin K.; Wilson, Emma H.

    2016-01-01

    The immune privileged nature of the CNS can make it vulnerable to chronic and latent infections. Little is known about the effects of lifelong brain infections, and thus inflammation, on the neurological health of the host. Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that can infect any mammalian nucleated cell with average worldwide seroprevalence rates of 30%. Infection by Toxoplasma is characterized by the lifelong presence of parasitic cysts within neurons in the brain, requiring a competent immune system to prevent parasite reactivation and encephalitis. In the immunocompetent individual, Toxoplasma infection is largely asymptomatic, however many recent studies suggest a strong correlation with certain neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a significant reduction in the primary astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1, following infection with Toxoplasma. Using microdialysis of the murine frontal cortex over the course of infection, a significant increase in extracellular concentrations of glutamate is observed. Consistent with glutamate dysregulation, analysis of neurons reveal changes in morphology including a reduction in dendritic spines, VGlut1 and NeuN immunoreactivity. Furthermore, behavioral testing and EEG recordings point to significant changes in neuronal output. Finally, these changes in neuronal connectivity are dependent on infection-induced downregulation of GLT-1 as treatment with the ß-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone, rescues extracellular glutamate concentrations, neuronal pathology and function. Altogether, these data demonstrate that following an infection with T. gondii, the delicate regulation of glutamate by astrocytes is disrupted and accounts for a range of deficits observed in chronic infection. PMID:27281462

  16. Genomic Locations of Conserved Noncoding Sequences and Their Proximal Protein-Coding Genes in Mammalian Expression Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Babarinde, Isaac Adeyemi; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-07-01

    Experimental studies have found the involvement of certain conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) in the regulation of the proximal protein-coding genes in mammals. However, reported cases of long range enhancer activities and inter-chromosomal regulation suggest that proximity of CNSs to protein-coding genes might not be important for regulation. To test the importance of the CNS genomic location, we extracted the CNSs conserved between chicken and four mammalian species (human, mouse, dog, and cattle). These CNSs were confirmed to be under purifying selection. The intergenic CNSs are often found in clusters in gene deserts, where protein-coding genes are in paucity. The distribution pattern, ChIP-Seq, and RNA-Seq data suggested that the CNSs are more likely to be regulatory elements and not corresponding to long intergenic noncoding RNAs. Physical distances between CNS and their nearest protein coding genes were well conserved between human and mouse genomes, and CNS-flanking genes were often found in evolutionarily conserved genomic neighborhoods. ChIP-Seq signal and gene expression patterns also suggested that CNSs regulate nearby genes. Interestingly, genes with more CNSs have more evolutionarily conserved expression than those with fewer CNSs. These computationally obtained results suggest that the genomic locations of CNSs are important for their regulatory functions. In fact, various kinds of evolutionary constraints may be acting to maintain the genomic locations of CNSs and protein-coding genes in mammals to ensure proper regulation. PMID:27017584

  17. T-cell- and macrophage-mediated axon damage in the absence of a CNS-specific immune response: involvement of metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Newman, T A; Woolley, S T; Hughes, P M; Sibson, N R; Anthony, D C; Perry, V H

    2001-11-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the fact that axon injury is an important component of multiple sclerosis pathology. The issue of whether a CNS antigen-specific immune response is required to produce axon injury remains unresolved. We investigated the extent and time course of axon injury in a rodent model of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction directed against the mycobacterium bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Using MRI, we determined whether the ongoing axon injury is restricted to the period during which the blood-brain barrier is compromised. DTH lesions were initiated in adult rats by intracerebral injection of heat-killed BCG followed by a peripheral challenge with BCG. Our findings demonstrate that a DTH reaction to a non-CNS antigen within a CNS white matter tract leads to axon injury. Ongoing axon injury persisted throughout the 3-month period studied and was not restricted to the period of blood-brain barrier breakdown, as detected by MRI enhancing lesions. We have previously demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are upregulated in multiple sclerosis plaques and DTH lesions. In this study we demonstrated that microinjection of activated MMPs into the cortical white matter results in axon injury. Our results show that axon injury, possibly mediated by MMPs, is immunologically non-specific and may continue behind an intact blood-brain barrier. PMID:11673322

  18. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, CNS stimulants and sport.

    PubMed

    Hickey, G; Fricker, P

    1999-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects 1 to 10% of children and is characterised by a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity. Over one-half of children with ADHD have associated conditions, including learning disabilities, conduct disorders, poor coordination, depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders and bipolar disorders. CNS stimulant medication used in the management of ADHD is not permitted for use in competition by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and this poses a problem for the physicians of patients with ADHD. On the one hand, attention and concentration are improved by stimulant medication and fine motor coordination and balance are improved after methylphenidate administration, but these therapeutic and sport-related benefits are not available to the athlete with ADHD who wishes to compete under IOC rules. It has been suggested that treatment with methylphenidate may be suitable for athletes with ADHD, as cessation of therapy 24 hours before competition is usually adequate to allow drug clearance which should avoid a positive result being returned on drug testing. More research is needed to establish whether stimulant medication for athletes with ADHD provides an unfair advantage in competition. PMID:10028130

  19. Role of Hemichannels in CNS Inflammation and the Inflammasome Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuri; Davidson, Joanne O; Gunn, Katherine C; Phillips, Anthony R; Green, Colin R; Gunn, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders, once triggered, share a number of common features, including sustained inflammatory cell activation and vascular disruption. These shared pathways are induced independently of any genetic predisposition to the disease or the precise external stimulus. Glial cells respond to injury with an innate immune response that includes release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Vascular endothelial cells may also be affected, leading to opening of the blood-brain barrier that facilitates invasion by circulating inflammatory cells. Inflammation can trigger acute neural injury followed by chronic inflammation that plays a key role in neurodegenerative conditions. Gap junction channels normally allow direct cell-to-cell communication. They are formed by the docking of two hemichannels, one contributed by each of the neighboring cells. While the opening probability of these channels is tightly controlled under resting conditions, hemichannels can open in response to injury or inflammatory factors, forming a large, relatively nonselective membrane pore. In this review, we consider the CNS immune system from the perspective that modulating connexin hemichannel opening can prevent tissue damage arising from excessive and uncontrolled inflammation. We discuss connexin channel roles in microglia, astrocytes, and endothelial cells in both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, and in particular describe the role of connexin hemichannels in the inflammasome pathway where they contribute to both its activation and its spread to neighboring cells. Finally, we describe the benefits of hemichannel block in animal models of brain injury. PMID:27038371

  20. Role of galectin-3 in prion infections of the CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Simon W.F.; Riemer, Constanze; Madela, Kazimierz; Hsu, Daniel K.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Gueltner, Sandra; Heise, Ines; Baier, Michael . E-mail: baierm@rki.de

    2007-08-03

    Galectin-3 is a multi-functional protein and participates in mediating inflammatory reactions. The pronounced overexpression of galectin-3 in prion-infected brain tissue prompted us to study the role of this protein in a murine prion model. Immunofluorescence double-labelling identified microglia as the major cell type expressing galectin-3. Ablation of galectin-3 did not affect PrP{sup Sc}-deposition and development of gliosis. However, galectin-3{sup -/-}-mice showed prolonged survival times upon intracerebral and peripheral scrapie infections. Moreover, protein levels of the lysosomal activation marker LAMP-2 were markedly reduced in prion-infected galectin-3{sup -/-}-mice suggesting a role of galectin-3 in regulation of lysosomal functions. Lower mRNA levels of Beclin-1 and Atg5 in prion-infected wild-type and galectin-3{sup -/-}-mice indicated an impairment of autophagy although autophagosome formation was unchanged. The results point towards a detrimental role of galectin-3 in prion infections of the CNS and suggest that endo-/lysosomal dysfunction in combination with reduced autophagy may contribute to disease development.

  1. Cell encapsulation technology as a therapeutic strategy for CNS malignancies.

    PubMed Central

    Visted, T.; Bjerkvig, R.; Enger, P. O.

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy using viral vectors has to date failed to reveal its definitive clinical usefulness. Cell encapsulation technology represents an alternative, nonviral approach for the delivery of biologically active compounds to tumors. This strategy involves the use of genetically engineered producer cells that secrete a protein with therapeutic potential. The cells are encapsulated in an immunoisolating material that makes them suitable for transplantation. The capsules, or bioreactors, permit the release of recombinant proteins that may assert their effects in the tumor microenvironment. During the last decades, there has been significant progress in the development of encapsulation technologies that comprise devices for both macro- and microencapsulation. The polysaccharide alginate is the most commonly used material for cell encapsulation and is well tolerated by various tissues. A wide spectrum of cells and tissues has been encapsulated and implanted, both in animals and humans, indicating the general applicability of this approach for both research and medical purposes, including CNS malignancies. Gliomas most frequently recur at the resection site. To provide local and sustained drug delivery, the bioreactors can be implanted in the brain parenchyma or in the ventricular system. The development of comprehensive analyses of geno- and phenotypic profiles of a tumor (genomics and proteomics) may provide new and important guidelines for choosing the optimal combination of bioreactors and recombinant proteins for therapeutic use. PMID:11465401

  2. Fluids and barriers of the CNS: a historical viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tracing the exact origins of modern science can be a difficult but rewarding pursuit. It is possible for the astute reader to follow the background of any subject through the many important surviving texts from the classical and ancient world. While empirical investigations have been described by many since the time of Aristotle and scientific methods have been employed since the Middle Ages, the beginnings of modern science are generally accepted to have originated during the 'scientific revolution' of the 16th and 17th centuries in Europe. The scientific method is so fundamental to modern science that some philosophers consider earlier investigations as 'pre-science'. Notwithstanding this, the insight that can be gained from the study of the beginnings of a subject can prove important in the understanding of work more recently completed. As this journal undergoes an expansion in focus and nomenclature from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into all barriers of the central nervous system (CNS), this review traces the history of both the blood-CSF and blood-brain barriers from as early as it was possible to find references, to the time when modern concepts were established at the beginning of the 20th century. PMID:21349150

  3. Carbon monoxide and the CNS: challenges and achievements

    PubMed Central

    Queiroga, Cláudia S F; Vercelli, Alessandro; Vieira, Helena L A

    2015-01-01

    Haem oxygenase (HO) and its product carbon monoxide (CO) are associated with cytoprotection and maintenance of homeostasis in several different organs and tissues. This review focuses upon the role of exogenous and endogenous CO (via HO activity and expression) in various CNS pathologies, based upon data from experimental models, as well as from some clinical data on human patients. The pathophysiological conditions reviewed are cerebral ischaemia, chronic neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases), multiple sclerosis and pain. Among these pathophysiological conditions, a variety of cellular mechanisms and processes are considered, namely cytoprotection, cell death, inflammation, cell metabolism, cellular redox responses and vasomodulation, as well as the different targeted neural cells. Finally, novel potential methods and strategies for delivering exogenous CO as a drug are discussed, particularly approaches based upon CO-releasing molecules, their limitations and challenges. The diagnostic and prognostic value of HO expression in clinical use for brain pathologies is also addressed. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:24758548

  4. Molecular MRI approaches to the detection of CNS inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sibson, Nicola R; Anthony, Daniel C; van Kasteren, Sander; Dickens, Alex; Perez-Balderas, Francisco; McAteer, Martina A; Choudhury, Robin P; Davis, Benjamin G

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is a key component of many neurological diseases, yet our understanding of the contribution of these processes to tissue damage remains poor. For many such diseases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for clinical diagnosis. However, many of the MRI parameters that enable disease detection, such as passive contrast enhancement across a compromised blood-brain barrier, are weighted towards late-stage disease. Moreover, whilst these methods may report on disease severity, they are not able to provide information on either disease activity or the underlying molecular processes. There is a need, therefore, to develop methods that enable earlier disease detection, potentially long before clinical symptoms become apparent, together with identification of specific molecular processes that may guide specific therapy. This chapter describes the methodology for the synthesis and validation of two novel, functional MRI-detectable probes, based on microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO), which target endothelial adhesion molecules. These contrast agents enable the detection of acute brain inflammation in vivo, at a time when pathology is undetectable by conventional MRI. Such molecular MRI methods are opening new vistas for the acute diagnosis of CNS disease, together with the possibility for individually tailored therapy and earlier, more sensitive assessment of the efficacy of novel therapies. PMID:21279613

  5. Stress Preconditioning of Spreading Depression in the Locust CNS

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Corinne I.; Armstrong, Gary A. B.; Shoemaker, Kelly L.; LaBrie, John D.; Moyes, Christopher D.; Robertson, R. Meldrum

    2007-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is closely associated with important pathologies including stroke, seizures and migraine. The mechanisms underlying SD in its various forms are still incompletely understood. Here we describe SD-like events in an invertebrate model, the ventilatory central pattern generator (CPG) of locusts. Using K+ -sensitive microelectrodes, we measured extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) in the metathoracic neuropile of the CPG while monitoring CPG output electromyographically from muscle 161 in the second abdominal segment to investigate the role K+ in failure of neural circuit operation induced by various stressors. Failure of ventilation in response to different stressors (hyperthermia, anoxia, ATP depletion, Na+/K+ ATPase impairment, K+ injection) was associated with a disturbance of CNS ion homeostasis that shares the characteristics of CSD and SD-like events in vertebrates. Hyperthermic failure was preconditioned by prior heat shock (3 h, 45°C) and induced-thermotolerance was associated with an increase in the rate of clearance of extracellular K+ that was not linked to changes in ATP levels or total Na+/K+ ATPase activity. Our findings suggest that SD-like events in locusts are adaptive to terminate neural network operation and conserve energy during stress and that they can be preconditioned by experience. We propose that they share mechanisms with CSD in mammals suggesting a common evolutionary origin. PMID:18159249

  6. Epsin1 modulates synaptic vesicle retrieval capacity at CNS synapses.

    PubMed

    Kyung, Jae Won; Bae, Jae Ryul; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Song, Woo Keun; Kim, Sung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle retrieval is an essential process for continuous maintenance of neural information flow after synaptic transmission. Epsin1, originally identified as an EPS15-interacting protein, is a major component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, the role of Epsin1 in synaptic vesicle endocytosis at CNS synapses remains elusive. Here, we showed significantly altered synaptic vesicle endocytosis in neurons transfected with shRNA targeting Epsin1 during/after neural activity. Endocytosis was effectively restored by introducing shRNA-insensitive Epsin1 into Epsin1-depleted neurons. Domain studies performed on neurons in which domain deletion mutants of Epsin1 were introduced after Epsin1 knockdown revealed that ENTH, CLAP, and NPFs are essential for synaptic vesicle endocytosis, whereas UIMs are not. Strikingly, the efficacy of the rate of synaptic vesicle retrieval (the "endocytic capacity") was significantly decreased in the absence of Epsin1. Thus, Epsin1 is required for proper synaptic vesicle retrieval and modulates the endocytic capacity of synaptic vesicles. PMID:27557559

  7. Epsin1 modulates synaptic vesicle retrieval capacity at CNS synapses

    PubMed Central

    Kyung, Jae Won; Bae, Jae Ryul; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Song, Woo Keun; Kim, Sung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle retrieval is an essential process for continuous maintenance of neural information flow after synaptic transmission. Epsin1, originally identified as an EPS15-interacting protein, is a major component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, the role of Epsin1 in synaptic vesicle endocytosis at CNS synapses remains elusive. Here, we showed significantly altered synaptic vesicle endocytosis in neurons transfected with shRNA targeting Epsin1 during/after neural activity. Endocytosis was effectively restored by introducing shRNA-insensitive Epsin1 into Epsin1-depleted neurons. Domain studies performed on neurons in which domain deletion mutants of Epsin1 were introduced after Epsin1 knockdown revealed that ENTH, CLAP, and NPFs are essential for synaptic vesicle endocytosis, whereas UIMs are not. Strikingly, the efficacy of the rate of synaptic vesicle retrieval (the “endocytic capacity”) was significantly decreased in the absence of Epsin1. Thus, Epsin1 is required for proper synaptic vesicle retrieval and modulates the endocytic capacity of synaptic vesicles. PMID:27557559

  8. Rumor management in nursing systems: role of the psychiatric CNS.

    PubMed

    Chase, P; Stuart, G W

    1995-11-01

    RUMOR MANAGEMENT AND control is particularly important in nursing systems during times of change. In this article, a brief history of the study of rumor and the rumor process is given and applied to nursing, systems thinking and the CNS, and three types of rumor are described. Examples are given and strategies and approaches for managing rumor are prescribed. The first approach, used when a final decision about a planned change has not been made, helps avoid "trickle down" and builds trust and empowerment by soliciting and using input from those who will be affected by the proposed change. The intent of the second approach, used when a decision has been finalized or an event has occurred and rumor has preceded an official announcement, is to debrief from the occurrence or transform the decision. The last approach is used to interrupt a pattern of misinformation and to clarify or inform. The nurse leader or manager must stay in the communication loop and refrain from blaming a speculated source in order to correct information. PMID:8697379

  9. Electrophysiological CNS-processes related to associative learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Gert R J; Schachtman, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiology of human associative memory has been studied with electroencephalographic techniques since the 1930s. This research has revealed that different types of electrophysiological processes in the human brain can be modified by conditioning: sensory evoked potentials, sensory induced gamma-band activity, periods of frequency-specific waves (alpha and beta waves, the sensorimotor rhythm and the mu-rhythm) and slow cortical potentials. Conditioning of these processes has been studied in experiments that either use operant conditioning or repeated contingent pairings of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (classical conditioning). In operant conditioning, the appearance of a specific brain process is paired with an external stimulus (neurofeedback) and the feedback enables subjects to obtain varying degrees of control of the CNS-process. Such acquired self-regulation of brain activity has found practical uses for instance in the amelioration of epileptic seizures, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It has also provided communicative means of assistance for tetraplegic patients through the use of brain computer interfaces. Both extra and intracortically recorded signals have been coupled with contingent external feedback. It is the aim for this review to summarize essential results on all types of electromagnetic brain processes that have been modified by classical or operant conditioning. The results are organized according to type of conditioned EEG-process, type of conditioning, and sensory modalities of the conditioning stimuli. PMID:26367470

  10. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: another manifestation of CNS SLE?

    PubMed

    Ishimori, M L; Pressman, B D; Wallace, D J; Weisman, M H

    2007-01-01

    A variety of neuropsychiatric findings may complicate systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. We describe the clinical and radiographic features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and distinguish PRES from other conditions seen in SLE. Patient charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of four patients with SLE on immunosuppressive therapy with acute or subacute neurologic changes initially suggesting cerebritis or stroke were reviewed. The English language literature was reviewed using the Medline databases from 1996-2006 for other reports of PRES with SLE. Literature review yielded 26 other SLE cases reported with PRES. SLE patients with PRES were more commonly on immunosuppressive drugs, had episodes of relative hypertension, and had renal involvement. Characteristic findings are seen on MRI, which differentiate PRES from other CNS complications of SLE. Clinical and radiographic resolution of abnormalities within 1-4 weeks is typically seen. PRES has been increasingly recognized. Reversible changes are found on brain MRI accompanied by sometimes dramatic signs and symptoms. The therapeutic implications for separating PRES from stroke or cerebritis are important. We propose that PRES should be considered in the differential diagnosis in SLE patients with new-onset neurologic signs and symptoms. PMID:17664235

  11. Database mining applied to central nervous system (CNS) activity.

    PubMed

    Pintore, M; Taboureau, O; Ros, F; Chrétien, J R

    2001-04-01

    A data set of 389 compounds, active in the central nervous system (CNS) and divided into eight classes according to the receptor type, was extracted from the RBI database and analyzed by Self-Organizing Maps (SOM), also known as Kohonen Artificial Neural Networks. This method gives a 2D representation of the distribution of the compounds in the hyperspace derived from their molecular descriptors. As SOM belongs to the category of unsupervised techniques, it has to be combined with another method in order to generate classification models with predictive ability. The fuzzy clustering (FC) approach seems to be particularly suitable to delineate clusters in a rational way from SOM and to get an automatic objective map interpretation. Maps derived by SOM showed specific regions associated with a unique receptor type and zones in which two or more activity classes are nested. Then, the modeling ability of the proposed SOM/FC Hybrid System tools applied simultaneously to eight activity classes was validated after dividing the 389 compounds into a training set and a test set, including 259 and 130 molecules, respectively. The proper experimental activity class, among the eight possible ones, was predicted simultaneously and correctly for 81% of the test set compounds. PMID:11461760

  12. DNA methylation functions as a critical regulator of Kir4.1 expression during CNS development

    PubMed Central

    Nwaobi, Sinifunanya E; Lin, Erica; Peramsetty, Sasank R; Olsen, Michelle L

    2014-01-01

    Kir4.1, a glial-specific K+ channel, is critical for normal CNS development. Studies utilizing both global and glial-specific knockout of Kir4.1 reveal abnormal CNS development with the loss of the channel. Specifically, Kir4.1 knockout animals are characterized by ataxia, severe hypomyelination, and early postnatal death. Additionally, Kir4.1 has emerged as a key player in several CNS diseases. Notably, decreased Kir4.1 protein expression occurs in several human CNS pathologies including CNS ischemic injury, spinal cord injury, epilepsy, ALS, and Alzheimer’s disease. Despite the emerging significance of Kir4.1 in normal and pathological conditions, its mechanisms of regulation are unknown. Here we report the first epigenetic regulation of a K+ channel in the CNS. Robust developmental upregulation of Kir4.1 expression in rats is coincident with reductions in DNA methylation of the Kir4.1 gene, KCNJ10. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals a dynamic interaction between KCNJ10 and DNA methyltransferase 1 during development. Finally, demethylation of the KCNJ10 promoter is necessary for transcription. These findings indicate DNA methylation is a key regulator of Kir4.1 transcription. Given the essential role of Kir4.1 in normal CNS development, understanding the regulation of this K+ channel is critical to understanding normal glial biology. PMID:24415225

  13. Bioavailability of dietary polyphenols: Factors contributing to their clinical application in CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Mythri, R B; Srinivas Bharath, M M

    2015-10-01

    The anatomical location of the central nervous system (CNS) renders it immunologically and pharmacologically privileged due to the blood brain barrier (BBB). Although this limits the transport of unfavorable molecules to the CNS, the ensuing privilege could be disadvantageous for therapeutic compounds. Hence, the greatest challenge in the pharmacotherapy of CNS diseases is to ensure efficient brain targeting and drug delivery. Research evidences indicate that dietary polyphenols have neuroprotective potential against CNS diseases. However, their selective permeability across BBB, poor absorption, rapid metabolism and systemic elimination limit their bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy. Consequently, the beneficial effects of these orally administered agents in the CNS still remain a subject of debate. This has also limited its clinical application either as independent or adjunctive therapy. Improving the in vivo bioavailability by novel methods could improve the therapeutic feasibility of polyphenols and assist in evolving novel drugs and their derivatives with improved efficacy in vivo. Here we review the mechanistic and pharmacological issues related to the bioavailability of polyphenols with therapeutic implications for CNS diseases. We surmise that improving the bioavailability of polyphenols entails efficient in vivo transport across BBB, biochemical stability, improved half-life and persistent neuroprotection in the CNS. PMID:26163045

  14. Compartmentalized intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis during HIV infection - a model of chronic CNS inflammation?

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Mickael; Barroso, Bruno; Demasles, Stéphanie; Krim, Elsa; Marasescu, Raluca; Miquel, Marie

    2015-08-15

    HIV infects the central nervous system (CNS) during primary infection and persists in resident macrophages. CNS infection initiates a strong local immune response that fails to control the virus but is responsible for by-stander lesions involved in neurocognitive disorders. Although highly active anti-retroviral therapy now offers an almost complete control of CNS viral proliferation, low-grade CNS inflammation persists. This review focuses on HIV-induced intrathecal immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis. Intrathecal Ig synthesis early occurs in more than three-quarters of patients in response to viral infection of the CNS and persists throughout the course of the disease. Viral antigens are targeted but this specific response accounts for <5% of the whole intrathecal synthesis. Although the nature and mechanisms leading to non-specific synthesis are unknown, this prominent proportion is comparable to that observed in various CNS viral infections. Cerebrospinal fluid-floating antibody-secreting cells account for a minority of the whole synthesis, which mainly takes place in perivascular inflammatory infiltrates of the CNS parenchyma. B-cell traffic and lineage across the blood-brain-barrier have not yet been described. We review common technical pitfalls and update the pending questions in the field. Moreover, since HIV infection is associated with an intrathecal chronic oligoclonal (and mostly non-specific) Ig synthesis and associates with low-grade axonal lesions, this could be an interesting model of the chronic intrathecal synthesis occurring during multiple sclerosis. PMID:26198917

  15. Computational models of adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2005-10-01

    Experimental results in recent years have shown that adult neurogenesis is a significant phenomenon in the mammalian brain. Little is known, however, about the functional role played by the generation and destruction of neurons in the context of an adult brain. Here, we propose two models where new projection neurons are incorporated. We show that in both models, using incorporation and removal of neurons as a computational tool, it is possible to achieve a higher computational efficiency that in purely static, synapse-learning-driven networks. We also discuss the implication for understanding the role of adult neurogenesis in specific brain areas like the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus.

  16. Adult ADHD Medications and Their Cardiovascular Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, O.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic neurobiological disorder exhibited by difficulty maintaining attention, as well as hyperactivity and impulsive behavior. Central nervous system (CNS) stimulants are the first line of treatment for ADHD. With the increase in number of adults on CNS stimulants, the question that arises is how well do we understand the long-term cardiovascular effects of these drugs. There has been increasing concern that adults with ADHD are at greater risk for developing adverse cardiovascular events such as sudden death, myocardial infarction, and stroke as compared to pediatric population. Cardiovascular response attributed to ADHD medication has mainly been observed in heart rate and blood pressure elevations, while less is known about the etiology of rare cardiovascular events like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), arrhythmia, and cardiomyopathy and its long-term sequelae. We present a unique case of AMI in an adult taking Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts) and briefly discuss the literature relevant to the cardiovascular safety of CNS stimulants for adult ADHD. PMID:27579185

  17. Adult ADHD Medications and Their Cardiovascular Implications.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A; Lewis, O; Kumar, R; Yeruva, S L H; Curry, B H

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic neurobiological disorder exhibited by difficulty maintaining attention, as well as hyperactivity and impulsive behavior. Central nervous system (CNS) stimulants are the first line of treatment for ADHD. With the increase in number of adults on CNS stimulants, the question that arises is how well do we understand the long-term cardiovascular effects of these drugs. There has been increasing concern that adults with ADHD are at greater risk for developing adverse cardiovascular events such as sudden death, myocardial infarction, and stroke as compared to pediatric population. Cardiovascular response attributed to ADHD medication has mainly been observed in heart rate and blood pressure elevations, while less is known about the etiology of rare cardiovascular events like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), arrhythmia, and cardiomyopathy and its long-term sequelae. We present a unique case of AMI in an adult taking Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts) and briefly discuss the literature relevant to the cardiovascular safety of CNS stimulants for adult ADHD. PMID:27579185

  18. Developmental alterations in centrosome integrity contribute to the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zebrowski, David C; Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Wu, Chi-Chung; Piatkowski, Tanja; Becker, Robert; Leone, Marina; Hirth, Sofia; Ricciardi, Filomena; Falk, Nathalie; Giessl, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Braun, Thomas; Weidinger, Gilbert; Engel, Felix B

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes become post-mitotic shortly after birth. Understanding how this occurs is highly relevant to cardiac regenerative therapy. Yet, how cardiomyocytes achieve and maintain a post-mitotic state is unknown. Here, we show that cardiomyocyte centrosome integrity is lost shortly after birth. This is coupled with relocalization of various centrosome proteins to the nuclear envelope. Consequently, postnatal cardiomyocytes are unable to undergo ciliogenesis and the nuclear envelope adopts the function as cellular microtubule organizing center. Loss of centrosome integrity is associated with, and can promote, cardiomyocyte G0/G1 cell cycle arrest suggesting that centrosome disassembly is developmentally utilized to achieve the post-mitotic state in mammalian cardiomyocytes. Adult cardiomyocytes of zebrafish and newt, which are able to proliferate, maintain centrosome integrity. Collectively, our data provide a novel mechanism underlying the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes as well as a potential explanation for why zebrafish and newts, but not mammals, can regenerate their heart. PMID:26247711

  19. Enhancer Evolution across 20 Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Diego; Berthelot, Camille; Aldridge, Sarah; Rayner, Tim F.; Lukk, Margus; Pignatelli, Miguel; Park, Thomas J.; Deaville, Robert; Erichsen, Jonathan T.; Jasinska, Anna J.; Turner, James M.A.; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Flicek, Paul; Odom, Duncan T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mammalian radiation has corresponded with rapid changes in noncoding regions of the genome, but we lack a comprehensive understanding of regulatory evolution in mammals. Here, we track the evolution of promoters and enhancers active in liver across 20 mammalian species from six diverse orders by profiling genomic enrichment of H3K27 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation. We report that rapid evolution of enhancers is a universal feature of mammalian genomes. Most of the recently evolved enhancers arise from ancestral DNA exaptation, rather than lineage-specific expansions of repeat elements. In contrast, almost all liver promoters are partially or fully conserved across these species. Our data further reveal that recently evolved enhancers can be associated with genes under positive selection, demonstrating the power of this approach for annotating regulatory adaptations in genomic sequences. These results provide important insight into the functional genetics underpinning mammalian regulatory evolution. PMID:25635462

  20. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Krams, Rob

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON–OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and toggle switches will be described. Several synthetic gene networks are further reviewed in the medical applications section, including cancer therapy gene circuits, immuno-regulatory networks, among others. The final sections focus on the applicability of synthetic gene networks to drug discovery, drug delivery, receptor-activating gene circuits and mammalian biomanufacturing processes. PMID:25808341

  1. Mammalian Response to Cenozoic Climatic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blois, Jessica L.; Hadly, Elizabeth A.

    2009-05-01

    Multiple episodes of rapid and gradual climatic changes influenced the evolution and ecology of mammalian species and communities throughout the Cenozoic. Climatic change influenced the abundance, genetic diversity, morphology, and geographic ranges of individual species. Within communities these responses interacted to catalyze immigration, speciation, and extinction. Combined they affected long-term patterns of community stability, functional turnover, biotic turnover, and diversity. Although the relative influence of climate on particular evolutionary processes is oft debated, an understanding of processes at the root of biotic change yields important insights into the complexity of mammalian response. Ultimately, all responses trace to events experienced by populations. However, many such processes emerge as patterns above the species level, where shared life history traits and evolutionary history allow us to generalize about mammalian response to climatic change. These generalizations provide the greatest power to understand and predict mammalian responses to current and future global change.

  2. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  3. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  4. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications.

    PubMed

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M; Krams, Rob

    2015-05-01

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON-OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and toggle switches will be described. Several synthetic gene networks are further reviewed in the medical applications section, including cancer therapy gene circuits, immuno-regulatory networks, among others. The final sections focus on the applicability of synthetic gene networks to drug discovery, drug delivery, receptor-activating gene circuits and mammalian biomanufacturing processes. PMID:25808341

  5. Reverse genetics for mammalian reovirus.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karl W; Ikizler, Miné; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Dermody, Terence S

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian orthoreoviruses (reoviruses) are highly tractable models for studies of viral replication and pathogenesis. The versatility of reovirus as an experimental model has been enhanced by development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system. Infectious reovirus can be recovered from cells transfected with plasmids encoding cDNAs of each reovirus gene segment using a strategy that does not require helper virus and is independent of selection. In this system, transcription of each gene segment is driven by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, which can be supplied transiently by recombinant vaccinia virus (rDIs-T7pol) or by cells that constitutively express the enzyme. Reverse genetics systems have been developed for two prototype reovirus strains, type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D). Each reovirus cDNA was encoded on an independent plasmid for the first-generation rescue system. The efficiency of virus recovery was enhanced in a second-generation system by combining the cDNAs for multiple reovirus gene segments onto single plasmids to reduce the number of plasmids from 10 to 4. The reduction in plasmid number and the use of baby hamster kidney cells that express T7 RNA polymerase increased the efficiency of viral rescue, reduced the incubation time required to recover infectious virus, and eliminated potential biosafety concerns associated with the use of recombinant vaccinia virus. Reovirus reverse genetics has been used to introduce mutations into viral capsid and nonstructural components to study viral protein-structure activity relationships and can be exploited to engineer recombinant reoviruses for vaccine and oncolytic applications. PMID:21798351

  6. Chemosignals, Hormones and Mammalian Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Petrulis, Aras

    2013-01-01

    Many mammalian species use chemosignals to coordinate reproduction by altering the physiology and behavior of both sexes. Chemosignals prime reproductive physiology so that individuals become sexually mature and active at times when mating is most probable and suppress it when it is not. Once in reproductive condition, odors produced and deposited by both males and females are used to find and select individuals for mating. The production, dissemination and appropriate responses to these cues are modulated heavily by organizational and activational effects of gonadal sex steroids and thereby intrinsically link chemical communication to the broader reproductive context. Many compounds have been identified as “pheromones” but very few have met the expectations of that term: a unitary, species-typical substance that is both necessary and sufficient for an experience-independent behavioral or physiological response. In contrast, most responses to chemosignals are dependent or heavily modulated by experience, either in adulthood or during development. Mechanistically, chemosignals are perceived by both main and accessory (vomeronasal) olfactory systems with the importance of each system tied strongly to the nature of the stimulus rather than to the response. In the central nervous system, the vast majority of responses to chemosignals are mediated by cortical and medial amygdala connections with hypothalamic and other forebrain structures. Despite the importance of chemosignals in mammals, many details of chemical communication differ even among closely related species and defy clear categorization. Although generating much research and public interest, strong evidence for the existence of a robust chemical communication among humans is lacking. PMID:23545474

  7. Hacking the genetic code of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Dirk

    2009-07-01

    A genetic shuttle: The highlighted article, which was recently published by Schultz, Geierstanger and co-workers, describes a straightforward scheme for enlarging the genetic code of mammalian cells. An orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for a new amino acid can be evolved in E. coli and subsequently transferred into mammalian cells. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by adding a photocaged lysine derivative to the genetic repertoire of a human cell line. PMID:19533721

  8. Simplified Bioreactor For Growing Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F.

    1995-01-01

    Improved bioreactor for growing mammalian cell cultures developed. Designed to support growth of dense volumes of mammalian cells by providing ample, well-distributed flows of nutrient solution with minimal turbulence. Cells relatively delicate and, unlike bacteria, cannot withstand shear forces present in turbulent flows. Bioreactor vessel readily made in larger sizes to accommodate greater cell production quantities. Molding equipment presently used makes cylinders up to 30 centimeters long. Alternative sintered plastic techniques used to vary pore size and quantity, as necessary.

  9. How common is the lipid body-containing interstitial cell in the mammalian lung?

    PubMed

    Tahedl, Daniel; Wirkes, André; Tschanz, Stefan A; Ochs, Matthias; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary lipofibroblasts are thought to be involved in lung development, regeneration, vitamin A storage, and surfactant synthesis. Most of the evidence for these important functions relies on mouse or rat studies. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the presence of lipofibroblasts in a variety of early postnatal and adult mammalian species (including humans) to evaluate the ability to generalize functions of this cell type for other species. For this purpose, lung samples from 14 adult mammalian species as well as from postnatal mice, rats, and humans were investigated using light and electron microscopic stereology to obtain the volume fraction and the total volume of lipid bodies. In adult animals, lipid bodies were observed only, but not in all rodents. In all other species, no lipofibroblasts were observed. In rodents, lipid body volume scaled with body mass with an exponent b = 0.73 in the power law equation. Lipid bodies were not observed in postnatal human lungs but showed a characteristic postnatal increase in mice and rats and persisted at a lower level in the adult animals. Among 14 mammalian species, lipofibroblasts were only observed in rodents. The great increase in lipid body volume during early postnatal development of the mouse lung confirms the special role of lipofibroblasts during rodent lung development. It is evident that the cellular functions of pulmonary lipofibroblasts cannot be transferred easily from rodents to other species, in particular humans. PMID:24973404

  10. Armies of pestilence: CNS infections as potential weapons of mass destruction.

    PubMed

    Hart, B L; Ketai, L

    2015-06-01

    Infectious agents have been investigated, developed, and used by both governments and terrorist groups as weapons of mass destruction. CNS infections, though traditionally considered less often than respiratory diseases in this scenario, may be very important. Viruses responsible for encephalitides can be highly infectious in aerosol form. CNS involvement in anthrax is ominous but should change treatment. Brucellosis, plague, Q fever, and other bacteria can uncommonly manifest with meningoencephalitis and other findings. Emerging diseases may also pose threats. We review infectious agents of particular concern for purposes of biowarfare with respect to CNS manifestations and imaging features. PMID:25477355

  11. Mapping the accumulation of co-infiltrating CNS dendritic cells and encephalitogenic T cells during EAE

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Benjamin D; Walker, Alec; Harris, Melissa; Rayasam, Aditya; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) suggests that CNS-infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial for restimulation of coinfiltrating T cells. Here we systematically quantified and visualized the distribution and interaction of CNS DCs and T cells during EAE. We report marked periventricular accumulation of DCs and myelin-specific T cells during EAE disease onset prior to accumulation in the spinal cord, indicating that the choroid plexus-CSF axis is a CNS entry portal. Moreover, despite emphasis on spinal cord inflammation in EAE and in correspondence with MS pathology, inflammatory lesions containing interacting DCs and T cells are present in specific brain regions. PMID:25288303

  12. A Practical Guide for Exploring Opportunities of Repurposing Drugs for CNS Diseases in Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Mei, Hongkang; Feng, Gang; Zhu, Jason; Lin, Simon; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Yue; Xia, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Systems biology has shown its potential in facilitating pathway-focused therapy development for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. An integrated network can be utilized to explore the multiple disease mechanisms and to discover repositioning opportunities. This review covers current therapeutic gaps for CNS diseases and the role of systems biology in pharmaceutical industry. We conclude with a Multiple Level Network Modeling (MLNM) example to illustrate the great potential of systems biology for CNS diseases. The system focuses on the benefit and practical applications in pathway centric therapy and drug repositioning. PMID:26235090

  13. Field Effects in the CNS Play Functional Roles

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Shennan A.; Faber, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    An endogenous electrical field effect, i.e., ephaptic transmission, occurs when an electric field associated with activity occurring in one neuron polarizes the membrane of another neuron. It is well established that field effects occur during pathological conditions, such as epilepsy, but less clear if they play a functional role in the healthy brain. Here, we describe the principles of field effect interactions, discuss identified field effects in diverse brain structures from the teleost Mauthner cell to the mammalian cortex, and speculate on the function of these interactions. Recent evidence supports that relatively weak endogenous and exogenous field effects in laminar structures reach significance because they are amplified by network interactions. Such interactions may be important in rhythmogenesis for the cortical slow wave and hippocampal sharp wave–ripple, and also during transcranial stimulation. PMID:20508749

  14. Young aphids avoid erroneous dropping when evading mammalian herbivores by combining input from two sensory modalities.

    PubMed

    Gish, Moshe; Dafni, Amots; Inbar, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian herbivores may incidentally ingest plant-dwelling insects while foraging. Adult pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) avoid this danger by dropping off their host plant after sensing the herbivore's warm and humid breath and the vibrations it causes while feeding. Aphid nymphs may also drop (to escape insect enemies), but because of their slow movement, have a lower chance of finding a new plant. We compared dropping rates of first-instar nymphs with those of adults, after exposing pea aphids to different combinations of simulated mammalian breath and vibrations. We hypothesized that nymphs would compensate for the greater risk they face on the ground by interpreting more conservatively the mammalian herbivore cues they perceive. Most adults dropped in response to breath alone, but nymphs rarely did so. Breath stimulus accompanied by one concurrent vibrational stimulus, caused a minor rise in adult dropping rates. Adding a second vibration during breath had no additional effect on adults. The nymphs, however, relied on a combination of the two types of stimuli, with a threefold increase in dropping rates when the breath was accompanied by one vibration, and a further doubling of dropping rates when the second vibration was added. The age-specificity of the aphids' herbivore detection mechanism is probably an adaptation to the different cost of dropping for the different age groups. Relying on a combination of stimuli from two sensory modalities enables the vulnerable nymphs to avoid costly mistakes. Our findings emphasize the importance of the direct trophic effect of mammalian herbivory for plant-dwelling insects. PMID:22496734

  15. Young Aphids Avoid Erroneous Dropping when Evading Mammalian Herbivores by Combining Input from Two Sensory Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Gish, Moshe; Dafni, Amots; Inbar, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian herbivores may incidentally ingest plant-dwelling insects while foraging. Adult pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) avoid this danger by dropping off their host plant after sensing the herbivore's warm and humid breath and the vibrations it causes while feeding. Aphid nymphs may also drop (to escape insect enemies), but because of their slow movement, have a lower chance of finding a new plant. We compared dropping rates of first-instar nymphs with those of adults, after exposing pea aphids to different combinations of simulated mammalian breath and vibrations. We hypothesized that nymphs would compensate for the greater risk they face on the ground by interpreting more conservatively the mammalian herbivore cues they perceive. Most adults dropped in response to breath alone, but nymphs rarely did so. Breath stimulus accompanied by one concurrent vibrational stimulus, caused a minor rise in adult dropping rates. Adding a second vibration during breath had no additional effect on adults. The nymphs, however, relied on a combination of the two types of stimuli, with a threefold increase in dropping rates when the breath was accompanied by one vibration, and a further doubling of dropping rates when the second vibration was added. The age-specificity of the aphids' herbivore detection mechanism is probably an adaptation to the different cost of dropping for the different age groups. Relying on a combination of stimuli from two sensory modalities enables the vulnerable nymphs to avoid costly mistakes. Our findings emphasize the importance of the direct trophic effect of mammalian herbivory for plant-dwelling insects. PMID:22496734

  16. Mammalian phylogeny reveals recent diversification rate shifts.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Tanja

    2011-04-12

    Phylogenetic trees of present-day species allow investigation of the rate of evolution that led to the present-day diversity. A recent analysis of the mammalian phylogeny challenged the view of explosive mammalian evolution after the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary (65 Mya). However, due to lack of appropriate methods, the diversification (speciation minus extinction) rates in the more recent past of mammalian evolution could not be determined. In this paper, I provide a method that reveals that the tempo of mammalian evolution did not change until ∼ 33 Mya. This constant period was followed by a peak of diversification rates between 33 and 30 Mya. Thereafter, diversification rates remained high and constant until 8.55 Mya. Diversification rates declined significantly at 8.55 and 3.35 Mya. Investigation of mammalian subgroups (marsupials, placentals, and the six largest placental subgroups) reveals that the diversification rate peak at 33-30 Mya is mainly driven by rodents, cetartiodactyla, and marsupials. The recent diversification rate decrease is significant for all analyzed subgroups but eulipotyphla, cetartiodactyla, and primates. My likelihood approach is not limited to mammalian evolution. It provides a robust framework to infer diversification rate changes and mass extinction events in phylogenies, reconstructed from, e.g., present-day species or virus data. In particular, the method is very robust toward noise and uncertainty in the phylogeny and can account for incomplete taxon sampling. PMID:21444816

  17. Safety Design and Mock-Up Tests on the Combustion of Hydrogen-Air Mixture in the Vertical CNS Channel of the CARR-CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Qingfeng Yu; Quanke Feng

    2006-07-01

    A two-phase thermo-siphon loop is applied to the Cold Neutron Source (CNS) of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR). The moderator is liquid hydrogen. The two-phase thermo-siphon consists of the crescent-shape moderator cell, the moderator transfer tube, and the condenser. The hydrogen is supplied from the buffer tank to the condenser. The most characteristic point is that the cold helium gas is introduced into the helium sub-cooling system covering the moderator cell and then flows up through the tube covering the moderator transfer tube into the condenser. The helium sub-cooling system also reduces the void fraction of the liquid hydrogen and takes a role of the helium barrier for preventing air from intruding into the hydrogen system. We call the two-phase thermo-siphon the hydrogen cold system. The main part of this system is installed in the CNS channel made of 6061 aluminum alloy (6061A) of 6 mm in thickness, 270 mm in outer diameter and about 6 m in height. For confirming the safety of the CNS, the combustion tests were carried out using the hydrogen-air mixture under the conditions in which air is introduced into the tube at 1 atmosphere, and then hydrogen gas is supplied from the gas cylinder up to the test pressures. And maximum test pressure is 0.140 MPa Gauge (G). This condition includes the design accident of the CNS. The peak pressure due to combustion is 1.09 MPa, and the design strength of the CNS channel is 3 MPa. The safety of the CNS was thus verified even if the design basis accident occurs. The pressure distribution, the stress, and the displacement of the tube were also measured. (authors)

  18. Monoallelic Expression of Multiple Genes in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinhui; Valo, Zuzana; Smith, David; Singer-Sam, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The inheritance pattern of a number of major genetic disorders suggests the possible involvement of genes that are expressed from one allele and silent on the other, but such genes are difficult to detect. Since DNA methylation in regulatory regions is often a mark of gene silencing, we modified existing microarray-based assays to detect both methylated and unmethylated DNA sequences in the same sample, a variation we term the MAUD assay. We probed a 65 Mb region of mouse Chr 7 for gene-associated sequences that show two distinct DNA methylation patterns in the mouse CNS. Selected genes were then tested for allele-specific expression in clonal neural stem cell lines derived from reciprocal F1 (C57BL/6×JF1) hybrid mice. In addition, using a separate approach, we directly analyzed allele-specific expression of a group of genes interspersed within clusters of OlfR genes, since the latter are subject to allelic exclusion. Altogether, of the 500 known genes in the chromosomal region surveyed, five show monoallelic expression, four identified by the MAUD assay (Agc1, p (pink-eyed dilution), P4ha3 and Thrsp), and one by its proximity to OlfR genes (Trim12). Thrsp (thyroid hormone responsive SPOT14 homolog) is expressed in hippocampus, but the human protein homolog, S14, has also been implicated in aggressive breast cancer. Monoallelic expression of the five genes is not coordinated at a chromosome-wide level, but rather regulated at individual loci. Taken together, our results suggest that at least 1% of previously untested genes are subject to allelic exclusion, and demonstrate a dual approach to expedite their identification. PMID:18074017

  19. Monoallelic expression of multiple genes in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhui; Valo, Zuzana; Smith, David; Singer-Sam, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The inheritance pattern of a number of major genetic disorders suggests the possible involvement of genes that are expressed from one allele and silent on the other, but such genes are difficult to detect. Since DNA methylation in regulatory regions is often a mark of gene silencing, we modified existing microarray-based assays to detect both methylated and unmethylated DNA sequences in the same sample, a variation we term the MAUD assay. We probed a 65 Mb region of mouse Chr 7 for gene-associated sequences that show two distinct DNA methylation patterns in the mouse CNS. Selected genes were then tested for allele-specific expression in clonal neural stem cell lines derived from reciprocal F(1) (C57BL/6xJF1) hybrid mice. In addition, using a separate approach, we directly analyzed allele-specific expression of a group of genes interspersed within clusters of OlfR genes, since the latter are subject to allelic exclusion. Altogether, of the 500 known genes in the chromosomal region surveyed, five show monoallelic expression, four identified by the MAUD assay (Agc1, p (pink-eyed dilution), P4ha3 and Thrsp), and one by its proximity to OlfR genes (Trim12). Thrsp (thyroid hormone responsive SPOT14 homolog) is expressed in hippocampus, but the human protein homolog, S14, has also been implicated in aggressive breast cancer. Monoallelic expression of the five genes is not coordinated at a chromosome-wide level, but rather regulated at individual loci. Taken together, our results suggest that at least 1% of previously untested genes are subject to allelic exclusion, and demonstrate a dual approach to expedite their identification. PMID:18074017

  20. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: Updates on an inflammatory CNS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Daniela; Alper, Gulay; Van Haren, Keith; Kornberg, Andrew J; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Tenembaum, Silvia; Belman, Anita L

    2016-08-30

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated demyelinating CNS disorder with predilection to early childhood. ADEM is generally considered a monophasic disease. However, recurrent ADEM has been described and defined as multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis. ADEM often occurs postinfectiously, although a causal relationship has never been established. ADEM and multiple sclerosis are currently viewed as distinct entities, generally distinguishable even at disease onset. However, pathologic studies have demonstrated transitional cases of yet unclear significance. ADEM is clinically defined by acute polyfocal neurologic deficits including encephalopathy. MRI typically demonstrates reversible, ill-defined white matter lesions of the brain and often also the spinal cord, along with frequent involvement of thalami and basal ganglia. CSF analysis may reveal a mild pleocytosis and elevated protein, but is generally negative for intrathecal oligoclonal immunoglobulin G synthesis. In the absence of a specific diagnostic test, ADEM is considered a diagnosis of exclusion, and ADEM mimics, especially those requiring a different treatment approach, have to be carefully ruled out. The role of biomarkers, including autoantibodies like anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of ADEM is currently under debate. Based on the presumed autoimmune etiology of ADEM, the current treatment approach consists of early immunotherapy. Outcome of ADEM in pediatric patients is generally favorable, but cognitive deficits have been reported even in the absence of other neurologic sequelae. This review summarizes the current knowledge on epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, neuroimaging features, CSF findings, differential diagnosis, therapy, and outcome, with a focus on recent advances and controversies. PMID:27572859

  1. LRP1 expression in microglia is protective during CNS autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tzu-Ying; Guo, Yong; Seki, Scott M; Rosen, Abagail M; Johanson, David M; Mandell, James W; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Gaultier, Alban

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a devastating neurological disorder characterized by the autoimmune destruction of the central nervous system myelin. While T cells are known orchestrators of the immune response leading to MS pathology, the precise contribution of CNS resident and peripheral infiltrating myeloid cells is less well described. Here, we explore the myeloid cell function of Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1), a scavenger receptor involved in myelin clearance and the inflammatory response, in the context of Multiple sclerosis. Supporting its central role in Multiple sclerosis pathology, we find that LRP1 expression is increased in Multiple sclerosis lesions in comparison to the surrounding healthy tissue. Using two genetic mouse models, we show that deletion of LRP1 in microglia, but not in peripheral macrophages, negatively impacts the progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of Multiple sclerosis. We further show that the increased disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is not due to haplodeficiency of the Cx3cr1 locus. At the cellular level, microglia lacking LRP1 adopt a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by amoeboid morphology and increased production of the inflammatory mediator TNF-α. We also show that LRP1 functions as a robust inhibitor of NF-kB activation in myeloid cells via a MyD88 dependent pathway, potentially explaining the increase in disease severity observed in mice lacking LRP1 expression in microglia. Taken together, our data suggest that the function of LRP1 in microglia is to keep these cells in an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective status during inflammatory insult, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and potentially in Multiple sclerosis. PMID:27400748

  2. Carbon monoxide inhalation increases microparticles causing vascular and CNS dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jiajun; Yang, Ming; Kosterin, Paul; Salzberg, Brian M.; Milovanova, Tatyana N.; Bhopale, Veena M.; Thom, Stephen R.

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that circulating microparticles (MPs) play a role in pro-inflammatory effects associated with carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation. Mice exposed for 1 h to 100 ppm CO or more exhibit increases in circulating MPs derived from a variety of vascular cells as well as neutrophil activation. Tissue injury was quantified as 2000 kDa dextran leakage from vessels and as neutrophil sequestration in the brain and skeletal muscle; and central nervous system nerve dysfunction was documented as broadening of the neurohypophysial action potential (AP). Indices of injury occurred following exposures to 1000 ppm for 1 h or to 1000 ppm for 40 min followed by 3000 ppm for 20 min. MPs were implicated in causing injuries because infusing the surfactant MP lytic agent, polyethylene glycol telomere B (PEGtB) abrogated elevations in MPs, vascular leak, neutrophil sequestration and AP prolongation. These manifestations of tissue injury also did not occur in mice lacking myeloperoxidase. Vascular leakage and AP prolongation were produced in naïve mice infused with MPs that had been obtained from CO poisoned mice, but this did not occur with MPs obtained from control mice. We conclude that CO poisoning triggers elevations of MPs that activate neutrophils which subsequently cause tissue injuries. - Highlights: • Circulating microparticles (MPs) increase in mice exposed to 100 ppm CO or more. • MPs are lysed by infusing the surfactant polyethylene glycol telomere B. • CO-induced MPs cause neutrophil activation, vascular leak and CNS dysfunction. • Similar tissue injuries do not arise with MPs obtained from air-exposed, control mice.

  3. Immunosuppressive Mechanisms of Malignant Gliomas: Parallels at Non-CNS Sites

    PubMed Central

    Perng, Powell; Lim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) possesses powerful local and global immunosuppressive capabilities that modulate unwanted inflammatory reactions in nervous tissue. These same immune-modulatory mechanisms are also co-opted by malignant brain tumors and pose a formidable challenge to brain tumor immunotherapy. Routes by which malignant gliomas coordinate immunosuppression include the mechanical and functional barriers of the CNS; immunosuppressive cytokines and catabolites; immune checkpoint molecules; tumor-infiltrating immune cells; and suppressor immune cells. The challenges to overcoming tumor-induced immunosuppression, however, are not unique to the brain, and several analogous immunosuppressive mechanisms also exist for primary tumors outside of the CNS. Ultimately, the immune responses in the CNS are linked and complementary to immune processes in the periphery, and advances in tumor immunotherapy in peripheral sites may therefore illuminate novel approaches to brain tumor immunotherapy, and vice versa. PMID:26217588

  4. Performing lumbar punctures for suspected CNS infections: experience and practice of trainee doctors.

    PubMed

    Defres, Sylviane; Mayer, Josephine; Backman, Ruth; Kneen, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    Lumbar punctures are essential in the management of suspected CNS infections. However, despite clear guidelines their use can be haphazard. This survey investigated the training, knowledge and experience of UK doctors in training in relation to lumbar punctures. PMID:26551497

  5. Auto Transplant for High Risk or Relapsed Solid or CNS Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Ewing's Family Tumors; Renal Tumors; Hepatoblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Primary Malignant Brain Neoplasms; Retinoblastoma; Medulloblastoma; Supra-tentorial Primative Neuro-Ectodermal Tumor (PNET); Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor (AT/RT); CNS Tumors; Germ Cell Tumors

  6. Dealing with Danger in the CNS: The Response of the Immune System to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gadani, Sachin P.; Walsh, James T.; Lukens, John R.; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Fighting pathogens and maintaining tissue homeostasis are prerequisites for survival. Both of these functions are upheld by the immune system, though the latter is often overlooked in the context of the CNS. The mere presence of immune cells in the CNS was long considered a hallmark of pathology, but this view has been recently challenged by studies demonstrating that immunological signaling can confer pivotal neuroprotective effects on the injured CNS. In this review we describe the temporal sequence of immunological events that follow CNS injury. Beginning with immediate changes at the injury site including death of neural cells and release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), and progressing through innate and adaptive immune responses, we describe the cascade of inflammatory mediators and the implications of their post-injury effects. We conclude by proposing a revised interpretation of immune privilege in the brain, which takes beneficial neuro-immune communications into account. PMID:26139369

  7. Evolution and development of the mammalian cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Zoltán; Kaas, Jon H.; de Carlos, Juan A.; Hevner, Robert F.; Lein, Ed; Němec, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Comparative developmental studies of the mammalian brain can identify key changes that can generate the diverse structures and functions of brains. We have studied how the neocortex of early mammals became organized into functionally distinct areas, and how the current level of cortical cellular and laminar specialization arose from the simpler premammalian cortex. We demonstrate the neocortical organization in early mammals that is most informative for an understanding of how the large, complex human brain evolved from a long line of ancestors. The radial and tangential enlargement of the cortex was driven by changes in the patterns of cortical neurogenesis, including alterations in the proportions of distinct progenitor types. Some cortical cell populations travel to the cortex through tangential migration, others migrate radially. A number of recent studies have begun to characterize the chick, mouse, human and non-human primate cortical transcriptome to help us understand how gene expression relates to the development, and to the anatomical and functional organization of the adult neocortex. Although all mammalian forms share the basic layout of cortical areas, the areal proportions and distributions are driven by distinct evolutionary pressures acting on sensory and motor experiences during the individual ontogenies. PMID:24776993

  8. Wnt signalling pathway parameters for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Wee; Gardiner, Bruce S; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Layton, Meredith J; Smith, David W; Burgess, Antony W

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling regulates cell fate, survival, proliferation and differentiation at many stages of mammalian development and pathology. Mutations of two key proteins in the pathway, APC and β-catenin, have been implicated in a range of cancers, including colorectal cancer. Activation of Wnt signalling has been associated with the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and consequential up-regulation of β-catenin/TCF gene transcription. In 2003, Lee et al. constructed a computational model of Wnt signalling supported by experimental data from analysis of time-dependent concentration of Wnt signalling proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. Subsequent studies have used the Xenopus quantitative data to infer Wnt pathway dynamics in other systems. As a basis for understanding Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, a confocal live cell imaging measurement technique is developed to measure the cell and nuclear volumes of MDCK, HEK293T cells and 3 human colorectal cancer cell lines and the concentrations of Wnt signalling proteins β-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK3β and E-cadherin. These parameters provide the basis for formulating Wnt signalling models for kidney/intestinal epithelial mammalian cells. There are significant differences in concentrations of key proteins between Xenopus extracts and mammalian whole cell lysates. Higher concentrations of Axin and lower concentrations of APC are present in mammalian cells. Axin concentrations are greater than APC in kidney epithelial cells, whereas in intestinal epithelial cells the APC concentration is higher than Axin. Computational simulations based on Lee's model, with this new data, suggest a need for a recalibration of the model.A quantitative understanding of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, in particular human colorectal cancers requires a detailed understanding of the concentrations of key protein complexes over time. Simulations of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells can be initiated with the parameters

  9. High-dose methotrexate with or without rituximab in newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambady, Prakash; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Sarai, Guneet; Bonekamp, David; Blakeley, Jaishri; Grossman, Stuart A.; Ye, Xiaobu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of rituximab (R) when added to high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) in patients with newly diagnosed immunocompetent primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSLs). Methods: Immunocompetent adults with newly diagnosed PCNSL treated at The Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1995 and 2012 were investigated. From 1995 to 2008, patients received HD-MTX monotherapy (8 g/m2 initially every 2 weeks and after complete response [CR] monthly to complete 12 months of therapy). From 2008 to 2012, patients received the same HD-MTX with rituximab (375 mg/m2) with each HD-MTX treatment. CR rates and median overall and progression-free survival were analyzed for each patient cohort in this single-institution, retrospective study. Results: A total of 81 patients were identified: 54 received HD-MTX (median age 66 years) while 27 received HD-MTX/R (median age 65 years). CR rates were 36% in the HD-MTX cohort and 73% in the HD-MTX/R cohort (p = 0.0145). Median progression-free survival was 4.5 months in the HD-MTX cohort and 26.7 months in the HD-MTX/R cohort (p = 0.003). Median overall survival was 16.3 months in the HD-MTX cohort and has not yet been reached in the HD-MTX/R cohort (p = 0.01). Conclusions: The addition of rituximab to HD-MTX appears to improve CR rates as well as overall and progression-free survival in patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL. Comparisons of long-term survival in the 2 cohorts await further maturation of the data. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that in immunocompetent patients with PCNSL, HD-MTX plus rituximab compared with HD-MTX alone improves CR and overall survival rates. PMID:24928128

  10. Panglial gap junctional communication is essential for maintenance of myelin in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Tress, Oliver; Maglione, Marta; May, Dennis; Pivneva, Tatjyana; Richter, Nadine; Seyfarth, Julia; Binder, Sonja; Zlomuzica, Armin; Seifert, Gerald; Theis, Martin; Dere, Ekrem; Kettenmann, Helmut; Willecke, Klaus

    2012-05-30

    In this study, we have investigated the contribution of oligodendrocytic connexin47 (Cx47) and astrocytic Cx30 to panglial gap junctional networks as well as myelin maintenance and function by deletion of both connexin coding DNAs in mice. Biocytin injections revealed complete disruption of oligodendrocyte-to-astrocyte coupling in the white matter of 10- to 15-d-old Cx30/Cx47 double-deficient mice, while oligodendrocyte-to-oligodendrocyte coupling was maintained. There were no quantitative differences regarding cellular networks in acute brain slices obtained from Cx30/Cx47 double-null mice and control littermates, probably caused by the upregulation of oligodendrocytic Cx32 in Cx30/Cx47 double-deficient mice. We observed early onset myelin pathology, and ∼40% of Cx30/Cx47 double-deficient animals died within 42 to 90 d after birth, accompanied by severe motor impairments. Histological and ultrastructural analyses revealed severe vacuolization and myelination defects in all white matter tracts of the CNS. Furthermore, Cx30/Cx47 double-deficient mice exhibited a decreased number of oligodendrocytes, severe astrogliosis, and microglial activation in white matter tracts. Although less affected concerning motor impairment, surviving double-knock-out (KO) mice showed behavioral alterations in the open field and in the rotarod task. Vacuole formation and thinner myelin sheaths were evident also with adult surviving double-KO mice. Since interastrocytic coupling due to Cx43 expression and interoligodendrocytic coupling because of Cx32 expression are still maintained, Cx30/Cx47 double-deficient mice demonstrate the functional role of both connexins for interastrocytic, interoligodendrocytic, and panglial coupling, and show that both connexins are required for maintenance of myelin. PMID:22649229

  11. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James T.; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R.; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell–mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4–producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4–deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4–deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell–derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4–producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration. PMID:25607842

  12. Normal adult ramified microglia separated from other central nervous system macrophages by flow cytometric sorting: Phenotypic differences defined and direct ex vivo antigen presentation to myelin basic protein-reactive CD4{sup +} T cells compared

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, A.L.; Goodsall, A.L.; Sedgwick, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    Ramified microglia in the adult central nervous system (CNS) are the principal glial element up-regulating MHC class I and II expression in response to inflammatory events or neuronal damage. A proportion of these cells also express MHC class II constitutively in the normal CNS. The role of microglia as APCs for CD4{sup +} cells extravasating into the CNS remains undefined. In this study, using irradiation bone marrow chimeras in CD45-congenic rats, the phenotype CD45{sup low}CD11b/c{sup +} is shown to identify microglial cells specifically within the CNS. Highly purified populations of microglia and nonmicroglial but CNS-associated macrophages (CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +}) have been obtained directly from the adult CNS, by using flow cytometric sorting. Morphologically, freshly isolated microglia vs other CNS macrophages are quite distinct. Of the two populations recovered from the normal CNS, it is the minority CD45{sup high}CD11 b/c{sup +} transitional macrophage population, and not microglia, that is the effective APC for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-inducing CD4{sup +} myelin basic protein (MBP)-reactive T cells. CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +} CNS macrophages also stimulate MBP-reactive T cells without addition of MBP to culture suggesting presentation of endogenous Ag. This is the first study in which microglia vs other CNS macrophages have been analyzed for APC ability directly from the CNS, with substantial cross-contamination between the two populations eliminated. The heterogeneity of these populations in terms of APC function is clearly demonstrated. Evidence is still lacking that adult CNS microglia have the capacity to interact with and stimulate CD4{sup +} T cells to proliferate or secrete IL-2. 60 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Fungal infections of the CNS: treatment strategies for the immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Black, Katharine E; Baden, Lindsey R

    2007-01-01

    Infections with fungi cause significant morbidity in the immunocompromised host and invasion of the CNS may lead to devastating consequences. Vulnerable individuals include those with haematological malignancies, transplant recipients, and those infected with HIV. Potential pathogens include yeasts, Aspergillus spp., other moulds of an increasing variety, and a range of dimorphic fungi, often associated with particular geographical locations. Antifungal treatments include polyenes such as amphotericin B and its lipid formulations, azoles such as fluconazole and itraconazole, and the more recent voriconazole and posaconazole. The new antifungal class of echinocandins, such as caspofungin, micafungin and anidulafungin, typically lack CNS penetration. Amphotericin B and flucytosine are used to initiate treatment for CNS yeast infections caused by Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans. Voriconazole is preferred for aspergillus, although amphotericin B, particularly in lipid formulation, is also useful. Reliable treatment data are lacking for CNS infections with most of the non-aspergillus moulds; posaconazole holds promise for the zygomycetes and perhaps some of the rarer pigmented fungi, but amphotericin B preparations are still recommended. Oral fluconazole is effective for the CNS manifestations of coccidioides, while histoplasmosis and blastomycoses typically require amphotericin B therapy. Effective treatment requires a definitive diagnosis, which is often challenging in the population at risk of CNS fungal infections. PMID:17381184

  14. Intracranial response to nivolumab in NSCLC patients with untreated or progressing CNS metastases.

    PubMed

    Dudnik, Elizabeth; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Nechushtan, Hovav; Goldstein, Daniel A; Zer, Alona; Flex, Dov; Siegal, Tali; Peled, Nir

    2016-08-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) metastases occur in 30% of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Localized treatments targeting CNS metastases result in delays in systemic therapy administration and are associated with neurocognitive impairment. Nivolumab is an immune check-point inhibitor that is approved as a second-line treatment of NSCLC. Data regarding the intracranial activity of nivolumab is lacking. We retrospectively reviewed the efficacy and safety of nivolumab in five patients with advanced NSCLC and new/progressing intracranial metastases. Intracranial response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using mRECIST v. 1.1 criteria. All patients had parenchymal brain metastases; two patients had leptomeningeal carcinomatosis diagnosed according to radiological criteria. All patients were asymptomatic and did not require corticosteroids or immediate local therapy. We observed one complete and one partial response in the brain. Stabilization of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis for 10 weeks was achieved in one additional patient. Two patients progressed in the CNS. Time-to-response comprised 5 weeks and 9 weeks; both responses are still ongoing at the time of the report (24+ and 28+ weeks since start of treatment). Systemic responses and intracranial responses were largely concordant. No treatment-related or CNS metastases-related grade≥3 adverse events were observed. Nivolumab might have intracranial activity and favorable safety profile in patients with CNS metastases secondary to NSCLC. Nivolumab CNS activity warrants further evaluation. PMID:27393516

  15. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  16. Changes in microtubule stability and density in myelin-deficient shiverer mouse CNS axons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, L. L.; Witt, A. S.; Payne, H. R.; Shine, H. D.; Brady, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    Altered axon-Schwann cell interactions in PNS myelin-deficient Trembler mice result in changed axonal transport rates, neurofilament and microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation, neurofilament density, and microtubule stability. To determine whether PNS and CNS myelination have equivalent effects on axons, neurofilaments, and microtubules in CNS, myelin-deficient shiverer axons were examined. The genetic defect in shiverer is a deletion in the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene, an essential component of CNS myelin. As a result, shiverer mice have little or no compact CNS myelin. Slow axonal transport rates in shiverer CNS axons were significantly increased, in contrast to the slowing in demyelinated PNS nerves. Even more striking were substantial changes in the composition and properties of microtubules in shiverer CNS axons. The density of axonal microtubules is increased, reflecting increased expression of tubulin in shiverer, and the stability of microtubules is drastically reduced in shiverer axons. Shiverer transgenic mice with two copies of a wild-type myelin basic protein transgene have an intermediate level of compact myelin, making it possible to determine whether the actual level of compact myelin is an important regulator of axonal microtubules. Both increased microtubule density and reduced microtubule stability were still observed in transgenic mouse nerves, indicating that signals beyond synaptogenesis and the mere presence of compact myelin are required for normal regulation of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton.

  17. Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase promotes axon growth in mammalian central nervous system neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meifan; Geoffroy, Cédric G.; Wong, Hetty N.; Tress, Oliver; Nguyen, Mallorie T.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; Jin, Yishi; Zheng, Binhai

    2016-01-01

    Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase (LZK/MAP3K13) is a member of the mixed lineage kinase family with high sequence identity to Dual Leucine Zipper Kinase (DLK/MAP3K12). While DLK is established as a key regulator of axonal responses to injury, the role of LZK in mammalian neurons is poorly understood. By gain- and loss-of-function analyses in neuronal cultures, we identify LZK as a novel positive regulator of axon growth. LZK signals specifically through MKK4 and JNKs among MAP2Ks and MAPKs respectively in neuronal cells, with JNK activity positively regulating LZK protein levels. Neuronal maturation or activity deprivation activates the LZK-MKK4-JNK pathway. LZK and DLK share commonalities in signaling, regulation, and effects on axon extension. Furthermore, LZK-dependent regulation of DLK protein expression and the lack of additive effects on axon growth upon co-manipulation suggest complex functional interaction and cross-regulation between these two kinases. Together, our data support the possibility for two structurally related MAP3Ks to work in concert to mediate axonal responses to external insult or injury in mammalian CNS neurons. PMID:27511108

  18. Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase promotes axon growth in mammalian central nervous system neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meifan; Geoffroy, Cédric G; Wong, Hetty N; Tress, Oliver; Nguyen, Mallorie T; Holzman, Lawrence B; Jin, Yishi; Zheng, Binhai

    2016-01-01

    Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase (LZK/MAP3K13) is a member of the mixed lineage kinase family with high sequence identity to Dual Leucine Zipper Kinase (DLK/MAP3K12). While DLK is established as a key regulator of axonal responses to injury, the role of LZK in mammalian neurons is poorly understood. By gain- and loss-of-function analyses in neuronal cultures, we identify LZK as a novel positive regulator of axon growth. LZK signals specifically through MKK4 and JNKs among MAP2Ks and MAPKs respectively in neuronal cells, with JNK activity positively regulating LZK protein levels. Neuronal maturation or activity deprivation activates the LZK-MKK4-JNK pathway. LZK and DLK share commonalities in signaling, regulation, and effects on axon extension. Furthermore, LZK-dependent regulation of DLK protein expression and the lack of additive effects on axon growth upon co-manipulation suggest complex functional interaction and cross-regulation between these two kinases. Together, our data support the possibility for two structurally related MAP3Ks to work in concert to mediate axonal responses to external insult or injury in mammalian CNS neurons. PMID:27511108

  19. Mammalian Cell-Based Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Pratik; Franz, Briana; Bhunia, Arun K.

    Use of living cells or cellular components in biosensors is receiving increased attention and opens a whole new area of functional diagnostics. The term "mammalian cell-based biosensor" is designated to biosensors utilizing mammalian cells as the biorecognition element. Cell-based assays, such as high-throughput screening (HTS) or cytotoxicity testing, have already emerged as dependable and promising approaches to measure the functionality or toxicity of a compound (in case of HTS); or to probe the presence of pathogenic or toxigenic entities in clinical, environmental, or food samples. External stimuli or changes in cellular microenvironment sometimes perturb the "normal" physiological activities of mammalian cells, thus allowing CBBs to screen, monitor, and measure the analyte-induced changes. The advantage of CBBs is that they can report the presence or absence of active components, such as live pathogens or active toxins. In some cases, mammalian cells or plasma membranes are used as electrical capacitors and cell-cell and cell-substrate contact is measured via conductivity or electrical impedance. In addition, cytopathogenicity or cytotoxicity induced by pathogens or toxins resulting in apoptosis or necrosis could be measured via optical devices using fluorescence or luminescence. This chapter focuses mainly on the type and applications of different mammalian cell-based sensor systems.

  20. A Comparative Study of Mammalian Diversification Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenhua; Xu, Junxiao; Wu, Yi; Yang, Guang

    2012-01-01

    Although mammals have long been regarded as a successful radiation, the diversification pattern among the clades is still poorly known. Higher-level phylogenies are conflicting and comprehensive comparative analyses are still lacking. Using a recently published supermatrix encompassing nearly all extant mammalian families and a novel comparative likelihood approach (MEDUSA), the diversification pattern of mammalian groups was examined. Both order- and family-level phylogenetic analyses revealed the rapid radiation of Boreoeutheria and Euaustralidelphia in the early mammalian history. The observation of a diversification burst within Boreoeutheria at approximately 100 My supports the Long Fuse model in elucidating placental diversification progress, and the rapid radiation of Euaustralidelphia suggests an important role of biogeographic dispersal events in triggering early Australian marsupial rapid radiation. Diversification analyses based on family-level diversity tree revealed seven additional clades with exceptional diversification rate shifts, six of which represent accelerations in net diversification rate as compared to the background pattern. The shifts gave origin to the clades Muridae+Cricetidae, Bovidae+Moschidae+Cervidae, Simiiformes, Echimyidae, Odontoceti (excluding Physeteridae+Kogiidae+Platanistidae), Macropodidae, and Vespertilionidae. Moderate to high extinction rates from background and boreoeutherian diversification patterns indicate the important role of turnovers in shaping the heterogeneous taxonomic richness observed among extant mammalian groups. Furthermore, the present results emphasize the key role of extinction on erasing unusual diversification signals, and suggest that further studies are needed to clarify the historical radiation of some mammalian groups for which MEDUSA did not detect exceptional diversification rates. PMID:22457604

  1. Heparan sulphate proteoglycans in glia and in the normal and injured CNS: expression of sulphotransferases and changes in sulphation.

    PubMed

    Properzi, Francesca; Lin, Rachel; Kwok, Jessica; Naidu, Murali; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Ten Dam, Gerdy B; Camargo, Luiz M; Raha-Chowdhury, Ruma; Furukawa, Yoko; Mikami, Tadahisa; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Fawcett, James W

    2008-02-01

    Heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have multiple functions relevant to the control of the CNS injury response, particularly in modulating the effects of growth factors and localizing molecules that affect axon growth. We examined the pattern of expression and glycanation of HSPGs in the normal and damaged CNS, and in astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors because of their participation in the injury reaction. The composition of HS glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains was analysed by biochemical analysis and by the binding of antibodies that recognize sulphated epitopes. We also measured levels of HS sulphotransferases and syndecans. Compared with oligodendrocytes, oligodendrocyte precursors have more 2-O-sulphation in their HS GAG. This is accompanied by higher expression of the enzyme responsible for 2-O-sulphation, HS 2-O-sulphotransferase (HS2ST) and a fall in syndecan-1. Astrocytes treated with tumour growth factor (TGF)alpha or TGFbeta to mimic the injury response showed upregulation of syndecan-1 and HS2ST correlating with an increase in 2-O-sulphate residues in their HS GAGs. This also correlated with increased staining with AO4B08 anti-GAG antibody that recognizes high sulphation, and reduced staining with RB4EA12 recognizing low sulphation. After injury to the adult rat brain there was an overall increase in the quantity of HSPG around the injury site, mRNA for HS2ST was increased, and the changes in staining with sulphation-specific antibodies were consistent with an increase in 2-O-sulphated HS. Syndecan-1 was upregulated in astrocytes. The major injury-related change, seen in injured brain and cultured glia, was an increase in 2-O-sulphated HS and increased syndecan-1, suggesting novel approaches to modulating scar formation. PMID:18279312

  2. HIV-1 Alters Neural and Glial Progenitor Cell Dynamics in the CNS: Coordinated Response to Opiates during Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Yun Kyung; Podhaizer, Elizabeth M.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are common sequelae of HIV infection, even when viral titers are well controlled by anti-retroviral therapy. Evidence in patients and animal models suggests that neurologic deficits are increased during chronic opiate exposure. We have hypothesized that CNS progenitor cells in both adult and developing CNS are affected by HIV infection, and that opiates exacerbate these effects. To examine this question, neural progenitors were exposed to HIV-1 Tat1-86 in the developing brain of inducible transgenic mice and in vitro. We examined whether Tat affected the proliferation or balance of progenitor populations expressing nestin, Sox2, and Olig2. Disease relevance was further tested by exposing human-derived progenitors to supernatant from HIV-1 infected monocytes. Studies concentrated on striatum, a region preferentially targeted by HIV and opiates. Results were similar among experimental paradigms. Tat or HIV exposure reduced the proliferation of undifferentiated (Sox2+) progenitors and oligodendroglial (Olig2+) progenitors. Co-exposure to morphine exacerbated the effects of Tat or HIV-1SF162 supernatant, but partially reversed HIV-1IIIB supernatant effects. Populations of Sox2+ and Olig2+ cells were also reduced by Tat exposure, although progenitor survival was unaffected. In rare instances, p24 immunolabeling was detected in viable human progenitors by confocal imaging. The vulnerability of progenitors is likely to distort the dynamic balance among neuron/glial populations as the brain matures, perhaps contributing to reports that neurologic disease is especially prevalent in pediatric HIV patients. Pediatric disease is atypical in developed regions, but remains a serious concern in resource-limited areas where infection occurs commonly at birth and through breast-feeding. PMID:22865725

  3. Capacitation-Associated Glycocomponents of Mammalian Sperm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min

    2016-05-01

    Mammalian fertilization is a series of events that are mostly carbohydrate mediated. The male gamete glycocomponents are extensively synthesized and modified during sperm development and sperm transport in the reproductive tracts. Freshly ejaculated mammalian sperm are required to undergo capacitation, which takes place in the female reproductive system, in order to become fully fertilizable. Several lines of evidence reveal changes in glycosylated sperm constituents during capacitation. Although the contributions of these molecular changes to capacitation are not completely understood, the presence, rearrangement, and/or modification of these sperm glycocomponents have been demonstrated to be important for fertilization. The following review summarizes mammalian sperm glycoconstituents, with emphasis on their molecular changes during capacitation. PMID:26363036

  4. Involvement of opsins in mammalian sperm thermotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Boryshpolets, Sergii; Afanzar, Oshri; Brandis, Alexander; Nevo, Reinat; Kiss, Vladimir; Eisenbach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A unique characteristic of mammalian sperm thermotaxis is extreme temperature sensitivity, manifested by the capacity of spermatozoa to respond to temperature changes of <0.0006 °C as they swim their body-length distance. The identity of the sensing system that confers this exceptional sensitivity on spermatozoa is not known. Here we show that the temperature-sensing system of mammalian spermatozoa involves opsins, known to be G-protein-coupled receptors that act as photosensors in vision. We demonstrate by molecular, immunological, and functional approaches that opsins are present in human and mouse spermatozoa at specific sites, which depend on the species and the opsin type, and that they are involved in sperm thermotaxis via two signalling pathways—the phospholipase C and the cyclic-nucleotide pathways. Our results suggest that, depending on the context and the tissue, mammalian opsins act not only as photosensors but also as thermosensors. PMID:26537127

  5. Toward predictive models of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ma'ayan, Avi; Blitzer, Robert D; Iyengar, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Progress in experimental and theoretical biology is likely to provide us with the opportunity to assemble detailed predictive models of mammalian cells. Using a functional format to describe the organization of mammalian cells, we describe current approaches for developing qualitative and quantitative models using data from a variety of experimental sources. Recent developments and applications of graph theory to biological networks are reviewed. The use of these qualitative models to identify the topology of regulatory motifs and functional modules is discussed. Cellular homeostasis and plasticity are interpreted within the framework of balance between regulatory motifs and interactions between modules. From this analysis we identify the need for detailed quantitative models on the basis of the representation of the chemistry underlying the cellular process. The use of deterministic, stochastic, and hybrid models to represent cellular processes is reviewed, and an initial integrated approach for the development of large-scale predictive models of a mammalian cell is presented. PMID:15869393

  6. Effect of Microgravity on Mammalian Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, H.; Blackshear, M.; Mahaffey, K.; Knight, C.; Khan, A. A.; Delucas, L.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on mammalian system is an important and interesting topic for scientific investigation, since NASA s objective is to send manned flights to planets like Mars and eventual human colonization.The Astronauts will be exposed to microgravity environment for a long duration of time during these flights.Our objective of research is to conduct in vitro studies for the effect of microgravity on mammalian immune system.We did our preliminary investigations by exposing mammalian lymphocytes to a microgravity simulator cell bioreactor designed by NASA and manufactured at Synthecon Inc (USA).Our initial results showed no significant change in cytokine expression in these cells for a time period of forty eight hours exposure.Our future experiments will involve exposure for a longer period of time.

  7. Effect of Microgravity on Mammalian Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, H.; Blackshear, M.; Mahaffey, K.; Khan, A. A.; Delucas, L.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on mammalian system is an important and interesting topic for scientific investigation, since NASA s objective is to send manned flights to planets like Mars and eventual human colonization. The Astronauts will be exposed to microgravity environment for a long duration of time during these flights. Our objective of research is to conduct in vitro studies for the effect of microgravity on mammalian immune system and nervous system. We did our preliminary investigations by exposing mammalian lymphocytes and astrocyte cells to a microgravity simulator cell bioreactor designed by NASA and manufactured at Synthecon, Inc. (USA).Our initial results showed no significant change in cytokine expression in these cells up to a time period of 120 hours exposure. Our future experiments will involve exposure for a longer period of time.

  8. Neural activity promotes long-distance, target-specific regeneration of adult retinal axons.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Hwan A; Stafford, Benjamin K; Nguyen, Phong L; Lien, Brian V; Wang, Chen; Zukor, Katherine; He, Zhigang; Huberman, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    Axons in the mammalian CNS fail to regenerate after injury. Here we show that if the activity of mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is increased by visual stimulation or using chemogenetics, their axons regenerate. We also show that if enhancement of neural activity is combined with elevation of the cell-growth-promoting pathway involving mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), RGC axons regenerate long distances and re-innervate the brain. Analysis of genetically labeled RGCs revealed that this regrowth can be target specific: RGC axons navigated back to their correct visual targets and avoided targets incorrect for their function. Moreover, these regenerated connections were successful in partially rescuing a subset of visual behaviors. Our findings indicate that combining neural activity with activation of mTOR can serve as powerful tool for enhancing axon regeneration, and they highlight the remarkable capacity of CNS neurons to re-establish accurate circuit connections in adulthood. PMID:27399843

  9. The mammalian blastema: regeneration at our fingertips

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi C.; Dawson, Lindsay A.; Schanes, Paula P.; Yu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the mouse, digit tip regeneration progresses through a series of discrete stages that include inflammation, histolysis, epidermal closure, blastema formation, and redifferentiation. Recent studies reveal how each regenerative stage influences subsequent stages to establish a blastema that directs the successful regeneration of a complex mammalian structure. The focus of this review is on early events of healing and how an amputation wound transitions into a functional blastema. The stepwise formation of a mammalian blastema is proposed to provide a model for how specific targeted treatments can enhance regenerative performance in humans.

  10. Epigenetic Regulation of Mammalian Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuekun

    2008-01-01

    Two critical properties of stem cells are self-renewal and multipotency. The maintenance of their “stemness” state and commitment to differentiation are therefore tightly controlled by intricate molecular networks. Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling and the noncoding RNA-mediated process, have profound regulatory roles in mammalian gene expression. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic regulators are key players in stem cell biology and their dysfunction can result in human diseases such as cancer and neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we review the recent evidences that advance our knowledge in epigenetic regulations of mammalian stem cells, with focus on embryonic stem cells and neural stem cells. PMID:18393635

  11. Detection of apoptosis in mammalian development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Penaloza, Carlos; Ye, Yixia; Lockshin, Richard A; Zakeri, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian development is dependent on an intricate orchestration of cell proliferation and death. Deregulation in the levels, localization, and type of cell death can lead to disease and even death of the developing embryo. The mechanisms involved in such deregulation are many; alterations and or manipulations of these can aid in the detection, prevention and possible treatments of any effects this de-regulation may have. Here we describe how cell death can be detected during mammalian development, using diverse staining and microscopy methods, while taking advantage of the advancements in cell death mechanisms, derived from biochemical and teratological studies in the field. PMID:19609762

  12. Physiology of the intrathecal bolus: the leptomeningeal route for macromolecule and particle delivery to CNS

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Vasily V.; Gannon, Kimberley S.

    2013-01-01

    Presently, there are no effective treatments for several diseases involving the CNS, which is protected by the blood-brain, blood-CSF and blood-arachnoid barriers. Traversing any of these barriers is difficult, especially for macromolecular drugs and particulates. However, there is significant experimental evidence that large molecules can be delivered to the CNS through the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF). The flux of the interstitial fluid in the CNS parenchyma, as well as the macro flux of CSF in the leptomeningeal space, are believed to be generally opposite to the desirable direction of CNS-targeted drug delivery. On the other hand, the available data suggest that the layer of pia mater lining the CNS surface is not continuous, and the continuity of the leptomeningeal space (LMS) with the perivascular spaces penetrating into the parenchyma provides an unexplored avenue for drug transport deep into the brain via CSF. The published data generally do not support the view that macromolecule transport from the LMS to CNS is hindered by the interstitial and CSF fluxes. The data strongly suggest that leptomeningeal transport depends on the location and volume of the administered bolus and consists of four processes: (i) pulsation-assisted convectional transport of the solutes with CSF, (ii) active “pumping” of CSF into the periarterial spaces, (iii) solute transport from the latter to and within the parenchyma, and (iv) neuronal uptake and axonal transport. The final outcome will depend on the drug molecule behavior in each of these processes, which have not been studied systematically. The data available to date suggest that many macromolecules and nanoparticles can be delivered to CNS in biologically significant amounts (>1% of the administered dose); mechanistic investigation of macromolecule and particle behavior in CSF may result in a significantly more efficient leptomeningeal drug delivery than previously thought. PMID:23316936

  13. Cell-type-specific Jumonji histone demethylase gene expression in the healthy rat CNS: detection by a novel flow cytometry method

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie M.C.; Kimyon, Rebecca S.; Watters, Jyoti J.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of how histone demethylation contributes to the regulation of basal gene expression in the brain is largely unknown in any injury model, and especially in the healthy adult brain. Although Jumonji genes are often regulated transcriptionally, cell-specific gene expression of Jumonji histone demethylases in the brain remains poorly understood. Thus, in the present study we profiled the mRNA levels of 26 Jumonji genes in microglia (CD11b+), neurons (NeuN+) and astrocytes (GFAP+) from the healthy adult rat brain. We optimized a method combining a mZBF (modified zinc-based fixative) and FCM (flow cytometry) to simultaneously sort cells from non-transgenic animals. We evaluated cell-surface, intracellular and nuclear proteins, including histones, as well as messenger- and micro-RNAs in different cell types simultaneously from a single-sorted sample. We found that 12 Jumonji genes were differentially expressed between adult microglia, neurons and astrocytes. While JMJD2D was neuron-restricted, PHF8 and JMJD1C were expressed in all three cell types although the expression was highest in neurons. JMJD3 and JMJD5 were expressed in all cell types, but were highly enriched in microglia; astrocytes had the lowest expression of UTX and JHDM1D. Levels of global H3K27 (H3 lysine 27) methylation varied among cell types and appeared to be lowest in microglia, indicating that differences in basal gene expression of specific Jumonji histone demethylases may contribute to cell-specific gene expression in the CNS (central nervous system). This multiparametric technique will be valuable for simultaneously assaying chromatin modifications and gene regulation in the adult CNS. PMID:24735454

  14. Skin-derived neural precursors competitively generate functional myelin in adult demyelinated mice

    PubMed Central

    Mozafari, Sabah; Laterza, Cecilia; Roussel, Delphine; Bachelin, Corinne; Marteyn, Antoine; Deboux, Cyrille; Martino, Gianvito; Evercooren, Anne Baron-Van

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell–derived (iPS-derived) neural precursor cells may represent the ideal autologous cell source for cell-based therapy to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in myelin diseases. So far, the therapeutic potential of reprogrammed cells has been evaluated in neonatal demyelinating models. However, the repair efficacy and safety of these cells has not been well addressed in the demyelinated adult CNS, which has decreased cell plasticity and scarring. Moreover, it is not clear if these induced pluripotent–derived cells have the same reparative capacity as physiologically committed CNS-derived precursors. Here, we performed a side-by-side comparison of CNS-derived and skin-derived neural precursors in culture and following engraftment in murine models of adult spinal cord demyelination. Grafted induced neural precursors exhibited a high capacity for survival, safe integration, migration, and timely differentiation into mature bona fide oligodendrocytes. Moreover, grafted skin–derived neural precursors generated compact myelin around host axons and restored nodes of Ranvier and conduction velocity as efficiently as CNS-derived precursors while outcompeting endogenous cells. Together, these results provide important insights into the biology of reprogrammed cells in adult demyelinating conditions and support use of these cells for regenerative biomedicine of myelin diseases that affect the adult CNS. PMID:26301815

  15. Functional neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Praag, Henriette; Schinder, Alejandro F.; Christie, Brian R.; Toni, Nicolas; Palmer, Theo D.; Gage, Fred H.

    2002-02-01

    There is extensive evidence indicating that new neurons are generated in the dentate gyrus of the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain that is important for learning and memory. However, it is not known whether these new neurons become functional, as the methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited to fixed tissue. We use here a retroviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein that only labels dividing cells, and that can be visualized in live hippocampal slices. We report that newly generated cells in the adult mouse hippocampus have neuronal morphology and can display passive membrane properties, action potentials and functional synaptic inputs similar to those found in mature dentate granule cells. Our findings demonstrate that newly generated cells mature into functional neurons in the adult mammalian brain.

  16. Is there a relationship between adult neurogenesis and neuron generation following injury across evolution?

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Patrizia

    2011-09-01

    All vertebrates can produce new neurons postnatally in discrete regions of their nervous system, but only some lower vertebrates (fish and amphibians) can significantly repair several neural structures, including brain, spinal cord, retina, olfactory and auditory-vestibular system, to compensate for neural tissue loss and recover significant functionality. Some regenerative ability, however, is found also in reptiles and birds, and even in mammals. The recognition that neurogenesis indeed occurs in the CNS of all adult vertebrates challenges the view that there is a simple relationship between maintenance of neurogenic regions in the adult CNS and regenerative capability. The aim of this review is to revisit this relationship in the light of recent literature focusing on selected examples of neurogenesis and regeneration, and discuss possible frameworks that may help to elucidate the relationship between adult neurogenesis and regeneration. This could provide useful paradigms for harnessing regeneration in the human CNS. PMID:21929627

  17. The cytogenetics of mammalian autosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, A.

    1988-01-01

    Combining data from animal and clinical studies with classical cytogenetic observations, the volume provides information on various aspects of mammalian autosomal rearrangements. Topics range from the reproductive consequences to carriers of autosomal rearrangements to the application of structural rearrangements and DNA probes to gene mapping. In addition, the book presents an overview of new perspectives and future directions for research.

  18. Mammalian PGRPs also mind the fort.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Stephen; Lee, Jooeun; Girardin, Stephen E

    2010-08-19

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs or Pglyrps) regulate antibacterial responses in Drosophila, yet their functions in humans remain unclear. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Saha and colleagues report that mammalian PGRPs can prevent aberrant interferon-gamma--induced inflammatory damage in vivo by modulating the composition of the intestinal bacterial flora. PMID:20709290

  19. Architecture of mammalian respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is essential for oxidative phosphorylation in mammalian mitochondria. It couples electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with proton translocation across the energy-transducing inner membrane, providing electrons for respiration and driving ATP synthesis. Mammalian complex I contains 44 different nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits, with a combined mass of 1 MDa. The fourteen conserved ‘core’ subunits have been structurally defined in the minimal, bacterial complex, but the structures and arrangement of the 30 ‘supernumerary’ subunits are unknown. Here, we describe a 5 Å resolution structure of complex I from Bos taurus heart mitochondria, a close relative of the human enzyme, determined by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. We present the structures of the mammalian core subunits that contain eight iron-sulphur clusters and 60 transmembrane helices, identify 18 supernumerary transmembrane helices, and assign and model 14 supernumerary subunits. Thus, we significantly advance knowledge of the structure of mammalian complex I and the architecture of its supernumerary ensemble around the core domains. Our structure provides insights into the roles of the supernumerary subunits in regulation, assembly and homeostasis, and a basis for understanding the effects of mutations that cause a diverse range of human diseases. PMID:25209663

  20. Crossroads between Bacterial and Mammalian Glycosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Brockhausen, Inka

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial glycosyltransferases (GT) often synthesize the same glycan linkages as mammalian GT; yet, they usually have very little sequence identity. Nevertheless, enzymatic properties, folding, substrate specificities, and catalytic mechanisms of these enzyme proteins may have significant similarity. Thus, bacterial GT can be utilized for the enzymatic synthesis of both bacterial and mammalian types of complex glycan structures. A comparison is made here between mammalian and bacterial enzymes that synthesize epitopes found in mammalian glycoproteins, and those found in the O antigens of Gram-negative bacteria. These epitopes include Thomsen–Friedenreich (TF or T) antigen, blood group O, A, and B, type 1 and 2 chains, Lewis antigens, sialylated and fucosylated structures, and polysialic acids. Many different approaches can be taken to investigate the substrate binding and catalytic mechanisms of GT, including crystal structure analyses, mutations, comparison of amino acid sequences, NMR, and mass spectrometry. Knowledge of the protein structures and functions helps to design GT for specific glycan synthesis and to develop inhibitors. The goals are to develop new strategies to reduce bacterial virulence and to synthesize vaccines and other biologically active glycan structures. PMID:25368613

  1. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly ‘housekeeping’, whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research. PMID:24670764

  2. Isolation of genomic DNA from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Cheryl M

    2013-01-01

    The isolation of genomic DNA from mammalian cells is a routine molecular biology laboratory technique with numerous downstream applications. The isolated DNA can be used as a template for PCR, cloning, and genotyping and to generate genomic DNA libraries. It can also be used for sequencing to detect mutations and other alterations, and for DNA methylation analyses. PMID:24011044

  3. [Placental developmental defects in cloned mammalian animals].

    PubMed

    Ao, Zheng; Liu, Dewu; Cai, Gengyuan; Wu, Zhenfang; Li, Zicong

    2016-05-01

    The cloning technique, also called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), has been successfully established and gradually applied to various mammalian species. However, the developmental rate of SCNT mammalian embryos is very low, usually at 1% to 5%, which limits the application of SCNT. Placental developmental defects are considered as the main cause of SCNT embryo development inhibition. Almost all of SCNT-derived mammalian placentas exhibit various abnormalities, such as placental hyperplasia, vascular defects and umbilical cord malformation. Mechanistically, these abnormalities result from failure of establishment of correct epigenetic modification in the trophectoderm genome, which leads to erroneous expression of important genes for placenta development-related, particularly imprinted genes. Consequently, aberrant imprinted gene expression gives rise to placental morphologic abnormalities and functional defects, therefore decreases developmental competence of cloned embryos. Currently, although numerous methods that can improve the developmental ability of SCNT-derived embryos have been reported, most of them are unable to substantially enhance the success rate of SCNT due to failure to eliminate the placental development defects. In this review, we summarize placental abnormalities and imprinted gene expression in mammalian cloning, and propose directions for the future research aiming to improve the cloning efficiency. PMID:27232488

  4. MAMMALIAN CELL MUTAGENESIS, BANBURY CONFERENCE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A conference on mammalian cell mutagenesis was held at the Banbury Center, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, March 22-25, 1987. The objective of the conference was to provide a forum for discussions concerning the genetic, biochemical, and molecular basis of induced mutations in stand...

  5. Structure of mammalian respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiapeng; Vinothkumar, Kutti R; Hirst, Judy

    2016-08-18

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), one of the largest membrane-bound enzymes in the cell, powers ATP synthesis in mammalian mitochondria by using the reducing potential of NADH to drive protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mammalian complex I (ref. 1) contains 45 subunits, comprising 14 core subunits that house the catalytic machinery (and are conserved from bacteria to humans) and a mammalian-specific cohort of 31 supernumerary subunits. Knowledge of the structures and functions of the supernumerary subunits is fragmentary. Here we describe a 4.2-Å resolution single-particle electron cryomicroscopy structure of complex I from Bos taurus. We have located and modelled all 45 subunits, including the 31 supernumerary subunits, to provide the entire structure of the mammalian complex. Computational sorting of the particles identified different structural classes, related by subtle domain movements, which reveal conformationally dynamic regions and match biochemical descriptions of the 'active-to-de-active' enzyme transition that occurs during hypoxia. Our structures therefore provide a foundation for understanding complex I assembly and the effects of mutations that cause clinically relevant complex I dysfunctions, give insights into the structural and functional roles of the supernumerary subunits and reveal new information on the mechanism and regulation of catalysis. PMID:27509854

  6. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  7. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  8. Cold shock response in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fujita, J

    1999-11-01

    Compared to bacteria and plants, the cold shock response has attracted little attention in mammals except in some areas such as adaptive thermogenesis, cold tolerance, storage of cells and organs, and recently, treatment of brain damage and protein production. At the cellular level, some responses of mammalian cells are similar to microorganisms; cold stress changes the lipid composition of cellular membranes, and suppresses the rate of protein synthesis and cell proliferation. Although previous studies have mostly dealt with temperatures below 20 degrees C, mild hypothermia (32 degrees C) can change the cell's response to subsequent stresses as exemplified by APG-1, a member of the HSP110 family. Furthermore, 32 degrees C induces expression of CIRP (cold-inducible RNA-binding protein), the first cold shock protein identified in mammalian cells, without recovery at 37 degrees C. Remniscent of HSP, CIRP is also expressed at 37 degrees C and developmentary regulated, possibly working as an RNA chaperone. Mammalian cells are metabolically active at 32 degrees C, and cells may survive and respond to stresses with different strategies from those at 37 degrees C. Cellular and molecular biology of mammalian cells at 32 degrees C is a new area expected to have considerable implications for medical sciences and possibly biotechnology. PMID:10943555

  9. AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites such as ammonia and lactic formed during mammalian cell culture can frequently be toxic to the cells themselves beyond a threshold concentration of the metabolites. ell culture conducted in the presence of such accumulated metabolites is therefore limited in productiv...

  10. Medical and experimental mammalian genetics: A perspective

    SciTech Connect

    McKusick, V.A.; Roderick, T.H.; Mori, J.; Paul, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure and Organization of Mammalian Chromosomes: Normal and Abnormal; Globin Gene Structure and the Nature of Mutation; Retroviral DNA Content of the Mouse Genome; Maternal Genes: Mitochondrial Diseases; Human Evolution; and Prospects for Gene Replacement Therapy.

  11. Ticks Take Cues from Mammalian Interferon.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Aravinda M

    2016-07-13

    Interferons are considered a first line of immune defense restricted to vertebrates. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Smith et al. (2016) demonstrate that mammalian interferon γ activates an antimicrobial response within ticks feeding on blood. The study suggests that arthropods have a parallel interferon-like defense system. PMID:27414493

  12. Genomics in mammalian cell culture bioprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, Diane M.; Harcum, Sarah W.; Lee, Kelvin H.

    2013-01-01

    Explicitly identifying the genome of a host organism including sequencing, mapping, and annotating its genetic code has become a priority in the field of biotechnology with aims at improving the efficiency and understanding of cell culture bioprocessing. Recombinant protein therapeutics, primarily produced in mammalian cells, constitute a $108 billion global market. The most common mammalian cell line used in biologic production processes is the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and although great improvements have been made in titer production over the past 25 years, the underlying molecular and physiological factors are not well understood. Confident understanding of CHO bioprocessing elements (e.g. cell line selection, protein production, and reproducibility of process performance and product specifications) would significantly improve with a well understood genome. This review describes mammalian cell culture use in bioprocessing, the importance of obtaining CHO cell line genetic sequences, and the current status of sequencing efforts. Furthermore, transcriptomic techniques and gene expression tools are presented, and case studies exploring genomic techniques and applications aimed to improve mammalian bioprocess performance are reviewed. Finally, future implications of genomic advances are surmised. PMID:22079893

  13. Cultured normal mammalian tissue and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cell aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  14. Aberrant dendritic excitability: a common pathophysiology in CNS disorders affecting memory?

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Michael W.; Hoffman, Dax A.

    2012-01-01

    Discovering the etiology of pathophysiologies and aberrant behavior in many central nervous system (CNS) disorders has proven elusive because susceptibility to these diseases can be a product of multiple factors such as genetics, epigenetics, and environment. Advances in molecular biology and wide-scale genomics have shown that a large heterogeneity of genetic mutations are potentially responsible for the neuronal pathologies and dysfunctional behaviors seen in CNS disorders. (Need to distinguish between pure genetic forms which are rare, and what most people get which is probable combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental insults). Despite this seemingly complex array of genetic and physiological factors, many disorders of the CNS converge on common dysfunctions in memory. In this review, we propose that mechanisms underlying the development of many CNS diseases may share an underlying cause involving abnormal dendritic integration of synaptic signals. Through understanding the relationship between molecular genetics and dendritic computation, future research may uncover important links between neuronal physiology at the cellular level and higher-order circuit and network abnormalities observed in CNS diseases, and their subsequent affect on memory. PMID:22528602

  15. Influenza Vaccine-Induced CNS Demyelination in a 50-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    Sacheli, Aaron; Bauer, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 50 Final Diagnosis: Acute post-vaccination CNS demyelinating disorder Symptoms: Blurred vision • hemiparesis • hemiplegia • hypertonia • itching • paresthesia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: MRI Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: There are several categories of primary inflammatory demyelinating disorders, which comprise clinically similar neurologic sequelae. Of interest, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) are 2 demyelinating conditions of the central nervous system (CNS), whose clinical similarity pose a significant challenge to definitive diagnosis. Yet, both remain important clinical considerations in patients with neurologic signs and symptoms in the context of recent vaccination. Case Report: We report a case of a 50-year-old Caucasian male with a course of progressive, focal, neurologic deficits within 24 h after receiving the influenza vaccine. Subsequent work-up revealed the possibility of an acute central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating episode secondary to the influenza vaccine, best described as either CIS or ADEM. Conclusions: Case reports of CNS demyelination following vaccinations have been previously noted, most often occurring in the context of recent influenza vaccination. This report serves to document a case of CNS demyelination occurring 24 h after influenza vaccination in a middle-aged patient, and will describe some salient features regarding the differential diagnosis of CIS and ADEM, as well as their potential management. PMID:25175754

  16. Immune privilege of the CNS is not the consequence of limited antigen sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Melissa G.; Hulseberg, Paul; Ling, Changying; Karman, Jozsef; Clarkson, Benjamin D.; Harding, Jeffrey S.; Zhang, Mengxue; Sandor, Adam; Christensen, Kelsey; Nagy, Andras; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2014-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) immune privilege is complex, and it is still not understood how CNS antigens are sampled by the peripheral immune system under steady state conditions. To compare antigen sampling from immune-privileged or nonprivileged tissues, we created transgenic mice with oligodendrocyte or gut epithelial cell expression of an EGFP-tagged fusion protein containing ovalbumin (OVA) antigenic peptides and tested peripheral anti-OVA peptide-specific sentinel OT-I and OT-II T cell activation. We report that oligodendrocyte or gut antigens are sampled similarly, as determined by comparable levels of OT-I T cell activation. However, activated T cells do not access the CNS under steady state conditions. These data show that afferent immunity is normally intact as there is no barrier at the antigen sampling level, but that efferent immunity is restricted. To understand how this one-sided surveillance contributes to CNS immune privilege will help us define mechanisms of CNS autoimmune disease initiation.

  17. The microglial ATP-gated ion channel P2X7 as a CNS drug target.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Biber, Knut

    2016-10-01

    Based on promising preclinical evidence, microglial P2X7 has increasingly being recognized as a target for therapeutic intervention in neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, despite this knowledge no P2X7-related drug has yet entered clinical trials with respect to CNS diseases. We here discuss the current literature on P2X7 being a drug target and identify unsolved issues and still open questions that have hampered the development of P2X7 dependent therapeutic approaches for CNS diseases. It is concluded here that the lack of brain penetrating P2X7 antagonists is a major obstacle in the field and that central P2X7 is a yet untested clinical drug target. In the CNS, microglial P2X7 activation causes neuroinflammation, which in turn plays a role in various CNS disorders. This has resulted in a surge of brain penetrant P2X7 antagonists. P2X7 is a viable, clinically untested CNS drug target. GLIA 2016;64:1772-1787. PMID:27219534

  18. Matrine protects neuro-axon from CNS inflammation-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Kan, Quan-Cheng; Lv, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Xu, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Zhu, Lin

    2015-02-01

    Neuro-axonal injury in the central nervous system (CNS) is one of the major pathological hallmarks of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Matrine (MAT), a quinolizidine alkaloid derived from the herb Radix Sophorae Flave, has recently been shown to effectively suppress EAE through an anti-inflammatory mechanism. However, whether MAT can also protect myelin/axons from damage is not known. In the present study we show that, while untreated rats developed severe clinical disease, CNS inflammatory demyelination, and axonal damage, these clinical and pathological signs were significantly reduced by MAT treatment. Consistently, MAT treatment reduced the concentration of myelin basic protein in serum and downregulated expression of β-amyloid (Aβ) and B-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE-1) in the CNS. Further, the CNS of MAT-treated rats exhibited increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), an important factor for neuronal survival and axonal growth. Together, these results demonstrate that MAT effectively prevented neuro-axonal injury, which can likely be attributed to inhibiting risk factors such as BACE-1 and upregulating neuroprotective factors such as BDNF. We conclude that this novel natural reagent, MAT, which effectively protects neuro-axons from CNS inflammation-induced damage, could be a potential candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as MS. PMID:25576296

  19. Immune privilege of the CNS is not the consequence of limited antigen sampling

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Melissa G.; Hulseberg, Paul; Ling, Changying; Karman, Jozsef; Clarkson, Benjamin D.; Harding, Jeffrey S.; Zhang, Mengxue; Sandor, Adam; Christensen, Kelsey; Nagy, Andras; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) immune privilege is complex, and it is still not understood how CNS antigens are sampled by the peripheral immune system under steady state conditions. To compare antigen sampling from immune-privileged or nonprivileged tissues, we created transgenic mice with oligodendrocyte or gut epithelial cell expression of an EGFP-tagged fusion protein containing ovalbumin (OVA) antigenic peptides and tested peripheral anti-OVA peptide-specific sentinel OT-I and OT-II T cell activation. We report that oligodendrocyte or gut antigens are sampled similarly, as determined by comparable levels of OT-I T cell activation. However, activated T cells do not access the CNS under steady state conditions. These data show that afferent immunity is normally intact as there is no barrier at the antigen sampling level, but that efferent immunity is restricted. To understand how this one-sided surveillance contributes to CNS immune privilege will help us define mechanisms of CNS autoimmune disease initiation. PMID:24651727

  20. Immune privilege of the CNS is not the consequence of limited antigen sampling.

    PubMed

    Harris, Melissa G; Hulseberg, Paul; Ling, Changying; Karman, Jozsef; Clarkson, Benjamin D; Harding, Jeffrey S; Zhang, Mengxue; Sandor, Adam; Christensen, Kelsey; Nagy, Andras; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) immune privilege is complex, and it is still not understood how CNS antigens are sampled by the peripheral immune system under steady state conditions. To compare antigen sampling from immune-privileged or nonprivileged tissues, we created transgenic mice with oligodendrocyte or gut epithelial cell expression of an EGFP-tagged fusion protein containing ovalbumin (OVA) antigenic peptides and tested peripheral anti-OVA peptide-specific sentinel OT-I and OT-II T cell activation. We report that oligodendrocyte or gut antigens are sampled similarly, as determined by comparable levels of OT-I T cell activation. However, activated T cells do not access the CNS under steady state conditions. These data show that afferent immunity is normally intact as there is no barrier at the antigen sampling level, but that efferent immunity is restricted. To understand how this one-sided surveillance contributes to CNS immune privilege will help us define mechanisms of CNS autoimmune disease initiation. PMID:24651727

  1. Arginase-1 is expressed exclusively by infiltrating myeloid cells in CNS injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Andrew D; Passos Dos Santos, Rosmarini; Zarruk, Juan Guillermo; Salmon, Christopher K; Kroner, Antje; David, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Resident microglia and infiltrating myeloid cells play important roles in the onset, propagation, and resolution of inflammation in central nervous system (CNS) injury and disease. Identifying cell type-specific mechanisms will help to appropriately target interventions for tissue repair. Arginase-1 (Arg-1) is a well characterised modulator of tissue repair and its expression correlates with recovery after CNS injury. Here we assessed the cellular localisation of Arg-1 in two models of CNS damage. Using microglia specific antibodies, P2ry12 and Fc receptor-like S (FCRLS), we show the LysM-EGFP reporter mouse is an excellent model to distinguish infiltrating myeloid cells from resident microglia. We show that Arg-1 is expressed exclusively in infiltrating myeloid cells but not microglia in models of spinal cord injury (SCI) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our in vitro studies suggest that factors in the CNS environment prevent expression of Arg-1 in microglia in vivo. This work suggests different functional roles for these cells in CNS injury and repair and shows that such repair pathways can be switched on in infiltrating myeloid cells in pro-inflammatory environments. PMID:27126514

  2. Expanded CD8 T-cell sharing between periphery and CNS in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Marion; Garcia, Alexandra; Michel, Laure; Gainche-Salmon, Anne; Loussouarn, Delphine; Nicol, Bryan; Guillot, Flora; Hulin, Philippe; Nedellec, Steven; Baron, Daniel; Ramstein, Gérard; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie; Nicot, Arnaud B; Degauque, Nicolas; Laplaud, David A

    2015-01-01

    Objective In multiple sclerosis (MS), central nervous system (CNS), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and blood display TCR clonal expansions of CD8+ T cells. These clones have been assumed – but never demonstrated – to be similar in the three compartments. Addressing this key question is essential to infer the implication of peripheral clonally expanded CD8+ T cells in the disease. Methods For the first time, TCR Vβ repertoire from paired blood (purified CD8+ and CD4+ T cells), CSF and CNS (22 lesions, various inflammatory and demyelination statuses) samples from three MS patients was studied using complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) spectratyping and high-throughput sequencing. In parallel, blood and CNS clonally expanded CD8+ T cells were characterized by fluorescent staining. Results TCR Vβ repertoire analysis revealed strong sharing of predominant T-cell clones between CNS lesions, CSF, and blood CD8+ T cells. In parallel, we showed that blood oligoclonal CD8+ T cells exhibit characteristics of pathogenic cells, as they displayed a bias toward a memory phenotype in MS patients, with increased expression of CCR5, CD11a and Granzyme B (GZM-B) compared to non oligoclonal counterparts. CNS-infiltrating T cells were mainly CD8 expressing CD11a and GZM-B. Interpretation This study highlights the predominant implication of CD8+ T cells in MS pathophysiology and demonstrates that potentially aggressive CD8+ T cells can be easily identified and characterized from blood and CSF samples. PMID:26125037

  3. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) as an aetiological factor of mastitis in cows.

    PubMed

    Bochniarz, M; Wawron, W; Szczubiał, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the proportions of individual coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species in clinical and subclinical mastitis. The material consisted of 100 CNS isolates obtained from 223 milk samples collected from cows with clinical and subclinical mastitis. Coagulase-negative staphylococci constituted 44.8% of all isolated microorganisms. CNS were isolated from the mammary gland secretions of 86 cows from farms in the Lublin region (Poland). Clinical mastitis was found in 20 whereas subclinical mastitis in 66 study cows (23.3% and 76.7%, respectively). The symptoms of clinical mastitis were mild. The clinical forms of mastitis concerned mainly the first or second lactation. Subclinical mastitis was most commonly observed during the second lactation. Four CNS species (S. xylosus, S. chromogenes, S. haemolyticus and S. sciuri) were isolated from clinical and subclinical mastitis. S. xylosus was the commonest CNS species isolated from cows with clinical mastitis whereas S. chromogenes was the most prevalent one in subclinical mastitis cases. The three CNS species (S. warneri, S. hominis and S. saprophyticus) caused only subclinical mastitis. PMID:24195283

  4. Central Nervous System Involvement in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Diagnostic Tools, Prophylaxis, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; De Santis, Giovanna; Di Veroli, Ambra; Ditto, Concetta; Nasso, Daniela; Postorino, Massimiliano; Refrigeri, Marco; Attrotto, Cristina; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    In adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement is associated with a very poor prognosis. The diagnostic assessment of this condition relies on the use of neuroradiology, conventional cytology (CC) and flow cytometry (FCM). Among these approaches, which is the gold standard it is still a matter of debate. Neuroradiology and CC have a limited sensitivity with a higher rate of false negative results. FCM demonstrated a superior sensitivity over CC, particularly when low levels of CNS infiltrating cells are present. Although prospective studies of a large series of patients are still awaited, a positive finding by FCM appears to anticipate an adverse outcome even if CC shows no infiltration. Current strategies for adult ALL CNS-directed prophylaxis or therapy involve systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and radiation therapy. An early and frequent intrathecal injection of cytostatic combined with systemic chemotherapy is the most effective strategy to reduce the frequency of CNS involvement. In patients with CNS overt ALL, at diagnosis or upon relapse, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation might be considered. This review discusses risk factors, diagnostic techniques for identification of CNS infiltration and modalities of prophylaxis and therapy to manage it. PMID:25408861

  5. Impact of dual expression of MYC and BCL2 by immunohistochemistry on the risk of CNS relapse in DLBCL.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kerry J; Slack, Graham W; Mottok, Anja; Sehn, Laurie H; Villa, Diego; Kansara, Roopesh; Kridel, Robert; Steidl, Christian; Ennishi, Daisuke; Tan, King L; Ben-Neriah, Susana; Johnson, Nathalie A; Connors, Joseph M; Farinha, Pedro; Scott, David W; Gascoyne, Randy D

    2016-05-01

    Dual expression of MYC and BCL2 by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is associated with poor outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Dual translocation of MYC and BCL2, so-called "double-hit lymphoma," has been associated with a high risk of central nervous system (CNS) relapse; however, the impact of dual expression of MYC and BCL2 (dual expressers) on the risk of CNS relapse remains unknown. Pretreatment formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded DLBCL biopsies derived from patients subsequently treated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) were assembled on tissue microarrays from 2 studies and were evaluated for expression of MYC and BCL2 by IHC. In addition, cell of origin was determined by IHC and the Lymph2Cx gene expression assay in a subset of patients. We identified 428 patients who met the inclusion criteria. By the recently described CNS risk score (CNS-International Prognostic Index [CNS-IPI]), 34% were low risk (0 to 1), 45% were intermediate risk (2 to 3), and 21% were high risk (4 or greater). With a median follow-up of 6.8 years, the risk of CNS relapse was higher in dual expressers compared with non-dual expressers (2-year risk, 9.7% vs 2.2%; P = .001). Patients with activated B-cell or non-germinal center B-cell type DLBCL also had an increased risk of CNS relapse. However, in multivariate analysis, only dual expresser status and CNS-IPI were associated with CNS relapse. Dual expresser MYC(+) BCL2(+) DLBCL defines a group at high risk of CNS relapse, independent of CNS-IPI score and cell of origin. Dual expresser status may help to identify a high-risk group who should undergo CNS-directed evaluation and consideration of prophylactic strategies. PMID:26834242

  6. Alectinib induced CNS radiation necrosis in an ALK+NSCLC patient with a remote (7 years) history of brain radiation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Weitz, Michael; Jalas, John R; Kelly, Daniel F; Wong, Vanessa; Azada, Michele C; Quines, Oliver; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-06-01

    Alectinib is a second generation ALK inhibitor that has significant clinical activity in central nervous system (CNS) metastases in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Pseudoprogression (PsP) due to radiation necrosis during alecitnib treatment of central nervous system (CNS) metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC as been reported. Hence, distinguishing radiation-related PsP from alectinib-induced radiographic changes is important to avoid erroneous early trial discontinuation and abandonment of an effective treatment. However, it remains difficult to assess casuality of radiation necrosis is related to recent direct radiation or induced by alectinib treatment or both. It is also unknown how long from previous radiation can alectinib still induce radiation necrosis. Here we reported a crizotinib-refractory ALK-positive NSCLC patient who develop radiation necrosis in one of his metastatic CNS lesions after approximately 12 months of alectinib treatment who otherwise had on-going CNS response on alectinib. His most recent radiation to his CNS metastases was 7 years prior to the start of alectinib. This case illustrates that in the setting of pror CNS radiation, given the significant clinical activity of alectinib in CNS metastases in ALK-positive NSCLC patients the risk of CNS radiation necrosis remains long after previous radiation to the CNS metastases has been completed and can occur after durable response of treatment. PMID:27133743

  7. Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI): Emerging Roles in CNS Trauma and Repair.

    PubMed

    Hannila, Sari S

    2015-12-01

    At first glance, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) would appear to have little relevance to the central nervous system (CNS). This serine protease inhibitor is most commonly found in mucosal fluids such as saliva and is best known for its anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. It has been shown to promote wound healing by reducing expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and it can also inhibit bacterial growth and block HIV infection of macrophages. In the past 10 years, however, several studies have reported that SLPI is strongly up-regulated in response to CNS injury and that exogenous administration of SLPI is neuroprotective. It has also been shown that SLPI can overcome inhibition by CNS myelin and promote axonal regeneration. In this review, we will discuss these studies, examine the molecular mechanisms underlying SLPI's effects, and consider SLPI's potential for therapeutic use in cerebral ischemia, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis. PMID:25118190

  8. Preclinical assessment of CNS drug action using eye movements in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Hugh; Rattner, Amir; Nathans, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The drug development process for CNS indications is hampered by a paucity of preclinical tests that accurately predict drug efficacy in humans. Here, we show that a wide variety of CNS-active drugs induce characteristic alterations in visual stimulus–induced and/or spontaneous eye movements in mice. Active compounds included sedatives and antipsychotic, antidepressant, and antiseizure drugs as well as drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, morphine, and phencyclidine. The use of quantitative eye-movement analysis was demonstrated by comparing it with the commonly used rotarod test of motor coordination and by using eye movements to monitor pharmacokinetics, blood-brain barrier penetration, drug-receptor interactions, heavy metal toxicity, pharmacologic treatment in a model of schizophrenia, and degenerative CNS disease. We conclude that eye-movement analysis could complement existing animal tests to improve preclinical drug development. PMID:21821912

  9. Neonatal CNS infection and inflammation caused by Ureaplasma species: rare or relevant?

    PubMed

    Glaser, Kirsten; Speer, Christian P

    2015-02-01

    Colonization with Ureaplasma species has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, and perinatal transmission has been implicated in the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm neonates. Little is known about Ureaplasma-mediated infection and inflammation of the CNS in neonates. Controversy remains concerning its incidence and implication in the pathogenesis of neonatal brain injury. In vivo and in vitro data are limited. Despite improving care options for extremely immature preterm infants, relevant complications remain. Systematic knowledge of ureaplasmal infection may be of great benefit. This review aims to summarize pathogenic mechanisms, clinical data and diagnostic pitfalls. Studies in preterm and term neonates are critically discussed with regard to their limitations. Clinical questions concerning therapy or prophylaxis are posed. We conclude that ureaplasmas may be true pathogens, especially in preterm neonates, and may cause CNS inflammation in a complex interplay of host susceptibility, serovar pathogenicity and gestational age-dependent CNS vulnerability. PMID:25578885

  10. TDP-43 in CNS development and function: clues to TDP-43-associated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sephton, Chantelle F.; Cenik, Basar; Cenik, Bercin Kutluk; Herz, Joachim; Yu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    From the earliest stages of embryogenesis and throughout life, transcriptional regulation is carefully orchestrated in order to generate, shape, and reshape the central nervous system (CNS). TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), is identified as a regulator of essential transcriptional events in the CNS. Evidence for its importance comes from the identification of TDP-43 protein aggregates and genetic mutations in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Efforts are being made to learn more about the biological function of TDP-43 and gain a better understanding of its role in neurodegeneration. TDP-43 RNA targets and protein interactions have now been identified and in vivo evidence shows that TDP-43 is essential in CNS development and function. This review will highlight aspects of these findings. PMID:22944662

  11. Awards, lectures, and fellowships sponsored by the AANS/CNS Section on Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lau, Darryl; Barker, Fred G; Aghi, Manish K

    2014-09-01

    A major goal of the Section on Tumors of the American Association of Neurological Surgery (AANS) and Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) since it was founded in 1984 has been to foster both education and research in the field of brain tumor treatment and development. In support of this goal, the Section sponsors a number of awards, named lectures, and fellowships at the annual meetings of the AANS and CNS. In this article, we describe the awards given by the AANS/CNS Section on Tumors since its foundation, the recipients of the awards, and their philanthropic donors. The subsequent history of awardees and their work is briefly examined. Specifically for the Preuss and Mahaley Awards, this article also examines the rates of publication among the award-winning abstracts and achievement of grant funding by awardees. PMID:24893731

  12. Health-related quality of life of significant others of patients with malignant CNS versus non-CNS tumors: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Boele, Florien W; Heimans, Jan J; Aaronson, Neil K; Taphoorn, Martin J B; Postma, Tjeerd J; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Klein, Martin

    2013-10-01

    It is often assumed that brain tumor patients' significant others (SOs: partners, other family members or close friends) may face greater stress than those of patients with malignancies not involving the central nervous system (CNS), due to progressive changes in neurological and cognitive functioning. We compared health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of SOs of patients with high-grade glioma (HGG) and low-grade glioma (LGG) with that of SOs of patients with non-CNS tumors with similar prognosis and at a similar phase in the disease trajectory (i.e. non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and low-grade hematological malignancies (NHL/CLL), respectively). HRQOL of SOs and patients was assessed using the Short Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey. Patients' neurological functioning was indexed and they underwent comprehensive neurocognitive testing. SOs of 213 LGG patients, 99 NHL/CLL patients, 55 HGG patients and 29 NSCLC patients participated. The SOs of LGG and NHL/CLL patients reported similar levels of HRQOL. SOs of HGG patients reported significantly lower mental health scores (MCS; p = 0.041) and social functioning (p = 0.028) than those of NSCLC patients. Mental health scores (MCS) of HGG and NSCLC patients were associated significantly with the mental health of their SOs (p = 0.013 and p < 0.001, respectively). Surprisingly, HGG patients' cognitive and neurological functioning were not predictive of SOs' mental health at the multivariate level. SOs of patients with highly malignant CNS tumors in the acute phase are at increased risk of compromised HRQOL compared to those of patients with systemic tumors without CNS involvement and a comparable life expectancy. PMID:23824535

  13. Can Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Improve Success Rates in CNS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Hargreaves, Richard; Becerra, Lino

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The bar for developing new treatments for CNS disease is getting progressively higher and fewer novel mechanisms are being discovered, validated and developed. The high costs of drug discovery necessitate early decisions to ensure the best molecules and hypotheses are tested in expensive late stage clinical trials. The discovery of brain imaging biomarkers that can bridge preclinical to clinical CNS drug discovery and provide a ‘language of translation’ affords the opportunity to improve the objectivity of decision-making. Areas Covered This review discusses the benefits, challenges and potential issues of using a science based biomarker strategy to change the paradigm of CNS drug development and increase success rates in the discovery of new medicines. The authors have summarized PubMed and Google Scholar based publication searches to identify recent advances in functional, structural and chemical brain imaging and have discussed how these techniques may be useful in defining CNS disease state and drug effects during drug development. Expert opinion The use of novel brain imaging biomarkers holds the bold promise of making neuroscience drug discovery smarter by increasing the objectivity of decision making thereby improving the probability of success of identifying useful drugs to treat CNS diseases. Functional imaging holds the promise to: (1) define pharmacodynamic markers as an index of target engagement (2) improve translational medicine paradigms to predict efficacy; (3) evaluate CNS efficacy and safety based on brain activation; (4) determine brain activity drug dose-response relationships and (5) provide an objective evaluation of symptom response and disease modification. PMID:21765857

  14. Drainage of cells and soluble antigen from the CNS to regional lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Laman, Jon D; Weller, Roy O

    2013-09-01

    Despite the absence of conventional lymphatics, there is efficient drainage of both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) from the CNS to regional lymph nodes. CSF drains from the subarachnoid space by channels that pass through the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone to the nasal mucosa and cervical lymph nodes in animals and in humans; antigen presenting cells (APC) migrate along this pathway to lymph nodes. ISF and solutes drain from the brain parenchyma to cervical lymph nodes by a separate route along 100-150 nm wide basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries. This pathway is too narrow for the migration of APC so it is unlikely that APC traffic directly from brain parenchyma to lymph nodes by this route. We present a model for the pivotal involvement of regional lymph nodes in immunological reactions of the CNS. The role of regional lymph nodes in immune reactions of the CNS in virus infections, the remote influence of the gut microbiota, multiple sclerosis and stroke are discussed. Evidence is presented for the role of cervical lymph nodes in the induction of tolerance and its influence on neuroimmunological reactions. We look to the future by examining how nanoparticle technology will enhance our understanding of CNS-lymph node connections and by reviewing the implications of lymphatic drainage of the brain for diagnosis and therapy of diseases of the CNS ranging from neuroimmunological disorders to dementias. Finally, we review the challenges and opportunities for progress in CNS-lymph node interactions and their involvement in disease processes. PMID:23695293

  15. Biocompatability of carbon nanotubes with stem cells to treat CNS injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Young Il; Yun, Kyungeun; Webster, Tom J

    2013-01-01

    Cases reporting traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord are extended range of disorders that affect a large percentage of the world's population. But, there are only few effective treatments available for central nervous system (CNS) injuries because the CNS is refractory to axonal regeneration and relatively inaccessible to many pharmacological treatments. The use of stem cell therapy in regenerative medicine has been extensively examined to replace lost cells during CNS injuries. But, given the complexity of CNS injuries oxidative stress, toxic byproducts, which prevails in the microenvironment during the diseased condition, may limit the survival of the transplanted stem cells affecting tissue regeneration and even longevity. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are a new class of nanomaterials, which have been shown to be promising in different areas of nanomedicine for the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of certain diseases, including CNS diseases. In particular, the use of CNTs as substrates/scaffolds for supporting the stem cell differentiation has been an area of active research. Single-walled and multi-walled CNT's have been increasingly used as scaffolds for neuronal growth and more recently for neural stem cell growth and differentiation. This review summarizes recent research on the application of CNT-based materials to direct the differentiation of progenitor and stem cells toward specific neurons and to enhance axon regeneration and synaptogenesis for the effective treatment of CNS injuries. Nonetheless, accumulating data support the use of CNTs as a biocompatible and permissive substrate/scaffold for neural cells and such application holds great potential in neurological research. PMID:23869255

  16. Development of Novel In Vivo Chemical Probes to Address CNS Protein Kinase Involvement in Synaptic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, D. Martin; Grum-Tokars, Valerie L.; Roy, Saktimayee M.; Schavocky, James P.; Bradaric, Brinda Desai; Bachstetter, Adam D.; Xing, Bin; Dimayuga, Edgardo; Saeed, Faisal; Zhang, Hong; Staniszewski, Agnieszka; Pelletier, Jeffrey C.; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F.; Arancio, Ottavio; Van Eldik, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Serine-threonine protein kinases are critical to CNS function, yet there is a dearth of highly selective, CNS-active kinase inhibitors for in vivo investigations. Further, prevailing assumptions raise concerns about whether single kinase inhibitors can show in vivo efficacy for CNS pathologies, and debates over viable approaches to the development of safe and efficacious kinase inhibitors are unsettled. It is critical, therefore, that these scientific challenges be addressed in order to test hypotheses about protein kinases in neuropathology progression and the potential for in vivo modulation of their catalytic activity. Identification of molecular targets whose in vivo modulation can attenuate synaptic dysfunction would provide a foundation for future disease-modifying therapeutic development as well as insight into cellular mechanisms. Clinical and preclinical studies suggest a critical link between synaptic dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders and the activation of p38αMAPK mediated signaling cascades. Activation in both neurons and glia also offers the unusual potential to generate enhanced responses through targeting a single kinase in two distinct cell types involved in pathology progression. However, target validation has been limited by lack of highly selective inhibitors amenable to in vivo use in the CNS. Therefore, we employed high-resolution co-crystallography and pharmacoinformatics to design and develop a novel synthetic, active site targeted, CNS-active, p38αMAPK inhibitor (MW108). Selectivity was demonstrated by large-scale kinome screens, functional GPCR agonist and antagonist analyses of off-target potential, and evaluation of cellular target engagement. In vitro and in vivo assays demonstrated that MW108 ameliorates beta-amyloid induced synaptic and cognitive dysfunction. A serendipitous discovery during co-crystallographic analyses revised prevailing models about active site targeting of inhibitors, providing insights that will

  17. Biocompatability of carbon nanotubes with stem cells to treat CNS injuries.

    PubMed

    Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Young Il; Yun, Kyungeun; Webster, Tom J; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-06-01

    Cases reporting traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord are extended range of disorders that affect a large percentage of the world's population. But, there are only few effective treatments available for central nervous system (CNS) injuries because the CNS is refractory to axonal regeneration and relatively inaccessible to many pharmacological treatments. The use of stem cell therapy in regenerative medicine has been extensively examined to replace lost cells during CNS injuries. But, given the complexity of CNS injuries oxidative stress, toxic byproducts, which prevails in the microenvironment during the diseased condition, may limit the survival of the transplanted stem cells affecting tissue regeneration and even longevity. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are a new class of nanomaterials, which have been shown to be promising in different areas of nanomedicine for the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of certain diseases, including CNS diseases. In particular, the use of CNTs as substrates/scaffolds for supporting the stem cell differentiation has been an area of active research. Single-walled and multi-walled CNT's have been increasingly used as scaffolds for neuronal growth and more recently for neural stem cell growth and differentiation. This review summarizes recent research on the application of CNT-based materials to direct the differentiation of progenitor and stem cells toward specific neurons and to enhance axon regeneration and synaptogenesis for the effective treatment of CNS injuries. Nonetheless, accumulating data support the use of CNTs as a biocompatible and permissive substrate/scaffold for neural cells and such application holds great potential in neurological research. PMID:23869255

  18. NON-MAMMALIAN ESTROGENICITY SCREEN: RAINBOW TROUT ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA has been mandated to screen industrial chemicals and pesticides for potential endocrine activity. Current assays for measuring endocrine activity are primarily mammalian-based. The appropriateness of extrapolating mammalian results to non-mammalian species is uncert...

  19. How to Build Transcriptional Network Models of Mammalian Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kioussi, Chrissa; Gross, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetic regulatory networks of sequence specific transcription factors underlie pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Deciphering and representing the mammalian networks is a central problem in development, neurobiology, and regenerative medicine. Transcriptional networks specify intermingled embryonic cell populations during pattern formation in the vertebrate neural tube. Each embryonic population gives rise to a distinct type of adult neuron. The homeodomain transcription factor Lbx1 is expressed in five such populations and loss of Lbx1 leads to distinct respecifications in each of the five populations. Methodology/Principal Findings We have purified normal and respecified pools of these five populations from embryos bearing one or two copies of the null Lbx1GFP allele, respectively. Microarrays were used to show that expression levels of 8% of all transcription factor genes were altered in the respecified pool. These transcription factor genes constitute 20–30% of the active nodes of the transcriptional network that governs neural tube patterning. Half of the 141 regulated nodes were located in the top 150 clusters of ultraconserved non-coding regions. Generally, Lbx1 repressed genes that have expression patterns outside of the Lbx1-expressing domain and activated genes that have expression patterns inside the Lbx1-expressing domain. Conclusions/Significance Constraining epistasis analysis of Lbx1 to only those cells that normally express Lbx1 allowed unprecedented sensitivity in identifying Lbx1 network interactions and allowed the interactions to be assigned to a specific set of cell populations. We call this method ANCEA, or active node constrained epistasis analysis, and think that it will be generally useful in discovering and assigning network interactions to specific populations. We discuss how ANCEA, coupled with population partitioning analysis, can greatly facilitate the systematic dissection of transcriptional networks that

  20. Problems of allometric scaling analysis: examples from mammalian reproductive biology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert D; Genoud, Michel; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K

    2005-05-01

    Biological scaling analyses employing the widely used bivariate allometric model are beset by at least four interacting problems: (1) choice of an appropriate best-fit line with due attention to the influence of outliers; (2) objective recognition of divergent subsets in the data (allometric grades); (3) potential restrictions on statistical independence resulting from phylogenetic inertia; and (4) the need for extreme caution in inferring causation from correlation. A new non-parametric line-fitting technique has been developed that eliminates requirements for normality of distribution, greatly reduces the influence of outliers and permits objective recognition of grade shifts in substantial datasets. This technique is applied in scaling analyses of mammalian gestation periods and of neonatal body mass in primates. These analyses feed into a re-examination, conducted with partial correlation analysis, of the maternal energy hypothesis relating to mammalian brain evolution, which suggests links between body size and brain size in neonates and adults, gestation period and basal metabolic rate. Much has been made of the potential problem of phylogenetic inertia as a confounding factor in scaling analyses. However, this problem may be less severe than suspected earlier because nested analyses of variance conducted on residual variation (rather than on raw values) reveals that there is considerable variance at low taxonomic levels. In fact, limited divergence in body size between closely related species is one of the prime examples of phylogenetic inertia. One common approach to eliminating perceived problems of phylogenetic inertia in allometric analyses has been calculation of 'independent contrast values'. It is demonstrated that the reasoning behind this approach is flawed in several ways. Calculation of contrast values for closely related species of similar body size is, in fact, highly questionable, particularly when there are major deviations from the best

  1. Developing highER-throughput zebrafish screens for in-vivo CNS drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of brain disorders and the lack of their efficient treatments necessitate improved in-vivo pre-clinical models and tests. The zebrafish (Danio rerio), a vertebrate species with high genetic and physiological homology to humans, is an excellent organism for innovative central nervous system (CNS) drug discovery and small molecule screening. Here, we outline new strategies for developing higher-throughput zebrafish screens to test neuroactive drugs and predict their pharmacological mechanisms. With the growing application of automated 3D phenotyping, machine learning algorithms, movement pattern- and behavior recognition, and multi-animal video-tracking, zebrafish screens are expected to markedly improve CNS drug discovery. PMID:25729356

  2. Orientia, rickettsia, and leptospira pathogens as causes of CNS infections in Laos: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Sabine; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Lee, Sue J; Panyanivong, Phonepasith; Craig, Scott B; Tulsiani, Suhella M; Blacksell, Stuart D; Dance, David A B; Dubot-Pérès, Audrey; Sengduangphachanh, Amphone; Phoumin, Phonelavanh; Paris, Daniel H; Newton, Paul N

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Scrub typhus (caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi), murine typhus (caused by Rickettsia typhi), and leptospirosis are common causes of febrile illness in Asia; meningitis and meningoencephalitis are severe complications. However, scarce data exist for the burden of these pathogens in patients with CNS disease in endemic countries. Laos is representative of vast economically poor rural areas in Asia with little medical information to guide public health policy. We assessed whether these pathogens are important causes of CNS infections in Laos. Methods Between Jan 10, 2003, and Nov 25, 2011, we enrolled 1112 consecutive patients of all ages admitted with CNS symptoms or signs requiring a lumbar puncture at Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Laos. Microbiological examinations (culture, PCR, and serology) targeted so-called conventional bacterial infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, S suis) and O tsutsugamushi, Rickettsia typhi/Rickettsia spp, and Leptospira spp infections in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We analysed and compared causes and clinical and CSF characteristics between patient groups. Findings 1051 (95%) of 1112 patients who presented had CSF available for analysis, of whom 254 (24%) had a CNS infection attributable to a bacterial or fungal pathogen. 90 (35%) of these 254 infections were caused by O tsutsugamushi, R typhi/Rickettsia spp, or Leptospira spp. These pathogens were significantly more frequent than conventional bacterial infections (90/1051 [9%] vs 42/1051 [4%]; p<0·0001) by use of conservative diagnostic definitions. CNS infections had a high mortality (236/876 [27%]), with 18% (13/71) for R typhi/Rickettsia spp, O tsutsugamushi, and Leptospira spp combined, and 33% (13/39) for conventional bacterial infections (p=0·076). Interpretation Our data suggest that R typhi/Rickettsia spp, O tsutsugamushi, and Leptospira spp infections are important causes of CNS infections in Laos

  3. Pharmacologic options for CNS infections caused by resistant Gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Peppard, William J; Johnston, Carolyn J; Urmanski, Angela M

    2008-02-01

    Infectious disease continues to evolve, presenting new and challenging clinical situations for practitioners. Specific to device-related and neurosurgical-related CNS infections, Gram-positive organisms are of growing concern. Current Infection Disease Society of America guidelines for the treatment of CNS infections offer little direction after conventional therapy, consisting of vancomycin, has failed or the patient has demonstrated intolerance. A review of literature evaluating alternative therapies, specifically linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, daptomycin and tigecycline, will be presented. Interpretations of these data are offered followed by a brief presentation of future therapies, including ortavancin, telavancin, dalbavancin, ceftobiprole and iclaprim, all of which possess potent Gram-positive activity. PMID:18251666

  4. Verruculogen: a new substance for decreasing of GABA levels in CNS.

    PubMed

    Hotujac, L; Muftić, R H; Filipović, N

    1976-01-01

    In our previous work we examined the mechanism of action of the new tremorogenic substance verruculogen isolated by Cole and coworkers. Examining the effect of various substances with known mechanisms of action on verruculogen-induced tremor, we concluded that this tremor was probably related to decrease of GABA levels in CNS. In order to further define the mechanisms of action of verruculogen, we determined brain GABA levels in animals in which tremor was produced by verruculogen administration. Verruculogen administration produced a decrease in GABA levels in mouse CNS. This finding substantiates our earlier suggestion that verruculogen-induced tremor is mediated by a loss of inhibitory GABA function. PMID:935244

  5. Adeno-Associated Virus-Based Gene Therapy for CNS Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hocquemiller, Michaël; Giersch, Laura; Audrain, Mickael; Parker, Samantha; Cartier, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is at the cusp of a revolution for treating a large spectrum of CNS disorders by providing a durable therapeutic protein via a single administration. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer is of particular interest as a therapeutic tool because of its safety profile and efficiency in transducing a wide range of cell types. The purpose of this review is to describe the most notable advancements in preclinical and clinical research on AAV-based CNS gene therapy and to discuss prospects for future development based on a new generation of vectors and delivery. PMID:27267688

  6. Developing highER-throughput zebrafish screens for in-vivo CNS drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of brain disorders and the lack of their efficient treatments necessitate improved in-vivo pre-clinical models and tests. The zebrafish (Danio rerio), a vertebrate species with high genetic and physiological homology to humans, is an excellent organism for innovative central nervous system (CNS) drug discovery and small molecule screening. Here, we outline new strategies for developing higher-throughput zebrafish screens to test neuroactive drugs and predict their pharmacological mechanisms. With the growing application of automated 3D phenotyping, machine learning algorithms, movement pattern- and behavior recognition, and multi-animal video-tracking, zebrafish screens are expected to markedly improve CNS drug discovery. PMID:25729356

  7. Relationships between performance on the Cogstate Brief Battery, neurodegeneration, and Aβ accumulation in cognitively normal older adults and adults with MCI.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yen Ying; Pietrzak, Robert H; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Ames, David; Ellis, Kathryn A; Rembach, Alan; Harrington, Karra; Salvado, Olivier; Martins, Ralph N; Snyder, Peter J; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C; Villemagne, Victor L; Maruff, Paul

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the extent to which decline in memory and working memory in beta-amyloid (Aβ) positive non-demented individuals was related to hippocampal atrophy and Aβ accumulation over 36 months. Cognitively normal older adults (CN) (n = 178) and adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n = 49) underwent positron emission tomography neuroimaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and cognitive assessments at baseline, 18- and 36-months. Relative to Aβ- CNs, Aβ+ CNs and Aβ+ MCIs showed greater rates of cognitive decline, Aβ accumulation, and hippocampal atrophy. Analysis of interrelationships between these Alzheimer's disease markers in Aβ+ CNs and MCIs indicated that rate of Aβ accumulation was associated with rate of hippocampal atrophy (β = -0.05, p = .037), which was in turn associated independently with rate of decline in memory (β = -0.03, p = .032). This suggests that Aβ accumulation precedes any neurodegeneration or clinical symptoms, and that the relationship between Aβ and cognitive decline is mediated by hippocampal atrophy. PMID:25467942

  8. TAM receptor deficiency affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Rui; Meng, Lingbin; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2014-01-01

    The Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM) subfamily of receptor protein tyrosine kinases functions in cell growth, differentiation, survival, and most recently found, in the regulation of immune responses and phagocytosis. All three receptors and their ligands, Gas6 (growth arrest-specific gene 6) and protein S, are expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). TAM receptors play pivotal roles in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Loss of these receptors causes a comprised neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus. TAM receptors have a negative regulatory effect on microglia and peripheral antigen-presenting cells, and play a critical role in preventing overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines detrimental to the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of adult neuronal stem cells (NSCs). Besides, these receptors also play an intrinsic trophic function in supporting NSC survival, proliferation, and differentiation into immature neurons. All these events collectively ensure a sustained neurogenesis in adult hippocampus. PMID:25487541

  9. TAM receptor deficiency affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Rui; Meng, Lingbin; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2015-06-01

    The Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM) subfamily of receptor protein tyrosine kinases functions in cell growth, differentiation, survival, and most recently found, in the regulation of immune responses and phagocytosis. All three receptors and their ligands, Gas6 (growth arrest-specific gene 6) and protein S, are expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). TAM receptors play pivotal roles in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Loss of these receptors causes a comprised neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus. TAM receptors have a negative regulatory effect on microglia and peripheral antigen-presenting cells, and play a critical role in preventing overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines detrimental to the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of adult neuronal stem cells (NSCs). Besides, these receptors also play an intrinsic trophic function in supporting NSC survival, proliferation, and differentiation into immature neurons. All these events collectively ensure a sustained neurogenesis in adult hippocampus. PMID:25487541

  10. The Africa Madagascar connection and mammalian migrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, Philip D.; Woods, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    Madagascar separated from Africa in the Middle-Late Jurassic and has been in its present position relative to Africa since the Early Cretaceous (˜120-130 my). Several Early Eocene to Late Oligocene (˜50-26 my) terrestrial mammalian groups are observed on Madagascar that have a similar ancestral lineage to those found in Africa. These mammalian groups means of transport across the Mozambique Channel from Africa to Madagascar was either by traversing on exposed land masses across a land bridge or by swimming/rafting, since (1) Madagascar has been separated from mainland Africa for at least 70 my before their arrival, and (2) it is unlikely that similar ancestral lineage's evolved simultaneously in separated regions. No evidence has been found for a land bridge across the Mozambique Channel. The mammals thus either swam or have been swept away on vegetation mats from rivers flowing out of Mozambique or Tanzania.

  11. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. A.; Gadêlha, H.; Smith, D. J.; Blake, J. R.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics.

  12. Mammalian hairs in Early Cretaceous amber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vullo, Romain; Girard, Vincent; Azar, Dany; Néraudeau, Didier

    2010-07-01

    Two mammalian hairs have been found in association with an empty puparium in a ˜100-million-year-old amber (Early Cretaceous) from France. Although hair is known to be an ancestral, ubiquitous feature in the crown Mammalia, the structure of Mesozoic hair has never been described. In contrast to fur and hair of some Jurassic and Cretaceous mammals preserved as carbonized filaments, the exceptional preservation of the fossils described here allows for the study of the cuticular structure. Results show the oldest direct evidence of hair with a modern scale pattern. This discovery implies that the morphology of hair cuticula may have remained unchanged throughout most of mammalian evolution. The association of these hairs with a possible fly puparium provides paleoecological information and indicates peculiar taphonomic conditions.

  13. Mammalian Sirtuins: Biological Insights and Disease Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Haigis, Marcia C.; Sinclair, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is accompanied by a decline in the healthy function of multiple organ systems, leading to increased incidence and mortality from diseases such as type II diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Historically, researchers have focused on investigating individual pathways in isolated organs as a strategy to identify the root cause of a disease, with hopes of designing better drugs. Studies of aging in yeast led to the discovery of a family of conserved enzymes known as the sirtuins, which affect multiple pathways that increase the life span and the overall health of organisms. Since the discovery of the first known mammalian sirtuin, SIRT1, 10 years ago, there have been major advances in our understanding of the enzymology of sirtuins, their regulation, and their ability to broadly improve mammalian physiology and health span. This review summarizes and discusses the advances of the past decade and the challenges that will confront the field in the coming years. PMID:20078221

  14. Mammalian lipoxygenases and their biological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Hartmut; Banthiya, Swathi; van Leyen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) form a heterogeneous class of lipid peroxidizing enzymes, which have been implicated in cell proliferation and differentiation but also in the pathogenesis of various diseases with major public health relevance. As other fatty acid dioxygenases LOX oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids to their corresponding hydroperoxy derivatives, which are further transformed to bioactive lipid mediators (eicosanoids and related substances). On the other hand, lipoxygenases are key players in regulation of the cellular redox homeostasis, which is an important element in gene expression regulation. Although the first mammalian lipoxygenases were discovered 40 years ago and although the enzymes have been well characterized with respect to their structural and functional properties the biological roles of the different lipoxygenase isoforms are not completely understood. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on the physiological roles of different mammalian LOX-isoforms and their patho-physiological function in inflammatory, metabolic, hyperproliferative, neurodegenerative and infectious disorders. PMID:25316652

  15. Freezing mammalian cells for production of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Seth, Gargi

    2012-03-01

    Cryopreservation techniques utilize very low temperatures to preserve the structure and function of living cells. Various strategies have been developed for freezing mammalian cells of biological and medical significance. This paper highlights the importance and application of cryopreservation for recombinant mammalian cells used in the biopharmaceutical industry to produce high-value protein therapeutics. It is a primer that aims to give insight into the basic principles of cell freezing for the benefit of biopharmaceutical researchers with limited or no prior experience in cryobiology. For the more familiar researchers, key cell banking parameters such as the cell density and hold conditions have been reviewed to possibly help optimize their specific cell freezing protocols. It is important to understand the mechanisms underlying the freezing of complex and sensitive cellular entities as we implement best practices around the techniques and strategies used for cryopreservation. PMID:22226818

  16. Pediatric acquired CNS demyelinating syndromes: Features associated with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Neuteboom, Rinze F; Mar, Soe; Banwell, Brenda

    2016-08-30

    Approximately one-third of children with an acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS) will be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), either at onset according to the 2010 McDonald criteria, or on the basis of clinical or MRI evidence of relapsing disease, in the majority of patients within 2-4 years. ADS in adolescents, female patients, and patients with polyfocal deficits is associated with the highest likelihood of MS, while children with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, those with documented preceding infection, and ADS presentation in young children more commonly portends a monophasic outcome. While pediatric MS associates with similar genetic risk alleles as have been documented in adult-onset MS, such associations are not diagnostically valuable at the individual level. The presence of antibodies directed against aquaporin-4 strongly supports a diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica, and should be assayed in children manifesting with severe optic neuritis, longitudinally extensive myelitis, or brainstem/hypothalamic syndromes. Further research will determine whether other antibody signatures are indicative of relapsing demyelination distinct from MS. PMID:27572864

  17. LIS1 Lissencephaly gene CNS expression: Relation to neuronal migration

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, O. |; Gal-Gerber, O.; Sapir, T.

    1994-09-01

    Lis1 is the murine gene corresponding to human LIS1 gene involved in Miller-Dieker lissencephaly located on chromosome 17p13.3 as demonstrated by cDNA cloning, sequence analysis and genetic mapping. Lis1 expression was studied in developing mouse brain using in situ hybridization. At embryonic day 15, Lis1 expression was most prominently localized in the neuronal layer of the retina, the developing hippocampus, doral root ganglia, cranial ganglia and the thalamus. At postnatal day 5 a unique pattern of expression was detected in the developing cerebellum. Lis1 was expressed at high levels in the Purkinje cell layer when the granule cells were migrating through the Purkinje cell layer inwards. The expression of Lis1 in Purkinje cells in the adult is markedly reduced. Similarly, Lis1 was expressed in the ontogenetically older layers of the neocortex (layers 5 and 6) where younger neurons have to migrate through to settle in the superficial layers. Thus, at both sites a link between expression and neuronal migration was demonstrated. These studies on the expression pattern of Lis1 could be useful in understanding abnormalities in Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome (MDS) patients.

  18. Structure and function of mammalian aldehyde oxidases.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mineko; Romão, Maria João; Leimkühler, Silke; Bolis, Marco; Fratelli, Maddalena; Coelho, Catarina; Santos-Silva, Teresa; Garattini, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian aldehyde oxidases (AOXs; EC1.2.3.1) are a group of conserved proteins belonging to the family of molybdo-flavoenzymes along with the structurally related xanthine dehydrogenase enzyme. AOXs are characterized by broad substrate specificity, oxidizing not only aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes into the corresponding carboxylic acids, but also hydroxylating a series of heteroaromatic rings. The number of AOX isoenzymes expressed in different vertebrate species is variable. The two extremes are represented by humans, which express a single enzyme (AOX1) in many organs and mice or rats which are characterized by tissue-specific expression of four isoforms (AOX1, AOX2, AOX3, and AOX4). In vertebrates each AOX isoenzyme is the product of a distinct gene consisting of 35 highly conserved exons. The extant species-specific complement of AOX isoenzymes is the result of a complex evolutionary process consisting of a first phase characterized by a series of asynchronous gene duplications and a second phase where the pseudogenization and gene deletion events prevail. In the last few years remarkable advances in the elucidation of the structural characteristics and the catalytic mechanisms of mammalian AOXs have been made thanks to the successful crystallization of human AOX1 and mouse AOX3. Much less is known about the physiological function and physiological substrates of human AOX1 and other mammalian AOX isoenzymes, although the importance of these proteins in xenobiotic metabolism is fairly well established and their relevance in drug development is increasing. This review article provides an overview and a discussion of the current knowledge on mammalian AOX. PMID:26920149

  19. Mammalian Evolution May not Be Strictly Bifurcating

    PubMed Central

    Hallström, Björn M.; Janke, Axel

    2010-01-01

    The massive amount of genomic sequence data that is now available for analyzing evolutionary relationships among 31 placental mammals reduces the stochastic error in phylogenetic analyses to virtually zero. One would expect that this would make it possible to finally resolve controversial branches in the placental mammalian tree. We analyzed a 2,863,797 nucleotide-long alignment (3,364 genes) from 31 placental mammals for reconstructing their evolution. Most placental mammalian relationships were resolved, and a consensus of their evolution is emerging. However, certain branches remain difficult or virtually impossible to resolve. These branches are characterized by short divergence times in the order of 1–4 million years. Computer simulations based on parameters from the real data show that as little as about 12,500