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Sample records for adult mammalian cns

  1. Inhibition of Poly-ADP-Ribosylation Fails to Increase Axonal Regeneration or Improve Functional Recovery after Adult Mammalian CNS Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Byrne, Alexandra B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After traumatic damage of the brain or spinal cord, many surviving neurons are disconnected, and recovery of function is limited by poor axon regeneration. Recent data have suggested that poly ADP-ribosylation plays a role in limiting axonal regrowth such that inhibition of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) may have therapeutic efficacy for neurological recovery after trauma. Here, we tested systemic administration of the PARP inhibitor, veliparib, and showed effective suppression of PARylation in the mouse CNS. After optic nerve crush injury or dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord in mice, treatment with veliparib at doses with pharmacodynamic action had no benefit for axonal regeneration or functional recovery. We considered whether PARP gene family specificity might play a role. In vitro mouse cerebral cortex axon regeneration experiments revealed that short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated suppression of PARP1 promoted axonal regeneration, whereas suppression of other PARP isoforms either had no effect or decreased regeneration. Therefore, we examined recovery from neurological trauma in mice lacking PARP1. No increase of axonal regeneration was observed in Parp1–/– mice after optic nerve crush injury or dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord, and there was no improvement in motor function recovery. Thus, comprehensive in vivo analysis reveals no indication that clinical PARP inhibitors will on their own provide benefit for recovery from CNS trauma. PMID:28032120

  2. In vivo imaging of axonal transport of mitochondria in the diseased and aged mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Takihara, Yuji; Inatani, Masaru; Eto, Kei; Inoue, Toshihiro; Kreymerman, Alexander; Miyake, Seiji; Ueno, Shinji; Nagaya, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Ayami; Iwao, Keiichiro; Takamura, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Satoh, Keita; Kondo, Mineo; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Nabekura, Junichi; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2015-08-18

    The lack of intravital imaging of axonal transport of mitochondria in the mammalian CNS precludes characterization of the dynamics of axonal transport of mitochondria in the diseased and aged mammalian CNS. Glaucoma, the most common neurodegenerative eye disease, is characterized by axon degeneration and the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and by an age-related increase in incidence. RGC death is hypothesized to result from disturbances in axonal transport and in mitochondrial function. Here we report minimally invasive intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mouse RGCs through the sclera that provides sequential time-lapse images of mitochondria transported in a single axon with submicrometer resolution. Unlike findings from explants, we show that the axonal transport of mitochondria is highly dynamic in the mammalian CNS in vivo under physiological conditions. Furthermore, in the early stage of glaucoma modeled in adult (4-mo-old) mice, the number of transported mitochondria decreases before RGC death, although transport does not shorten. However, with increasing age up to 23-25 mo, mitochondrial transport (duration, distance, and duty cycle) shortens. In axons, mitochondria-free regions increase and lengths of transported mitochondria decrease with aging, although totally organized transport patterns are preserved in old (23- to 25-mo-old) mice. Moreover, axonal transport of mitochondria is more vulnerable to glaucomatous insults in old mice than in adult mice. These mitochondrial changes with aging may underlie the age-related increase in glaucoma incidence. Our method is useful for characterizing the dynamics of axonal transport of mitochondria and may be applied to other submicrometer structures in the diseased and aged mammalian CNS in vivo.

  3. Apoptosis in the mammalian CNS: Lessons from animal models.

    PubMed

    Lossi, L; Cantile, C; Tamagno, I; Merighi, A

    2005-07-01

    It is generally assumed that about half of the neurons produced during neurogenesis die before completion of maturation of the central nervous system (CNS). Neural cell death is also relevant in aging and several neurodegenerative diseases. Among the modalities by which neurons die, apoptosis has very much attracted the interest of investigators because in this type of cell death neurons are actively responsible for their own demise by switching on a number of genes and activating a series of specific intracellular pathways. This review focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of apoptosis in normal and transgenic animal models related to naturally occurring neuronal death within the CNS. We will also consider some examples of apoptotic cell death in canine neuropathologies. A thorough analysis of naturally occurring neuronal death in vivo will offer a basis for parallel and future studies involving secondary neuronal loss such as those in neurodegenerative disorders, trauma or ischaemia.

  4. Costorage and coexistence of neuropeptides in the mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Merighi, A

    2002-02-01

    The term neuropeptides commonly refers to a relatively large number of biologically active molecules that have been localized to discrete cell populations of central and peripheral neurons. I review here the most important histological and functional findings on neuropeptide distribution in the central nervous system (CNS), in relation to their role in the exchange of information between the nerve cells. Under this perspective, peptide costorage (presence of two or more peptides within the same subcellular compartment) and coexistence (concurrent presence of peptides and other messenger molecules within single nerve cells) are discussed in detail. In particular, the subcellular site(s) of storage and sorting mechanisms within neurons are thoroughly examined in the view of the mode of release and action of neuropeptides as neuronal messengers. Moreover, the relationship of neuropeptides and other molecules implicated in neural transmission is discussed in functional terms, also referring to the interactions with novel unconventional transmitters and trophic factors. Finally, a brief account is given on the presence of neuropeptides in glial cells.

  5. The density of EAAC1 (EAAT3) glutamate transporters expressed by neurons in the mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Holmseth, Silvia; Dehnes, Yvette; Huang, Yanhua H; Follin-Arbelet, Virginie V; Grutle, Nina J; Mylonakou, Maria N; Plachez, Celine; Zhou, Yun; Furness, David N; Bergles, Dwight E; Lehre, Knut P; Danbolt, Niels C

    2012-04-25

    The extracellular levels of excitatory amino acids are kept low by the action of the glutamate transporters. Glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) are the most abundant subtypes and are essential for the functioning of the mammalian CNS, but the contribution of the EAAC1 subtype in the clearance of synaptic glutamate has remained controversial, because the density of this transporter in different tissues has not been determined. We used purified EAAC1 protein as a standard during immunoblotting to measure the concentration of EAAC1 in different CNS regions. The highest EAAC1 levels were found in the young adult rat hippocampus. Here, the concentration of EAAC1 was ∼0.013 mg/g tissue (∼130 molecules μm⁻³), 100 times lower than that of GLT-1. Unlike GLT-1 expression, which increases in parallel with circuit formation, only minor changes in the concentration of EAAC1 were observed from E18 to adulthood. In hippocampal slices, photolysis of MNI-D-aspartate (4-methoxy-7-nitroindolinyl-D-aspartate) failed to elicit EAAC1-mediated transporter currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons, and D-aspartate uptake was not detected electron microscopically in spines. Using EAAC1 knock-out mice as negative controls to establish antibody specificity, we show that these relatively small amounts of EAAC1 protein are widely distributed in somata and dendrites of all hippocampal neurons. These findings raise new questions about how so few transporters can influence the activation of NMDA receptors at excitatory synapses.

  6. Neuronal intrinsic barriers for axon regeneration in the adult CNS

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fang; He, Zhigang

    2010-01-01

    A major reason for the devastating and permanent disabilities after spinal cord and other types of CNS injury is the failure of injured axons to regenerate and to re-build the functional circuits. Thus, a long-standing goal has been to develop strategies that could promote axon regeneration and restore functions. Recent studies revealed that simply removing extracellular inhibitory activities is insufficient for successful axon regeneration in the adult CNS. On the other side, evidence from different species and different models is accumulating to support the notion that diminished intrinsic regenerative ability of mature neurons is a major contributor to regeneration failure. This review will summarize the molecular mechanisms regulating intrinsic axon growth capacity in the adult CNS and discuss potential implications for therapeutic strategies. PMID:20418094

  7. Control of Cell Survival in Adult Mammalian Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, H Georg

    2015-10-28

    The fact that continuous proliferation of stem cells and progenitors, as well as the production of new neurons, occurs in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) raises several basic questions concerning the number of neurons required in a particular system. Can we observe continued growth of brain regions that sustain neurogenesis? Or does an elimination mechanism exist to maintain a constant number of cells? If so, are old neurons replaced, or are the new neurons competing for limited network access among each other? What signals support their survival and integration and what factors are responsible for their elimination? This review will address these and other questions regarding regulatory mechanisms that control cell-death and cell-survival mechanisms during neurogenesis in the intact adult mammalian brain.

  8. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. PMID:27382491

  9. Noncanonical Sites of Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, David M; Bordey, Angélique; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-09-18

    Two decades after the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) populate some regions of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), deep knowledge has been accumulated on their capacity to generate new neurons in the adult brain. This constitutive adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life primarily within remnants of the embryonic germinal layers known as "neurogenic sites." Nevertheless, some processes of neurogliogenesis also occur in the CNS parenchyma commonly considered as "nonneurogenic." This "noncanonical" cell genesis has been the object of many claims, some of which turned out to be not true. Indeed, it is often an "incomplete" process as to its final outcome, heterogeneous by several measures, including regional location, progenitor identity, and fate of the progeny. These aspects also strictly depend on the animal species, suggesting that persistent neurogenic processes have uniquely adapted to the brain anatomy of different mammals. Whereas some examples of noncanonical neurogenesis are strictly parenchymal, others also show stem cell niche-like features and a strong link with the ventricular cavities. This work will review results obtained in a research field that expanded from classic neurogenesis studies involving a variety of areas of the CNS outside of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ). It will be highlighted how knowledge concerning noncanonical neurogenic areas is still incomplete owing to its regional and species-specific heterogeneity, and to objective difficulties still hampering its full identification and characterization.

  10. MALDI mass spectrometry based molecular phenotyping of CNS glial cells for prediction in mammalian brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Wicher, Grzegorz; Bergquist, Jonas; Andersson, Malin; Fex-Svenningsen, Asa

    2011-07-01

    The development of powerful analytical techniques for specific molecular characterization of neural cell types is of central relevance in neuroscience research for elucidating cellular functions in the central nervous system (CNS). This study examines the use of differential protein expression profiling of mammalian neural cells using direct analysis by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). MALDI-MS analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and specific for large biomolecules in complex matrices. Here, we describe a newly developed and straightforward methodology for direct characterization of rodent CNS glial cells using MALDI-MS-based intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS). This molecular phenotyping approach enables monitoring of cell growth stages, (stem) cell differentiation, as well as probing cellular responses towards different stimulations. Glial cells were separated into pure astroglial, microglial, and oligodendroglial cell cultures. The intact cell suspensions were then analyzed directly by MALDI-TOF-MS, resulting in characteristic mass spectra profiles that discriminated glial cell types using principal component analysis. Complementary proteomic experiments revealed the identity of these signature proteins that were predominantly expressed in the different glial cell types, including histone H4 for oligodendrocytes and S100-A10 for astrocytes. MALDI imaging MS was performed, and signature masses were employed as molecular tracers for prediction of oligodendroglial and astroglial localization in brain tissue. The different cell type specific protein distributions in tissue were validated using immunohistochemistry. ICMS of intact neuroglia is a simple and straightforward approach for characterization and discrimination of different cell types with molecular specificity.

  11. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  12. Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Hippocampus: Why the Dentate Gyrus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity…

  13. Long-term fate of neural precursor cells following transplantation into developing and adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Lepore, A C; Neuhuber, B; Connors, T M; Han, S S W; Liu, Y; Daniels, M P; Rao, M S; Fischer, I

    2006-05-12

    Successful strategies for transplantation of neural precursor cells for replacement of lost or dysfunctional CNS cells require long-term survival of grafted cells and integration with the host system, potentially for the life of the recipient. It is also important to demonstrate that transplants do not result in adverse outcomes. Few studies have examined the long-term properties of transplanted neural precursor cells in the CNS, particularly in non-neurogenic regions of the adult. The aim of the present study was to extensively characterize the fate of defined populations of neural precursor cells following transplantation into the developing and adult CNS (brain and spinal cord) for up to 15 months, including integration of graft-derived neurons with the host. Specifically, we employed neuronal-restricted precursors and glial-restricted precursors, which represent neural precursor cells with lineage restrictions for neuronal and glial fate, respectively. Transplanted cells were prepared from embryonic day-13.5 fetal spinal cord of transgenic donor rats that express the marker gene human placental alkaline phosphatase to achieve stable and reliable graft tracking. We found that in both developing and adult CNS grafted cells showed long-term survival, morphological maturation, extensive distribution and differentiation into all mature CNS cell types (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes). Graft-derived neurons also formed synapses, as identified by electron microscopy, suggesting that transplanted neural precursor cells integrated with adult CNS. Furthermore, grafts did not result in any apparent deleterious outcomes. We did not detect tumor formation, cells did not localize to unwanted locations and no pronounced immune response was present at the graft sites. The long-term stability of neuronal-restricted precursors and glial-restricted precursors and the lack of adverse effects suggest that transplantation of lineage-restricted neural precursor cells can

  14. Cell death and proliferation in acute slices and organotypic cultures of mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Alasia, Silvia; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of the interplay between cell proliferation and death has been greatly advantaged by the development of CNS slice preparations. In slices, interactions between neurons and neurons and the glial cells are fundamentally preserved in a fashion close to the in vivo situation. In parallel, these preparations offer the possibility of an easy experimental manipulation. Two main types of slices are currently in use: the acute slices, which are short living preparations where the major functions of the intact brain (including neurogenesis) are maintained, and the organotypic cultures, where the maturation and plasticity of neuronal circuitries in relation to naturally occurring neuronal death and/or experimental insults can be followed over several weeks in vitro. We will discuss here the main advantages/disadvantages linked to the use of CNS slices for histological analysis of neuronal proliferation and death, as well as the main findings obtained in the most popular types of preparations, i.e. the cortical, hippocampal, cerebellar and retinal slices.

  15. Single Cell Electroporation Method for Mammalian CNS Neurons in Organotypic Slice Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Naofumi; Hayano, Yasufumi; Yamada, Akito; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko

    Axon tracing is an essential technique to study the projection pattern of neurons in the CNS. Horse radish peroxidase and lectins have contributed to revealing many neural connection patterns in the CNS (Itaya and van Hoesen, 1982; Fabian and Coulter, 1985; Yoshihara, 2002). Moreover, a tracing method with fluorescent dye has enabled the observation of growing axons in living conditions, and demon strated a lot of developmental aspects in axon growth and guidance (Harris et al., 1987; O'Rourke and Fraser, 1990; Kaethner and Stuermer, 1992; Halloran and Kalil, 1994; Yamamoto et al., 1997). More recently, genetically encoded fluores cent proteins can be used as a powerful tool to observe various biological events. Several gene transfer techniques such as microinjection, biolistic gene gun, viral infection, lipofection and transgenic technology have been developed (Feng et al., 2000; Ehrengruber et al., 2001; O'Brien et al., 2001; Ma et al., 2002; Sahly et al., 2003). In particular, the electroporation technique was proved as a valuable tool, since it can be applied to a wide range of tissues and cell types with little toxicity and can be performed with relative technical easiness. Most methods, including a stand ard electroporation technique, are suitable for gene transfer to a large number of cells. However, this is not ideal for axonal tracing, because observation of individ ual axons is occasionally required. To overcome this problem, we have developed an electroporation method using glass micropipettes containing plasmid solutions and small current injection. Here we introduce the method in detail and exemplified results with some example applications and discuss its usefulness.

  16. Clinical features, outcomes, and cerebrospinal fluid findings in adult patients with central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by varicella-zoster virus: comparison with enterovirus CNS infections.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyo-Lim; Lee, Eun Mi; Sung, Heungsup; Kang, Joong Koo; Lee, Sang-Ahm; Choi, Sang-Ho

    2014-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is known to be associated with central nervous system (CNS) infections in adults. However, the clinical characteristics of VZV CNS infections are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical manifestations, outcomes, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings in patients with VZV CNS infections with those in patients with enterovirus (EV) CNS infections. This retrospective cohort study was performed at a 2,700-bed tertiary care hospital. Using a clinical microbiology computerized database, all adults with CSF PCR results positive for VZV or EV that were treated between January 1999 and February 2013 were identified. Thirty-eight patients with VZV CNS infection and 68 patients with EV CNS infection were included in the study. Compared with the EV group, the median age in the VZV group was higher (VZV, 35 years vs. EV, 31 years; P = 0.02), and showed a bimodal age distribution with peaks in the third and seventh decade. Encephalitis was more commonly encountered in the VZV group (VZV, 23.7% vs. EV, 4.4%; P = 0.01). The median lymphocyte percentage in the CSF (VZV, 81% vs. EV, 36%; P < 0.001) and the CSF protein level (VZV, 100 mg/dl vs. EV, 46 mg/dl; P < 0.001) were higher in the VZV group. Compared with patients with EV CNS infection, patients with VZV CNS infection developed encephalitis more often and exhibited more intense inflammatory reaction. Nevertheless, both VZV and EV CNS infections were associated with excellent long-term prognosis.

  17. Intrinsic electrical properties of mammalian neurons and CNS function: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2014-01-01

    This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons. It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function. The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function.

  18. Intrinsic electrical properties of mammalian neurons and CNS function: a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2014-01-01

    This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons. It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function. The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function. PMID:25408634

  19. Enhancing Psychosocial Outcomes for Young Adult Childhood CNS Cancer Survivors: Importance of Addressing Vocational Identity and Community Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauser, David R.; Wagner, Stacia; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between vocational identity, community integration, positive and negative affect, and satisfaction with life in a group of young adult central nervous system (CNS) cancer survivors. Participants in this study included 45 young adult CNS cancer survivors who ranged in age from 18 to 30 years…

  20. Neurotrophin-dependent modulation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Lessmann, V

    1998-11-01

    1. The protein family of the neurotrophins, consisting of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin-3, -4/5, and -6 (NT-3; NT-4/5; NT-6) is well known to enhance the survival and to stabilize the phenotype of different populations of neurons in the central and the peripheral nervous system. These effects are mediated via binding to specific tyrosine kinase receptors (Trks) and to the low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor. 2. The neurotrophins NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 and the BDNF and NT-3 selective receptors (TrkB, TrkC) are expressed at high levels in neurons of the basal forebrain, the hippocampus, and the neocortex of the mammalian brain. The expression and secretion of NGF and BDNF in these brain areas is regulated by (physiological levels of) neuronal activity. 3. Exogenous application of the neurotrophins to hippocampal and neocortical neurons can enhance excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission via activation of Trk receptors. In addition, long-term potentiation (a potential cellular correlate for learning and memory formation in mammals) in the rodent hippocampus depends on endogenous supply of neurons with BDNF. 4. Judged by the analysis of electrophysiological data, the BDNF- and NT-3-induced enhancement of glutamatergic synapses is mediated by increasing the efficacy of glutamate release from the presynaptic neuron. However, neurotrophin-dependent postsynaptic enhancement of NMDA (but not AMPA) receptor responsiveness has also been shown. 5. On the molecular level, neither the pre- nor the postsynaptic modulation of glutamatergic synapses by neurotrophins is well understood. However, neurotrophins were shown to acutely affect intraneuronal Ca2+ levels and to influence molecular components of the transmitter release machinery, which could underly the presynaptic modifications, whereas BDNF-induced phosphorylation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors could account for the postsynaptic effects. 6. Taken together

  1. Adult Mammalian Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis: Five Decades Later

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Allison M.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adult somatic stem cells in various organs maintain homeostatic tissue regeneration and enhance plasticity. Since its initial discovery five decades ago, investigations of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cells have led to an established and expanding field that has significantly influenced many facets of neuroscience, developmental biology and regenerative medicine. Here we review recent progress and focus on questions related to adult mammalian neural stem cells that also apply to other somatic stem cells. We further discuss emerging topics that are guiding the field toward better understanding adult neural stem cells and ultimately applying these principles to improve human health. PMID:26431181

  2. Highly efficient transduction of primary adult CNS and PNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Evgeny; Diekmann, Heike; Fischer, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Delivery and expression of recombinant genes, a key methodology for many applications in biological research, remains a challenge especially for mature neurons. Here, we report easy, highly efficient and well tolerated transduction of adult peripheral and central neuronal populations of diverse species in culture using VSV-G pseudo-typed, recombinant baculovirus (BacMam). Transduction rates of up to 80% were reliably achieved at high multiplicity of infection without apparent neuro-cytopathic effects. Neurons could be transduced either shortly after plating or after several days in culture. Co-incubation with two different baculoviruses attained near complete co-localization of fluorescent protein expression, indicating multigene delivery. Finally, evidence for functional protein expression is provided by means of cre-mediated genetic recombination and neurite outgrowth assays. Recombinant protein was already detected within hours after transduction, thereby enabling functional readouts even in relatively short-lived neuronal cultures. Altogether, these results substantiate the usefulness of baculovirus-mediated transduction of mature neurons for future research in neuroscience. PMID:27958330

  3. Organotypic Cultures as a Model to Study Adult Neurogenesis in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, Fabio; Benito-Muñoz, Monica; Matute, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neural regeneration resides in certain specific regions of adult CNS. Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life, especially from the subgranular zone of hippocampus and the subventricular zone, and can be modulated in physiological and pathological conditions. Numerous techniques and animal models have been developed to demonstrate and observe neural regeneration but, in order to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms and to characterize multiple types of cell populations involved in the activation of neurogenesis and gliogenesis, investigators have to turn to in vitro models. Organotypic cultures best recapitulate the 3D organization of the CNS and can be explored taking advantage of many techniques. Here, we review the use of organotypic cultures as a reliable and well defined method to study the mechanisms of neurogenesis under normal and pathological conditions. As an example, we will focus on the possibilities these cultures offer to study the pathophysiology of diseases like Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral ischemia. PMID:27127518

  4. CNS depressive role of aqueous extract of Spinacia oleracea L. leaves in adult male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Sutapa; Guha, Debjani

    2008-03-01

    Treatment with Spinacia oleracea extract (SO; 400 mg/kg body weight) decreased the locomotor activity, grip strength, increased pentobarbitone induced sleeping time and also markedly altered pentylenetetrazole induced seizure status in Holtzman strain adult male albino rats. SO increased serotonin level and decreased both norepinephrine and dopamine levels in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, caudate nucleus, midbrain and pons and medulla. Result suggests that SO exerts its CNS depressive effect in PTZ induced seizure by modulating the monoamines in different brain areas.

  5. MASH1/Ascl1a leads to GAP43 expression and axon regeneration in the adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ryan R; Venkatesh, Ishwariya; Pearse, Damien D; Udvadia, Ava J; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2015-01-01

    Unlike CNS neurons in adult mammals, neurons in fish and embryonic mammals can regenerate their axons after injury. These divergent regenerative responses are in part mediated by the growth-associated expression of select transcription factors. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, MASH1/Ascl1a, is transiently expressed during the development of many neuronal subtypes and regulates the expression of genes that mediate cell fate determination and differentiation. In the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio), Ascl1a is also transiently expressed in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that regenerate axons after optic nerve crush. Utilizing transgenic zebrafish with a 3.6 kb GAP43 promoter that drives expression of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), we observed that knock-down of Ascl1a expression reduces both regenerative gap43 gene expression and axonal growth after injury compared to controls. In mammals, the development of noradrenergic brainstem neurons requires MASH1 expression. In contrast to zebrafish RGCs, however, MASH1 is not expressed in the mammalian brainstem after spinal cord injury (SCI). Therefore, we utilized adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to overexpress MASH1 in four month old rat (Rattus norvegicus) brainstem neurons in an attempt to promote axon regeneration after SCI. We discovered that after complete transection of the thoracic spinal cord and implantation of a Schwann cell bridge, animals that express MASH1 exhibit increased noradrenergic axon regeneration and improvement in hindlimb joint movements compared to controls. Together these data demonstrate that MASH1/Ascl1a is a fundamental regulator of axonal growth across vertebrates and can induce modifications to the intrinsic state of neurons to promote functional regeneration in response to CNS injury.

  6. MASH1/Ascl1a Leads to GAP43 Expression and Axon Regeneration in the Adult CNS

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, Damien D.; Udvadia, Ava J.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2015-01-01

    Unlike CNS neurons in adult mammals, neurons in fish and embryonic mammals can regenerate their axons after injury. These divergent regenerative responses are in part mediated by the growth-associated expression of select transcription factors. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, MASH1/Ascl1a, is transiently expressed during the development of many neuronal subtypes and regulates the expression of genes that mediate cell fate determination and differentiation. In the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio), Ascl1a is also transiently expressed in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that regenerate axons after optic nerve crush. Utilizing transgenic zebrafish with a 3.6 kb GAP43 promoter that drives expression of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), we observed that knock-down of Ascl1a expression reduces both regenerative gap43 gene expression and axonal growth after injury compared to controls. In mammals, the development of noradrenergic brainstem neurons requires MASH1 expression. In contrast to zebrafish RGCs, however, MASH1 is not expressed in the mammalian brainstem after spinal cord injury (SCI). Therefore, we utilized adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to overexpress MASH1 in four month old rat (Rattus norvegicus) brainstem neurons in an attempt to promote axon regeneration after SCI. We discovered that after complete transection of the thoracic spinal cord and implantation of a Schwann cell bridge, animals that express MASH1 exhibit increased noradrenergic axon regeneration and improvement in hindlimb joint movements compared to controls. Together these data demonstrate that MASH1/Ascl1a is a fundamental regulator of axonal growth across vertebrates and can induce modifications to the intrinsic state of neurons to promote functional regeneration in response to CNS injury. PMID:25751153

  7. The role of olfactory stimulus in adult mammalian neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arisi, Gabriel M; Foresti, Maira L; Mukherjee, Sanjib; Shapiro, Lee A

    2012-02-14

    Neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain in discrete regions related to olfactory sensory signaling and integration. The olfactory receptor cell population is in constant turn-over through local progenitor cells. Also, newborn neurons are added to the olfactory bulbs through a major migratory route from the subventricular zone, the rostral migratory stream. The olfactory bulbs project to different brain structures, including: piriform cortex, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, striatum and hippocampus. These structures play important roles in odor identification, feeding behavior, social interactions, reproductive behavior, behavioral reinforcement, emotional responses, learning and memory. In all of these regions neurogenesis has been described in normal and in manipulated mammalian brain. These data are reviewed in the context of a sensory-behavioral hypothesis on adult neurogenesis that olfactory input modulates neurogenesis in many different regions of the brain.

  8. Promoting axon regeneration in the adult CNS by modulation of the melanopsin/GPCR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songshan; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuejie; Liu, Wen; Wang, Yuqi; Jiang, Songshan; Wong, Yung Hou; Zhang, Yifeng; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Cell-type–specific G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling regulates distinct neuronal responses to various stimuli and is essential for axon guidance and targeting during development. However, its function in axonal regeneration in the mature CNS remains elusive. We found that subtypes of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in mice maintained high mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) levels after axotomy and that the light-sensitive GPCR melanopsin mediated this sustained expression. Melanopsin overexpression in the RGCs stimulated axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush by up-regulating mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). The extent of the regeneration was comparable to that observed after phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) knockdown. Both the axon regeneration and mTOR activity that were enhanced by melanopsin required light stimulation and Gq/11 signaling. Specifically, activating Gq in RGCs elevated mTOR activation and promoted axonal regeneration. Melanopsin overexpression in RGCs enhanced the amplitude and duration of their light response, and silencing them with Kir2.1 significantly suppressed the increased mTOR signaling and axon regeneration that were induced by melanopsin. Thus, our results provide a strategy to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury by modulating neuronal activity through GPCR signaling. PMID:26831088

  9. Morphological alterations of central nervous system (CNS) myelin in vanadium (V)-exposed adult rats.

    PubMed

    García, Graciela B; Quiroga, Ariel D; Stürtz, Nelson; Martinez, Alejandra I; Biancardi, María E

    2004-08-01

    In the present work we show morphological data of the in vivo susceptibility of CNS myelin to sodium metavanadate [V(+5)] in adult rats. The possible role of vanadium in behavioral alterations and in brain lipid peroxidation was also investigated. Animals were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 3 mg/kg body weight (bw) of sodium metavanadate [1.25 V/kg bw/day] for 5 consecutive days. Open field and rotarod tests were performed the day after the last dose had been administered and then animals were sacrificed by different methods for histological and lipid peroxidation studies. The present results show that intraperitoneal administration of V(+5) to adult rats resulted in changes in locomotor activity, specific myelin stainings and lipid peroxidation in some brain areas. They support the notion that CNS myelin could be a preferential target of V(+5)-mediated lipid peroxidation in adult rats. The mechanisms underlying this action could affect the myelin sheath leading to behavioral perturbations.

  10. Epigenetic choreographers of neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dengke K; Marchetto, Maria Carolina; Guo, Junjie U; Ming, Guo-li; Gage, Fred H; Song, Hongjun

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate cell differentiation during embryonic development and also serve as important interfaces between genes and the environment in adulthood. Neurogenesis in adults, which generates functional neural cell types from adult neural stem cells, is dynamically regulated by both intrinsic state-specific cell differentiation cues and extrinsic neural niche signals. Epigenetic regulation by DNA and histone modifiers, non-coding RNAs and other self-sustained mechanisms can lead to relatively long-lasting biological effects and maintain functional neurogenesis throughout life in discrete regions of the mammalian brain. Here, we review recent evidence that epigenetic mechanisms carry out diverse roles in regulating specific aspects of adult neurogenesis and highlight the implications of such epigenetic regulation for neural plasticity and disorders. PMID:20975758

  11. ERK1/2 Activation in Preexisting Oligodendrocytes of Adult Mice Drives New Myelin Synthesis and Enhanced CNS Function

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Marisa A.; Urbanek, Kelly; Torres, Lester; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus; Rubio, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence shows that mechanisms controlling CNS plasticity extend beyond the synapse and that alterations in myelin can modify conduction velocity, leading to changes in neural circuitry. Although it is widely accepted that newly generated oligodendrocytes (OLs) produce myelin in the adult CNS, the contribution of preexisting OLs to functional myelin remodeling is not known. Here, we show that sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in preexisting OLs of adult mice is sufficient to drive increased myelin thickness, faster conduction speeds, and enhanced hippocampal-dependent emotional learning. Although preexisting OLs do not normally contribute to remyelination, we show that sustained activation of ERK1/2 renders them able to do so. These data suggest that strategies designed to push mature OLs to reinitiate myelination may be beneficial both for enhancing remyelination in demyelinating diseases and for increasing neural plasticity in the adult CNS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelin is a crucial regulator of CNS plasticity, function, and repair. Although it is generally accepted that new myelin production in the adult CNS is initiated by newly generated oligodendrocytes (OLs), great interest remains in additionally driving mature preexisting OLs to make myelin. The ability to induce myelination by the larger population of preexisting OLs carries the potential for enhanced remyelination in demyelinating diseases and increased neural plasticity in the adult CNS. Here, we show that sustained activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway is sufficient to drive mature OLs in the adult mouse CNS to reinitiate myelination, leading to new myelin wraps and functional changes. PMID:27581459

  12. Adult neurogenesis in the mammalian hippocampus: Why the dentate gyrus?

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity after the perinatal period suggests that unique aspects of the structure and function of DG and olfactory bulb circuits allow them to benefit from the adult generation of neurons. In this review, we consider the distinctive features of the DG that may account for it being able to profit from this singular form of neural plasticity. Approaches to the problem of neurogenesis are grouped as “bottom-up,” where the phenotype of adult-born granule cells is contrasted to that of mature developmentally born granule cells, and “top-down,” where the impact of altering the amount of neurogenesis on behavior is examined. We end by considering the primary implications of these two approaches and future directions. PMID:24255101

  13. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation and CNS Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Hamblin, Milton H; Lee, Jean-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    In neurological disorders, pathological lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) may be globally dispersed throughout the brain or localized to specific regions. Although native neural stem cells (NSCs) are present in the adult mammalian brain, intrinsic self-repair of injured adult CNS tissue is inadequate or ineffective. The brain's poor regenerative ability may be due to the fact that NSCs are restricted to discrete locations, are few in number, or are surrounded by a microenvironment that does not support neuronal differentiation. Therapeutic potential of NSC transplantation in CNS diseases characterized by global degeneration requires that gene products and/or replaced cells be widely distributed. Global degenerative CNS diseases include inherited pediatric neurodegenerative diseases (inborn errors of metabolism, including lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), such as Tay-Sachs-related Sandhoff disease), hypoxic or ischemic encephalopathy, and some adult CNS diseases (such as multiple sclerosis). Both mouse and human NSCs express many chemokines and chemokine receptors (including CXCR4 and adhesion molecules, such as integrins, selectins, and immunoglobulins) that mediate homing to sources of inflammatory chemokines, such as SDF-1α. In mammalian brains of all ages, NSCs may be attracted even at a great distance to regions of neurodegeneration. Consequently, NSC transplantation presents a promising strategy for treating many CNS diseases.

  14. Live or let die - retinal ganglion cell death and survival during development and in the lesioned adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Bähr, M

    2000-10-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is a common and widespread phenomenon that is important for proper development of the nervous system. In the adult CNS, however, apoptosis contributes to secondary cell loss after various types of lesions. The retino-tectal system has been successfully used as a convenient model system to study the molecular mechanisms of neuronal apoptosis and survival during development and in the lesioned adult CNS. This review describes the current knowledge about the interactions of cell death and survival pathways in general and for retinal ganglion cells specifically.

  15. Endothelial β-Catenin Signaling Is Required for Maintaining Adult Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and CNS Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Khiem A.; Zhang, Xianming; Predescu, Dan; Huang, Xiaojia; Machado, Roberto F.; Göthert, Joachim R.; Malik, Asrar B.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Zhao, You-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background The blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed by brain endothelial cells (ECs) interconnected by tight junctions (TJs) is essential for the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). Although studies have shown the importance of various signaling molecules in BBB formation during development, little is known about the molecular basis regulating the integrity of the adult BBB. Methods and Results Using a mouse model with tamoxifen-inducible EC-restricted disruption of ctnnb1 (iCKO), here we show that endothelial β-catenin signaling is essential for maintaining BBB integrity and CNS homeostasis in adult. The iCKO mice developed severe seizures accompanied by neuronal injury, multiple brain petechial hemorrhages, and CNS inflammation, and all died postictal. Disruption of endothelial β-catenin induced BBB breakdown and downregulation of specific TJ proteins Claudin-1 and -3 in adult brain ECs. The clinical relevance of the data is indicated by the observation of decreased expression of Claudin-1 and nuclear β-catenin in brain ECs of hemorrhagic lesions of hemorrhagic stroke patients. Conclusion These results demonstrate the prerequisite role of endothelial β-catenin in maintaining the integrity of adult BBB. The results suggest that BBB dysfunction secondary to defective β-catenin transcription activity is a key pathogenic factor in hemorrhagic stroke, seizure activity and CNS inflammation. PMID:26538583

  16. Spatially-dependent Dynamic MAPK Modulation by the Nde1-Lis1-Brap Complex Patterns Mammalian CNS

    PubMed Central

    Lanctot, Alison A.; Peng, Chian-Yu; Pawlisz, Ashley S.; Joksimovic, Milan; Feng, Yuanyi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Regulating cell proliferation and differentiation in CNS development requires both extraordinary complexity and precision. Neural progenitors receive graded overlapping signals from midline signaling centers, yet each makes a unique cell fate decision in a spatiotemporally restricted pattern. The Nde1-Lis1 complex regulates individualized cell fate decisions based on the geographical location with respect to the midline. While cells distant from the midline fail to self-renew in the Nde1-Lis1 double mutant CNS, cells embedded in the signaling centers showed marked over-proliferation. A direct interaction between Lis1 and Brap, a MAPK signaling threshold modulator, mediates this differential response to mitogenic signal gradients. Nde1-Lis1 deficiency resulted in a spatially-dependent alteration of MAPK scaffold Ksr and hyper-activation of MAPK. Epistasis analyses supported synergistic Brap and Lis1 functions. These results suggest that a molecular complex composed of Nde1, Lis1, and Brap regulates the dynamic MAPK signaling threshold in a spatially-dependent fashion. PMID:23673330

  17. Antibodies to MOG in adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Woodhall, Mark R.; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kim, Seong-Joon; Park, Kyung Seok; Vincent, Angela; Lee, Kwang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical relevance of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG-Ab) in a cohort of adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease (IDD) of the CNS. Methods: Live cell-based assays for MOG-Ab (IgG1 subset) and antibody to aquaporin-4 (AQP4-Ab) were performed in a cohort of 270 adult patients with IDD and 72 controls. Patients were first grouped by positive antibody result as MOG-Ab or AQP4-Ab, and the remainder were grouped by published diagnostic criteria. Results: Seventeen patients with IDD (6.3%) had MOG-Abs and 49 patients (18.1%) had AQP4-Abs; none had both antibodies. The MOG-Ab patients predominantly manifested with isolated symptoms of optic neuritis (83%). One-third of these patients experienced relapses, which involved only the optic nerve, and all relapsed within 1 year of disease onset. At onset, MRI in the MOG-Ab group uniquely demonstrated perineural enhancement, extending to the soft tissues around the optic nerves (33%). Although about 30% of MOG-Ab patients had brain MRI lesions, they had fewer periventricular lesions than the 26 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS); none of these lesions were ovoid or perpendicular to the ventricle. Moreover, MOG-Ab patients did not meet the diagnostic criteria for definite neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and had less spinal cord involvement than the AQP4-Ab group. Four patients (23.5%) had poor visual outcomes (<0.2) or paraplegia. Conclusions: MOG-Abs may be a disease-specific biomarker in adult patients with IDD who have a disease distinct from NMO or MS. The radiologic as well as clinical manifestations of MOG-Ab patients can be useful in their differential diagnosis. PMID:26516628

  18. Hereditary leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids: a spectrum of phenotypes from CNS vasculitis to parkinsonism in an adult onset leukodystrophy series

    PubMed Central

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Phadke, Rahul; Brandner, Sebastian; Milonas, Ionnis; Dean, Andrew; Bajaj, Nin; McNicholas, Nuala; Costello, Daniel; Cronin, Simon; McGuigan, Chris; Rossor, Martin; Fox, Nick; Murphy, Elaine; Chataway, Jeremy; Houlden, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids (HDLS) is a hereditary, adult onset leukodystrophy which is characterised by the presence of axonal loss, axonal spheroids and variably present pigmented macrophages on pathological examination. It most frequently presents in adulthood with dementia and personality change. HDLS has recently been found to be caused by mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. Methods In this study, we sequenced the CSF1R gene in a cohort of 48 patients from the UK, Greece and Ireland with adult onset leukodystrophy of unknown cause. Results Five pathogenic mutations were found, including three novel mutations. The presentations ranged from suspected central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis to extrapyramidal to cognitive phenotypes. The case histories and imaging are presented here, in addition to neuropathological findings from two cases with novel mutations. Conclusion We estimate that CSF1R mutations account for 10% of idiopathic adult onset leukodystrophies and that genetic testing for CSF1R mutations is essential in adult patients presenting with undefined CNS vasculitis or a leukodystrophy with prominent neuropsychiatric signs or dementia. PMID:25935893

  19. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Weismann, Cara M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M.; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A.; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal−/−) at 1 × 1011 or 3 × 1011 vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36–76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75–86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 1011 vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 1011 vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316–576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250–264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  20. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Cara M; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal(-/-)) at 1 × 10(11) or 3 × 10(11) vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36-76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75-86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 10(11) vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 10(11) vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316-576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250-264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan.

  1. Adults with CNS primitive neuroectodermal tumors/pineoblastomas: results of multimodal treatment according to the pediatric HIT 2000 protocol.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Carsten; Müller, Klaus; von Hoff, Katja; Kwiecien, Robert; Pietsch, Torsten; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Gerber, Nicolas U; Hau, Peter; Kuehl, Joachim; Kortmann, Rolf D; von Bueren, André O; Rutkowski, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    Central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumors (CNS-PNET) and pineoblastomas (PBL) are rare in adulthood. Knowledge on clinical outcome and the efficacy and toxicities of chemotherapy in addition to radiotherapy is limited. Patients older than 21 years at diagnosis were followed in the observational arm of the prospective pediatric multicenter trial HIT 2000. After surgery, craniospinal irradiation and maintenance or sandwich chemotherapy were recommended. Radiotherapy was normo- (35.2 Gy; tumor region, 55.0 Gy; metastasis, 49.6 Gy) or hyperfractionated (40.0 Gy; tumor bed, 68.0 Gy; metastasis, 50-60 Gy). Maintenance chemotherapy consisted of eight courses (vincristine, lomustine, cisplatin). Sandwich chemotherapy included two cycles of postoperative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, and four courses of maintenance chemotherapy. Seventeen patients (CNS-PNET, n = 7; PBL, n = 10), median age 30 years, were included. Eight patients had a postoperative residual tumor and four patients metastatic disease. The median follow-up of ten surviving patients was 41 months. The estimated rates for 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were 68 ± 12 and 66 ± 13%, respectively. PBL compared to CNS-PNET tended towards a better PFS, although the difference was not clear (p = 0.101). Both chemotherapeutic (maintenance, n = 6; sandwich, n = 8) protocols did not differ in their PFS and were feasible with acceptable toxicities. Intensified regimens of combined chemo- and radiotherapy are generally feasible in adults with CNS-PNET/PBL. The impact of intensified chemotherapy on survival should be further assessed.

  2. The Social Environment and Neurogenesis in the Adult Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis – the formation of new neurons in adulthood – has been shown to be modulated by a variety of endogenous (e.g., trophic factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones) as well as exogenous (e.g., physical activity and environmental complexity) factors. Research on exogenous regulators of adult neurogenesis has focused primarily on the non-social environment. More recently, however, evidence has emerged suggesting that the social environment can also affect adult neurogenesis. The present review details the effects of adult–adult (e.g., mating and chemosensory interactions) and adult–offspring (e.g., gestation, parenthood, and exposure to offspring) interactions on adult neurogenesis. In addition, the effects of a stressful social environment (e.g., lack of social support and dominant–subordinate interactions) on adult neurogenesis are reviewed. The underlying hormonal mechanisms and potential functional significance of adult-generated neurons in mediating social behaviors are also discussed. PMID:22586385

  3. Biologic scaffold for CNS repair.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanwei; Modo, Michel; Badylak, Stephen F

    2014-05-01

    Injury to the CNS typically results in significant morbidity and endogenous repair mechanisms are limited in their ability to restore fully functional CNS tissue. Biologic scaffolds composed of individual purified components have been shown to facilitate functional tissue reconstruction following CNS injury. Extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from mammalian tissues retain a number of bioactive molecules and their ability for CNS repair has recently been recognized. In addition, novel biomaterials for dural mater repairs are of clinical interest as the dura provides barrier function and maintains homeostasis to CNS. The present article describes the application of regenerative medicine principles to the CNS tissues and dural mater repair. While many approaches have been exploring the use of cells and/or therapeutic molecules, the strategies described herein focus upon the use of extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from mammalian tissues that are free of cells and exogenous factors.

  4. CNS development: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowakowski, R. S.; Hayes, N. L.

    1999-01-01

    The basic principles of the development of the central nervous system (CNS) are reviewed, and their implications for both normal and abnormal development of the brain are discussed. The goals of this review are (a) to provide a set of concepts to aid in understanding the variety of complex processes that occur during CNS development, (b) to illustrate how these concepts contribute to our knowledge of the normal anatomy of the adult brain, and (c) to provide a basis for understanding how modifications of normal developmental processes by traumatic injury, by environmental or experiential influences, or by genetic variations may lead to modifications in the resultant structure and function of the adult CNS.

  5. Erythropoietin promotes regeneration of adult CNS neurons via Jak2/Stat3 and PI3K/AKT pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Kretz, Alexandra; Happold, Caroline J; Marticke, Julia K; Isenmann, Stefan

    2005-08-01

    The cytokine hormone erythropoietin (EPO) has proved neuroprotective in CNS injury, and clinical trials for ischemic stroke are ongoing. The capability of EPO to restore postmitotic CNS architecture and function by fibre regeneration has not been examined. Here, we compared in vitro outgrowth capacity of adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following optic nerve (ON) lesion in the presence and absence of EPO. Immediate EPO conditioning in vivo, or delayed EPO treatment of cultures with 10--10,000 IU rhEPO significantly increased numbers (2.66-fold) and length (8.31-fold) of newly generated neurites, without evoking rheological complications. EPO induced Stat3 phosphorylation in RGCs, and inhibition of Jak2/Stat3 abolished EPO-induced growth. EPO-facilitated neuritogenesis was paralleled by upregulation of Bcl-X(L), a Bcl-2 homologue capable of promoting RGC regeneration. The PI3K/Akt pathway was also involved in antiapoptotic and regeneration-enhancing EPO actions. In conclusion, EPO treatment may offer a unique dual-function strategy for neuroprotection and regeneration.

  6. Activity-Dependent Plasticity and Gene Expression Modifications in the Adult CNS

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Daniela; Foscarin, Simona; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2011-01-01

    Information processing, memory formation, or functional recovery after nervous system damage depend on the ability of neurons to modify their functional properties or their connections. At the cellular/molecular level, structural modifications of neural circuits are finely regulated by intrinsic neuronal properties and growth-regulatory cues in the extracellular milieu. Recently, it has become clear that stimuli coming from the external world, which comprise sensory inflow, motor activity, cognitive elaboration, or social interaction, not only provide the involved neurons with instructive information needed to shape connection patterns to sustain adaptive function, but also exert a powerful influence on intrinsic and extrinsic growth-related mechanisms, so to create permissive conditions for neuritic remodeling. Here, we present an overview of recent findings concerning the effects of experience on molecular mechanisms underlying CNS structural plasticity, both in physiological conditions and after damage, with particular focus on activity-dependent modulation of growth-regulatory genes and epigenetic modifications. PMID:22144945

  7. An in vitro model of adult mammalian nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Alka; Li, Zhaobo; Aspalter, Manuela; Feiner, Jeffrey; Hoke, Ahmet; Zhou, Chunhua; O'Daly, Andres; Abdullah, Madeel; Rohde, Charles; Brushart, Thomas M

    2010-05-01

    The role of pathway-derived growth factors in the support of peripheral axon regeneration remains elusive. Few appropriate knock-out mice are available, and gene silencing techniques are rarely 100% effective. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed an in vitro organotypic co-culture system that accurately models peripheral nerve repair in the adult mammal. Spinal cord sections from P4 mice that express YFP in their neurons are used to innervate segments of P4 peripheral nerve. This reconstructed ventral root is then transected and joined to a nerve graft. Growth of axons across the nerve repair and into the graft can be imaged repeatedly with fluorescence microscopy to define regeneration speed, and parent neurons can be labeled in retrograde fashion to identify contributing neurons. Nerve graft harvested from adult mice remains viable in culture by both morphologic and functional criteria. Motoneurons are supported with GDNF for the first week in culture, after which they survive axotomy, and are thus functionally adult. This platform can be modified by using motoneurons from any genetically modified mouse that can be bred to express XFP, by harvesting nerve graft from any source, or by treating the culture systemically with antibodies, growth factors, or pathway inhibitors. The regeneration environment is controlled to a degree not possible in vivo, and the use of experimental animals is reduced substantially. The flexibility and control offered by this technique should thus make it a useful tool for the study of regeneration biology.

  8. Potential for neural regeneration after neurotoxic injury in the adult mammalian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooto, Sotaro; Akagi, Tadamichi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Akita, Joe; Mandai, Michiko; Honda, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Masayo

    2004-09-01

    It has long been believed that the retina of mature mammals is incapable of regeneration. In this study, using the N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotoxicity model of adult rat retina, we observed that some Müller glial cells were stimulated to proliferate in response to a toxic injury and produce bipolar cells and rod photoreceptors. Although these newly produced neurons were limited in number, retinoic acid treatment promoted the number of regenerated bipolar cells. Moreover, misexpression of basic helix-loop-helix and homeobox genes promoted the induction of amacrine, horizontal, and rod photoreceptor specific phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that retinal neurons regenerated even in adult mammalian retina after toxic injury. Furthermore, we could partially control the fate of the regenerated neurons with extrinsic factors or intrinsic genes. The Müller glial cells constitute a potential source for the regeneration of adult mammalian retina and can be a target for drug delivery and gene therapy in retinal degenerative diseases.

  9. Strength of ERK1/2 MAPK Activation Determines Its Effect on Myelin and Axonal Integrity in the Adult CNS

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Akihiro; Furusho, Miki; Dupree, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Myelin growth is a tightly regulated process driven by multiple signals. ERK1/2-MAPK signaling is an important regulator of myelin thickness. Because, in demyelinating diseases, the myelin formed during remyelination fails to achieve normal thickness, increasing ERK1/2 activity in oligodendrocytes is of obvious therapeutic potential for promoting efficient remyelination. However, other studies have suggested that increased levels of ERK1/2 activity could, in fact, have detrimental effects on myelinating cells. Because the strength, duration, or timing of ERK1/2 activation may alter the biological outcomes of cellular responses markedly, here, we investigated the effect of modulating ERK1/2 activity in myelinating cells using transgenic mouse lines in which ERK1/2 activation was upregulated conditionally in a graded manner. We found enhanced myelin gene expression and myelin growth in the adult CNS at both moderate and hyperactivated levels of ERK1/2 when upregulation commenced during developmental myelination or was induced later during adulthood in quiescent preexisting oligodendrocytes, after active myelination is largely terminated. However, a late onset of demyelination and axonal degeneration occurred at hyperelevated, but not moderately elevated, levels regardless of the timing of the upregulation. Similarly, myelin and axonal pathology occurred with elevated ERK1/2 activity in Schwann cells. We conclude that a fine tuning of ERK1/2 signaling strength is critically important for normal oligodendrocyte and Schwann cell function and that disturbance of this balance has negative consequences for myelin and axonal integrity in the long term. Therefore, therapeutic modulation of ERK1/2 activity in demyelinating disease or peripheral neuropathies must be approached with caution. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT ERK1/2-MAPK activation in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells is an important signal for promoting myelin growth during developmental myelination. Here, we show that

  10. Tangential migration of neuronal precursors of glutamatergic neurons in the adult mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Gerald J.; Zhou, Yi; Stadel, Ryan P.; Moss, Jonathan; Yong, Jing Hui A.; Ito, Shiori; Kawasaki, Nicholas K.; Phan, Alexander T.; Oh, Justin H.; Modak, Nikhil; Reed, Randall R.; Toni, Nicolas; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li

    2015-01-01

    In a classic model of mammalian brain formation, precursors of principal glutamatergic neurons migrate radially along radial glia fibers whereas GABAergic interneuron precursors migrate tangentially. These migration modes have significant implications for brain function. Here we used clonal lineage tracing of active radial glia-like neural stem cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus and made the surprising discovery that proliferating neuronal precursors of glutamatergic granule neurons exhibit significant tangential migration along blood vessels, followed by limited radial migration. Genetic birthdating and morphological and molecular analyses pinpointed the neuroblast stage as the main developmental window when tangential migration occurs. We also developed a partial “whole-mount” dentate gyrus preparation and observed a dense plexus of capillaries, with which only neuroblasts, among the entire population of progenitors, are directly associated. Together, these results provide insight into neuronal migration in the adult mammalian nervous system. PMID:26170290

  11. Genetic Pharmacotherapy as an Early CNS Drug Development Strategy: Testing Glutaminase Inhibition for Schizophrenia Treatment in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mingote, Susana; Masson, Justine; Gellman, Celia; Thomsen, Gretchen M.; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Merker, Robert J.; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna; Wang, Yvonne; Ernst, Rachel; Hen, René; Rayport, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genetic pharmacotherapy is an early drug development strategy for the identification of novel CNS targets in mouse models prior to the development of specific ligands. Here for the first time, we have implemented this strategy to address the potential therapeutic value of a glutamate-based pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia involving inhibition of the glutamate recycling enzyme phosphate-activated glutaminase. Mice constitutively heterozygous for GLS1, the gene encoding glutaminase, manifest a schizophrenia resilience phenotype, a key dimension of which is an attenuated locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. If resilience is due to glutaminase deficiency in adulthood, then glutaminase inhibitors should have therapeutic potential. However, this has been difficult to test given the dearth of neuroactive glutaminase inhibitors. So, we used genetic pharmacotherapy to ask whether adult induction of GLS1 heterozygosity would attenuate amphetamine responsiveness. We generated conditional floxGLS1 mice and crossed them with global CAGERT2cre∕+ mice to produce GLS1 iHET mice, susceptible to tamoxifen induction of GLS1 heterozygosity. One month after tamoxifen treatment of adult GLS1 iHET mice, we found a 50% reduction in GLS1 allelic abundance and glutaminase mRNA levels in the brain. While GLS1 iHET mice showed some recombination prior to tamoxifen, there was no impact on mRNA levels. We then asked whether induction of GLS heterozygosity would attenuate the locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. Before tamoxifen, control and GLS1 iHET mice did not differ in their response to amphetamine. One month after tamoxifen treatment, amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion was blocked in GLS1 iHET mice. The block was largely maintained after 5 months. Thus, a genetically induced glutaminase reduction—mimicking pharmacological inhibition—strongly attenuated the response to a propsychotic challenge, suggesting that glutaminase may be a novel

  12. Genetic Pharmacotherapy as an Early CNS Drug Development Strategy: Testing Glutaminase Inhibition for Schizophrenia Treatment in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Mingote, Susana; Masson, Justine; Gellman, Celia; Thomsen, Gretchen M; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Merker, Robert J; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna; Wang, Yvonne; Ernst, Rachel; Hen, René; Rayport, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic pharmacotherapy is an early drug development strategy for the identification of novel CNS targets in mouse models prior to the development of specific ligands. Here for the first time, we have implemented this strategy to address the potential therapeutic value of a glutamate-based pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia involving inhibition of the glutamate recycling enzyme phosphate-activated glutaminase. Mice constitutively heterozygous for GLS1, the gene encoding glutaminase, manifest a schizophrenia resilience phenotype, a key dimension of which is an attenuated locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. If resilience is due to glutaminase deficiency in adulthood, then glutaminase inhibitors should have therapeutic potential. However, this has been difficult to test given the dearth of neuroactive glutaminase inhibitors. So, we used genetic pharmacotherapy to ask whether adult induction of GLS1 heterozygosity would attenuate amphetamine responsiveness. We generated conditional floxGLS1 mice and crossed them with global CAG(ERT2cre∕+) mice to produce GLS1 iHET mice, susceptible to tamoxifen induction of GLS1 heterozygosity. One month after tamoxifen treatment of adult GLS1 iHET mice, we found a 50% reduction in GLS1 allelic abundance and glutaminase mRNA levels in the brain. While GLS1 iHET mice showed some recombination prior to tamoxifen, there was no impact on mRNA levels. We then asked whether induction of GLS heterozygosity would attenuate the locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. Before tamoxifen, control and GLS1 iHET mice did not differ in their response to amphetamine. One month after tamoxifen treatment, amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion was blocked in GLS1 iHET mice. The block was largely maintained after 5 months. Thus, a genetically induced glutaminase reduction-mimicking pharmacological inhibition-strongly attenuated the response to a propsychotic challenge, suggesting that glutaminase may be a novel target

  13. Years of potential life lost for brain and CNS tumors relative to other cancers in adults in the United States, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Chaturia; Gittleman, Haley; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Kruchko, Carol; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Years of potential life lost (YPLL) complement incidence and survival rates by measuring how much a patient's life is likely to be shortened by his or her cancer. In this study, we examine the impact of death due to brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors compared to other common cancers in adults by investigating the YPLL of adults in the United States. Methods Mortality and life table data were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics Vital Statistics Data for 2010. The study population included individuals aged 20 years or older at death who died from one of the selected cancers. YPLL was calculated by taking an individual's age at death and finding the corresponding expected remaining years of life using life table data. Results The cancers with the greatest mean YPLL were other malignant CNS tumors (20.65), malignant brain tumors (19.93), and pancreatic cancer (15.13) for males and malignant brain tumors (20.31), breast cancer (18.78), and other malignant CNS tumors (18.36) for females. For both sexes, non-Hispanic whites had the lowest YPLL, followed by non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics. Conclusion Malignant brain and other CNS tumors have the greatest mean YPLL, thereby reflecting their short survival time post diagnosis. These findings will hopefully motivate more research into mitigating the impact of these debilitating tumors. PMID:26459813

  14. Temporal features of adult neurogenesis: differences and similarities across mammalian species

    PubMed Central

    Brus, Maïna; Keller, Matthieu; Lévy, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Production of new neurons continues throughout life in most invertebrates and vertebrates like crustaceans, fishes, reptiles, birds, and mammals including humans. Most studies have been carried out on rodent models and demonstrated that adult neurogenesis is located mainly in two structures, the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ). If adult neurogenesis is well preserved throughout evolution, yet there are however some features which differ between species. The present review proposes to target similarities and differences in the mechanism of mammalian adult neurogenesis by comparing selected species including humans. We will highlight the cellular composition and morphological organization of the SVZ in primates which differs from that of rodents and may be of functional relevance. We will particularly focus on the dynamic of neuronal maturation in rodents, primates, and humans but also in sheep which appears to be an interesting model due to its similarities with the primate brain. PMID:23935563

  15. Biology of the Sertoli Cell in the Fetal, Pubertal, and Adult Mammalian Testis.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Zarzycka, Marta; Mruk, Dolores D

    A healthy man typically produces between 50 × 10(6) and 200 × 10(6) spermatozoa per day by spermatogenesis; in the absence of Sertoli cells in the male gonad, this individual would be infertile. In the adult testis, Sertoli cells are sustentacular cells that support germ cell development by secreting proteins and other important biomolecules that are essential for germ cell survival and maturation, establishing the blood-testis barrier, and facilitating spermatozoa detachment at spermiation. In the fetal testis, on the other hand, pre-Sertoli cells form the testis cords, the future seminiferous tubules. However, the role of pre-Sertoli cells in this process is much less clear than the function of Sertoli cells in the adult testis. Within this framework, we provide an overview of the biology of the fetal, pubertal, and adult Sertoli cell, highlighting relevant cell biology studies that have expanded our understanding of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  16. Potential for neural regeneration after neurotoxic injury in the adult mammalian retina

    PubMed Central

    Ooto, Sotaro; Akagi, Tadamichi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Akita, Joe; Mandai, Michiko; Honda, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Masayo

    2004-01-01

    It has long been believed that the retina of mature mammals is incapable of regeneration. In this study, using the N-methyl-d-aspartate neurotoxicity model of adult rat retina, we observed that some Müller glial cells were stimulated to proliferate in response to a toxic injury and produce bipolar cells and rod photoreceptors. Although these newly produced neurons were limited in number, retinoic acid treatment promoted the number of regenerated bipolar cells. Moreover, misexpression of basic helix–loop–helix and homeobox genes promoted the induction of amacrine, horizontal, and rod photoreceptor specific phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that retinal neurons regenerated even in adult mammalian retina after toxic injury. Furthermore, we could partially control the fate of the regenerated neurons with extrinsic factors or intrinsic genes. The Müller glial cells constitute a potential source for the regeneration of adult mammalian retina and can be a target for drug delivery and gene therapy in retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:15353594

  17. Control of adult neurogenesis by programmed cell death in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Hong, Caroline Jeeyeon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Sun, Woong; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-04-21

    The presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) and the production of new neurons in the adult brain have received great attention from scientists and the public because of implications to brain plasticity and their potential use for treating currently incurable brain diseases. Adult neurogenesis is controlled at multiple levels, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and programmed cell death (PCD). Among these, PCD is the last and most prominent process for regulating the final number of mature neurons integrated into neural circuits. PCD can be classified into apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death and emerging evidence suggests that all three may be important modes of cell death in neural stem/progenitor cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate PCD and thereby impact the intricate balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during adult neurogenesis are not well understood. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the extent, mechanism, and biological significance of PCD for the control of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the regulation of PCD at the molecular and systems levels is also discussed. Adult neurogenesis is a dynamic process, and the signals for differentiation, proliferation, and death of neural progenitor/stem cells are closely interrelated. A better understanding of how adult neurogenesis is influenced by PCD will help lead to important insights relevant to brain health and diseases.

  18. Identification of mammalian noggin and its expression in the adult nervous system.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, D M; Economides, A N; Rojas, E; Lamb, T M; Nuñez, L; Jones, P; Lp, N Y; Espinosa, R; Brannan, C I; Gilbert, D J

    1995-09-01

    The multiple roles of noggin during dorsal fate specification in Xenopus embryos, together with noggin's ability to directly induce neural tissue, inspired an effort to determine whether a similar molecule exists in mammals. Here we describe the identification of human and rat noggin and explore their expression patterns; we also localize the human NOGGIN gene to chromosome 17q22, and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 11. Mammalian noggin is remarkably similar in its sequence to Xenopus noggin, and is similarly active in induction assays performed on Xenopus embryo tissues. In the adult mammal, noggin is most notably expressed in particular regions of the nervous system, such as the tufted cells of the olfactory bulb, the piriform cortex of the brain, and the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, suggesting that one of the earliest acting neural inducers also has important roles in the adult nervous system.

  19. Disability, body image and sports/physical activity in adult survivors of childhood CNS tumors: population-based outcomes from a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Boman, Krister K; Hörnquist, Lina; De Graaff, Lisanne; Rickardsson, Jenny; Lannering, Birgitta; Gustafsson, Göran

    2013-03-01

    Childhood CNS tumor survivors risk health and functional impairments that threaten normal psychological development and self-perception. This study investigated the extent to which health and functional ability predict adult survivors' body image (BI) and self-confidence regarding sports and physical activity. The study cohort covered 708 eligible ≥ 18 year old CNS tumor survivors, and data from 528 (75 %) were analyzed. Disability was estimated using the Health Utilities Index™ Mark2/3, a multidimensional self-report instrument. Physical self-confidence in terms of BI and sports/physical activity-related self-confidence (SPAS) were assessed using the BI and the Sports/Athletics modules of a standardized self-report assessment scale. In adjusted regression models, global health and functional status (GHFS) predicted BI (B = 0.94, 95 % CI 0.69-1.19) and SPAS (B = 0.79, 95 % CI 0.55-1.04). Emotion and pain, and to a lesser degree cognition, speech and vision disability, were associated with poorer BI and SPAS. Gender, sub-diagnosis, and time since diagnosis influenced the relationship between health status and physical self-confidence outcomes. Females had poorer GHFS, BI and SPAS than males. Decreased health and functional ability following childhood CNS cancer intrudes on physical self-confidence, with females being at heightened risk for both disability and negative self-confidence. Identified disability and gender-related risk calls for a follow-up plan that integrates treatment of psychological sequelae in lifetime monitoring of childhood CNS tumor survivors to restore and protect self-image and self-confidence, essential mental health correlates. An expanded plan should recognize the need for such services, optimizing life-long quality of survival for CNS tumor survivors.

  20. Regulation of neonatal and adult mammalian heart regeneration by the miR-15 family

    PubMed Central

    Porrello, Enzo R.; Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; Simpson, Emma; Johnson, Brett A.; Grinsfelder, David; Canseco, Diana; Mammen, Pradeep P.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Olson, Eric N.; Sadek, Hesham A.

    2013-01-01

    We recently identified a brief time period during postnatal development when the mammalian heart retains significant regenerative potential after amputation of the ventricular apex. However, one major unresolved question is whether the neonatal mouse heart can also regenerate in response to myocardial ischemia, the most common antecedent of heart failure in humans. Here, we induced ischemic myocardial infarction (MI) in 1-d-old mice and found that this results in extensive myocardial necrosis and systolic dysfunction. Remarkably, the neonatal heart mounted a robust regenerative response, through proliferation of preexisting cardiomyocytes, resulting in full functional recovery within 21 d. Moreover, we show that the miR-15 family of microRNAs modulates neonatal heart regeneration through inhibition of postnatal cardiomyocyte proliferation. Finally, we demonstrate that inhibition of the miR-15 family from an early postnatal age until adulthood increases myocyte proliferation in the adult heart and improves left ventricular systolic function after adult MI. We conclude that the neonatal mammalian heart can regenerate after myocardial infarction through proliferation of preexisting cardiomyocytes and that the miR-15 family contributes to postnatal loss of cardiac regenerative capacity. PMID:23248315

  1. CNS Metastases from Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: Are They Really So Rare?

    PubMed Central

    Duczkowska, Agnieszka; Duczkowski, Marek; Bragoszewska, Hanna; Romaniuk-Doroszewska, Anna; Iwanowska, Beata; Szkudlinska-Pawlak, Sylwia; Madzik, Jaroslaw; Bilska, Katarzyna; Raciborska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To check whether primary involvement of brain/spinal cord by bone/soft tissue sarcomas' metastases in children is as rare as described and to present various morphological forms of bone/soft tissue sarcomas' CNS metastases. Methods. Patients with first diagnosis in 1999–2014 treated at single center were included with whole course of disease evaluation. Brain/spinal canal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/computed tomography were performed in cases suspicious for CNS metastases. Extension from skull/vertebral column metastases was excluded. Results. 550 patients were included. MRI revealed CNS metastases in 19 patients (incidence 3.45%), 14 boys, aged 5–22 years. There were 12/250 osteosarcoma cases, 2/200 Ewing's sarcoma, 1/50 chondrosarcoma, 3/49 rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), and 1/1 malignant mesenchymoma. There were 10 single metastases and 7 cases of multiple ones; in 2 RMS cases only leptomeningeal spread in brain and spinal cord was found. Calcified metastases were found in 3 patients and hemorrhagic in 4. In one RMS patient there were numerous solid, cystic, hemorrhagic lesions and leptomeningeal spread. Conclusions. CNS metastases are rare and late in children with bone/soft tissue sarcomas, although in our material more frequent (3.45%) than in other reports (0.7%). Hematogenous spread to brain and hemorrhagic and calcified lesions dominated in osteosarcoma. Ewing sarcoma tended to metastasize to skull bones. Soft tissue sarcomas presented various morphological forms. PMID:28243595

  2. The neonate versus adult mammalian immune system in cardiac repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Susanne; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    The immune system is a crucial player in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. A sophisticated cascade of events triggered upon injury ensures protection from infection and initiates and orchestrates healing. While the neonatal mammal can readily regenerate damaged tissues, adult regenerative capacity is limited to specific tissue types, and in organs such as the heart, adult wound healing results in fibrotic repair and loss of function. Growing evidence suggests that the immune system greatly influences the balance between regeneration and fibrotic repair. The neonate mammalian immune system has impaired pro-inflammatory function, is prone to T-helper type 2 responses and has an immature adaptive immune system skewed towards regulatory T cells. While these characteristics make infants susceptible to infection and prone to allergies, it may also provide an immunological environment permissive of regeneration. In this review we will give a comprehensive overview of the immune cells involved in healing and regeneration of the heart and explore differences between the adult and neonate immune system that may explain differences in regenerative ability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  3. Current recordings at the single channel level in adult mammalian isolated cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Guinamard, Romain; Hof, Thomas; Sallé, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes appropriate methods to investigate mammalian cardiac channels properties at the single channel level. Cell isolation is performed from new born or adult heart by enzymatic digestion on minced tissue or using the Langendorff apparatus. Isolation proceeding is suitable for rabbit, rat, and mouse hearts. In addition, isolation of human atrial cardiomyocytes is described. Such freshly isolated cells or cells maintained in primary culture are suitable for patch-clamp studies. Here we describe the single channel variants of the patch-clamp technique (cell-attached, inside-out, outside-out) used to investigate channel properties. Proceedings for the evaluation of biophysical properties such as conductance, ionic selectivity, regulations by extracellular and intracellular mechanisms are described. To illustrate the study, we provide an example by the characterization of a calcium-activated non-selective cation channel (TRPM4).

  4. [Proliferation of adult mammalian ventricular cardiomyocytes: a sporadic but feasible phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Vargas-González, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of adult mammalian ventricular cardiomyocytes has been ruled out by some researchers, who have argued that these cells are terminally differentiated; however, this dogma has been rejected because other researchers have reported that these cells can present the processes necessary to proliferate, that is, DNA synthesis, mitosis and cytokinesis when the heart is damaged experimentally through pharmacological and surgical strategies or due to pathological conditions concerning the cardiovascular system. This review integrates some of the available works in the literature evaluating the DNA synthesis, mitosis and cytokinesis in these myocytes, when the myocardium is damaged, with the purpose of knowing if their proliferation can be considered as a feasible phenomenon. The review is concluded with a reflection about the perspectives of the knowledge generated in this area.

  5. Sensory Response of Transplanted Astrocytes in Adult Mammalian Cortex In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuan; Chen, Chunhai; Yang, Zhiqi; He, Wenjing; Liao, Xiang; Ma, Qinlong; Deng, Ping; Lu, Jian; Li, Jingcheng; Wang, Meng; Li, Mingli; Zheng, Lianghong; Zhou, Zhuan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Liting; Jia, Hongbo; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Chen, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Glial precursor transplantation provides a potential therapy for brain disorders. Before its clinical application, experimental evidence needs to indicate that engrafted glial cells are functionally incorporated into the existing circuits and become essential partners of neurons for executing fundamental brain functions. While previous experiments supporting for their functional integration have been obtained under in vitro conditions using slice preparations, in vivo evidence for such integration is still lacking. Here, we utilized in vivo two-photon Ca2+ imaging along with immunohistochemistry, fluorescent indicator labeling-based axon tracing and correlated light/electron microscopy to analyze the profiles and the functional status of glial precursor cell-derived astrocytes in adult mouse neocortex. We show that after being transplanted into somatosensory cortex, precursor-derived astrocytes are able to survive for more than a year and respond with Ca2+ signals to sensory stimulation. These sensory-evoked responses are mediated by functionally-expressed nicotinic receptors and newly-established synaptic contacts with the host cholinergic afferents. Our results provide in vivo evidence for a functional integration of transplanted astrocytes into adult mammalian neocortex, representing a proof-of-principle for sensory cortex remodeling through addition of essential neural elements. Moreover, we provide strong support for the use of glial precursor transplantation to understand glia-related neural development in vivo. PMID:27405333

  6. Late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy for adult onset non-CNS cancer; cognitive impairment, brain structure and risk of dementia.

    PubMed

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Breteler, Monique M B; Boogerd, Willem; Seynaeve, Caroline; Schagen, Sanne B

    2013-10-01

    Few studies have investigated the late (i.e. ≥ 5 years post-treatment) effects of chemotherapy for non-central nervous system (non-CNS) cancer on the brain. Here we discuss the studies that have investigated the late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy for non-CNS cancer on cognitive function (n=6); brain structure and function (n=5); and incidence of dementia (n=4). The neuropsychological studies showed long-term adverse cognitive problems in chemotherapy-exposed breast cancer survivors. This is in line with results from neuroimaging studies that report long-term brain structural alterations after chemotherapy. The studies exploring the association between chemotherapy and the incidence of dementia were contradictive and showed no clear relationship between the two phenomena. Although several methodological issues limit the validity and interpretation of some of the results of these studies, they suggest that chemotherapy is associated with subtle, yet long-lasting cognitive deficits, possibly related to brain structural and functional differences, but as yet not with an increased risk of dementia.

  7. Novel Kv3 glycoforms differentially expressed in adult mammalian brain contain sialylated N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Ruth A; Corey, Melissa J; Cartwright, Tara A

    2008-02-01

    The N-glycan pool of mammalian brain contains remarkably high levels of sialylated N-glycans. This study provides the first evidence that voltage-gated K+ channels Kv3.1, Kv3.3, and Kv3.4, possess distinct sialylated N-glycan structures throughout the central nervous system of the adult rat. Electrophoretic migration patterns of Kv3.1, Kv3.3, and Kv3.4 glycoproteins from spinal cord, hypothalamus, thalamus, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum membranes digested with glycosidases were used to identify the various glycoforms. Differences in the migration of Kv3 proteins were attributed to the desialylated N-glycans. Expression levels of the Kv3 proteins were highest in cerebellum, whereas those of Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 were much lower in the other 5 regions. The lowest level of Kv3.1 was expressed in the hypothalamus, whereas the lowest levels of Kv3.3 were expressed in both thalamus and hypothalamus. The other regions expressed intermediate levels of Kv3.3, with spinal cord expressing the highest. The expression level of Kv3.4 in the hippocampus was slightly lower than that in cerebellum, and was closely followed by the other 4 regions, with spinal cord expressing the lowest level. We suggest that novel Kv3 glycoforms may endow differences in channel function and expression among regions throughout the central nervous system.

  8. NG2+ CNS glial progenitors remain committed to the oligodendrocyte lineage in postnatal life and following neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shin H.; Fukaya, Masahiro; Yang, Jason K.; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Bergles, Dwight E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The mammalian CNS contains a ubiquitous population of glial progenitors known as NG2+ cells that have the ability to develop into oligodendrocytes and undergo dramatic changes in response to injury and demyelination. Although it has been reported that NG2+ cells are multipotent, their fate in health and disease remains controversial. Here, we generated PDGFαR-CreER transgenic mice and followed their fate in vivo in the developing and adult CNS. These studies revealed that NG2+ cells in the postnatal CNS generate myelinating oligodendrocytes, but not astrocytes or neurons. In regions of neurodegeneration in the spinal cord of ALS mice, NG2+ cells exhibited enhanced proliferation and accelerated differentiation into oligodendrocytes, but remained committed to the oligodendrocyte lineage. These results indicate that NG2+ cells in the normal CNS are oligodendrocyte precursors with restricted lineage potential, and that cell loss and gliosis are not sufficient to alter the lineage potential of these progenitors in ALS mice. PMID:21092857

  9. Long-Term Neurocognitive Functioning and Social Attainment in Adult Survivors of Pediatric CNS Tumors: Results From the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Krasin, Matthew J.; Liu, Wei; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Ojha, Rohit P.; Sadighi, Zsila S.; Gupta, Pankaj; Kimberg, Cara; Srivastava, Deokumar; Merchant, Thomas E.; Gajjar, Amar; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the prevalence and severity of neurocognitive impairment in adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumors and to examine associated treatment exposures. Patients and Methods Participants included 224 survivors of CNS tumors who were treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital (current median age [range], 26 years [19 to 53 years]; time from diagnosis, 18 years [11 to 42 years]) and completed neurocognitive testing. Information on cranial radiation therapy (CRT) doses and parameters of delivery were abstracted from medical records. The prevalence of severe impairment (ie, at least two standard deviations below normative mean) was compared across radiation treatment groups (no CRT, focal irradiation, craniospinal irradiation) using the χ2 test. Log-binomial models were used to estimate risk ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% CIs for severe impairment. Results In multivariable models, craniospinal irradiation was associated with a 1.5- to threefold increased risk of severe impairment compared with no CRT (eg, intelligence: RR = 2.70; 95% CI, 1.37 to 5.34; memory: RR = 2.93; 95% CI, 1.69 to 5.08; executive function: RR = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.24 to 2.45). Seizures were associated with impaired academic performance (RR = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.14), attention (RR = 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.13), and memory (RR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.99). Hydrocephalus with shunt placement was associated with impaired intelligence (RR = 1.78; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.82) and memory (RR = 1.42; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.95). Differential follow-up time contributed to variability in prevalence estimates between survivors treated with older nonconformal and those treated with more contemporary conformal radiation therapy methods. Neurocognitive impairment was significantly associated with lower educational attainment, unemployment, and nonindependent living. Conclusion Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk of severe neurocognitive impairment in adulthood. The prevalence of severe

  10. Regeneration strategies after the adult mammalian central nervous system injury—biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yudan; Yang, Zhaoyang; Li, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has very restricted intrinsic regeneration ability under the injury or disease condition. Innovative repair strategies, therefore, are urgently needed to facilitate tissue regeneration and functional recovery. The published tissue repair/regeneration strategies, such as cell and/or drug delivery, has been demonstrated to have some therapeutic effects on experimental animal models, but can hardly find clinical applications due to such methods as the extremely low survival rate of transplanted cells, difficulty in integrating with the host or restriction of blood–brain barriers to administration patterns. Using biomaterials can not only increase the survival rate of grafts and their integration with the host in the injured CNS area, but also sustainably deliver bioproducts to the local injured area, thus improving the microenvironment in that area. This review mainly introduces the advances of various strategies concerning facilitating CNS regeneration. PMID:27047678

  11. Basic Concepts of CNS Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowakowski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this review are to: (1) provide a set of concepts to aid in the understanding of complex processes which occur during central nervous system (CNS) development; (2) illustrate how they contribute to our knowlege of adult brain anatomy; and (3) delineate how modifications of normal developmental processes may affect the structure and…

  12. The adult CNS retains the potential to direct region-specific differentiation of a transplanted neuronal precursor cell line.

    PubMed

    Shihabuddin, L S; Hertz, J A; Holets, V R; Whittemore, S R

    1995-10-01

    The chronic survival and differentiation of the conditionally immortalized neuronal cell line, RN33B, was examined following transplantation into the adult and neonatal rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. In clonal culture, differentiated RN33B cells express p75NTR and trkB mRNA and protein, and respond to brain-derived neurotrophic factor treatment by inducing c-fos mRNA. Transplanted cells, identified using immunohistochemistry to detect beta-galactosidase expression, were seen in most animals up to 24 weeks posttransplantation (the latest time point examined). Stably integrated cells with various morphologies consistent with their transplantation site were observed. In the cerebral cortex, many RN33B cells differentiated with morphologies similar to pyramidal neurons and stellate cells. In the hippocampal formation, many RN33B cells assumed morphologies similar to pyramidal neurons characteristic of CA1 and CA3 regions, granular cell layer neurons of the dentate gyrus, and polymorphic neurons of the hilar region. Identical morphologies were observed in both adult and neonatal hosts, although a greater percentage of beta-galactosidase immunoreactive cells had differentiated in the neonatal brains. These results suggest that RN33B cells have the developmental plasticity to respond to local microenvironmental signals and that the adult brain retains the capacity to direct the differentiation of neuronal precursor cells in a direction that is consistent with that of endogenous neurons.

  13. Patterns of diagnostic marker assessment in adult diffuse glioma: a survey of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS).

    PubMed

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Vital, Anne; Hainfellner, Johannes A

    The 2016 update of the WHO classification has introduced an integrated diagnostic approach that incorporates both tumor morphology and molecular information. This conceptual change has far-reaching implications, especially for neuropathologists who are in the forefront of translating molecular markers to routine diagnostic use. Adult diffuse glioma is a prototypic example for a group of tumors that underwent substantial regrouping, and it represents a major workload for surgical neuropathologists. Hence, we conducted a survey among members of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS) in order to assess 1) the extent to which molecular markers have already been incorporated in glioma diagnoses, 2) which molecular techniques are in daily use, and 3) to set a baseline for future surveys in this field. Based on 130 responses from participants across 40 nations neuropathologists uniformly rate molecular marker testing as highly relevant and already incorporate molecular information in their diagnostic assessments. At the same time however, the survey documents substantial differences in access to crucial biomarkers and molecular techniques across geographic regions and within individual countries. Concerns are raised concerning the validity of test assays with MGMT, 1p19q, and ATRX; being perceived as most problematic. Neuropathologists advocate the need for international harmonization of standards and consensus guidelines, and the majority is willing to actively engage in interlaboratory trials aiming at quality control (Figure 1).
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  14. Patterns of diagnostic marker assessment in adult diffuse glioma: a survey of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS)

    PubMed Central

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Kristensen, Bjarne W.; Vital, Anne; Hainfellner, Johannes A.

    2017-01-01

    The 2016 update of the WHO classification has introduced an integrated diagnostic approach that incorporates both tumor morphology and molecular information. This conceptual change has far-reaching implications, especially for neuropathologists who are in the forefront of translating molecular markers to routine diagnostic use. Adult diffuse glioma is a prototypic example for a group of tumors that underwent substantial regrouping, and it represents a major workload for surgical neuropathologists. Hence, we conducted a survey among members of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS) in order to assess 1) the extent to which molecular markers have already been incorporated in glioma diagnoses, 2) which molecular techniques are in daily use, and 3) to set a baseline for future surveys in this field. Based on 130 responses from participants across 40 nations neuropathologists uniformly rate molecular marker testing as highly relevant and already incorporate molecular information in their diagnostic assessments. At the same time however, the survey documents substantial differences in access to crucial biomarkers and molecular techniques across geographic regions and within individual countries. Concerns are raised concerning the validity of test assays with MGMT, 1p19q, and ATRX; being perceived as most problematic. Neuropathologists advocate the need for international harmonization of standards and consensus guidelines, and the majority is willing to actively engage in interlaboratory trials aiming at quality control (Figure 1). PMID:27966427

  15. Adult stem cells and mammalian epimorphic regeneration-insights from studying annual renewal of deer antlers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyi; Yang, Fuhe; Sheppard, Allan

    2009-09-01

    Mammalian organ regeneration is the "Holy Grail" of modern regenerative biology and medicine. The most dramatic organ replacement is known as epimorphic regeneration. To date our knowledge of epimorphic regeneration has come from studies of amphibians. Notably, these animals have the ability to reprogram phenotypically committed cells at the amputation plane toward an embryonic-like cell phenotype (dedifferentiation). The capability of mammals to initiate analogous regeneration, and whether similar mechanisms would be involved if it were to occur, remain unclear. Deer antlers are the only mammalian appendages capable of full renewal, and therefore offer a unique opportunity to explore how nature has solved the problem of mammalian epimorphic regeneration. Following casting of old hard antlers, new antlers regenerate from permanent bony protuberances, known as pedicles. Studies through morphological and histological examinations, tissue deletion and transplantation, and cellular and molecular techniques have demonstrated that antler renewal is markedly different from that of amphibian limb regeneration (dedifferentiation-based), being a stem cell-based epimorphic process. Antler stem cells reside in the pedicle periosteum. We envisage that epimorphic regeneration of mammalian appendages, other than antler, could be made possible by recreating comparable milieu to that which supports the elaboration of that structure from the pedicle periosteum.

  16. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Its Role in Early Neural Development and in Adult and Aged Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Lombó, Carla; Gonsebatt, María E.

    2016-01-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates signals triggered by energy, stress, oxygen levels, and growth factors. It regulates ribosome biogenesis, mRNA translation, nutrient metabolism, and autophagy. mTOR participates in various functions of the brain, such as synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, memory, and learning. mTOR is present during early neural development and participates in axon and dendrite development, neuron differentiation, and gliogenesis, among other processes. Furthermore, mTOR has been shown to modulate lifespan in multiple organisms. This protein is an important energy sensor that is present throughout our lifetime its role must be precisely described in order to develop therapeutic strategies and prevent diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to present our current understanding of the functions of mTOR in neural development, the adult brain and aging. PMID:27378854

  17. The electrophysiology of the olfactory-hippocampal circuit in the isolated and perfused adult mammalian brain in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, M; Paré, D; Llinás, R R

    1991-10-01

    The viability and general electrophysiological properties of the limbic system in the adult mammalian brain isolated and maintained in vitro by arterial perfusion are described. The isolated brain preparation combines the advantages of intact synaptic connectivity and accessibility of different areas of the encephalic mass with those of the in vitro approach, i.e., stability and control of the ionic environment. Extracellular field potential as well as intracellular recordings were performed at different levels in the limbic system of isolated adult guinea pig brains. The results demonstrate that in the piriform, entorhinal, and hippocampal cortices, the intrinsic electrical properties of individual cells as well as the spontaneous and evoked electrical activity in the neuronal ensembles they comprise, were virtually identical to those observed in vivo. The properties of the limbic system loop were determined.

  18. Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Two Distinct Classes of Erythroblastic Island Isolated from Adult Mammalian Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jia Hao; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Fraser, Stuart T

    2016-04-01

    Erythroblastic islands are multicellular clusters in which a central macrophage supports the development and maturation of red blood cell (erythroid) progenitors. These clusters play crucial roles in the pathogenesis observed in animal models of hematological disorders. The precise structure and function of erythroblastic islands is poorly understood. Here, we have combined scanning electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of surface proteins to develop a better understanding of the ultrastructure of these multicellular clusters. The erythroid-specific surface antigen Ter-119 and the transferrin receptor CD71 exhibited distinct patterns of protein sorting during erythroid cell maturation as detected by immuno-gold labeling. During electron microscopy analysis we observed two distinct classes of erythroblastic islands. The islands varied in size and morphology, and the number and type of erythroid cells interacting with the central macrophage. Assessment of femoral marrow isolated from a cavid rodent species (guinea pig, Cavis porcellus) and a marsupial carnivore species (fat-tailed dunnarts, Sminthopsis crassicaudata) showed that while the morphology of the central macrophage varied, two different types of erythroblastic islands were consistently identifiable. Our findings suggest that these two classes of erythroblastic islands are conserved in mammalian evolution and may play distinct roles in red blood cell production.

  19. A Novel Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Adult Zebrafish Demonstrates Response to Injury and Treatment Comparable with Mammalian Models.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Victoria; Park, Eugene; Liu, Elaine; Sobhebidari, Pooya; Tavakkoli, Jahan; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Baker, Andrew J

    2016-12-20

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and morbidity in industrialized countries with considerable associated health care costs. The cost and time associated with pre-clinical development of TBI therapeutics is lengthy and expensive with a poor track record of successful translation to the clinic. The zebrafish is an emerging model organism in research with unique technical and genomic strengths in the study of disease and development. Its high degree of genetic homology and cell signaling pathways relative to mammalian species and amenability to high and medium throughput assays has potential to accelerate the rate of therapeutic drug identification. Accordingly, we developed a novel closed-head model of TBI in adult zebrafish using a targeted, pulsed, high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) to induce mechanical injury of the brain. Western blot results indicated altered microtubule and neurofilament expression as well as increased expression of cleaved caspase-3 and beta APP (β-APP; p < 0.05). We used automated behavioral tracking software to evaluate locomotor deficits 24 and 48 h post-injury. Significant behavioral impairment included decreased swim distance and velocity (p < 0.05), as well as heightened anxiety and altered group social dynamics. Responses to injury were pHIFU dose-dependent and modifiable with MK-801, MDL-28170, or temperature modulation. Together, results indicate that the zebrafish exhibits responses to injury and intervention similar to mammalian TBI pathophysiology and suggest the potential for use to rapidly evaluate therapeutic compounds with high efficiency.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of a Model Extracellular Matrix that Induces Partial Regeneration of Adult Mammalian Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannas, I. V.; Lee, E.; Orgill, D. P.; Skrabut, E. M.; Murphy, G. F.

    1989-02-01

    Regeneration of the dermis does not occur spontaneously in the adult mammal. The epidermis is regenerated spontaneously provided there is a dermal substrate over which it can migrate. Certain highly porous, crosslinked collagen--glycosaminoglycan copolymers have induced partial morphogenesis of skin when seeded with dermal and epidermal cells and then grafted on standard, full-thickness skin wounds in the adult guinea pig. A mature epidermis and a nearly physiological dermis, which lacked hair follicles but was demonstrably different from scar, were regenerated over areas as large as 16 cm2. These chemical analogs of extracellular matrices were morphogenetically active provided that the average pore diameter ranged between 20 and 125 μ m, the resistance to degradation by collagenase exceeded a critical limit, and the density of autologous dermal and epidermal cells inoculated therein was >5 × 104 cells per cm2 of wound area. Unseeded copolymers with physical structures that were within these limits delayed the onset of wound contraction by about 10 days but did not eventually prevent it. Seeded copolymers not only delayed contraction but eventually arrested and reversed it while new skin was being regenerated. The data identify a model extracellular matrix that acts as if it were an insoluble growth factor with narrowly specified physicochemical structure, functioning as a transient basal lamina during morphogenesis of skin.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of a model extracellular matrix that induces partial regeneration of adult mammalian skin.

    PubMed Central

    Yannas, I V; Lee, E; Orgill, D P; Skrabut, E M; Murphy, G F

    1989-01-01

    Regeneration of the dermis does not occur spontaneously in the adult mammal. The epidermis is regenerated spontaneously provided there is a dermal substrate over which it can migrate. Certain highly porous, crosslinked collagen-glycosaminoglycan copolymers have induced partial morphogenesis of skin when seeded with dermal and epidermal cells and then grafted on standard, full-thickness skin wounds in the adult guinea pig. A mature epidermis and a nearly physiological dermis, which lacked hair follicles but was demonstrably different from scar, were regenerated over areas as large as 16 cm2. These chemical analogs of extracellular matrices were morphogenetically active provided that the average pore diameter ranged between 20 and 125 microns, the resistance to degradation by collagenase exceeded a critical limit, and the density of autologous dermal and epidermal cells inoculated therein was greater than 5 x 10(4) cells per cm2 of wound area. Unseeded copolymers with physical structures that were within these limits delayed the onset of wound contraction by about 10 days but did not eventually prevent it. Seeded copolymers not only delayed contraction but eventually arrested and reversed it while new skin was being regenerated. The data identify a model extracellular matrix that acts as if it were an insoluble growth factor with narrowly specified physiochemical structure, functioning as a transient basal lamina during morphogenesis of skin. Images PMID:2915988

  2. Epigenetic gene regulation in the adult mammalian brain: multiple roles in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Farah D

    2011-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) is one of numerous gene products necessary for long-term memory formation and dysregulation of bdnf has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive and mental disorders. Recent work indicates that epigenetic-regulatory mechanisms including the markings of histone proteins and associated DNA remain labile throughout the life-span and represent an attractive molecular process contributing to gene regulation in the brain. In this review, important information will be discussed on epigenetics as a set of newly identified dynamic transcriptional mechanisms serving to regulate gene expression changes in the adult brain with particular emphasis on bdnf transcriptional readout in learning and memory formation. This review will also highlight evidence for the role of epigenetics in aberrant bdnf gene regulation in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction associated with seizure disorders, Rett syndrome, Schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Such research offers novel concepts for understanding epigenetic transcriptional mechanisms subserving adult cognition and mental health, and furthermore promises novel avenues for therapeutic approach in the clinic.

  3. CNS and spinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Andre D; Panigrahy, Ashok; Fitz, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    Primary CNS tumors consist of a diverse group of neoplasms originating from various cell types in the CNS. Brain tumors are the most common solid malignancy in children under the age of 15 years and the second leading cause of cancer death after leukemia. The most common brain neoplasms in children differ consistently from those in older age groups. Pediatric brain tumors demonstrate distinct patterns of occurrence and biologic behavior according to sex, age, and race. This chapter highlights the imaging features of the most common tumors that affect the child's CNS (brain and spinal cord).

  4. Detection, Characterization, and Spontaneous Differentiation In Vitro of Very Small Embryonic-Like Putative Stem Cells in Adult Mammalian Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Parte, Seema; Telang, Jyoti; Daithankar, Vinita; Salvi, Vinita; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to detect, characterize, and study differentiation potential of stem cells in adult rabbit, sheep, monkey, and menopausal human ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Two distinct populations of putative stem cells (PSCs) of variable size were detected in scraped OSE, one being smaller and other similar in size to the surrounding red blood cells in the scraped OSE. The smaller 1–3 μm very small embryonic-like PSCs were pluripotent in nature with nuclear Oct-4 and cell surface SSEA-4, whereas the bigger 4–7 μm cells with cytoplasmic localization of Oct-4 and minimal expression of SSEA-4 were possibly the tissue committed progenitor stem cells. Pluripotent gene transcripts of Oct-4, Oct-4A, Nanog, Sox-2, TERT, and Stat-3 in human and sheep OSE were detected by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. The PSCs underwent spontaneous differentiation into oocyte-like structures, parthenote-like structures, embryoid body-like structures, cells with neuronal-like phenotype, and embryonic stem cell-like colonies, whereas the epithelial cells transformed into mesenchymal phenotype by epithelial–mesenchymal transition in 3 weeks of OSE culture. Germ cell markers like c-Kit, DAZL, GDF-9, VASA, and ZP4 were immuno-localized in oocyte-like structures. In conclusion, as opposed to the existing view of OSE being a bipotent source of oocytes and granulosa cells, mammalian ovaries harbor distinct very small embryonic-like PSCs and tissue committed progenitor stem cells population that have the potential to develop into oocyte-like structures in vitro, whereas mesenchymal fibroblasts appear to form supporting granulosa-like somatic cells. Research at the single-cell level, including complete gene expression profiling, is required to further confirm whether postnatal oogenesis is a conserved phenomenon in adult mammals. PMID:21291304

  5. Detection, characterization, and spontaneous differentiation in vitro of very small embryonic-like putative stem cells in adult mammalian ovary.

    PubMed

    Parte, Seema; Bhartiya, Deepa; Telang, Jyoti; Daithankar, Vinita; Salvi, Vinita; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to detect, characterize, and study differentiation potential of stem cells in adult rabbit, sheep, monkey, and menopausal human ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Two distinct populations of putative stem cells (PSCs) of variable size were detected in scraped OSE, one being smaller and other similar in size to the surrounding red blood cells in the scraped OSE. The smaller 1-3 μm very small embryonic-like PSCs were pluripotent in nature with nuclear Oct-4 and cell surface SSEA-4, whereas the bigger 4-7 μm cells with cytoplasmic localization of Oct-4 and minimal expression of SSEA-4 were possibly the tissue committed progenitor stem cells. Pluripotent gene transcripts of Oct-4, Oct-4A, Nanog, Sox-2, TERT, and Stat-3 in human and sheep OSE were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The PSCs underwent spontaneous differentiation into oocyte-like structures, parthenote-like structures, embryoid body-like structures, cells with neuronal-like phenotype, and embryonic stem cell-like colonies, whereas the epithelial cells transformed into mesenchymal phenotype by epithelial-mesenchymal transition in 3 weeks of OSE culture. Germ cell markers like c-Kit, DAZL, GDF-9, VASA, and ZP4 were immuno-localized in oocyte-like structures. In conclusion, as opposed to the existing view of OSE being a bipotent source of oocytes and granulosa cells, mammalian ovaries harbor distinct very small embryonic-like PSCs and tissue committed progenitor stem cells population that have the potential to develop into oocyte-like structures in vitro, whereas mesenchymal fibroblasts appear to form supporting granulosa-like somatic cells. Research at the single-cell level, including complete gene expression profiling, is required to further confirm whether postnatal oogenesis is a conserved phenomenon in adult mammals.

  6. Fm1-43 reveals membrane recycling in adult inner hair cells of the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Griesinger, Claudius B; Richards, Chistopher D; Ashmore, Jonathan F

    2002-05-15

    Neural transmission of complex sounds demands fast and sustained rates of synaptic release from the primary cochlear receptors, the inner hair cells (IHCs). The cells therefore require efficient membrane recycling. Using two-photon imaging of the membrane marker FM1-43 in the intact sensory epithelium within the cochlear bone of the adult guinea pig, we show that IHCs possess fast calcium-dependent membrane uptake at their apical pole. FM1-43 did not permeate through the stereocilial mechanotransducer channel because uptake kinetics were neither changed by the blockers dihydrostreptomycin and d-tubocurarine nor by treatment of the apical membrane with BAPTA, known to disrupt mechanotransduction. Moreover, the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow produced a similar labeling pattern to FM1-43, consistent with FM1-43 uptake via endocytosis. We estimate the membrane retrieval rate at approximately 0.5% of the surface area of the cell per second. Labeled membrane was rapidly transported to the base of IHCs by kinesin-dependent trafficking and accumulated in structures that resembled synaptic release sites. Using confocal imaging of FM1-43 in excised strips of the organ of Corti, we show that the time constants of fluorescence decay at the basolateral pole of IHCs and apical endocytosis were increased after depolarization of IHCs with 40 mm potassium, a stimulus that triggers calcium influx and increases synaptic release. Blocking calcium channels with either cadmium or nimodipine during depolarization abolished the rate increase of apical endocytosis. We suggest that IHCs use fast calcium-dependent apical endocytosis for activity-associated replenishment of synaptic membrane.

  7. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 2 Signaling Provokes Adverse Cardiac Remodeling in the Adult Mammalian Heart

    PubMed Central

    Divakaran, Vijay G.; Evans, Sarah; Topkara, Veli K.; Diwan, Abhinav; Burchfield, Jana; Gao, Feng; Dong, Jianwen; Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Barger, Philip M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily ligands that provoke a dilated cardiac phenotype signal through a common scaffolding protein termed TNF receptor associated factor 2 (TRAF2); however, virtually nothing is known with regard to TRAF2 signaling in the adult mammalian heart. Methods and Results We generated multiple founder lines of mice with cardiac restricted overexpression of TRAF2 and characterized the phenotype of mice with higher expression levels of TRAF2 (MHC-TRAF2HC). MHC-TRAF2HC transgenic mice developed a time-dependent increase in cardiac hypertrophy, LV dilation and adverse LV remodeling, and a significant decrease in LV +dP/dt and −dP/dt when compared to littermate (LM) controls (p < 0.05 compared to LM). During the early phases of LV remodeling there was a significant increase in total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity that corresponded with a decrease in total myocardial fibrillar collagen content. As the MHC-TRAF2HC mice aged, there was a significant decrease in total MMP activity accompanied by an increase in total fibrillar collagen content and an increase in myocardial tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels. There was a significant increase in NF-κB activation at 4 – 12 weeks and JNK activation at 4 weeks in the MHCs TRAF2HC mice. Transciptional profiling revealed that > 95% of the hypertrophic/dilated cardiomyopathy-related genes that were significantly upregulated genes in the MHC-TRAF2HC hearts contained κB elements in their promoters. Conclusions These results show for the first time that targeted overexpression of TRAF2 is sufficient to mediate adverse cardiac remodeling in the heart. PMID:23493088

  8. Estrogen and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampus: complexity of steroid hormone-growth factor interactions in the adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Scharfman, Helen E; MacLusky, Neil J

    2006-12-01

    In the CNS, there are widespread and diverse interactions between growth factors and estrogen. Here we examine the interactions of estrogen and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), two molecules that have historically been studied separately, despite the fact that they seem to share common targets, effects, and mechanisms of action. The demonstration of an estrogen-sensitive response element on the BDNF gene provided an impetus to explore a direct relationship between estrogen and BDNF, and predicted that the effects of estrogen, at least in part, might be due to the induction of BDNF. This hypothesis is discussed with respect to the hippocampus, where substantial evidence has accumulated in favor of it, but alternate hypotheses are also raised. It is suggested that some of the interactions between estrogen and BDNF, as well as the controversies and implications associated with their respective actions, may be best appreciated in light of the ability of BDNF to induce neuropeptide Y (NPY) synthesis in hippocampal neurons. Taken together, this tri-molecular cascade, estrogen-BDNF-NPY, may be important in understanding the hormonal regulation of hippocampal function. It may also be relevant to other regions of the CNS where estrogen is known to exert profound effects, such as amygdala and hypothalamus; and may provide greater insight into neurological disorders and psychiatric illness, including Alzheimer's disease, depression and epilepsy.

  9. Risk and survival outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica W; Wernicke, A Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    Patients treated with cranial radiation are at risk of developing secondary CNS tumors. Understanding the incidence, treatment, and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors plays a role in clinical decision-making and patient education. Additionally, as meningiomas and pituitary tumors have been detected at increasing rates across all ages and may potentially be treated with radiation, it is important to know and communicate the risk of secondary tumors in children and adults. After conducting an extensive literature search, we identified publications that report incidence and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors. We reviewed 14 studies in children, which reported that radiation confers a 7- to 10-fold increase in subsequent CNS tumors, with a 20-year cumulative incidence ranging from 1.03 to 28.9 %. The latency period for secondary tumors ranged from 5.5 to 30 years, with gliomas developing in 5-10 years and meningiomas developing around 15 years after radiation. We also reviewed seven studies in adults, where the two strongest studies showed no increased risk while the remaining studies found a higher risk compared to the general population. The latency period for secondary CNS tumors in adults ranged from 5 to 34 years. Treatment and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors have been documented in four case series, which did not conclusively demonstrate that secondary CNS tumors fared worse than primary CNS tumors. Radiation-induced CNS tumors remain a rare occurrence that should not by itself impede radiation treatment. Additional investigation is needed on the risk of radiation-induced tumors in adults and the long-term outcomes of these tumors.

  10. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A; Toprak, Umut H; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C; Pajtler, Kristian W; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, André O; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S; Taylor, Michael D; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; Ellison, David W; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-02-25

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of institutionally diagnosed CNS-PNETs display molecular profiles indistinguishable from those of various other well-defined CNS tumor entities, facilitating diagnosis and appropriate therapy for patients with these tumors. From the remaining fraction of CNS-PNETs, we identify four new CNS tumor entities, each associated with a recurrent genetic alteration and distinct histopathological and clinical features. These new molecular entities, designated "CNS neuroblastoma with FOXR2 activation (CNS NB-FOXR2)," "CNS Ewing sarcoma family tumor with CIC alteration (CNS EFT-CIC)," "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with MN1 alteration (CNS HGNET-MN1)," and "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with BCOR alteration (CNS HGNET-BCOR)," will enable meaningful clinical trials and the development of therapeutic strategies for patients affected by poorly differentiated CNS tumors.

  11. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination.

  12. CNS Diseases and Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Pia; Rissotto, Roberto; Herbort, Carl P.; Murialdo, Ugo

    2011-01-01

    A number of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic and idiopathic disorders affect the eye and the central nervous system (CNS) concurrently or at different time frames. These conditions pose a diagnostic challenge to the clinician since they may present with similar ocular and neurological manifestations. The purpose of this review is to describe major neurological syndromes including multiple sclerosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, other autoimmune syndromes, and several infectious diseases which may affect the eye. This article may serve as a guide for the diagnosis and treatment of such disorders. It should be noted that these conditions have been viewed from a neurologist’s perspective thereby neurologic involvement is stressed. PMID:22454751

  13. Mammalian sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  14. CNS regulation of appetite.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Joanne A; Dovey, Terry M; Blundell, John E; Halford, Jason C G

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews the regulation of appetite from a biopsychological perspective. It considers psychological experiences and peripheral nutritional systems (both episodic and tonic) and addresses their relationship with the CNS networks that process and integrate their input. Whilst such regulatory aspects of obesity focus on homeostatic control mechanisms, in the modern environment hedonic aspects of appetite are also critical. Enhanced knowledge of the complexity of appetite regulation and the mechanisms that sustain obesity indicate the challenge presented by management of the obesity epidemic. Nonetheless, effective control of appetite expression remains a critical therapeutic target for weight management. Currently, strategies which utilise a combination of agents to target both homeostatic and hedonic control mechanisms represent the most promising approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'.

  15. Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation to Treat CNS Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Muhammad O.; Moore, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field. PMID:27582692

  16. [Imaging features of CNS tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; El Kharras, A; Mahi, M; Hsaini, Y; Benameur, M; Aziz, N; Chaouir, S; Akjouj, S

    2008-02-01

    CNS tuberculosis remains relatively frequent in endemic regions. Both CT and MRI are valuable for diagnosis. Even though non-specific, MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging and proton spectroscopy is more sensitive than CT for detection of some lesions. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the imaging features of CNS tuberculosis.

  17. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Molecular Switches Regulating CNS Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Kundi, Sarina; Ahmed, Zubair

    2012-01-01

    The poor or lack of injured adult central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration results in devastating consequences and poor functional recovery. The interplay between the intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributes to robust inhibition of axon regeneration of injured CNS neurons. The insufficient or lack of trophic support for injured neurons is considered as one of the major obstacles contributing to their failure to survive and regrow their axons after injury. In the CNS, many of the signalling pathways associated with neuronal survival and axon regeneration are regulated by several classes of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) that respond to a variety of ligands. This paper highlights and summarises the most relevant recent findings pertinent to different classes of the RTK family of molecules, with a particular focus on elucidating their role in CNS axon regeneration. PMID:22848811

  18. Comparing adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mammalian species and orders: influence of chronological age and life history stage.

    PubMed

    Amrein, Irmgard; Isler, Karin; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2011-09-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a prominent event in rodents. In species with longer life expectancies, newly born cells in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation are less abundant or can be completely absent. Several lines of evidence indicate that the regulatory mechanisms of adult neurogenesis differ between short- and long-lived mammals. After a critical appraisal of the factors and problems associated with comparing different species, we provide a quantitative comparison derived from seven laboratory strains of mice (BALB, C57BL/6, CD1, outbred) and rats (F344, Sprague-Dawley, Wistar), six other rodent species of which four are wild-derived (wood mouse, vole, spiny mouse and guinea pig), three non-human primate species (marmoset and two macaque species) and one carnivore (red fox). Normalizing the number of proliferating cells to total granule cell number, we observe an overall exponential decline in proliferation that is chronologically equal between species and orders and independent of early developmental processes and life span. Long- and short-lived mammals differ with regard to major life history stages; at the time points of weaning, age at first reproduction and average life expectancy, long-lived primates and foxes have significantly fewer proliferating cells than rodents. Although the database for neuronal differentiation is limited, we find indications that the extent of neuronal differentiation is subject to species-specific selective adaptations. We conclude that absolute age is the critical factor regulating cell genesis in the adult hippocampus of mammals. Ontogenetic and ecological factors primarily influence the regulation of neuronal differentiation rather than the rate of cell proliferation.

  19. HB-GAM (pleiotrophin) reverses inhibition of neural regeneration by the CNS extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Paveliev, Mikhail; Fenrich, Keith K.; Kislin, Mikhail; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Varjosalo, Markku; Kajander, Tommi; Mugantseva, Ekaterina; Ahonen-Bishopp, Anni; Khiroug, Leonard; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Rougon, Geneviève; Rauvala, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) glycosaminoglycans inhibit regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS). We report here that HB-GAM (heparin-binding growth-associated molecule; also known as pleiotrophin), a CS-binding protein expressed at high levels in the developing CNS, reverses the role of the CS chains in neurite growth of CNS neurons in vitro from inhibition to activation. The CS-bound HB-GAM promotes neurite growth through binding to the cell surface proteoglycan glypican-2; furthermore, HB-GAM abrogates the CS ligand binding to the inhibitory receptor PTPσ (protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma). Our in vivo studies using two-photon imaging of CNS injuries support the in vitro studies and show that HB-GAM increases dendrite regeneration in the adult cerebral cortex and axonal regeneration in the adult spinal cord. Our findings may enable the development of novel therapies for CNS injuries. PMID:27671118

  20. Expression of the Otx2 homeobox gene in the developing mammalian brain: embryonic and adult expression in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Rath, Martin F; Muñoz, Estela; Ganguly, Surajit; Morin, Fabrice; Shi, Qiong; Klein, David C; Møller, Morten

    2006-04-01

    Otx2 is a vertebrate homeobox gene, which has been found to be essential for the development of rostral brain regions and appears to play a role in the development of retinal photoreceptor cells and pinealocytes. In this study, the temporal expression pattern of Otx2 was revealed in the rat brain, with special emphasis on the pineal gland throughout late embryonic and postnatal stages. Widespread high expression of Otx2 in the embryonic brain becomes progressively restricted in the adult to the pineal gland. Crx (cone-rod homeobox), a downstream target gene of Otx2, showed a pineal expression pattern similar to that of Otx2, although there was a distinct lag in time of onset. Otx2 protein was identified in pineal extracts and found to be localized in pinealocytes. Total pineal Otx2 mRNA did not show day-night variation, nor was it influenced by removal of the sympathetic input, indicating that the level of Otx2 mRNA appears to be independent of the photoneural input to the gland. Our results are consistent with the view that pineal expression of Otx2 is required for development and we hypothesize that it plays a role in the adult in controlling the expression of the cluster of genes associated with phototransduction and melatonin synthesis.

  1. In vivo induction of massive proliferation, directed migration, and differentiation of neural cells in the adult mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, James; Reid, Steve; Kinyamu, Richard; Opole, Isaac; Opole, Rebecca; Baratta, Janie; Korc, Murray; Endo, Tiffany L.; Duong, Alexander; Nguyen, Gemi; Karkehabadhi, Masoud; Twardzik, Daniel; Loughlin, Sandra

    2000-01-01

    The development of an in vivo procedure for the induction of massive proliferation, directed migration, and neurodifferentiation (PMD) in the damaged adult central nervous system would hold promise for the treatment of human neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We investigated the in vivo induction of PMD in the forebrain of the adult rat by using a combination of 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons and infusions of transforming growth factor α (TGFα) into forebrain structures. Only in animals with both lesion and infusion of TGFα was there a rapid proliferation of forebrain stem cells followed by a timed migration of a ridge of neuronal and glial progenitors directed toward the region of the TGFα infusion site. Subsequently, increasing numbers of differentiated neurons were observed in the striatum. In behavioral experiments, there was a significant reduction of apomorphine-induced rotations in animals receiving the TGFα infusions. These results show that the brain contains stem cells capable of PMD in response to an exogenously administered growth factor. This finding has significant implications with respect to the development of treatments for both acute neural trauma and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:11121069

  2. Potential of adult mammalian lumbosacral spinal cord to execute and acquire improved locomotion in the absence of supraspinal input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Prober, R. J.; de Guzman, C. P.; de Leon, R.

    1992-01-01

    The neural circuitry of the lumbar spinal cord can generate alternating extension and flexion of the hindlimbs. The hindlimbs of adult cats with complete transection of the spinal cord at a low thoracic level (T12-T13) can perform full weight-supporting locomotion on a treadmill belt moving at a range of speeds. Some limitations in the locomotor capacity can be associated with a deficit in the recruitment level of the fast extensors during the stance phase and the flexors during the swing phase of a step cycle. The level of locomotor performance, however, can be enhanced by daily training on a treadmill while emphasizing full weight-support stepping and by providing appropriately timed sensory stimulation, loading, and/or pharmacologic stimulation of the hindlimb neuromuscular apparatus. Furthermore, there appears to be an interactive effect of these interventions. For example, the maximum treadmill speed that a spinal adult cat can attain and maintain is significantly improved with daily full weight-supporting treadmill training, but progressive recruitment of fast extensors becomes apparent only when the hindlimbs are loaded by gently pulling down on the tail during the stepping. Stimulation of the sural nerve at the initiation of the flexion phase of the step cycle can likewise markedly improve the locomotor capability. Administration of clonidine, in particular in combination with an elevated load, resulted in the most distinct and consistent alternating bursts of electromyographic activity during spinal stepping. These data indicate that the spinal cord has the ability to execute alternating activation of the extensor and flexor musculature of the hindlimbs (stepping) and that this ability can be improved by several interventions such as training, sensory stimulation, and use of some pharmacologic agents. Thus, it appears that the spinal cord, without supraspinal input, is highly plastic and has the potential to "learn," that is, to acquire and improve its

  3. Stem Cells in Mammalian Gonads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Ding, Xinbao; Wang, Jian

    Stem cells have great value in clinical application because of their ability to self-renew and their potential to differentiate into many different cell types. Mammalian gonads, including testes for males and ovaries for females, are composed of germline and somatic cells. In male mammals, spermatogonial stem cells maintain spermatogenesis which occurs continuously in adult testis. Likewise, a growing body of evidence demonstrated that female germline stem cells could be found in mammalian ovaries. Meanwhile, prior studies have shown that somatic stem cells exist in both testes and ovaries. In this chapter, we focus on mammalian gonad stem cells and discuss their characteristics as well as differentiation potentials.

  4. Tumor Necrosis Factor-stimulated Gene-6 (TSG-6) Is Constitutively Expressed in Adult Central Nervous System (CNS) and Associated with Astrocyte-mediated Glial Scar Formation following Spinal Cord Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J.; Lauer, Mark E.; Soleman, Sara; Zhao, Chao; Hascall, Vincent C.; Day, Anthony J.; Fawcett, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) binds to hyaluronan and can reorganize/stabilize its structure, also enhancing the binding of this glycosaminoglycan to its cell surface receptor, CD44. TSG-6 is rapidly up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines protecting tissues from the damaging effects of inflammation. Despite TSG-6 treatment having been shown to improve outcomes in an experimental model of traumatic brain injury, TSG-6 expression has not been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS). We hereby analyzed the expression profile of TSG-6 in the developing CNS and following injury. We show that TSG-6 is expressed in the rat CNS by GFAP+ and CD44+ astrocytes, solely in the mature brain and spinal cord, and is not present during the development of the CNS. TSG-6−/− mice present a reduced number of GFAP+ astrocytes when compared with the littermate TSG-6+/− mice. TSG-6 expression is drastically up-regulated after injury, and the TSG-6 protein is present within the glial scar, potentially coordinating and stabilizing the formation of this hyaluronan-rich matrix. This study shows that TSG-6 is expressed in the CNS, suggesting a role for TSG-6 in astrocyte activation and tissue repair. We hypothesize that within this context TSG-6 could participate in the formation of the glial scar and confer anti-inflammatory properties. Further studies are required to elucidate the therapeutic potential of targeting TSG-6 after CNS injury to promote its protective effects while reducing the inhibitory properties of the glial scar in axon regeneration. PMID:27435674

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor-stimulated Gene-6 (TSG-6) Is Constitutively Expressed in Adult Central Nervous System (CNS) and Associated with Astrocyte-mediated Glial Scar Formation following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Lauer, Mark E; Soleman, Sara; Zhao, Chao; Hascall, Vincent C; Day, Anthony J; Fawcett, James W

    2016-09-16

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) binds to hyaluronan and can reorganize/stabilize its structure, also enhancing the binding of this glycosaminoglycan to its cell surface receptor, CD44. TSG-6 is rapidly up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines protecting tissues from the damaging effects of inflammation. Despite TSG-6 treatment having been shown to improve outcomes in an experimental model of traumatic brain injury, TSG-6 expression has not been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS). We hereby analyzed the expression profile of TSG-6 in the developing CNS and following injury. We show that TSG-6 is expressed in the rat CNS by GFAP(+) and CD44(+) astrocytes, solely in the mature brain and spinal cord, and is not present during the development of the CNS. TSG-6(-/-) mice present a reduced number of GFAP(+) astrocytes when compared with the littermate TSG-6(+/-) mice. TSG-6 expression is drastically up-regulated after injury, and the TSG-6 protein is present within the glial scar, potentially coordinating and stabilizing the formation of this hyaluronan-rich matrix. This study shows that TSG-6 is expressed in the CNS, suggesting a role for TSG-6 in astrocyte activation and tissue repair. We hypothesize that within this context TSG-6 could participate in the formation of the glial scar and confer anti-inflammatory properties. Further studies are required to elucidate the therapeutic potential of targeting TSG-6 after CNS injury to promote its protective effects while reducing the inhibitory properties of the glial scar in axon regeneration.

  6. NF-KappaB in Long-Term Memory and Structural Plasticity in the Adult Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Kaltschmidt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) is a well-known regulator of inflammation, stress, and immune responses as well as cell survival. In the nervous system, NF-κB is one of the crucial components in the molecular switch that converts short- to long-term memory—a process that requires de novo gene expression. Here, the researches published on NF-κB and downstream target genes in mammals will be reviewed, which are necessary for structural plasticity and long-term memory, both under normal and pathological conditions in the brain. Genetic evidence has revealed that NF-κB regulates neuroprotection, neuronal transmission, and long-term memory. In addition, after genetic ablation of all NF-κB subunits, a severe defect in hippocampal adult neurogenesis was observed during aging. Proliferation of neural precursors is increased; however, axon outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and tissue homeostasis of the dentate gyrus are hampered. In this process, the NF-κB target gene PKAcat and other downstream target genes such as Igf2 are critically involved. Therefore, NF-κB activity seems to be crucial in regulating structural plasticity and replenishment of granule cells within the hippocampus throughout the life. In addition to the function of NF-κB in neurons, we will discuss on a neuroinflammatory role of the transcription factor in glia. Finally, a model for NF-κB homeostasis on the molecular level is presented, in order to explain seemingly the contradictory, the friend or foe, role of NF-κB in the nervous system. PMID:26635522

  7. Palmitoylethanolamide in CNS health and disease.

    PubMed

    Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Russo, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Meli, Rosaria

    2014-08-01

    The existence of acylethanolamides (AEs) in the mammalian brain has been known for decades. Among AEs, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is abundant in the central nervous system (CNS) and conspicuously produced by neurons and glial cells. Antihyperalgesic and neuroprotective properties of PEA have been mainly related to the reduction of neuronal firing and to control of inflammation. Growing evidence suggest that PEA may be neuroprotective during CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Advances in the understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of PEA have potentiated its interest as useful biological tool for disease management. Several rapid non-genomic and delayed genomic mechanisms of action have been identified for PEA as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α dependent. First, an early molecular control, through Ca(+2)-activated intermediate- and/or big-conductance K(+) channels opening, drives to rapid neuronal hyperpolarization. This is reinforced by the increase of the inward Cl(-) currents due to the modulation of the gamma aminobutyric acid A receptor and by the desensitization of the transient receptor potential channel type V1. Moreover, the gene transcription-mediated mechanism sustains the long-term anti-inflammatory effects, by reducing pro-inflammatory enzyme expression and increasing neurosteroid synthesis. Overall, the integration of these different modes of action allows PEA to exert an immediate and prolonged efficacious control in neuron signaling either on inflammatory process or neuronal excitability, maintaining cellular homeostasis. In this review, we will discuss the effect of PEA on metabolism, behavior, inflammation and pain perception, related to the control of central functions and the emerging evidence demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy in several neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Mammalian pheromones.

    PubMed

    Liberles, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors.

  9. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  10. A Common Phenotype Polymorphism in Mammalian Brains Defined by Concomitant Production of Prolactin and Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Daude, Nathalie; Lee, Inyoul; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Janus, Christopher; Glaves, John Paul; Gapeshina, Hristina; Yang, Jing; Sykes, Brian D.; Carlson, George A.; Hood, Leroy E.; Westaway, David

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary Prolactin (PRL) and Growth Hormone (GH) are separately controlled and sub-serve different purposes. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that extra-pituitary expression in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is coordinated at mRNA and protein levels. However this was not a uniform effect within populations, such that wide inter-individual variation was superimposed on coordinate PRL/GH expression. Up to 44% of individuals in healthy cohorts of mice and rats showed protein levels above the norm and coordinated expression of PRL and GH transcripts above baseline occurred in the amygdala, frontal lobe and hippocampus of 10% of human subjects. High levels of PRL and GH present in post mortem tissue were often presaged by altered responses in fear conditioning and stress induced hyperthermia behavioral tests. Our data define a common phenotype polymorphism in healthy mammalian brains, and, given the pleiotropic effects known for circulating PRL and GH, further consequences of coordinated CNS over-expression may await discovery. PMID:26894278

  11. Astrocyte scar formation aids CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark A.; Burda, Joshua E.; Ren, Yilong; Ao, Yan; O’Shea, Timothy M.; Kawaguchi, Riki; Coppola, Giovanni; Khakh, Baljit S.; Deming, Timothy J.; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system (CNS). Astrocyte scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or deleting chronic astrocyte scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. In striking contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocyte scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents CNS axon regeneration. PMID:27027288

  12. Cellular organization of the central canal ependymal zone, a niche of latent neural stem cells in the adult mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, L K; Truong, M K V; Bednarczyk, M R; Aumont, A; Fernandes, K J L

    2009-12-15

    A stem cell's microenvironment, or "niche," is a critical regulator of its behaviour. In the adult mammalian spinal cord, central canal ependymal cells possess latent neural stem cell properties, but the ependymal cell niche has not yet been described. Here, we identify important similarities and differences between the central canal ependymal zone and the forebrain subventricular zone (SVZ), a well-characterized niche of neural stem cells. First, direct immunohistochemical comparison of the spinal cord ependymal zone and the forebrain SVZ revealed distinct patterns of neural precursor marker expression. In particular, ependymal cells in the spinal cord were found to be bordered by a previously uncharacterized sub-ependymal layer, which is relatively less elaborate than that of the SVZ and comprised of small numbers of astrocytes, oligodendrocyte progenitors and neurons. Cell proliferation surrounding the central canal occurs in close association with blood vessels, but unlike in the SVZ, involves mainly ependymal rather than sub-ependymal cells. These proliferating ependymal cells typically self-renew rather than produce transit-amplifying progenitors, as they generate doublets of progeny that remain within the ependymal layer and show no evidence of a lineage relationship to sub-ependymal cells. Interestingly, the dorsal pole of the central canal was found to possess a sub-population of tanycyte-like cells that express markers of both ependymal cells and neural precursors, and their presence correlates with higher numbers of dorsally proliferating ependymal cells. Together, these data identify key features of the spinal cord ependymal cell niche, and suggest that dorsal ependymal cells possess the potential for stem cell activity. This work provides a foundation for future studies aimed at understanding ependymal cell regulation under normal and pathological conditions.

  13. Prodrug approaches for CNS delivery.

    PubMed

    Rautio, Jarkko; Laine, Krista; Gynther, Mikko; Savolainen, Jouko

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) drug delivery remains a major challenge, despite extensive efforts that have been made to develop novel strategies to overcome obstacles. Prodrugs are bioreversible derivatives of drug molecules that must undergo an enzymatic and/or chemical transformation in vivo to release the active parent drug, which subsequently exerts the desired pharmacological effect. In both drug discovery and drug development, prodrugs have become an established tool for improving physicochemical, biopharmaceutical or pharmacokinetic properties of pharmacologically active agents that overcome barriers to a drug's usefulness. This review provides insight into various prodrug strategies explored to date for CNS drug delivery, including lipophilic prodrugs, carrier- and receptor-mediated prodrug delivery systems, and gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

  14. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  15. CNS reservoirs for HIV: implications for eradication.

    PubMed

    Hellmuth, Joanna; Valcour, Victor; Spudich, Serena

    2015-04-01

    Controversy exists as to whether the central nervous system (CNS) serves as a reservoir site for HIV, in part reflecting the varying perspectives on what constitutes a 'reservoir' versus a mere site of latent viral integration. However, if the CNS proves to be a site of HIV persistence capable of replicating and reseeding the periphery, leading to failure of virological control, this privileged anatomical site would need dedicated consideration during the development of HIV cure strategies. In this review we discuss the current literature focused on the question of the CNS as a reservoir for HIV, covering the clinical evidence for continued CNS involvement despite suppressive therapy, the theorised dynamics of HIV integration into the CNS, as well as studies indicating that HIV can replicate independently and compartmentalise in the CNS. The unique cellular and anatomical sites of HIV integration in the CNS are also reviewed, as are the potential implications for HIV cure strategies.

  16. Development of a stereotaxic device for low impact implantation of neural constructs or pieces of neural tissues into the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Jozwiak, Andrzej; Liu, Yiwen; Yang, Ying; Gates, Monte A

    2014-01-01

    Implanting pieces of tissue or scaffolding material into the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is wrought with difficulties surrounding the size of tools needed to conduct such implants and the ability to maintain the orientation and integrity of the constructs during and after their transplantation. Here, novel technology has been developed that allows for the implantation of neural constructs or intact pieces of neural tissue into the CNS with low trauma. By "laying out" (instead of forcibly expelling) the implantable material from a thin walled glass capillary, this technology has the potential to enhance neural transplantation procedures by reducing trauma to the host brain during implantation and allowing for the implantation of engineered/dissected tissues or constructs in such a way that their orientation and integrity are maintained in the host. Such technology may be useful for treating various CNS disorders which require the reestablishment of point-to-point contacts (e.g., Parkinson's disease) across the adult CNS, an environment which is not normally permissive to axonal growth.

  17. Nanomedicines for the Treatment of CNS Diseases.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Mahato, Ram I

    2017-03-01

    Targeting and delivering macromolecular therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) has been a major challenge. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Therefore, much effort has been channelled into improving transport of therapeutics across the BBB and into the CNS including the use of nanoparticles. In this thematic issue, several reviews and original research are presented that address "Nanomedicines for CNS Diseases." The articles in this issue are concentrated on either CNS-HIV disease or CNS tumors. In regards to CNS-HIV disease, there are two reviews that discuss the role of nanoparticles for improving the delivery of HIV therapeutics to the CNS. In addition, there are two original articles focusing on therapies for CNS-HIV, one of them uses nanoparticles for delivery of siRNA specific to a key protein in autophagy to microglia, and another discusses nanoparticle delivery of a soluble mediator to suppress neuroinflammation. Furthermore, a comprehensive review about gene therapy for CNS neurological diseases is also included. Finally, this issue also includes review articles on enhanced drug targeting to CNS tumors. These articles include a review on the use of nanoparticles for CNS tumors, a review on functionalization (ligands) of nanoparticles for drug targeting to the brain tumor by overcoming BBB, and the final review discusses the use of macrophages as a delivery vehicle to CNS tumors. This thematic issue provides a wealth of knowledge on using nanomedicines for CNS diseases.

  18. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M.; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) results in oligodendrocyte cell death and progressive demyelination. Demyelinated axons undergo considerable physiological changes and molecular reorganizations that collectively result in axonal dysfunction, degeneration and loss of sensory and motor functions. Endogenous adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neural stem/progenitor cells contribute to the replacement of oligodendrocytes, however, the extent and quality of endogenous remyelination is suboptimal. Emerging evidence indicates that optimal remyelination is restricted by multiple factors including (i) low levels of factors that promote oligodendrogenesis; (ii) cell death among newly generated oligodendrocytes, (iii) inhibitory factors in the post-injury milieu that impede remyelination, and (iv) deficient expression of key growth factors essential for proper re-construction of a highly organized myelin sheath. Considering these challenges, over the past several years, a number of cell-based strategies have been developed to optimize remyelination therapeutically. Outcomes of these basic and preclinical discoveries are promising and signify the importance of remyelination as a mechanism for improving functions in CNS injuries. In this review, we provide an overview on: (1) the precise organization of myelinated axons and the reciprocal axo-myelin interactions that warrant properly balanced physiological activities within the CNS; (2) underlying cause of demyelination and the structural and functional consequences of demyelination in axons following injury and disease; (3) the endogenous mechanisms of oligodendrocyte replacement; (4) the modulatory role of reactive astrocytes and inflammatory cells in remyelination; and (5) the current status of cell-based therapies for promoting remyelination. Careful elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of demyelination in the pathologic CNS is a key to better understanding the impact of remyelination for

  19. RNAi therapeutics for CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Ryan L; Davidson, Beverly L

    2010-06-18

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process of sequence-specific gene silencing and serves as a powerful molecular tool to manipulate gene expression in vitro and in vivo. RNAi technologies have been applied to study gene function and validate drug targets. Researchers are investigating RNAi-based compounds as novel therapeutics to treat a variety of human diseases that are currently lacking sufficient treatment. To date, numerous studies support that RNAi therapeutics can improve disease phenotypes in various rodent models of human disease. Here, we focus on the development of RNAi-based therapies aimed at treating neurological disorders for which reduction of mutant or toxic gene expression may provide clinical benefit. We review RNAi-based gene-silencing strategies, proof-of-concept studies testing therapeutic RNAi for CNS disorders, and highlight the most recent research aimed at transitioning RNAi-based therapeutics toward clinical trials.

  20. CNS Schwann cells display oligodendrocyte precursor-like potassium channel activation and antigenic expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Kristel; Imbschweiler, Ilka; Ulrich, Reiner; Kovermann, Peter; Fahlke, Christoph; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno; Baumgärnter, Wolfgang; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2014-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) injury triggers production of myelinating Schwann cells from endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors (OLPs). These CNS Schwann cells may be attractive candidates for novel therapeutic strategies aiming to promote endogenous CNS repair. However, CNS Schwann cells have been so far mainly characterized in situ regarding morphology and marker expression, and it has remained enigmatic whether they display functional properties distinct from peripheral nervous system (PNS) Schwann cells. Potassium channels (K+) have been implicated in progenitor and glial cell proliferation after injury and may, therefore, represent a suitable pharmacological target. In the present study, we focused on the function and expression of voltage-gated K+ channels Kv(1-12) and accessory β-subunits in purified adult canine CNS and PNS Schwann cell cultures using electrophysiology and microarray analysis and characterized their antigenic phenotype. We show here that K+ channels differed significantly in both cell types. While CNS Schwann cells displayed prominent K D-mediated K+ currents, PNS Schwann cells elicited K(D-) and K(A-type) K+ currents. Inhibition of K+ currents by TEA and Ba2+ was more effective in CNS Schwann cells. These functional differences were not paralleled by differential mRNA expression of Kv(1-12) and accessory β-subunits. However, O4/A2B5 and GFAP expressions were significantly higher and lower, respectively, in CNS than in PNS Schwann cells. Taken together, this is the first evidence that CNS Schwann cells display specific properties not shared by their peripheral counterpart. Both Kv currents and increased O4/A2B5 expression were reminiscent of OLPs suggesting that CNS Schwann cells retain OLP features during maturation.

  1. Assessment of vascular regeneration in the CNS using the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Miloudi, Khalil; Dejda, Agnieszka; Binet, François; Lapalme, Eric; Cerani, Agustin; Sapieha, Przemyslaw

    2014-06-23

    The rodent retina is perhaps the most accessible mammalian system in which to investigate neurovascular interplay within the central nervous system (CNS). It is increasingly being recognized that several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis present elements of vascular compromise. In addition, the most prominent causes of blindness in pediatric and working age populations (retinopathy of prematurity and diabetic retinopathy, respectively) are characterized by vascular degeneration and failure of physiological vascular regrowth. The aim of this technical paper is to provide a detailed protocol to study CNS vascular regeneration in the retina. The method can be employed to elucidate molecular mechanisms that lead to failure of vascular growth after ischemic injury. In addition, potential therapeutic modalities to accelerate and restore healthy vascular plexuses can be explored. Findings obtained using the described approach may provide therapeutic avenues for ischemic retinopathies such as that of diabetes or prematurity and possibly benefit other vascular disorders of the CNS.

  2. Mapping the prion protein distribution in marsupials: insights from comparing opossum with mouse CNS.

    PubMed

    Poggiolini, Ilaria; Legname, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a sialoglycoprotein widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammalian species during neurodevelopment and in adulthood. The location of the protein in the CNS may play a role in the susceptibility of a species to fatal prion diseases, which are also known as the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). To date, little is known about PrP(C) distribution in marsupial mammals, for which no naturally occurring prion diseases have been reported. To extend our understanding of varying PrP(C) expression profiles in different mammals we carried out a detailed expression analysis of PrP(C) distribution along the neurodevelopment of the metatherian South American short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica). We detected lower levels of PrP(C) in white matter fiber bundles of opossum CNS compared to mouse CNS. This result is consistent with a possible role for PrP(C) in the distinct neurodevelopment and neurocircuitry found in marsupials compared to other mammalian species.

  3. Revisiting the concept of CNS immune privilege

    PubMed Central

    Louveau, Antoine; Harris, Tajie H.; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the study of the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) has often focused on pathological conditions, the importance of neuroimmune communication in CNS homeostasis and function has become clear over that last two decades. Here we discuss the progression of our understanding of the interaction between the peripheral immune system and the CNS. We examine the notion of immune privilege of the CNS in light of both earlier findings and recent studies revealing a functional meningeal lymphatic system that drains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the deep cervical lymph nodes, and consider the implications of a revised perspective on the immune privilege of the CNS on the etiology and pathology of different neurological disorders. PMID:26431936

  4. Clitoria ternatea and the CNS.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neeti N; Ohal, C C; Shroff, S K; Bhutada, R H; Somani, R S; Kasture, V S; Kasture, S B

    2003-06-01

    The present investigation was aimed at determining the spectrum of activity of the methanolic extract of Clitoria ternatea (CT) on the CNS. The CT was studied for its effect on cognitive behavior, anxiety, depression, stress and convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) and maximum electroshock (MES). To explain these effects, the effect of CT was also studied on behavior mediated by dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, serotonin and acetylcholine. The extract decreased time required to occupy the central platform (transfer latency, TL) in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and increased discrimination index in the object recognition test, indicating nootropic activity. The extract was more active in the object recognition test than in the EPM. The extract increased occupancy in the open arm of EPM by 160% and in the lit box of the light/dark exploration test by 157%, indicating its anxiolytic activity. It decreased the duration of immobility in tail suspension test (suggesting its antidepressant activity), reduced stress-induced ulcers and reduced the convulsing action of PTZ and MES. The extract exhibited tendency to reduce the intensity of behavior mediated via serotonin and acetylcholine. The effect on DA- and noradrenaline-mediated behavior was not significant. In conclusion, the extract was found to possess nootropic, anxiolytic, antidepressant, anticonvulsant and antistress activity. Further studies are necessary to isolate the active principle responsible for the activities and to understand its mode of action.

  5. Adult myelination: wrapping up neuronal plasticity

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Megan; Gasperini, Robert; Young, Kaylene M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we outline the major neural plasticity mechanisms that have been identified in the adult central nervous system (CNS), and offer a perspective on how they regulate CNS function. In particular we examine how myelin plasticity can operate alongside neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity to influence information processing and transfer in the mature CNS. PMID:25221576

  6. Adherent neural stem (NS) cells from fetal and adult forebrain.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Steven M; Conti, Luciano; Sun, Yirui; Goffredo, Donato; Smith, Austin

    2006-07-01

    Stable in vitro propagation of central nervous system (CNS) stem cells would offer expanded opportunities to dissect basic molecular, cellular, and developmental processes and to model neurodegenerative disease. CNS stem cells could also provide a source of material for drug discovery assays and cell replacement therapies. We have recently reported the generation of adherent, symmetrically expandable, neural stem (NS) cell lines derived both from mouse and human embryonic stem cells and from fetal forebrain (Conti L, Pollard SM, Gorba T, Reitano E, Toselli M, Biella G, Sun Y, Sanzone S, Ying QL, Cattaneo E, Smith A. 2005. Niche-independent symmetrical self-renewal of a mammalian tissue stem cell. PLoS Biol 3(9):e283). These NS cells retain neuronal and glial differentiation potential after prolonged passaging and are transplantable. NS cells are likely to comprise the resident stem cell population within heterogeneous neurosphere cultures. Here we demonstrate that similar NS cell cultures can be established from the adult mouse brain. We also characterize the growth factor requirements for NS cell derivation and self-renewal. We discuss our current understanding of the relationship of NS cell lines to physiological progenitor cells of fetal and adult CNS.

  7. Electrophoretic deposition of cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) and CNs/alginate nanocomposite coatings and free standing membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; de Larraya, Uxua Pérez; Garmendia, Nere; Lasheras-Zubiate, María; Cordero-Arias, Luis; Virtanen, Sannakaisa; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) and CNs-based alginate composite coatings for biomedical applications. The mechanism of anodic deposition of CNs and co-deposition of CNs/alginate composites was analyzed based on the results of zeta-potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. The capability of the EPD technique for manipulating the orientation of CNs and for the preparation of multilayer CNs coatings was demonstrated. The nanotopographic surface roughness and hydrophilicity of the deposited coatings were measured and discussed. Electrochemical testing demonstrated that a significant degree of corrosion protection of stainless steel could be achieved when CNs-containing coatings were present. Additionally, the one-step EPD-based processing of free-standing CNs/alginate membranes was demonstrated confirming the versatility of EPD to fabricate free-standing membrane structures compared to a layer-by-layer deposition technique. CNs and CNs/alginate nanocomposite coatings produced by EPD are potential candidates for biomedical, cell technology and drug delivery applications.

  8. Clinical Applications Involving CNS Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Boris; McCown, Thomas; Leone, Paola; Gray, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) have traditionally been the most difficult to treat by traditional pharmacological methods, due mostly to the blood–brain barrier and the difficulties associated with repeated drug administration targeting the CNS. Viral vector gene transfer represents a way to permanently provide a therapeutic protein within the nervous system after a single administration, whether this be a gene replacement strategy for an inherited disorder or a disease-modifying protein for a disease such as Parkinson's. Gene therapy approaches for CNS disorders has evolved considerably over the last two decades. Although a breakthrough treatment has remained elusive, current strategies are now considerably safer and potentially much more effective. This chapter will explore the past, current, and future status of CNS gene therapy, focusing on clinical trials utilizing adeno-associated virus and lentiviral vectors. PMID:25311921

  9. Nanotechnology-novel therapeutics for CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Maya; Kessler, John A

    2012-04-24

    Research into treatments for diseases of the CNS has made impressive strides in the past few decades, but therapeutic options are limited for many patients with CNS disorders. Nanotechnology has emerged as an exciting and promising new means of treating neurological disease, with the potential to fundamentally change the way we approach CNS-targeted therapeutics. Molecules can be nanoengineered to cross the blood-brain barrier, target specific cell or signalling systems, respond to endogenous stimuli, or act as vehicles for gene delivery, or as a matrix to promote axon elongation and support cell survival. The wide variety of available nanotechnologies allows the selection of a nanoscale material with the characteristics best suited to the therapeutic challenges posed by an individual CNS disorder. In this Review, we describe recent advances in the development of nanotechnology for the treatment of neurological disorders-in particular, neurodegenerative disease and malignant brain tumours-and for the promotion of neuroregeneration.

  10. ABC transporters in the CNS - an inventory.

    PubMed

    Hartz, A M S; Bauer, B

    2011-04-01

    In the present review we provide a summary of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the central nervous system (CNS). Our review is focused on transporters of the ABC A, B, C, D, and G families that have been detected in the cells of the neurovascular unit/blood-brain barrier including brain capillary endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, and neurons, as well as in other brain cells, such as microglia, oligodendrocytes, and choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this review, we provide an overview, organized by ABC family, of transporter expression, localization, and function. We summarize recent findings on ABC transporter regulation in the CNS and address the role of ABC transporters in CNS diseases including brain cancer, seizures/epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we discuss new therapeutic strategies focused on ABC transporters in CNS disease.

  11. Knowledge-Based, Central Nervous System (CNS) Lead Selection and Lead Optimization for CNS Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is the major area that is affected by aging. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), brain cancer, and stroke are the CNS diseases that will cost trillions of dollars for their treatment. Achievement of appropriate blood–brain barrier (BBB) penetration is often considered a significant hurdle in the CNS drug discovery process. On the other hand, BBB penetration may be a liability for many of the non-CNS drug targets, and a clear understanding of the physicochemical and structural differences between CNS and non-CNS drugs may assist both research areas. Because of the numerous and challenging issues in CNS drug discovery and the low success rates, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to deprioritize their drug discovery efforts in the CNS arena. Prompted by these challenges and to aid in the design of high-quality, efficacious CNS compounds, we analyzed the physicochemical property and the chemical structural profiles of 317 CNS and 626 non-CNS oral drugs. The conclusions derived provide an ideal property profile for lead selection and the property modification strategy during the lead optimization process. A list of substructural units that may be useful for CNS drug design was also provided here. A classification tree was also developed to differentiate between CNS drugs and non-CNS oral drugs. The combined analysis provided the following guidelines for designing high-quality CNS drugs: (i) topological molecular polar surface area of <76 Å2 (25–60 Å2), (ii) at least one (one or two, including one aliphatic amine) nitrogen, (iii) fewer than seven (two to four) linear chains outside of rings, (iv) fewer than three (zero or one) polar hydrogen atoms, (v) volume of 740–970 Å3, (vi) solvent accessible surface area of 460–580 Å2, and (vii) positive QikProp parameter CNS. The ranges within parentheses may be used during lead optimization. One violation to this proposed profile may be acceptable. The

  12. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for CNS, but not non-CNS, angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daneman, Richard; Agalliu, Dritan; Zhou, Lu; Kuhnert, Frank; Kuo, Calvin J.; Barres, Ben A.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the importance of CNS blood vessels, the molecular mechanisms that regulate CNS angiogenesis and blood−brain barrier (BBB) formation are largely unknown. Here we analyze the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in regulating the formation of CNS blood vessels. First, through the analysis of TOP-Gal Wnt reporter mice, we identify that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is specifically activated in CNS, but not non-CNS, blood vessels during development. This activation correlates with the expression of different Wnt ligands by neural progenitor cells in distinct locations throughout the CNS, including Wnt7a and Wnt7b in ventral regions and Wnt1, Wnt3, Wnt3a, and Wnt4 in dorsal regions. Blockade of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vivo specifically disrupts CNS, but not non-CNS, angiogenesis. These defects include reduction in vessel number, loss of capillary beds, and the formation of hemorrhagic vascular malformations that remain adherent to the meninges. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates the expression of the BBB-specific glucose transporter glut-1. Taken together these experiments reveal an essential role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in driving CNS-specific angiogenesis and provide molecular evidence that angiogenesis and BBB formation are in part linked. PMID:19129494

  13. The Involvement of the Myelin-Associated Inhibitors and Their Receptors in CNS Plasticity and Injury.

    PubMed

    Boghdadi, Anthony G; Teo, Leon; Bourne, James A

    2017-02-22

    The limited capacity for the central nervous system (CNS) to repair itself was first described over 100 years ago by Spanish neuroscientist Ramon Y. Cajal. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this failure in neuronal regeneration remain unclear and, as such, no effective therapeutics yet exist. Numerous studies have attempted to elucidate the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that inhibit neuronal repair with increasing evidence suggesting that several inhibitory factors and repulsive guidance cues active during development actually persist into adulthood and may be contributing to the inhibition of repair. For example, in the injured adult CNS, there are various inhibitory factors that impede the outgrowth of neurites from damaged neurons. One of the most potent of these neurite outgrowth inhibitors is the group of proteins known as the myelin-associated inhibitors (MAIs), present mainly on the membranes of oligodendroglia. Several studies have shown that interfering with these proteins can have positive outcomes in CNS injury models by promoting neurite outgrowth and improving functional recovery. As such, the MAIs, their receptors, and downstream effectors are valid drug targets for the treatment of CNS injury. This review will discuss the current literature on MAIs in the context of CNS development, plasticity, and injury. Molecules that interfere with the MAIs and their receptors as potential candidates for the treatment of CNS injury will additionally be introduced in the context of preclinical and clinical trials.

  14. Selective transduction of astrocytic and neuronal CNS subpopulations by lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with Chikungunya virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Dieringer, Michael; Poh, Xuan Ying; Sanchez-Garrido, Julia; Gao, Yunan; Sgourou, Argyro; Simmons, Laura E; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2017-04-01

    Lentiviral vectors are gene delivery vehicles that integrate into the host genome of dividing and non-dividing mammalian cells facilitating long-term transgene expression. Lentiviral vector versatility is greatly increased by incorporating heterologous viral envelope proteins onto the vector particles instead of the native envelope, conferring on these pseudotyped vectors a modified tropism and host range specificity. We investigated the pseudotyping efficiency of HIV-1 based lentiviral vectors with alphaviral envelope proteins from the Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV-G) and Sindbis Virus (SINV-G). Following vector production optimisation, titres for the CHIKV-G pseudotype were comparable to the VSV-G pseudotype but those for the SINV-G pseudotype were significantly lower. High titre CHIKV-G pseudotyped vector efficiently transduced various human and mouse neural cell lines and normal human astrocytes (NHA) in vitro. Although transduction was broad, tropism for NHAs was observed. In vivo stereotaxic delivery in striatum, thalamus and hippocampus respectively in the adult rat brain revealed localised transduction restricted to striatal astrocytes and hippocampal dentate granule neurons. Transduction of different subtypes of granule neurons from precursor to post-mitotic stages of differentiation was evident in the sub-granular zone and dentate granule cell layer. No significant inflammatory response was observed, but comparable to that of VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vectors. Robust long-term expression followed for three months post-transduction along with absence of neuroinflammation, coupled to the selective and unique neuron/glial tropism indicates that these vectors could be useful for modelling and gene therapy studies in the CNS.

  15. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah B; Arrildt, Kathryn T; Sturdevant, Christa B; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the "immune privileged" CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir.

  16. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sarah B.; Arrildt, Kathryn T.; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the “immune privileged” CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir. PMID:25236812

  17. Cilia in the CNS: the Quiet Organelle Claims Center Stage

    PubMed Central

    Louvi, Angeliki; Grove, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The primary cilium is a cellular organelle that is almost ubiquitous in eukaryotes, yet its functions in vertebrates have been slow to emerge. The last fifteen years have been marked by accelerating insight into the biology of primary cilia, arising from the synergy of three major lines of research. These research programs describe a specialized mode of protein trafficking in cilia, reveal that genetic disruptions of primary cilia cause complex human disease syndromes, and establish that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction requires the primary cilium. New lines of research have branched off to investigate the role of primary cilia in neuronal signaling, adult neurogenesis, and brain tumor formation. We review a fast expanding literature to determine what we now know about the primary cilium in the developing and adult CNS, and what new directions should lead to further clarity. PMID:21435552

  18. Enhancing CNS repair in neurological disease: challenges arising from neurodegeneration and rewiring of the network.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohua; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Rodriguez, Moses

    2011-07-01

    Repair of the central nervous system (CNS) constitutes an integral part of treating neurological disease and plays a crucial role in restoring CNS architecture and function. Distinct strategies have been developed to reconstruct the damaged neural tissue, with many tested preclinically in animal models. We review cell replacement-based repair strategies. By taking spinal cord injury, cerebral ischaemia and degenerative CNS disorders as examples for CNS repair, we discuss progress and potential problems in utilizing embryonic stem cells and adult neural/non-neural stem cells to repair cell loss in the CNS. Nevertheless, CNS repair is not simply a matter of cell transplantation. The major challenge is to induce regenerating neural cells to integrate into the neural network and compensate for damaged neural function. The neural cells confront an environment very different from that of the developmental stage in which these cells differentiate to form interwoven networks. During the repair process, one of the challenges is neurodegeneration, which can develop from interrupted innervations to/from the targets, chronic inflammation, ischaemia, aging or idiopathic neural toxicity. Neurodegeneration, which occurs on the basis of a characteristic vascular and neural web, usually presents as a chronically progressive process with unknown aetiology. Currently, there is no effective treatment to stop or slow down neurodegeneration. Pathological changes from patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis indicate a broken homeostasis in the CNS. We discuss how the blood-brain barrier and neural networks are formed to maintain CNS homeostasis and their contribution to neurodegeneration in diseased conditions. Another challenge is that some inhibitors produced by CNS injury do not facilitate the regenerating neural cells to incorporate into a pre-existing network. We review glial responses to CNS injury. Of note, the reactive astrocytes

  19. N-Acetylaspartate in the CNS: From Neurodiagnostics to Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, John R.; Ross, Brian; Arun, Peethambaran; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N.; Namboodiri, M. A. A.

    2007-01-01

    The brain is unique among organs in many respects, including its mechanisms of lipid synthesis and energy production. The nervous system-specific metabolite N-acetylaspartate (NAA), which is synthesized from aspartate and acetyl-coenzyme A in neurons, appears to be a key link in these distinct biochemical features of CNS metabolism. During early postnatal CNS development, the expression of lipogenic enzymes in oligodendrocytes, including the NAA-degrading enzyme aspartoacylase (ASPA), is increased along with increased NAA production in neurons. NAA is transported from neurons to the cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes, where ASPA cleaves the acetate moiety for use in fatty acid and steroid synthesis. The fatty acids and steroids produced then go on to be used as building blocks for myelin lipid synthesis. Mutations in the gene for ASPA result in the fatal leukodystrophy Canavan disease, for which there is currently no effective treatment. Once postnatal myelination is completed, NAA may continue to be involved in myelin lipid turnover in adults, but it also appears to adopt other roles, including a bioenergetic role in neuronal mitochondria. NAA and ATP metabolism appear to be linked indirectly, whereby acetylation of aspartate may facilitate its removal from neuronal mitochondria, thus favoring conversion of glutamate to alpha ketoglutarate which can enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle for energy production. In its role as a mechanism for enhancing mitochondrial energy production from glutamate, NAA is in a key position to act as a magnetic resonance spectroscopy marker for neuronal health, viability and number. Evidence suggests that NAA is a direct precursor for the enzymatic synthesis of the neuron specific dipeptide N-acetylaspartylglutamate, the most concentrated neuropeptide in the human brain. Other proposed roles for NAA include neuronal osmoregulation and axon-glial signaling. We propose that NAA may also be involved in brain nitrogen balance. Further research

  20. The subventricular zone continues to generate corpus callosum and rostral migratory stream astroglia in normal adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jiho; Orosco, Lori; Guo, Fuzheng; Chung, Seung-Hyuk; Bannerman, Peter; Mills Ko, Emily; Zarbalis, Kostas; Deng, Wenbin; Pleasure, David

    2015-03-04

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the CNS, and have many essential functions, including maintenance of blood-brain barrier integrity, and CNS water, ion, and glutamate homeostasis. Mammalian astrogliogenesis has generally been considered to be completed soon after birth, and to be reactivated in later life only under pathological circumstances. Here, by using genetic fate-mapping, we demonstrate that new corpus callosum astrocytes are continuously generated from nestin(+) subventricular zone (SVZ) neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in normal adult mice. These nestin fate-mapped corpus callosum astrocytes are uniformly postmitotic, express glutamate receptors, and form aquaporin-4(+) perivascular endfeet. The entry of new astrocytes from the SVZ into the corpus callosum appears to be balanced by astroglial apoptosis, because overall numbers of corpus callosum astrocytes remain constant during normal adulthood. Nestin fate-mapped astrocytes also flow anteriorly from the SVZ in association with the rostral migratory stream, but do not penetrate into the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. Production of new astrocytes from nestin(+) NPCs is absent in the normal adult cortex, striatum, and spinal cord. Our study is the first to demonstrate ongoing SVZ astrogliogenesis in the normal adult mammalian forebrain.

  1. Kv3.1b is a novel component of CNS nodes.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Jérôme; Alcaraz, Gisèle; Grinspan, Judith; Bennett, Vann; Joho, Rolf; Crest, Marcel; Scherer, Steven S

    2003-06-01

    We herein demonstrate that Kv3.1b subunits are present at nodes of Ranvier in the CNS of both rats and mice. Kv3.1b colocalizes with voltage-gated Na+ channels in a subset of nodes in the spinal cord, particularly those of large myelinated axons. Kv3.1b is abundantly expressed in the gray matter of the spinal cord, but does not colocalize with Na+ channels in initial segments. In the PNS, few nodes are Kv3.1b-positive. During the development of the CNS, Kv3.1b clustering at nodes occurs later than that of Na+ channels, but precedes the juxtaparanodal clustering of Kv1.2. Moreover, in myelin-deficient rats, which have severe CNS dysmyelination, node-like clusters of Kv3.1b and Na+ channels are observed even in regions devoid of oligodendrocytes. Ankyrin G coimmunoprecipitates Kv3.1b in vivo, indicating that these two proteins may interact in the CNS at nodes. 4-Aminopyridine, a K+ channel blocker, broadened the compound action potential recorded from adult rat optic nerve and spinal cord, but not from the sciatic nerve. These effects were also observed in Kv3.1-deficient mice. In conclusion, Kv3.1b is the first K+ channel subunit to be identified in CNS nodes; but Kv3.1b does not account for the effects of 4-aminopyridine on central myelinated tracts.

  2. Primary Central Nervous System (CNS) Lymphoma B Cell Receptors Recognize CNS Proteins.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Purschke, Frauke G; Brunn, Anna; May, Caroline; Nordhoff, Eckhard; Marcus, Katrin; Deckert, Martina

    2015-08-01

    Primary lymphoma of the CNS (PCNSL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma confined to the CNS. To elucidate its peculiar organ tropism, we generated recombinant Abs (recAbs) identical to the BCR of 23 PCNSLs from immunocompetent patients. Although none of the recAbs showed self-reactivity upon testing with common autoantigens, they recognized 1547 proteins present on a large-scale protein microarray, indicating polyreactivity. Interestingly, proteins (GRINL1A, centaurin-α, BAIAP2) recognized by the recAbs are physiologically expressed by CNS neurons. Furthermore, 87% (20/23) of the recAbs, including all Abs derived from IGHV4-34 using PCNSL, recognized galectin-3, which was upregulated on microglia/macrophages, astrocytes, and cerebral endothelial cells upon CNS invasion by PCNSL. Thus, PCNSL Ig may recognize CNS proteins as self-Ags. Their interaction may contribute to BCR signaling with sustained NF-κB activation and, ultimately, may foster tumor cell proliferation and survival. These data may also explain, at least in part, the affinity of PCNSL cells for the CNS.

  3. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  4. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.

    2006-11-02

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O({alpha},p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  5. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  6. Decellularization technology in CNS tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Lin, Xian-Feng; Wang, Li-Ren; Lin, Yi-Qian; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Liu, Wen-Yue; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Braddock, Martin; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Decellularization methodologies have been successfully used in a variety of tissue engineering and regenerative technologies and methods of decellularization have been developed for target tissues and organs of interest. The technology to promote regeneration and functional recovery in the CNS, including brain and spinal cord, has, however, made slow progress mainly because the intrinsic regenerative potential of the CNS is regarded as low. To date, currently available therapies have been unable to provide significant functional recovery and successful therapies, which could provide functional restoration to the injured brain and spinal cord are controversial. In this review, the authors provide a critical analysis, comparing the advantages and limitations of the major decellularization methods and considering the effects of these methods upon the biologic scaffold material. The authors also review studies that supplement decellularized grafts with exogenous factors, such as stem cells and growth factors, to both promote and enhance regeneration through decellularized allografts.

  7. Histamine and Immune Biomarkers in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Torrellas, Clara; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; López-Muñoz, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimmune dysregulation is a common phenomenon in different forms of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Cross-links between central and peripheral immune mechanisms appear to be disrupted as reflected by a series of immune markers (CD3, CD4, CD7, HLA-DR, CD25, CD28, and CD56) which show variability in brain disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, migraine, epilepsy, vascular dementia, mental retardation, cerebrovascular encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, cranial nerve neuropathies, mental retardation, and posttraumatic brain injury. Histamine (HA) is a pleiotropic monoamine involved in several neurophysiological functions, neuroimmune regulation, and CNS pathogenesis. Changes in brain HA show an age- and sex-related pattern, and alterations in brain HA levels are present in different CNS regions of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain HA in neuronal and nonneuronal compartments plays a dual role (neurotrophic versus neurotoxic) in a tissue-specific manner. Pathogenic mechanisms associated with neuroimmune dysregulation in AD involve HA, interleukin-1β, and TNF-α, whose aberrant expression contributes to neuroinflammation as an aggravating factor for neurodegeneration and premature neuronal death. PMID:27190492

  8. Agile delivery of protein therapeutics to CNS.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2014-09-28

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics.

  9. Agile Delivery of Protein Therapeutics to CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S.; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. PMID:24956489

  10. cJun promotes CNS axon growth

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Jessica K; Martinez, Yania; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2014-01-01

    A number of genes regulate regeneration of peripheral axons, but their ability to drive axon growth and regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) remains largely untested. To address this question we overexpressed eight transcription factors and one small GTPase alone and in pairwise combinations to test whether combinatorial overexpression would have a synergistic impact on CNS neuron neurite growth. The Jun oncogene/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (JUN/STAT6) combination increased neurite growth in dissociated cortical neurons and in injured cortical slices. In injured cortical slices, JUN overexpression increased axon growth to a similar extent as JUN and STAT6 together. Interestingly, JUN overexpression was not associated with increased growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) or integrin alpha 7 (ITGA7) expression, though these are predicted transcriptional targets. This study demonstrates that JUN overexpression in cortical neurons stimulates axon growth, but does so independently of changes in expression of genes thought to be critical for JUN’s effects on axon growth. We conclude that JUN activity underlies this CNS axonal growth response, and that it is mechanistically distinct from peripheral regeneration responses, in which increases in JUN expression coincide with increases in GAP43 expression. PMID:24521823

  11. Alternative generation of CNS neural stem cells and PNS derivatives from neural crest-derived peripheral stem cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marlen; Apostolova, Galina; Widera, Darius; Mittelbronn, Michel; Dechant, Georg; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Rohrer, Hermann

    2015-02-01

    Neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) from the embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS) can be reprogrammed in neurosphere (NS) culture to rNCSCs that produce central nervous system (CNS) progeny, including myelinating oligodendrocytes. Using global gene expression analysis we now demonstrate that rNCSCs completely lose their previous PNS characteristics and acquire the identity of neural stem cells derived from embryonic spinal cord. Reprogramming proceeds rapidly and results in a homogenous population of Olig2-, Sox3-, and Lex-positive CNS stem cells. Low-level expression of pluripotency inducing genes Oct4, Nanog, and Klf4 argues against a transient pluripotent state during reprogramming. The acquisition of CNS properties is prevented in the presence of BMP4 (BMP NCSCs) as shown by marker gene expression and the potential to produce PNS neurons and glia. In addition, genes characteristic for mesenchymal and perivascular progenitors are expressed, which suggests that BMP NCSCs are directed toward a pericyte progenitor/mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) fate. Adult NCSCs from mouse palate, an easily accessible source of adult NCSCs, display strikingly similar properties. They do not generate cells with CNS characteristics but lose the neural crest markers Sox10 and p75 and produce MSC-like cells. These findings show that embryonic NCSCs acquire a full CNS identity in NS culture. In contrast, MSC-like cells are generated from BMP NCSCs and pNCSCs, which reveals that postmigratory NCSCs are a source for MSC-like cells up to the adult stage.

  12. Alpha-mannosidosis: characterization of CNS pathology and correlation between CNS pathology and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Borgwardt, L; Danielsen, E R; Thomsen, C; Månsson, J E; Taouatas, N; Thuesen, A M; Olsen, K J; Fogh, J; Dali, C I; Lund, A M

    2015-07-23

    Alpha-mannosidosis (AM) (OMIM 248500) is a rare lysosomal storage disease. The understanding of the central nervous system (CNS) pathology is limited. This study is the first describing the CNS pathology and the correlation between the CNS pathology and intellectual disabilities in human AM. Thirty-four patients, aged 6-35 years, with AM were included. Data from 13 healthy controls were included in the analysis of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Measurements of CNS neurodegeneration biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), CSF-oligosaccharides, and performance of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRS were carried out. On MRI, 5 of 10 patients had occipital white matter (WM) signal abnormalities, and 6 of 10 patients had age-inappropriate myelination. MRS demonstrated significantly elevated mannose complex in gray matter and WM. We found elevated concentrations of tau-protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurofilament light protein in 97 patients, 74% and 41% of CSF samples, respectively. A negative correlation between CSF-biomarkers and cognitive function and CSF-oligosaccharides and cognitive function was found. The combination of MRS/MRI changes, elevated concentrations of CSF-biomarkers and CSF-oligosaccharides suggests gliosis and reduced myelination, as part of the CNS pathology in AM. Our data demonstrate early neuropathological changes, which may be taken into consideration when planning initiation of treatment.

  13. Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-12-18

    With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

  14. CNS repair and axon regeneration: Using genetic variation to determine mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Andrea; Omura, Takao; Costigan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The importance of genetic diversity in biological investigation has been recognized since the pioneering studies of Gregor Johann Mendel and Charles Darwin. Research in this area has been greatly informed recently by the publication of genomes from multiple species. Genes regulate and create every part and process in a living organism, react with the environment to create each living form and morph and mutate to determine the history and future of each species. The regenerative capacity of neurons differs profoundly between animal lineages and within the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems. Here, we discuss research that suggests that genetic background contributes to the ability of injured axons to regenerate in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), by controlling the regulation of specific signaling cascades. We detail the methods used to identify these pathways, which include among others Activin signaling and other TGF-β superfamily members. We discuss the potential of altering these pathways in patients with CNS damage and outline strategies to promote regeneration and repair by combinatorial manipulation of neuron-intrinsic and extrinsic determinants.

  15. Differential properties of type I and type II benzodiazepine receptors in mammalian CNS neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Shirasaki, T.; Munakata, M.; Hirata, A.; Akaike, N.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) partial agonists, Y-23684 and CL218,872, were compared with its full agonist, diazepam, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current (ICl) in acutely dissociated rat cerebral cortex (CTX), cerebellar Purkinje (CPJ) and spinal ventral horn (SVH) neurones, by the whole-cell mode patch-clamp technique. 2. The GABA-induced responses were essentially the same in both SVH and CPJ neurones, but the KD value of the GABA response in CTX neurone was lower than those in the other two brain regions. 3. Enhancement of the GABA response by the two partial agonists was about one-third of that by diazepam in the SVH neurones (where type II subtype of BZR, BZ2, is predominant), whereas these partial agonists potentiated the GABA response as much as diazepam in CPJ neurones (where the type I subtype of BZR, BZ1, is predominant). In CTX neurones where both type I and II variants are expressed, the augmentation ratio of the GABA response by diazepam was between the values in CPJ and SVH neurones. 4. In concentration-response relationships of BZR partial agonists, the threshold concentrations, KD values and maximal augmentation ratio of the GABA response were similar in all CTX, CPJ and SVH neurones. Also, in all preparations, the threshold concentration and KD values of diazepam action were 10 fold less than those induced by partial agonists. 5. All BZR agonists shifted the concentration-response relationship for GABA to the left without changing the maximum current amplitude, indicating that activation of both BZ1 and BZ2 increase the affinity of the GABAA receptor for GABA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8395299

  16. Differential properties of type I and type II benzodiazepine receptors in mammalian CNS neurones.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji, T; Shirasaki, T; Munakata, M; Hirata, A; Akaike, N

    1993-07-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) partial agonists, Y-23684 and CL218,872, were compared with its full agonist, diazepam, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current (ICl) in acutely dissociated rat cerebral cortex (CTX), cerebellar Purkinje (CPJ) and spinal ventral horn (SVH) neurones, by the whole-cell mode patch-clamp technique. 2. The GABA-induced responses were essentially the same in both SVH and CPJ neurones, but the KD value of the GABA response in CTX neurone was lower than those in the other two brain regions. 3. Enhancement of the GABA response by the two partial agonists was about one-third of that by diazepam in the SVH neurones (where type II subtype of BZR, BZ2, is predominant), whereas these partial agonists potentiated the GABA response as much as diazepam in CPJ neurones (where the type I subtype of BZR, BZ1, is predominant). In CTX neurones where both type I and II variants are expressed, the augmentation ratio of the GABA response by diazepam was between the values in CPJ and SVH neurones. 4. In concentration-response relationships of BZR partial agonists, the threshold concentrations, KD values and maximal augmentation ratio of the GABA response were similar in all CTX, CPJ and SVH neurones. Also, in all preparations, the threshold concentration and KD values of diazepam action were 10 fold less than those induced by partial agonists. 5. All BZR agonists shifted the concentration-response relationship for GABA to the left without changing the maximum current amplitude, indicating that activation of both BZ1 and BZ2 increase the affinity of the GABAA receptor for GABA. 6. The results are important in clarifying the mechanism of anxiety and might explain the anxioselectivity of BZR partial agonists.

  17. The movers and shapers in immune privilege of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Britta; Vajkoczy, Peter; Weller, Roy O

    2017-02-01

    Discoveries leading to an improved understanding of immune surveillance of the central nervous system (CNS) have repeatedly provoked dismissal of the existence of immune privilege of the CNS. Recent rediscoveries of lymphatic vessels within the dura mater surrounding the brain, made possible by modern live-cell imaging technologies, have revived this discussion. This review emphasizes the fact that understanding immune privilege of the CNS requires intimate knowledge of its unique anatomy. Endothelial, epithelial and glial brain barriers establish compartments in the CNS that differ strikingly with regard to their accessibility to immune-cell subsets. There is a unique system of lymphatic drainage from the CNS to the peripheral lymph nodes. We summarize current knowledge on the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in immune-cell trafficking and lymphatic drainage from the CNS, and we take into account differences in rodent and human CNS anatomy.

  18. Incidence of CNS tumors in Appalachian children.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Luo, Alice; Durbin, Eric B; Lycan, Ellen; Tucker, Thomas; Chen, Quan; Horbinski, Craig; Villano, John L

    2017-03-11

    Determine whether the risk of astrocytomas in Appalachian children is higher than the national average. We compared the incidence of pediatric brain tumors in Appalachia versus non-Appalachia regions, covering years 2000-2011. The North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collects population-based data from 55 cancer registries throughout U.S. and Canada. All invasive primary (i.e. non-metastatic tumors), with age at diagnosis 0-19 years old, were included. Nearly 27,000 and 2200 central nervous system (CNS) tumors from non-Appalachia and Appalachia, respectively comprise the cohorts. Age-adjusted incidence rates of each main brain tumor subtype were compared. The incidence rate of pediatric CNS tumors was 8% higher in Appalachia, 3.31 [95% CI 3.17-3.45] versus non-Appalachia, 3.06, [95% CI 3.02-3.09] for the years 2001-2011, all rates are per 100,000 population. Astrocytomas accounted for the majority of this difference, with the rate being 16% higher in Appalachian children, 1.77, [95% CI 1.67-1.87] versus non-Appalachian children, 1.52, [95% CI 1.50-1.55]. Among astrocytomas, World Health Organization (WHO) grade I astrocytomas were 41% higher in Appalachia, 0.63 [95% CI 0.56-0.70] versus non-Appalachia 0.44 [95% CI 0.43-0.46] for the years 2004-2011. This is the first study to demonstrate that Appalachian children are at greater risk of CNS neoplasms, and that much of this difference is in WHO grade I astrocytomas, 41% more common. The cause of this increased incidence is unknown and we discuss the importance of this in relation to genetic and environmental findings in Appalachia.

  19. Human African trypanosomiasis, chemotherapy and CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Jean

    2009-06-25

    Trypanosomes have been recognised as human pathogens for over a century. Human African trypanosomiasis is endemic in an area sustaining 60 million people and is fatal without chemotherapeutic intervention. Available trypanocidal drugs require parenteral administration and are associated with adverse reactions including the development of a severe post-treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE). Following infection the parasites proliferate in the systemic compartment before invading the CNS where a cascade of events results in neuroinflammation. This review summarises the clinical manifestations of the infection and chemotherapeutic regimens as well as the current research findings and hypotheses regarding the neuropathogenesis of the disease.

  20. Obstructive hydrocephalus due to CNS toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Sang Weon; Kim, Hak-Jin; Choi, Kwang-Dong

    2013-06-15

    A 46-year-old man developed intermittent headache, diplopia, and visual obscuration for two months. Funduscopic examination showed optic disk swelling in both eyes. Brain MRI exhibited hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal enhancement at the prepontine cistern, left cerebellopontine angle cistern and bilateral cerebral hemisphere, and hemosiderin deposition along the cerebellar folia. CSF analysis revealed an elevated opening pressure with xanthochromic appearance and small amount of red blood cells. Antibody titer against Toxocariasis using ELISA was elevated both in blood and CSF. Obstructive hydrocephalus and hemosiderin deposition in this case may result from the active inflammatory process due to CNS toxocariasis within the subarachnoid space.

  1. Role of Secretory Phospholipase A2 in CNS Inflammation: Implications in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Titsworth, W. Lee; Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) are a subfamily of lipolytic enzymes which hydrolyze the acyl bond at the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids to produce free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. These products are precursors of bioactive eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor (PAF). The hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids by PLA2 is a rate-limiting step for generation of eicosanoids and PAF. To date, more than 10 isozymes of sPLA2 have been found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Under physiological conditions, sPLA2s are involved in diverse cellular responses, including host defense, phospholipid digestion and metabolism. However, under pathological situations, increased sPLA2 activity and excessive production of free fatty acids and their metabolites may lead to inflammation, loss of membrane integrity, oxidative stress, and subsequent tissue injury. Emerging evidence suggests that sPLA2 plays a role in the secondary injury process after traumatic or ischemic injuries in the brain and spinal cord. Importantly, sPLA2 may act as a convergence molecule that mediates multiple key mechanisms involved in the secondary injury since it can be induced by multiple toxic factors such as inflammatory cytokines, free radicals, and excitatory amino acids, and its activation and metabolites can exacerbate the secondary injury. Blocking sPLA2 action may represent a novel and efficient strategy to block multiple injury pathways associated with the CNS secondary injury. This review outlines the current knowledge of sPLA2 in the CNS with emphasis placed on the possible roles of sPLA2 in mediating CNS injuries, particularly the traumatic and ischemic injuries in the brain and spinal cord. PMID:18673210

  2. Immune cell trafficking from the brain maintains CNS immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad G; Tsai, Vicky W W; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Hassanpour, Masoud; Li, Hui; Hart, Prue H; Breit, Samuel N; Sawchenko, Paul E; Brown, David A

    2014-03-01

    In the CNS, no pathway dedicated to immune surveillance has been characterized for preventing the anti-CNS immune responses that develop in autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease. Here, we identified a pathway for immune cells to traffic from the brain that is associated with the rostral migratory stream (RMS), which is a forebrain source of newly generated neurons. Evaluation of fluorescently labeled leukocyte migration in mice revealed that DCs travel via the RMS from the CNS to the cervical LNs (CxLNs), where they present antigen to T cells. Pharmacologic interruption of immune cell traffic with the mononuclear cell-sequestering drug fingolimod influenced anti-CNS T cell responses in the CxLNs and modulated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fingolimod treatment also induced EAE in a disease-resistant transgenic mouse strain by altering DC-mediated Treg functions in CxLNs and disrupting CNS immune tolerance. These data describe an immune cell pathway that originates in the CNS and is capable of dampening anti-CNS immune responses in the periphery. Furthermore, these data provide insight into how fingolimod treatment might exacerbate CNS neuroinflammation in some cases and suggest that focal therapeutic interventions, outside the CNS have the potential to selectively modify anti-CNS immunity.

  3. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 and synaptic function in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Randall, Andrew D; Kurihara, Mai; Brandon, Nicholas J; Brown, Jon T

    2014-04-01

    The disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene is found at the breakpoint of an inherited chromosomal translocation, and segregates with major mental illnesses. Its potential role in central nervous system (CNS) malfunction has triggered intensive investigation of the biological roles played by DISC1, with the hope that this may shed new light on the pathobiology of psychiatric disease. Such work has ranged from investigations of animal behavior to detailed molecular-level analysis of the assemblies that DISC1 forms with other proteins. Here, we discuss the evidence for a role of DISC1 in synaptic function in the mammalian CNS.

  4. Immunohistological localization of serotonin in the CNS and feeding system of the stable fly stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera: muscidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), plays critical roles as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator that control or modulate many behaviors in insects, such as feeding. Neurons immunoreactive (IR)to 5-HT were detected in the central nervous system (CNS) of the larval and adult stages of the stab...

  5. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had central nervous system involvement: a study from the Adult ALL Working Group of the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Akio; Kako, Shinichi; Mitsuhashi, Kenjiro; Iwato, Koji; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Fukuda, Takahiro; Sawa, Masashi; Senoo, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Miyamura, Koichi; Takada, Satoru; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Morishima, Yasuo; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Mizuta, Shuichi; Tanaka, Junji

    2017-02-14

    The prognosis for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with central nervous system (CNS) involvement (CNS+) who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unclear. We retrospectively compared the outcomes of allo-SCT for patients with CNS involvement and for patients without CNS involvement (CNS-) using a database in Japan. The eligibility criteria for this study were as follows: diagnosis of ALL, aged more than 16 years, allo-SCT between 2005 and 2012, and first SCT. Data for 2582 patients including 136 CNS+ patients and 2446 CNS- patients were used for analyses. As compared with CNS- patients, CNS+ patients were younger, had worse disease status at SCT and had poorer performance status (PS) at SCT (P < 0.01). Incidence of relapse was higher in CNS+ patients (P = 0.02), and incidence of CNS relapse was also higher (P < 0.01). The probability of 3-year overall survival (OS) was better in CNS- patients (P < 0.01) by univariate analysis. However, in patients who received SCT in CR, there was no difference in the probability of OS between CNS+ and CNS- patients (P = 0.38) and CNS involvement did not have an unfavorable effect on OS by multivariate analysis. CNS+ patients who achieved CR showed OS comparable to that of CNS- patients.

  6. Mammalian development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  7. Mammalian development in space.

    PubMed

    Ronca, April E

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  8. CNS Myelination Requires Cytoplasmic Dynein Function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Michele L.; Shin, Jimann; Kearns, Christina A.; Langworthy, Melissa M.; Snell, Heather; Walker, Macie B.; Appel, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytoplasmic dynein provides the main motor force for minus-end-directed transport of cargo on microtubules. Within the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS), proliferation, neuronal migration and retrograde axon transport are among the cellular functions known to require dynein. Accordingly, mutations of DYNC1H1, which encodes the heavy chain subunit of cytoplasmic dynein, have been linked to developmental brain malformations and axonal pathologies. Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating glial cell type of the CNS, migrate from their origins to their target axons and subsequently extend multiple long processes that ensheath axons with specialized insulating membrane. These processes are filled with microtubules, which facilitate molecular transport of myelin components. However, whether oligodendrocytes require cytoplasmic dynein to ensheath axons with myelin is not known. Results We identified a mutation of zebrafish dync1h1 in a forward genetic screen that caused a deficit of oligodendrocytes. Using in vivo imaging and gene expression analyses, we additionally found evidence that dync1h1 promotes axon ensheathment and myelin gene expression. Conclusions In addition to its well known roles in axon transport and neuronal migration, cytoplasmic dynein contributes to neural development by promoting myelination. PMID:25488883

  9. Growth Arrest Specific 1 (GAS1) Is Abundantly Expressed in the Adult Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zarco, Natanael; Bautista, Elizabeth; Cuéllar, Manola; Vergara, Paula; Flores-Rodriguez, Paola; Aguilar-Roblero, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Growth arrest specific 1 (GAS1) is a pleiotropic protein that induces apoptosis and cell arrest in different tumors, but it is also involved in the development of the nervous system and other tissues and organs. This dual ability is likely caused by its capacity to interact both by inhibiting the intracellular signaling cascade induced by glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor and by facilitating the activity of the sonic hedgehog pathway. The presence of GAS1 mRNA has been described in adult mouse brain, and here we corroborated this observation. We then proceeded to determine the distribution of the protein in the adult central nervous system (CNS). We detected, by western blot analysis, expression of GAS1 in olfactory bulb, caudate-putamen, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, mesencephalon, medulla oblongata, cerebellum, and cervical spinal cord. To more carefully map the expression of GAS1, we performed double-label immunohistochemistry and noticed expression of GAS1 in neurons in all brain areas examined. We also observed expression of GAS1 in astroglial cells, albeit the pattern of expression was more restricted than that seen in neurons. Briefly, in the present article, we report the widespread distribution and cellular localization of the GAS1 native protein in adult mammalian CNS. PMID:23813868

  10. Extra-CNS metastasis from glioblastoma: a rare clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Awan, Musaddiq; Liu, Stanley; Sahgal, Arjun; Das, Sunit; Chao, Samuel T; Chang, Eric L; Knisely, Jonathan P S; Redmond, Kristin; Sohn, Jason W; Machtay, Mitchell; Sloan, Andrew E; Mansur, David B; Rogers, Lisa R; Lo, Simon S

    2015-05-01

    Extra-CNS metastasis from glioblastoma (ECMGBM) is an emerging but little known clinical entity. We review pre-clinical and translational publications assessing the ability of GBM to spread locally and outside the CNS. Reported cases demonstrating ECMGBM are reviewed providing a summary of presentations for the entity. Special attention is placed on transmission of GBM through organ transplantation. Finally, predictions are made as to the future significance of ECMGBM, especially in the context of better outcomes in CNS GBM.

  11. Plant sterols: Friend or foe in CNS disorders?

    PubMed

    Vanmierlo, Tim; Bogie, Jeroen F J; Mailleux, Jo; Vanmol, Jasmine; Lütjohann, Dieter; Mulder, Monique; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, the central nervous system (CNS) is the most cholesterol rich organ by weight. Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated in the CNS and all cholesterol available is synthesized in situ. Deficits in cholesterol homeostasis at the level of synthesis, transport, or catabolism result in severe disorders featured by neurological disability. Recent studies indicate that a disturbed cholesterol metabolism is involved in CNS disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In contrast to circulating cholesterol, dietary plant sterols, can cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the membranes of CNS cells. Plant sterols are well-known for their ability to lower circulating cholesterol levels. The finding that they gain access to the CNS has fueled research focusing on the physiological roles of plant sterols in the healthy and diseased CNS. To date, both beneficial and detrimental effects of plant sterols on CNS disorders are defined. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding the impact of plant sterols on homeostatic and pathogenic processes in the CNS, and elaborate on the therapeutic potential of plant sterols in CNS disorders.

  12. Impact of Cranial Irradiation Added to Intrathecal Conditioning in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Central Nervous System Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mayadev, Jyoti S.; Douglas, James G.; Storer, Barry E.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storb, Rainer

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Neither the prognostic importance nor the appropriate management of central nervous system (CNS) involvement is known for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We examined the impact of a CNS irradiation boost to standard intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC). Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2005, a total of 648 adult AML patients received a myeloablative HCT: 577 patients were CNS negative (CNS-), and 71 were CNS positive (CNS+). Of the 71 CNS+ patients, 52 received intrathecal chemotherapy alone (CNS+ITC), and 19 received ITC plus an irradiation boost (CNS+RT). Results: The CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT patients had 1- and 5-year relapse-free survivals (RFS) of 43% and 35%, 15% and 6%, and 37% and 32%, respectively. CNS+ITC patients had a statistically significant worse RFS compared with CNS- patients (hazard ratio [HR], 2.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-3.6; p < 0.0001). CNS+RT patients had improved relapse free survival over that of CNS+ITC patients (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p = 0.01). The 1- and 5-year overall survivals (OS) of patients with CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT, were 50% and 38%, 21% and 6%, and 53% and 42%, respectively. The survival of CNS+RT were significantly better than CNS+ITC patients (p = 0.004). After adjusting for known risk factors, CNS+RT patients had a trend toward lower relapse rates and reduced nonrelapse mortality. Conclusions: CNS+ AML is associated with a poor prognosis. The role of a cranial irradiation boost to intrathecal chemotherapy appears to mitigate the risk of CNS disease, and needs to be further investigated to define optimal treatment strategies.

  13. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  14. Identification of Radial Glia Progenitors in the Developing and Adult Retina of Sharks

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Farías, Nuria; Candal, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells give rise to transient progenitors termed neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and radial glial cells (RGCs). RGCs represent the major source of neurons, glia and adult stem cells in several regions of the central nervous system (CNS). RGCs are mostly transient in mammals, but they are widely maintained in the adult CNS of fishes, where they continue to be morphologically similar to RGCs in the mammalian brain and fulfill similar roles as progenitors and guide for migrating neurons. The retina of fishes offers an exceptional model to approach the study of adult neurogenesis because of the presence of constitutive proliferation from the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), containing NECs, and from adult glial cells with radial morphology (the Müller glia). However, the cellular hierarchies and precise contribution of different types of progenitors to adult neurogenesis remain unsolved. We have analyzed the transition from NECs to RGCs and RGC differentiation in the retina of the cartilaginous fish Scyliorhinus canicula, which offers a particularly good spatial and temporal frame to investigate this process. We have characterized progenitor and adult RGCs by immunohistochemical detection of glial markers as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamine synthetase (GS). We have compared the emergence and localization of glial markers with that of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, a proliferation maker) and Doublecortin (DCX, which increases at early stages of neuronal differentiation). During retinal development, GFAP-immunoreactive NECs located in the most peripheral CMZ (CMZp) codistribute with DCX-immunonegative cells. GFAP-immunoreactive RGCs and Müller cells are located in successive more central parts of the retina and codistribute with DCX- and DCX/GS-immunoreactive cells, respectively. The same types of progenitors are found in juveniles, suggesting that the contribution of the CMZ to adult neurogenesis implies a transition through the

  15. Role of GFAP in CNS injuries

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The role of GFAP in CNS injury is reviewed as revealed by studies using GFAP null mice. In order to provide background information for these studies, the effects of absence of GFAP in the uninjured astrocyte is also described. Activities attributable to GFAP include suppressing neuronal proliferation and neurite extension in the mature brain, forming a physical barrier to isolate damaged tissue, regulating blood flow following ischemia, contributing to the blood-brain barrier, supporting myelination, and providing mechanical strength. However, findings for many of these roles have been variable among laboratories, pointing to the presence of unappreciated complexity in GFAP function. One complexity may be regional differences in GFAP activities; others are yet to be discovered. PMID:24508671

  16. Biomarkers for CNS involvement in pediatric lupus

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Tamar B; Putterman, Chaim; Goilav, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    CNS disease, or central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (cNPSLE), occurs frequently in pediatric lupus, leading to significant morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. Diagnosing cNPSLE is especially difficult in pediatrics; many current diagnostic tools are invasive and/or costly, and there are no current accepted screening mechanisms. The most complicated aspect of diagnosis is differentiating primary disease from other etiologies; research to discover new biomarkers is attempting to address this dilemma. With many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cNPSLE, biomarker profiles across several modalities (molecular, psychometric and neuroimaging) will need to be used. For the care of children with lupus, the challenge will be to develop biomarkers that are accessible by noninvasive measures and reliable in a pediatric population. PMID:26079959

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of primary CNS lymphoma in immunocompetent patients: guidelines from the European Association for Neuro-Oncology.

    PubMed

    Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Bessell, Eric; Bromberg, Jacoline; Hottinger, Andreas F; Preusser, Matthias; Rudà, Roberta; Schlegel, Uwe; Siegal, Tali; Soussain, Carole; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Cassoux, Nathalie; Deckert, Martina; Dirven, Clemens M F; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Graus, Francesc; Henriksson, Roger; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Taphoorn, Martin; Soffietti, Riccardo; Weller, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The management of primary CNS lymphoma is one of the most controversial topics in neuro-oncology because of the complexity of the disease and the very few controlled studies available. In 2013, the European Association of Neuro-Oncology created a multidisciplinary task force to establish evidence-based guidelines for immunocompetent adults with primary CNS lymphoma. In this Review, we present these guidelines, which provide consensus considerations and recommendations for diagnosis, assessment, staging, and treatment of primary CNS lymphoma. Specifically, we address aspects of care related to surgery, systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy, intensive chemotherapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation, radiotherapy, intraocular manifestations, and management of elderly patients. The guidelines should aid clinicians in their daily practice and decision making, and serve as a basis for future investigations in neuro-oncology.

  18. Deficits in adult neurogenesis, contextual fear conditioning, and spatial learning in a Gfap mutant mouse model of Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Tracy L; Paylor, Richard; Messing, Albee

    2013-11-20

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament of mature astrocytes in the mammalian CNS. Dominant gain of function mutations in GFAP lead to the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Alexander disease (AxD), which is characterized by cytoplasmic protein aggregates known as Rosenthal fibers along with variable degrees of leukodystrophy and intellectual disability. The mechanisms by which mutant GFAP leads to these pleiotropic effects are unknown. In addition to astrocytes, GFAP is also expressed in other cell types, particularly neural stem cells that form the reservoir supporting adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Here, we show that mouse models of AxD exhibit significant pathology in GFAP-positive radial glia-like cells in the dentate gyrus, and suffer from deficits in adult neurogenesis. In addition, they display impairments in contextual learning and spatial memory. This is the first demonstration of cognitive phenotypes in a model of primary astrocyte disease.

  19. IL-6 regulation of synaptic function in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gruol, Donna L

    2015-09-01

    A growing body of evidence supports a role for glial-produced neuroimmune factors, including the cytokine IL-6, in CNS physiology and pathology. CNS expression of IL-6 has been documented in the normal CNS at low levels and at elevated levels in several neurodegenerative or psychiatric disease states as well as in CNS infection and injury. The altered CNS function associated with these conditions raises the possibility that IL-6 has neuronal or synaptic actions. Studies in in vitro and in vivo models confirmed this possibility and showed that IL-6 can regulate a number of important neuronal and synaptic functions including synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, an important cellular mechanism of memory and learning. Behavioral studies in animal models provided further evidence of an important role for IL-6 as a regulator of CNS pathways that are critical to cognitive function. This review summarizes studies that have lead to our current state of knowledge. In spite of the progress that has been made, there is a need for a greater understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological actions of IL-6 in the CNS, the mechanisms underlying these actions, conditions that induce production of IL-6 in the CNS and therapeutic strategies that could ameliorate or promote IL-6 actions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroimmunology and Synaptic Function'.

  20. CNS Regulation of Energy Metabolism: Ghrelin versus Leptin

    PubMed Central

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    In this brief review, we introduce some major themes in the regulation of energy, lipid and glucose metabolism by the central nervous system (CNS). Rather than comprehensively discussing the field, we instead will discuss some of the key findings made regarding the interaction of the hormones ghrelin and leptin with the CNS. PMID:18448790

  1. Mechanisms of Hypothermia, Delayed Hyperthermia and Fever Following CNS Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage is often associated with robust body temperature changes, such as hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia. Hypothermia is one of the most common body temperature changes to CNS insults in rodents and is often associated with improved outcome. Alth...

  2. The role of dendritic cells in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Alla L.; Clarkson, Benjamin D.; Ortler, Sonja; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated, central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease. Clinical and histopathological features suggest an inflammatory etiology involving resident CNS innate cells as well as invading adaptive immune cells. Encephalitogenic myelin-reactive T cells have been implicated in the initiation of an inflammatory cascade, eventually resulting in demyelination and axonal damage (the histological hallmarks of MS). Dendritic cells (DC) have recently emerged as key modulators of this immunopathological cascade, as supported by studies in humans and experimental disease models. In one such model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), CNS microvessel-associated DC have been shown to be essential for local antigen recognition by myelin-reactive T cells. Moreover, the functional state and compartmental distribution of DC derived from CNS and associated lymphatics seem to be limiting factors in both the induction and effector phases of EAE. Moreover, DC modulate and balance the recruitment of encephalitogenic and regulatory T cells into CNS tissue. This capacity is critically influenced by DC surface expression of co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory molecules. The fact that DC accumulate in the CNS before T cells and can direct T-cell responses suggests that they are key determinants of CNS autoimmune outcomes. Here we provide a comprehensive review of recent advances in our understanding of CNS-derived DC and their relevance to neuroinflammation. PMID:20217033

  3. CNS involvement in hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Tackenberg, B; Möller, J C; Rindock, H; Bien, S; Sommer, N; Oertel, W H; Rosenow, F; Schepelmann, K; Hamer, H M; Bandmann, O

    2006-12-26

    We assessed seven patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with 16 electrophysiological tests and cranial MRI for CNS abnormalities. Mean latencies differed between patients with HNPP and controls for the blink reflex, the jaw-opening reflex, and acoustic evoked potentials. MRI abnormalities were observed in four patients. Our study suggests subclinical but functionally relevant CNS myelin damage in HNPP.

  4. Lack of neurogenesis in the adult rat cerebellum after Purkinje cell degeneration and growth factor infusion.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Piercesare; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2006-05-01

    Although constitutive neurogenesis exclusively occurs in restricted regions of the adult mammalian brain, resident progenitors can be isolated from many different CNS sites, and neuronal neogeneration can be stimulated in vivo by injury or infusion of growth factors. To ask whether latent compensatory mechanisms, which may be exploited to promote repair processes, are present throughout the CNS, we examined the neurogenic potentialities of the adult rat cerebellum in normal conditions, following injury, and after infusion of growth factors. Degeneration of Purkinje cells was induced by intracerebroventricular administration of the toxin saporin, conjugated to anti-p75 antibodies. In addition, epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor, or FGF8, were infused for 2 weeks to either intact or injured animals. In all conditions, proliferating cells were identified from bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. In the unmanipulated cerebellum there were rare dividing cells, mainly represented by NG2-positive presumptive oligodendrocyte precursors. Mitotic activity was strongly enhanced in cortical areas with Purkinje cell degeneration, being mostly sustained by microglia, plus minor fractions of NG2-expressing cells, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. In contrast, growth factor infusion had a weak effect on both intact and injured cerebella. In all experimental conditions, we never found any BrdU-positive cells coexpressing distinctive markers for immature or differentiated cerebellar neurons. Therefore, although some progenitor cells reside in the adult cerebellum, the local environment, either intact or injured, does not provide efficient cues to direct their differentiation towards neuronal phenotypes. In addition, neurogenic potentialities cannot be induced or boosted by the application of growth factors which are effective in other CNS regions.

  5. Immune surveillance of the CNS following infection and injury

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Matthew; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) contains a sophisticated neural network that must be constantly surveyed in order to detect and mitigate a diverse array of challenges. The innate and adaptive immune systems actively participate in this surveillance, which is critical for the maintenance of CNS homeostasis and can facilitate the resolution of infections, degeneration, and tissue damage. Infections and sterile injuries represent two common challenges imposed on the CNS that require a prompt immune response. While the inducers of these two challenges differ in origin, the resultant responses orchestrated by the CNS share some overlapping features. Here, we review how the CNS immunologically discriminates between pathogens and sterile injuries, mobilizes an immune reaction, and, ultimately, regulates local and peripherally-derived immune cells to provide a supportive milieu for tissue repair. PMID:26431941

  6. Models of CNS radiation damage during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopewell, J. W.

    1994-10-01

    The primary structural and functional arrangement of the different cell types within the CNS are reviewed. This was undertaken with a view to providing a better understanding of the complex interrelationships that may contribute to the pathogenesis of lesions in this tissue after exposure to ionizing radiation. The spectrum of possible CNS radiation-induced syndromes are discussed although not all have an immediate relevance to exposure during space flight. The specific characteristics of the lesions observed would appear to be dose related. Very high doses may produce an acute CNS syndrome that can cause death. Of the delayed lesions, selective coagulation necrosis of white matter and a later appearing vascular microangiopathy, have been reported in patients after cancer therapy doses. Lower doses, perhaps very low doses, may produce a delayed generalised CNS atrophy; this effect and the probability of the induction of CNS tumors could potentially have the greatest significance for space flight.

  7. Cognitive Impairment and Persistent CNS Injury in Treated HIV.

    PubMed

    Chan, Phillip; Hellmuth, Joanna; Spudich, Serena; Valcour, Victor

    2016-08-01

    The implementation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has changed HIV infection into a chronic illness, conveying extensive benefits, including greater longevity and advantages for the central nervous system (CNS). However, studies increasingly confirm that the CNS gains are incomplete, with reports of persistent immune activation affecting the CNS despite suppression of plasma HIV RNA. The rate of cognitive impairment is unchanged, although severity is generally milder than in the pre-cART era. In this review, we discuss cognitive outcomes from recently published clinical HIV studies, review observations on HIV biomarkers for cognitive change, and emphasize longitudinal imaging findings. Additionally, we summarize recent studies on CNS viral invasion, CD8 encephalitis, and how CNS involvement during the earliest stages of infection may set the stage for later cognitive manifestations.

  8. Beta4 tubulin identifies a primitive cell source for oligodendrocytes in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuanshen; Chang, Ansi; Smith, Maria C; Won, Roy; Yin, Xinghua; Staugaitis, Susan M; Agamanolis, Dimitri; Kidd, Grahame J; Miller, Robert H; Trapp, Bruce D

    2009-06-17

    We have identified a novel population of cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the mammalian brain that expresses beta4 tubulin (betaT4) and has properties of primitive neuroectodermal cells. betaT4 cells are scattered throughout the SVZ of the lateral ventricles in adult human brain and are significantly increased in the SVZs bordering demyelinated white matter in multiple sclerosis brains. In human fetal brain, betaT4 cell densities peak during the latter stages of gliogenesis, which occurs in the SVZ of the lateral ventricles. betaT4 cells represent <2% of the cells present in neurospheres generated from postnatal rat brain but >95% of cells in neurospheres treated with the anti-mitotic agent Ara C. betaT4 cells produce oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes in vitro. We compared the myelinating potential of betaT4-positive cells with A2B5-positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells after transplantation (25,000 cells) into postnatal day 3 (P3) myelin-deficient rat brains. At P20, the progeny of betaT4 cells myelinated up to 4 mm of the external capsule, which significantly exceeded that of transplanted A2B5-positive progenitor cells. Such extensive and rapid mature CNS cell generation by a relatively small number of transplanted cells provides in vivo support for the therapeutic potential of betaT4 cells. We propose that betaT4 cells are an endogenous cell source that can be recruited to promote neural repair in the adult telencephalon.

  9. Mammalian glycosylation in immunity.

    PubMed

    Marth, Jamey D; Grewal, Prabhjit K

    2008-11-01

    Glycosylation produces a diverse and abundant repertoire of glycans, which are collectively known as the glycome. Glycans are one of the four fundamental macromolecular components of all cells, and are highly regulated in the immune system. Their diversity reflects their multiple biological functions that encompass ligands for proteinaceous receptors known as lectins. Since the discovery that selectins and their glycan ligands are important for the regulation of leukocyte trafficking, it has been shown that additional features of the vertebrate immune system are also controlled by endogenous cellular glycosylation. This Review focuses on the emerging immunological roles of the mammalian glycome.

  10. Target identification for CNS diseases by transcriptional profiling.

    PubMed

    Altar, C Anthony; Vawter, Marquis P; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression changes in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, and gene responses to therapeutic drugs, provide new ways to identify central nervous system (CNS) targets for drug discovery. This review summarizes gene and pathway targets replicated in expression profiling of human postmortem brain, animal models, and cell culture studies. Analysis of isolated human neurons implicates targets for Alzheimer's disease and the cognitive decline associated with normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. In addition to tau, amyloid-beta precursor protein, and amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta), these targets include all three high-affinity neurotrophin receptors and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system, synapse markers, glutamate receptors (GluRs) and transporters, and dopamine (DA) receptors, particularly the D2 subtype. Gene-based candidates for Parkinson's disease (PD) include the ubiquitin-proteosome system, scavengers of reactive oxygen species, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its receptor, TrkB, and downstream target early growth response 1, Nurr-1, and signaling through protein kinase C and RAS pathways. Increasing variability and decreases in brain mRNA production from middle age to old age suggest that cognitive impairments during normal aging may be addressed by drugs that restore antioxidant, DNA repair, and synaptic functions including those of DA to levels of younger adults. Studies in schizophrenia identify robust decreases in genes for GABA function, including glutamic acid decarboxylase, HINT1, glutamate transport and GluRs, BDNF and TrkB, numerous 14-3-3 protein family members, and decreases in genes for CNS synaptic and metabolic functions, particularly glycolysis and ATP generation. Many of these metabolic genes are increased by insulin and muscarinic agonism, both of which are therapeutic in psychosis. Differential genomic signals are relatively sparse in bipolar disorder, but include deficiencies in the expression of 14

  11. Target Identification for CNS Diseases by Transcriptional Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Altar, C Anthony; Vawter, Marquis P; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression changes in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, and gene responses to therapeutic drugs, provide new ways to identify central nervous system (CNS) targets for drug discovery. This review summarizes gene and pathway targets replicated in expression profiling of human postmortem brain, animal models, and cell culture studies. Analysis of isolated human neurons implicates targets for Alzheimer’s disease and the cognitive decline associated with normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. In addition to τ, amyloid-β precursor protein, and amyloid-β peptides (Aβ), these targets include all three high-affinity neurotrophin receptors and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system, synapse markers, glutamate receptors (GluRs) and transporters, and dopamine (DA) receptors, particularly the D2 subtype. Gene-based candidates for Parkinson’s disease (PD) include the ubiquitin–proteosome system, scavengers of reactive oxygen species, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its receptor, TrkB, and downstream target early growth response 1, Nurr-1, and signaling through protein kinase C and RAS pathways. Increasing variability and decreases in brain mRNA production from middle age to old age suggest that cognitive impairments during normal aging may be addressed by drugs that restore antioxidant, DNA repair, and synaptic functions including those of DA to levels of younger adults. Studies in schizophrenia identify robust decreases in genes for GABA function, including glutamic acid decarboxylase, HINT1, glutamate transport and GluRs, BDNF and TrkB, numerous 14-3-3 protein family members, and decreases in genes for CNS synaptic and metabolic functions, particularly glycolysis and ATP generation. Many of these metabolic genes are increased by insulin and muscarinic agonism, both of which are therapeutic in psychosis. Differential genomic signals are relatively sparse in bipolar disorder, but include deficiencies in the expression of 14

  12. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design.

    PubMed

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Ricq, Emily L; Hooker, Jacob M

    2014-10-21

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test-retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are available

  13. A Philosophy for CNS Radiotracer Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test–retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods

  14. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design

    DOE PAGES

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C.; Ricq, Emily L.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2014-10-01

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfallsmore » of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test–retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are

  15. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C.; Ricq, Emily L.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2014-10-01

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test–retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are

  16. Mammalian sperm morphometry.

    PubMed Central

    Gage, M J

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the adaptive significance of sperm form and function has been a challenge to biologists because sperm are highly specialized cells operating at a microscopic level in a complex environment. A fruitful course of investigation has been to use the comparative approach. This comparative study attempts to address some fundamental questions of the evolution of mammalian sperm morphometry. Data on sperm morphometry for 445 mammalian species were collated from published sources. I use contemporary phylogenetic analysis to control for the inherent non-independence of species and explore relationships between the morphometric dimensions of the three essential spermatozoal components: head, mid-piece and flagellum. Energy for flagellar action is metabolized by the mitochondrial-dense mid-piece and these combine to propel the sperm head, carrying the male haplotype, to the ovum. I therefore search for evolutionary associations between sperm morphometry and body mass, karyotype and the duration of oestrus. In contrast to previous findings, there is no inverse correlation between body weight and sperm length. Sperm mid-piece and flagellum lengths are positively associated with both head length and area, and the slopes of these relationships are discussed. Flagellum length is positively associated with mid-piece length but, in contrast to previous research and after phylogenetic control, I find no relationship between flagellum length and the volume of the mitochondrial sheath. Sperm head dimensions are not related to either genome mass or chromosome number, and there are no relationships between sperm morphometry and the duration of oestrus. PMID:9474794

  17. Endocannabinoids and synaptic function in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Hashimotodani, Yuki; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Kano, Masanobu

    2007-04-01

    Marijuana affects neural functions through the binding of its active component (Delta(9)-THC) to cannabinoid receptors in the CNS. Recent studies have elucidated that endogenous ligands for cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids, serve as retrograde messengers at central synapses. Endocannabinoids are produced on demand in activity-dependent manners and released from postsynaptic neurons. The released endocannabinoids travel backward across the synapse, activate presynaptic CB1 cannabinoid receptors, and modulate presynaptic functions. Retrograde endocannabinoid signaling is crucial for certain forms of short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity at excitatory or inhibitory synapses in many brain regions, and thereby contributes to various aspects of brain function including learning and memory. Molecular identities of the CB1 receptor and enzymes involved in production and degradation of endocannabinoids have been elucidated. Anatomical studies have demonstrated unique distributions of these molecules around synapses, which provide morphological bases for the roles of endocannabinoids as retrograde messengers. CB1-knockout mice exhibit various behavioral abnormalities and multiple defects in synaptic plasticity, supporting the notion that endocannabinoid signaling is involved in various aspects of neural function. In this review article, the authors describe molecular mechanisms of the endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic modulation and its possible physiological significance.

  18. 3-D imaging of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Runge, V M; Gelblum, D Y; Wood, M L

    1990-01-01

    3-D gradient echo techniques, and in particular FLASH, represent a significant advance in MR imaging strategy allowing thin section, high resolution imaging through a large region of interest. Anatomical areas of application include the brain, spine, and extremities, although the majority of work to date has been performed in the brain. Superior T1 contrast and thus sensitivity to the presence of GdDTPA is achieved with 3-D FLASH when compared to 2-D spin echo technique. There is marked arterial and venous enhancement following Gd DTPA administration on 3-D FLASH, a less common finding with 2-D spin echo. Enhancement of the falx and tentorium is also more prominent. From a single data acquisition, requiring less than 11 min of scan time, high resolution reformatted sagittal, coronal, and axial images can obtained in addition to sections in any arbitrary plane. Tissue segmentation techniques can be applied and lesions displayed in three dimensions. These results may lead to the replacement of 2-D spin echo with 3-D FLASH for high resolution T1-weighted MR imaging of the CNS, particularly in the study of mass lesions and structural anomalies. The application of similar T2-weighted gradient echo techniques may follow, however the signal-to-noise ratio which can be achieved remains a potential limitation.

  19. Risk-tailored CNS prophylaxis in a mono-institutional series of 200 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, Andrés J M; Bruno-Ventre, Marta; Donadoni, Giovanni; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Citterio, Giovanni; Foppoli, Marco; Vignati, Alessandro; Scarfò, Lydia; Sassone, Marianna; Govi, Silvia; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico

    2015-03-01

    The most effective strategy to prevent central nervous system (CNS) dissemination in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains an important, unmet clinical need. Herein, we report a retrospective analysis of risk-tailored CNS prophylaxis in 200 human immunodeficiency virus-negative adults with DLBCL treated with rituximab-CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) or similar. High risk of CNS relapse was defined by involvement of specific extranodal organs, or simultaneous presence of advanced stage and high serum lactate dehydrogenase level; CNS prophylaxis with high-dose methotrexate ± intrathecal chemotherapy (IT) was routinely used in high-risk patients diagnosed after 2007. CNS relapse risk was low in 93 patients and high in 107; 40 high-risk patients received prophylaxis, which consisted of IT alone in 7. At a median follow-up of 60 months, one low-risk and nine high-risk patients (1% vs. 8%; P = 0·01) experienced CNS relapse. In the high-risk group, CNS relapses occurred in 8/67 (12%) patients who did not receive prophylaxis and in 1/40 (2·5%) patients who did; the latter occurred in a patient managed with IT alone. CNS relapse rate was 12% (9/74) for patients treated with "inadequate" prophylaxis (none or IT only) and 0% (0/33) for patients managed with intravenous prophylaxis (P = 0·03). In conclusion, high-dose methotrexate-based prophylaxis significantly reduces CNS failures in high-risk patients stratified by involvement of specific extranodal sites and International Prognostic Index.

  20. CXCR4/CXCR7 molecular involvement in neuronal and neural progenitor migration: focus in CNS repair.

    PubMed

    Merino, José Joaquín; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, María Jesús; Cubelos, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    In the adult brain, neural progenitor cells (NPCs) reside in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles, the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb. Following CNS insult, NPCs from the SVZ can migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS), a migration of NPCs that is directed by proinflammatory cytokines. Cells expressing CXCR4 follow a homing signal that ultimately leads to neuronal integration and CNS repair, although such molecules can also promote NPC quiescence. The ligand, SDF1 alpha (or CXCL12) is one of the chemokines secreted at sites of injury that it is known to attract NSC-derived neuroblasts, cells that express CXCR4. In function of its concentration, CXCL12 can induce different responses, promoting NPC migration at low concentrations while favoring cell adhesion via EGF and the alpha 6 integrin at high CXCL12 concentrations. However, the preclinical effectiveness of chemokines and their relationship with NPC mobilization requires further study, particularly with respect to CNS repair. NPC migration may also be affected by the release of cytokines or chemokines induced by local inflammation, through autocrine or paracrine mechanisms, as well as through erythropoietin (EPO) or nitric oxide (NO) release. CXCL12 activity requires G-coupled proteins and the availability of its ligand may be modulated by its binding to CXCR7, for which it shows a stronger affinity than for CXCR4.

  1. Seamless Reconstruction of Intact Adult-Born Neurons by Serial End-Block Imaging Reveals Complex Axonal Guidance and Development in the Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Gerald J.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Mahmood, Qasim A.; Chavali, Nikhil; Christian, Kimberly M.; Song, Hongjun

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian hippocampus, newborn dentate granule cells are continuously integrated into the existing circuitry and contribute to specific brain functions. Little is known about the axonal development of these newborn neurons in the adult brain due to technological challenges that have prohibited large-scale reconstruction of long, thin, and complex axonal processes within the mature nervous system. Here, using a new serial end-block imaging (SEBI) technique, we seamlessly reconstructed axonal and dendritic processes of intact individual retrovirus-labeled newborn granule cells at different developmental stages in the young adult mouse hippocampus. We found that adult-born dentate granule cells exhibit tortuous, yet highly stereotyped, axonal projections to CA3 hippocampal subregions. Primary axonal projections of cohorts of new neurons born around the same time organize into laminar patterns with staggered terminations that stack along the septo-temporal hippocampal axis. Analysis of individual newborn neuron development further defined an initial phase of rapid axonal and dendritic growth within 21 d after newborn neuron birth, followed by minimal growth of primary axonal and whole dendritic processes through the last time point examined at 77 d. Our results suggest that axonal development and targeting is a highly orchestrated, precise process in the adult brain. These findings demonstrate a striking regenerative capacity of the mature CNS to support long-distance growth and guidance of neuronal axons. Our SEBI approach can be broadly applied for analysis of intact, complex neuronal projections in limitless tissue volume. PMID:23843512

  2. Seamless reconstruction of intact adult-born neurons by serial end-block imaging reveals complex axonal guidance and development in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gerald J; Sailor, Kurt A; Mahmood, Qasim A; Chavali, Nikhil; Christian, Kimberly M; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li

    2013-07-10

    In the adult mammalian hippocampus, newborn dentate granule cells are continuously integrated into the existing circuitry and contribute to specific brain functions. Little is known about the axonal development of these newborn neurons in the adult brain due to technological challenges that have prohibited large-scale reconstruction of long, thin, and complex axonal processes within the mature nervous system. Here, using a new serial end-block imaging (SEBI) technique, we seamlessly reconstructed axonal and dendritic processes of intact individual retrovirus-labeled newborn granule cells at different developmental stages in the young adult mouse hippocampus. We found that adult-born dentate granule cells exhibit tortuous, yet highly stereotyped, axonal projections to CA3 hippocampal subregions. Primary axonal projections of cohorts of new neurons born around the same time organize into laminar patterns with staggered terminations that stack along the septo-temporal hippocampal axis. Analysis of individual newborn neuron development further defined an initial phase of rapid axonal and dendritic growth within 21 d after newborn neuron birth, followed by minimal growth of primary axonal and whole dendritic processes through the last time point examined at 77 d. Our results suggest that axonal development and targeting is a highly orchestrated, precise process in the adult brain. These findings demonstrate a striking regenerative capacity of the mature CNS to support long-distance growth and guidance of neuronal axons. Our SEBI approach can be broadly applied for analysis of intact, complex neuronal projections in limitless tissue volume.

  3. CNS Vasculitis Associated with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Riangwiwat, Tanawan; Wu, Chris Y; Santos-Ocampo, Alberto S; Liu, Randal J; McMurtray, Aaron M; Nakamoto, Beau K

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorder with monoclonal IgM secretion. We present a patient with WM who presented with multifocal acute cortical ischemic strokes and was found to have central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis. Workup was negative for cryoglobulins and hyperviscosity syndrome. Immunosuppression with intravenous steroids and cyclophosphamide stabilized the patient's mental status and neurologic deficits. On followup over 7 years, patient gained independence from walking aids and experienced no recurrences of CNS vasculitis. To our knowledge, CNS vasculitis in a WM patient, in the absence of cryoglobulins, has not been reported. Immunosuppression is the preferred treatment.

  4. LINGO-1 and its role in CNS repair.

    PubMed

    Mi, Sha; Sandrock, Alfred; Miller, Robert H

    2008-01-01

    LINGO-1 is selectively expressed in the CNS on both oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and neurons. Its expression is developmentally regulated in the normal CNS, as well as up-regulated in human or rat models of neuropathologies. LINGO-1 functions as a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, neuronal survival and axonal regeneration. Across diverse animal CNS disease models, targeted LINGO-1 inhibition was found to promote neuron and oligodendrocyte survival, axon regeneration, oligodendrocyte differentiation, remyelination and improved functional recovery. The targeted inhibition of LINGO-1 therefore presents a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of neurological diseases.

  5. CNS Vasculitis Associated with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Riangwiwat, Tanawan; Wu, Chris Y.; Santos-Ocampo, Alberto S.; Liu, Randal J.

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorder with monoclonal IgM secretion. We present a patient with WM who presented with multifocal acute cortical ischemic strokes and was found to have central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis. Workup was negative for cryoglobulins and hyperviscosity syndrome. Immunosuppression with intravenous steroids and cyclophosphamide stabilized the patient's mental status and neurologic deficits. On followup over 7 years, patient gained independence from walking aids and experienced no recurrences of CNS vasculitis. To our knowledge, CNS vasculitis in a WM patient, in the absence of cryoglobulins, has not been reported. Immunosuppression is the preferred treatment. PMID:27818812

  6. How Do Meningeal Lymphatic Vessels Drain the CNS?

    PubMed

    Raper, Daniel; Louveau, Antoine; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    The many interactions between the nervous and the immune systems, which are active in both physiological and pathological states, have recently become more clearly delineated with the discovery of a meningeal lymphatic system capable of carrying fluid, immune cells, and macromolecules from the central nervous system (CNS) to the draining deep cervical lymph nodes. However, the exact localization of the meningeal lymphatic vasculature and the path of drainage from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the lymphatics remain poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential differences between peripheral and CNS lymphatic vessels and examine the purported mechanisms of CNS lymphatic drainage, along with how these may fit into established patterns of CSF flow.

  7. Axon-glial interactions at the Drosophila CNS midline.

    PubMed

    Crews, Stephen T

    2010-01-01

    The glia that reside at the midline of the Drosophila CNS are an important embryonic signaling center and also wrap the axons that cross the CNS. The development of the midline glia (MG) is characterized by migration, ensheathment, subdivision of axon commissures, apoptosis, and the extension of glial processes. All of these events are characterized by cell-cell contact between MG and adjacent neurons. Cell adhesion and signaling proteins that mediate different aspects of MG development and MG-neuron interactions have been identified. This provides a foundation for ultimately obtaining an integrated picture of how the MG assemble into a characteristic axonal support structure in the CNS.

  8. The mammalian blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Stephen R; de Barros, Flavia R O; Rossant, Janet; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2016-01-01

    The blastocyst is a mammalian invention that carries the embryo from cleavage to gastrulation. For such a simple structure, it exhibits remarkable diversity in its mode of formation, morphology, longevity, and intimacy with the uterine endometrium. This review explores this diversity in the light of the evolution of viviparity, comparing the three main groups of mammals: monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians. The principal drivers in blastocyst evolution were loss of yolk coupled with evolution of the placenta. An important outcome of blastocyst development is differentiation of two extraembryonic lineages (trophoblast and hypoblast) that contribute to the placenta. While in many species trophoblast segregation is often coupled with blastocyst formation, in marsupials and at least some Afrotherians, these events do not coincide. Thus, many questions regarding the conservation of molecular mechanisms controlling these events are of great interest but currently unresolved. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  9. Loss of Coupling Distinguishes GJB1 Mutations Associated with CNS Manifestations of CMT1X from Those Without CNS Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Charles K; Goman, Mikhail; Wong, Sarah; Scherer, Steven S; Kleopa, Kleopas A; Peinado, Alejandro; Freidin, Mona M

    2017-01-10

    CMT1X, an X-linked inherited neuropathy, is caused by mutations in GJB1, which codes for Cx32, a gap junction protein expressed by Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes. Many GJB1 mutations cause central nervous system (CNS) abnormality in males, including stable subclinical signs and, less often, short-duration episodes characterized by motor difficulties and altered consciousness. However, some mutations have no apparent CNS effects. What distinguishes mutations with and without CNS manifestations has been unclear. Here we studied a total of 14 Cx32 mutations, 10 of which are associated with florid episodic CNS clinical syndromes in addition to peripheral neuropathy. The other 4 mutations exhibit neuropathy without clinical or subclinical CNS abnormalities. These "PNS-only" mutations (Y151C, V181M, R183C and L239I) form gap junction plaques and produce levels of junctional coupling similar to those for wild-type Cx32. In contrast, mutants with CNS manifestations (F51L, E102del, V139M, R142Q, R142W, R164W T55I, R164Q and C168Y) either form no morphological gap junction plaques or, if they do, produce little or no detectable junctional coupling. Thus, PNS and CNS abnormalities may involve different aspects of connexin function.

  10. Loss of Coupling Distinguishes GJB1 Mutations Associated with CNS Manifestations of CMT1X from Those Without CNS Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Charles K.; Goman, Mikhail; Wong, Sarah; Scherer, Steven S.; Kleopa, Kleopas A.; Peinado, Alejandro; Freidin, Mona M.

    2017-01-01

    CMT1X, an X-linked inherited neuropathy, is caused by mutations in GJB1, which codes for Cx32, a gap junction protein expressed by Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes. Many GJB1 mutations cause central nervous system (CNS) abnormality in males, including stable subclinical signs and, less often, short-duration episodes characterized by motor difficulties and altered consciousness. However, some mutations have no apparent CNS effects. What distinguishes mutations with and without CNS manifestations has been unclear. Here we studied a total of 14 Cx32 mutations, 10 of which are associated with florid episodic CNS clinical syndromes in addition to peripheral neuropathy. The other 4 mutations exhibit neuropathy without clinical or subclinical CNS abnormalities. These “PNS-only” mutations (Y151C, V181M, R183C and L239I) form gap junction plaques and produce levels of junctional coupling similar to those for wild-type Cx32. In contrast, mutants with CNS manifestations (F51L, E102del, V139M, R142Q, R142W, R164W T55I, R164Q and C168Y) either form no morphological gap junction plaques or, if they do, produce little or no detectable junctional coupling. Thus, PNS and CNS abnormalities may involve different aspects of connexin function. PMID:28071741

  11. Absence of SOX3 in the developing marsupial gonad is not consistent with a conserved role in mammalian sex determination.

    PubMed

    Pask, A J; Harry, J L; Renfree, M B; Marshall Graves, J A

    2000-08-01

    Expression of Sox3 has been detected in the testes of humans and of developing and adult mice at the same time as Sox9 and Sry. The co-expression of these three related Sox genes in the mouse indifferent gonadal ridge led to the hypothesis that these three genes, encoding transcription factors with similar DNA target binding sites, may interact with each other in initiating testis differentiation. The location of SOX3 on the marsupial Dunnart X chromosome also makes it a candidate for the marsupial X-linked gene responsible for the SRY- and hormone-independent initiation of scrotum or mammary gland development. Here we show that although marsupial SOX3 is highly conserved at the genetic level and appears to have a conserved role in CNS development, its expression during sexual differentiation differs from that of mice and humans. SOX3 expression is absent from the developing marsupial genital ridge and from the scrotal and mammary primordia during the critical time of differentiation and throughout the time that SRY is expressed. The absence of expression in the developing gonad strongly suggests that SOX3 does not have a conserved role in mammalian sexual determination or differentiation.

  12. The Processing of Airspace Concept Evaluations Using FASTE-CNS as a Pre- or Post-Simulation CNS Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mainger, Steve

    2004-01-01

    As NASA speculates on and explores the future of aviation, the technological and physical aspects of our environment increasing become hurdles that must be overcome for success. Research into methods for overcoming some of these selected hurdles have been purposed by several NASA research partners as concepts. The task of establishing a common evaluation environment was placed on NASA's Virtual Airspace Simulation Technologies (VAST) project (sub-project of VAMS), and they responded with the development of the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES). As one examines the ACES environment from a communication, navigation or surveillance (CNS) perspective, the simulation parameters are built with assumed perfection in the transactions associated with CNS. To truly evaluate these concepts in a realistic sense, the contributions/effects of CNS must be part of the ACES. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has supported the Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) project through the continued development of CNS models and analysis capabilities which supports the ACES environment. NASA GRC initiated the development a communications traffic loading analysis tool, called the Future Aeronautical Sub-network Traffic Emulator for Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (FASTE-CNS), as part of this support. This tool allows for forecasting of communications load with the understanding that, there is no single, common source for loading models used to evaluate the existing and planned communications channels; and that, consensus and accuracy in the traffic load models is a very important input to the decisions being made on the acceptability of communication techniques used to fulfill the aeronautical requirements. Leveraging off the existing capabilities of the FASTE-CNS tool, GRC has called for FASTE-CNS to have the functionality to pre- and post-process the simulation runs of ACES to report on instances when traffic density, frequency congestion or aircraft spacing

  13. Nanomaterial-mediated CNS Delivery of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone-Thorpe, Laura; Marchi, Nicola; Guo, Kathy; Ghosh, Chaitali; Janigro, Damir; Valerie, Kristoffer; Yang, Hu

    2011-01-01

    Research into the diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases has been enhanced by rapid advances in nanotechnology and an expansion in the library of nanostructured carriers. This review discusses the latest applications of nanomaterials in the CNS with an emphasis on brain tumors. Novel administration routes and transport mechanisms for nanomaterial-mediated CNS delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to bypass or cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) are also discussed. These include temporary disruption of the BBB, use of impregnated polymers (polymer wafers), convection-enhanced delivery (CED), and intranasal delivery. Moreover, an in vitro BBB model capable of mimicking geometrical, cellular and rheological features of the human cerebrovasculature has been developed. This is a useful tool that can be used for screening CNS nanoparticles or therapeutics prior to in vivo and clinical investigation. A discussion of this novel model is included. PMID:22178615

  14. Contribution of CNS cells in NeuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ashish Swarup; Singh, Udai Pratap; Dwivedi, Premendra Dhar; Singh, Anchal

    2010-01-01

    NeuroAIDS is becoming a major health problem among AIDS patients and long-term HIV survivors. As per 2009 estimates of UNAIDS report, more than 34 million people have been infected with HIV out of which ≥ 50% show signs and symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders. These disorders affect central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). CNS is one of the most protected organ systems in body which is protected by blood-brain barrier (BBB). Not only this, most of the cells of CNS are negative for receptors and co-receptors for HIV infections. Neurons have been found to be completely nonpermissive for HIV infection. These facts suggest that neurotoxicity could be an indirect mechanism responsible for neuropsychiatric complications. In this review, we will discuss the importance of different cell types of CNS and their contribution toward neurotoxicity. PMID:21180461

  15. Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacogenetic, and Other Factors Influencing CNS Penetration of Antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Babalola, Chinedum Peace; Morse, Gene D.; Taiwo, Babafemi

    2016-01-01

    Neurological complications associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a matter of great concern. While antiretroviral (ARV) drugs are the cornerstone of HIV treatment and typically produce neurological benefit, some ARV drugs have limited CNS penetration while others have been associated with neurotoxicity. CNS penetration is a function of several factors including sieving role of blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers and activity of innate drug transporters. Other factors are related to pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of the specific ARV agent or mediated by drug interactions, local inflammation, and blood flow. In this review, we provide an overview of the various factors influencing CNS penetration of ARV drugs with an emphasis on those commonly used in sub-Saharan Africa. We also summarize some key associations between ARV drug penetration, CNS efficacy, and neurotoxicity. PMID:27777797

  16. B cells and Autoantibodies: Complex Roles in CNS Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ankeny, Daniel P.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging data indicate that traumatic injury to the brain or spinal cord activates B lymphocytes, culminating in the production of antibodies specific for antigens found within and outside the central nervous system (CNS). In this article, we summarize what is known about the effects of CNS injury on B cells. We outline the potential mechanisms for CNS trauma-induced B cell activation and discuss the potential consequences of these injury-induced B cell responses. Based on recent data, we hypothesize that a subset of autoimmune B cell responses initiated by CNS injury are pathogenic and that targeted inhibition of B cells could improve recovery in brain and spinal cord injured patients. PMID:20691635

  17. Global Epigenomic Reconfiguration During Mammalian Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Joseph R.; Urich, Mark; Puddifoot, Clare A.; Johnson, Nicholas D.; Lucero, Jacinta; Huang, Yun; Dwork, Andrew J.; Schultz, Matthew D.; Yu, Miao; Tonti-Filippini, Julian; Heyn, Holger; Hu, Shijun; Wu, Joseph C.; Rao, Anjana; Esteller, Manel; He, Chuan; Haghighi, Fatemeh G.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Behrens, M. Margarita; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is implicated in mammalian brain development and plasticity underlying learning and memory. We report the genome-wide composition, patterning, cell specificity, and dynamics of DNA methylation at single-base resolution in human and mouse frontal cortex throughout their lifespan. Widespread methylome reconfiguration occurs during fetal to young adult development, coincident with synaptogenesis. During this period, highly conserved non-CG methylation (mCH) accumulates in neurons, but not glia, to become the dominant form of methylation in the human neuronal genome. Moreover, we found an mCH signature that identifies genes escaping X-chromosome inactivation. Last, whole-genome single-base resolution 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC) maps revealed that hmC marks fetal brain cell genomes at putative regulatory regions that are CG-demethylated and activated in the adult brain and that CG demethylation at these hmC-poised loci depends on Tet2 activity. PMID:23828890

  18. Differential roles of NF-Y transcription factor in ER chaperone expression and neuronal maintenance in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Tomoyuki; Tosaki, Asako; Miyazaki, Haruko; Kurosawa, Masaru; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Maity, Sankar N.; Misawa, Hidemi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Shimogori, Tomomi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) contains various types of neurons with different neuronal functions. In contrast to established roles of cell type-specific transcription factors on neuronal specification and maintenance, whether ubiquitous transcription factors have conserved or differential neuronal function remains uncertain. Here, we revealed that inactivation of a ubiquitous factor NF-Y in different sets of neurons resulted in cell type-specific neuropathologies and gene downregulation in mouse CNS. In striatal and cerebellar neurons, NF-Y inactivation led to ubiquitin/p62 pathologies with downregulation of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone Grp94, as we previously observed by NF-Y deletion in cortical neurons. In contrast, NF-Y inactivation in motor neurons induced neuronal loss without obvious protein deposition. Detailed analysis clarified downregulation of another ER chaperone Grp78 in addition to Grp94 in motor neurons, and knockdown of both ER chaperones in motor neurons recapitulated the pathology observed after NF-Y inactivation. Finally, additional downregulation of Grp78 in striatal neurons suppressed ubiquitin accumulation induced by NF-Y inactivation, implying that selective ER chaperone downregulation mediates different neuropathologies. Our data suggest distinct roles of NF-Y in protein homeostasis and neuronal maintenance in the CNS by differential regulation of ER chaperone expression. PMID:27687130

  19. Human African trypanosomiasis of the CNS: current issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Peter G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa. Current therapy with melarsoprol for CNS HAT has unacceptable side-effects with an overall mortality of 5%. This review discusses the issues of diagnosis and staging of CNS disease, its neuropathogenesis, and the possibility of new therapies for treating late-stage disease. PMID:14966556

  20. [Influence of a CNS pathology on the electrocochleography response].

    PubMed

    Arslan, E; Lupi, G; Rosignoli, M

    1994-01-01

    This study analyzed 73 electrocochleographic recordings made in children with a normal hearing threshold, selected retrospectively from 1563 recordings made between 1973 and 1990. The aim of the study was to check the original findings for any correlation between the various response parameters which might be indicative of a pathological condition. Compound action potential (AP) latency and amplitude, presynaptic summation potential (SP) and cochlear microphonic (CM) amplitudes and AP rapid adaptation behavior were calculated and recordings were associated with clinical information on aetiologic diagnosis, otoscopic examination, impedance measurement data and the finding of any central nervous system (CNS) pathology. The trend of the amplitudes as a function of the intensity of all three potentials (input-output functions), CM and SP in particular, demonstrated unexpected scattered values especially towards the high intensities. This was found correlated to the presence of CNS pathology. The comparison between the two groups (with vs without CNS pathology) with the aid of the Student's t-test proved statically significant, especially for CM and SP amplitudes while rather less so for AP amplitude. In particular, all CM and SP amplitude values outside the confidence intervals (calculated as 95% of normal cases) revealed CNS pathology. It has been suggested that the influence of the CNS on cochlear function is due to a disturbed function of the olicocochlear bundle, which is known to have an inhibitory effect on cochlear dynamics; furthermore, there is also proof that it can be activated regardless of any ipso-and/or contra-lateral acoustic stimulation. The effects observed on the electrocochleography in cases with CNS disorders would thus be explained by an interruption of the olivocochlear bundle at the CNS level or a disruption of the CNS mechanism capable of controlling its activation.

  1. A Distinct Population of Microglia Supports Adult Neurogenesis in the Subventricular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Xavier, Anna L.; Kress, Benjamin T.; Goldman, Steven A.; Lacerda de Menezes, João R.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are involved in synaptic pruning both in development and in the mature CNS. In this study, we investigated whether microglia might further contribute to circuit plasticity by modulating neuronal recruitment from the neurogenic subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult mouse striatum. We found that microglia residing in the SVZ and adjacent rostral migratory stream (RMS) comprise a morphologically and antigenically distinct phenotype of immune effectors. Whereas exhibiting characteristics of alternatively activated microglia, the SVZ/RMS microglia were clearly distinguished by their low expression of purinoceptors and lack of ATP-elicitable chemotaxis. Furthermore, the in vivo depletion of these microglia hampered the survival and migration of newly generated neuroblasts through the RMS to the olfactory bulb. SVZ and RMS microglia thus appear to comprise a functionally distinct class that is selectively adapted to the support and direction of neuronal integration into the olfactory circuitry. Therefore, this unique microglial subpopulation may serve as a novel target with which to modulate cellular addition from endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells of the adult brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Microglial cells are a specialized population of macrophages in the CNS, playing key roles as immune mediators. As integral components in the CNS, the microglia stand out for using the same mechanisms, phagocytosis and cytochemokine release, to promote homeostasis, synaptic pruning, and neural circuitry sculpture. Here, we addressed microglial functions in the subventricular zone (SVZ), the major postnatal neurogenic niche. Our results depict microglia as a conspicuous component of SVZ and its anterior extension, the rostral migratory stream, a pathway used by neuroblasts during their transit toward olfactory bulb layers. In addition to other unique populations residing in the SVZ niche, microglia display distinct morphofunctional properties that boost neuronal

  2. The role of inflammation in CNS injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sian-Marie; Rothwell, Nancy J; Gibson, Rosemary M

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the central nervous system (CNS) was considered to be 'immune privileged', neither susceptible to nor contributing to inflammation. It is now appreciated that the CNS does exhibit features of inflammation, and in response to injury, infection or disease, resident CNS cells generate inflammatory mediators, including proinflammatory cytokines, prostaglandins, free radicals and complement, which in turn induce chemokines and adhesion molecules, recruit immune cells, and activate glial cells. Much of the key evidence demonstrating that inflammation and inflammatory mediators contribute to acute, chronic and psychiatric CNS disorders is summarised in this review. However, inflammatory mediators may have dual roles, with detrimental acute effects but beneficial effects in long-term repair and recovery, leading to complications in their application as novel therapies. These may be avoided in acute diseases in which treatment administration might be relatively short-term. Targeting interleukin (IL)-1 is a promising novel therapy for stroke and traumatic brain injury, the naturally occurring antagonist (IL-1ra) being well tolerated by rheumatoid arthritis patients. Chronic disorders represent a greater therapeutic challenge, a problem highlighted in Alzheimer's disease (AD); significant data suggested that anti-inflammatory agents might reduce the probability of developing AD, or slow its progression, but prospective clinical trials of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or cyclooxygenase inhibitors have been disappointing. The complex interplay between inflammatory mediators, ageing, genetic background, and environmental factors may ultimately regulate the outcome of acute CNS injury and progression of chronic neurodegeneration, and be critical for development of effective therapies for CNS diseases.

  3. Slice Culture Modeling of Central Nervous System (CNS) Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Kalen R.; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the central nervous system (CNS) is not recapitulated in cell culture models. Thin slicing and subsequent culture of CNS tissue has become a valued means to study neuronal and glial biology within the context of the physiologically relevant tissue milieu. Modern membrane-interface slice culturing methodology allows straightforward access to both CNS tissue and feeding medium, enabling experimental manipulations and analyses that would otherwise be impossible in vivo. CNS slices can be successfully maintained in culture for up to several weeks for investigation of evolving pathology and long-term intervention in models of chronic neurologic disease. Herein, membrane-interface slice culture models for studying viral encephalitis and myelitis are detailed, with emphasis on the use of these models for investigation of pathogenesis and evaluation of novel treatment strategies. We describe techniques to (1) generate brain and spinal cord slices from rodent donors, (2) virally infect slices, (3) monitor viral replication, (4) assess virally induced injury/apoptosis, (5) characterize “CNS-specific” cytokine production, and (6) treat slices with cytokines/pharmaceuticals. Although our focus is on CNS viral infection, we anticipate that the described methods can be adapted to address a wide range of investigations within the fields of neuropathology, neuroimmunology, and neuropharmacology. PMID:23975824

  4. Cellular and Molecular Characterization of Multipolar Map5-Expressing Cells: A Subset of Newly Generated, Stage-Specific Parenchymal Cells in the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Conte, Daniele; Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although extremely interesting in adult neuro-glio-genesis and promising as an endogenous source for repair, parenchymal progenitors remain largely obscure in their identity and physiology, due to a scarce availability of stage-specific markers. What appears difficult is the distinction between real cell populations and various differentiation stages of the same population. Here we focused on a subset of multipolar, polydendrocyte-like cells (mMap5 cells) expressing the microtubule associated protein 5 (Map5), which is known to be present in most neurons. We characterized the morphology, phenotype, regional distribution, proliferative dynamics, and stage-specific marker expression of these cells in the rabbit and mouse CNS, also assessing their existence in other mammalian species. mMap5 cells were never found to co-express the Ng2 antigen. They appear to be a population of glial cells sharing features but also differences with Ng2+progenitor cells. We show that mMap5 cells are newly generated, postmitotic parenchymal elements of the oligodendroglial lineage, thus being a stage-specific population of polydendrocytes. Finally, we report that the number of mMap5 cells, although reduced within the brain of adult/old animals, can increase in neurodegenerative and traumatic conditions. PMID:23667595

  5. Cellular and molecular characterization of multipolar Map5-expressing cells: a subset of newly generated, stage-specific parenchymal cells in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Conte, Daniele; Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although extremely interesting in adult neuro-glio-genesis and promising as an endogenous source for repair, parenchymal progenitors remain largely obscure in their identity and physiology, due to a scarce availability of stage-specific markers. What appears difficult is the distinction between real cell populations and various differentiation stages of the same population. Here we focused on a subset of multipolar, polydendrocyte-like cells (mMap5 cells) expressing the microtubule associated protein 5 (Map5), which is known to be present in most neurons. We characterized the morphology, phenotype, regional distribution, proliferative dynamics, and stage-specific marker expression of these cells in the rabbit and mouse CNS, also assessing their existence in other mammalian species. mMap5 cells were never found to co-express the Ng2 antigen. They appear to be a population of glial cells sharing features but also differences with Ng2+progenitor cells. We show that mMap5 cells are newly generated, postmitotic parenchymal elements of the oligodendroglial lineage, thus being a stage-specific population of polydendrocytes. Finally, we report that the number of mMap5 cells, although reduced within the brain of adult/old animals, can increase in neurodegenerative and traumatic conditions.

  6. Restoring axonal localization and transport of transmembrane receptors to promote repair within the injured CNS: a critical step in CNS regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Lindsey H.; Andrews, Melissa R.

    2017-01-01

    Each neuronal subtype is distinct in how it develops, responds to environmental cues, and whether it is capable of mounting a regenerative response following injury. Although the adult central nervous system (CNS) does not regenerate, several experimental interventions have been trialled with successful albeit limited instances of axonal repair. We highlight here some of these approaches including extracellular matrix (ECM) modification, cellular grafting, gene therapy-induced replacement of proteins, as well as application of biomaterials. We also review the recent report demonstrating the failure of axonal localization and transport of growth-promoting receptors within certain classes of mature neurons. More specifically, we discuss an inability of integrin receptors to localize within the axonal compartment of mature motor neurons such as in the corticospinal and rubrospinal tracts, whereas in immature neurons of those pathways and in mature sensory tracts such as in the optic nerve and dorsal column pathways these receptors readily localize within axons. Furthermore we assert that this failure of axonal localization contributes to the intrinsic inability of axonal regeneration. We conclude by highlighting the necessity for both combined therapies as well as a targeted approach specific to both age and neuronal subtype will be required to induce substantial CNS repair. PMID:28250734

  7. Liposomal cytarabine in the prophylaxis and treatment of CNS lymphoma: toxicity analysis in a retrospective case series study conducted at Polish Lymphoma Research Group Centers.

    PubMed

    Jurczak, Wojciech; Kroll-Balcerzak, Renata; Giebel, Sebastian; Machaczka, Maciej; Giza, Agnieszka; Ogórka, Tomasz; Fornagiel, Szymon; Rybka, Justyna; Wróbel, Tomasz; Kumiega, Beata; Skotnicki, Aleksander B; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2015-04-01

    Lymphomas with primary or secondary involvement of central nervous system (CNS) have poor prognosis despite specific treatment protocols which include whole brain radiotherapy and high-dose systemic and/or intrathecal chemotherapy. Toxicity of intrathecal liposomal cytarabine-based regimens collected between November 2006 and January 2012 was assessed retrospectively. Data from 120 adult lymphoma patients with, or at high risk of CNS involvement who received intrathecal liposomal cytarabine-based regimens at six Polish Lymphoma Research Group centres between November 2006 and January 2012 were assessed retrospectively. Patients were divided into three cohorts: A (high risk of CNS disease, n = 88), B (cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis without neurological symptoms or pathological imaging findings, n = 7), and C (CNS disease/neurological involvement; n = 25). In all examined groups, toxicity of treatment was found to be acceptable (including the prophylactic setting). None of the patients in cohorts A or B who took intrathecal liposomal cytarabine 50 mg, repeated every 2-4 weeks (mean 3.8 doses) had experienced a CNS relapse at a median follow-up time of 3 years. Patients in cohort C had a 76 % overall neurological response rate (including a 40 % complete response rate) and median overall survival of 4.8 years. Regimens incorporating liposomal cytarabine seem to be safe and effective treatments for lymphomas with CNS involvement.

  8. Mammalian clock output mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Yi, Chun-Xia; Cailotto, Cathy; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Buijs, Ruud M

    2011-06-30

    In mammals many behaviours (e.g. sleep-wake, feeding) as well as physiological (e.g. body temperature, blood pressure) and endocrine (e.g. plasma corticosterone concentration) events display a 24 h rhythmicity. These 24 h rhythms are induced by a timing system that is composed of central and peripheral clocks. The highly co-ordinated output of the hypothalamic biological clock not only controls the daily rhythm in sleep-wake (or feeding-fasting) behaviour, but also exerts a direct control over many aspects of hormone release and energy metabolism. First, we present the anatomical connections used by the mammalian biological clock to enforce its endogenous rhythmicity on the rest of the body, especially the neuro-endocrine and energy homoeostatic systems. Subsequently, we review a number of physiological experiments investigating the functional significance of this neuro-anatomical substrate. Together, this overview of experimental data reveals a highly specialized organization of connections between the hypothalamic pacemaker and neuro-endocrine system as well as the pre-sympathetic and pre-parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system.

  9. The Mammalian Septin Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Katharina; Zieger, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Septins are GTP-binding and membrane-interacting proteins with a highly conserved domain structure involved in various cellular processes, including cytoskeleton organization, cytokinesis, and membrane dynamics. To date, 13 different septin genes have been identified in mammals (SEPT1 to SEPT12 and SEPT14), which can be classified into four distinct subgroups based on the sequence homology of their domain structure (SEPT2, SEPT3, SEPT6, and SEPT7 subgroup). The family members of these subgroups have a strong affinity for other septins and form apolar tri-, hexa-, or octameric complexes consisting of multiple septin polypeptides. The first characterized core complex is the hetero-trimer SEPT2-6-7. Within these complexes single septins can be exchanged in a subgroup-specific manner. Hexamers contain SEPT2 and SEPT6 subgroup members and SEPT7 in two copies each whereas the octamers additionally comprise two SEPT9 subgroup septins. The various isoforms seem to determine the function and regulation of the septin complex. Septins self-assemble into higher-order structures, including filaments and rings in orders, which are typical for different cell types. Misregulation of septins leads to human diseases such as neurodegenerative and bleeding disorders. In non-dividing cells such as neuronal tissue and platelets septins have been associated with exocytosis. However, many mechanistic details and roles attributed to septins are poorly understood. We describe here some important mammalian septin interactions with a special focus on the clinically relevant septin interactions. PMID:28224124

  10. Zebrafish as a Model to Investigate CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Marnie A.; Macklin, Wendy B.

    2015-01-01

    Myelin plays a critical role in proper neuronal function by providing trophic and metabolic support to axons and facilitating energy-efficient saltatory conduction. Myelination is influenced by numerous molecules including growth factors, hormones, transmembrane receptors and extracellular molecules, which activate signaling cascades that drive cellular maturation. Key signaling molecules and downstream signaling cascades controlling myelination have been identified in cell culture systems. However, in vitro systems are not able to faithfully replicate the complex in vivo signaling environment that occurs during development or following injury. Currently, it remains time-consuming and expensive to investigate myelination in vivo in rodents, the most widely used model for studying mammalian myelination. As such, there is a need for alternative in vivo myelination models, particularly ones that can test molecular mechanisms without removing oligodendrocyte lineage cells from their native signaling environment or disrupting intercellular interactions with other cell types present during myelination. Here, we review the ever-increasing role of zebrafish in studies uncovering novel mechanisms controlling vertebrate myelination. These innovative studies range from observations of the behavior of single cells during in vivo myelination as well as mutagenesis- and pharmacology-based screens in whole animals. Additionally, we discuss recent efforts to develop novel models of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death in adult zebrafish for the study of cellular behavior in real time during repair and regeneration of damaged nervous systems. PMID:25263121

  11. A Rosetta stone of mammalian genetics.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, J H; Grant, P L; Mankala, S; Reiner, A H; Richardson, J E; Eppig, J T

    1995-01-26

    The Mammalian Comparative Database provides genetic maps of mammalian species. Comparative maps are valuable aids for predicting linkages, developing animal models and studying genome organization and evolution.

  12. The truncated TrkB receptor influences mammalian sleep

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Adam J.; Henson, Kyle; Dorsey, Susan G.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin hypothesized to play an important role in mammalian sleep expression and regulation. In order to investigate the role of the truncated receptor for BDNF, TrkB.T1, in mammalian sleep, we examined sleep architecture and sleep regulation in adult mice constitutively lacking this receptor. We find that TrkB.T1 knockout mice have increased REM sleep time, reduced REM sleep latency, and reduced sleep continuity. These results demonstrate a novel role for the TrkB.T1 receptor in sleep expression and provide new insights into the relationship between BDNF, psychiatric illness, and sleep. PMID:25502751

  13. Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), Concept Simulations using Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don

    2006-01-01

    Project Objectives include: a) CNS Model Development; b Design/Integration of baseline set of CNS Models into ACES; c) Implement Enhanced Simulation Capabilities in ACES; d) Design and Integration of Enhanced (2nd set) CNS Models; and e) Continue with CNS Model Integration/Concept evaluations.

  14. Neu3 sialidase-mediated ganglioside conversion is necessary for axon regeneration and is blocked in CNS axons.

    PubMed

    Kappagantula, Sunil; Andrews, Melissa R; Cheah, Menghon; Abad-Rodriguez, José; Dotti, Carlos G; Fawcett, James W

    2014-02-12

    PNS axons have a high intrinsic regenerative ability, whereas most CNS axons show little regenerative response. We show that activation of Neu3 sialidase, also known as Neuraminidase-3, causing conversion of GD1a and GT1b to GM1 ganglioside, is an essential step in regeneration occurring in PNS (sensory) but not CNS (retinal) axons in adult rat. In PNS axons, axotomy activates Neu3 sialidase, increasing the ratio of GM1/GD1a and GM1/GT1b gangliosides immediately after injury in vitro and in vivo. No change in the GM1/GD1a ratio after axotomy was observed in retinal axons (in vitro and in vivo), despite the presence of Neu3 sialidase. Externally applied sialidase converted GD1a ganglioside to GM1 and rescued axon regeneration in CNS axons and in PNS axons after Neu3 sialidase blockade. Neu3 sialidase activation in DRGs is initiated by an influx of extracellular calcium, activating P38MAPK and then Neu3 sialidase. Ganglioside conversion by Neu3 sialidase further activates the ERK pathway. In CNS axons, P38MAPK and Neu3 sialidase were not activated by axotomy.

  15. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  16. Evolution of the mammalian dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hevner, Robert F

    2016-02-15

    The dentate gyrus (DG), a part of the hippocampal formation, has important functions in learning, memory, and adult neurogenesis. Compared with homologous areas in sauropsids (birds and reptiles), the mammalian DG is larger and exhibits qualitatively different phenotypes: 1) folded (C- or V-shaped) granule neuron layer, concave toward the hilus and delimited by a hippocampal fissure; 2) nonperiventricular adult neurogenesis; and 3) prolonged ontogeny, involving extensive abventricular (basal) migration and proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs). Although gaps remain, available data indicate that these DG traits are present in all orders of mammals, including monotremes and marsupials. The exception is Cetacea (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which DG size, convolution, and adult neurogenesis have undergone evolutionary regression. Parsimony suggests that increased growth and convolution of the DG arose in stem mammals concurrently with nonperiventricular adult hippocampal neurogenesis and basal migration of NSPCs during development. These traits could all result from an evolutionary change that enhanced radial migration of NSPCs out of the periventricular zones, possibly by epithelial-mesenchymal transition, to colonize and maintain nonperiventricular proliferative niches. In turn, increased NSPC migration and clonal expansion might be a consequence of growth in the cortical hem (medial patterning center), which produces morphogens such as Wnt3a, generates Cajal-Retzius neurons, and is regulated by Lhx2. Finally, correlations between DG convolution and neocortical gyrification (or capacity for gyrification) suggest that enhanced abventricular migration and proliferation of NSPCs played a transformative role in growth and folding of neocortex as well as archicortex.

  17. Maturation of the mammalian secretome

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jeremy C; Mateos, Alvaro; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    A recent use of quantitative proteomics to determine the constituents of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex is discussed in the light of other available methodologies for cataloging the proteins associated with the mammalian secretory pathway. PMID:17472737

  18. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  19. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Victor A.; Tonge, Peter J.; Gallo, James M.; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Dar, Arvin C.; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J.; Heffron, Timothy P.; Elmquist, William F.; Lachowicz, Jean E.; Johnson, Ted W.; White, Forest M.; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R.; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y.; Berry, Donald A.; Petter, Russell C.

    2015-01-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric “Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors,” further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward. PMID:26403167

  20. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper.

    PubMed

    Levin, Victor A; Tonge, Peter J; Gallo, James M; Birtwistle, Marc R; Dar, Arvin C; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J; Heffron, Timothy P; Elmquist, William F; Lachowicz, Jean E; Johnson, Ted W; White, Forest M; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y; Berry, Donald A; Petter, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric "Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors," further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward.

  1. Ependymal cells of chordate larvae are stem-like cells that form the adult nervous system.

    PubMed

    Horie, Takeo; Shinki, Ryoko; Ogura, Yosuke; Kusakabe, Takehiro G; Satoh, Nori; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2011-01-27

    In ascidian tunicates, the metamorphic transition from larva to adult is accompanied by dynamic changes in the body plan. For instance, the central nervous system (CNS) is subjected to extensive rearrangement because its regulating larval organs are lost and new adult organs are created. To understand how the adult CNS is reconstructed, we traced the fate of larval CNS cells during ascidian metamorphosis by using transgenic animals and imaging technologies with photoconvertible fluorescent proteins. Here we show that most parts of the ascidian larval CNS, except for the tail nerve cord, are maintained during metamorphosis and recruited to form the adult CNS. We also show that most of the larval neurons disappear and only a subset of cholinergic motor neurons and glutamatergic neurons are retained. Finally, we demonstrate that ependymal cells of the larval CNS contribute to the construction of the adult CNS and that some differentiate into neurons in the adult CNS. An unexpected role of ependymal cells highlighted by this study is that they serve as neural stem-like cells to reconstruct the adult nervous network during chordate metamorphosis. Consequently, the plasticity of non-neuronal ependymal cells and neuronal cells in chordates should be re-examined by future studies.

  2. Production of Neurospheres from CNS Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Gregory P.; Ross, Heather H.; Suslov, Oleg; Zheng, Tong; Steindler, Dennis A.; Laywell, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The relatively recent discovery of persistent adult neurogenesis has led to the experimental isolation and characterization of central nervous system neural stem cell populations. Protocols for in vitro analysis and expansion of neural stem cells are crucial for understanding their properties and defining characteristics. The methods described here allow for cell and molecular analysis of individual clones of cells—neurospheres—derived from neural stem/progenitor cells. Neurospheres can be cultivated from a variety of normal, genetically altered, or pathological tissue specimens, even with protracted postmortem intervals, for studies of mechanisms underlying neurogenesis, cell fate decisions, and cell differentiation. Neurosphere-forming cells hold great promise for the development of cell and molecular therapeutics for a variety of neurological diseases. PMID:18369755

  3. Decellularized zebrafish cardiac extracellular matrix induces mammalian heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William C. W.; Wang, Zhouguang; Missinato, Maria Azzurra; Park, Dae Woo; Long, Daniel Ward; Liu, Heng-Jui; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A.; Kim, Kang; Wang, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Heart attack is a global health problem that leads to significant morbidity, mortality, and health care burden. Adult human hearts have very limited regenerative capability after injury. However, evolutionarily primitive species generally have higher regenerative capacity than mammals. The extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to this difference. Mammalian cardiac ECM may not be optimally inductive for cardiac regeneration because of the fibrotic, instead of regenerative, responses in injured adult mammalian hearts. Given the high regenerative capacity of adult zebrafish hearts, we hypothesize that decellularized zebrafish cardiac ECM (zECM) made from normal or healing hearts can induce mammalian heart regeneration. Using zebrafish and mice as representative species of lower vertebrates and mammals, we show that a single administration of zECM, particularly the healing variety, enables cardiac functional recovery and regeneration of adult mouse heart tissues after acute myocardial infarction. zECM-treated groups exhibit proliferation of the remaining cardiomyocytes and multiple cardiac precursor cell populations and reactivation of ErbB2 expression in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, zECM exhibits pro-proliferative and chemotactic effects on human cardiac precursor cell populations in vitro. These contribute to the structural preservation and correlate with significantly higher cardiac contractile function, notably less left ventricular dilatation, and substantially more elastic myocardium in zECM-treated hearts than control animals treated with saline or decellularized adult mouse cardiac ECM. Inhibition of ErbB2 activity abrogates beneficial effects of zECM administration, indicating the possible involvement of ErbB2 signaling in zECM-mediated regeneration. This study departs from conventional focuses on mammalian ECM and introduces a new approach for cardiac tissue regeneration. PMID:28138518

  4. Mechanisms regulating regional localization of inflammation during CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Emily; Simmons, Sarah B.; Castelli, Luca; Goverman, Joan M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammatory, demyelinating lesions localized in the brain and spinal cord. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of MS that is induced by activating myelin-specific T cells and exhibits immune cell infiltrates in the CNS similar to those seen in MS. Both MS and EAE exhibit disease heterogeneity, reflecting variations in clinical course and localization of lesions within the CNS. Collectively, the differences seen in MS and EAE suggest that the brain and spinal cord function as unique microenvironments that respond differently to infiltrating immune cells. This review addresses the roles of the cytokines interferon-γ and interleukin-17 in determining the localization of inflammation to the brain or spinal cord in EAE. PMID:22725963

  5. Prospects for the development of epigenetic drugs for CNS conditions.

    PubMed

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-07-01

    Advances in our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS) and their role in neuropsychiatric disorders are paving the way for a potential new therapeutic approach that is focused on reversing the epigenetic underpinnings of neuropsychiatric conditions. In this article, the complexity of epigenetic processes and the current level of proof for their involvement in CNS disorders are discussed. The preclinical evidence for efficacy of pharmacological approaches that target epigenetics in the CNS and the particular challenges of this approach are also examined. Finally, strategies to address these challenges through the development of improved evidence-based epigenetic therapeutics and through combining pharmacological and behavioural approaches are presented.

  6. NanoART, neuroAIDS and CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nowacek, Ari; Gendelman, Howard E

    2009-01-01

    A broad range of nanomedicines is being developed to improve drug delivery for CNS disorders. The structure of the blood–brain barrier (BBB), the presence of efflux pumps and the expression of metabolic enzymes pose hurdles for drug-brain entry. Nanoformulations can circumvent the BBB to improve CNS-directed drug delivery by affecting such pumps and enzymes. Alternatively, they can be optimized to affect their size, shape, and protein and lipid coatings to facilitate drug uptake, release and ingress across the barrier. This is important as the brain is a sanctuary for a broad range of pathogens including HIV-1. Improved drug delivery to the CNS would affect pharmacokinetic and drug biodistribution properties. This article focuses on how nanotechnology can serve to improve the delivery of antiretroviral medicines, termed nanoART, across the BBB and affect the biodistribution and clinical benefit for HIV-1 disease. PMID:19572821

  7. Disruption of Microtubule Integrity Initiates Mitosis during CNS Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S.; Fischer, Bettina; Russell, Steven; Shepherd, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mechanisms of CNS repair have vital medical implications. We show that traumatic injury to the ventral midline of the embryonic Drosophila CNS activates cell divisions to replace lost cells. A pilot screen analyzing transcriptomes of single cells during repair pointed to downregulation of the microtubule-stabilizing GTPase mitochondrial Rho (Miro) and upregulation of the Jun transcription factor Jun-related antigen (Jra). Ectopic Miro expression can prevent midline divisions after damage, whereas Miro depletion destabilizes cortical β-tubulin and increases divisions. Disruption of cortical microtubules, either by chemical depolymerization or by overexpression of monomeric tubulin, triggers ectopic mitosis in the midline and induces Jra expression. Conversely, loss of Jra renders midline cells unable to replace damaged siblings. Our data indicate that upon injury, the integrity of the microtubule cytoskeleton controls cell division in the CNS midline, triggering extra mitosis to replace lost cells. The conservation of the identified molecules suggests that similar mechanisms may operate in vertebrates. PMID:22841498

  8. Case report of unusual leukoencephalopathy preceding primary CNS lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Brecher, K.; Hochberg, F.; Louis, D.; de la Monte, S.; Riskind, P.

    1998-01-01

    A previously healthy 35 year old woman presented with bilateral uveitus associated with multiple, evolving, non-enhancing white matter lesions consistent with a progressive leukoencephalopathy such as multiple sclerosis. Thirty months after her initial presentation, she was diagnosed with primary CNS lymphoma and died 14 months later. The unusual clinical course preceding the diagnosis suggests that a demyelinating disease may have preceded, and possibly heralded, the development of primary CNS lymphoma. Cases of "sentinel lesions" heralding the diagnosis of primary CNS lymphoma have been reported, and this case further corroborates such instances and raises further issues regarding possible neoplastic transformation occurring in inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

 PMID:9854972

  9. Isolated CNS Hodgkin's lymphoma: implications for tissue diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Derek L; Gujrati, Meena; Geoffroy, Francois; Tsung, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    CNS involvement in the setting of lymphoid neoplasia is a clinical situation that requires specific diagnosis due to the disparate treatment regimens recommended for neoplasms of specific lymphoid cell types. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling may provide sufficient information to determine the presence of abnormal lymphoid cells but may not be able to further specify the malignant cellular population. In cases where abnormal clinical or radiographic features are present, accurate tissue diagnosis is essential. In this report, we define a rare case of primary CNS intramedullary Hodgkin's lymphoma without leptomeningeal dissemination diagnosed via resectional biopsy of a conus medullaris lesion. The patient received post-resection radiation therapy and subsequently demonstrated radiographic and clinical improvement. Lymphoid neoplasia within the CNS comprises a diverse group with varying response and survival rates. Treatment hinges upon accurate diagnosis as chemotherapy varies widely among Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. While CSF sampling may yield a positive result with sufficiency to diagnose an abnormal lymphoid cell population, tissue is necessary for further defining cellular pathology. In this report, we define a rare case of primary CNS intramedullary Hodgkin's lymphoma without leptomeningeal dissemination via resectional biopsy of a conus medullaris lesion. In cases where abnormal enhancement is found in eloquent CNS regions and lymphoid neoplasia is suspected, management often entails either stereotactic biopsy or CSF sampling. While CSF analysis may differentiate malignancy at a low rate, tissue diagnosis via paraffin block immunohistochemistry is necessary to further classify malignancy as primary or peripheral, Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or other such as metastatic leptomeningeal dissemination and glioma. Within the subtypes of lymphoid neoplasms, treatment regimens vastly differ and thus accurate tissue diagnosis is paramount. We

  10. Risk of subsequent cancer following a primary CNS tumor.

    PubMed

    Strodtbeck, Kyle; Sloan, Andrew; Rogers, Lisa; Fisher, Paul Graham; Stearns, Duncan; Campbell, Laura; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2013-04-01

    Improvements in survival among central nervous system (CNS) tumor patients has made the risk of developing a subsequent cancer an important survivorship issue. Such a risk is likely influenced by histological and treatment differences between CNS tumors. De-identified data for 41,159 patients with a primary CNS tumor diagnosis from 9 Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries were used to calculate potential risk for subsequent cancer development. Relative risk (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) of subsequent cancer was calculated using SEER*Stat 7.0.9, comparing observed number of subsequent cancers versus expected in the general United States population. For all CNS tumors studied, there were 830 subsequent cancers with a RR of 1.26 (95 % CI, 1.18-1.35). Subsequent cancers were observed in the CNS, digestive system, bones/joints, soft tissue, thyroid and leukemia. Radiotherapy was associated with an elevated risk, particularly in patients diagnosed with a medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (MPNET). MPNET patients who received radiotherapy were at a significant risk for development of cancers of the digestive system, leukemia, bone/joint and cranial nerves. Glioblastoma multiforme patients who received radiotherapy were at lower risks for female breast and prostate cancers, though at an elevated risk for cancers of the thyroid and brain. Radiotherapy is associated with subsequent cancer development, particularly for sites within the field of radiation, though host susceptibility and post-treatment status underlie this risk. Variation in subsequent cancer risk among different CNS tumor histological subtypes indicate a complex interplay between risk factors in subsequent cancer development.

  11. Rescue of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in a Mouse Model of HIV Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Wang, Tongguang; Jang, Mi-Hyeon; Steiner, Joseph; Haughey, Norman; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun; Nath, Avindra; Venkatesan, Arun

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of central nervous system (CNS) neurologic dysfunction associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continues to increase, despite the use of antiretroviral therapy. Previous work has focused on the deleterious effects of HIV on mature neurons and on development of neuroprotective strategies, which have consistently failed to show a meaningful clinical benefit. It is now well established that new neurons are continuously generated in discrete regions in the adult mammalian brain, and accumulating evidence supports important roles for these neurons in specific cognitive functions. In a transgenic mouse model of HIV neurologic disease with glial expression of the HIV envelope protein gp120, we demonstrate a significant reduction in proliferation of hippocampal neural progenitors in the dentate gyrus of adult animals, resulting in a dramatic decrease in the number of newborn neurons in the adult brain. We identify amplifying neural progenitor cells (ANPs) as the first class of progenitors affected by gp120, and we also demonstrate that newly generated neurons exhibit aberrant dendritic development. Furthermore, voluntary exercise and treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor increase the ANP population and rescue the observed deficits in gp120 transgenic mice. Thus, during HIV infection, the envelope protein gp120 may potently inhibit adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and neurorestorative approaches may be effective in ameliorating these effects. Our study has significant implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for HIV-infected individuals with neurologic dysfunction and may be applicable to other neurodegenerative diseases in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired. PMID:21146610

  12. Development of mammalian ovary.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Rodgers, Raymond J

    2014-06-01

    Pre-natal and early post-natal ovarian development has become a field of increasing importance over recent years. The full effects of perturbations of ovarian development on adult fertility, through environmental changes or genetic anomalies, are only now being truly appreciated. Mitigation of these perturbations requires an understanding of the processes involved in the development of the ovary. Herein, we review some recent findings from mice, sheep, and cattle on the key events involved in ovarian development. We discuss the key process of germ cell migration, ovigerous cord formation, meiosis, and follicle formation and activation. We also review the key contributions of mesonephric cells to ovarian development and propose roles for these cells. Finally, we discuss polycystic ovary syndrome, premature ovarian failure, and pre-natal undernutrition; three key areas in which perturbations to ovarian development appear to have major effects on post-natal fertility.

  13. In vivo imaging of the neurovascular unit in CNS disease

    PubMed Central

    Merlini, Mario; Davalos, Dimitrios; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    The neurovascular unit—comprised of glia, pericytes, neurons and cerebrovasculature—is a dynamic interface that ensures physiological central nervous system (CNS) functioning. In disease dynamic remodeling of the neurovascular interface triggers a cascade of responses that determine the extent of CNS degeneration and repair. The dynamics of these processes can be adequately captured by imaging in vivo, which allows the study of cellular responses to environmental stimuli and cell-cell interactions in the living brain in real time. This perspective focuses on intravital imaging studies of the neurovascular unit in stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer disease (AD) models and discusses their potential for identifying novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25197615

  14. Emerging Roles for Glycogen in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Waitt, Alice E.; Reed, Liam; Ransom, Bruce R.; Brown, Angus M.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of glycogen, the depot into which excess glucose is stored in mammals, to act as a source of rapidly available energy substrate, has been exploited by several organs for both general and local advantage. The liver, expressing the highest concentration of glycogen maintains systemic normoglycemia ensuring the brain receives a supply of glucose in excess of demand. However the brain also contains glycogen, although its role is more specialized. Brain glycogen is located exclusively in astrocytes in the adult, with the exception of pathological conditions, thus in order to benefit neurons, and energy conduit (lactate) is trafficked inter-cellularly. Such a complex scheme requires cell type specific expression of a variety of metabolic enzymes and transporters. Glycogen supports neural elements during withdrawal of glucose, but once the limited buffer of glycogen is exhausted neural function fails and irreversible injury ensues. Under physiological conditions glycogen acts to provide supplemental substrates when ambient glucose is unable to support function during increased energy demand. Glycogen also supports learning and memory where it provides lactate to neurons during the conditioning phase of in vitro long-term potentiation (LTP), an experimental correlate of learning. Inhibiting the breakdown of glycogen or intercellular transport of lactate in in vivo rat models inhibits the retention of memory. Our current understanding of the importance of brain glycogen is expanding to encompass roles that are fundamental to higher brain function. PMID:28360839

  15. The risk of CNS involvement in aggressive lymphomas in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, Giulia; Chiappella, Annalisa; Vitolo, Umberto

    2013-12-01

    The risk of CNS dissemination and CNS prophylaxis strategies in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is still debated. CNS dissemination is a rare but fatal event. A CNS prophylaxis is common for Burkitt and B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma; however, in other NHLs, prophylactic treatments are not systematically warranted. Current risk models showed low sensitivity in predicting CNS involvement, implying overtreatment in roughly 70% of high-risk patients. Risk models in the rituximab era were modulated for the detection of occult CNS disease at diagnosis using flow cytometry. The optimal regimen for CNS prophylaxis in aggressive lymphoma patients has not been established thus far and should be modulated at different levels of 'intensity' such as standard intrathecal chemotherapy, 'active' intrathecal chemotherapy with liposomal cytarabine or more aggressive systemic treatment with high doses of drugs having good CNS bioavailability reserved for patients who are truly at high risk of CNS dissemination.

  16. The Intrinsic Electrophysiological Properties of Mammalian Neurons: Insights into Central Nervous System Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo R.

    1988-12-01

    This article reviews the electroresponsive properties of single neurons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). In some of these cells the ionic conductances responsible for their excitability also endow them with autorhythmic electrical oscillatory properties. Chemical or electrical synaptic contacts between these neurons often result in network oscillations. In such networks, autorhytmic neurons may act as true oscillators (as pacemakers) or as resonators (responding preferentially to certain firing frequencies). Oscillations and resonance in the CNS are proposed to have diverse functional roles, such as (i) determining global functional states (for example, sleep-wakefulness or attention), (ii) timing in motor coordination, and (iii) specifying connectivity during development. Also, oscillation, especially in the thalamo-cortical circuits, may be related to certain neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review proposes that the autorhythmic electrical properties of central neurons and their connectivity form the basis for an intrinsic functional coordinate system that provides internal context to sensory input.

  17. The intrinsic electrophysiological properties of mammalian neurons: insights into central nervous system function.

    PubMed

    Llinás, R R

    1988-12-23

    This article reviews the electroresponsive properties of single neurons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). In some of these cells the ionic conductances responsible for their excitability also endow them with autorhythmic electrical oscillatory properties. Chemical or electrical synaptic contacts between these neurons often result in network oscillations. In such networks, autorhythmic neurons may act as true oscillators (as pacemakers) or as resonators (responding preferentially to certain firing frequencies). Oscillations and resonance in the CNS are proposed to have diverse functional roles, such as (i) determining global functional states (for example, sleep-wakefulness or attention), (ii) timing in motor coordination, and (iii) specifying connectivity during development. Also, oscillation, especially in the thalamo-cortical circuits, may be related to certain neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review proposes that the autorhythmic electrical properties of central neurons and their connectivity form the basis for an intrinsic functional coordinate system that provides internal context to sensory input.

  18. Inducible targeting of CNS astrocytes in Aldh1l1-CreERT2 BAC transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Winchenbach, Jan; Düking, Tim; Berghoff, Stefan A.; Stumpf, Sina K.; Hülsmann, Swen; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Saher, Gesine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studying astrocytes in higher brain functions has been hampered by the lack of genetic tools for the efficient expression of inducible Cre recombinase throughout the CNS, including the neocortex. Methods: Therefore, we generated BAC transgenic mice, in which CreERT2 is expressed under control of the Aldh1l1 regulatory region. Results: When crossbred to Cre reporter mice, adult Aldh1l1-CreERT2 mice show efficient gene targeting in astrocytes. No such Cre-mediated recombination was detectable in CNS neurons, oligodendrocytes, and microglia. As expected, Aldh1l1-CreERT2 expression was evident in several peripheral organs, including liver and kidney. Conclusions: Taken together, Aldh1l1-CreERT2 mice are a useful tool for studying astrocytes in neurovascular coupling, brain metabolism, synaptic plasticity and other aspects of neuron-glia interactions. PMID:28149504

  19. Regulation of Rap GTPases in mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavin; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-10-01

    Small GTPases are central regulators of many cellular processes. The highly conserved Rap GTPases perform essential functions in the mammalian nervous system during development and in mature neurons. During neocortical development, Rap1 is required to regulate cadherin- and integrin-mediated adhesion. In the adult nervous system Rap1 and Rap2 regulate the maturation and plasticity of dendritic spine and synapses. Although genetic studies have revealed important roles of Rap GTPases in neurons, their regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate them and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that inactivate them by stimulating their intrinsic GTPase activity is just beginning to be explored in vivo. Here we review how GEFs and GAPs regulate Rap GTPases in the nervous system with a focus on their in vivo function.

  20. Axonal Localization of Integrins in the CNS Is Neuronal Type and Age Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Soleman, Sara; Mason, Matthew R. J.; Verhaagen, Joost; Bensadoun, Jean-Charles; Aebischer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The regenerative ability of CNS axons decreases with age, however, this ability remains largely intact in PNS axons throughout adulthood. These differences are likely to correspond with age-related silencing of proteins necessary for axon growth and elongation. In previous studies, it has been shown that reintroduction of the α9 integrin subunit (tenascin-C receptor, α9) that is downregulated in adult CNS can improve neurite outgrowth and sensory axon regeneration after a dorsal rhizotomy or a dorsal column crush spinal cord lesion. In the current study, we demonstrate that virally expressed integrins (α9, α6, or β1 integrin) in the adult rat sensorimotor cortex and adult red nucleus are excluded from axons following neuronal transduction. Attempts to stimulate transport by inclusion of a cervical spinal injury and thus an upregulation of extracellular matrix molecules at the lesion site, or cotransduction with its binding partner, β1 integrin, did not induce integrin localization within axons. In contrast, virally expressed α9 integrin in developing rat cortex (postnatal day 5 or 10) demonstrated clear localization of integrins in cortical axons revealed by the presence of integrin in the axons of the corpus callosum and internal capsule, as well as in the neuronal cell body. Furthermore, examination of dorsal root ganglia neurons and retinal ganglion cells demonstrated integrin localization both within peripheral nerve as well as dorsal root axons and within optic nerve axons, respectively. Together, our results suggest a differential ability for in vivo axonal transport of transmembrane proteins dependent on neuronal age and subtype. PMID:27570822

  1. Employment of adult mammalian primary cells in toxicology: In vivo and in vitro genotoxic effects of environmentally significant N-nitrosodialkylamines in cells of the liver, lung, and kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, B.L.; Brendler, S.Y.; Liegibel, U.M.; Schmezer, P. ); Tompa, A. )

    1990-01-01

    This report focuses on the use of freshly isolated primary mammalian cells from different tissues and organs of the rat for the rapid and efficient analysis of toxic and genotoxic chemicals. The cells are either treated in vitro or they are isolated from treated animals. Viability by trypan blue exclusion and DNA damage as single-strand breaks are monitored in either case. Therefore, it is possible to compare in vitro and in vivo results directly. N-nitrosamines with unique organ-specific modes in carcinogenesis were studied in vitro using hepatocytes derived from three species (rat, hamster, and pig) and in rat lung and kidney cells. The sensitive detection of all carcinogenic nitrosamines was achieved, although a pattern of cell-specific activation was not observable. The new modification of the in vivo approach allowed the sensitive detection of NDMA genotoxicity in hepatic and in extrahepatic tissues. It is important to point out that the method is an efficient tool for toxicokinetic studies with genotoxic carcinogens in vivo.

  2. Electroporation into Cultured Mammalian Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masanori; Osumi, Noriko

    Over the last century, mammalian embryos have been used extensively as a common animal model to investigate fundamental questions in the field of developmental biology. More recently, the establishment of transgenic and gene-targeting systems in laboratory mice has enabled researchers to unveil the genetic mechanisms under lying complex developmental processes (Mak, 2007). However, our understanding of cell—cell interactions and their molecular basis in the early stages of mammalian embryogenesis is still very fragmentary. One of the major problems is the difficulty of precise manipulation and limited accessibility to mammalian embryos via uterus wall. Unfortunately, existing tissue and organotypic culture systems per se do not fully recapitulate three-dimensional, dynamic processes of organogenesis observed in vivo. Although transgenic animal technology and virus-mediated gene delivery are useful to manipulate gene expression, these techniques take much time and financial costs, which limit their use.

  3. CNS Multiparameter Optimization Approach: Is it in Accordance with Occam's Razor Principle?

    PubMed

    Raevsky, Oleg A

    2016-04-01

    A detailed analysis of the possibility of using the Multiparameter Optimization approach (MPO) for CNS/non-CNS classification of drugs was carried out. This work has shown that MPO descriptors are able to describe only part of chemical transport in the CNS connected with transmembrane diffusion. Hence the "intuitive" CNS MPO approach with arbitrary selection of descriptors and calculations of score functions, search of thresholds of classification, and absence of any chemometric procedures, leads to rather modest accuracy of CNS/non-CNS classification models.

  4. Delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Therese S; Banks, William A

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and proteins have potent effects on the brain after their peripheral administration, suggesting that they may be good substrates for the development of CNS therapeutics. Major hurdles to such development include their relation to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and poor pharmacokinetics. Some peptides cross the BBB by transendothelial diffusion and others cross in the blood-to-brain direction by saturable transporters. Some regulatory proteins are also transported across the BBB and antibodies can enter the CNS via the extracellular pathways. Glycoproteins and some antibody fragments can be taken up and cross the BBB by mechanisms related to adsorptive endocytosis/transcytosis. Many peptides and proteins are transported out of the CNS by saturable efflux systems and enzymatic activity in the blood, CNS, or BBB are substantial barriers to others. Both influx and efflux transporters are altered by various substances and in disease states. Strategies that manipulate these interactions between the BBB and peptides and proteins provide many opportunities for the development of therapeutics. Such strategies include increasing transendothelial diffusion of small peptides, upregulation of saturable influx transporters with allosteric regulators and other posttranslational means, use of vectors and other Trojan horse strategies, inhibition of efflux transporters including with antisense molecules, and improvement in pharmacokinetic parameters to overcome short half-lives, tissue sequestration, and enzymatic degradation.

  5. HIV-associated opportunistic CNS infections: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Lauren N; Smith, Bryan; Reich, Daniel; Quezado, Martha; Nath, Avindra

    2016-10-27

    Nearly 30 years after the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), CNS opportunistic infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-positive individuals. Unknown HIV-positive disease status, antiretroviral drug resistance, poor drug compliance, and recreational drug abuse are factors that continue to influence the morbidity and mortality of infections. The clinical and radiographic pattern of CNS opportunistic infections is unique in the setting of HIV infection: opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients often have characteristic clinical and radiological presentations that can differ from the presentation of opportunistic infections in immunocompetent patients and are often sufficient to establish the diagnosis. ART in the setting of these opportunistic infections can lead to a paradoxical worsening caused by an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). In this Review, we discuss several of the most common CNS opportunistic infections: cerebral toxoplasmosis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), tuberculous meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis and cytomegalovirus infection, with an emphasis on clinical pearls, pathological findings, MRI findings and treatment. Moreover, we discuss the risk factors, pathophysiology and management of IRIS. We also summarize the challenges that remain in management of CNS opportunistic infections, which includes the lack of phase II and III clinical trials, absence of antimicrobials for infections such as PML, and controversy regarding the use of corticosteroids for treatment of IRIS.

  6. A treatment accessory for CNS irradiation in children.

    PubMed

    Bukovitz, A G; Timo, J

    1975-09-01

    A treatment accessory for use in CNS radiotherapy of small children enables the head and spinal fields to be treated while the child lies supine. Children are not moved during therapy which minimizes the problem of gaps between the head and spinal fields.

  7. Subacute CNS Demyelination after Treatment with Nivolumab for Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Catherine; Schneider, Raphael; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Bavi, Prashant; Roehrl, Michael H A; Mason, Warren P; Hogg, David

    2015-12-01

    Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) or programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) has improved the survival of patients with metastatic melanoma. These agents carry a certain risk of adverse immune-related events. We present a patient with widely metastatic melanoma who was initially treated with ipilimumab and subsequently with nivolumab. After four infusions of nivolumab, he developed subacute multifocal central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. Nivolumab was discontinued and, despite immunosuppressive therapy, the largest lesion progressed significantly, whereas another lesion showed radiographic improvement. After further progression, the patient succumbed to his CNS lesions 4 months later. Autopsy revealed extensive demyelination, a mild multifocal T-cell-rich perivascular lymphoid infiltrate, abundant macrophages, and necrosis. There was no metastatic melanoma in the brain. CNS demyelination has not been described in association with nivolumab. We hypothesize that the combination therapy of ipilimumab and subsequent nivolumab accounted for the severity of the demyelinating process in this patient. This case, with comprehensive clinical, molecular, and neuropathologic characterization, illustrates the need for awareness of these potential CNS complications with the use of multiple checkpoint inhibitors.

  8. CNS Control of Glucose Metabolism: Response to Environmental Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna M.; Sandoval, Darleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, considerable work has accumulated to support the role of the CNS in regulating postprandial glucose levels. As discussed in the first section of this review, the CNS receives and integrates information from afferent neurons, circulating hormones, and postprandially generated nutrients to subsequently direct changes in glucose output by the liver and glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. The second major component of this review focuses on the effects of external pressures, including high fat diet and changes to the light:dark cycle on CNS-regulating glucose homeostasis. We also discuss the interaction between these different pressures and how they contribute to the multifaceted mechanisms that we hypothesize contribute to the dysregulation of glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We argue that while current peripheral therapies serve to delay the progression of T2DM, generating combined obesity and T2DM therapies targeted at the CNS, the primary site of dysfunction for both diseases, would lead to a more profound impact on the progression of both diseases. PMID:23550218

  9. CNS control of glucose metabolism: response to environmental challenges.

    PubMed

    Arble, Deanna M; Sandoval, Darleen A

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, considerable work has accumulated to support the role of the CNS in regulating postprandial glucose levels. As discussed in the first section of this review, the CNS receives and integrates information from afferent neurons, circulating hormones, and postprandially generated nutrients to subsequently direct changes in glucose output by the liver and glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. The second major component of this review focuses on the effects of external pressures, including high fat diet and changes to the light:dark cycle on CNS-regulating glucose homeostasis. We also discuss the interaction between these different pressures and how they contribute to the multifaceted mechanisms that we hypothesize contribute to the dysregulation of glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We argue that while current peripheral therapies serve to delay the progression of T2DM, generating combined obesity and T2DM therapies targeted at the CNS, the primary site of dysfunction for both diseases, would lead to a more profound impact on the progression of both diseases.

  10. Causes of CNS inflammation and potential targets for anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Falip, Mercé; Salas-Puig, Xavier; Cara, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important endogenous defence mechanisms in an organism. It has been suggested that inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of a number of human epilepsies and convulsive disorders, and there is clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that inflammatory processes within the CNS may either contribute to or be a consequence of epileptogenesis. This review discusses evidence from human studies on the role of inflammation in epilepsy and highlights potential new targets in the inflammatory cascade for antiepileptic drugs. A number of mechanisms have been shown to be involved in CNS inflammatory reactions. These include an inflammatory response at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), immune-mediated damage to the CNS, stress-induced release of inflammatory mediators and direct neuronal dysfunction or damage as a result of inflammatory reactions. Mediators of inflammation in the CNS include interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor-κB and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). IL-1β, BBB and high-mobility group box-1-TLR4 signalling appear to be the most promising targets for anticonvulsant agents directed at inflammation. Such agents may provide effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsies in the future.

  11. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can create oxidative stress (OS)-mediated inflammatory changes upon impact. The oxidative burst signals the activation of phage-lineage cells such as peripheral macrophages, Kupffer cells and CNS microgl...

  12. Role of resident CNS cell populations in HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lepoutre, Veronique; Jain, Pooja; Quann, Kevin; Wigdahl, Brian; Khan, Zafar K

    2009-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the etiologic agent for a number of disorders; the two most common pathologies include adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and a progressive demyelinating neuroinflammatory disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The neurologic dysfunction associated with HAM/TSP is a result of viral intrusion into the central nervous system (CNS) and the generation of a hyperstimulated host response within the peripheral and central nervous system that includes expanded populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This robust, yet detrimental immune response likely contributes to the death of myelin producing oligodendrocytes and degeneration of neuronal axons. The mechanisms of neurological degeneration in HAM/TSP have yet to be fully delineated in vivo and may involve the immunogenic properties of the HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax. This comprehensive review characterizes the available knowledge to date concerning the effects of HTLV-1 on CNS resident cell populations with emphasis on both viral and host factors contributing to the genesis of HAM/TSP.

  13. Cell Therapy From Bench to Bedside Translation in CNS Neurorestoratology Era

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongyun; Chen, Lin; Sanberg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in cell biology, neural injury and repair, and the progress towards development of neurorestorative interventions are the basis for increased optimism. Based on the complexity of the processes of demyelination and remyelination, degeneration and regeneration, damage and repair, functional loss and recovery, it would be expected that effective therapeutic approaches will require a combination of strategies encompassing neuroplasticity, immunomodulation, neuroprotection, neurorepair, neuroreplacement, and neuromodulation. Cell-based restorative treatment has become a new trend, and increasing data worldwide have strongly proven that it has a pivotal therapeutic value in CNS disease. Moreover, functional neurorestoration has been achieved to a certain extent in the CNS clinically. Up to now, the cells successfully used in preclinical experiments and/or clinical trial/treatment include fetal/embryonic brain and spinal cord tissue, stem cells (embryonic stem cells, neural stem/progenitor cells, hematopoietic stem cells, adipose-derived adult stem/precursor cells, skin-derived precursor, induced pluripotent stem cells), glial cells (Schwann cells, oligodendrocyte, olfactory ensheathing cells, astrocytes, microglia, tanycytes), neuronal cells (various phenotypic neurons and Purkinje cells), mesenchymal stromal cells originating from bone marrow, umbilical cord, and umbilical cord blood, epithelial cells derived from the layer of retina and amnion, menstrual blood-derived stem cells, Sertoli cells, and active macrophages, etc. Proof-of-concept indicates that we have now entered a new era in neurorestoratology. PMID:21359168

  14. Combinatorial actions of Tgfβ and Activin ligands promote oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipankar J; Zameer, Andleeb; Mariani, John N; Zhang, Jingya; Asp, Linnea; Huynh, Jimmy; Mahase, Sean; Laitman, Benjamin M; Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Mitiku, Nesanet; Urbanski, Mateusz; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V; Casaccia, Patrizia; Hayot, Fernand; Bottinger, Erwin P; Brown, Chester W; John, Gareth R

    2014-06-01

    In the embryonic CNS, development of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes is limited by bone morphogenetic proteins, which constitute one arm of the transforming growth factor-β (Tgfβ) family and signal canonically via Smads 1/5/8. Tgfβ ligands and Activins comprise the other arm and signal via Smads 2/3, but their roles in oligodendrocyte development are incompletely characterized. Here, we report that Tgfβ ligands and activin B (ActB) act in concert in the mammalian spinal cord to promote oligodendrocyte generation and myelination. In mouse neural tube, newly specified oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) are first exposed to Tgfβ ligands in isolation, then later in combination with ActB during maturation. In primary OLP cultures, Tgfβ1 and ActB differentially activate canonical Smad3 and non-canonical MAP kinase signaling. Both ligands enhance viability, and Tgfβ1 promotes proliferation while ActB supports maturation. Importantly, co-treatment strongly activates both signaling pathways, producing an additive effect on viability and enhancing both proliferation and differentiation such that mature oligodendrocyte numbers are substantially increased. Co-treatment promotes myelination in OLP-neuron co-cultures, and maturing oligodendrocytes in spinal cord white matter display strong Smad3 and MAP kinase activation. In spinal cords of ActB-deficient Inhbb(-/-) embryos, apoptosis in the oligodendrocyte lineage is increased and OLP numbers transiently reduced, but numbers, maturation and myelination recover during the first postnatal week. Smad3(-/-) mice display a more severe phenotype, including diminished viability and proliferation, persistently reduced mature and immature cell numbers, and delayed myelination. Collectively, these findings suggest that, in mammalian spinal cord, Tgfβ ligands and ActB together support oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation.

  15. Pygmy squids and giant brains: mapping the complex cephalopod CNS by phalloidin staining of vibratome sections and whole-mount preparations.

    PubMed

    Wollesen, T; Loesel, R; Wanninger, A

    2009-04-30

    Among bilaterian invertebrates, cephalopod molluscs (e.g., squids, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a central nervous system (CNS) that rivals in complexity that of the phylogenetically distant vertebrates (e.g., mouse and human). However, this prime example of convergent evolution has rarely been the subject of recent developmental and evolutionary studies, which may partly be due to the lack of suitable neural markers and the large size of cephalopod brains. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of fluorescence-coupled phalloidin to characterize the CNS of cephalopods using histochemistry combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Whole-mount preparations of developmental stages as well as vibratome sections of embryonic and adult brains were analyzed and the benefits of this technique are illustrated. Compared to classical neuroanatomical and antibody-based studies, phalloidin labeling experiments are less time-consuming and allow a high throughput of samples. Besides other advantages summarized here, phalloidin reliably labels the entire neuropil of the CNS of all squids, cuttlefish and octopuses investigated. This facilitates high-resolution in toto reconstructions of the CNS and contributes to a better understanding of the organization of neural networks. Amenable for multi-labeling experiments employing antibodies against neurotransmitters, proteins and enzymes, phalloidin constitutes an excellent neuropil marker for the complex cephalopod CNS.

  16. The microtubule destabilizing protein stathmin controls the transition from dividing neuronal precursors to postmitotic neurons during adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boekhoorn, Karin; van Dis, Vera; Goedknegt, Erika; Sobel, André; Lucassen, Paul J; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2014-12-01

    The hippocampus is one of the two areas in the mammalian brain where adult neurogenesis occurs. Adult neurogenesis is well known to be involved in hippocampal physiological functions as well as pathophysiological conditions. Microtubules (MTs), providing intracellular transport, stability, and transmitting force, are indispensable for neurogenesis by facilitating cell division, migration, growth, and differentiation. Although there are several examples of MT-stabilizing proteins regulating different aspects of adult neurogenesis, relatively little is known about the function of MT-destabilizing proteins. Stathmin is such a MT-destabilizing protein largely restricted to the CNS, and in contrast to its developmental family members, stathmin is also expressed at significant levels in the adult brain, notably in areas involved in adult neurogenesis. Here, we show an important role for stathmin during adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the mouse hippocampus. After carefully mapping stathmin expression in the adult dentate gyrus (DG), we investigated its role in hippocampal neurogenesis making use of stathmin knockout mice. Although hippocampus development appears normal in these animals, different aspects of adult neurogenesis are affected. First, the number of proliferating Ki-67+ cells is decreased in stathmin knockout mice, as well as the expression of the immature markers Nestin and PSA-NCAM. However, newborn cells that do survive express more frequently the adult marker NeuN and have a more mature morphology. Furthermore, our data suggest that migration in the DG might be affected. We propose a model in which stathmin controls the transition from neuronal precursors to early postmitotic neurons.

  17. Elucidating the Role of Injury-Induced Electric Fields (EFs) in Regulating the Astrocytic Response to Injury in the Mammalian Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Baer, Matthew L; Henderson, Scott C; Colello, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) induces astrocytes to change their morphology, to increase their rate of proliferation, and to display directional migration to the injury site, all to facilitate repair. These astrocytic responses to injury occur in a clear temporal sequence and, by their intensity and duration, can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the repair of damaged CNS tissue. Studies on highly regenerative tissues in non-mammalian vertebrates have demonstrated that the intensity of direct-current extracellular electric fields (EFs) at the injury site, which are 50-100 fold greater than in uninjured tissue, represent a potent signal to drive tissue repair. In contrast, a 10-fold EF increase has been measured in many injured mammalian tissues where limited regeneration occurs. As the astrocytic response to CNS injury is crucial to the reparative outcome, we exposed purified rat cortical astrocytes to EF intensities associated with intact and injured mammalian tissues, as well as to those EF intensities measured in regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, to determine whether EFs may contribute to the astrocytic injury response. Astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with uninjured tissue showed little change in their cellular behavior. However, astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with injured tissue showed a dramatic increase in migration and proliferation. At EF intensities associated with regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, these cellular responses were even more robust and included morphological changes consistent with a regenerative phenotype. These findings suggest that endogenous EFs may be a crucial signal for regulating the astrocytic response to injury and that their manipulation may be a novel target for facilitating CNS repair.

  18. Elucidating the Role of Injury-Induced Electric Fields (EFs) in Regulating the Astrocytic Response to Injury in the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Matthew L.; Henderson, Scott C.; Colello, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) induces astrocytes to change their morphology, to increase their rate of proliferation, and to display directional migration to the injury site, all to facilitate repair. These astrocytic responses to injury occur in a clear temporal sequence and, by their intensity and duration, can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the repair of damaged CNS tissue. Studies on highly regenerative tissues in non-mammalian vertebrates have demonstrated that the intensity of direct-current extracellular electric fields (EFs) at the injury site, which are 50–100 fold greater than in uninjured tissue, represent a potent signal to drive tissue repair. In contrast, a 10-fold EF increase has been measured in many injured mammalian tissues where limited regeneration occurs. As the astrocytic response to CNS injury is crucial to the reparative outcome, we exposed purified rat cortical astrocytes to EF intensities associated with intact and injured mammalian tissues, as well as to those EF intensities measured in regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, to determine whether EFs may contribute to the astrocytic injury response. Astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with uninjured tissue showed little change in their cellular behavior. However, astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with injured tissue showed a dramatic increase in migration and proliferation. At EF intensities associated with regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, these cellular responses were even more robust and included morphological changes consistent with a regenerative phenotype. These findings suggest that endogenous EFs may be a crucial signal for regulating the astrocytic response to injury and that their manipulation may be a novel target for facilitating CNS repair. PMID:26562295

  19. A heterogeneous "resting" pool of synaptic vesicles that is dynamically interchanged across boutons in mammalian CNS synapses.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alfonso, Tomas; Ryan, Timothy A

    2008-08-01

    Using pHluorin-tagged synaptic vesicle proteins we have examined the partitioning of these probes into recycling and nonrecycling pools at hippocampal nerve terminals in cell culture. Our studies show that for three of the major synaptic vesicle components, vGlut-1, VAMP-2, and Synaptotagmin I, approximately 50-60% of the tagged protein appears in a recycling pool that responds readily to sustained action potential stimulation by mobilizing and fusing with the plasma membrane, while the remainder is targeted to a nonrecycling, acidic compartment. The fraction of recycling and nonrecycling (or resting) pools varied significantly across boutons within an individual axon, from 100% resting (silent) to 100% recycling. Single-bouton bleaching studies show that recycling and resting pools are dynamic and exchange between synaptic boutons. The quantitative parameters that can be extracted with the approaches outlined here should help elucidate the potential functional role of the resting vesicle pool.

  20. Global deprivation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the CNS reveals an area-specific requirement for dendritic growth.

    PubMed

    Rauskolb, Stefanie; Zagrebelsky, Marta; Dreznjak, Anita; Deogracias, Rubén; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Wiese, Stefan; Erne, Beat; Sendtner, Michael; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Korte, Martin; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2010-02-03

    Although brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is linked with an increasing number of conditions causing brain dysfunction, its role in the postnatal CNS has remained difficult to assess. This is because the bdnf-null mutation causes the death of the animals before BDNF levels have reached adult levels. In addition, the anterograde axonal transport of BDNF complicates the interpretation of area-specific gene deletion. The present study describes the generation of a new conditional mouse mutant essentially lacking BDNF throughout the CNS. It shows that BDNF is not essential for prolonged postnatal survival, but that the behavior of such mutant animals is markedly altered. It also reveals that BDNF is not a major survival factor for most CNS neurons and for myelination of their axons. However, it is required for the postnatal growth of the striatum, and single-cell analyses revealed a marked decreased in dendritic complexity and spine density. In contrast, BDNF is dispensable for the growth of the hippocampus and only minimal changes were observed in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in mutant animals. Spine density remained unchanged, whereas the proportion of the mushroom-type spine was moderately decreased. In line with these in vivo observations, we found that BDNF markedly promotes the growth of cultured striatal neurons and of their dendrites, but not of those of hippocampal neurons, suggesting that the differential responsiveness to BDNF is part of a neuron-intrinsic program.

  1. Immunogold evidence that neuronal gap junctions in adult rat brain and spinal cord contain connexin-36 but not connexin-32 or connexin-43

    PubMed Central

    Rash, J. E.; Staines, W. A.; Yasumura, T.; Patel, D.; Furman, C. S.; Stelmack, G. L.; Nagy, J. I.

    2000-01-01

    Physiological and ultrastructural evidence indicates that gap junctions link many classes of neurons in mammalian central nervous system (CNS), allowing direct electrical and metabolic communication. Among at least six gap junction-forming connexin proteins in adult rat brain, connexin- (Cx) 32, Cx36, and Cx43 have been reported to occur in neurons. However, no connexin has been documented at ultrastructurally defined neuronal gap junctions. To address this question directly, freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling (FRIL) and immunofluorescence (IF) were used to visualize the subcellular and regional localization of Cx36 in rat brain and spinal cord. Three antibodies were generated against different sequences in Cx36. By Western blotting, these antibodies detected protein at 36 and 66 kDa, corresponding to Cx36 monomer and dimer forms, respectively. After double-labeling for Cx36 and Cx43 by FRIL, neuronal gap junctions in inferior olive, spinal cord, and retina were consistently immunogold-labeled for Cx36, but none were labeled for Cx43. Conversely, Cx43 but not Cx36 was detected in astrocyte and ependymocyte gap junctions. In >250 Cx32/Cx43 single- and double-labeled replicas from 10 CNS regions, no neuronal gap junctions were labeled for either Cx32 or Cx43. Instead, Cx32 and Cx43 were restricted to glial gap junctions. By IF, Cx36 labeling was widely distributed in neuropil, including along dendritic processes and within neuronal somata. On the basis of FRIL identification of Cx36 in neuronal gap junctions and IF imaging of Cx36 throughout rat brain and spinal cord, neuronal gap junctions containing Cx36 appear to occur in sufficient density to provide widespread electrical and metabolic coupling in adult CNS. PMID:10861019

  2. Cytokines and effector T cell subsets causing autoimmune CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Franziska; Korn, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Although experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is limited in its potency to reproduce the entirety of clinical and histopathologic features of multiple sclerosis (MS), this model has been successfully used to prove that MS like autoimmunity in the CNS is orchestrated by autoantigen specific T cells. EAE was also very useful to refute the idea that IFN-γ producing T helper type 1 (Th1) cells were the sole players within the pathogenic T cell response. Rather, "new" T cell lineages such as IL-17 producing Th17 cells or IL-9 producing Th9 cells have been first discovered in the context of EAE. Here, we will summarize new concepts of early and late T cell plasticity and the cytokine network that shapes T helper cell responses and lesion development in CNS specific autoimmunity.

  3. Autoradiographic visualization of CNS receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.M.; Moody, T.W.

    1986-03-01

    Receptors for VIP were characterized in the rat CNS. /sup 125/I-VIP bound with high affinity to rat brain slices. Binding was time dependent and specific. Pharmacology studies indicated that specific /sup 125/I-VIP binding was inhibited with high affinity by VIP and low affinity by secretin and PHI. Using in vitro autoradiographic techniques high grain densities were present in the dentate gyrus, pineal gland, supraoptic and suprachiasmatic nuclei, superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and the area postrema. Moderate grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, cerebral cortex, nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, interstitial nucleus of the stria terminalis, paraventricular thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, subiculum and the medial geniculate nucleus. Grains were absent in the corpus callosum and controls treated with 1 microM unlabeled VIP. The discrete regional distribution of VIP receptors suggest that it may function as an important modulator of neural activity in the CNS.

  4. Positron emission tomography in CNS drug discovery and drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Piel, Markus; Vernaleken, Ingo; Rösch, Frank

    2014-11-26

    Molecular imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) are increasingly involved in the development of new drugs. Using radioactive tracers as imaging probes, PET allows the determination of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a drug candidate, via recording target engagement, the pattern of distribution, and metabolism. Because of the noninvasive nature and quantitative end point obtainable by molecular imaging, it seems inherently suited for the examination of a pharmaceutical's behavior in the brain. Molecular imaging, most especially PET, can therefore be a valuable tool in CNS drug research. In this Perspective, we present the basic principles of PET, the importance of appropriate tracer selection, the impact of improved radiopharmaceutical chemistry in radiotracer development, and the different roles that PET can fulfill in CNS drug research.

  5. Histone regulation in the CNS: basic principles of epigenetic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Maze, Ian; Noh, Kyung-Min; Allis, C David

    2013-01-01

    Postmitotic neurons are subject to a vast array of environmental influences that require the nuclear integration of intracellular signaling events to promote a wide variety of neuroplastic states associated with synaptic function, circuit formation, and behavioral memory. Over the last decade, much attention has been paid to the roles of transcription and chromatin regulation in guiding fundamental aspects of neuronal function. A great deal of this work has centered on neurodevelopmental and adulthood plasticity, with increased focus in the areas of neuropharmacology and molecular psychiatry. Here, we attempt to provide a broad overview of chromatin regulation, as it relates to central nervous system (CNS) function, with specific emphasis on the modes of histone posttranslational modifications, chromatin remodeling, and histone variant exchange. Understanding the functions of chromatin in the context of the CNS will aid in the future development of pharmacological therapeutics aimed at alleviating devastating neurological disorders.

  6. Imaging of CNS Tumors in Children: Advances and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Vézina, Louis-Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    MR technology is constantly improving. Functional imaging techniques such as MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, diffusion imaging and diffusion tensor imaging are increasingly utilized in the pediatric patient with a brain tumor. However estimate of tumor size remains the primary imaging endpoint in the evaluation of response to treatment; validation across institutions and vendor platforms of MRI functional parameters is necessary given the relative uncommon occurrence of brain tumors in children. Pediatric neuroimaging can be challenging, and the optimal way to image children with CNS tumors is not uniformly applied across all centers. Application of proper scanning techniques and validation of functional imaging techniques should lead to improved care of children with CNS tumors PMID:18952579

  7. Leptin and the CNS Control of Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Gregory J.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of body fat stores and blood glucose levels is critical for survival. This review highlights growing evidence that leptin action in the central nervous system (CNS) plays a key role in both processes. Investigation into underlying mechanisms has begun to clarify the physiological role of leptin in the control of glucose metabolism and raises interesting new possibilities for the treatment of diabetes and related disorders. PMID:21527729

  8. C.N.S. tumors in eastern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, A W

    1992-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, there were no attempts previously to describe a population based frequency or incidence, particularly so the age adjusted incidence of various CNS tumors. This paper presents the primary CNS tumors from a population based tumor registry over two years period, from January 1987 till December 1988. There was a total of 85 cases representing 5.4% of the total captured cases (1,568 cases of malignant tumors at all sites). The population of the Eastern Province is estimated to be 1.37 million, the Saudis forming 80% of the total population. Out of the 85 cases captured over two years, there were 64 cases diagnosed in indigenous Saudi population forming 75%. The remaining occurred in non-Saudi residents. The male/female ratio in Saudis was 1:1.1 with a slight predominance of the female, while the reverse is true in the non-Saudis (2:1). The total captured cases per annum is 43, making the incidence of primary CNS neoplasms in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia 3.1/100,000 of all the population and 2.9/100,000 in Saudi nationals. Comparing this incidence to the international figure, it was clear that it is far less than the incidence reported from North America and Europe, particularly in the Caucasian population, but similar to incidences reported in the Chinese, black Americans, Romanians and Yugoslavians, but certainly less than the Ashkenazi or Safari Jews, and slightly higher than the incidence reported in Japan and Southeast Asia. Malignant brain tumors of various types dominated the primary CNS neoplasms reported over these two years forming 69% of the cases and 52% of the primary brain tumors.

  9. Reassembly of Excitable Domains after CNS Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Miguel A.; de Lima, Silmara; Gilbert, Hui-Ya; Giger, Roman J.; Benowitz, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Action potential initiation and propagation in myelinated axons require ion channel clustering at axon initial segments (AIS) and nodes of Ranvier. Disruption of these domains after injury impairs nervous system function. Traditionally, injured CNS axons are considered refractory to regeneration, but some recent approaches challenge this view by showing robust long-distance regeneration. However, whether these approaches allow remyelination and promote the reestablishment of AIS and nodes of Ranvier is unknown. Using mouse optic nerve crush as a model for CNS traumatic injury, we performed a detailed analysis of AIS and node disruption after nerve crush. We found significant disruption of AIS and loss of nodes within days of the crush, and complete loss of nodes 1 week after injury. Genetic deletion of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), coupled with stimulation of RGCs by inflammation and cAMP, dramatically enhanced regeneration. With this treatment, we found significant reestablishment of RGC AIS, remyelination, and even reassembly of nodes in regions proximal, within, and distal to the crush site. Remyelination began near the retina, progressed distally, and was confirmed by electron microscopy. Although axons grew rapidly, remyelination and nodal ion channel clustering was much slower. Finally, genetic deletion of ankyrinG from RGCs to block AIS reassembly did not affect axon regeneration, indicating that preservation of neuronal polarity is not required for axon regeneration. Together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that regenerating CNS axons can be remyelinated and reassemble new AIS and nodes of Ranvier. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show, for the first time, that regenerated CNS axons have the capacity to both remyelinate and reassemble the axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier necessary for rapid and efficient action potential propagation. PMID:27581456

  10. Oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the mouse juvenile and adult central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Codeluppi, Simone; van Bruggen, David; Mendanha Falcão, Ana; Xiao, Lin; Li, Huiliang; Häring, Martin; Hochgerner, Hannah; Romanov, Roman A.; Gyllborg, Daniel; Muñoz Manchado, Ana; La Manno, Gioele; Lönnerberg, Peter; Floriddia, Elisa M.; Rezayee, Fatemah; Ernfors, Patrik; Arenas, Ernest; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Harkany, Tibor; Richardson, William D.; Linnarsson, Sten; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes have been considered as a functionally homogenous population in the central nervous system (CNS). We performed single-cell RNA-Seq on 5072 cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage from ten regions of the mouse juvenile/adult CNS. Twelve populations were identified, representing a continuum from Pdgfra+ oligodendrocyte precursors (OPCs) to distinct mature oligodendrocytes. Initial stages of differentiation were similar across the juvenile CNS, whereas subsets of mature oligodendrocytes were enriched in specific regions in the adult brain. Newly-formed oligodendrocytes were found to be resident in the adult CNS and responsive to complex motor learning. A second Pdgfra+ population, distinct from OPCs, was found along vessels. Our study reveals the dynamics of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation, uncoupling them at a transcriptional level and highlighting oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the CNS. PMID:27284195

  11. Functional CB2 type cannabinoid receptors at CNS synapses.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Nicola H; Stanford, Ian M; Woodhall, Gavin L

    2009-09-01

    To date, it has been thought that cannabinoid receptors in CNS are primarily of the CB1R subtype, with CB2R expressed only in glia and peripheral tissues. However, evidence for the expression of CB2 type cannabinoid receptors at neuronal sites in the CNS is building through anatomical localization of receptors and mRNA in neurons and behavioural studies of central effects of CB2R agonists. In the medial entorhinal area of the rat, we found that blockade of CB1R did not occlude suppression of GABAergic inhibition by the non-specific endogenous cannabinoid 2-AG, suggesting that CB1R could not account fully for the effects of 2-AG. Suppression could be mimicked using the CB2R agonist JWH-133 and reversed by the CB2R inverse agonist AM-630, indicating the presence of functional CB2R. When we reversed the order of drug application AM-630 blocked the effects of the CB2R agonist JWH-133, but not the CB1R inverse agonist LY320135. JTE-907, a CB2R inverse agonist structurally unrelated to AM-630 elicited increased GABAergic neurotransmission at picomolar concentrations. Analysis of mIPSCs revealed that CB2R effects were restricted to action potential dependent, but not action potential independent GABA release. These data provide pharmacological evidence for functional CB2R at CNS synapses.

  12. Origin, fate and dynamics of macrophages at CNS interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, Tobias; Jordão, Marta Joana Costa; Wieghofer, Peter; Prutek, Fabiola; Hagemeyer, Nora; Frenzel, Kathrin; Staszewski, Ori; Kierdorf, Katrin; Amann, Lukas; Krueger, Martin; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Hochgarner, Hannah; Zeiser, Robert; Epelman, Slava; Geissmann, Frederic; Priller, Josef; Rossi, Fabio; Bechmann, Ingo; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Linnarsson, Sten; Jung, Steffen; Prinz, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular, meningeal and choroid plexus macrophages are non-parenchymal macrophages that mediate immune responses at brain boundaries. Although the origin of parenchymal microglia has recently been elucidated, much less is known about the precursors, the underlying transcriptional program and the dynamics of the other macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS). It has been assumed that they have a high turnover with blood-borne monocytes. However, large scale single-cell RNA-sequencing reveals a striking molecular overlap between perivascular macrophages and microglia but not monocytes. Using several fate mapping approaches and parabiosis we demonstrate that CNS macrophages arise from yolk sac precursors during embryonic development and remain a stable population. Notably, the generation of CNS macrophages relies on the transcription factor Pu.1 whereas myb, Batf3 and Nr4a1 are not required. Upon autoimmune inflammation, macrophages undergo extensive self-renewal by local proliferation. Our data provide challenging new insights into brains innate immune system. PMID:27135602

  13. TSC1/TSC2 Signaling in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Han, Juliette M.; Sahin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Over the past several years, the study of a hereditary tumor syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), has shed light on the regulation of cellular proliferation and growth. TSC is an autosomal dominant disorder that is due to inactivating mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 and characterized by benign tumors (hamartomas) involving multiple organ systems. The TSC1/2 complex has been found to play a crucial role in an evolutionarily-conserved signaling pathway that regulates cell growth: the mTORC1 pathway. This pathway promotes anabolic processes and inhibits catabolic processes in response to extracellular and intracellular factors. Findings in cancer biology have reinforced the critical role for TSC1/2 in cell growth and proliferation. In contrast to cancer cells, in the CNS, the TSC1/2 complex not only regulates cell growth/proliferation, but also orchestrates an intricate and finely tuned system that has distinctive roles under different conditions, depending on cell type, stage of development, and subcellular localization. Overall, TSC1/2 signaling in the CNS, via its multi-faceted roles, contributes to proper neural connectivity. Here, we will review the TSC signaling in the CNS. PMID:21329690

  14. Mechanisms of CNS invasion and damage by parasites.

    PubMed

    Kristensson, Krister; Masocha, Willias; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a most devastating complication of a parasitic infection. Several physical and immunological barriers provide obstacles to such an invasion. In this broad overview focus is given to the physical barriers to neuroinvasion of parasites provided at the portal of entry of the parasites, i.e., the skin and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, and between the blood and the brain parenchyma, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A description is given on how human pathogenic parasites can reach the CNS via the bloodstream either as free-living or extracellular parasites, by embolization of eggs, or within red or white blood cells when adapted to intracellular life. Molecular mechanisms are discussed by which parasites can interact with or pass across the BBB. The possible targeting of the circumventricular organs by parasites, as well as the parasites' direct entry to the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory nerve pathway, is also highlighted. Finally, examples are given which illustrate different mechanisms by which parasites can cause dysfunction or damage in the CNS related to toxic effects of parasite-derived molecules or to immune responses to the infection.

  15. PPAR agonists as therapeutics for CNS trauma and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mandrekar-Colucci, Shweta; Sauerbeck, Andrew; Popovich, Phillip G.; McTigue, Dana M.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury or disease of the spinal cord and brain elicits multiple cellular and biochemical reactions that together cause or are associated with neuropathology. Specifically, injury or disease elicits acute infiltration and activation of immune cells, death of neurons and glia, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the secretion of substrates that inhibit axon regeneration. In some diseases, inflammation is chronic or non-resolving. Ligands that target PPARs (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors), a group of ligand-activated transcription factors, are promising therapeutics for neurologic disease and CNS injury because their activation affects many, if not all, of these interrelated pathologic mechanisms. PPAR activation can simultaneously weaken or reprogram the immune response, stimulate metabolic and mitochondrial function, promote axon growth and induce progenitor cells to differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. PPAR activation has beneficial effects in many pre-clinical models of neurodegenerative diseases and CNS injury; however, the mechanisms through which PPARs exert these effects have yet to be fully elucidated. In this review we discuss current literature supporting the role of PPAR activation as a therapeutic target for treating traumatic injury and degenerative diseases of the CNS. PMID:24215544

  16. Treatment Options for Medulloblastoma and CNS Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET)

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    The amount of residual disease after surgery better correlates with survival for medulloblastomas than for CNS PNETs. Maximal surgical resection of tumor should be done, only if additional permanent, neurologic deficits can be spared. Patients should have a staging work-up to assess the extent of disease. This includes postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, MRI of the entire spine and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling for cytological examination, if deemed safe. Radiation therapy to the entire CNS axis is required, with a greater dose (boost) given to the region of the primary site or any bulky residual disease for older children. Adjuvant chemotherapy must be given even if no evidence of disease after radiation therapy exists, as the risk of relapse is substantial after radiation alone. Subsets of younger children with medulloblastoma, arbitrarily defined as those younger than 3 years of age in some studies and 4 or even 5 years in other studies, can be effectively treated with chemotherapy alone. Recent genomic studies have revealed further subtypes of disease than previously recognized. Clinical trials to exploit these biologic differences are required to assess potential efficacy of targeted agents. The treatment of medulloblastoma and CNS PNET can cause significant impairment in neurologic function. Evaluations by physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and neurocognitive assessments should be obtained, as needed. After therapy is completed, survivors need follow-up of endocrine function, surveillance scans and psychosocial support. PMID:23979905

  17. Primary CNS lymphoproliferative disease, mycophenolate and calcineurin inhibitor usage

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Powell, Helen; Kostadinov, Rumen; Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Rifkin, Dena E.; Burger, Peter C.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppression for solid organ transplantation increases lymphoproliferative disease risk. While central nervous system (CNS) involvement is more rare, we noticed an increase in primary CNS (PCNS) disease. To investigate a potential association with the immunosuppressive regimen we identified all post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) cases diagnosed over a 28-year period at our institution (174 total, 29 PCNS) and all similar cases recorded in a United Network for Organ Sharing-Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (UNOS-OPTN) data file. While no PCNS cases were diagnosed at our institution between 1986 and 1997, they comprised 37% of PTLD cases diagnosed from 2011–2014. PCNS disease was more often associated with renal vs. other organ transplant, Epstein-Barr virus, large B-cell morphology and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as compared to PTLD that did not involve the CNS. Calcineurin inhibitors were protective against PCNS disease when given alone or in combination with MMF. A multivariate analysis of a larger UNOS-OPTN dataset confirmed these findings, where both MMF and lack of calcineurin inhibitor usage were independently associated with risk for development of PCNS PTLD. These findings have significant implications for the transplant community, particularly given the introduction of new regimens lacking calcineurin inhibitors. Further investigation into these associations is warranted. PMID:26460822

  18. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-03-03

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications. Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.

  19. Bioenergetics of Mammalian Sperm Capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Zara, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    After ejaculation, the mammalian male gamete must undergo the capacitation process, which is a prerequisite for egg fertilization. The bioenergetics of sperm capacitation is poorly understood despite its fundamental role in sustaining the biochemical and molecular events occurring during gamete activation. Glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are the two major metabolic pathways producing ATP which is the primary source of energy for spermatozoa. Since recent data suggest that spermatozoa have the ability to use different metabolic substrates, the main aim of this work is to present a broad overview of the current knowledge on the energy-producing metabolic pathways operating inside sperm mitochondria during capacitation in different mammalian species. Metabolism of glucose and of other energetic substrates, such as pyruvate, lactate, and citrate, is critically analyzed. Such knowledge, besides its obvious importance for basic science, could eventually translate into the development of novel strategies for treatment of male infertility, artificial reproduction, and sperm selection methods. PMID:24791005

  20. Area and mammalian elevational diversity.

    PubMed

    McCain, Christy M

    2007-01-01

    Elevational gradients hold enormous potential for understanding general properties of biodiversity. Like latitudinal gradients, the hypotheses for diversity patterns can be grouped into historical explanations, climatic drivers, and spatial hypotheses. The spatial hypotheses include the species-area effect and spatial constraint (mid-domain effect null models). I test these two spatial hypotheses using regional diversity patterns for mammals (non-volant small mammals and bats) along 34 elevational gradients spanning 24.4 degrees S-40.4 degrees N latitude. There was high variability in the fit to the species-area hypothesis and the mid-domain effect. Both hypotheses can be eliminated as primary drivers of elevational diversity. Area and spatial constraint both represent sources of error rather than mechanisms underlying these mammalian diversity patterns. Similar results are expected for other vertebrate taxa, plants, and invertebrates since they show comparable distributions of elevational diversity patterns to mammalian patterns.

  1. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using N-nitrosomorpholine in young adult rats: report on collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS)-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study (MMS) Group.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Aya; Kosaka, Mizuki; Kimura, Aoi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of a repeated-dose liver micronucleus (LMN) assay in young adult rats as a collaborative study by the Mammalian mutagenicity study (MMS) group. All procedures were performed in accordance with the standard protocols of the MMS Group. Six-week-old male Crl:CD(SD) rats (5 animals/group) received oral doses of the hepatocarcinogen N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) at 0 (control), 5, 10, and 30mg/kg/day (10mL/kg) for 14 days. Control animals received vehicle (water). Hepatocytes were collected from the liver 24h after the last dose, and the number of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) was determined by microscopy. The number of micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) in the femoral bone marrow was also determined. The liver was examined using histopathologic methods after formalin fixation. The results showed statistically significant and dose-dependent increases in the number of MNHEPs in the liver at doses of 10mg/kg and greater when compared with the vehicle control. However, no significant increase was noted in the number of MNIMEs in the bone marrow at doses of up to 30mg/kg. Histopathology of the liver revealed hypertrophy and single cell necrosis of hepatocytes at doses of 5mg/kg and above. These results showed that the induction of micronuclei by NMOR was detected by the repeated-dose LMN assay, but not by the repeated-dose bone marrow micronucleus assay.

  2. Mammalian Polyamine Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, Anthony E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Polyamines are ubiquitous small basic molecules that play multiple essential roles in mammalian physiology. Their cellular content is highly regulated and there is convincing evidence that altered metabolism is involvement in many disease states. Drugs altering polyamine levels may therefore have a variety of important targets. This review will summarize the current state of understanding of polyamine metabolism and function, the regulation of polyamine content, and heritable pathological conditions that may be derived from altered polyamine metabolism. PMID:19603518

  3. When herbivores eat predators: predatory insects effectively avoid incidental ingestion by mammalian herbivores.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Matan; Inbar, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The direct trophic links between mammalian herbivores and plant-dwelling insects have been practically ignored. Insects are ubiquitous on plants consumed by mammalian herbivores and are thus likely to face the danger of being incidentally ingested by a grazing mammal. A few studies have shown that some herbivorous hemipterans are able to avoid this peril by dropping to the ground upon detecting the heat and humidity on the mammal's breath. We hypothesized that if this risk affects the entire plant-dwelling insect community, other insects that share this habitat are expected to develop similar escape mechanisms. We assessed the ability of three species (adults and larvae) of coccinellid beetles, important aphid predators, to avoid incidental ingestion. Both larvae and adults were able to avoid incidental ingestion effectively by goats by dropping to the ground, demonstrating the importance of this behavior in grazed habitats. Remarkably, all adult beetles escaped by dropping off the plant and none used their functional wings to fly away. In controlled laboratory experiments, we found that human breath caused 60-80% of the beetles to drop. The most important component of mammalian herbivore breath in inducing adult beetles and larvae to drop was the combination of heat and humidity. The fact that the mechanism of dropping in response to mammalian breath developed in distinct insect orders and disparate life stages accentuates the importance of the direct influence of mammalian herbivores on plant-dwelling insects. This direct interaction should be given its due place when discussing trophic interactions.

  4. When Herbivores Eat Predators: Predatory Insects Effectively Avoid Incidental Ingestion by Mammalian Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Matan; Inbar, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The direct trophic links between mammalian herbivores and plant-dwelling insects have been practically ignored. Insects are ubiquitous on plants consumed by mammalian herbivores and are thus likely to face the danger of being incidentally ingested by a grazing mammal. A few studies have shown that some herbivorous hemipterans are able to avoid this peril by dropping to the ground upon detecting the heat and humidity on the mammal's breath. We hypothesized that if this risk affects the entire plant-dwelling insect community, other insects that share this habitat are expected to develop similar escape mechanisms. We assessed the ability of three species (adults and larvae) of coccinellid beetles, important aphid predators, to avoid incidental ingestion. Both larvae and adults were able to avoid incidental ingestion effectively by goats by dropping to the ground, demonstrating the importance of this behavior in grazed habitats. Remarkably, all adult beetles escaped by dropping off the plant and none used their functional wings to fly away. In controlled laboratory experiments, we found that human breath caused 60–80% of the beetles to drop. The most important component of mammalian herbivore breath in inducing adult beetles and larvae to drop was the combination of heat and humidity. The fact that the mechanism of dropping in response to mammalian breath developed in distinct insect orders and disparate life stages accentuates the importance of the direct influence of mammalian herbivores on plant-dwelling insects. This direct interaction should be given its due place when discussing trophic interactions. PMID:23424674

  5. GLUTs and mammalian sperm metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Diego; Rodriguez-Gil, Juan Enrique; Vallorani, Claudia; Spinaci, Marcella; Galeati, Giovanna; Tamanini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian cells use glucides as a substrate that can be catabolized through glycolitic pathways or oxidative phosphorylation, used as a source of reducing potential, or used for anabolic aims. An important role in supplying cells with energy is played by different membrane proteins that can actively (sodium-dependent glucose transporters) or passively (glucose transporters; GLUT) transport hexoses through the lipidic bilayer. In particular, GLUTs are a family of 13 proteins that facilitate the transport of sugars and have a peculiar distribution in different tissues as well as a particular affinity for substrates. These proteins are also present in mature sperm cells, which, in fact, need carriers for uptake energetic sources that are important for maintaining cell basic activity as well as specific functions, such as motility and fertilization ability. Likewise, several GLUTs have been studied in various mammalian species (man, bull, rat, mouse, boar, dog, stallion, and donkey) to point out both their actual presence or absence and their localization on plasma membrane. The aim of this work is to give an overall picture of the studies available on GLUTs in mammalian spermatozoa at this moment, pointing out the species peculiarity, the possible role of these proteins, and the potential future research on this item.

  6. Strain-dependent CNS dissemination in guinea pigs after Mycobacterium tuberculosis aerosol challenge.

    PubMed

    Be, Nicholas A; Klinkenberg, Lee G; Bishai, William R; Karakousis, Petros C; Jain, Sanjay K

    2011-09-01

    Clinical reports suggest an association of distinct Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains with CNS disease. We therefore examined CNS dissemination by different laboratory strains (two M. tuberculosis H37Rv, one CDC1551) in a guinea pig aerosol infection model. Although all strains grew exponentially in lungs, with similar bacterial burdens at the time of extrapulmonary dissemination, M. tuberculosis CDC1551 disseminated to the CNS significantly more than the H37Rv strains. No CNS lesions were observed throughout the study, with only a modest cytokine response. These data suggest that M. tuberculosis may have virulence factors that promote CNS dissemination, distinct from those required for pulmonary TB.

  7. Expression of ataxin-7 in CNS and non-CNS tissue of normal and SCA7 individuals.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Jenni; Ström, Anna-Lena; Hart, Patricia; Brännström, Thomas; Forsgren, Lars; Holmberg, Monica

    2002-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is a neurodegenerative disorder primarily affecting the cerebellum, brain stem and retina. The disease is caused by an expanded polyglutamine tract in the protein ataxin-7. In this study we analyzed the expression pattern of ataxin-7 in CNS and non-CNS tissue from three SCA7 patients and age-matched controls. SCA7 is a rare autosomal dominant disorder, limiting the number of patients available for analysis. We therefore compiled data on ataxin-7 expression from all SCA7 patients (n=5) and controls (n=7) published to date, and compared with the results obtained in this study. Expression of ataxin-7 was found in neurons throughout the CNS and was highly abundant in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, in regions of the hippocampus and in cerebral cortex. Ataxin-7 expression was not restricted to regions of pathology, and there were no apparent regional differences in ataxin-7 expression patterns between patients and controls. The subcellular distribution of ataxin-7 was primarily nuclear in all brain regions studied. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, however, differences in subcellular distribution of ataxin-7 were observed between patients and controls of different ages. Here we provide an increased understanding of the distribution of ataxin-7, and the possible implication of subcellular localization of this protein on disease pathology is discussed.

  8. Glycine-mediated changes of onset reliability at a mammalian central synapse.

    PubMed

    Kopp-Scheinpflug, C; Dehmel, S; Tolnai, S; Dietz, B; Milenkovic, I; Rübsamen, R

    2008-11-19

    Glycine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter activating a chloride conductance in the mammalian CNS. In vitro studies from brain slices revealed a novel presynaptic site of glycine action in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) which increases the release of the excitatory transmitter glutamate from the calyx of Held. Here, we investigate the action of glycine on action potential firing of single MNTB neurons from the gerbil under acoustic stimulation in vivo. Iontophoretic application of the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine caused a significant decrease in spontaneous and sound-evoked firing rates throughout the neurons' excitatory response areas, with the largest changes at the respective characteristic frequency (CF). The decreased firing rate was accompanied by longer and more variable onset latencies of sound-evoked responses. Outside the neurons' excitatory response areas, firing rates increased during the application of strychnine due to a reduction of inhibitory sidebands, causing a broadening of frequency tuning. These results indicate that glycine enhances the efficacy for on-CF stimuli, while simultaneously suppressing synaptic transmission for off-CF stimuli. These in vivo results provide evidence of multiple excitatory and inhibitory glycine effects on the same neuronal population in the mature mammalian CNS.

  9. Functional characterization of mammalian Wntless homolog in mammalian system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ting; Wang, Shih-Jong; Hsu, Shih-Hsien

    2012-07-01

    Wntless (GPR177) protein is a newly identified regulator of Wnt signals in Drosophila, but its cellular function in mammals is still unclear. In this study, we explored the expression pattern and potential cellular function of Wntless in mammalian cells. Wntless mRNA was expressed in many mouse tissues, including the spleen, lung, kidney, thymus, and stomach, and lower levels of expression were detected in the mouse brain and testis. Expression of Wntless protein analyzed by Western blot and immunohistochemical staining was only detected in the submucosa, muscle, ganglia, and nerve cells of murine large intestines. Both immunofluorescence staining and subcellular fraction extraction analysis revealed that endogenous Wntless protein was expressed predominantly in the cytoplasmic organelles with a morphologically dot-shaped distribution. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless could be corrected by and may activate the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in cancer (HeLa) cells. These results suggest that Wntless plays a role in signaling regulation during the formation of cancer in addition to its role as a retromer protein in mammalian systems.

  10. Evolutionary paths to mammalian cochleae.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A

    2012-12-01

    Evolution of the cochlea and high-frequency hearing (>20 kHz; ultrasonic to humans) in mammals has been a subject of research for many years. Recent advances in paleontological techniques, especially the use of micro-CT scans, now provide important new insights that are here reviewed. True mammals arose more than 200 million years (Ma) ago. Of these, three lineages survived into recent geological times. These animals uniquely developed three middle ear ossicles, but these ossicles were not initially freely suspended as in modern mammals. The earliest mammalian cochleae were only about 2 mm long and contained a lagena macula. In the multituberculate and monotreme mammalian lineages, the cochlea remained relatively short and did not coil, even in modern representatives. In the lineage leading to modern therians (placental and marsupial mammals), cochlear coiling did develop, but only after a period of at least 60 Ma. Even Late Jurassic mammals show only a 270 ° cochlear coil and a cochlear canal length of merely 3 mm. Comparisons of modern organisms, mammalian ancestors, and the state of the middle ear strongly suggest that high-frequency hearing (>20 kHz) was not realized until the early Cretaceous (~125 Ma). At that time, therian mammals arose and possessed a fully coiled cochlea. The evolution of modern features of the middle ear and cochlea in the many later lineages of therians was, however, a mosaic and different features arose at different times. In parallel with cochlear structural evolution, prestins in therian mammals evolved into effective components of a new motor system. Ultrasonic hearing developed quite late-the earliest bat cochleae (~60 Ma) did not show features characteristic of those of modern bats that are sensitive to high ultrasonic frequencies.

  11. Critical role for prokineticin 2 in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Hamdan, Mhamad; Costanza, Massimo; Fontana, Elena; Di Dario, Marco; Musio, Silvia; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Lattanzi, Roberta; Radaelli, Marta; Martinelli, Vittorio; Salvadori, Severo; Negri, Lucia; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Farina, Cinthia; Balboni, Gianfranco; Steinman, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential role of prokineticin 2 (PK2), a bioactive peptide involved in multiple biological functions including immune modulation, in CNS autoimmune demyelinating disease. Methods: We investigated the expression of PK2 in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), and in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. We evaluated the biological effects of PK2 on expression of EAE and on development of T-cell response against myelin by blocking PK2 in vivo with PK2 receptor antagonists. We treated with PK2 immune cells activated against myelin antigen to explore the immune-modulating effects of this peptide in vitro. Results: Pk2 messenger RNA was upregulated in spinal cord and lymph node cells (LNCs) of mice with EAE. PK2 protein was expressed in EAE inflammatory infiltrates and was increased in sera during EAE. In patients with relapsing-remitting MS, transcripts for PK2 were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells compared with healthy controls, and PK2 serum concentrations were significantly higher. A PK2 receptor antagonist prevented or attenuated established EAE in chronic and relapsing-remitting models, reduced CNS inflammation and demyelination, and decreased the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A cytokines in LNCs while increasing IL-10. PK2 in vitro increased IFN-γ and IL-17A and reduced IL-10 in splenocytes activated against myelin antigen. Conclusion: These data suggest that PK2 is a critical immune regulator in CNS autoimmune demyelination and may represent a new target for therapy. PMID:25884014

  12. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Luarte, Alejandro; Bátiz, Luis Federico; Wyneken, Ursula; Lafourcade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future. PMID:27195011

  13. Kynurenines in CNS disease: regulation by inflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Brian M.; Charych, Erik; Lee, Anna W.; Möller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolizes the essential amino acid tryptophan and generates a number of neuroactive metabolites collectively called the kynurenines. Segregated into at least two distinct branches, often termed the “neurotoxic” and “neuroprotective” arms of the KP, they are regulated by the two enzymes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase and kynurenine aminotransferase, respectively. Interestingly, several enzymes in the pathway are under tight control of inflammatory mediators. Recent years have seen a tremendous increase in our understanding of neuroinflammation in CNS disease. This review will focus on the regulation of the KP by inflammatory mediators as it pertains to neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24567701

  14. Proton therapy for the treatment of children with CNS malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sreeraman, Radhika; Indelicato, Daniel J

    2014-03-01

    Proton therapy is a novel technique for treating pediatric malignancies. As a tool to reduce normal-tissue dose, it has the potential to decrease late toxicity. Although proton therapy has been used for over five decades, most pediatric dosimetry studies and clinical series have been published over the last 10 years. The purpose of this article is to review the physical, radiobiological and economic rationales for proton therapy in pediatric CNS malignancies, and provide an overview of the current challenges and future direction of research and utilization of this approach.

  15. The role of peripheral immune cells in the CNS in steady state and disease.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Marco; Priller, Josef

    2017-02-01

    The CNS is protected by the immune system, including cells that reside directly within the CNS and help to ensure proper neural function, as well as cells that traffic into the CNS with disease. The CNS-resident immune system is comprised mainly of innate immune cells and operates under homeostatic conditions. These myeloid cells in the CNS parenchyma and at CNS-periphery interfaces are highly specialized but also extremely plastic cells that immediately react to any changes in CNS homeostasis and become reactive in the context of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. However, when the blood-brain barrier is impaired during CNS diseases such as multiple sclerosis or altered with cerebral ischemia, peripheral adaptive and innate immune cells, including monocytes, neutrophils, T cells and B cells, can enter the CNS, where they execute distinct cell-mediated effects. On the basis of these observations, we assess strategies for targeting peripheral immune cells to reduce CNS disease burden.

  16. A mammalian acetate switch regulates stress erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Nagati, Jason S.; Xie, Jian; Li, Jiwen; Walters, Holly; Moon, Young-Ah; Gerard, Robert D.; Huang, Chou-Long; Comerford, Sarah A.; Hammer, Robert E.; Horton, Jay D.; Chen, Rui; Garcia, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine erythropoietin (Epo), which is synthesized in the kidney or liver of adult mammals, controls erythrocyte production and is regulated by the stress-responsive transcription factor Hypoxia Inducible Factor 2 (HIF-2). We previously reported that the lysine acetyltransferase Cbp is required for HIF-2α acetylation and efficient HIF-2 dependent Epo induction during hypoxia. We now show these processes require acetate-dependent acetyl CoA synthetase 2 (Acss2). In Hep3B hepatoma cells and in Epo-generating organs of hypoxic or acutely anemic mice, acetate levels increase and Acss2 is required for HIF-2α acetylation, Cbp/HIF-2α complex formation and recruitment to the Epo enhancer, and efficient Epo induction. In acutely anemic mice, acetate supplementation augments stress erythropoiesis in an Acss2-dependent manner. In acquired and genetic chronic anemia mouse models, acetate supplementation also increases Epo expression and resting hematocrits. Thus, a mammalian stress-responsive acetate switch controls HIF-2 signaling and Epo induction during pathophysiological states marked by tissue hypoxia. PMID:25108527

  17. Ceramide signaling in mammalian epidermis.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2014-03-01

    Ceramide, the backbone structure of all sphingolipids, as well as a minor component of cellular membranes, has a unique role in the skin, by forming the epidermal permeability barrier at the extracellular domains of the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, which is required for terrestrial mammalian survival. In contrast to the role of ceramide in forming the permeability barrier, the signaling roles of ceramide and its metabolites have not yet been recognized. Ceramide and/or its metabolites regulate proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in epidermal keratinocytes. Recent studies have further demonstrated that a ceramide metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate, modulates innate immune function. Ceramide has already been applied to therapeutic approaches for treatment of eczema associated with attenuated epidermal permeability barrier function. Pharmacological modulation of ceramide and its metabolites' signaling can also be applied to cutaneous disease prevention and therapy. The author here describes the signaling roles of ceramide and its metabolites in mammalian cells and tissues, including the epidermis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias.

  18. GPCR drug discovery: novel ligands for CNS receptors.

    PubMed

    Lim, William K

    2007-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of cell surface receptors in humans. They convey extracellular signals into the cell interior by activating intracellular processes such as heterotrimeric G protein-dependent signaling pathways. They are widely distributed in the nervous system, and mediate key physiological processes including cognition, mood, appetite, pain and synaptic transmission. With at least 30% of marketed drugs being GPCR modulators, they are a major therapeutic target in the pharmaceutical industry's drug discovery programs. This review will survey recently patented ligands for GPCRs implicated in CNS disorders, in particular the metabotropic glutamate, adenosine and cannabinoid receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors regulate signaling by glutamate, the major excitatory brain neurotransmitter, while adenosine is a ubiquitous neuromodulater mediating diverse physiological effects. Recent patents for ligands of these receptors include mGluR5 antagonists and adenosine A(1) receptor agonists. Cannabinoid receptors remain one of the most important GPCR drug discovery target due to the intense interest in CB(1) receptor antagonists for treating obesity and metabolic syndrome. Such small molecule ligands are the outcome of the continuing focus of many pharmaceutical companies to identify novel GPCR agonist, antagonist or allosteric modulators useful for CNS disorders, for which more effective drugs are eagerly awaited.

  19. Expression of Arginine Vasotocin Receptors in the Developing Zebrafish CNS

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Kenichi; Taguchi, Meari; Bonkowsky, Joshua L.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2013-01-01

    Vasotocin/vasopressin is a neuropeptide that regulates social and reproductive behaviors in a variety of animals including fish. Arginine vasotocin (AVT) is expressed by cells in the ventral hypothalamic and preoptic areas in the diencephalon during embryogenesis in zebrafish suggesting that vasotocin might mediate other functions within the CNS prior to the development of social and reproductive behaviors. In order to examine potential early roles for vasotocin we cloned two zebrafish vasotocin receptors homologous to AVPR1a. The receptors are expressed primarily in the CNS in similar but generally non-overlapping patterns. Both receptors are expressed in the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain by larval stage. Of note, AVTR1a-expressing neurons in the hindbrain appear to be contacted by the axons of preoptic neurons in the forebrain that include avt+ neurons and from sensory axons in the lateral longitudinal fasciculus (LLF). Furthermore, AVTR1a-expressing hindbrain neurons extend axons into the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) that contains axons of many neurons thought to be involved in locomotor responses to sensory stimulation. One hypothesis consistent with this anatomy is that AVT signaling mediates or gates sensory input to motor circuits in the hindbrain and spinal cord. PMID:23830982

  20. Hyperosmotic activation of CNS sympathetic drive: implications for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Toney, Glenn M; Stocker, Sean D

    2010-01-01

    Evidence now indicates that exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) significantly contributes to salt-sensitive cardiovascular diseases. Although CNS mechanisms that support the elevation of SNA in various cardiovascular disease models have been intensively studied, many mechanistic details remain unknown. In recent years, studies have shown that SNA can rise as a result of both acute and chronic increases of body fluid osmolality. These findings have raised the possibility that salt-sensitive cardiovascular diseases could result, at least in part, from direct osmosensory activation of CNS sympathetic drive. In this brief review we emphasize recent findings from several laboratories, including our own, which demonstrate that neurons of the forebrain organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) play a pivotal role in triggering hyperosmotic activation of SNA by recruiting neurons in specific regions of the hypothalamus, brainstem and spinal cord. Although OVLT neurons are intrinsically osmosensitive and shrink when exposed to extracellular hypertonicity, it is not yet clear if these processes are functionally linked. Whereas acute hypertonic activation of OVLT neurons critically depends on TRPV1 channels, studies in TRPV1−/− mice suggest that acute and long-term osmoregulatory responses remain largely intact. Therefore, acute and chronic osmosensory transduction by OVLT neurons may be mediated by distinct mechanisms. We speculate that organic osmolytes such as taurine and possibly novel processes such as extracellular acidification could contribute to long-term osmosensory transduction by OVLT neurons and might therefore participate in the elevation of SNA in salt-sensitive cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20603334

  1. Phytocannabinoids as novel therapeutic agents in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew J; Williams, Claire M; Whalley, Benjamin J; Stephens, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    The Cannabis sativa herb contains over 100 phytocannabinoid (pCB) compounds and has been used for thousands of years for both recreational and medicinal purposes. In the past two decades, characterisation of the body's endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid, eCB) system (ECS) has highlighted activation of central CB(1) receptors by the major pCB, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) as the primary mediator of the psychoactive, hyperphagic and some of the potentially therapeutic properties of ingested cannabis. Whilst Δ(9)-THC is the most prevalent and widely studied pCB, it is also the predominant psychotropic component of cannabis, a property that likely limits its widespread therapeutic use as an isolated agent. In this regard, research focus has recently widened to include other pCBs including cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), Δ(9)tetrahydrocannabivarin (Δ(9)-THCV) and cannabidivarin (CBDV), some of which show potential as therapeutic agents in preclinical models of CNS disease. Moreover, it is becoming evident that these non-Δ(9)-THC pCBs act at a wide range of pharmacological targets, not solely limited to CB receptors. Disorders that could be targeted include epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, affective disorders and the central modulation of feeding behaviour. Here, we review pCB effects in preclinical models of CNS disease and, where available, clinical trial data that support therapeutic effects. Such developments may soon yield the first non-Δ(9)-THC pCB-based medicines.

  2. Plant Derived Phytocompound, Embelin in CNS Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kundap, Uday P; Bhuvanendran, Saatheeyavaane; Kumari, Yatinesh; Othman, Iekhsan; Shaikh, Mohd Farooq

    2017-01-01

    A Central nervous system (CNS) disease is the one which affects either the spinal cord or brain and causing neurological or psychiatric complications. During the nineteenth century, modern medicines have occupied the therapy for many ailments and are widely used these days. Herbal medicines have often maintained popularity for historical and cultural reasons and also considered safer as they originate from natural sources. Embelin is a plant-based benzoquinone which is the major active constituent of the fruits of Embelia ribes Burm. It is an Indo-Malaysian species, extensively used in various traditional medicine systems for treating various diseases. Several natural products including quinone derivatives, which are considered to possess better safety and efficacy profile, are known for their CNS related activity. The bright orange hydroxybenzoquinone embelin-rich fruits of E. ribes have become popular in ethnomedicine. The present systematic review summarizes the effects of embelin on central nervous system and related diseases. A PRISMA model for systematic review was utilized for search. Various electronic databases such as Pubmed, Springer, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were searched between January 2000 and February 2016. Based on the search criteria for the literature, 13 qualified articles were selected and discussed in this review. The results of the report showed that there is a lack of translational research and not a single study was found in human. This report gives embelin a further way to be explored in clinical trials for its safety and efficacy.

  3. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  4. Plant Derived Phytocompound, Embelin in CNS Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kundap, Uday P.; Bhuvanendran, Saatheeyavaane; Kumari, Yatinesh; Othman, Iekhsan; Shaikh, Mohd. Farooq

    2017-01-01

    A Central nervous system (CNS) disease is the one which affects either the spinal cord or brain and causing neurological or psychiatric complications. During the nineteenth century, modern medicines have occupied the therapy for many ailments and are widely used these days. Herbal medicines have often maintained popularity for historical and cultural reasons and also considered safer as they originate from natural sources. Embelin is a plant-based benzoquinone which is the major active constituent of the fruits of Embelia ribes Burm. It is an Indo-Malaysian species, extensively used in various traditional medicine systems for treating various diseases. Several natural products including quinone derivatives, which are considered to possess better safety and efficacy profile, are known for their CNS related activity. The bright orange hydroxybenzoquinone embelin-rich fruits of E. ribes have become popular in ethnomedicine. The present systematic review summarizes the effects of embelin on central nervous system and related diseases. A PRISMA model for systematic review was utilized for search. Various electronic databases such as Pubmed, Springer, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were searched between January 2000 and February 2016. Based on the search criteria for the literature, 13 qualified articles were selected and discussed in this review. The results of the report showed that there is a lack of translational research and not a single study was found in human. This report gives embelin a further way to be explored in clinical trials for its safety and efficacy. PMID:28289385

  5. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully.

  6. Mottled Mice and Non-Mammalian Models of Menkes Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Krzeptowski, Wojciech; Lipiński, Paweł; Grzmil, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał; Pierzchała, Olga; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2015-01-01

    Menkes disease is a multi-systemic copper metabolism disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked ATP7A gene and characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and severe connective tissue defects. The ATP7A protein is a copper (Cu)-transporting ATPase expressed in all tissues and plays a critical role in the maintenance of copper homeostasis in cells of the whole body. ATP7A participates in copper absorption in the small intestine and in copper transport to the central nervous system (CNS) across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Cu is essential for synaptogenesis and axonal development. In cells, ATP7A participates in the incorporation of copper into Cu-dependent enzymes during the course of its maturation in the secretory pathway. There is a high degree of homology (>80%) between the human ATP7A and murine Atp7a genes. Mice with mutations in the Atp7a gene, called mottled mutants, are well-established and excellent models of Menkes disease. Mottled mutants closely recapitulate the Menkes phenotype and are invaluable for studying Cu-metabolism. They provide useful models for exploring and testing new forms of therapy in Menkes disease. Recently, non-mammalian models of Menkes disease, Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio mutants were used in experiments which would be technically difficult to carry out in mammals. PMID:26732058

  7. Mottled Mice and Non-Mammalian Models of Menkes Disease.

    PubMed

    Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Krzeptowski, Wojciech; Lipiński, Paweł; Grzmil, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał; Pierzchała, Olga; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2015-01-01

    Menkes disease is a multi-systemic copper metabolism disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked ATP7A gene and characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and severe connective tissue defects. The ATP7A protein is a copper (Cu)-transporting ATPase expressed in all tissues and plays a critical role in the maintenance of copper homeostasis in cells of the whole body. ATP7A participates in copper absorption in the small intestine and in copper transport to the central nervous system (CNS) across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Cu is essential for synaptogenesis and axonal development. In cells, ATP7A participates in the incorporation of copper into Cu-dependent enzymes during the course of its maturation in the secretory pathway. There is a high degree of homology (>80%) between the human ATP7A and murine Atp7a genes. Mice with mutations in the Atp7a gene, called mottled mutants, are well-established and excellent models of Menkes disease. Mottled mutants closely recapitulate the Menkes phenotype and are invaluable for studying Cu-metabolism. They provide useful models for exploring and testing new forms of therapy in Menkes disease. Recently, non-mammalian models of Menkes disease, Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio mutants were used in experiments which would be technically difficult to carry out in mammals.

  8. Migration of bone marrow progenitor cells in the adult brain of rats and rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dennie, Donnahue; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis takes place in the adult mammalian brain in three areas: Subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG); subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle; olfactory bulb. Different molecular markers can be used to characterize the cells involved in adult neurogenesis. It has been recently suggested that a population of bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells may migrate to the brain and differentiate into neuronal lineage. To explore this hypothesis, we injected recombinant SV40-derived vectors into the BM and followed the potential migration of the transduced cells. Long-term BM-directed gene transfer using recombinant SV40-derived vectors leads to expression of the genes delivered to the BM firstly in circulating cells, then after several months in mature neurons and microglial cells, and thus without central nervous system (CNS) lesion. Most of transgene-expressing cells expressed NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Thus, BM-derived cells may function as progenitors of CNS cells in adult animals. The mechanism by which the cells from the BM come to be neurons remains to be determined. Although the observed gradual increase in transgene-expressing neurons over 16 mo suggests that the pathway involved differentiation of BM-resident cells into neurons, cell fusion as the principal route cannot be totally ruled out. Additional studies using similar viral vectors showed that BM-derived progenitor cells migrating in the CNS express markers of neuronal precursors or immature neurons. Transgene-positive cells were found in the subgranular zone of the DG of the hippocampus 16 mo after intramarrow injection of the vector. In addition to cells expressing markers of mature neurons, transgene-positive cells were also positive for nestin and doublecortin, molecules expressed by developing neuronal cells. These cells were actively proliferating, as shown by short term BrdU incorporation studies. Inducing seizures by using kainic acid increased the number of BM progenitor cells

  9. Migration of bone marrow progenitor cells in the adult brain of rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Dennie, Donnahue; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2016-04-26

    Neurogenesis takes place in the adult mammalian brain in three areas: Subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG); subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle; olfactory bulb. Different molecular markers can be used to characterize the cells involved in adult neurogenesis. It has been recently suggested that a population of bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells may migrate to the brain and differentiate into neuronal lineage. To explore this hypothesis, we injected recombinant SV40-derived vectors into the BM and followed the potential migration of the transduced cells. Long-term BM-directed gene transfer using recombinant SV40-derived vectors leads to expression of the genes delivered to the BM firstly in circulating cells, then after several months in mature neurons and microglial cells, and thus without central nervous system (CNS) lesion. Most of transgene-expressing cells expressed NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Thus, BM-derived cells may function as progenitors of CNS cells in adult animals. The mechanism by which the cells from the BM come to be neurons remains to be determined. Although the observed gradual increase in transgene-expressing neurons over 16 mo suggests that the pathway involved differentiation of BM-resident cells into neurons, cell fusion as the principal route cannot be totally ruled out. Additional studies using similar viral vectors showed that BM-derived progenitor cells migrating in the CNS express markers of neuronal precursors or immature neurons. Transgene-positive cells were found in the subgranular zone of the DG of the hippocampus 16 mo after intramarrow injection of the vector. In addition to cells expressing markers of mature neurons, transgene-positive cells were also positive for nestin and doublecortin, molecules expressed by developing neuronal cells. These cells were actively proliferating, as shown by short term BrdU incorporation studies. Inducing seizures by using kainic acid increased the number of BM progenitor cells

  10. Determining Immune System Suppression versus CNS Protection for Pharmacological Interventions in Autoimmune Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Evonuk, Kirsten S; Moseley, Carson E; Doyle, Ryan E; Weaver, Casey T; DeSilva, Tara M

    2016-09-12

    A major hallmark of the autoimmune demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS) is immune cell infiltration into the brain and spinal cord resulting in myelin destruction, which not only slows conduction of nerve impulses, but causes axonal injury resulting in motor and cognitive decline. Current treatments for MS focus on attenuating immune cell infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS). These treatments decrease the number of relapses, improving quality of life, but do not completely eliminate relapses so long-term disability is not improved. Therefore, therapeutic agents that protect the CNS are warranted. In both animal models as well as human patients with MS, T cell entry into the CNS is generally considered the initiating inflammatory event. In order to assess if a drug protects the CNS, any potential effects on immune cell infiltration or proliferation in the periphery must be ruled out. This protocol describes how to determine whether CNS protection observed after drug intervention is a consequence of attenuating CNS-infiltrating immune cells or blocking death of CNS cells during inflammatory insults. The ability to examine MS treatments that are protective to the CNS during inflammatory insults is highly critical for the advancement of therapeutic strategies since current treatments reduce, but do not completely eliminate, relapses (i.e., immune cell infiltration), leaving the CNS vulnerable to degeneration.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) in the tumors of central nervous system (CNS).

    PubMed

    Lukaszewicz-Zając, Marta; Mroczko, Barbara; Kornhuber, Johannes; Lewczuk, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    Malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS) account for about 1.3 % of all tumors and 2.2 % of all cancer-related deaths. CNS tumors consist of heterogeneous group of neoplasms, including different variants of primary brain tumors and metastatic neoplasms. Advanced imaging techniques improved the neuroradiological diagnostic accuracy, although these methods are not specific enough for differentiation of CNS tumors, thus new approaches of patients' diagnosis are critically needed. The best solution for the diagnosis of patients with CNS tumors could be easily available biomarkers, which could be useful for the management of CNS neoplasms. Biomarkers should facilitate the diagnosis, monitor of treatment response and assess the prognosis of patients' survival. Currently, except for rare germ cell tumors, there is a lack of knowledge on biochemical markers for CNS neoplasms. Therefore, in this paper we summarized and referred a number of comprehensive reviews concerning the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors in tumor progression, including CNS neoplasms as well as described the general biochemistry of MMPs and their tissue inhibitors. Moreover, we presented the wide variety of previous findings, where authors suggested the significance of selected MMPs and their tissue inhibitors as potential biomarkers of human tumors, including CNS tumors. However, future investigations are needed to be performed before some of these enzymes could finally be used as biomarkers of specific types of CNS neoplasms.

  12. Determining Immune System Suppression versus CNS Protection for Pharmacological Interventions in Autoimmune Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Ryan E.; Weaver, Casey T.; DeSilva, Tara M.

    2016-01-01

    A major hallmark of the autoimmune demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS) is immune cell infiltration into the brain and spinal cord resulting in myelin destruction, which not only slows conduction of nerve impulses, but causes axonal injury resulting in motor and cognitive decline. Current treatments for MS focus on attenuating immune cell infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS). These treatments decrease the number of relapses, improving quality of life, but do not completely eliminate relapses so long-term disability is not improved. Therefore, therapeutic agents that protect the CNS are warranted. In both animal models as well as human patients with MS, T cell entry into the CNS is generally considered the initiating inflammatory event. In order to assess if a drug protects the CNS, any potential effects on immune cell infiltration or proliferation in the periphery must be ruled out. This protocol describes how to determine whether CNS protection observed after drug intervention is a consequence of attenuating CNS-infiltrating immune cells or blocking death of CNS cells during inflammatory insults. The ability to examine MS treatments that are protective to the CNS during inflammatory insults is highly critical for the advancement of therapeutic strategies since current treatments reduce, but do not completely eliminate, relapses (i.e., immune cell infiltration), leaving the CNS vulnerable to degeneration. PMID:27685467

  13. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  14. Body Size in Mammalian Paleobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damuth, John; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    1990-11-01

    This valuable collection of essays presents and evaluates techniques of body-mass estimation and reviews current and potential applications of body-size estimates in paleobiology. Papers discuss explicitly the errors and biases of various regression techniques and predictor variables, and the identification of functionally similar groups of species for improving the accuracy of estimates. At the same time other chapters review and discuss the physiological, ecological, and behavioral correlates of body size in extant mammals; the significance of body-mass distributions in mammalian faunas; and the ecology and evolution of body size in particular paleofaunas. Coverage is particularly detailed for carnivores, primates, and ungulates, but information is also presented on marsupials, rodents, and proboscideans.

  15. Mammalian skin evolution: a reevaluation.

    PubMed

    Maderson, P F A

    2003-06-01

    A 1972 model for the evolutionary origin of hair suggested a primary mechanoreceptor role improving behavioral thermoregulation contributed to the success of late Paleozoic mammal-like reptiles. An insulatory role appeared secondarily subsequent to protohair multiplication. That model is updated in light of new data on (a) palaeoecology of mammalian ancestors; (b) involvement of HRPs in keratinization; (c) lipogenic lamellar bodies that form the barrier to cutaneous water loss; and (d) growth factors involved in hair follicle embryogenesis and turnover. It is now proposed that multiplication of sensory protohairs caused by mutations in patterning genes initially protected the delicate barrier tissues and eventually produced the minimal morphology necessary for an insulatory pelage. The latter permitted Mesozoic mammals to occupy the nocturnal niche 'in the shadow of dinosaurs'. When the giant reptiles became extinct, mammals underwent rapid radiation and reemerged as the dominant terrestrial vertebrates.

  16. Mammalian glutaminase isozymes in brain.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Javier; Cardona, Carolina; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Peñalver, Ana; Tosina, Marta; Matés, José M; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes

    2013-06-01

    Glutamine/glutamate homeostasis must be exquisitely regulated in mammalian brain and glutaminase (GA, E.C. 3.5.1.2) is one of the main enzymes involved. The products of GA reaction, glutamate and ammonia, are essential metabolites for energy and biosynthetic purposes but they are also hazardous compounds at concentrations beyond their normal physiological thresholds. The classical pattern of GA expression in mammals has been recently challenged by the discovery of novel transcript variants and protein isoforms. Furthermore, the interactome of brain GA is also starting to be uncovered adding a new level of regulatory complexity. GA may traffic in brain and unexpected locations, like cytosol and nucleus, have been found for GA isoforms. Finally, the expression of GA in glial cells has been reported and its potential implications in ammonia homeostasis are discussed.

  17. Pharmacology of mammalian olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard S; Peterlin, Zita; Araneda, Ricardo C

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian species have evolved a large and diverse number of odorant receptors (ORs). These proteins comprise the largest family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known, amounting to ~1,000-different receptors in the rodent. From the perspective of olfactory coding, the availability of such a vast number of chemosensory receptors poses several fascinating questions; in addition, such a large repertoire provides an attractive biological model to study ligand-receptor interactions. The limited functional expression of these receptors in heterologous systems, however, has greatly hampered attempts to deorphanize them. We have employed a successful approach that combines electrophysiological and imaging techniques to analyze the response profiles of single sensory neurons. Our approach has enabled us to characterize the "odor space" of a population of native aldehyde receptors and the molecular range of a genetically engineered receptor, OR-I7.

  18. Interaction theory of mammalian mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Nakada, K; Inoue, K; Hayashi, J

    2001-11-09

    We generated mice with deletion mutant mtDNA by its introduction from somatic cells into mouse zygotes. Expressions of disease phenotypes are limited to tissues expressing mitochondrial dysfunction. Considering that all these mice share the same nuclear background, these observations suggest that accumulation of the mutant mtDNA and resultant expressions of mitochondrial dysfunction are responsible for expression of disease phenotypes. On the other hand, mitochondrial dysfunction and expression of clinical abnormalities were not observed until the mutant mtDNA accumulated predominantly. This protection is due to the presence of extensive and continuous interaction between exogenous mitochondria from cybrids and recipient mitochondria from embryos. Thus, we would like to propose a new hypothesis on mitochondrial biogenesis, interaction theory of mitochondria: mammalian mitochondria exchange genetic contents, and thus lost the individuality and function as a single dynamic cellular unit.

  19. Determinants of Mammalian Nucleolar Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Katherine I.; Surovtseva, Yulia; Merkel, Janie; Baserga, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is responsible for the production of ribosomes, essential machines which synthesize all proteins needed by the cell. The structure of human nucleoli is highly dynamic and is directly related to its functions in ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of this organelle, the intricate relationship between nucleolar structure and function remains largely unexplored. How do cells control nucleolar formation and function? What are the minimal requirements for making a functional nucleolus? Here we review what is currently known regarding mammalian nucleolar formation at nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), which can be studied by observing the dissolution and reformation of the nucleolus during each cell division. Additionally, the nucleolus can be examined by analyzing how alterations in nucleolar function manifest in differences in nucleolar architecture. Furthermore, changes in nucleolar structure and function are correlated with cancer, highlighting the importance of studying the determinants of nucleolar formation. PMID:25670395

  20. Genome regulation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Krystosek, A; Chan, D C

    1990-05-01

    A theory is presented proposing that genetic regulation in mammalian cells is at least a two-tiered effect; that one level of regulation involves the transition between gene exposure and sequestration; that normal differentiation requires a different spectrum of genes to be exposed in each separate state of differentiation; that the fiber systems of the cell cytoskeleton and the nuclear matrix together control the degree of gene exposure; that specific phosphorylation of these elements causes them to assume a different organizational network and to impose a different pattern of sequestration and exposure on the elements of the genome; that the varied gene phosphorylation mechanisms in the cell are integrated in this function; that attachment of this network system to specific parts of the chromosomes brings about sequestration or exposure of the genes in their neighborhood in a fashion similar to that observed when microtubule elements attach through the kinetochore to the centromeric DNA; that one function of repetitive sequences is to serve as elements for the final attachment of this fibrous network to the specific chromosomal loci; and that at least an important part of the calcium manifestation as a metabolic trigger of different differentiation states involves its acting as a binding agent to centers of electronegativity, in particular proteins and especially phosphorylated groups, so as to change the conformation of the fiber network that ultimately controls gene exposure in the mammalian cell. It would appear essential to determine what abnormal gene exposures and sequestrations are characteristic of each type of cancer; which agonists, if any, will bring about reverse transformation; and whether these considerations can be used in therapy.

  1. The mammalian Cretaceous cochlear revolution.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A

    2016-12-19

    The hearing organs of amniote vertebrates show large differences in their size and structure between the species' groups. In spite of this, their performance in terms of hearing sensitivity and the frequency selectivity of auditory-nerve units shows unexpectedly small differences. The only substantial difference is that therian, defined as live-bearing, mammalian groups are able to hear ultrasonic frequencies (above 15-20 kHz), whereas in contrast monotreme (egg laying) mammals and all non-mammalian amniotes cannot. This review compares the structure and physiology of the cochleae of the main groups and asks the question as to why the many structural differences seen in therian mammals arose, yet did not result in greater differences in physiology. The likely answers to this question are found in the history of the mammals during the Cretaceous period that ended 65 million years ago. During that period, the therian cochlea lost its lagenar macula, leading to a fall in endolymph calcium levels. This likely resulted in a small revolution and an auditory crisis that was compensated for by a subsequent series of structural and physiological adaptations. The end result was a system of equivalent performance to that independently evolved in other amniotes but with the additional - and of course "unforeseen" - advantage that ultrasonic-frequency responses became an available option. That option was not always availed of, but in most groups of therian mammals it did evolve and is used for communication and orientation based on improved sound localization, with micro-bats and toothed whales relying on it for prey capture.

  2. Safety and regulatory requirements and challenge for CNS drug development.

    PubMed

    Gad, Shayne C

    2014-01-01

    As our recognition and understanding of diseases and disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) become more insightful, and society's concerns for the safety, efficacy, and use of such drugs become more acute, the regulatory requirements and expectations around assessing potential safety of the drug have continued to become more complex. Currently, these concerns and requirements are addressed in a time phased manner, attempting to match the advance of spending rate on assessing safety issues in alignment with advancing the moiety through development of the therapeutics. This article seeks to communicate all the critical but frequently overlooked aspects of current and pending regulatory requirements including the lesser known parts associated with impurities, active metabolites, and distribution of active components to (and subsequent clearance from) the population brain. While there are some exciting developments in treating CNS diseases with stem cells and some protein based therapies (Aboody et al., 2011), drugs meant to favorably effect, prevent, or cure a disease process within the central nervous system (CNS) are primarily small molecule and must meet a number of regulatory and scientifically mandated criteria to establish that their safety in clinical use is acceptable. This is initially done in in vivo animals or in in vitro preparations. The starting place for such nonclinical safety assessment requires some fundamental assumptions about the potential therapeutic (Ball et al., 2007; Gad, 2009; ICH S6, 2004; ICH M3 (R2), 2008). The first assumption is that the primary intended route of therapeutic administration is oral, as is indeed the case for the vast majority of both current and for most potential new drugs. Most aspects of nonclinical safety assessment do not depend on route, and we will consider the situations where the use of other routes influences requirements for nonclinical safety assessment, and why. A second general case assumption in the

  3. Connexin36 identified at morphologically mixed chemical/electrical synapses on trigeminal motoneurons and at primary afferent terminals on spinal cord neurons in adult mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, W; McCrea, D A; Nagy, J I

    2014-03-28

    Morphologically mixed chemical/electrical synapses at axon terminals, with the electrical component formed by gap junctions, is common in the CNS of lower vertebrates. In mammalian CNS, evidence for morphologically mixed synapses has been obtained in only a few locations. Here, we used immunofluorescence approaches to examine the localization of the neuronally expressed gap junction forming protein connexin36 (Cx36) in relation to the axon terminal marker vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (vglut1) in the spinal cord and the trigeminal motor nucleus (Mo5) of rat and mouse. In adult rodents, immunolabeling for Cx36 appeared exclusively as Cx36-puncta, and was widely distributed at all rostro-caudal levels in most spinal cord laminae and in the Mo5. A high proportion of Cx36-puncta was co-localized with vglut1, forming morphologically mixed synapses on motoneurons, in intermediate spinal cord lamina, and in regions of medial lamina VII, where vglut1-containing terminals associated with Cx36 converged on neurons adjacent to the central canal. Unilateral transection of lumbar dorsal roots reduced immunolabeling of both vglut1 and Cx36 in intermediate laminae and lamina IX. Further, vglut1-terminals displaying Cx36-puncta were contacted by terminals labeled for glutamic acid decarboxylase65, which is known to be contained in presynaptic terminals on large-diameter primary afferents. Developmentally, mixed synapses begin to emerge in the spinal cord only after the second to third postnatal week and thereafter increase to adult levels. Our findings demonstrate that axon terminals of primary afferent origin form morphologically mixed synapses containing Cx36 in broadly distributed areas of adult rodent spinal cord and Mo5.

  4. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  5. Functional Zonation of the Adult Mammalian Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, Gavin P.

    2016-01-01

    The standard model of adrenocortical zonation holds that the three main zones, glomerulosa, fasciculata, and reticularis each have a distinct function, producing mineralocorticoids (in fact just aldosterone), glucocorticoids, and androgens respectively. Moreover, each zone has its specific mechanism of regulation, though ACTH has actions throughout. Finally, the cells of the cortex originate from a stem cell population in the outer cortex or capsule, and migrate centripetally, changing their phenotype as they progress through the zones. Recent progress in understanding the development of the gland and the distribution of steroidogenic enzymes, trophic hormone receptors, and other factors suggests that this model needs refinement. Firstly, proliferation can take place throughout the gland, and although the stem cells are certainly located in the periphery, zonal replenishment can take place within zones. Perhaps more importantly, neither the distribution of enzymes nor receptors suggest that the individual zones are necessarily autonomous in their production of steroid. This is particularly true of the glomerulosa, which does not seem to have the full suite of enzymes required for aldosterone biosynthesis. Nor, in the rat anyway, does it express MC2R to account for the response of aldosterone to ACTH. It is known that in development, recruitment of stem cells is stimulated by signals from within the glomerulosa. Furthermore, throughout the cortex local regulatory factors, including cytokines, catecholamines and the tissue renin-angiotensin system, modify and refine the effects of the systemic trophic factors. In these and other ways it more and more appears that the functions of the gland should be viewed as an integrated whole, greater than the sum of its component parts. PMID:27378832

  6. Enhanced Neurite Growth from Mammalian Neurons in Three-Dimensional Salmon Fibrin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yo-El; Janmey, Paul A.; McCormick, Margaret; Sawyer, Evelyn S.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional fibrin matrices have been used as cellular substrates in vitro and as bridging materials for central nervous system repair. Cells can be embedded within fibrin gels since the polymerization process is non-toxic, making fibrin an attractive scaffold for transplanted cells. Most studies have utilized fibrin prepared from human or bovine blood proteins. However, fish fibrin may be well suited for neuronal growth since fish undergo remarkable central nervous system regeneration and molecules implicated in this process are present in fibrin. We assessed the growth of mammalian central nervous system neurons in bovine, human, and salmon fibrin and found that salmon fibrin gels encouraged the greatest degree of neurite (dendrite and axon) growth and were the most resistant to degradation by cellular proteases. The neurite growth-promoting effect was not due to the thrombin used to polymerize the gels or to any copurifying plasminogen. Co-purified fibronectin partially accounted for the effect on neurites, and blockade of fibrinogen/fibrin-binding integrins markedly decreased neurite growth. Anion exchange chromatography revealed different elution profiles for salmon and mammalian fibrinogens. These data demonstrate that salmon fibrin encourages the growth of neurites from mammalian neurons and suggest that salmon fibrin may be a beneficial scaffold for neuronal regrowth after CNS injury. PMID:17258313

  7. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  8. Recent advances in mammalian protein production

    PubMed Central

    Bandaranayake, Ashok D.; Almo, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian protein production platforms have had a profound impact in many areas of basic and applied research, and an increasing number of blockbuster drugs are recombinant mammalian proteins. With global sales of these drugs exceeding US$120 billion per year, both industry and academic research groups continue to develop cost effective methods for producing mammalian proteins to support preclinical and clinical evaluations of potential therapeutics. While a wide range of platforms have been successfully exploited for laboratory use, the bulk of recent biologics have been produced in mammalian cell lines due to the requirement for post translational modification and the biosynthetic complexity of the target proteins. In this review we highlight the range of mammalian expression platforms available for recombinant protein production, as well as advances in technologies for the rapid and efficient selection of highly productive clones. PMID:24316512

  9. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  10. Occupational risks for meningiomas of the CNS in Sweden.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J K; Thomas, T L; Stone, B J; Blot, W J; Malker, H S; Wiener, J A; Ericsson, J L; Malker, B K

    1987-01-01

    Using the Cancer-Environment Registry of Sweden, which links cancer incidence (1961 to 1979) with census information (1960) for all employed individuals in Sweden, a systematic, population-based assessment was made of the occurrence of meningiomas of the CNS according to industrial and occupational classifications. Statistically significant standardized incidence ratios (SIR) between 5 and 6 for meningioma were observed among glass, porcelain, or ceramic workers of both sexes. SIRs of similar magnitude were also found for men employed in the headwear fabrication and book publishing industries. Significantly elevated two- to three-fold risks were observed for men employed in health care, railroad and trolley construction, sheet and plate metal fabrication, and as moving equipment operators. Some of the findings of this descriptive survey may have arisen as a result of multiple comparisons, but several are consistent with earlier observations for brain cancer from other countries and deserve further study.

  11. Autoimmune control of lesion growth in CNS with minimal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathankumar, R.; Mohan, T. R. Krishna

    2013-07-01

    Lesions in central nervous system (CNS) and their growth leads to debilitating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's etc. We developed a model earlier [1, 2] which shows how the lesion growth can be arrested through a beneficial auto-immune mechanism. We compared some of the dynamical patterns in the model with different facets of MS. The success of the approach depends on a set of control parameters and their phase space was shown to have a smooth manifold separating the uncontrolled lesion growth region from the controlled. Here we show that an optimal set of parameter values exist in the model which minimizes system damage while, at once, achieving control of lesion growth.

  12. The Coordinated Noninvasive Studies (CNS) Project. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Mitg qEUO EEG sat*dJ6 EEG syfls al EEG lores adj EEO Was sdj ABR III ampCs ABR I empCs ABRIII a mp ABR III amp JLM (38yr female; personal R, family R...nslt qu.O US& qmO ERG iId 11 110 s eb dj AflRflhauapCs ADR m ampCs ABIIIamp AIR R m= J.L. Lauter [CNS Project/AFOSR 88-0352] FINAL REPORT p. 55 HR (22yr...qUO n/ftes qtdO BEG0329 odi EEG s)13 SOi 11G 0i adpS EE 11ws ad ABR III ampCS ABR III emp~s AIR III amp AIR IIIm S3 (45yr female; personal L, family L

  13. Gene therapy for CNS diseases – Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV) alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases. PMID:27525222

  14. Structural remodeling of astrocytes in the injured CNS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2012-12-01

    Astrocytes respond to all forms of CNS insult and disease by becoming reactive, a nonspecific but highly characteristic response that involves various morphological and molecular changes. Probably the most recognized aspect of reactive astrocytes is the formation of a glial scar that impedes axon regeneration. Although the reactive phenotype was first suggested more than 100 years ago based on morphological changes, the remodeling process is not well understood. We know little about the actual structure of a reactive astrocyte, how an astrocyte remodels during the progression of an insult, and how populations of these cells reorganize to form the glial scar. New methods of labeling astrocytes, along with transgenic mice, allow the complete morphology of reactive astrocytes to be visualized. Recent studies show that reactivity can induce a remarkable change in the shape of a single astrocyte, that not all astrocytes react in the same way, and that there is plasticity in the reactive response.

  15. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induce a neuroprotective state when administered acutely or prior to experimental injury to the CNS. In this review, we discuss the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol in stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, with a focus on the molecular pathways responsible for this protection. PMID:26277384

  16. Experience-dependent structural synaptic plasticity in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Holtmaat, Anthony; Svoboda, Karel

    2009-09-01

    Synaptic plasticity in adult neural circuits may involve the strengthening or weakening of existing synapses as well as structural plasticity, including synapse formation and elimination. Indeed, long-term in vivo imaging studies are beginning to reveal the structural dynamics of neocortical neurons in the normal and injured adult brain. Although the overall cell-specific morphology of axons and dendrites, as well as of a subpopulation of small synaptic structures, are remarkably stable, there is increasing evidence that experience-dependent plasticity of specific circuits in the somatosensory and visual cortex involves cell type-specific structural plasticity: some boutons and dendritic spines appear and disappear, accompanied by synapse formation and elimination, respectively. This Review focuses on recent evidence for such structural forms of synaptic plasticity in the mammalian cortex and outlines open questions.

  17. The Gut-Brain Axis, BDNF, NMDA and CNS Disorders.

    PubMed

    Maqsood, Raeesah; Stone, Trevor W

    2016-11-01

    Gastro-intestinal (GI) microbiota and the 'gut-brain axis' are proving to be increasingly relevant to early brain development and the emergence of psychiatric disorders. This review focuses on the influence of the GI tract on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its relationship with receptors for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR), as these are believed to be involved in synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. NMDAR may be associated with the development of schizophrenia and a range of other psychopathologies including neurodegenerative disorders, depression and dementias. An analysis of the routes and mechanisms by which the GI microbiota contribute to the pathophysiology of BDNF-induced NMDAR dysfunction could yield new insights relevant to developing novel therapeutics for schizophrenia and related disorders. In the absence of GI microbes, central BDNF levels are reduced and this inhibits the maintenance of NMDAR production. A reduction of NMDAR input onto GABA inhibitory interneurons causes disinhibition of glutamatergic output which disrupts the central signal-to-noise ratio and leads to aberrant synaptic behaviour and cognitive deficits. Gut microbiota can modulate BDNF function in the CNS, via changes in neurotransmitter function by affecting modulatory mechanisms such as the kynurenine pathway, or by changes in the availability and actions of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the brain. Interrupting these cycles by inducing changes in the gut microbiota using probiotics, prebiotics or antimicrobial drugs has been found promising as a preventative or therapeutic measure to counteract behavioural deficits and these may be useful to supplement the actions of drugs in the treatment of CNS disorders.

  18. Novel approaches and challenges to treatment of CNS viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Avindra; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Existing and emerging viral CNS infections are major sources of human morbidity and mortality. Treatments of proven efficacy are currently limited predominantly to herpesviruses and human immunodeficiency virus. Development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal model systems for some important viruses and by the difficulty in conducting human clinical trials for diseases that may be rare, or in the case of arboviral infections, often have variable seasonal and geographic incidence. Nonetheless, many novel approaches to antiviral therapy are available including candidate thiazolide and purazinecarboxamide derivatives with potential broad-spectrum antiviral efficacy. New herpesvirus drugs include viral helicase-primase and terminase inhibitors. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and other strategies to interfere with viral RNA translation has shown efficacy in experimental models of CNS viral disease. Identifying specific molecular targets within viral replication cycles has led to many existing antivirals and will undoubtedly continue to be the basis of future drug design. A promising new area of research involves therapies based on enhanced understanding of host antiviral immune responses. Toll-like receptor agonists, and drugs that inhibit specific cytokines as well as interferon preparations have all shown potential therapeutic efficacy. Passive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes have been used in humans and may provide an effective therapies for some herpesvirus infections and potentially for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Humanized monoclonal antibodies directed against specific viral proteins have been developed and in several cases evaluated in humans in settings including West Nile virus and HIV infection and in pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies. PMID:23913580

  19. CD19 as a molecular target in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Stüve, Olaf; Warnke, Clemens; Deason, Krystin; Stangel, Martin; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; von Büdingen, Hans-Christian; Centonze, Diego; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Kappertz, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are the most prevalent neuroinflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). The immunological cascade of these disorders is complex, and the exact spatial and temporal role of different immune cells is not fully understood. Although MS has been considered for many years to be primarily T cell driven, it is well established that B cells and the humoral immune response play an important role in its pathogenesis. This has long been evident from laboratory findings that include the presence of oligoclonal bands in the CSF. In NMO the importance of the humoral immune system appears even more obvious as evidenced by pathogenic antibodies against aquaporin 4 (AQP4). Besides their capacity to mature into antibody-producing plasma cells, B cells are potent antigen presenting cells to T lymphocytes and they can provide soluble factors for cell activation and differentiation to other immune-competent cells. In MS and NMO, there are substantial data from clinical trials that B cell depletion with CD20-directed agents is effective and relatively safe. Plasma cells, which produce antibodies against molecular targets expressed by the host, but which also provide humeral immune responses against pathogens, are not targeted by anti-CD20 therapies. Therefore the depletion of CD19-expressing cells would offer potential advantages with regard to efficacy, but potentially higher risks with regard to infectious complications. This review will outline the rationale for CD19 as a molecular target in CNS autoimmunity. The current stage of drug development is illustrated. Potential safety concerns will be discussed. PMID:24993505

  20. Subsequent neoplasms of the CNS among survivors of childhood cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Daniel C; Nathan, Paul C; Constine, Louis; Woodman, Catherine; Bhatia, Smita; Keller, Karen; Bashore, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at risk for development of subsequent neoplasms of the CNS. Better understanding of the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of subsequent neoplasms of the CNS among survivors of childhood cancer could lead to more informed screening guidelines. Two investigators independently did a systematic search of Medline and Embase (from January, 1966, through March, 2012) for studies examining subsequent neoplasms of the CNS among survivors of childhood cancer. Articles were selected to answer three questions: what is the risk of CNS tumours after radiation to the cranium for a paediatric cancer, compared with the risk in the general population; what are the outcomes in children with subsequent neoplasms of the CNS who received CNS-directed radiation for a paediatric cancer; and, are outcomes of subsequent neoplasms different from primary neoplasms of the same histology? Our search identified 72 reports, of which 18 were included in this Review. These studies reported that childhood cancer survivors have an 8·1-52·3-times higher incidence of subsequent CNS neoplasms compared with the general population. Nearly all cancer survivors who developed a CNS neoplasm had been exposed to cranial radiation, and some studies showed a correlation between radiation dose and risk of subsequent CNS tumours. 5-year survival ranged from 0-19·5% for subsequent high-grade gliomas and 57·3-100% for meningiomas, which are similar rates to those observed in patients with primary gliomas or meningiomas. The quality of evidence was limited by variation in study design, heterogeneity of details regarding treatment and outcomes, limited follow-up, and small sample sizes. We conclude that survivors of childhood cancer who received cranial radiation therapy have an increased risk for subsequent CNS neoplasms. The current literature is insufficient to comment about the potential harms and benefits of routine screening for subsequent CNS neoplasms.

  1. Drug Delivery to CNS: Challenges and Opportunities with Emphasis on Biomaterials Based Drug Delivery Strategies.

    PubMed

    Khambhla, Ekta; Shah, Viral; Baviskar, Kalpesh

    2016-01-01

    The current epoch has witnessed a lifestyle impregnated with stress, which is a major cause of several neurological disorders. High morbidity and mortality rate due to neurological diseases and disorders have generated a huge social impact. Despite voluminous research, patients suffering from fatal and/or debilitating CNS diseases such as brain tumors, HIV, encephalopathy, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, Parkinson's, migraine and multiple sclerosis outnumbered those suffering from systemic cancer or heart diseases. The brain being a highly sensitive neuronal organ, has evolved with vasculature barriers, which regulates the efflux and influx of substances to CNS. Treatment of CNS diseases/disorders is challenging because of physiologic, metabolic and biochemical obstacles created by these barriers which comprise mainly of BBB and BCFB. The inability of achieving therapeutically active concentration has become the bottleneck level difficulty, hampering the therapeutic efficiency of several promising drug candidates for CNS related disorders. Parallel maturation of an effective CNS drug delivery strategy with CNS drug discovery is the need of the hour. Recently, the focus of the pharmaceutical community has aggravated in the direction of developing novel and more efficient drug delivery systems, giving the potential of more effective and safer CNS therapies. The present review outlines several hurdles in drug delivery to the CNS along with ideal physicochemical properties desired in drug substance/formulation for CNS delivery. The review also focuses on different conventional and novel strategies for drug delivery to the CNS. The article also assesses and emphasizes on possible benefits of biomaterial based formulations for drug delivery to the CNS.

  2. Ontogenetic development of the mammalian circadian system.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ontogenetic development of the circadian system in mammals. The developmental changes of overt rhythms are discussed, although the main focus of the review is the underlying neuronal and molecular mechanisms. In addition, the review describes ontogenetic development, not only as a process of morpho-functional maturation. The need of repeated adaptations and readaptations due to changing developmental stage and environmental conditions is also considered. The review analyzes mainly rodent data, obtained from the literature and from the author's own studies. Results from other species, including humans, are presented to demonstrate common features and species-dependent differences. The review first describes the development of the suprachiasmatic nuclei as the central pacemaker system and shows that intrinsic circadian rhythms are already generated in the mammalian fetus. As in adult organisms, the period length is different from 24 h and needs continuous correction by environmental periodicities, or zeitgebers. The investigation of the ontogenetic development of the mechanisms of entrainment reveals that, at prenatal and early postnatal stages, non-photic cues deriving from the mother are effective. Light-dark entrainment develops later. At a certain age, both photic and non-photic zeitgebers may act in parallel, even though the respective time information is 12 h out of phase. That leads to a temporary internal desynchronization. Because rhythmic information needs to be transferred to effector organs, the corresponding neural and humoral signalling pathways are also briefly described. Finally, to be able to transform a rhythmic signal into an overt rhythm, the corresponding effector organs must be functionally mature. As many of these organs are able to generate their own intrinsic rhythms, another aspect of the review is dedicated to the development of peripheral oscillators and mechanisms of their entrainment

  3. New tools for studying microglia in the mouse and human CNS

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, F. Chris; Liddelow, Shane A.; Ajami, Bahareh; Zamanian, Jennifer L.; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B.; Mulinyawe, Sara B.; Bohlen, Christopher J.; Adil, Aykezar; Tucker, Andrew; Weissman, Irving L.; Chang, Edward F.; Li, Gordon; Grant, Gerald A.; Hayden Gephart, Melanie G.; Barres, Ben A.

    2016-01-01

    The specific function of microglia, the tissue resident macrophages of the brain and spinal cord, has been difficult to ascertain because of a lack of tools to distinguish microglia from other immune cells, thereby limiting specific immunostaining, purification, and manipulation. Because of their unique developmental origins and predicted functions, the distinction of microglia from other myeloid cells is critically important for understanding brain development and disease; better tools would greatly facilitate studies of microglia function in the developing, adult, and injured CNS. Here, we identify transmembrane protein 119 (Tmem119), a cell-surface protein of unknown function, as a highly expressed microglia-specific marker in both mouse and human. We developed monoclonal antibodies to its intracellular and extracellular domains that enable the immunostaining of microglia in histological sections in healthy and diseased brains, as well as isolation of pure nonactivated microglia by FACS. Using our antibodies, we provide, to our knowledge, the first RNAseq profiles of highly pure mouse microglia during development and after an immune challenge. We used these to demonstrate that mouse microglia mature by the second postnatal week and to predict novel microglial functions. Together, we anticipate these resources will be valuable for the future study and understanding of microglia in health and disease. PMID:26884166

  4. Order in the classroom: graded responses to instructive Hh signaling in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Matise, Michael P

    2007-05-15

    In many animals, the secreted Hedgehog (Hh) signaling proteins play important roles during development and in adults. Studies in both flies and vertebrates indicate that Hh functions as a morphogen to elicit different responses at distinct concentration thresholds. In vertebrates, Gli proteins are the primary transcriptional mediators of Hh target genes. However, the mechanisms that implement specific genetic responses to graded Hh-Gli signaling are only just beginning to be understood. In particular, it is unclear whether target gene responses are determined solely by the ambient levels of pathway activity, or if other pathways or factors function to amplify or attenuate the response to this signal to provide an additional level of context that permits a more fine-tuned outcome. Here, I will review recent evidence suggesting that the response of some Hh-Gli target genes in the CNS is regulated by the activity of another important extracellular signal, the canonical Wnt pathway. The possibility that the Hh and Wnt pathways interact at the transcriptional level has broad significance for understanding normal embryogenesis and diagnosing and treating the numerous developmental disorders and cancers that involve these two pathways. Thus, while Hh-Gli signals provide important information, it is likely that they receive assistance from other "instructors".

  5. Minimal gender differences on the CNS vital signs computerized neurocognitive battery.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L; Brooks, Brian L; Ashton Rennison, V Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Normative test scores often are corrected for demographic variables that can have an impact on neurocognitive abilities (e.g., gender, age, education, and ethnicity). The purpose of this study is to determine whether there are gender differences on the CNS Vital Signs computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants, selected from a large normative database, were 100 healthy adults aged 18 to 68 years old (M(age) = 35.8 years, SD = 13.6) with 15.5 years of education (SD = 2.2). Men (n = 50) and women (n = 50) were individually and precisely matched on age, education, ethnicity, computer use, occupation, and handedness. This battery of seven tests yields 23 test scores, 5 domain scores (Memory, Psychomotor Speed, Reaction Time, Complex Attention, and Cognitive Flexibility), and a total score. Men had significantly better scores than did women on the Finger-Tapping Test for the right hand (p = .006, Cohen's d = 0.57). No other scores were significantly different, although there were small-medium effect sizes in favor of women on Symbol-Digit Coding (d = .39) and Verbal Memory (d = .37). The trends toward gender differences in word-list recognition memory and processing speed are consistent with the literature, but because they were nonsignificant and the effect sizes were modest, the clinician likely does not need to factor this into test interpretation.

  6. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James T; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell-mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4-producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4-deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4-deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell-derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration.

  7. Safety Evaluation of CNS Administered Biologics-Study Design, Data Interpretation, and Translation to the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Vuillemenot, Brian R; Korte, Sven; Wright, Teresa L; Adams, Eric L; Boyd, Robert B; Butt, Mark T

    2016-07-01

    Many central nervous system (CNS) diseases are inadequately treated by systemically administered therapies due to the blood brain barrier (BBB), which prevents achieving adequate drug concentrations at sites of action. Due to the increasing prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases and the inability of most systemically administered therapies to cross the BBB, direct CNS delivery will likely play an increasing role in treatment. Administration of large molecules, cells, viral vectors, oligonucleotides, and other novel therapies directly to the CNS via the subarachnoid space, ventricular system, or parenchyma overcomes this obstacle. Clinical experience with direct CNS administration of small molecule therapies suggests that this approach may be efficacious for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders using biological therapies. Risks of administration into the brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid include local damage from implantation of the delivery system and/or administration of the therapeutic and reactions affecting the CNS. Preclinical safety studies on CNS administered compounds must differentiate between the effects of the test article, the delivery device, and/or the vehicle, and assess exacerbations of reactions due to combinations of effects. Animal models characterized for safety assessment of CNS administered therapeutics have enabled human trials, but interpretation can be challenging. This manuscript outlines the challenges of preclinical intrathecal/intracerebroventricular/intraparenchymal studies, evaluation of results, considerations for special endpoints, and translation of preclinical findings to enable first-in-human trials. Recommendations will be made based on the authors' collective experience with conducting these studies to enable clinical development of CNS-administered biologics.

  8. Relapsing-remitting CNS autoimmunity mediated by GFAP-specific CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Bean, Angela; Shah, Shivanee; Schutten, Elizabeth; Huseby, Priya G.; Peters, Bjorn; Shen, Zu T.; Vanguri, Vijay; Liggitt, Denny; Huseby, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the CNS that causes the demyelination of nerve cells and destroys oligodendrocytes, neurons and axons. Historically, MS has been thought to be a CD4 T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of CNS white matter. However, recent studies have identified CD8 T cell infiltrates and gray matter lesions in MS patients. These findings suggest that CD8 T cells, and CNS antigens other than myelin proteins may be involved during the MS disease process. Here we show that CD8 T cells reactive to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a protein expressed in astrocytes, can avoid tolerance mechanisms, and depending upon the T cell triggering event, drive unique aspects of inflammatory CNS autoimmunity. In GFAP-specific CD8 T cell receptor transgenic (BG1) mice, tissue resident memory-like CD8 T cells spontaneously infiltrate the gray matter and white matter of the CNS, resulting in a relapsing-remitting CNS autoimmunity. The frequency, severity and remissions from spontaneous disease are controlled by the presence of polyclonal B cells. In contrast, a viral trigger induces GFAP-specific CD8 T effector cells to exclusively target the meninges and vascular/perivascular space of the gray and white matter of the brain, causing a rapid, acute CNS disease. These findings demonstrate that the type of CD8 T cell-triggering event can determine the presentation of distinct CNS autoimmune disease pathologies. PMID:24591371

  9. Technology of mammalian cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Uludag, H; De Vos, P; Tresco, P A

    2000-08-20

    Entrapment of mammalian cells in physical membranes has been practiced since the early 1950s when it was originally introduced as a basic research tool. The method has since been developed based on the promise of its therapeutic usefulness in tissue transplantation. Encapsulation physically isolates a cell mass from an outside environment and aims to maintain normal cellular physiology within a desired permeability barrier. Numerous encapsulation techniques have been developed over the years. These techniques are generally classified as microencapsulation (involving small spherical vehicles and conformally coated tissues) and macroencapsulation (involving larger flat-sheet and hollow-fiber membranes). This review is intended to summarize techniques of cell encapsulation as well as methods for evaluating the performance of encapsulated cells. The techniques reviewed include microencapsulation with polyelectrolyte complexation emphasizing alginate-polylysine capsules, thermoreversible gelation with agarose as a prototype system, interfacial precipitation and interfacial polymerization, as well as the technology of flat sheet and hollow fiber-based macroencapsulation. Four aspects of encapsulated cells that are critical for the success of the technology, namely the capsule permeability, mechanical properties, immune protection and biocompatibility, have been singled out and methods to evaluate these properties were summarized. Finally, speculations regarding future directions of cell encapsulation research and device development are included from the authors' perspective.

  10. Chemosignals, hormones and mammalian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Petrulis, Aras

    2013-05-01

    Many mammalian species use chemosignals to coordinate reproduction by altering the physiology and behavior of both sexes. Chemosignals prime reproductive physiology so that individuals become sexually mature and active at times when mating is most probable and suppress it when it is not. Once in reproductive condition, odors produced and deposited by both males and females are used to find and select individuals for mating. The production, dissemination and appropriate responses to these cues are modulated heavily by organizational and activational effects of gonadal sex steroids and thereby intrinsically link chemical communication to the broader reproductive context. Many compounds have been identified as "pheromones" but very few have met the expectations of that term: a unitary, species-typical substance that is both necessary and sufficient for an experience-independent behavioral or physiological response. In contrast, most responses to chemosignals are dependent or heavily modulated by experience, either in adulthood or during development. Mechanistically, chemosignals are perceived by both main and accessory (vomeronasal) olfactory systems with the importance of each system tied strongly to the nature of the stimulus rather than to the response. In the central nervous system, the vast majority of responses to chemosignals are mediated by cortical and medial amygdala connections with hypothalamic and other forebrain structures. Despite the importance of chemosignals in mammals, many details of chemical communication differ even among closely related species and defy clear categorization. Although generating much research and public interest, strong evidence for the existence of a robust chemical communication among humans is lacking.

  11. Autophagosome formation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Burman, Chloe; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2010-12-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental intracellular trafficking pathway conserved from yeast to mammals. It is generally thought to play a pro-survival role, and it can be up regulated in response to both external and intracellular factors, including amino acid starvation, growth factor withdrawal, low cellular energy levels, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, hypoxia, oxidative stress, pathogen infection, and organelle damage. During autophagy initiation a portion of the cytosol is surrounded by a flat membrane sheet known as the isolation membrane or phagophore. The isolation membrane then elongates and seals itself to form an autophagosome. The autophagosome fuses with normal endocytic traffic to mature into a late autophagosome, before fusing with lysosomes. The molecular machinery that enables formation of an autophagosome in response to the various autophagy stimuli is almost completely identified in yeast and-thanks to the observed conservation-is also being rapidly elucidated in higher eukaryotes including mammals. What are less clear and currently under intense investigation are the mechanism by which these various autophagy components co-ordinate in order to generate autophagosomes. In this review, we will discuss briefly the fundamental importance of autophagy in various pathophysiological states and we will then review in detail the various players in early autophagy. Our main thesis will be that a conserved group of heteromeric protein complexes and a relatively simple signalling lipid are responsible for the formation of autophagosomes in mammalian cells.

  12. Structure of the mammalian kinetochore.

    PubMed

    Ris, H; Witt, P L

    1981-01-01

    The structure of the mammalian trilaminar kinetochore was investigated using stereo electron microscopy of chromosomes in hypotonic solutions which unraveled the chromosome but maintained microtubules. Mouse and Chinese hamster ovary cells were arrested in Colcemid and allowed to reform microtubules after Colcemid was removed. Recovered cells were then swelled, lysed or spread in hypotonic solutions which contained D2O to preserve microtubules. The chromosomes were observed in thin and thick sections and as whole mounts using high voltage electron microscopy. Bundles of microtubules were seen directly attached to chromatin, indicating that the kinetochore outer layer represents a differential arrangement of chromatin, continuous with the body of the chromosome. In cells fixed wihout pretreatment, the outer layer could be seen to be composed of hairpin loops of chromatin stacked together to form a solid layer. The hypotonically-induced unraveling of the outer layer was found to be reversible, and the typical 300 nm thick disk reformed when cells were returned to isotonic solutions. Short microtubules, newly nucleated after Colcemid removal, were found not to be attached to the kinetochore out layer, but were situated in the fibrous corona on the external surface of the outer layer. This was verified by observation of thick sections in stereo which made it possible to identify microtubules ends within the section. Thus, kinetochore microtubules are nucleated within the fibrous corona, and subsequently become attached to the outer layer.

  13. Mammalian cell cultivation in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmünder, Felix K.; Suter, Robert N.; Kiess, M.; Urfer, R.; Nordau, C.-G.; Cogoli, A.

    Equipment used in space for the cultivation of mammalian cells does not meet the usual standard of earth bound bioreactors. Thus, the development of a space worthy bioreactor is mandatory for two reasons: First, to investigate the effect on single cells of the space environment in general and microgravity conditions in particular, and second, to provide researchers on long term missions and the Space Station with cell material. However, expertise for this venture is not at hand. A small and simple device for animal cell culture experiments aboard Spacelab (Dynamic Cell Culture System; DCCS) was developed. It provides 2 cell culture chambers, one is operated as a batch system, the other one as a perfusion system. The cell chambers have a volume of 200 μl. Medium exchange is achieved with an automatic osmotic pump. The system is neither mechanically stirred nor equipped with sensors. Oxygen for cell growth is provided by a gas chamber that is adjacent to the cell chambers. The oxygen gradient produced by the growing cells serves to maintain the oxygen influx by diffusion. Hamster kidney cells growing on microcarriers were used to test the biological performance of the DCCS. On ground tests suggest that this system is feasible.

  14. From blood-brain barrier to blood-brain interface: new opportunities for CNS drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2016-04-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the development of therapeutics for central nervous system (CNS) disorders is achieving sufficient blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. Research in the past few decades has revealed that the BBB is not only a substantial barrier for drug delivery to the CNS but also a complex, dynamic interface that adapts to the needs of the CNS, responds to physiological changes, and is affected by and can even promote disease. This complexity confounds simple strategies for drug delivery to the CNS, but provides a wealth of opportunities and approaches for drug development. Here, I review some of the most important areas that have recently redefined the BBB and discuss how they can be applied to the development of CNS therapeutics.

  15. CNS Target Identification and Validation: Avoiding the Valley of Death or Naive Optimism?

    PubMed

    Hutson, P H; Clark, J A; Cross, A J

    2017-01-06

    There are many challenges along the path to the approval of new drugs to treat CNS disorders, one of the greatest areas of unmet medical need with a large societal burden and health-care impact. Unfortunately, over the past two decades, few CNS drug approvals have succeeded, leading many pharmaceutical companies to deprioritize this therapeutic area. The reasons for the failures in CNS drug discovery are likely to be multifactorial. However, selecting the most biologically plausible molecular targets that are relevant to the disorder is a critical first step to improve the probability of success. In this review, we outline previous methods for identifying and validating novel targets for CNS drug discovery, and, cognizant of previous failures, we discuss potential new strategies that may improve the probability of success of developing novel treatments for CNS disorders.

  16. Current approaches to enhance CNS delivery of drugs across the brain barriers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Wong, Ho Lun; Cai, Jun; Peng, Lei; Tian, Xin-Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Although many agents have therapeutic potentials for central nervous system (CNS) diseases, few of these agents have been clinically used because of the brain barriers. As the protective barrier of the CNS, the blood–brain barrier and the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier maintain the brain microenvironment, neuronal activity, and proper functioning of the CNS. Different strategies for efficient CNS delivery have been studied. This article reviews the current approaches to open or facilitate penetration across these barriers for enhanced drug delivery to the CNS. These approaches are summarized into three broad categories: noninvasive, invasive, and miscellaneous techniques. The progresses made using these approaches are reviewed, and the associated mechanisms and problems are discussed. PMID:24872687

  17. Neuron-specific SALM5 limits inflammation in the CNS via its interaction with HVEM.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuwen; Yao, Sheng; Augustine, Mathew M; Xu, Haiying; Wang, Jun; Sun, Jingwei; Broadwater, Megan; Ruff, William; Luo, Liqun; Zhu, Gefeng; Tamada, Koji; Chen, Lieping

    2016-04-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immune-privileged organ with the capacity to prevent excessive inflammation. Aside from the blood-brain barrier, active immunosuppressive mechanisms remain largely unknown. We report that a neuron-specific molecule, synaptic adhesion-like molecule 5 (SALM5), is a crucial contributor to CNS immune privilege. We found that SALM5 suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in the CNS and that a SALM-specific monoclonal antibody promoted inflammation in the CNS, and thereby aggravated clinical symptoms of mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, we identified herpes virus entry mediator as a functional receptor that mediates SALM5's suppressive function. Our findings reveal a molecular link between the neuronal system and the immune system, and provide potential therapeutic targets for the control of CNS diseases.

  18. Viral nanoparticles associate with regions of inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption during CNS infection

    PubMed Central

    Shriver, Leah P.; Koudelka, Kristopher J.; Manchester, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Targeted treatment of inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) remains problematic due to the complex pathogenesis of these disorders and difficulty in drug delivery. The plant virus, cow pea mosaic virus (CPMV), has recently been explored as a nanoparticle delivery system for therapeutics targeting a number of diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. To understand the biodistribution of CPMV in the CNS, we examined CPMV uptake during infection of mice with neurotropic mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). CPMV localized mainly to the CNS endothelium in areas that contained an intact blood brain barrier. However, in inflammatory lesions containing macrophage/microglial cell infiltration and IgG, CPMV could be detected in the brain parenchyma. Furthermore, CPMV showed rapid internalization in an in vitro model of the BBB. These results suggest that CPMV particles could be used to a vehicle to deliver therapeutics to the damaged CNS during neurodegenerative and infectious diseases of the CNS. PMID:19394707

  19. High resolution thermal denaturation of mammalian DNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Guttmann, T; Vítek, A; Pivec, L

    1977-01-01

    High resolution melting profiles of different mammalian DNAs are presented. Melting curves of various mammalian DNAs were compared with respect to the degree of asymmetry, first moment, transition breath and Tmi of individual subtransitions. Quantitative comparison of the shape of all melting curves was made. Correlation between phylogenetical relations among mammals and shape of the melting profiles of their DNAs was demonstrated. The difference between multi-component heterogeneity of mammalian DNAs found by optical melting analysis and sedimentation in CsCl-netropsin density gradient is also discussed. PMID:840642

  20. Ghrelin Receptors in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered 3 years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates. PMID:23882259

  1. Infiltration of central nervous system in adult acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Pippard, M J; Callender, S T; Sheldon, P W

    1979-01-01

    Out of 64 consecutive unselected patients with acute myeloid leukaemia studied during 1973-6, five developed clinical evidence of spread to the central nervous system (CNS). Neuroradiological examination showed cerebral deposits in three, in whom rapid symptomatic relief was obtained with radiotherapy. In two of these patients who developed solid intracranial deposits haematological remission could be reinduced or maintained; they were still alive 86 and 134 weeks later. When patients presented with spread to the CNS complicating generalised uncontrolled leukaemia they had short survivals. CNS infiltration may respond dramatically to appropriate treatment provided that it is not associated with generalised uncontrolled leukaemia, which has a poor prognosis. In view of this, routine "prophylaxis" of the CNS in adult acute myeloid leukaemia does not seem justified at present. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 PMID:283873

  2. Enzymology of Mammalian DNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Jurkowska, Renata Z; Jeltsch, Albert

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is currently one of the hottest topics in basic and biomedical research. Despite tremendous progress in understanding the structures and biochemical properties of the mammalian DNA nucleotide methyltransferases (DNMTs), principles of their regulation in cells have only begun to be uncovered. In mammals, DNA methylation is introduced by the DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B enzymes, which are all large multi-domain proteins. These enzymes contain a catalytic C-terminal domain with a characteristic cytosine-C5 methyltransferase fold and an N-terminal part with different domains that interacts with other proteins and chromatin and is involved in targeting and regulation of the DNMTs. The subnuclear localization of the DNMT enzymes plays an important role in their biological function: DNMT1 is localized to replicating DNA via interaction with PCNA and UHRF1. DNMT3 enzymes bind to heterochromatin via protein multimerization and are targeted to chromatin by their ADD and PWWP domains. Recently, a novel regulatory mechanism has been discovered in DNMTs, as latest structural and functional data demonstrated that the catalytic activities of all three enzymes are under tight allosteric control of their N-terminal domains having autoinhibitory functions. This mechanism provides numerous possibilities for the precise regulation of the methyltransferases via controlling the binding and release of autoinhibitory domains by protein factors, noncoding RNAs, or by posttranslational modifications of the DNMTs. In this chapter, we summarize key enzymatic properties of DNMTs, including their specificity and processivity, and afterward we focus on the regulation of their activity and targeting via allosteric processes, protein interactors, and posttranslational modifications.

  3. Chemosignals, Hormones and Mammalian Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Petrulis, Aras

    2013-01-01

    Many mammalian species use chemosignals to coordinate reproduction by altering the physiology and behavior of both sexes. Chemosignals prime reproductive physiology so that individuals become sexually mature and active at times when mating is most probable and suppress it when it is not. Once in reproductive condition, odors produced and deposited by both males and females are used to find and select individuals for mating. The production, dissemination and appropriate responses to these cues are modulated heavily by organizational and activational effects of gonadal sex steroids and thereby intrinsically link chemical communication to the broader reproductive context. Many compounds have been identified as “pheromones” but very few have met the expectations of that term: a unitary, species-typical substance that is both necessary and sufficient for an experience-independent behavioral or physiological response. In contrast, most responses to chemosignals are dependent or heavily modulated by experience, either in adulthood or during development. Mechanistically, chemosignals are perceived by both main and accessory (vomeronasal) olfactory systems with the importance of each system tied strongly to the nature of the stimulus rather than to the response. In the central nervous system, the vast majority of responses to chemosignals are mediated by cortical and medial amygdala connections with hypothalamic and other forebrain structures. Despite the importance of chemosignals in mammals, many details of chemical communication differ even among closely related species and defy clear categorization. Although generating much research and public interest, strong evidence for the existence of a robust chemical communication among humans is lacking. PMID:23545474

  4. Modern cerebrospinal fluid analyses for the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Schroers, Roland

    2014-01-01

    CNS lymphomas represent rare and aggressive variants of extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, which may present with diverse neurological symptoms and are often diagnostically challenging. Primary CNS lymphomas develop within the CNS and characteristically involve the brain, leptomeninges, eyes and, in rare cases, spinal cord. Secondary CNS lymphomas are characterized by expansion of systemic lymphomas to the CNS. Multimodal investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comprises an important component of the diagnostic work-up for patients with suspected CNS lymphomas. Cytopathological examination of the CSF is still regarded as the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of leptomeningeal malignant disease. However, cytopathology has only a low sensitivity in detecting leptomeningeal lymphoma involvement. Modern technologies including proteochemical and immunophenotypic studies by flow cytometry, and molecular genetic analyses of CSF may increase sensitivity and specificity, therefore, facilitating the diagnosis of CNS lymphomas. This review gives an overview and discussion of the current aspects of CSF analyses in CNS lymphomas.

  5. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications.

    PubMed

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M; Krams, Rob

    2015-05-06

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON-OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and toggle switches will be described. Several synthetic gene networks are further reviewed in the medical applications section, including cancer therapy gene circuits, immuno-regulatory networks, among others. The final sections focus on the applicability of synthetic gene networks to drug discovery, drug delivery, receptor-activating gene circuits and mammalian biomanufacturing processes.

  6. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-11-09

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general.

  7. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Krams, Rob

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON–OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and toggle switches will be described. Several synthetic gene networks are further reviewed in the medical applications section, including cancer therapy gene circuits, immuno-regulatory networks, among others. The final sections focus on the applicability of synthetic gene networks to drug discovery, drug delivery, receptor-activating gene circuits and mammalian biomanufacturing processes. PMID:25808341

  8. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  9. BRAIN-SPECIFIC CARNITINE PALMITOYLTRANSFERASE-1C: ROLE IN CNS FATTY ACID METABOLISM, FOOD INTAKE AND BODY WEIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Cha, Seung Hun; Millington, David S.; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Kurama, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    While the brain does not utilize fatty acids as a primary energy source, recent evidence shows that intermediates of fatty acid metabolism serve as hypothalamic sensors of energy status. Increased hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, an intermediate in fatty acid synthesis, is indicative of energy surplus and leads to the suppression of food intake and increased energy expenditure. Malonyl-CoA functions as an inhibitor of CPT1, a mitochondrial outer membrane enzyme that initiates translocation of fatty acids into mitochondria for oxidation. The mammalian brain expresses a unique homologous CPT1, CPT1c, that binds malonyl-CoA tightly but does not support fatty acid oxidation in vivo, in hypothalamic explants or in heterologous cell culture systems. CPT1c KO mice under fasted or refed conditions do not exhibit an altered CNS transcriptome of genes known to be involved in fatty acid metabolism. CPT1c KO mice exhibit normal levels of metabolites and of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and fatty acyl-CoA levels either in the fasted or refed states. However, CPT1c KO mice exhibit decreased food intake and lower body weight than WT littermates. In contrast, CPT1c KO mice gain excessive body weight and body fat when fed a high-fat diet while maintaining lower or equivalent food intake. Heterozygous mice display an intermediate phenotype. These findings provide further evidence that CPT1c plays a role in maintaining energy homeostasis, but not through altered fatty acid oxidation. PMID:18248603

  10. GLT-1-Dependent Disruption of CNS Glutamate Homeostasis and Neuronal Function by the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    David, Clément N.; Frias, Elma S.; Szu, Jenny I.; Vieira, Philip A.; Hubbard, Jacqueline A.; Lovelace, Jonathan; Michael, Marena; Worth, Danielle; McGovern, Kathryn E.; Ethell, Iryna M.; Stanley, B. Glenn; Korzus, Edward; Fiacco, Todd A.; Binder, Devin K.; Wilson, Emma H.

    2016-01-01

    The immune privileged nature of the CNS can make it vulnerable to chronic and latent infections. Little is known about the effects of lifelong brain infections, and thus inflammation, on the neurological health of the host. Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that can infect any mammalian nucleated cell with average worldwide seroprevalence rates of 30%. Infection by Toxoplasma is characterized by the lifelong presence of parasitic cysts within neurons in the brain, requiring a competent immune system to prevent parasite reactivation and encephalitis. In the immunocompetent individual, Toxoplasma infection is largely asymptomatic, however many recent studies suggest a strong correlation with certain neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a significant reduction in the primary astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1, following infection with Toxoplasma. Using microdialysis of the murine frontal cortex over the course of infection, a significant increase in extracellular concentrations of glutamate is observed. Consistent with glutamate dysregulation, analysis of neurons reveal changes in morphology including a reduction in dendritic spines, VGlut1 and NeuN immunoreactivity. Furthermore, behavioral testing and EEG recordings point to significant changes in neuronal output. Finally, these changes in neuronal connectivity are dependent on infection-induced downregulation of GLT-1 as treatment with the ß-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone, rescues extracellular glutamate concentrations, neuronal pathology and function. Altogether, these data demonstrate that following an infection with T. gondii, the delicate regulation of glutamate by astrocytes is disrupted and accounts for a range of deficits observed in chronic infection. PMID:27281462

  11. Pharmacology of Glutamate Transport in the CNS: Substrates and Inhibitors of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAATs) and the Glutamate/Cystine Exchanger System x c -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Richard J.; Patel, Sarjubhai A.

    As the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, l-glutamate participates not only in standard fast synaptic communication, but also contributes to higher order signal processing, as well as neuropathology. Given this variety of functional roles, interest has been growing as to how the extracellular concentrations of l-glutamate surrounding neurons are regulated by cellular transporter proteins. This review focuses on two prominent systems, each of which appears capable of influencing both the signaling and pathological actions of l-glutamate within the CNS: the sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) and the glutamate/cystine exchanger, system x c - (Sx c -). While the family of EAAT subtypes limit access to glutamate receptors by rapidly and efficiently sequestering l-glutamate in neurons and glia, Sxc - provides a route for the export of glutamate from cells into the extracellular environment. The primary intent of this work is to provide an overview of the inhibitors and substrates that have been developed to delineate the pharmacological specificity of these transport systems, as well as be exploited as probes with which to selectively investigate function. Particular attention is paid to the development of small molecule templates that mimic the structural properties of the endogenous substrates, l-glutamate, l-aspartate and l-cystine and how strategic control of functional group position and/or the introduction of lipophilic R-groups can impact multiple aspects of the transport process, including: subtype selectivity, inhibitory potency, and substrate activity.

  12. Pathways of mammalian replication fork restart.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Single-molecule analyses of DNA replication have greatly advanced our understanding of mammalian replication restart. Several proteins that are not part of the core replication machinery promote the efficient restart of replication forks that have been stalled by replication inhibitors, suggesting that bona fide fork restart pathways exist in mammalian cells. Different models of replication fork restart can be envisaged, based on the involvement of DNA helicases, nucleases, homologous recombination factors and the importance of DNA double-strand break formation.

  13. Circadian Plasticity of Mammalian Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons participate in all neuronal circuits in the mammalian brain, including the circadian clock system, and are indispensable for their effective function. Although the clock neurons have different molecular and electrical properties, their main function is the generation of circadian oscillations. Here we review the circadian plasticity of GABAergic interneurons in several areas of the mammalian brain, suprachiasmatic nucleus, neocortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, cerebellum, striatum, and in the retina. PMID:28367335

  14. Hacking the genetic code of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Dirk

    2009-07-06

    A genetic shuttle: The highlighted article, which was recently published by Schultz, Geierstanger and co-workers, describes a straightforward scheme for enlarging the genetic code of mammalian cells. An orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for a new amino acid can be evolved in E. coli and subsequently transferred into mammalian cells. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by adding a photocaged lysine derivative to the genetic repertoire of a human cell line.

  15. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases.

  16. Delayed CNS maturation in iron-deficient anaemic infants.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Rosalva; Otero, Gloria A; Porcayo Mercado, Rosario; Pliego-Rivero, F Bernardo

    2008-04-01

    Direct evidence of CNS developmental alterations in iron-deficient anaemic (IDA) infants was obtained. Twenty 3-15-month-old IDA and 20 non-IDA infants (age and gender matched), healthy in every other respect, were studied. Complete blood and iron kinetics tests determined an IDA status. Psychomotor development was assessed through the test of Rogers and co-workers [Rogers SJ, Donovan CM, D'Eugenio D, Brown SL, Whiteside E, Moersch MS, Schafer DS. (eds) Developmental Programming for Infants and Young Children, Vol 2. University of Michigan Press, 1981] and under the 10-20 International System qEEG was performed (sleep/stage II). A Pearson's correlation test was applied between haematological, psychomotor and broad band EEG variables, and through ANOVA psychomotor and AP means were compared. IDA infants showed lower scores in cognition, fine motor and social/emotional areas, higher delta/theta and lower alpha power. Most correlations between haematological/psychological variables were positive. Delta/theta correlations were negative with self-care/gross and motor items while alpha/beta AP showed positive correlations with psychomotor and haematological variables. A clear association was found between EEG alterations and a low haematological/iron profile leading to a delayed psychomotor development.

  17. Carbon monoxide and the CNS: challenges and achievements

    PubMed Central

    Queiroga, Cláudia S F; Vercelli, Alessandro; Vieira, Helena L A

    2015-01-01

    Haem oxygenase (HO) and its product carbon monoxide (CO) are associated with cytoprotection and maintenance of homeostasis in several different organs and tissues. This review focuses upon the role of exogenous and endogenous CO (via HO activity and expression) in various CNS pathologies, based upon data from experimental models, as well as from some clinical data on human patients. The pathophysiological conditions reviewed are cerebral ischaemia, chronic neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases), multiple sclerosis and pain. Among these pathophysiological conditions, a variety of cellular mechanisms and processes are considered, namely cytoprotection, cell death, inflammation, cell metabolism, cellular redox responses and vasomodulation, as well as the different targeted neural cells. Finally, novel potential methods and strategies for delivering exogenous CO as a drug are discussed, particularly approaches based upon CO-releasing molecules, their limitations and challenges. The diagnostic and prognostic value of HO expression in clinical use for brain pathologies is also addressed. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:24758548

  18. Rumor management in nursing systems: role of the psychiatric CNS.

    PubMed

    Chase, P; Stuart, G W

    1995-11-01

    RUMOR MANAGEMENT AND control is particularly important in nursing systems during times of change. In this article, a brief history of the study of rumor and the rumor process is given and applied to nursing, systems thinking and the CNS, and three types of rumor are described. Examples are given and strategies and approaches for managing rumor are prescribed. The first approach, used when a final decision about a planned change has not been made, helps avoid "trickle down" and builds trust and empowerment by soliciting and using input from those who will be affected by the proposed change. The intent of the second approach, used when a decision has been finalized or an event has occurred and rumor has preceded an official announcement, is to debrief from the occurrence or transform the decision. The last approach is used to interrupt a pattern of misinformation and to clarify or inform. The nurse leader or manager must stay in the communication loop and refrain from blaming a speculated source in order to correct information.

  19. Epsin1 modulates synaptic vesicle retrieval capacity at CNS synapses

    PubMed Central

    Kyung, Jae Won; Bae, Jae Ryul; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Song, Woo Keun; Kim, Sung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle retrieval is an essential process for continuous maintenance of neural information flow after synaptic transmission. Epsin1, originally identified as an EPS15-interacting protein, is a major component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, the role of Epsin1 in synaptic vesicle endocytosis at CNS synapses remains elusive. Here, we showed significantly altered synaptic vesicle endocytosis in neurons transfected with shRNA targeting Epsin1 during/after neural activity. Endocytosis was effectively restored by introducing shRNA-insensitive Epsin1 into Epsin1-depleted neurons. Domain studies performed on neurons in which domain deletion mutants of Epsin1 were introduced after Epsin1 knockdown revealed that ENTH, CLAP, and NPFs are essential for synaptic vesicle endocytosis, whereas UIMs are not. Strikingly, the efficacy of the rate of synaptic vesicle retrieval (the “endocytic capacity”) was significantly decreased in the absence of Epsin1. Thus, Epsin1 is required for proper synaptic vesicle retrieval and modulates the endocytic capacity of synaptic vesicles. PMID:27557559

  20. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: Updates on an inflammatory CNS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Daniela; Alper, Gulay; Van Haren, Keith; Kornberg, Andrew J; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Tenembaum, Silvia; Belman, Anita L

    2016-08-30

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated demyelinating CNS disorder with predilection to early childhood. ADEM is generally considered a monophasic disease. However, recurrent ADEM has been described and defined as multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis. ADEM often occurs postinfectiously, although a causal relationship has never been established. ADEM and multiple sclerosis are currently viewed as distinct entities, generally distinguishable even at disease onset. However, pathologic studies have demonstrated transitional cases of yet unclear significance. ADEM is clinically defined by acute polyfocal neurologic deficits including encephalopathy. MRI typically demonstrates reversible, ill-defined white matter lesions of the brain and often also the spinal cord, along with frequent involvement of thalami and basal ganglia. CSF analysis may reveal a mild pleocytosis and elevated protein, but is generally negative for intrathecal oligoclonal immunoglobulin G synthesis. In the absence of a specific diagnostic test, ADEM is considered a diagnosis of exclusion, and ADEM mimics, especially those requiring a different treatment approach, have to be carefully ruled out. The role of biomarkers, including autoantibodies like anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of ADEM is currently under debate. Based on the presumed autoimmune etiology of ADEM, the current treatment approach consists of early immunotherapy. Outcome of ADEM in pediatric patients is generally favorable, but cognitive deficits have been reported even in the absence of other neurologic sequelae. This review summarizes the current knowledge on epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, neuroimaging features, CSF findings, differential diagnosis, therapy, and outcome, with a focus on recent advances and controversies.

  1. Fluids and barriers of the CNS: a historical viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tracing the exact origins of modern science can be a difficult but rewarding pursuit. It is possible for the astute reader to follow the background of any subject through the many important surviving texts from the classical and ancient world. While empirical investigations have been described by many since the time of Aristotle and scientific methods have been employed since the Middle Ages, the beginnings of modern science are generally accepted to have originated during the 'scientific revolution' of the 16th and 17th centuries in Europe. The scientific method is so fundamental to modern science that some philosophers consider earlier investigations as 'pre-science'. Notwithstanding this, the insight that can be gained from the study of the beginnings of a subject can prove important in the understanding of work more recently completed. As this journal undergoes an expansion in focus and nomenclature from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into all barriers of the central nervous system (CNS), this review traces the history of both the blood-CSF and blood-brain barriers from as early as it was possible to find references, to the time when modern concepts were established at the beginning of the 20th century. PMID:21349150

  2. Role of galectin-3 in prion infections of the CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Simon W.F.; Riemer, Constanze; Madela, Kazimierz; Hsu, Daniel K.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Gueltner, Sandra; Heise, Ines; Baier, Michael . E-mail: baierm@rki.de

    2007-08-03

    Galectin-3 is a multi-functional protein and participates in mediating inflammatory reactions. The pronounced overexpression of galectin-3 in prion-infected brain tissue prompted us to study the role of this protein in a murine prion model. Immunofluorescence double-labelling identified microglia as the major cell type expressing galectin-3. Ablation of galectin-3 did not affect PrP{sup Sc}-deposition and development of gliosis. However, galectin-3{sup -/-}-mice showed prolonged survival times upon intracerebral and peripheral scrapie infections. Moreover, protein levels of the lysosomal activation marker LAMP-2 were markedly reduced in prion-infected galectin-3{sup -/-}-mice suggesting a role of galectin-3 in regulation of lysosomal functions. Lower mRNA levels of Beclin-1 and Atg5 in prion-infected wild-type and galectin-3{sup -/-}-mice indicated an impairment of autophagy although autophagosome formation was unchanged. The results point towards a detrimental role of galectin-3 in prion infections of the CNS and suggest that endo-/lysosomal dysfunction in combination with reduced autophagy may contribute to disease development.

  3. Chromatin profiling of Drosophila CNS subpopulations identifies active transcriptional enhancers.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joseph C; McKay, Daniel J; Lieb, Jason D; Crews, Stephen T

    2016-10-15

    One of the key issues in studying transcriptional regulation during development is how to employ genome-wide assays that reveals sites of open chromatin and transcription factor binding to efficiently identify biologically relevant genes and enhancers. Analysis of Drosophila CNS midline cell development provides a useful system for studying transcriptional regulation at the genomic level due to a large, well-characterized set of midline-expressed genes and in vivo validated enhancers. In this study, FAIRE-seq on FACS-purified midline cells was performed and the midline FAIRE data were compared with whole-embryo FAIRE data. We find that regions of the genome with a strong midline FAIRE peak and weak whole-embryo FAIRE peak overlap with known midline enhancers and provide a useful predictive tool for enhancer identification. In a complementary analysis, we compared a large dataset of fragments that drive midline expression in vivo with the FAIRE data. Midline enhancer fragments with a midline FAIRE peak tend to be near midline-expressed genes, whereas midline enhancers without a midline FAIRE peak were often distant from midline-expressed genes and unlikely to drive midline transcription in vivo.

  4. Neurotrophins and their receptors in early development of the mammalian nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bartkowska, Katarzyna; Turlejski, Kris; Djavadian, Rouzanna L

    2010-01-01

    Neurotrophins belonging to the class of growth factors and including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5) are widely recognized as essential factors in the developing central nervous system (CNS). Neurotrophins are synthesized as precursor forms (proneurotrophins). Mature forms of neurotrophins exert their effect by binding to specific tyrosine kinases receptors (TrkA, TrkB and TrkC) as well as via the p75 receptor, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily while proneurotrophins interact with the receptor p75 or co-receptor complex of p75 and sortilin, that is a Vps10p domain-containing transmembrane protein. Expression of neurotrophins corresponds with the onset of neurogenesis in developing mammalian species. BDNF is low in early embryonic stages of development, while NT-3 highly expresses in the developing CNS. Expression of neurotrophins receptors mainly overlaps at early development. Data concerning early distribution of neurotrophins and their receptors in the nervous system and results in mice with targeted disruptions of neurotrophin or receptor genes show that neurotrophins and their receptors play distinct roles in control and regulation of the most crucial developmental processes such as proliferation, migration, differentiation, survival, apoptosis and synaptic plasticity.

  5. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Activation Increases Axonal Growth Capacity of Injured Peripheral Nerves*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Namiko; Borson, Steven H.; Gambello, Michael J.; Wang, Fan; Cavalli, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Unlike neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), injured neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) can regenerate their axons and reinnervate their targets. However, functional recovery in the PNS often remains suboptimal, especially in cases of severe damage. The lack of regenerative ability of CNS neurons has been linked to down-regulation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. We report here that PNS dorsal root ganglial neurons (DRGs) activate mTOR following damage and that this activity enhances axonal growth capacity. Furthermore, genetic up-regulation of mTOR activity by deletion of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) in DRGs is sufficient to enhance axonal growth capacity in vitro and in vivo. We further show that mTOR activity is linked to the expression of GAP-43, a crucial component of axonal outgrowth. However, although TSC2 deletion in DRGs facilitates axonal regrowth, it leads to defects in target innervation. Thus, whereas manipulation of mTOR activity could provide new strategies to stimulate nerve regeneration in the PNS, fine control of mTOR activity is required for proper target innervation. PMID:20615870

  6. Compartmentalized intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis during HIV infection - a model of chronic CNS inflammation?

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Mickael; Barroso, Bruno; Demasles, Stéphanie; Krim, Elsa; Marasescu, Raluca; Miquel, Marie

    2015-08-15

    HIV infects the central nervous system (CNS) during primary infection and persists in resident macrophages. CNS infection initiates a strong local immune response that fails to control the virus but is responsible for by-stander lesions involved in neurocognitive disorders. Although highly active anti-retroviral therapy now offers an almost complete control of CNS viral proliferation, low-grade CNS inflammation persists. This review focuses on HIV-induced intrathecal immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis. Intrathecal Ig synthesis early occurs in more than three-quarters of patients in response to viral infection of the CNS and persists throughout the course of the disease. Viral antigens are targeted but this specific response accounts for <5% of the whole intrathecal synthesis. Although the nature and mechanisms leading to non-specific synthesis are unknown, this prominent proportion is comparable to that observed in various CNS viral infections. Cerebrospinal fluid-floating antibody-secreting cells account for a minority of the whole synthesis, which mainly takes place in perivascular inflammatory infiltrates of the CNS parenchyma. B-cell traffic and lineage across the blood-brain-barrier have not yet been described. We review common technical pitfalls and update the pending questions in the field. Moreover, since HIV infection is associated with an intrathecal chronic oligoclonal (and mostly non-specific) Ig synthesis and associates with low-grade axonal lesions, this could be an interesting model of the chronic intrathecal synthesis occurring during multiple sclerosis.

  7. TNF-α increases in the CSF of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia before CNS relapse.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Gamboa-Alonso, Carmen Magdalena; Jiménez-Castillo, Raúl Alberto; López-Silva, Leslie Jazmín; Pinzón-Uresti, Mónica Andrea; Gómez-De León, Andrés; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2017-03-01

    There is scarce information regarding the concentration of cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and their clinical association with CNS status. A prospective analysis of 40 patients <18years with newly diagnosed ALL was performed. Human cytokine magnetic bead panel assay values of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, TNF-α in CSF at diagnosis, end of induction to remission, and 6months after diagnosis were determined. IL-6 and MCP-1 values showed a significant increment at the end of induction. From the whole group 4 (10.0%), patients relapsed to the CNS at a median of 11.48months. A significantly higher value of TNF-α at third determination in these CNS-relapsed patients was documented, 7.48 vs. 2.86pg/mL in 36 children without relapse (p=0.024). TNF-α concentration increased at a median 5.48months before CNS relapse. By receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, the best cut-off point of TNF-α concentration that better predicted CNS relapse was ≥1.79pg/mL. In conclusion an increase in TNF-α concentration on CSF preceded CNS relapse in children with ALL. An increase in MCP-1 and IL-6 was not associated to CNS relapse and appears to result from an inflammatory response after IT injection of chemotherapy.

  8. Prophylactic CNS directed therapy in systemic diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Abhimanyu; Kundu, Ria; Latif, Tahir

    2014-09-01

    Overall survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has significantly improved in the last decade, especially after the incorporation of rituximab. Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) at presentation or at recurrence is an uncommon event, but carries a dismal prognosis with median survival of less than 6 months. Although prophylactic CNS directed therapy is a widely used approach to prevent this complication, randomized clinical trials have been very limited. CNS prophylaxis has inherent toxicities; therefore, identifying the population of patients who would receive most benefit is of utmost importance. From an extensive review of current literature, we report the incidence of CNS relapse in DLBCL and describe the role of CNS prophylaxis in the post-rituximab compared to the pre-rituximab era. We also review the current modalities of CNS prophylaxis and attempt to identify the high-risk patients who would benefit. Lastly, we present a treatment algorithm that defines the role of CNS prophylaxis in the management of patients with DLBCL.

  9. CNS uptake of bortezomib is enhanced by P-glycoprotein inhibition: implications for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Foran, Emily; Kwon, Deborah Y; Nofziger, Jonathan H; Arnold, Eveline S; Hall, Matthew D; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Burnett, Barrington G

    2016-04-01

    The development of therapeutics for neurological disorders is constrained by limited access to the central nervous system (CNS). ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), are expressed on the luminal surface of capillaries in the CNS and transport drugs out of the endothelium back into the blood against the concentration gradient. Survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, which is deficient in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), is a target of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Inhibiting the proteasome in a rodent model of SMA with bortezomib increases SMN protein levels in peripheral tissues but not the CNS, because bortezomib has poor CNS penetrance. We sought to determine if we could inhibit SMN degradation in the CNS of SMA mice with a combination of bortezomib and the ABC transporter inhibitor tariquidar. In cultured cells we show that bortezomib is a substrate of P-gp. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that intraperitoneal co-administration of tariquidar increased the CNS penetrance of bortezomib, and reduced proteasome activity in the brain and spinal cord. This correlated with increased SMN protein levels and improved survival and motor function of SMA mice. These findings show that CNS penetrance of treatment for this neurological disorder can be improved by inhibiting drug efflux at the blood-brain barrier.

  10. Bioavailability of dietary polyphenols: Factors contributing to their clinical application in CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Mythri, R B; Srinivas Bharath, M M

    2015-10-01

    The anatomical location of the central nervous system (CNS) renders it immunologically and pharmacologically privileged due to the blood brain barrier (BBB). Although this limits the transport of unfavorable molecules to the CNS, the ensuing privilege could be disadvantageous for therapeutic compounds. Hence, the greatest challenge in the pharmacotherapy of CNS diseases is to ensure efficient brain targeting and drug delivery. Research evidences indicate that dietary polyphenols have neuroprotective potential against CNS diseases. However, their selective permeability across BBB, poor absorption, rapid metabolism and systemic elimination limit their bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy. Consequently, the beneficial effects of these orally administered agents in the CNS still remain a subject of debate. This has also limited its clinical application either as independent or adjunctive therapy. Improving the in vivo bioavailability by novel methods could improve the therapeutic feasibility of polyphenols and assist in evolving novel drugs and their derivatives with improved efficacy in vivo. Here we review the mechanistic and pharmacological issues related to the bioavailability of polyphenols with therapeutic implications for CNS diseases. We surmise that improving the bioavailability of polyphenols entails efficient in vivo transport across BBB, biochemical stability, improved half-life and persistent neuroprotection in the CNS.

  11. DNA methylation functions as a critical regulator of Kir4.1 expression during CNS development.

    PubMed

    Nwaobi, Sinifunanya E; Lin, Erica; Peramsetty, Sasank R; Olsen, Michelle L

    2014-03-01

    Kir4.1, a glial-specific K+ channel, is critical for normal CNS development. Studies using both global and glial-specific knockout of Kir4.1 reveal abnormal CNS development with the loss of the channel. Specifically, Kir4.1 knockout animals are characterized by ataxia, severe hypomyelination, and early postnatal death. Additionally, Kir4.1 has emerged as a key player in several CNS diseases. Notably, decreased Kir4.1 protein expression occurs in several human CNS pathologies including CNS ischemic injury, spinal cord injury, epilepsy, ALS, and Alzheimer's disease. Despite the emerging significance of Kir4.1 in normal and pathological conditions, its mechanisms of regulation are unknown. Here, we report the first epigenetic regulation of a K+ channel in the CNS. Robust developmental upregulation of Kir4.1 expression in rats is coincident with reductions in DNA methylation of the Kir4.1 gene, KCNJ10. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals a dynamic interaction between KCNJ10 and DNA methyltransferase 1 during development. Finally, demethylation of the KCNJ10 promoter is necessary for transcription. These findings indicate DNA methylation is a key regulator of Kir4.1 transcription. Given the essential role of Kir4.1 in normal CNS development, understanding the regulation of this K+ channel is critical to understanding normal glial biology.

  12. Glucocortiocoid Treatment of MCMV Infected Newborn Mice Attenuates CNS Inflammation and Limits Deficits in Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Kosmac, Kate; Bantug, Glenn R.; Pugel, Ester P.; Cekinovic, Djurdjica; Jonjic, Stipan; Britt, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of the developing fetus with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of central nervous system disease in infants and children; however, mechanism(s) of disease associated with this intrauterine infection remain poorly understood. Utilizing a mouse model of HCMV infection of the developing CNS, we have shown that peripheral inoculation of newborn mice with murine CMV (MCMV) results in CNS infection and developmental abnormalities that recapitulate key features of the human infection. In this model, animals exhibit decreased granule neuron precursor cell (GNPC) proliferation and altered morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex. Deficits in cerebellar cortical development are symmetric and global even though infection of the CNS results in a non-necrotizing encephalitis characterized by widely scattered foci of virus-infected cells with mononuclear cell infiltrates. These findings suggested that inflammation induced by MCMV infection could underlie deficits in CNS development. We investigated the contribution of host inflammatory responses to abnormal cerebellar development by modulating inflammatory responses in infected mice with glucocorticoids. Treatment of infected animals with glucocorticoids decreased activation of CNS mononuclear cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-β and IFNγ) in the CNS while minimally impacting CNS virus replication. Glucocorticoid treatment also limited morphogenic abnormalities and normalized the expression of developmentally regulated genes within the cerebellum. Importantly, GNPC proliferation deficits were normalized in MCMV infected mice following glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings argue that host inflammatory responses to MCMV infection contribute to deficits in CNS development in MCMV infected mice and suggest that similar mechanisms of disease could be responsible for the abnormal CNS development in human infants infected in-utero with HCMV. PMID:23505367

  13. How common is the lipid body-containing interstitial cell in the mammalian lung?

    PubMed

    Tahedl, Daniel; Wirkes, André; Tschanz, Stefan A; Ochs, Matthias; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary lipofibroblasts are thought to be involved in lung development, regeneration, vitamin A storage, and surfactant synthesis. Most of the evidence for these important functions relies on mouse or rat studies. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the presence of lipofibroblasts in a variety of early postnatal and adult mammalian species (including humans) to evaluate the ability to generalize functions of this cell type for other species. For this purpose, lung samples from 14 adult mammalian species as well as from postnatal mice, rats, and humans were investigated using light and electron microscopic stereology to obtain the volume fraction and the total volume of lipid bodies. In adult animals, lipid bodies were observed only, but not in all rodents. In all other species, no lipofibroblasts were observed. In rodents, lipid body volume scaled with body mass with an exponent b = 0.73 in the power law equation. Lipid bodies were not observed in postnatal human lungs but showed a characteristic postnatal increase in mice and rats and persisted at a lower level in the adult animals. Among 14 mammalian species, lipofibroblasts were only observed in rodents. The great increase in lipid body volume during early postnatal development of the mouse lung confirms the special role of lipofibroblasts during rodent lung development. It is evident that the cellular functions of pulmonary lipofibroblasts cannot be transferred easily from rodents to other species, in particular humans.

  14. The Potential of the CNS as a Reservoir for HIV-1 Infection: Implications for HIV Eradication.

    PubMed

    Fois, Alessandro F; Brew, Bruce J

    2015-06-01

    The ability of HIV-1 to establish latent infection is a key obstacle to its eradication despite the existence of effective antiretroviral drugs. The brain has been postulated as a reservoir for latent infection, but its role in HIV persistence remains unclear. In this review, we discuss the evidence surrounding the role of the central nervous system (CNS) as a viral reservoir and the potential challenges this might present in eradicating HIV. The strategies for eradication of HIV and their application to latent CNS infection are explored. Finally, we outline new developments in drug delivery and new therapeutic modalities designed to target HIV infection in the CNS.

  15. Measuring blood-brain barrier penetration using the NeuroCart, a CNS test battery.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, Geert Jan; Hay, Justin Luke; Van Gerven, Johannes Marinus

    2016-06-01

    To systematically study the pharmacodynamics of a CNS drug early in the development process, we developed and validated a battery of drug-sensitive CNS tests, which we call NeuroCart. Using this test battery, data-intensive phase 1 studies in healthy subjects can be performed to demonstrate the specific, time- and dose-dependent, neurophysiological and/or neuropsychological effects of a compound, thereby confirming whether the test compound reaches its intended target in the CNS - or does not reach its intended target. We use this test battery to demonstrate that a compound passes the blood-brain barrier.

  16. Fatal lymphomatoid granulomatosis with primary CNS-involvement in an immunocompetent 80-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Olmes, David G; Agaimy, Abbas; Kloska, Stephan; Linker, Ralf A

    2014-01-01

    An 80-year-old woman presented with weight loss, fatigue, dizziness and a brain stem lesion. Extensive work-up revealed lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) with primary clinical manifestation in the central nervous system (CNS), a rare Epstein-Barr virus-driven multisystem lymphoproliferative disorder, to be causative for the symptoms. Immunochemotherapy consisting of rituximab and temozolomide was started, but the disease progressed and the patient subsequently died. Histology, diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis and treatment options for LYG with CNS involvement are discussed. This case demonstrates that LYG with CNS involvement may necessitate more aggressive treatment approaches than combination therapy with rituximab and temozolomide. PMID:25535225

  17. Mapping the accumulation of co-infiltrating CNS dendritic cells and encephalitogenic T cells during EAE

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Benjamin D; Walker, Alec; Harris, Melissa; Rayasam, Aditya; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) suggests that CNS-infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial for restimulation of coinfiltrating T cells. Here we systematically quantified and visualized the distribution and interaction of CNS DCs and T cells during EAE. We report marked periventricular accumulation of DCs and myelin-specific T cells during EAE disease onset prior to accumulation in the spinal cord, indicating that the choroid plexus-CSF axis is a CNS entry portal. Moreover, despite emphasis on spinal cord inflammation in EAE and in correspondence with MS pathology, inflammatory lesions containing interacting DCs and T cells are present in specific brain regions. PMID:25288303

  18. Young Aphids Avoid Erroneous Dropping when Evading Mammalian Herbivores by Combining Input from Two Sensory Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Gish, Moshe; Dafni, Amots; Inbar, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian herbivores may incidentally ingest plant-dwelling insects while foraging. Adult pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) avoid this danger by dropping off their host plant after sensing the herbivore's warm and humid breath and the vibrations it causes while feeding. Aphid nymphs may also drop (to escape insect enemies), but because of their slow movement, have a lower chance of finding a new plant. We compared dropping rates of first-instar nymphs with those of adults, after exposing pea aphids to different combinations of simulated mammalian breath and vibrations. We hypothesized that nymphs would compensate for the greater risk they face on the ground by interpreting more conservatively the mammalian herbivore cues they perceive. Most adults dropped in response to breath alone, but nymphs rarely did so. Breath stimulus accompanied by one concurrent vibrational stimulus, caused a minor rise in adult dropping rates. Adding a second vibration during breath had no additional effect on adults. The nymphs, however, relied on a combination of the two types of stimuli, with a threefold increase in dropping rates when the breath was accompanied by one vibration, and a further doubling of dropping rates when the second vibration was added. The age-specificity of the aphids' herbivore detection mechanism is probably an adaptation to the different cost of dropping for the different age groups. Relying on a combination of stimuli from two sensory modalities enables the vulnerable nymphs to avoid costly mistakes. Our findings emphasize the importance of the direct trophic effect of mammalian herbivory for plant-dwelling insects. PMID:22496734

  19. Safety Design and Mock-Up Tests on the Combustion of Hydrogen-Air Mixture in the Vertical CNS Channel of the CARR-CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Qingfeng Yu; Quanke Feng

    2006-07-01

    A two-phase thermo-siphon loop is applied to the Cold Neutron Source (CNS) of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR). The moderator is liquid hydrogen. The two-phase thermo-siphon consists of the crescent-shape moderator cell, the moderator transfer tube, and the condenser. The hydrogen is supplied from the buffer tank to the condenser. The most characteristic point is that the cold helium gas is introduced into the helium sub-cooling system covering the moderator cell and then flows up through the tube covering the moderator transfer tube into the condenser. The helium sub-cooling system also reduces the void fraction of the liquid hydrogen and takes a role of the helium barrier for preventing air from intruding into the hydrogen system. We call the two-phase thermo-siphon the hydrogen cold system. The main part of this system is installed in the CNS channel made of 6061 aluminum alloy (6061A) of 6 mm in thickness, 270 mm in outer diameter and about 6 m in height. For confirming the safety of the CNS, the combustion tests were carried out using the hydrogen-air mixture under the conditions in which air is introduced into the tube at 1 atmosphere, and then hydrogen gas is supplied from the gas cylinder up to the test pressures. And maximum test pressure is 0.140 MPa Gauge (G). This condition includes the design accident of the CNS. The peak pressure due to combustion is 1.09 MPa, and the design strength of the CNS channel is 3 MPa. The safety of the CNS was thus verified even if the design basis accident occurs. The pressure distribution, the stress, and the displacement of the tube were also measured. (authors)

  20. Combination Therapy with Lenalidomide and Nanoceria Ameliorates CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Eitan, Erez; Hutchison, Emmette R.; Greig, Nigel H.; Tweedie, David; Celik, Hasan; Ghosh, Soumita; Fishbein, Kenneth W.; Spencer, Richard G.; Sasaki, Carl Y.; Ghosh, Paritosh; Das, Soumen; Chigurapati, Susheela; Raymick, James; Sarkar, Sumit; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Seal, Sudipta; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating neurological disorder involving an autoimmune reaction to oligodendrocytes and degeneration of the axons they ensheath in the CNS. Because the damage to oligodendrocytes and axons involves local inflammation and associated oxidative stress, we tested the therapeutic efficacy of combined treatment with a potent anti-inflammatory thalidomide analog (lenalidomide) and novel synthetic anti-oxidant cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of MS. Methods C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to a control (no EAE) group, or one of four myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced EAE groups: vehicle, lenalidomide, nanoceria, or lenalidomide plus nanoceria. During a 23 day period, clinical EAE symptoms were evaluated daily, and MRI brain scans were performed at 11-13 days and 20-22 days. Histological and biochemical analyses of brain tissue samples were performed to quantify myelin loss and local inflammation. Results Lenalidomide treatment alone delayed symptom onset, while nanoceria treatment had no effect on symptom onset or severity, but did promote recovery; lenalidomide and nanoceria each significantly attenuated white matter pathology and associated inflammation. Combined treatment with lenalidomide and nanoceria resulted in a near elimination of EAE symptoms, and reduced white matter pathology and inflammatory cell responses to a much greater extent than either treatment alone. Interpretation By suppressing inflammation and oxidative stress, combined treatment with lenalidomide and nanoceria can reduce demyelination and associated neurological symptoms in EAE mice. Our preclinical data suggest a potential application of this combination therapy in MS. PMID:26277686

  1. Carbon monoxide inhalation increases microparticles causing vascular and CNS dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jiajun; Yang, Ming; Kosterin, Paul; Salzberg, Brian M.; Milovanova, Tatyana N.; Bhopale, Veena M.; Thom, Stephen R.

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that circulating microparticles (MPs) play a role in pro-inflammatory effects associated with carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation. Mice exposed for 1 h to 100 ppm CO or more exhibit increases in circulating MPs derived from a variety of vascular cells as well as neutrophil activation. Tissue injury was quantified as 2000 kDa dextran leakage from vessels and as neutrophil sequestration in the brain and skeletal muscle; and central nervous system nerve dysfunction was documented as broadening of the neurohypophysial action potential (AP). Indices of injury occurred following exposures to 1000 ppm for 1 h or to 1000 ppm for 40 min followed by 3000 ppm for 20 min. MPs were implicated in causing injuries because infusing the surfactant MP lytic agent, polyethylene glycol telomere B (PEGtB) abrogated elevations in MPs, vascular leak, neutrophil sequestration and AP prolongation. These manifestations of tissue injury also did not occur in mice lacking myeloperoxidase. Vascular leakage and AP prolongation were produced in naïve mice infused with MPs that had been obtained from CO poisoned mice, but this did not occur with MPs obtained from control mice. We conclude that CO poisoning triggers elevations of MPs that activate neutrophils which subsequently cause tissue injuries. - Highlights: • Circulating microparticles (MPs) increase in mice exposed to 100 ppm CO or more. • MPs are lysed by infusing the surfactant polyethylene glycol telomere B. • CO-induced MPs cause neutrophil activation, vascular leak and CNS dysfunction. • Similar tissue injuries do not arise with MPs obtained from air-exposed, control mice.

  2. Interactions between oligodendrocyte precursors control the onset of CNS myelination

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Lewis, Rebecca; Miller, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of CNS myelin is dependent on the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and oligodendrocyte maturation. How the initiation of myelination is regulated is unclear but it is likely to depend on the development of competence by oligodendrocytes and receptivity by target axons. Here we identify an additional level of control of oligodendrocyte maturation mediated by interactions between the different cellular components of the oligodendrocyte lineage. During development oligodendrocyte precursors mature through a series of stages defined by labeling with monoclonal antibodies A2B5 and O4. Newly differentiated oligodendrocytes begin to express galactocerebroside recognized by O1 antibodies and subsequently mature to myelin basic protein (MBP) positive cells prior to formation of compact myelin. Using an in vitro brain slice culture system that supports robust myelination, the consequences of ablating cells at different stages of the oligodendrocyte lineage on myelination has been assayed. Elimination of all OPC lineage cells through A2B5+, O4+ and O1+ complement mediated cell lysis resulted in a delay in development of MBP cells and myelination. Selective elimination of early OPCs (A2B5+) also unexpectedly resulted in delayed MBP expression compared to controls suggesting early OPCs contribute to the timing of myelination onset. By contrast, elimination of differentiated (O1+) immature oligodendrocytes permanently inhibited the appearance of MBP+ cells suggesting that oligodendrocytes are critical to facilitate the maturation of OPCs. These data illuminate that the presence of intra-lineage feed-forward and feedback cues are important for timely myelination by oligodendrocytes. PMID:21144846

  3. Stem cells and lineage development in the mammalian blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Rossant, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian blastocyst is the source of the most pluripotent stem cells known: embryonic stem (ES) cells. However, ES cells are not totipotent; in mouse chimeras, they do not contribute to extra-embryonic cell types of the trophectoderm (TE) and primitive endoderm (PrE) lineages. Understanding the genetic pathways that control pluripotency v. extra-embryonic lineage restriction is key to understanding not only normal embryonic development, but also how to reprogramme adult cells to pluripotency. The trophectoderm and primitive endoderm lineages also provide the first signals that drive patterned differentiation of the pluripotent epiblast cells of the embryo. My laboratory has produced permanent mouse cell lines from both the TE and the PrE, termed trophoblast stem (TS) and eXtra-embryonic ENdoderm (XEN) cells. We have used these cells to explore the genetic and molecular hierarchy of lineage restriction and identify the key factors that distinguish the ES cell v. the TS or XEN cell fate. The major molecular pathways of lineage commitment defined in mouse embryos and stem cells are probably conserved across mammalian species, but more comparative studies of lineage development in embryos of non-rodent mammals will likely yield interesting differences in terms of timing and details.

  4. Computational models of adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2005-10-01

    Experimental results in recent years have shown that adult neurogenesis is a significant phenomenon in the mammalian brain. Little is known, however, about the functional role played by the generation and destruction of neurons in the context of an adult brain. Here, we propose two models where new projection neurons are incorporated. We show that in both models, using incorporation and removal of neurons as a computational tool, it is possible to achieve a higher computational efficiency that in purely static, synapse-learning-driven networks. We also discuss the implication for understanding the role of adult neurogenesis in specific brain areas like the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus.

  5. Adult ADHD Medications and Their Cardiovascular Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, O.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic neurobiological disorder exhibited by difficulty maintaining attention, as well as hyperactivity and impulsive behavior. Central nervous system (CNS) stimulants are the first line of treatment for ADHD. With the increase in number of adults on CNS stimulants, the question that arises is how well do we understand the long-term cardiovascular effects of these drugs. There has been increasing concern that adults with ADHD are at greater risk for developing adverse cardiovascular events such as sudden death, myocardial infarction, and stroke as compared to pediatric population. Cardiovascular response attributed to ADHD medication has mainly been observed in heart rate and blood pressure elevations, while less is known about the etiology of rare cardiovascular events like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), arrhythmia, and cardiomyopathy and its long-term sequelae. We present a unique case of AMI in an adult taking Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts) and briefly discuss the literature relevant to the cardiovascular safety of CNS stimulants for adult ADHD. PMID:27579185

  6. Archetype, adaptation and the mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Meijler, F L; Meijler, T D

    2011-03-01

    Forty years ago, we started our quest for 'The Holy Grail' of understanding ventricular rate control and rhythm in atrial fibrillation (AF). We therefore studied the morphology and function of a wide range of mammalian hearts. From mouse to whale, we found that all hearts show similar structural and functional characteristics. This suggests that the mammalian heart remained well conserved during evolution and in this aspect it differs from other organs and parts of the mammalian body. The archetype of the mammalian heart was apparently so successful that adaptation by natural selection (evolution) caused by varying habitat demands, as occurred in other organs and many other aspects of mammalian anatomy, bypassed the heart. The structure and function of the heart of placental mammals have thus been strikingly conserved throughout evolution. The changes in the mammalian heart that did take place were mostly adjustments (scaling), to compensate for variations in body size and shape. A remarkable scaling effect is, for instance, the difference in atrioventricular (AV) conduction time, which is vital for optimal cardiac function in all mammals, small and large. Scaling of AV conduction takes place in the AV node (AVN), but its substrate is unknown. This sheds new light on the vital role of the AVN in health and disease. The AVN is master and servant of the heart at the same time and is of salient importance for our understanding of supraventricular arrhythmias in humans, especially AF. In Information Technology a software infra-structure called 'enterprise service bus' (ESB) may provide understanding of the mammalian heart's conservation during evolution. The ESB is quite unspecific (and thus general) when compared with the specialised components it has to support. For instance, one of the functions of an ESB is the routing of messages between system nodes. This routing is independent and unaware of the content of the messages. The function of the heart is likewise

  7. Targeting blood–brain barrier changes during inflammatory pain: an opportunity for optimizing CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Patrick T; Davis, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is the most significant obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. It possesses structural and biochemical features (i.e., tight-junction protein complexes and, influx and efflux transporters) that restrict xenobiotic permeation. Pathophysiological stressors (i.e., peripheral inflammatory pain) can alter BBB tight junctions and transporters, which leads to drug-permeation changes. This is especially critical for opioids, which require precise CNS concentrations to be safe and effective analgesics. Recent studies have identified molecular targets (i.e., endogenous transporters and intracellular signaling systems) that can be exploited for optimization of CNS drug delivery. This article summarizes current knowledge in this area and emphasizes those targets that present the greatest opportunity for controlling drug permeation and/or drug transport across the BBB in an effort to achieve optimal CNS opioid delivery. PMID:22468221

  8. Dealing with Danger in the CNS: The Response of the Immune System to Injury.

    PubMed

    Gadani, Sachin P; Walsh, James T; Lukens, John R; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Fighting pathogens and maintaining tissue homeostasis are prerequisites for survival. Both of these functions are upheld by the immune system, though the latter is often overlooked in the context of the CNS. The mere presence of immune cells in the CNS was long considered a hallmark of pathology, but this view has been recently challenged by studies demonstrating that immunological signaling can confer pivotal neuroprotective effects on the injured CNS. In this review, we describe the temporal sequence of immunological events that follow CNS injury. Beginning with immediate changes at the injury site, including death of neural cells and release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), and progressing through innate and adaptive immune responses, we describe the cascade of inflammatory mediators and the implications of their post-injury effects. We conclude by proposing a revised interpretation of immune privilege in the brain, which takes beneficial neuro-immune communications into account.

  9. A non-cell autonomous mouse model of CNS haemangioblastoma mediated by mutant KRAS

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Leyuan; Al-Assar, Osama; Drynan, Lesley F.; Arends, Mark J.; Tyers, Pam; Barker, Roger A.; Rabbitts, Terence H.

    2017-01-01

    Haemangioblastoma is a rare malignancy of the CNS where vascular proliferation causes lesions due to endothelial propagation. We found that conditionally expressing mutant Kras, using Rag1-Cre, gave rise to CNS haemangioblastoma in the cortex and cerebellum in mice that present with highly vascular tumours with stromal cells similar to human haemangioblastomas. The aberrant haemangioblastoma endothelial cells do not express mutant Kras but rather the mutant oncogene is expressed in CNS interstitial cells, including neuronal cells and progeny. This demonstrates a non-cell autonomous origin of this disease that is unexpectedly induced via Rag1-Cre expression in CNS interstitial cells. This is the first time that mutant RAS has been shown to stimulate non-cell autonomous proliferation in malignancy and suggests that mutant RAS can control endothelial cell proliferation in neo-vascularisation when expressed in certain cells. PMID:28322325

  10. The role of MeCP2 in CNS development and function

    PubMed Central

    Na, Elisa S.; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is a direct consequence of functional mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) gene, which has focused attention on epigenetic mechanisms in neurons. MeCP2 is widely believed to be a transcriptional repressor although it may have additional functions in the CNS. Genetic mouse models that compromise MeCP2 function demonstrate that homeostatic regulation of MeCP2 is necessary for normal CNS functioning. Recent work has also demonstrated that MeCP2 plays an important role in mediating synaptic transmission in the CNS in particular, spontaneous neurotransmission and short-term synaptic plasticity. This review will discuss the role of MeCP2 in CNS development and function, as well as a potential important role for MeCP2 and epigenetic processes involved in mediating transcriptional repression in Rett syndrome. PMID:20515694

  11. Auto Transplant for High Risk or Relapsed Solid or CNS Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Ewing's Family Tumors; Renal Tumors; Hepatoblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Primary Malignant Brain Neoplasms; Retinoblastoma; Medulloblastoma; Supra-tentorial Primative Neuro-Ectodermal Tumor (PNET); Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor (AT/RT); CNS Tumors; Germ Cell Tumors

  12. The Diverse Roles of Microglia in the Neurodegenerative Aspects of Central Nervous System (CNS) Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kaitlyn K.; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) involve inflammatory components and result in neurodegenerative processes. Microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, are the first responders after insults to the CNS and comprise a major link between the inflammation and neurodegeneration. Here, we will focus on the roles of microglia in two autoimmune diseases: the prevalent condition of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the much rarer Rasmussen’s encephalitis (RE). Although there is an abundance of evidence that microglia actively contribute to neuronal damage in pathological states such as MS and RE, there is also evidence of important reparative functions. As current research supports a more complex and diverse array of functions and phenotypes that microglia can assume, it is an especially interesting time to examine what is known about both the damaging and restorative roles that microglia can play in the inflammatory CNS setting. We will also discuss the pharmacological approaches to modulating microglia towards a more neuroprotective state. PMID:28245617

  13. Immunosuppressive Mechanisms of Malignant Gliomas: Parallels at Non-CNS Sites

    PubMed Central

    Perng, Powell; Lim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) possesses powerful local and global immunosuppressive capabilities that modulate unwanted inflammatory reactions in nervous tissue. These same immune-modulatory mechanisms are also co-opted by malignant brain tumors and pose a formidable challenge to brain tumor immunotherapy. Routes by which malignant gliomas coordinate immunosuppression include the mechanical and functional barriers of the CNS; immunosuppressive cytokines and catabolites; immune checkpoint molecules; tumor-infiltrating immune cells; and suppressor immune cells. The challenges to overcoming tumor-induced immunosuppression, however, are not unique to the brain, and several analogous immunosuppressive mechanisms also exist for primary tumors outside of the CNS. Ultimately, the immune responses in the CNS are linked and complementary to immune processes in the periphery, and advances in tumor immunotherapy in peripheral sites may therefore illuminate novel approaches to brain tumor immunotherapy, and vice versa. PMID:26217588

  14. Mammalian Cell-Based Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Pratik; Franz, Briana; Bhunia, Arun K.

    Use of living cells or cellular components in biosensors is receiving increased attention and opens a whole new area of functional diagnostics. The term "mammalian cell-based biosensor" is designated to biosensors utilizing mammalian cells as the biorecognition element. Cell-based assays, such as high-throughput screening (HTS) or cytotoxicity testing, have already emerged as dependable and promising approaches to measure the functionality or toxicity of a compound (in case of HTS); or to probe the presence of pathogenic or toxigenic entities in clinical, environmental, or food samples. External stimuli or changes in cellular microenvironment sometimes perturb the "normal" physiological activities of mammalian cells, thus allowing CBBs to screen, monitor, and measure the analyte-induced changes. The advantage of CBBs is that they can report the presence or absence of active components, such as live pathogens or active toxins. In some cases, mammalian cells or plasma membranes are used as electrical capacitors and cell-cell and cell-substrate contact is measured via conductivity or electrical impedance. In addition, cytopathogenicity or cytotoxicity induced by pathogens or toxins resulting in apoptosis or necrosis could be measured via optical devices using fluorescence or luminescence. This chapter focuses mainly on the type and applications of different mammalian cell-based sensor systems.

  15. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James T.; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R.; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell–mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4–producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4–deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4–deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell–derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4–producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration. PMID:25607842

  16. The genetic and epigenetic landscape for CNS drug discovery targeting cross-diagnostic behavioral domains.

    PubMed

    de Mooij-van Malsen, Annetrude J G; Pjetri, Eneda; Kas, Martien J

    2015-04-15

    Animal studies play a central role in the identification and testing of novel drugs for CNS disorders. In his longstanding career, Berend Olivier has significantly contributed to CNS drug discovery by applying and supporting novel views and methodologies in the fields of behavioral neuroscience, pharmacology, and (epi-) genetics. Here we review and put forward some of these integrated approaches that have led to a productive collaboration and new insights into the genetic and epigenetic regulation of neurobehavioural traits related to psychiatric disorders.

  17. Role of Academic Drug Discovery in the Quest for New CNS Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yokley, Brian H; Hartman, Matthew; Slusher, Barbara S

    2017-03-15

    There was a greater than 50% decline in central nervous system (CNS) drug discovery and development programs by major pharmaceutical companies from 2009 to 2014. This decline was paralleled by a rise in the number of university led drug discovery centers, many in the CNS area, and a growth in the number of public-private drug discovery partnerships. Diverse operating models have emerged as the academic drug discovery centers adapt to this changing ecosystem.

  18. Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase promotes axon growth in mammalian central nervous system neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meifan; Geoffroy, Cédric G.; Wong, Hetty N.; Tress, Oliver; Nguyen, Mallorie T.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; Jin, Yishi; Zheng, Binhai

    2016-01-01

    Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase (LZK/MAP3K13) is a member of the mixed lineage kinase family with high sequence identity to Dual Leucine Zipper Kinase (DLK/MAP3K12). While DLK is established as a key regulator of axonal responses to injury, the role of LZK in mammalian neurons is poorly understood. By gain- and loss-of-function analyses in neuronal cultures, we identify LZK as a novel positive regulator of axon growth. LZK signals specifically through MKK4 and JNKs among MAP2Ks and MAPKs respectively in neuronal cells, with JNK activity positively regulating LZK protein levels. Neuronal maturation or activity deprivation activates the LZK-MKK4-JNK pathway. LZK and DLK share commonalities in signaling, regulation, and effects on axon extension. Furthermore, LZK-dependent regulation of DLK protein expression and the lack of additive effects on axon growth upon co-manipulation suggest complex functional interaction and cross-regulation between these two kinases. Together, our data support the possibility for two structurally related MAP3Ks to work in concert to mediate axonal responses to external insult or injury in mammalian CNS neurons. PMID:27511108

  19. Innate-Adaptive Crosstalk: How Dendritic Cells Shape Immune Responses in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Héninger, Erika; Harris, Melissa G; Lee, JangEun; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous group of professional antigen presenting cells that lie in a nexus between innate and adaptive immunity because they recognize and respond to danger signals and subsequently initiate and regulate effector T-cell responses. Initially thought to be absent from the CNS, both plasmacytoid and conventional DCs as well as DC precursors have recently been detected in several CNS compartments where they are seemingly poised for responding to injury and pathogens. Additionally, monocyte-derived DCs rapidly accumulate in the inflamed CNS where they, along with other DC subsets, may function to locally regulate effector T-cells and/or carry antigens to CNS-draining cervical lymph nodes. In this review we highlight recent research showing that (a) distinct inflammatory stimuli differentially recruit DC subsets to the CNS; (b) DC recruitment across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is regulated by adhesion molecules, growth factors, and chemokines; and (c) DCs positively or negatively regulate immune responses in the CNS. PMID:21948376

  20. Changes in microtubule stability and density in myelin-deficient shiverer mouse CNS axons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, L. L.; Witt, A. S.; Payne, H. R.; Shine, H. D.; Brady, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    Altered axon-Schwann cell interactions in PNS myelin-deficient Trembler mice result in changed axonal transport rates, neurofilament and microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation, neurofilament density, and microtubule stability. To determine whether PNS and CNS myelination have equivalent effects on axons, neurofilaments, and microtubules in CNS, myelin-deficient shiverer axons were examined. The genetic defect in shiverer is a deletion in the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene, an essential component of CNS myelin. As a result, shiverer mice have little or no compact CNS myelin. Slow axonal transport rates in shiverer CNS axons were significantly increased, in contrast to the slowing in demyelinated PNS nerves. Even more striking were substantial changes in the composition and properties of microtubules in shiverer CNS axons. The density of axonal microtubules is increased, reflecting increased expression of tubulin in shiverer, and the stability of microtubules is drastically reduced in shiverer axons. Shiverer transgenic mice with two copies of a wild-type myelin basic protein transgene have an intermediate level of compact myelin, making it possible to determine whether the actual level of compact myelin is an important regulator of axonal microtubules. Both increased microtubule density and reduced microtubule stability were still observed in transgenic mouse nerves, indicating that signals beyond synaptogenesis and the mere presence of compact myelin are required for normal regulation of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton.

  1. Protective Autoimmunity: A Unifying Model for the Immune Network Involved in CNS Repair.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michal; Raposo, Catarina

    2014-08-01

    Immune activity in the CNS parenchyma under various acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions has been often interpreted as a sign of pathological inflammation. The apparent resemblance of the local neuroinflammatory processes to autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), generated the view that, despite differences in etiology and pathology, neurodegenerative disorders with a local inflammatory component can benefit from systemic anti-inflammatory therapy. In addition, as CNS self-reactive T cells are associated with the etiology of MS, autoimmunity was assumed to solely reflect pathology, and therefore, was universally linked to autoimmune disease. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that CNS-specific T cells, along with circulating and local innate immune cells, can enhance CNS healing processes following non-infectious injuries, or any deviation from homeostasis, including chronic pathological conditions. Here, we discuss the theory of "protective autoimmunity," which describes the activity of an immune cell network encompassing effector and regulatory T cells with specificity for CNS antigens, in CNS maintenance and repair. Such an immune network, evoked in response to external and internal threats, functions in a tightly regulated way, ensuring restoration of the brain's equilibrium and return to homeostasis.

  2. Thiazole: a promising heterocycle for the development of potent CNS active agents.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Chandra Bhushan; Kumari, Shikha; Tiwari, Manisha

    2015-03-06

    Thiazole is a valuable scaffold in the field of medicinal chemistry and has accounted to display a variety of biological activities. Thiazole and its derivatives have attracted continuing interest to design various novel CNS active agents. In the past few decades, thiazoles have been widely used to develop a variety of therapeutic agents against numerous CNS targets. Thiazole containing drug molecules are currently being used in treatment of various CNS disorders and a number of thiazole derivatives are also presently in clinical trials. A lot of research has been carried out on thiazole and their analogues, which has proved their efficacy to overcome several CNS disorders in rodent as well as primate models. The aim of present review is to highlights diverse CNS activities displayed by thiazole and their derivatives. SAR of this nucleus has also been well discussed. This review covers the recent updates present in literature and will surely provide a greater insight for the designing and development of potent thiazole based CNS active agents in future.

  3. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Peter J; Calderon, Tina M; Coley, Jacqueline S; Berman, Joan W

    2013-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70 % of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers.

  4. CNS infections in Greenland: A nationwide register-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nordholm, Anne Christine; Søborg, Bolette; Andersson, Mikael; Hoffmann, Steen; Skinhøj, Peter; Koch, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Background Indigenous Arctic people suffer from high rates of infectious diseases. However, the burden of central nervous system (CNS) infections is poorly documented. This study aimed to estimate incidence rates and mortality of CNS infections among Inuits and non-Inuits in Greenland and in Denmark. Methods We conducted a nationwide cohort study using the populations of Greenland and Denmark 1990–2012. Information on CNS infection hospitalizations and pathogens was retrieved from national registries and laboratories. Incidence rates were estimated as cases per 100,000 person-years. Incidence rate ratios were calculated using log-linear Poisson-regression. Mortality was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Log Rank test. Results The incidence rate of CNS infections was twice as high in Greenland (35.6 per 100,000 person years) as in Denmark (17.7 per 100,000 person years), but equally high among Inuits in Greenland and Denmark (38.2 and 35.4, respectively). Mortality from CNS infections was 2 fold higher among Inuits (10.5%) than among non-Inuits (4.8%) with a fivefold higher case fatality rate in Inuit toddlers. Conclusion Overall, Inuits living in Greenland and Denmark suffer from twice the rate of CNS infections compared with non-Inuits, and Inuit toddlers carried the highest risk of mortality. Further studies regarding risk factors such as genetic susceptibility, life style and socioeconomic factors are warranted. PMID:28158207

  5. Involvement of opsins in mammalian sperm thermotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Boryshpolets, Sergii; Afanzar, Oshri; Brandis, Alexander; Nevo, Reinat; Kiss, Vladimir; Eisenbach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A unique characteristic of mammalian sperm thermotaxis is extreme temperature sensitivity, manifested by the capacity of spermatozoa to respond to temperature changes of <0.0006 °C as they swim their body-length distance. The identity of the sensing system that confers this exceptional sensitivity on spermatozoa is not known. Here we show that the temperature-sensing system of mammalian spermatozoa involves opsins, known to be G-protein-coupled receptors that act as photosensors in vision. We demonstrate by molecular, immunological, and functional approaches that opsins are present in human and mouse spermatozoa at specific sites, which depend on the species and the opsin type, and that they are involved in sperm thermotaxis via two signalling pathways—the phospholipase C and the cyclic-nucleotide pathways. Our results suggest that, depending on the context and the tissue, mammalian opsins act not only as photosensors but also as thermosensors. PMID:26537127

  6. Mammalian diversity: gametes, embryos and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Richard R; Eakin, Guy S; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2006-01-01

    The class Mammalia is composed of approximately 4800 extant species. These mammalian species are divided into three subclasses that include the monotremes, marsupials and eutherians. Monotremes are remarkable because these mammals are born from eggs laid outside of the mother's body. Marsupial mammals have relatively short gestation periods and give birth to highly altricial young that continue a significant amount of 'fetal' development after birth, supported by a highly sophisticated lactation. Less than 10% of mammalian species are monotremes or marsupials, so the great majority of mammals are grouped into the subclass Eutheria, including mouse and human. Mammals exhibit great variety in morphology, physiology and reproduction. In the present article, we highlight some of this remarkable diversity relative to the mouse, one of the most widely used mammalian model organisms, and human. This diversity creates challenges and opportunities for gamete and embryo collection, culture and transfer technologies.

  7. Effect of Microgravity on Mammalian Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, H.; Blackshear, M.; Mahaffey, K.; Khan, A. A.; Delucas, L.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on mammalian system is an important and interesting topic for scientific investigation, since NASA s objective is to send manned flights to planets like Mars and eventual human colonization. The Astronauts will be exposed to microgravity environment for a long duration of time during these flights. Our objective of research is to conduct in vitro studies for the effect of microgravity on mammalian immune system and nervous system. We did our preliminary investigations by exposing mammalian lymphocytes and astrocyte cells to a microgravity simulator cell bioreactor designed by NASA and manufactured at Synthecon, Inc. (USA).Our initial results showed no significant change in cytokine expression in these cells up to a time period of 120 hours exposure. Our future experiments will involve exposure for a longer period of time.

  8. Effect of Microgravity on Mammalian Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, H.; Blackshear, M.; Mahaffey, K.; Knight, C.; Khan, A. A.; Delucas, L.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on mammalian system is an important and interesting topic for scientific investigation, since NASA s objective is to send manned flights to planets like Mars and eventual human colonization.The Astronauts will be exposed to microgravity environment for a long duration of time during these flights.Our objective of research is to conduct in vitro studies for the effect of microgravity on mammalian immune system.We did our preliminary investigations by exposing mammalian lymphocytes to a microgravity simulator cell bioreactor designed by NASA and manufactured at Synthecon Inc (USA).Our initial results showed no significant change in cytokine expression in these cells for a time period of forty eight hours exposure.Our future experiments will involve exposure for a longer period of time.

  9. The mammalian blastema: regeneration at our fingertips

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi C.; Dawson, Lindsay A.; Schanes, Paula P.; Yu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the mouse, digit tip regeneration progresses through a series of discrete stages that include inflammation, histolysis, epidermal closure, blastema formation, and redifferentiation. Recent studies reveal how each regenerative stage influences subsequent stages to establish a blastema that directs the successful regeneration of a complex mammalian structure. The focus of this review is on early events of healing and how an amputation wound transitions into a functional blastema. The stepwise formation of a mammalian blastema is proposed to provide a model for how specific targeted treatments can enhance regenerative performance in humans. PMID:27499871

  10. Structure and diversity in mammalian accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Meisami, E; Bhatnagar, K P

    1998-12-15

    The accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) is the first neural integrative center for the olfactory-like vomeronasal sensory system. In this article, we first briefly present an overview of vomeronasal system organization and review the history of the discovery of mammalian AOB. Next, we briefly review the evolution of the vomeronasal system in vertebrates, in particular the reptiles. Following these introductory aspects, the structure of the rodent AOB, as typical of the well-developed mammalian AOB, is presented, detailing laminar organization and cell types as well as aspects of the homology with the main olfactory bulb. Then, the evolutionary origin and diversity of the AOB in mammalian orders and species is discussed, describing structural, phylogenetic, and species-specific variation in the AOB location, shape, and size and morphologic differentiation and development. The AOB is believed to be absent in fishes but present in terrestrial tetrapods including amphibians; among the reptiles AOB is absent in crocodiles, present in turtles, snakes, and some lizards where it may be as large or larger than the main bulb. The AOB is absent in bird and in the aquatic mammals (whales, porpoises, manatees). Among other mammals, AOB is present in the monotremes and marsupials, edentates, and in the majority of the placental mammals like carnivores, herbivores, as well as rodents and lagomorphs. Most bat species do not have an AOB and among those where one is found, it shows marked variation in size and morphologic development. Among insectivores and primates, AOB shows marked variation in occurrence, size, and morphologic development. It is small in shrews and moles, large in hedgehogs and prosimians; AOB continues to persist in New World monkeys but is not found in the adults of the higher primates such as the Old World monkeys, apes, and humans. In many species where AOB is absent in the adult, it often develops in the embryo and fetus but regresses in later stages of

  11. Activity-Driven CNS Changes in Learning and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-14

    possibility that in the adult the plasticity may be restored by NMDA treatment . Many questions remain. These concern the interaction between calcium...permission from reference 27. fields after TTX or strobe treatment ; the enlarged multiunit receptive fields were therefore due to abnormal convergence...The stripes were expected to be present at the time of treatment , but after several weeks of treatment with D-AP5 there were no stripes in the area

  12. The Coordinated Noninvasive Studies (CNS) Project. Phase 1. Appendices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    our PET library of 29 studie using auditory stimulation in 0 normal young adults to document patterns of global brain asymmetries . The first two...Advisor) "Regional cerebral blood flow activation asymmetries in human brains during rest and auditory stimulation" (1989) Ph.D. Dissertations: Carol...Soc Amer 85: S38. "Global brain asymmetries in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during resting conditions with positron emission tomography (PET

  13. Tcf7l2/Tcf4 Transcriptional Repressor Function Requires HDAC Activity in the Developing Vertebrate CNS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Matise, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of functionally distinct neuronal subtypes within the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) requires the precise regulation of progenitor gene expression in specific neuronal territories during early embryogenesis. Accumulating evidence has implicated histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins in cell specification, proliferation, and differentiation in diverse embryonic and adult tissues. However, although HDAC proteins have shown to be expressed in the developing vertebrate neural tube, their specific role in CNS neural progenitor fate specification remains unclear. Prior work from our lab showed that the Tcf7l2/Tcf4 transcription factor plays a key role in ventral progenitor lineage segregation by differential repression of two key specification factors, Nkx2.2 and Olig2. In this study, we found that administration of HDAC inhibitors (Valproic Acid (VPA), Trichostatin-A (TSA), or sodium butyrate) in chick embryos in ovo disrupted normal progenitor gene segregation in the developing neural tube, indicating that HDAC activity is required for this process. Further, using functional and pharmacological approaches in vivo, we found that HDAC activity is required for the differential repression of Nkx2.2 and Olig2 by Tcf7l2/Tcf4. Finally, using dominant-negative functional assays, we provide evidence that Tcf7l2/Tcf4 repression also requires Gro/TLE/Grg co-repressor factors. Together, our data support a model where the transcriptional repressor activity of Tcf7l2/Tcf4 involves functional interactions with both HDAC and Gro/TLE/Grg co-factors at specific target gene regulatory elements in the developing neural tube, and that this activity is required for the proper segregation of the Nkx2.2 (p3) and Olig2 (pMN) expressing cells from a common progenitor pool. PMID:27668865

  14. Mitochondrial DNMT3A and DNA methylation in skeletal muscle and CNS of transgenic mouse models of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Margaret; Gertz, Barry; Chestnut, Barry A.; Martin, Lee J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is an epigenetic modification of DNA catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases. Cytosine methylation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is believed to have relative underrepresentation; however, possible tissue and cell differences in mtDNA methylation and relationships to neurodegenerative disease have not been examined. We show by immunoblotting that DNA methyltransferase 3A (Dnmt3a) isoform is present in pure mitochondria of adult mouse CNS, skeletal muscle, and testes, and adult human cerebral cortex. Dnmt1 was not detected in adult mouse CNS or skeletal muscle mitochondria but appeared bound to the outer mitochondrial membrane. Immunofluorescence confirmed the mitochondrial localization of Dnmt3a and showed 5-methylcytosine (5mC) immunoreactivity in mitochondria of neurons and skeletal muscle myofibers. DNA pyrosequencing of two loci (D-loop and 16S rRNA gene) and twelve cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites in mtDNA directly showed a tissue differential presence of 5mC. Because mitochondria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the disease mechanisms are uncertain, we evaluated mitochondrial Dnmt3a and 5mC levels in human superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) transgenic mouse models of ALS. Mitochondrial Dnmt3a protein levels were reduced significantly in skeletal muscle and spinal cord at presymptomatic or early disease. Immunofluorescence showed that 5mC immunoreactivity was present in mitochondria of neurons and skeletal myofibers, and 5mC immunoreactivity became aggregated in motor neurons of ALS mice. DNA pyrosequencing revealed significant abnormalities in 16S rRNA gene methylation in ALS mice. Immunofluorescence showed that 5mC immunoreactivity can be sequestered into autophagosomes and that mitophagy was increased and mitochondrial content was decreased in skeletal muscle in ALS mice. This study reveals a tissue-preferential mitochondrial localization of Dnmt3a and presence of cytosine methylation in mt

  15. Medical and experimental mammalian genetics: A perspective

    SciTech Connect

    McKusick, V.A.; Roderick, T.H.; Mori, J.; Paul, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure and Organization of Mammalian Chromosomes: Normal and Abnormal; Globin Gene Structure and the Nature of Mutation; Retroviral DNA Content of the Mouse Genome; Maternal Genes: Mitochondrial Diseases; Human Evolution; and Prospects for Gene Replacement Therapy.

  16. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly ‘housekeeping’, whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research. PMID:24670764

  17. Architecture of mammalian respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R; Zhu, Jiapeng; Hirst, Judy

    2014-11-06

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is essential for oxidative phosphorylation in mammalian mitochondria. It couples electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with proton translocation across the energy-transducing inner membrane, providing electrons for respiration and driving ATP synthesis. Mammalian complex I contains 44 different nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits, with a combined mass of 1 MDa. The 14 conserved 'core' subunits have been structurally defined in the minimal, bacterial complex, but the structures and arrangement of the 30 'supernumerary' subunits are unknown. Here we describe a 5 Å resolution structure of complex I from Bos taurus heart mitochondria, a close relative of the human enzyme, determined by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. We present the structures of the mammalian core subunits that contain eight iron-sulphur clusters and 60 transmembrane helices, identify 18 supernumerary transmembrane helices, and assign and model 14 supernumerary subunits. Thus, we considerably advance knowledge of the structure of mammalian complex I and the architecture of its supernumerary ensemble around the core domains. Our structure provides insights into the roles of the supernumerary subunits in regulation, assembly and homeostasis, and a basis for understanding the effects of mutations that cause a diverse range of human diseases.

  18. Architecture of mammalian respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is essential for oxidative phosphorylation in mammalian mitochondria. It couples electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with proton translocation across the energy-transducing inner membrane, providing electrons for respiration and driving ATP synthesis. Mammalian complex I contains 44 different nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits, with a combined mass of 1 MDa. The fourteen conserved ‘core’ subunits have been structurally defined in the minimal, bacterial complex, but the structures and arrangement of the 30 ‘supernumerary’ subunits are unknown. Here, we describe a 5 Å resolution structure of complex I from Bos taurus heart mitochondria, a close relative of the human enzyme, determined by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. We present the structures of the mammalian core subunits that contain eight iron-sulphur clusters and 60 transmembrane helices, identify 18 supernumerary transmembrane helices, and assign and model 14 supernumerary subunits. Thus, we significantly advance knowledge of the structure of mammalian complex I and the architecture of its supernumerary ensemble around the core domains. Our structure provides insights into the roles of the supernumerary subunits in regulation, assembly and homeostasis, and a basis for understanding the effects of mutations that cause a diverse range of human diseases. PMID:25209663

  19. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  20. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  1. Cultured normal mammalian tissue and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cell aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  2. Structure of mammalian respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), one of the largest membrane-bound enzymes in the cell, powers ATP synthesis in mammalian mitochondria by using the reducing potential of NADH to drive protons across the inner membrane. Mammalian complex I1 contains 45 subunits, comprising 14 core subunits that house the catalytic machinery and are conserved from bacteria to humans, and a mammalian-specific cohort of 31 supernumerary subunits1,2. Knowledge about the structures and functions of the supernumerary subunits is fragmentary. Here, we describe a 4.2 Å resolution single-particle cryoEM structure of complex I from Bos taurus. We locate and model all 45 subunits to provide the entire structure of the mammalian complex. Furthermore, computational sorting of the particles identified different structural classes, related by subtle domain movements, which reveal conformationally-dynamic regions and match biochemical descriptions of the ‘active-to-deactive’ enzyme transition that occurs during hypoxia3,4. Thus, our structures provide a foundation for understanding complex I assembly5 and the effects of mutations that cause clinically-relevant complex I dysfunctions6, insights into the structural and functional roles of the supernumerary subunits, and new information on the mechanism and regulation of catalysis. PMID:27509854

  3. Crossroads between Bacterial and Mammalian Glycosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Brockhausen, Inka

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial glycosyltransferases (GT) often synthesize the same glycan linkages as mammalian GT; yet, they usually have very little sequence identity. Nevertheless, enzymatic properties, folding, substrate specificities, and catalytic mechanisms of these enzyme proteins may have significant similarity. Thus, bacterial GT can be utilized for the enzymatic synthesis of both bacterial and mammalian types of complex glycan structures. A comparison is made here between mammalian and bacterial enzymes that synthesize epitopes found in mammalian glycoproteins, and those found in the O antigens of Gram-negative bacteria. These epitopes include Thomsen–Friedenreich (TF or T) antigen, blood group O, A, and B, type 1 and 2 chains, Lewis antigens, sialylated and fucosylated structures, and polysialic acids. Many different approaches can be taken to investigate the substrate binding and catalytic mechanisms of GT, including crystal structure analyses, mutations, comparison of amino acid sequences, NMR, and mass spectrometry. Knowledge of the protein structures and functions helps to design GT for specific glycan synthesis and to develop inhibitors. The goals are to develop new strategies to reduce bacterial virulence and to synthesize vaccines and other biologically active glycan structures. PMID:25368613

  4. Ticks Take Cues from Mammalian Interferon.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Aravinda M

    2016-07-13

    Interferons are considered a first line of immune defense restricted to vertebrates. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Smith et al. (2016) demonstrate that mammalian interferon γ activates an antimicrobial response within ticks feeding on blood. The study suggests that arthropods have a parallel interferon-like defense system.

  5. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Alistair R R; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J; Meehan, Terrence F; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A; Ishizu, Yuri; Young, Robert S; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M; Arakawa, Takahiro; Archer, John A C; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Rennie, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J; Beckhouse, Anthony G; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S B; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Favorov, Alexander V; Fisher, Malcolm E; Frith, Martin C; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furino, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B; Gibson, Andrew P; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J; Ho Sui, Shannan J; Hofmann, Oliver M; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Furni; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S; Kenna, Tony J; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S Peter; Knox, Alan J; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T; Laros, Jeroen F J; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; de Lima Morais, David A; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Noma, Shohei; Noazaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohimiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G D; Rackham, Owen J L; Ramilowski, Jordan A; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaai; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Naoko; Swoboda, Rolf K; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyodo, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Elvind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M; Verado, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A; Winteringham, Louise N; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Susan E; Zhang, Peter G; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B; Taylor, Martin S; Makeev, Vsevolod J; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-03-27

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly 'housekeeping', whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research.

  6. Physiology of the intrathecal bolus: the leptomeningeal route for macromolecule and particle delivery to CNS.

    PubMed

    Papisov, Mikhail I; Belov, Vasily V; Gannon, Kimberley S

    2013-05-06

    Presently, there are no effective treatments for several diseases involving the CNS, which is protected by the blood-brain, blood-CSF, and blood-arachnoid barriers. Traversing any of these barriers is difficult, especially for macromolecular drugs and particulates. However, there is significant experimental evidence that large molecules can be delivered to the CNS through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The flux of the interstitial fluid in the CNS parenchyma, as well as the macro flux of CSF in the leptomeningeal space, are believed to be generally opposite to the desirable direction of CNS-targeted drug delivery. On the other hand, the available data suggest that the layer of pia mater lining the CNS surface is not continuous, and the continuity of the leptomeningeal space (LMS) with the perivascular spaces penetrating into the parenchyma provides an unexplored avenue for drug transport deep into the brain via CSF. The published data generally do not support the view that macromolecule transport from the LMS to CNS is hindered by the interstitial and CSF fluxes. The data strongly suggest that leptomeningeal transport depends on the location and volume of the administered bolus and consists of four processes: (i) pulsation-assisted convectional transport of the solutes with CSF, (ii) active "pumping" of CSF into the periarterial spaces, (iii) solute transport from the latter to and within the parenchyma, and (iv) neuronal uptake and axonal transport. The final outcome will depend on the drug molecule behavior in each of these processes, which have not been studied systematically. The data available to date suggest that many macromolecules and nanoparticles can be delivered to CNS in biologically significant amounts (>1% of the administered dose); mechanistic investigation of macromolecule and particle behavior in CSF may result in a significantly more efficient leptomeningeal drug delivery than previously thought.

  7. Emerging roles of system [Formula: see text] antiporter and its inhibition in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhaval; Kharkar, Prashant S; Nandave, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    System [Formula: see text] is an antiporter belonging to the hetero(di)meric amino acid transporter family. It is located on astrocytes as well as on blood-brain barrier within the CNS. It plays a pivotal role in free radical neutralization as well as neuronal signalling by regulating the glutathione production which occurs via the exchange of intracellular glutamate with extracellular cystine at 1:1 molar ratio. Understandably, it is a vital component responsible for the maintenance of neuronal homeostasis (e.g. redox state). Hence, it could be postulated that any perturbation in system [Formula: see text] function may contribute, directly or indirectly, to the pathophysiology of a variety of CNS disorders like Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, drug addiction, depression, multiple sclerosis, hypoglycemic neuronal cell death, glioma, and excitotoxicity, making system [Formula: see text] a promising target for treating CNS disorders. In recent times, recognizing the potential of this target, variety of inhibitors has been synthesized by modifying commercially available potent inhibitors including sulfasalazine, erastin, and sorafenib. Although, they have demonstrated efficacy, the in-depth data is still lacking to warrant their use for the treatment of aforementioned CNS disorders. In this review, we discuss the in-depth role of system [Formula: see text] transporter in maintaining normal physiology as well as in the pathophysiology of CNS diseases. Additionally, we have also listed some of the potent inhibitors of system [Formula: see text]. In conclusion, the critical role of system [Formula: see text] in multiple CNS disorders and advanced research on its inhibitors have promising future prospects for better management of the CNS ailments.

  8. Connexin and pannexin signaling pathways, an architectural blueprint for CNS physiology and pathology?

    PubMed

    Decrock, Elke; De Bock, Marijke; Wang, Nan; Bultynck, Geert; Giaume, Christian; Naus, Christian C; Green, Colin R; Leybaert, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is composed of a highly heterogeneous population of cells. Dynamic interactions between different compartments (neuronal, glial, and vascular systems) drive CNS function and allow to integrate and process information as well as to respond accordingly. Communication within this functional unit, coined the neuro-glio-vascular unit (NGVU), typically relies on two main mechanisms: direct cell-cell coupling via gap junction channels (GJCs) and paracrine communication via the extracellular compartment, two routes to which channels composed of transmembrane connexin (Cx) or pannexin (Panx) proteins can contribute. Multiple isoforms of both protein families are present in the CNS and each CNS cell type is characterized by a unique Cx/Panx portfolio. Over the last two decades, research has uncovered a multilevel platform via which Cxs and Panxs can influence different cellular functions within a tissue: (1) Cx GJCs enable a direct cell-cell communication of small molecules, (2) Cx hemichannels and Panx channels can contribute to autocrine/paracrine signaling pathways, and (3) different structural domains of these proteins allow for channel-independent functions, such as cell-cell adhesion, interactions with the cytoskeleton, and the activation of intracellular signaling pathways. In this paper, we discuss current knowledge on their multifaceted contribution to brain development and to specific processes in the NGVU, including synaptic transmission and plasticity, glial signaling, vasomotor control, and blood-brain barrier integrity in the mature CNS. By highlighting both physiological and pathological conditions, it becomes evident that Cxs and Panxs can play a dual role in the CNS and that an accurate fine-tuning of each signaling mechanism is crucial for normal CNS physiology.

  9. TNF and its receptors in the CNS: The essential, the desirable and the deleterious effects.

    PubMed

    Probert, L

    2015-08-27

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is the prototypic pro-inflammatory cytokine. It is central to host defense and inflammatory responses but under certain circumstances also triggers cell death and tissue degeneration. Its pleiotropic effects often lead to opposing outcomes during the development of immune-mediated diseases, particularly those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). The reported contradictions may result from lack of precision in discussing TNF. TNF signaling comprises at minimum a two-ligand (soluble and transmembrane TNF) and two-receptor (TNFR1 and TNFR2) system, with ligands and receptors both differentially expressed and regulated on different cell types. The "functional multiplicity" this engenders is the focus of much research, but there is still no general consensus on functional outcomes of TNF signaling in general, let alone in the CNS. In this review, evidence showing the effects of TNF in the CNS under physiological and pathophysiological conditions is placed in the context of major advances in understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern TNF function in general. Thus the roles of TNF signaling in the CNS shift from the conventional dichotomy of beneficial and deleterious, that mainly explain effects under pathological conditions, to incorporate a growing number of "essential" and "desirable" roles for TNF and its main cellular source in the CNS, microglia, under physiological conditions including regulation of neuronal activity and maintenance of myelin. An improved holistic view of TNF function in the CNS might better reconcile the expansive experimental data with stark clinical evidence that reduced functioning of TNF and its dominant pro-inflammatory receptor, TNFR1, are risk factors for the development of multiple sclerosis. It will also facilitate the safe translation of basic research findings from animal models to humans and propel the development of more selective anti-TNF therapies aimed at selectively

  10. Contribution of Schwann Cells to Remyelination in a Naturally Occurring Canine Model of CNS Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Kristel; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Imbschweiler, Ilka; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Seehusen, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Gliogenesis under pathophysiological conditions is of particular clinical relevance since it may provide evidence for regeneration promoting cells recruitable for therapeutic purposes. There is evidence that neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR)-expressing cells emerge in the lesioned CNS. However, the phenotype and identity of these cells, and signals triggering their in situ generation under normal conditions and certain pathological situations has remained enigmatic. In the present study, we used a spontaneous, idiopathic and inflammatory CNS condition in dogs with prominent lympho-histiocytic infiltration as a model to study the phenotype of Schwann cells and their relation to Schwann cell remyelination within the CNS. Furthermore, the phenotype of p75NTR-expressing cells within the injured CNS was compared to their counter-part in control sciatic nerve and after peripheral nerve injury. In addition, organotypic slice cultures were used to further elucidate the origin of p75NTR-positive cells. In cerebral and cerebellar white and grey matter lesions as well as in the brain stem, p75NTR-positive cells co-expressed the transcription factor Sox2, but not GAP-43, GFAP, Egr2/Krox20, periaxin and PDGFR-α. Interestingly, and contrary to the findings in control sciatic nerves, p75NTR-expressing cells only co-localized with Sox2 in degenerative neuropathy, thus suggesting that such cells might represent dedifferentiated Schwann cells both in the injured CNS and PNS. Moreover, effective Schwann cell remyelination represented by periaxin- and P0-positive mature myelinating Schwann cells, was strikingly associated with the presence of p75NTR/Sox2-expressing Schwann cells. Intriguingly, the emergence of dedifferentiated Schwann cells was not affected by astrocytes, and a macrophage-dominated inflammatory response provided an adequate environment for Schwann cells plasticity within the injured CNS. Furthermore, axonal damage was reduced in brain stem areas with p75NTR/Sox2

  11. Contribution of Schwann Cells to Remyelination in a Naturally Occurring Canine Model of CNS Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Imbschweiler, Ilka; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Seehusen, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Gliogenesis under pathophysiological conditions is of particular clinical relevance since it may provide evidence for regeneration promoting cells recruitable for therapeutic purposes. There is evidence that neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR)-expressing cells emerge in the lesioned CNS. However, the phenotype and identity of these cells, and signals triggering their in situ generation under normal conditions and certain pathological situations has remained enigmatic. In the present study, we used a spontaneous, idiopathic and inflammatory CNS condition in dogs with prominent lympho-histiocytic infiltration as a model to study the phenotype of Schwann cells and their relation to Schwann cell remyelination within the CNS. Furthermore, the phenotype of p75NTR-expressing cells within the injured CNS was compared to their counter-part in control sciatic nerve and after peripheral nerve injury. In addition, organotypic slice cultures were used to further elucidate the origin of p75NTR-positive cells. In cerebral and cerebellar white and grey matter lesions as well as in the brain stem, p75NTR-positive cells co-expressed the transcription factor Sox2, but not GAP-43, GFAP, Egr2/Krox20, periaxin and PDGFR-α. Interestingly, and contrary to the findings in control sciatic nerves, p75NTR-expressing cells only co-localized with Sox2 in degenerative neuropathy, thus suggesting that such cells might represent dedifferentiated Schwann cells both in the injured CNS and PNS. Moreover, effective Schwann cell remyelination represented by periaxin- and P0-positive mature myelinating Schwann cells, was strikingly associated with the presence of p75NTR/Sox2-expressing Schwann cells. Intriguingly, the emergence of dedifferentiated Schwann cells was not affected by astrocytes, and a macrophage-dominated inflammatory response provided an adequate environment for Schwann cells plasticity within the injured CNS. Furthermore, axonal damage was reduced in brain stem areas with p75NTR/Sox2

  12. Brain-specific carnitine palmitoyl-transferase-1c: role in CNS fatty acid metabolism, food intake, and body weight.

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, Michael J; Cha, Seung Hun; Millington, David S; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Kurama, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M Daniel

    2008-05-01

    While the brain does not utilize fatty acids as a primary energy source, recent evidence shows that intermediates of fatty acid metabolism serve as hypothalamic sensors of energy status. Increased hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, an intermediate in fatty acid synthesis, is indicative of energy surplus and leads to the suppression of food intake and increased energy expenditure. Malonyl-CoA functions as an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1 (CPT1), a mitochondrial outer membrane enzyme that initiates translocation of fatty acids into mitochondria for oxidation. The mammalian brain expresses a unique homologous CPT1, CPT1c, that binds malonyl-CoA tightly but does not support fatty acid oxidation in vivo, in hypothalamic explants or in heterologous cell culture systems. CPT1c knockout (KO) mice under fasted or refed conditions do not exhibit an altered CNS transcriptome of genes known to be involved in fatty acid metabolism. CPT1c KO mice exhibit normal levels of metabolites and of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and fatty acyl-CoA levels either in the fasted or refed states. However, CPT1c KO mice exhibit decreased food intake and lower body weight than wild-type littermates. In contrast, CPT1c KO mice gain excessive body weight and body fat when fed a high-fat diet while maintaining lower or equivalent food intake. Heterozygous mice display an intermediate phenotype. These findings provide further evidence that CPT1c plays a role in maintaining energy homeostasis, but not through altered fatty acid oxidation.

  13. AMPA receptor potentiators for the treatment of CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Michael J; Bleakman, David; Zimmerman, Dennis M; Nisenbaum, Eric S

    2004-06-01

    Glutamate alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors mediate most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system and also participate in forms of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie memory and learning, and the formation of neural networks during development. Molecular cloning techniques have shown that the AMPA receptor family is composed of four different subunits named GluR1-4 or GluRA-D (newly termed as Glu(A1)-Glu(A4)) and native AMPA receptors are most likely tetramers generated by the assembly of one or more of these subunits, yielding homomeric or heteromeric receptors. Additional complexity among AMPA receptors is conferred by alternative splicing of RNA for each subunit giving rise to flip and flop variants. Clinical and experimental data have suggested that positive modulation of AMPA receptors may be therapeutically effective in the treatment of cognitive deficits. Several classes of AMPA receptor potentiators have been reported, including pyrroliddones (piracetam, aniracetam), benzothiazides (cyclothiazide), benzylpiperidines (CX-516, CX-546) and more recently biarylpropylsulfonamides (LY392098, LY404187 and LY503430). These molecules enhance cognitive function in rodents, which appears to correlate with increased hippocampal activity. In addition, clinical studies have suggested that AMPA receptor modulators enhance cognitive function in elderly subjects, as well as patients suffering from neurological and psychiatric disorders. Several independent studies have suggested that AMPA receptors can increase BDNF expression by both calcium-dependent and independent pathways. For example, recent studies have shown that AMPA receptors interact with the protein tyrosine kinase, Lyn. Activation of Lyn can recruit the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway and increase the expression of BDNF. Therefore, in addition to directly enhancing glutamatergic synaptic transmission, AMPA

  14. The role of p21 in regulating mammalian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Larry Matthew; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2011-06-29

    The MRL (Murphy Roths Large) mouse has provided a unique model of adult mammalian regeneration as multiple tissues show this important phenotype. Furthermore, the healing employs a blastema-like structure similar to that seen in amphibian regenerating tissue. Cells from the MRL mouse display DNA damage, cell cycle G2/M arrest, and a reduced level of p21CIP1/WAF. A functional role for p21 was confirmed when tissue injury in an adult p21-/- mouse showed a healing phenotype that matched the MRL mouse, with the replacement of tissues, including cartilage, and with hair follicle formation and a lack of scarring. Since the major canonical function of p21 is part of the p53/p21 axis, we explored the consequences of p53 deletion. A regenerative response was not seen in a p53-/- mouse and the elimination of p53 from the MRL background had no negative effect on the regeneration of the MRL.p53-/- mouse. An exploration of other knockout mice to identify p21-dependent, p53-independent regulatory pathways involved in the regenerative response revealed another significant finding showing that elimination of transforming growth factor-β1 displayed a healing response as well. These results are discussed in terms of their effect on senescence and differentiation.

  15. The role of p21 in regulating mammalian regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The MRL (Murphy Roths Large) mouse has provided a unique model of adult mammalian regeneration as multiple tissues show this important phenotype. Furthermore, the healing employs a blastema-like structure similar to that seen in amphibian regenerating tissue. Cells from the MRL mouse display DNA damage, cell cycle G2/M arrest, and a reduced level of p21CIP1/WAF. A functional role for p21 was confirmed when tissue injury in an adult p21-/- mouse showed a healing phenotype that matched the MRL mouse, with the replacement of tissues, including cartilage, and with hair follicle formation and a lack of scarring. Since the major canonical function of p21 is part of the p53/p21 axis, we explored the consequences of p53 deletion. A regenerative response was not seen in a p53-/- mouse and the elimination of p53 from the MRL background had no negative effect on the regeneration of the MRL.p53-/- mouse. An exploration of other knockout mice to identify p21-dependent, p53-independent regulatory pathways involved in the regenerative response revealed another significant finding showing that elimination of transforming growth factor-β1 displayed a healing response as well. These results are discussed in terms of their effect on senescence and differentiation. PMID:21722344

  16. Overcoming the challenges in the effective delivery of chemotherapies to CNS solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Hemant

    2011-01-01

    Locoregional therapies, such as surgery and intratumoral chemotherapy, do not effectively treat infiltrative primary CNS solid tumors and multifocal metastatic solid tumor disease of the CNS. It also remains a challenge to treat such CNS malignant solid tumor disease with systemic chemotherapies, although these lipid-soluble small-molecule drugs demonstrate potent cytotoxicity in vitro. Even in the setting of a ‘normalized’ tumor microenvironment, small-molecule drugs do not accumulate to effective concentrations in the vast majority of tumor cells, which is due to the fact that small-molecule drugs have short blood half-lives. It has been recently shown that drug-conjugated spherical lipid-insoluble nanoparticles within the 7–10 nm size range can deliver therapeutic concentrations of drug fraction directly into individual tumor cells following systemic administration, since these functionalized particles maintain peak blood concentrations for several hours and are smaller than the physiologic upper limit of pore size in the VEGF-derived blood capillaries of solid tumors, which is approximately 12 nm. In this article, the physiologic and ultrastructural basis of this novel translational approach for the treatment of CNS, as well as non-CNS, solid cancers is reviewed. PMID:22163071

  17. Expanded CD8 T-cell sharing between periphery and CNS in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Marion; Garcia, Alexandra; Michel, Laure; Gainche-Salmon, Anne; Loussouarn, Delphine; Nicol, Bryan; Guillot, Flora; Hulin, Philippe; Nedellec, Steven; Baron, Daniel; Ramstein, Gérard; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie; Nicot, Arnaud B; Degauque, Nicolas; Laplaud, David A

    2015-01-01

    Objective In multiple sclerosis (MS), central nervous system (CNS), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and blood display TCR clonal expansions of CD8+ T cells. These clones have been assumed – but never demonstrated – to be similar in the three compartments. Addressing this key question is essential to infer the implication of peripheral clonally expanded CD8+ T cells in the disease. Methods For the first time, TCR Vβ repertoire from paired blood (purified CD8+ and CD4+ T cells), CSF and CNS (22 lesions, various inflammatory and demyelination statuses) samples from three MS patients was studied using complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) spectratyping and high-throughput sequencing. In parallel, blood and CNS clonally expanded CD8+ T cells were characterized by fluorescent staining. Results TCR Vβ repertoire analysis revealed strong sharing of predominant T-cell clones between CNS lesions, CSF, and blood CD8+ T cells. In parallel, we showed that blood oligoclonal CD8+ T cells exhibit characteristics of pathogenic cells, as they displayed a bias toward a memory phenotype in MS patients, with increased expression of CCR5, CD11a and Granzyme B (GZM-B) compared to non oligoclonal counterparts. CNS-infiltrating T cells were mainly CD8 expressing CD11a and GZM-B. Interpretation This study highlights the predominant implication of CD8+ T cells in MS pathophysiology and demonstrates that potentially aggressive CD8+ T cells can be easily identified and characterized from blood and CSF samples. PMID:26125037

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