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Sample records for adult mammalian muscle

  1. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  2. Control levels of acetylcholinesterase expression in the mammalian skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Grubic, Z; Zajc-Kreft, K; Brank, M; Mars, T; Komel, R; Miranda, A F

    1999-05-14

    Protein expression can be controled at different levels. Understanding acetylcholinesterase (EC. 3.1.1.7, AChE) expression in the living organisms therefore necessitates: (1) determination and mapping of control levels of AChE metabolism; (2) identification of the regulatory factors acting at these levels; and (3) detailed insight into the mechanisms of action of these factors. Here we summarize the results of our studies on the regulation of AChE expression in the mammalian skeletal muscle. Three experimental models were employed: in vitro innervated human muscle, mechanically denervated adult fast rat muscle, and the glucocorticoid treated fast rat muscle. In situ hybridization of AChE mRNA, combined with AChE histochemistry, revealed that different distribution patterns of AChE, observed during in vitro ontogenesis and synaptogenesis of human skeletal muscle, reflect alterations in the distribution of AChE mRNA (Z. Grubic, R. Komel, W.F. Walker, A.F. Miranda, Myoblast fusion and innervation with rat motor nerve alter the distribution of acetylcholinesterase and its mRNA in human muscle cultures, Neuron 14 (1995) 317-327). To study the mechanisms of AChE mRNA loss in denervated adult rat skeletal muscle, we exposed deproteinated AChE mRNA to various subcellular fractions in vitro. Fractions were isolated from the normal and denervated rat sternomastoideus muscle. We found significantly increased, but non-specific AChE mRNA degradation capacities in the three fractions studied, suggesting that increased susceptibility of muscle mRNA to degradation might be at least partly responsible for the decreased AChE mRNA observed under such conditions (K. Zajc-Kreft, S. Kreft, Z. Grubic, Degradation of AChE mRNA in the normal and denervated rat skeletal muscle, Book of Abstracts, The Sixth International Meeting on Cholinesterases, La Jolla, CA, March 20-24, 1998, p. A3.). In adult fast rat muscle, treated chronically with glucocorticoids, we found the fraction of early

  3. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  4. Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Hippocampus: Why the Dentate Gyrus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity…

  5. Immunological studies on the structure and function of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mammalian muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The specificity of the antibodies in the serum of a patient with myasthenia gravis for a the {alpha}-bungarotoxin binding sites of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) was examined using AChRs in the C2 mouse muscle cell line as a model. The antibodies were shown to be specific for one of the two toxin-binding sites. The effect of the antibodies in this myasthenic serum on the functional response of the receptor to cholinergic agonists was also examined using carbamylcholine-induced {sup 22}Na uptake into C2 myotubes as a measured of the receptor function. Antibodies specific for the {gamma}, {delta}, and {epsilon} subunit, respectively, of mammalian muscle AChRs were developed using subunit-specific synthetic peptides as antigens. Using these antibodies and monoclonal antibodies for other subunits as probes, I have identified four ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, and {delta}) subunits of mammalian muscle AChRs on immunoblots. When AChRs from embryonic, neonatal, normal and denervated adult muscles were compared on immunoblots, the {alpha}, {beta}, and {delta} subunits were identical in all four receptor preparations, with or without endoglycosidase digestion. The spatial and temporal distribution of the {gamma}- and {epsilon}- AChRs in developing and in denervated muscles corresponds to the distribution of AChRs with slow and fast channels, respectively, and that the development changes in the channel properties of the receptor arise from a change in the subunit composition of the receptor, in which the {gamma} is replaced by {epsilon}.

  6. Markers of epidermal stem cell subpopulations in adult mammalian skin.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-10-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties.

  7. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  8. Adult neurogenesis in the mammalian hippocampus: Why the dentate gyrus?

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity after the perinatal period suggests that unique aspects of the structure and function of DG and olfactory bulb circuits allow them to benefit from the adult generation of neurons. In this review, we consider the distinctive features of the DG that may account for it being able to profit from this singular form of neural plasticity. Approaches to the problem of neurogenesis are grouped as “bottom-up,” where the phenotype of adult-born granule cells is contrasted to that of mature developmentally born granule cells, and “top-down,” where the impact of altering the amount of neurogenesis on behavior is examined. We end by considering the primary implications of these two approaches and future directions. PMID:24255101

  9. Markers of Epidermal Stem Cell Subpopulations in Adult Mammalian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties. PMID:24993676

  10. Transient inactivation of Rb and ARF yields regenerative cells from postmitotic mammalian muscle.

    PubMed

    Pajcini, Kostandin V; Corbel, Stephane Y; Sage, Julien; Pomerantz, Jason H; Blau, Helen M

    2010-08-01

    An outstanding biological question is why tissue regeneration in mammals is limited, whereas urodele amphibians and teleost fish regenerate major structures, largely by cell cycle reentry. Upon inactivation of Rb, proliferation of postmitotic urodele skeletal muscle is induced, whereas in mammalian muscle this mechanism does not exist. We postulated that a tumor suppressor present in mammals but absent in regenerative vertebrates, the Ink4a product ARF (alternative reading frame), is a regeneration suppressor. Concomitant inactivation of Arf and Rb led to mammalian muscle cell cycle reentry, loss of differentiation properties, and upregulation of cytokinetic machinery. Single postmitotic myocytes were isolated by laser micro-dissection-catapulting, and transient suppression of Arf and Rb yielded myoblast colonies that retained the ability to differentiate and fuse into myofibers upon transplantation in vivo. These results show that differentiation of mammalian cells is reversed by inactivation of Arf and Rb and support the hypothesis that Arf evolved at the expense of regeneration. PMID:20682446

  11. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser(319) and Thr(24), as well as p-Foxo3a Thr(32) decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was

  12. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser319 and Thr24, as well as p-Foxo3a Thr32 decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was upregulated only

  13. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser319 and Thr24, as well as p-Foxo3a Thr32 decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was upregulated only

  14. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser(319) and Thr(24), as well as p-Foxo3a Thr(32) decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was

  15. Epicardial FSTL1 reconstitution regenerates the adult mammalian heart

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ke; Serpooshan, Vahid; Hurtado, Cecilia; Diez-Cuñado, Marta; Zhao, Mingming; Maruyama, Sonomi; Zhu, Wenhong; Fajardo, Giovanni; Noseda, Michela; Nakamura, Kazuto; Tian, Xueying; Liu, Qiaozhen; Wang, Andrew; Matsuura, Yuka; Bushway, Paul; Cai, Wenqing; Savchenko, Alex; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Schneider, Michael D.; van den Hoff, Maurice J. B.; Butte, Manish J.; Yang, Phillip C.; Walsh, Kenneth; Zhou, Bin; Bernstein, Daniel; Mercola, Mark; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The elucidation of factors that activate the regeneration of the adult mammalian heart is of major scientific and therapeutic importance. Here we found that epicardial cells contain a potent cardiogenic activity identified as follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1). Epicardial Fstl1 declines following myocardial infarction and is replaced by myocardial expression. Myocardial Fstl1 does not promote regeneration, either basally or upon transgenic overexpression. Application of the human Fstl1 protein (FSTL1) via an epicardial patch stimulates cell cycle entry and division of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, improving cardiac function and survival in mouse and swine models of myocardial infarction. The data suggest that the loss of epicardial FSTL1 is a maladaptive response to injury, and that its restoration would be an effective way to reverse myocardial death and remodelling following myocardial infarction in humans. PMID:26375005

  16. Epicardial FSTL1 reconstitution regenerates the adult mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ke; Serpooshan, Vahid; Hurtado, Cecilia; Diez-Cuñado, Marta; Zhao, Mingming; Maruyama, Sonomi; Zhu, Wenhong; Fajardo, Giovanni; Noseda, Michela; Nakamura, Kazuto; Tian, Xueying; Liu, Qiaozhen; Wang, Andrew; Matsuura, Yuka; Bushway, Paul; Cai, Wenqing; Savchenko, Alex; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Schneider, Michael D; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Butte, Manish J; Yang, Phillip C; Walsh, Kenneth; Zhou, Bin; Bernstein, Daniel; Mercola, Mark; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2015-09-24

    The elucidation of factors that activate the regeneration of the adult mammalian heart is of major scientific and therapeutic importance. Here we found that epicardial cells contain a potent cardiogenic activity identified as follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1). Epicardial Fstl1 declines following myocardial infarction and is replaced by myocardial expression. Myocardial Fstl1 does not promote regeneration, either basally or upon transgenic overexpression. Application of the human Fstl1 protein (FSTL1) via an epicardial patch stimulates cell cycle entry and division of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, improving cardiac function and survival in mouse and swine models of myocardial infarction. The data suggest that the loss of epicardial FSTL1 is a maladaptive response to injury, and that its restoration would be an effective way to reverse myocardial death and remodelling following myocardial infarction in humans.

  17. Skeletal muscle mass and composition during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Clark J

    2016-01-01

    Hibernation is characterized by prolonged periods of inactivity with concomitantly low nutrient intake, conditions that would typically result in muscle atrophy combined with a loss of oxidative fibers. Yet, hibernators consistently emerge from winter with very little atrophy, frequently accompanied by a slight shift in fiber ratios to more oxidative fiber types. Preservation of muscle morphology is combined with down-regulation of glycolytic pathways and increased reliance on lipid metabolism instead. Furthermore, while rates of protein synthesis are reduced during hibernation, balance is maintained by correspondingly low rates of protein degradation. Proposed mechanisms include a number of signaling pathways and transcription factors that lead to increased oxidative fiber expression, enhanced protein synthesis and reduced protein degradation, ultimately resulting in minimal loss of skeletal muscle protein and oxidative capacity. The functional significance of these outcomes is maintenance of skeletal muscle strength and fatigue resistance, which enables hibernating animals to resume active behaviors such as predator avoidance, foraging and mating immediately following terminal arousal in the spring.

  18. Acetylcholine activates an inward current in single mammalian smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Benham, C D; Bolton, T B; Lang, R J

    Acetylcholine, the major excitatory neurotransmitter to the smooth muscle of mammalian intestine, is known to depolarize smooth muscle cells with an apparent increase in membrane conductance. However, the ionic mechanisms that are triggered by muscarinic receptor activation and underlie this response are poorly understood, due in part to the technical problems associated with the electrophysiological study of smooth muscle. The muscarinic action of acetylcholine in certain neurones has been shown to involve the switching off of a resting K+ current (M-current) and a similar mechanism has recently also been identified in smooth muscle of amphibian stomach. We have now applied the patch-clamp technique to single smooth muscle cells of rabbit jejunum and find that muscarinic receptor activation switches on a nonselective, voltage-sensitive inward current. In addition, acetylcholine activates and then suppresses spontaneous K+ current transients, which are probably triggered by rises in intracellular Ca2+ in these cells.

  19. Motor unit regulation of mammalian pharyngeal dilator muscle activity.

    PubMed Central

    van Lunteren, E; Dick, T E

    1989-01-01

    The present study examined the cellular regulation of one of the pharyngeal dilator muscles, the geniohyoid, by assessing its motor unit (MU) behavior in anesthetized cats. During spontaneous breathing, MU that (a) were active during inspiration only (I-MU) and (b) were active during both inspiration and expiration (I/E-MU) were identified. I-MU had a later inspiratory onset time and a shorter duration of inspiratory firing than did I/E-MU (P less than 0.002 and P less than 0.0001, respectively). I-MU were usually quiescent whereas I/E-MU were usually active during the last 20% of inspiration. I/E-MU fired more rapidly (P less than 0.00001) and for relatively longer periods of time (P less than 0.00001) during inspiration than during expiration. End-expiratory airway occlusion (preventing lung expansion during inspiration) augmented the inspiratory activity of both I-MU and I/E-MU. Conversely, end-expiratory airway occlusion reduced the absolute and relative firing durations (P less than 0.002 and P less than 0.00002, respectively) and the firing frequency (P less than 0.001) of I/E-MU activity during expiration. These results indicate that (a) the complex pattern of pharyngeal dilator muscle activity is due to the integrated activity of a heterogeneous group of MU, (b) changes in the degree to which pharyngeal dilator muscles are active result from combinations of MU recruitment/decruitment and modulations of the frequency and duration of MU firing, and (c) gating of lung-volume afferent information occurs during the respiratory cycle. PMID:2760202

  20. The Link between Dietary Protein Intake, Skeletal Muscle Function and Health in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Jamie I.; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and function are progressively lost with age, a condition referred to as sarcopenia. By the age of 60, many older adults begin to be affected by muscle loss. There is a link between decreased muscle mass and strength and adverse health outcomes such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Data suggest that increasing dietary protein intake at meals may counterbalance muscle loss in older individuals due to the increased availability of amino acids, which stimulate muscle protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORC1). Increased muscle protein synthesis can lead to increased muscle mass, strength and function over time. This review aims to address the current recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein and whether or not this value meets the needs for older adults based upon current scientific evidence. The current RDA for protein is 0.8 g/kg body weight/day. However, literature suggests that consuming protein in amounts greater than the RDA can improve muscle mass, strength and function in older adults. PMID:27417778

  1. MED12 mutations occurring in benign and malignant mammalian smooth muscle tumors.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Dominique Nadine; Huhle, Sonja; Nimzyk, Rolf; Stenman, Göran; Löning, Thomas; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2013-03-01

    Mutations of the mediator subcomplex 12 gene (MED12) recently have been described in a large group of uterine leiomyomas (UL) but only in a single malignant uterine smooth muscle tumor. To further address the occurrence of fibroid-type MED12 mutations in smooth muscle tumors, we have analyzed samples from 34 leiomyosarcomas (LMS), 21 UL, two extrauterine leiomyomas (EL), and 10 canine genital leiomyomas for the presence of MED12 mutations of the UL-type. Interestingly, besides UL MED12 mutations were found in one uterine LMS, one EL, and two canine vaginal leiomyomas. The results confirm the occurrence of fibroid-type MED12 mutations in malignant uterine smooth muscle tumors thus suggesting a rare but existing leiomyoma-LMS sequence. In addition, for the first time MED12 mutations are reported in smooth muscle tumors in a non-primate mammalian species. PMID:23225304

  2. Preliminary evidence for a postsynaptic action of beta-bungarotoxin in mammalian skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storella, R. J.; Schouchoff, A. L.; Fujii, M.; Hill, J.; Fletcher, J. E.; Jiang, M. S.; Smith, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    Two hours after treatment with beta-bungarotoxin (0.34-0.4 microM), when there was complete neuromuscular block, the peak contracture response to 50 microM succinylcholine was significantly reduced by about 35% in the mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation. Additionally, significant phospholipase A2 activity was detected on primary cell cultures from skeletal muscle which were incubated for 2 hr with concentrations of beta-bungarotoxin greater than or equal to 0.1 microM. Thus, beta-bungarotoxin appears to have pharmacologically and biochemically detectable postsynaptic actions in mammalian muscle systems.

  3. S. macrurus myogenic regulatory factors induce mammalian skeletal muscle differentiation: Evidence for functional conservation of MRFs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Güth, Robert; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Unguez, Graciela A.

    2009-01-01

    The current-producing cells of the electric organ (EO), i.e., electrocytes, in Sternopygus macrurus derive from skeletal muscle fibers. Mature electrocytes are not contractile but they do retain some muscle proteins, are multinucleated, and receive cholinergic innervation. Electrocytes express the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) MyoD, myogenin, Myf5 and MRF4 despite their incomplete muscle phenotype. Although S. macrurus MRFs share functional domains that are highly conserved and their expression is confined to the myogenic lineage, their capability to induce the muscle phenotype has not been determined. To test the functional conservation of S. macrurus MRFs to transcriptionally activate skeletal muscle gene expression and induce the myogenic program, we transiently over-expressed S. macrurus MyoD (SmMyoD) and myogenin (SmMyoG) in mouse C3H/10T1/2 and NIH3T3 embryonic cells. RT-PCR and immunolabeling studies showed that SmMyoD and SmMyoG efficiently can convert these two cell lines into multinucleated myotubes that expressed differentiated muscle markers. The levels of myogenic induction by SmMyoD and SmMyoG were comparable to those obtained with mouse MRF homologs. Furthermore, SmMyoD and SmMyoG proteins were able to induce mouse MyoD and myogenin in C3H/10T1/2 cells. We conclude that S. macrurus MRFs are functionally conserved as they can transcriptionally activate skeletal muscle gene expression and induce the myogenic program in mammalian non-muscle cells. Hence, these data suggest that the partial muscle phenotype of electrocytes is not likely due to differences in the MRF-dependent transcriptional program between skeletal muscle and electric organ. PMID:19598116

  4. Regional differences in length change and electromyographic heterogeneity in sternohyoid muscle during infant mammalian swallowing.

    PubMed

    Konow, Nicolai; Thexton, Allan; Crompton, A W; German, Rebecca Z

    2010-08-01

    A complex sling of muscles moves and stabilizes the hyoid bone during many mammalian behaviors. One muscle in this sling, the sternohyoid, is recruited during food acquisition, processing, and swallowing, and also during nonfeeding behaviors. We used synchronous sonomicrometry and electromyography to investigate regional (intramuscular) changes in length and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the sternohyoid during swallowing in the infant pig. The simple straplike architecture of the sternohyoid led us to hypothesize that limited regional variation in length and muscle activity would be present. We found statistically significant regional differences in EMG activity, and, with respect to length dynamics, the sternohyoid did not behave homogeneously during swallowing. The midbelly region typically shortened while the anterior and posterior regions lengthened, although in a minority of swallows (12.5%) the midbelly lengthened simultaneously with the end-regions. Despite its nonpennate architecture and evolutionarily conservative innervation, the mammalian sternohyoid appears to contain previously unrecognized populations of regionally specialized motor units. It also displays differential contraction patterns, very similar to the sternohyoid of nonmammalian vertebrates. PMID:20538841

  5. Mammalian Mss51 is a skeletal muscle-specific gene modulating cellular metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Adam L.; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling pathways modulate skeletal muscle growth, regeneration, and cellular metabolism. Several recent gene expression studies have shown that inhibition of myostatin and TGF-β1 signaling consistently leads to a significant reduction in expression of Mss51, also named Zmynd17. The function of mammalian Mss51 is unknown although a putative homolog in yeast is a mitochondrial translational activator. Objective The objective of this work was to characterize mammalian Mss51. Methods Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot of subcellular fractionation were used to determine expression patterns and localization of Mss51. The CRISPR/Cas9 system was used to reduce expression of Mss51 in C2C12 myoblasts and the function of Mss51 was evaluated in assays of proliferation, differentiation and cellular metabolism. Results Mss51 was predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle and in those muscles dominated by fast-twitch fibers. In vitro, its expression was upregulated upon differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes. Expression of Mss51 was modulated in response to altered TGF-β family signaling. In human muscle, Mss51 localized to the mitochondria. Its genetic disruption resulted in increased levels of cellular ATP, β-oxidation, glycolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation. Conclusions Mss51 is a novel, skeletal muscle-specific gene and a key target of myostatin and TGF-β1 signaling. Unlike myostatin, TGF-β1 and IGF-1, Mss51 does not regulate myoblast proliferation or differentiation. Rather, Mss51 appears to be one of the effectors of these growth factors on metabolic processes including fatty acid oxidation, glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:26634192

  6. Implications for the mammalian sialidases in the physiopathology of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The family of mammalian sialidases is composed of four distinct versatile enzymes that remove negatively charged terminal sialic acid residues from gangliosides and glycoproteins in different subcellular areas and organelles, including lysosomes, cytosol, plasma membrane and mitochondria. In this review we summarize the growing body of data describing the important role of sialidases in skeletal muscle, a complex apparatus involved in numerous key functions and whose functional integrity can be affected by various conditions, such as aging, chronic diseases, cancer and neuromuscular disorders. In addition to supporting the proper catabolism of glycoconjugates, sialidases can affect different signaling pathways by desialylation of many receptors and modulation of ganglioside content in cell membranes, thus actively participating in myoblast proliferation, differentiation and hypertrophy, insulin responsiveness and skeletal muscle architecture. PMID:23114189

  7. The Social Environment and Neurogenesis in the Adult Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis – the formation of new neurons in adulthood – has been shown to be modulated by a variety of endogenous (e.g., trophic factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones) as well as exogenous (e.g., physical activity and environmental complexity) factors. Research on exogenous regulators of adult neurogenesis has focused primarily on the non-social environment. More recently, however, evidence has emerged suggesting that the social environment can also affect adult neurogenesis. The present review details the effects of adult–adult (e.g., mating and chemosensory interactions) and adult–offspring (e.g., gestation, parenthood, and exposure to offspring) interactions on adult neurogenesis. In addition, the effects of a stressful social environment (e.g., lack of social support and dominant–subordinate interactions) on adult neurogenesis are reviewed. The underlying hormonal mechanisms and potential functional significance of adult-generated neurons in mediating social behaviors are also discussed. PMID:22586385

  8. Activity of creatine kinase in a contracting mammalian muscle of uniform fiber type.

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, E W; Kushmerick, M J; Moerland, T S

    1994-01-01

    We investigated whether the creatine kinase-catalyzed phosphate exchange between PCr and gamma ATP in vivo equilibrated with cellular substrates and products as predicted by in vitro kinetic properties of the enzyme, or was a function of ATPase activity as predicted by obligatory "creatine phosphate shuttle" concepts. A transient NMR spin-transfer method was developed, tested, and applied to resting and stimulated ex vivo muscle, the soleus, which is a cellularly homogeneous slow-twitch mammalian muscle, to measure creatine kinase kinetics. The forward and reverse unidirectional CK fluxes were equal, being 1.6 mM.s-1 in unstimulated muscle at 22 degrees C, and 2.7 mM.s-1 at 30 degrees C. The CK fluxes did not differ during steady-state stimulation conditions giving a 10-fold range of ATPase rates in which the ATP/PCr ratio increased from approximately 0.3 to 1.6. The observed kinetic behavior of CK activity in the muscle was that expected from the enzyme in vitro in a homogeneous solution only if account was taken of inhibition by an anion-stabilized quaternary dead-end enzyme complex: E.Cr.MgADP.anion. The CK fluxes in soleus were not a function of ATPase activity as predicted by obligatory phosphocreatine shuttle models for cellular energetics. PMID:7858128

  9. A new scenario of the evolutionary derivation of the mammalian diaphragm from shoulder muscles

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of the diaphragm remains unclear, due to the lack of a comparable structure in other extant taxa. However, recent researches into the developmental mechanism of this structure have yielded new insights into its origin. Here we summarize current understanding regarding the development of the diaphragm, and present a possible scenario for the evolutionary acquisition of this uniquely mammalian structure. Recent developmental analyses indicate that the diaphragm and forelimb muscles are derived from a shared cell population during embryonic development. Therefore, the embryonic positions of forelimb muscle progenitors, which correspond to the position of the brachial plexus, likely played an important role in the evolution of the diaphragm. We surveyed the literature to reexamine the position of the brachial plexus among living amniotes and confirmed that the cervico-thoracic transition in ribs reflects the brachial plexus position. Using this osteological correlate, we concluded that the anterior borders of the brachial plexuses in the stem synapsids were positioned at the level of the fourth spinal nerve, suggesting that the forelimb buds were laid in close proximity of the infrahyoid muscles. The topology of the phrenic and suprascapular nerves of mammals is similar to that of subscapular and supracoracoid nerves, respectively, of the other amniotes, suggesting that the diaphragm evolved from a muscle positioned medial to the pectoral girdle (cf. subscapular muscle). We hypothesize that the diaphragm was acquired in two steps: first, forelimb muscle cells were incorporated into tissues to form a primitive diaphragm in the stem synapsid grade, and second, the diaphragm in cynodonts became entrapped in the region controlled by pulmonary development. PMID:23448284

  10. Muscle fatigue examined at different temperatures in experiments on intact mammalian (rat) muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Roots, H.; Ball, G.; Talbot-Ponsonby, J.; King, M.; McBeath, K.; Ranatunga, K. W.

    2009-01-01

    In experiments on small bundles of intact fibers from a rat fast muscle, in vitro, we examined the decline in force in repeated tetanic contractions; the aim was to characterize the effect of shortening and of temperature on the initial phase of muscle fatigue. Short tetanic contractions were elicited at a control repetition rate of 1/60 s, and fatigue was induced by raising the rate to 1/5 s for 2–3 min, both in isometric mode (no shortening) and in shortening mode, in which each tetanic contraction included a ramp shortening at a standard velocity. In experiments at 20°C (n = 12), the force decline during a fatigue run was 25% in the isometric mode but was significantly higher (35%) in the shortening mode. In experiments at different temperatures (10–30°C, n = 11), the tetanic frequency and duration were adjusted as appropriate, and for shortening mode, the velocity was adjusted for maximum power output. In isometric mode, fatigue of force was significantly less at 30°C (∼20%) than at 10°C (∼30%); the power output (force × velocity) was >10× higher at 30°C than at 10°C, and power decline during a fatigue run was less at 30°C (∼20–30%) than at 10°C (∼50%). The finding that the extent of fatigue is increased with shortening contractions and is lower at higher temperatures is consistent with the view that force depression by inorganic phosphate, which accumulates within fibers during activity, may be a primary cause of initial muscle fatigue. PMID:19057001

  11. cap alpha. -skeletal and. cap alpha. -cardiac actin genes are coexpressed in adult human skeletal muscle and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, P.; Ponte, P.; Blau, H.; Kedes, L.

    1983-11-01

    The authors determined the actin isotypes encoded by 30 actin cDNA clones previously isolated from an adult human muscle cDNA library. Using 3' untranslated region probes, derived from ..cap alpha.. skeletal, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin cDNAs and from an ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genomic clone, they showed that 28 of the cDNAs correspond to ..cap alpha..-skeletal actin transcripts. Unexpectedly, however, the remaining two cDNA clones proved to derive from ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin mRNA. Sequence analysis confirmed that the two skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin cDNAs are derived from transcripts of the cloned ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin gene. Comparison of total actin mRNA levels in adult skeletal muscle and adult heart revealed that the steady-state levels in skeletal muscle are about twofold greater, per microgram of total cellular RNA, than those in heart. Thus, in skeletal muscle and in heart, both of the sarcomeric actin mRNA isotypes are quite abundant transcripts. They conclude that ..cap alpha..-skeletal and ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genes are coexpressed as an actin pair in human adult striated muscles. Since the smooth-muscle actins (aortic and stomach) and the cytoplasmic actins (..beta.. and ..gamma..) are known to be coexpressed in smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells, respectively, they postulate that coexpression of actin pairs may be a common feature of mammalian actin gene expression in all tissues.

  12. Muscle organizers in Drosophila: the role of persistent larval fibers in adult flight muscle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, E. R.; Fernandes, J.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    In many organisms muscle formation depends on specialized cells that prefigure the pattern of the musculature and serve as templates for myoblast organization and fusion. These include muscle pioneers in insects and muscle organizing cells in leech. In Drosophila, muscle founder cells have been proposed to play a similar role in organizing larval muscle development during embryogenesis. During metamorphosis in Drosophila, following histolysis of most of the larval musculature, there is a second round of myogenesis that gives rise to the adult muscles. It is not known whether muscle founder cells organize the development of these muscles. However, in the thorax specific larval muscle fibers do not histolyze at the onset of metamorphosis, but instead serve as templates for the formation of a subset of adult muscles, the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs). Because these persistent larval muscle fibers appear to be functioning in many respects like muscle founder cells, we investigated whether they were necessary for DLM development by using a microbeam laser to ablate them singly and in combination. We found that, in the absence of the larval muscle fibers, DLMs nonetheless develop. Our results show that the persistent larval muscle fibers are not required to initiate myoblast fusion, to determine DLM identity, to locate the DLMs in the thorax, or to specify the total DLM fiber volume. However, they are required to regulate the number of DLM fibers generated. Thus, while the persistent larval muscle fibers are not obligatory for DLM fiber formation and differentiation, they are necessary to ensure the development of the correct number of fibers.

  13. Myocyte Dedifferentiation Drives Extraocular Muscle Regeneration in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kasprick, Daniel S.; Junttila, Tyler L.; Grzegorski, Steven J.; Louie, Ke'ale W.; Chiari, Estelle F.; Kish, Phillip E.; Kahana, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to characterize the injury response of extraocular muscles (EOMs) in adult zebrafish. Methods Adult zebrafish underwent lateral rectus (LR) muscle myectomy surgery to remove 50% of the muscle, followed by molecular and cellular characterization of the tissue response to the injury. Results Following myectomy, the LR muscle regenerated an anatomically correct and functional muscle within 7 to 10 days post injury (DPI). Following injury, the residual muscle stump was replaced by a mesenchymal cell population that lost cell polarity and expressed mesenchymal markers. Next, a robust proliferative burst repopulated the area of the regenerating muscle. Regenerating cells expressed myod, identifying them as myoblasts. However, both immunofluorescence and electron microscopy failed to identify classic Pax7-positive satellite cells in control or injured EOMs. Instead, some proliferating nuclei were noted to express mef2c at the very earliest point in the proliferative burst, suggesting myonuclear reprogramming and dedifferentiation. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of regenerating cells followed by a second myectomy without repeat labeling resulted in a twice-regenerated muscle broadly populated by BrdU-labeled nuclei with minimal apparent dilution of the BrdU signal. A double-pulse experiment using BrdU and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) identified double-labeled nuclei, confirming the shared progenitor lineage. Rapid regeneration occurred despite a cell cycle length of 19.1 hours, whereas 72% of the regenerating muscle nuclei entered the cell cycle by 48 hours post injury (HPI). Dextran lineage tracing revealed that residual myocytes were responsible for muscle regeneration. Conclusions EOM regeneration in adult zebrafish occurs by dedifferentiation of residual myocytes involving a muscle-to-mesenchyme transition. A mechanistic understanding of myocyte reprogramming may facilitate novel approaches to the development of molecular

  14. Muscle dissatisfaction in young adult men

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Backround Appearance concerns are of increasing importance in young men's lives. We investigated whether muscle dissatisfaction is associated with psychological symptoms, dietary supplement or anabolic steroid use, or physical activity in young men. Methods As a part of a questionnaire assessment of health-related behaviors in the population-based FinnTwin16 study, we assessed factors associated with muscle dissatisfaction in 1245 men aged 22–27 using logistic regression models. Results Of men, 30% experienced high muscle dissatisfaction, while 12% used supplements/steroids. Of highly muscle-dissatisfied men, 21.5% used supplements/steroids. Mean body mass index, waist circumference, or leisure aerobic activity index did not differ between individuals with high/low muscle dissatisfaction. Muscle dissatisfaction was significantly associated with a psychological and psychosomatic problems, alcohol and drug use, lower height satisfaction, sedentary lifestyle, poor subjective physical fitness, and lower life satisfaction. Conclusion Muscle dissatisfaction and supplement/steroid use are relatively common, and are associated with psychological distress and markers of sedentary lifestyle. PMID:16594989

  15. Muscle niche-driven Insulin-Notch-Myc cascade reactivates dormant Adult Muscle Precursors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Rajaguru; Zmojdzian, Monika; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-12-09

    How stem cells specified during development keep their non-differentiated quiescent state, and how they are reactivated, remain poorly understood. Here, we applied a Drosophila model to follow in vivo behavior of adult muscle precursors (AMPs), the transient fruit fly muscle stem cells. We report that emerging AMPs send out thin filopodia that make contact with neighboring muscles. AMPs keep their filopodia-based association with muscles throughout their dormant state but also when they start to proliferate, suggesting that muscles could play a role in AMP reactivation. Indeed, our genetic analyses indicate that muscles send inductive dIlp6 signals that switch the Insulin pathway ON in closely associated AMPs. This leads to the activation of Notch, which regulates AMP proliferation via dMyc. Altogether, we report that Drosophila AMPs display homing behavior to muscle niche and that the niche-driven Insulin-Notch-dMyc cascade plays a key role in setting the activated state of AMPs.

  16. Lessons from mammalian hibernators: molecular insights into striated muscle plasticity and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Shannon N; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-05-01

    Striated muscle shows an amazing ability to adapt its structural apparatus based on contractile activity, loading conditions, fuel supply, or environmental factors. Studies with mammalian hibernators have identified a variety of molecular pathways which are strategically regulated and allow animals to endure multiple stresses associated with the hibernating season. Of particular interest is the observation that hibernators show little skeletal muscle atrophy despite the profound metabolic rate depression and mechanical unloading that they experience during long weeks of torpor. Additionally, the cardiac muscle of hibernators must adjust to low temperature and reduced perfusion, while the strength of contraction increases in order to pump cold, viscous blood. Consequently, hibernators hold a wealth of knowledge as it pertains to understanding the natural capacity of myocytes to alter structural, contractile and metabolic properties in response to environmental stimuli. The present review outlines the molecular and biochemical mechanisms which play a role in muscular atrophy, hypertrophy, and remodeling. In this capacity, four main networks are highlighted: (1) antioxidant defenses, (2) the regulation of structural, contractile and metabolic proteins, (3) ubiquitin proteosomal machinery, and (4) macroautophagy pathways. Subsequently, we discuss the role of transcription factors nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), Myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), and Forkhead box (FOXO) and their associated posttranslational modifications as it pertains to regulating each of these networks. Finally, we propose that comparing and contrasting these concepts to data collected from model organisms able to withstand dramatic changes in muscular function without injury will allow researchers to delineate physiological versus pathological responses. PMID:26982616

  17. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bonaparte, Sebastián; Segovia, Sonia; Llauger, Jaume; Belmonte, Izaskun; Pedrosa, Irene; Alejaldre, Aída; Mayos, Mercè; Suárez-Cuartín, Guillermo; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD). The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far. Methods We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale), respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure), daily live activities scales (Activlim) and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire). We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region. Results T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients. Conclusion Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment. Take home message Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic. PMID:27711114

  18. Differential effects of chronic overload-induced muscle hypertrophy on mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways in adult and aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in adult (Y; 6 mo old; n = 16) and aged (O; 30 mo old; n = 16) male rats (Fischer 344 x Brown Norway) subjected to chronic overload-induced muscle hypertrophy of the plan...

  19. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  20. Differential effects of caffeine and perchlorate on excitation-contraction coupling in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Csernoch, L; Szentesi, P; Kovács, L

    1999-10-01

    1. Enzymatically dissociated single muscle fibres of the rat were studied under voltage clamp conditions in a double Vaseline gap experimental chamber. Intramembrane charge movement and changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were measured and the rate of calcium release (Rrel) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was calculated. This enabled the determination of SR permeability and thus the estimation of the transfer function between intramembrane charge movement and SR permeability. 2. Perchlorate (3 mM) shifted the membrane potential dependence of intramembrane charge movement to more negative voltages without any effect on the steepness or on the maximal available charge. The drug increased SR permeability at every membrane potential but did not alter the peak-to-steady level ratio. It also increased the slope of the transfer function, indicating a more efficient coupling between the voltage sensors and the ryanodine receptors. 3. Caffeine (1 mM), on the other hand, increased SR permeability without altering the voltage dependence of intramembrane charge movement. It neither prolonged the depolarization-induced increase in [Ca2+]i at short pulse durations nor altered the time to peak of Rrel. The augmentation of SR permeability by the drug was more pronounced during the peak caffeine response than during its steady level. This was manifested in a leftward shift of the transfer function rather than an increase in its slope. 4. These observations indicate that perchlorate and caffeine alter the coupling between the voltage sensors and SR calcium release channels in mammalian skeletal muscle. They do not, however, share a common mechanism for enhancing the depolarization-induced release of calcium from the SR.

  1. Calsequestrins in skeletal and cardiac muscle from adult Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sandra; Mosole, Simone; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Argenton, Francesco; Volpe, Pompeo; Nori, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Calsequestrin (Casq) is a high capacity, low affinity Ca(2+)-binding protein, critical for Ca(2+)-buffering in cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. All vertebrates have multiple genes encoding for different Casq isoforms. Increasing interest has been focused on mammalian and human Casq genes since mutations of both cardiac (Casq2) and skeletal muscle (Casq1) isoforms cause different, and sometime severe, human pathologies. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is a powerful model for studying function and mutations of human proteins. In this work, expression, biochemical properties cellular and sub-cellular localization of D. rerio native Casq isoforms are investigated. By quantitative PCR, three mRNAs were detected in skeletal muscle and heart with different abundances. Three zebrafish Casqs: Casq1a, Casq1b and Casq2 were identified by mass spectrometry (Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002455). Skeletal and cardiac zebrafish calsequestrins share properties with mammalian Casq1 and Casq2. Skeletal Casqs were found primarily, but not exclusively, at the sarcomere Z-line level where terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum are located. PMID:26585961

  2. The head and neck muscles of the serval and tiger: homologies, evolution, and proposal of a mammalian and a veterinary muscle ontology.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Rui; Pastor, Francisco; De Paz, Felix; Potau, Josep M; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Ferrero, Eva M; Fisher, Rebecca E

    2012-12-01

    Here we describe the head and neck muscles of members of the two extant felid subfamilies (Leptailurus serval: Felinae; Panthera tigris: Pantherinae) and compare these muscles with those of other felids, other carnivorans (e.g., domestic dogs), other eutherian mammals (e.g., rats, tree-shrews and modern humans), and noneutherian mammals including monotremes. Another major goal of the article is to discuss and help clarify nomenclatural discrepancies found in the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria and in veterinary atlases and textbooks that use cats and dogs as models to understand the anatomy of domestic mammals and to stress differences with modern humans. We propose a unifying nomenclature that is expanded to all the head and neck muscles and to all mammalian taxa in order to help build veterinary and mammalian muscle ontologies. Our observations and comparisons and the specific use of this nomenclature point out that felids such as tigers and servals and other carnivorans such as dogs have more facial muscle structures related to the mobility of both the auricular and orbital regions than numerous other mammals, including modern humans, which might be the result of an ancient adaptation related to the remarkable predatory capacities of carnivorans. Interestingly, the skeletal differences, mainly concerning the hyoid apparatus, pharynx, and larynx, that are likely associated with the different types of vocalizations seen in the Felinae (mainly purring) and Pantherinae (mainly roaring) are not accompanied by clear differences in the musculature connected to these structures in the feline L. serval and the pantherine P. tigris.

  3. Biology of the Sertoli Cell in the Fetal, Pubertal, and Adult Mammalian Testis.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Zarzycka, Marta; Mruk, Dolores D

    2016-01-01

    A healthy man typically produces between 50 × 10(6) and 200 × 10(6) spermatozoa per day by spermatogenesis; in the absence of Sertoli cells in the male gonad, this individual would be infertile. In the adult testis, Sertoli cells are sustentacular cells that support germ cell development by secreting proteins and other important biomolecules that are essential for germ cell survival and maturation, establishing the blood-testis barrier, and facilitating spermatozoa detachment at spermiation. In the fetal testis, on the other hand, pre-Sertoli cells form the testis cords, the future seminiferous tubules. However, the role of pre-Sertoli cells in this process is much less clear than the function of Sertoli cells in the adult testis. Within this framework, we provide an overview of the biology of the fetal, pubertal, and adult Sertoli cell, highlighting relevant cell biology studies that have expanded our understanding of mammalian spermatogenesis. PMID:27300181

  4. Proliferating subventricular zone cells in the adult mammalian forebrain can differentiate into neurons and glia.

    PubMed Central

    Lois, C; Alvarez-Buylla, A

    1993-01-01

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) cells proliferate spontaneously in vivo in the telencephalon of adult mammals. Several studies suggest that SVZ cells do not differentiate after mitosis into neurons or glia but die. In the present work, we show that SVZ cells labeled in the brains of adult mice with [3H]thymidine differentiate directly into neurons and glia in explant cultures. In vitro labeling with [3H]thymidine shows that 98% of the neurons that differentiate from the SVZ explants are derived from precursor cells that underwent their last division in vivo. This report identifies the SVZ cells as neuronal precursors in an adult mammalian brain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8446631

  5. Muscle power failure in mobility-limited adults: preserved single muscle fibre function despite reduced whole muscle size, quality and neuromuscular activiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the physiological and gender determinants of the age-related loss of muscle power in 31 healthy middle-aged adults (aged 40-55 years), 28 healthy older adults (70-85 years) and 34 mobility-limited older adults (70-85 years). We hypothesized that leg extensor muscle power woul...

  6. Muscle niche-driven Insulin-Notch-Myc cascade reactivates dormant Adult Muscle Precursors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Aradhya, Rajaguru; Zmojdzian, Monika; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    How stem cells specified during development keep their non-differentiated quiescent state, and how they are reactivated, remain poorly understood. Here, we applied a Drosophila model to follow in vivo behavior of adult muscle precursors (AMPs), the transient fruit fly muscle stem cells. We report that emerging AMPs send out thin filopodia that make contact with neighboring muscles. AMPs keep their filopodia-based association with muscles throughout their dormant state but also when they start to proliferate, suggesting that muscles could play a role in AMP reactivation. Indeed, our genetic analyses indicate that muscles send inductive dIlp6 signals that switch the Insulin pathway ON in closely associated AMPs. This leads to the activation of Notch, which regulates AMP proliferation via dMyc. Altogether, we report that Drosophila AMPs display homing behavior to muscle niche and that the niche-driven Insulin-Notch-dMyc cascade plays a key role in setting the activated state of AMPs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08497.001 PMID:26650355

  7. Continued Expression of Neonatal Myosin Heavy Chain in Adult Dystrophic Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandman, Everett

    1985-02-01

    The expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms was examined in normal and dystrophic chicken muscle with a monoclonal antibody specific for neonatal myosin. Adult dystrophic muscle continued to contain neonatal myosin long after it disappeared from adult normal muscle. A new technique involving western blotting and peptide mapping demonstrated that the immunoreactive myosin in adult dystrophic muscle was identical to that found in neonatal normal muscle. Immunocytochemistry revealed that all fibers in the dystrophic muscle failed to repress neonatal myosin heavy chain. These studies suggest that muscular dystrophy inhibits the myosin gene switching that normally occurs during muscle maturation.

  8. Control of adult neurogenesis by programmed cell death in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Hong, Caroline Jeeyeon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Sun, Woong; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-04-21

    The presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) and the production of new neurons in the adult brain have received great attention from scientists and the public because of implications to brain plasticity and their potential use for treating currently incurable brain diseases. Adult neurogenesis is controlled at multiple levels, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and programmed cell death (PCD). Among these, PCD is the last and most prominent process for regulating the final number of mature neurons integrated into neural circuits. PCD can be classified into apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death and emerging evidence suggests that all three may be important modes of cell death in neural stem/progenitor cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate PCD and thereby impact the intricate balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during adult neurogenesis are not well understood. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the extent, mechanism, and biological significance of PCD for the control of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the regulation of PCD at the molecular and systems levels is also discussed. Adult neurogenesis is a dynamic process, and the signals for differentiation, proliferation, and death of neural progenitor/stem cells are closely interrelated. A better understanding of how adult neurogenesis is influenced by PCD will help lead to important insights relevant to brain health and diseases.

  9. The effect of replacement of methionine by homocystine on survival of malignant and normal adult mammalian cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Halpern, B C; Clark, B R; Hardy, D N; Halpern, R M; Smith, R A

    1974-04-01

    In tissue cultures of normal adult and malignant mammalian cells, homocystine has been substituted for methionine in a medium rich in folic acid and cyanocobalamin. Normal adult cells thrive. Three highly malignant cell types from three different species, including man, die.

  10. Characterizing upper limb muscle volume and strength in older adults: a comparison with young adults.

    PubMed

    Vidt, Meghan E; Daly, Melissa; Miller, Michael E; Davis, Cralen C; Marsh, Anthony P; Saul, Katherine R

    2012-01-10

    Aging is associated with the loss of muscle volume (MV) and force leading to difficulties with activities of daily living. However, the relationship between upper limb MV and joint strength has not been characterized for older adults. Quantifying this relationship may help our understanding of the functional declines of the upper limb that older adults experience. Our objective was to assess the relationship between upper limb MV and maximal isometric joint moment-generating capacity (IJM) in a single cohort of healthy older adults (age ≥ 65 years) for 6 major functional groups (32 muscles). MV was determined from MRI for 18 participants (75.1±4.3 years). IJM at the shoulder (abduction/adduction), elbow (flexion/extension), and wrist (flexion/extension) was measured. MV and IJM measurements were compared to previous reports for young adults (28.6±4.5 years). On average older adults had 16.5% less total upper limb MV compared to young adults. Additionally, older adult wrist extensors composed a significantly increased percentage of upper limb MV. Older adult IJM was reduced across all joints, with significant differences for shoulder abductors (p<0.0001), adductors (p=0.01), and wrist flexors (p<0.0001). Young adults were strongest at the shoulder, which was not the case for older adults. In older adults, 40.6% of the variation in IJM was accounted for by MV changes (p≤0.027), compared to 81.0% in young adults. We conclude that for older adults, MV and IJM are, on average, reduced but the significant linear relationship between MV and IJM is maintained. These results suggest that older adult MV and IJM cannot be simply scaled from young adults.

  11. A Study of the Reinnervation of Fast and Slow Mammalian Muscles

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Joseph J.; Albuquerque, Edson X.

    1973-01-01

    Miniature end plate potential (mepp) frequency in innervated extensor muscle is significantly higher than in soleus muscle. 9 days after nerve crush mepps of low amplitude and prolonged duration reappeared at a frequency of 2% of control and were similar to normal muscles after 35 days. Membrane potential began to increase 9–10 days after nerve crush and at 30 days was similar to controls. The region most sensitive to ACh in denervated and reinnervated muscles was the end plate. Caffeine (20 mM, 23°C) induced contracture in innervated soleus but not in extensor muscles. After denervation the extensor became sensitive to caffeine while the soleus muscles decreased in sensitivity to the drug; 4–5 days after reinnervation the effect of caffeine on these muscles was similar to control. The events during reinnervation are: (a) reappearance of mepps at the same time as end plate potential and muscle twitch; (b) partial restoration of the membrane potential; (c) return of caffeine-induced contracture to normal levels in the soleus and its absence in the extensor muscles; (d) return of membrane resistance to normal values in both muscles at about 25 days; and (e) return of ACh-sensitivity to control levels at about 30 days in both muscles. Although these results suggest that the membrane potential and sarcoplasmic reticulum are under neural influence, it remains to be established whether or not separate neurotrophic factors are involved. PMID:4683095

  12. Skeletal muscle power: a critical determinant of physical functioning in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle power declines earlier and more precipitously with advancing age compared to muscle strength. Peak muscle power has also emerged as an important predictor of functional limitations in older adults. Our current working hypothesis is focused on examining lower extremity muscle power as a more d...

  13. Membrane glucocorticoid receptors are localised in the extracellular matrix and signal through the MAPK pathway in mammalian skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Boncompagni, Simona; Arthurton, Lewis; Akujuru, Eugene; Pearson, Timothy; Steverding, Dietmar; Protasi, Feliciano; Mutungi, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have previously proposed the existence of glucocorticoid receptors on the plasma membrane of many cell types, including skeletal muscle fibres. However, their exact localisation and the cellular signalling pathway(s) they utilise to communicate with the rest of the cell are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the localisation and the mechanism(s) underlying the non-genomic physiological functions of these receptors in mouse skeletal muscle cells. The results show that the receptors were localised in the cytoplasm in myoblasts, in the nucleus in myotubes, in the extracellular matrix, in satellite cells and in the proximity of mitochondria in adult muscle fibres. Also, they bound laminin in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner. Treating small skeletal muscle fibre bundles with the synthetic glucocorticoid beclomethasone dipropionate increased the phosphorylation (= activation) of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. This occurred within 5 min and depended on the fibre type and the duration of the treatment. It was also abolished by the glucocorticoid receptor inhibitor, mifepristone, and a monoclonal antibody against the receptor. From these results we conclude that the non-genomic/non-canonical physiological functions of glucocorticoids, in adult skeletal muscle fibres, are mediated by a glucocorticoid receptor localised in the extracellular matrix, in satellite cells and close to mitochondria, and involve activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. PMID:25846902

  14. The neonate versus adult mammalian immune system in cardiac repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Susanne; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    The immune system is a crucial player in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. A sophisticated cascade of events triggered upon injury ensures protection from infection and initiates and orchestrates healing. While the neonatal mammal can readily regenerate damaged tissues, adult regenerative capacity is limited to specific tissue types, and in organs such as the heart, adult wound healing results in fibrotic repair and loss of function. Growing evidence suggests that the immune system greatly influences the balance between regeneration and fibrotic repair. The neonate mammalian immune system has impaired pro-inflammatory function, is prone to T-helper type 2 responses and has an immature adaptive immune system skewed towards regulatory T cells. While these characteristics make infants susceptible to infection and prone to allergies, it may also provide an immunological environment permissive of regeneration. In this review we will give a comprehensive overview of the immune cells involved in healing and regeneration of the heart and explore differences between the adult and neonate immune system that may explain differences in regenerative ability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  15. An Active Learning Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Lab Demonstrating Contractile and Kinetic Properties of Fast- and Slow-Twitch Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, S. I.; Arber, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The fact that humans possess fast and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of approximately 50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic…

  16. Twitchin can regulate the ATPase cycle of actomyosin in a phosphorylation-dependent manner in skinned mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Avrova, Stanislava V; Rysev, Nikita A; Matusovsky, Oleg S; Shelud'ko, Nikolay S; Borovikov, Yurii S

    2012-05-01

    The effect of twitchin, a thick filament protein of molluscan muscles, on the actin-myosin interaction at several mimicked sequential steps of the ATPase cycle was investigated using the polarized fluorescence of 1.5-IAEDANS bound to myosin heads, FITC-phalloidin attached to actin and acrylodan bound to twitchin in the glycerol-skinned skeletal muscle fibres of mammalian. The phosphorylation-dependent multi-step changes in mobility and spatial arrangement of myosin SH1 helix, actin subunit and twitchin during the ATPase cycle have been revealed. It was shown that nonphosphorylated twitchin inhibited the movements of SH1 helix of the myosin heads and actin subunits and decreased the affinity of myosin to actin by freezing the position and mobility of twitchin in the muscle fibres. The phosphorylation of twitchin reverses this effect by changing the spatial arrangement and mobility of the actin-binding portions of twitchin. In this case, enhanced movements of SH1 helix of the myosin heads and actin subunits are observed. The data imply a novel property of twitchin incorporated into organized contractile system: its ability to regulate the ATPase cycle in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion by changing the affinity and spatial arrangement of the actin-binding portions of twitchin.

  17. Sarcoplasmic reticulum and excitation-contraction coupling in mammalian smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Devine, C E; Somlyo, A V; Somlyo, A P

    1972-03-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in the smooth muscles of rabbit main pulmonary artery, mesenteric vein, aorta, mesenteric artery, taenia coli, guinea pig mesenteric artery, and human uterus, and correlated with contractions of the smooth muscles in Ca-free media. SR volumes were determined in main pulmonary artery (5.1%), aorta (5%), portal-anterior mesenteric vein (2.2%), taenia coli (2%), and mesenteric artery (1.8%): because of tangentially sectioned membranes these estimates are subject to a correction factor of up to +50% of the values measured. Smooth muscles that contained a relatively large volume of SR maintained significant contractile responses to drugs in the virtual absence of extracellular calcium at room temperatures, while smooth muscles that had less SR did not. The unequal maximal contractions of main pulmonary artery elicited by different drugs were also observed in Ca-free, high potassium-depolarizing solution, indicating that they were secondary to some mechanism independent of changes in membrane potential or calcium influx. Longitudinal tubules of SR run between and are fenestrated about groups of surface vesicles separated from each other by intervening dense bodies. Extracellular markers (ferritin and lanthanum) entered the surface vesicles, but not the SR. The peripheral SR formed couplings with the surface membrane: the two membranes were separated by gaps of approximately 10 nm traversed by electron-opaque connections suggestive of a periodicity of approximately 20-25 nm. These couplings are considered to be the probable sites of electromechanical coupling in twitch smooth muscles. Close contacts between the SR and the surface vesicles may have a similar function, or represent sites of calcium extrusion. The presence of both thick and thin myofilaments and of rough SR in smooth muscles supports the dual, contractile and morphogenetic, function of smooth muscle.

  18. Sensory Response of Transplanted Astrocytes in Adult Mammalian Cortex In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuan; Chen, Chunhai; Yang, Zhiqi; He, Wenjing; Liao, Xiang; Ma, Qinlong; Deng, Ping; Lu, Jian; Li, Jingcheng; Wang, Meng; Li, Mingli; Zheng, Lianghong; Zhou, Zhuan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Liting; Jia, Hongbo; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Chen, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Glial precursor transplantation provides a potential therapy for brain disorders. Before its clinical application, experimental evidence needs to indicate that engrafted glial cells are functionally incorporated into the existing circuits and become essential partners of neurons for executing fundamental brain functions. While previous experiments supporting for their functional integration have been obtained under in vitro conditions using slice preparations, in vivo evidence for such integration is still lacking. Here, we utilized in vivo two-photon Ca2+ imaging along with immunohistochemistry, fluorescent indicator labeling-based axon tracing and correlated light/electron microscopy to analyze the profiles and the functional status of glial precursor cell-derived astrocytes in adult mouse neocortex. We show that after being transplanted into somatosensory cortex, precursor-derived astrocytes are able to survive for more than a year and respond with Ca2+ signals to sensory stimulation. These sensory-evoked responses are mediated by functionally-expressed nicotinic receptors and newly-established synaptic contacts with the host cholinergic afferents. Our results provide in vivo evidence for a functional integration of transplanted astrocytes into adult mammalian neocortex, representing a proof-of-principle for sensory cortex remodeling through addition of essential neural elements. Moreover, we provide strong support for the use of glial precursor transplantation to understand glia-related neural development in vivo. PMID:27405333

  19. Sensory Response of Transplanted Astrocytes in Adult Mammalian Cortex In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuan; Chen, Chunhai; Yang, Zhiqi; He, Wenjing; Liao, Xiang; Ma, Qinlong; Deng, Ping; Lu, Jian; Li, Jingcheng; Wang, Meng; Li, Mingli; Zheng, Lianghong; Zhou, Zhuan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Liting; Jia, Hongbo; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Chen, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    Glial precursor transplantation provides a potential therapy for brain disorders. Before its clinical application, experimental evidence needs to indicate that engrafted glial cells are functionally incorporated into the existing circuits and become essential partners of neurons for executing fundamental brain functions. While previous experiments supporting for their functional integration have been obtained under in vitro conditions using slice preparations, in vivo evidence for such integration is still lacking. Here, we utilized in vivo two-photon Ca(2+) imaging along with immunohistochemistry, fluorescent indicator labeling-based axon tracing and correlated light/electron microscopy to analyze the profiles and the functional status of glial precursor cell-derived astrocytes in adult mouse neocortex. We show that after being transplanted into somatosensory cortex, precursor-derived astrocytes are able to survive for more than a year and respond with Ca(2+) signals to sensory stimulation. These sensory-evoked responses are mediated by functionally-expressed nicotinic receptors and newly-established synaptic contacts with the host cholinergic afferents. Our results provide in vivo evidence for a functional integration of transplanted astrocytes into adult mammalian neocortex, representing a proof-of-principle for sensory cortex remodeling through addition of essential neural elements. Moreover, we provide strong support for the use of glial precursor transplantation to understand glia-related neural development in vivo. PMID:27405333

  20. Regeneration of stereocilia of hair cells by forced Atoh1 expression in the adult mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Ming; Chen, Wei; Guo, Wei-Wei; Jia, Shuping; Sun, Jian-He; Liu, Hui-Zhan; Young, Wie-Yen; He, David Z Z

    2012-01-01

    The hallmark of mechanosensory hair cells is the stereocilia, where mechanical stimuli are converted into electrical signals. These delicate stereocilia are susceptible to acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. While hair cells in lower vertebrates and the mammalian vestibular system can spontaneously regenerate lost stereocilia, mammalian cochlear hair cells no longer retain this capability. We explored the possibility of regenerating stereocilia in the noise-deafened guinea pig cochlea by cochlear inoculation of a viral vector carrying Atoh1, a gene critical for hair cell differentiation. Exposure to simulated gunfire resulted in a 60-70 dB hearing loss and extensive damage and loss of stereocilia bundles of both inner and outer hair cells along the entire cochlear length. However, most injured hair cells remained in the organ of Corti for up to 10 days after the trauma. A viral vector carrying an EGFP-labeled Atoh1 gene was inoculated into the cochlea through the round window on the seventh day after noise exposure. Auditory brainstem response measured one month after inoculation showed that hearing thresholds were substantially improved. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the damaged/lost stereocilia bundles were repaired or regenerated after Atoh1 treatment, suggesting that Atoh1 was able to induce repair/regeneration of the damaged or lost stereocilia. Therefore, our studies revealed a new role of Atoh1 as a gene critical for promoting repair/regeneration of stereocilia and maintaining injured hair cells in the adult mammal cochlea. Atoh1-based gene therapy, therefore, has the potential to treat noise-induced hearing loss if the treatment is carried out before hair cells die. PMID:23029493

  1. Expression of reelin in adult mammalian blood, liver, pituitary pars intermedia, and adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Smalheiser, N R; Costa, E; Guidotti, A; Impagnatiello, F; Auta, J; Lacor, P; Kriho, V; Pappas, G D

    2000-02-01

    Reelin regulates telencephalic and cerebellar lamination during mammalian development and is expressed in several structures of the adult brain; however, only traces of reelin were believed to be in peripheral tissues. Because reelin structurally resembles extracellular matrix proteins, and because many of these proteins are expressed in blood, we hypothesized that reelin also might be detectable in the circulation. Reelin (420 kDa) and two reelin-like immunoreactive bands (310 and 160 kDa) are expressed in serum and platelet-poor plasma of rats, mice, and humans, but these three bands were not detectable in serum of homozygous reeler (rl/rl) mice. Reelin plasma levels in heterozygous (rl/+) mice were half of those in wild-type littermates. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry using antireelin mAbs indicated that reelin-like immunoreactivity was expressed in a subset of chromaffin cells within the rat adrenal medulla and in a subset of cells coexpressing alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone within the pituitary pars intermedia. However, surgical removal of adrenal or pituitary failed to decrease the amount of reelin (420-kDa band) expressed in serum. Adult liver expressed one-third of the reelin mRNA concentration expressed in adult mouse cerebral cortex. Full-length reelin protein was detectable in liver extracts in situ; acutely isolated liver cells also secreted full-length reelin in vitro. Liver appears to be a prime candidate to produce and maintain the circulating reelin pool. It now becomes relevant to ask whether circulating reelin has a physiologic role on one or more peripheral target tissues.

  2. Expression of reelin in adult mammalian blood, liver, pituitary pars intermedia, and adrenal chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R.; Costa, Erminio; Guidotti, Alessandro; Impagnatiello, Francesco; Auta, James; Lacor, Pascale; Kriho, Virginia; Pappas, George D.

    2000-01-01

    Reelin regulates telencephalic and cerebellar lamination during mammalian development and is expressed in several structures of the adult brain; however, only traces of reelin were believed to be in peripheral tissues. Because reelin structurally resembles extracellular matrix proteins, and because many of these proteins are expressed in blood, we hypothesized that reelin also might be detectable in the circulation. Reelin (420 kDa) and two reelin-like immunoreactive bands (310 and 160 kDa) are expressed in serum and platelet-poor plasma of rats, mice, and humans, but these three bands were not detectable in serum of homozygous reeler (rl/rl) mice. Reelin plasma levels in heterozygous (rl/+) mice were half of those in wild-type littermates. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry using antireelin mAbs indicated that reelin-like immunoreactivity was expressed in a subset of chromaffin cells within the rat adrenal medulla and in a subset of cells coexpressing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone within the pituitary pars intermedia. However, surgical removal of adrenal or pituitary failed to decrease the amount of reelin (420-kDa band) expressed in serum. Adult liver expressed one-third of the reelin mRNA concentration expressed in adult mouse cerebral cortex. Full-length reelin protein was detectable in liver extracts in situ; acutely isolated liver cells also secreted full-length reelin in vitro. Liver appears to be a prime candidate to produce and maintain the circulating reelin pool. It now becomes relevant to ask whether circulating reelin has a physiologic role on one or more peripheral target tissues. PMID:10655522

  3. Effects of subacute pyridostigmine administration on mammalian skeletal muscle function. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.; Deshpande, S.S.; Foster, R.E.; Maxwell, D.M.; Albuquerque, E.X.

    1992-12-31

    The subacute effects of pyridostigmine bromide were investigated on the contractile properties of rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and diaphragm muscles. The cholinesterase inhibitor was delivered via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps (Alzet) at 9 microns g h-1 (low dose) or 60 micro g h-1 (high dose). Animals receiving high-dose pyridostigmine pumps exhibited marked alterations in muscle properties within the first day of exposure that persisted for the remaining 13 days. With 0.1 Hz stimulation, EDL twitch tensions of treated animals were elevated relative to control. Repetitive stimulation at frequencies > 1 Hz led a use-dependent depression in the amplitude of successive twitches during the train. Recovery from pyridostigmine was essentially complete by 1 day of withdrawal. Rats implanted with low-dose pyridostigmine pumps showed little or no alteration of in vivo twitch tensions during the entire 14 days of treatment. Diaphragm and EDL muscles excised from pyridostigmine-treated rats and tested in vitro showed no significant alterations in twitch and tetanic tensions and displayed the same sensitivity as muscles of control animals to subsequent pyridostigmine exposures. In the presence of atropine, subacutely administered pyridostigmine protected rats from two LD5O doses of the irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor, soman. In the absence of atropine, the LD50 of soman was not altered by subacute pyridostigmine treatment. Extensor digitorum longus; diaphragm; twitch tension; ACh release; subacute; Alzet pumps; tolerance; anticholinesterase; pyridostigmine; soman.

  4. A new role for muscle segment homeobox genes in mammalian embryonic diapause

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Bartos, Amanda; Fenelon, Jane; Lefèvre, Pavine; Daikoku, Takiko; Shaw, Geoff; Maxson, Robert; Murphy, Bruce D.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian embryonic diapause is a phenomenon defined by the temporary arrest in blastocyst growth and metabolic activity within the uterus which synchronously becomes quiescent to blastocyst activation and implantation. This reproductive strategy temporally uncouples conception from parturition until environmental or maternal conditions are favourable for the survival of the mother and newborn. The underlying molecular mechanism by which the uterus and embryo temporarily achieve quiescence, maintain blastocyst survival and then resume blastocyst activation with subsequent implantation remains unknown. Here, we show that uterine expression of Msx1 or Msx2, members of an ancient, highly conserved homeobox gene family, persists in three unrelated mammalian species during diapause, followed by rapid downregulation with blastocyst activation and implantation. Mice with uterine inactivation of Msx1 and Msx2 fail to achieve diapause and reactivation. Remarkably, the North American mink and Australian tammar wallaby share similar expression patterns of MSX1 or MSX2 as in mice—it persists during diapause and is rapidly downregulated upon blastocyst activation and implantation. Evidence from mouse studies suggests that the effects of Msx genes in diapause are mediated through Wnt5a, a known transcriptional target of uterine Msx. These studies provide strong evidence that the Msx gene family constitutes a common conserved molecular mediator in the uterus during embryonic diapause to improve female reproductive fitness. PMID:23615030

  5. A new role for muscle segment homeobox genes in mammalian embryonic diapause.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Bartos, Amanda; Fenelon, Jane; Lefèvre, Pavine; Daikoku, Takiko; Shaw, Geoff; Maxson, Robert; Murphy, Bruce D; Renfree, Marilyn B; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2013-04-01

    Mammalian embryonic diapause is a phenomenon defined by the temporary arrest in blastocyst growth and metabolic activity within the uterus which synchronously becomes quiescent to blastocyst activation and implantation. This reproductive strategy temporally uncouples conception from parturition until environmental or maternal conditions are favourable for the survival of the mother and newborn. The underlying molecular mechanism by which the uterus and embryo temporarily achieve quiescence, maintain blastocyst survival and then resume blastocyst activation with subsequent implantation remains unknown. Here, we show that uterine expression of Msx1 or Msx2, members of an ancient, highly conserved homeobox gene family, persists in three unrelated mammalian species during diapause, followed by rapid downregulation with blastocyst activation and implantation. Mice with uterine inactivation of Msx1 and Msx2 fail to achieve diapause and reactivation. Remarkably, the North American mink and Australian tammar wallaby share similar expression patterns of MSX1 or MSX2 as in mice-it persists during diapause and is rapidly downregulated upon blastocyst activation and implantation. Evidence from mouse studies suggests that the effects of Msx genes in diapause are mediated through Wnt5a, a known transcriptional target of uterine Msx. These studies provide strong evidence that the Msx gene family constitutes a common conserved molecular mediator in the uterus during embryonic diapause to improve female reproductive fitness. PMID:23615030

  6. Effects of H2O2 on insulin signaling the glucose transport system in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Erik J

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important regulator of cellular events leading to glucose transport activation in mammalian skeletal muscle. In the absence of insulin, H2O2 in the low micromolar range engages the canonical IRS-1/PI3K/Akt-dependent insulin signaling pathway, as well as other signaling elements (AMPK and p38 MAPK), to increase basal glucose transport activity. In contrast, in the presence of insulin, H2O2 antagonizes insulin signaling by recruitment of various deleterious serine/threonine kinases, producing a state of insulin resistance. Here, we describe the H2O2 enzymatic-generating system, utilizing glucose oxidase, that has been used to investigate the impact of H2O2 on cellular signaling mechanisms related to glucose transport activity in isolated rat skeletal muscle preparations, such as the soleus. By varying the glucose oxidase concentration in the medium, target ranges of steady-state H2O2 concentrations (30-90 μM) can be attained for up to 6h, with subsequent assessment of cellular signaling and glucose transport activity.

  7. Intrinsic Ability of Adult Stem Cell in Skeletal Muscle: An Effective and Replenishable Resource to the Establishment of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Machida, Masanao; Hidaka, Ryo; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells play an essential role in mammalian organ maintenance and repair throughout adulthood since they ensure that organs retain their ability to regenerate. The choice of cell fate by adult stem cells for cellular proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation into multiple lineages is critically important for the homeostasis and biological function of individual organs. Responses of stem cells to stress, injury, or environmental change are precisely regulated by intercellular and intracellular signaling networks, and these molecular events cooperatively define the ability of stem cell throughout life. Skeletal muscle tissue represents an abundant, accessible, and replenishable source of adult stem cells. Skeletal muscle contains myogenic satellite cells and muscle-derived stem cells that retain multipotent differentiation abilities. These stem cell populations have the capacity for long-term proliferation and high self-renewal. The molecular mechanisms associated with deficits in skeletal muscle and stem cell function have been extensively studied. Muscle-derived stem cells are an obvious, readily available cell resource that offers promise for cell-based therapy and various applications in the field of tissue engineering. This review describes the strategies commonly used to identify and functionally characterize adult stem cells, focusing especially on satellite cells, and discusses their potential applications. PMID:23818907

  8. Myogenic regulatory factors during regeneration of skeletal muscle in young, adult, and old rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, D. R.; Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    Myogenic factor mRNA expression was examined during muscle regeneration after bupivacaine injection in Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats aged 3, 18, and 31 mo of age (young, adult, and old, respectively). Mass of the tibialis anterior muscle in the young rats had recovered to control values by 21 days postbupivacaine injection but in adult and old rats remained 40% less than that of contralateral controls at 21 and 28 days of recovery. During muscle regeneration, myogenin mRNA was significantly increased in muscles of young, adult, and old rats 5 days after bupivacaine injection. Subsequently, myogenin mRNA levels in young rat muscle decreased to postinjection control values by day 21 but did not return to control values in 28-day regenerating muscles of adult and old rats. The expression of MyoD mRNA was also increased in muscles at day 5 of regeneration in young, adult, and old rats, decreased to control levels by day 14 in young and adult rats, and remained elevated in the old rats for 28 days. In summary, either a diminished ability to downregulate myogenin and MyoD mRNAs in regenerating muscle occurs in old rat muscles, or the continuing myogenic effort includes elevated expression of these mRNAs.

  9. Muscle Size Not Density Predicts Variance in Muscle Strength and Neuromuscular Performance in Healthy Adult Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Benjamin K; Gerrits, Tom A J; Horan, Sean A; Beck, Belinda R

    2016-06-01

    Weeks, BK, Gerrits, TAJ, Horan, SA, and Beck, BR. Muscle size not density predicts variance in muscle strength and neuromuscular performance in healthy adult men and women. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1577-1584, 2016-The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT)-derived measures of muscle area and density and markers of muscle strength and performance in men and women. Fifty-two apparently healthy adults (26 men, 26 women; age 33.8 ± 12.0 years) volunteered to participate. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (XR-800; Norland Medical Systems, Inc., Trumbull, CT, USA) was used to determine whole body and regional lean and fat tissue mass, whereas pQCT (XCT-3000; Stratec, Pforzheim, Germany) was used to determine muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) and muscle density of the leg, thigh, and forearm. Ankle plantar flexor and knee extensor strengths were examined using isokinetic dynamometry, and grip strength was examined with dynamometry. Impulse generated during a maximal vertical jump was used as an index of neuromuscular performance. Thigh, forearm, and leg MCSA strongly predicted variance in knee extensor (R = 0.77, p < 0.001) and grip strength (R = 0.77, p < 0.001) and weakly predicted variance in ankle plantar flexor strength (R = 0.20, p < 0.001), respectively, whereas muscle density was only a weak predictor of variance in knee extensor strength (R = 0.18, p < 0.001). Thigh and leg MCSA accounted for 79 and 69% of the variance in impulse generated from a maximal vertical jump (p < 0.001), whereas thigh muscle density predicted only 18% of the variance (p < 0.002). In conclusion, we found that pQCT-derived muscle area is more strongly related to strength and neuromuscular performance than muscle density in adult men and women.

  10. MuSK levels differ between adult skeletal muscles and influence postsynaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Punga, Anna R; Maj, Marcin; Lin, Shuo; Meinen, Sarina; Rüegg, Markus A

    2011-03-01

    Muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is involved in the formation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), and is necessary for NMJ integrity. As muscle involvement is strikingly selective in pathological conditions in which MuSK is targeted, including congenital myasthenic syndrome with MuSK mutation and MuSK antibody-seropositive myasthenia gravis, we hypothesized that the postsynaptic response to MuSK-agrin signalling differs between adult muscles. Transcript levels of postsynaptic proteins were compared between different muscles in wild-type adult mice. MuSK expression was high in the soleus and sternomastoid muscles and low in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and omohyoid muscles. The acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α subunit followed a similar expression pattern, whereas expression of Dok-7, Lrp4 and rapsyn was comparable between the muscles. We subsequently examined muscles in mice that overexpressed a miniaturized form of neural agrin or MuSK. In these transgenic mice, the soleus and sternomastoid muscles responded with formation of ectopic AChR clusters, whereas such clusters were almost absent in the EDL and omohyoid muscles. Electroporation of Dok-7 revealed its important role as an activator of MuSK in AChR cluster formation in adult muscles. Together, our findings indicate for the first time that adult skeletal muscles harbour different endogenous levels of MuSK and that these levels determine the ability to form ectopic AChR clusters upon overexpression of agrin or MuSK. We believe that these findings are important for our understanding of adult muscle plasticity and the selective muscle involvement in neuromuscular disorders in which MuSK is diminished. PMID:21255125

  11. Diastolic scattered light fluctuation, resting force and twitch force in mammalian cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lakatta, E. G.; Lappé, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    1. When coherent light was passed through isolated isometric cardiac muscles during the diastolic or resting period, intensity fluctuations were observed in the scattered field. The frequency of these intensity fluctuations (f½) varied with many experimental interventions known to enhance Ca2+ flux into the cell. 2. In rat muscles stimulated at low frequencies (0.1 ± 2.0 min-1) stepwise increases (0.4-10 mm) of [Ca2+] in the bathing fluid ([Ca2+]e), or addition of ouabain (10-6-6 × 10-4 m) to the perfusate caused stepwise increases in f½. These were paralleled by increments in resting force (RF) such that the changes in f½ and RF were highly correlated. Substitution of K+ for Na+ in the perfusate resulted in parallel transients in RF and f½. 3. In contrast to the rat, most cat muscles stimulated at low frequencies in the steady state exhibited neither diastolic intensity fluctuations nor Ca2+-dependent changes in RF in [Ca2+]e of 10 mm or less; when [Ca2+]e was increased to 12-32 mm, however, steady-state Ca2+-dependent f½ and RF were observed. In a given [Ca2+]e reduction of [Na+]e increased f½. In the transient state following cessation of regular stimulation at more rapid rates (12-96 min-1) intensity fluctuations were present in all [Ca2+]e and decayed with time (seconds to minutes); the f½ and time course of the decay of the fluctuations were determined by the rate of prior stimulation and [Ca2+]e. 4. Maximum potentiation of twitch force in response to the above inotropic interventions was associated with an optimal level of f½ which was similar in both species; when higher levels of f½ were produced by more intense inotropic intervention, twitch force declined. Over the range of inotropic intervention up to and including that at which maximum twitch potentiation occurred, the increase in diastolic f½ predicted the extent of twitch potentiation with a high degree of accuracy (r > 0.97) both in the transient and steady states. 5. In contrast to the

  12. Ca2+ Sparks and Embers of Mammalian Muscle. Properties of the Sources

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, J.; Brum, G.; González, A.; Launikonis, B.S.; Stern, M.D.; Ríos, E.

    2003-01-01

    Ca2+ sparks of membrane-permeabilized rat muscle cells were analyzed to derive properties of their sources. Most events identified in longitudinal confocal line scans looked like sparks, but 23% (1,000 out of 4,300) were followed by long-lasting embers. Some were preceded by embers, and 48 were “lone embers.” Average spatial width was ∼2 μm in the rat and 1.5 μm in frog events in analogous solutions. Amplitudes were 33% smaller and rise times 50% greater in the rat. Differences were highly significant. The greater spatial width was not a consequence of greater open time of the rat source, and was greatest at the shortest rise times, suggesting a wider Ca2+ source. In the rat, but not the frog, spark width was greater in scans transversal to the fiber axis. These features suggested that rat spark sources were elongated transversally. Ca2+ release was calculated in averages of sparks with long embers. Release current during the averaged ember started at 3 or 7 pA (depending on assumptions), whereas in lone embers it was 0.7 or 1.3 pA, which suggests that embers that trail sparks start with five open channels. Analysis of a spark with leading ember yielded a current ratio ranging from 37 to 160 in spark and ember, as if 37–160 channels opened in the spark. In simulations, 25–60 pA of Ca2+ current exiting a point source was required to reproduce frog sparks. 130 pA, exiting a cylindric source of 3 μm, qualitatively reproduced rat sparks. In conclusion, sparks of rat muscle require a greater current than frog sparks, exiting a source elongated transversally to the fiber axis, constituted by 35–260 channels. Not infrequently, a few of those remain open and produce the trailing ember. PMID:12835473

  13. The dependence of membrane potential on extracellular chloride concentration in mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, A F

    1978-01-01

    1. The steady-state intracellular membrane potential of fibres in thin bundles dissected from mouse extensor digitorum longus or soleus muscles or rat sternomastoid muscles was measured with 3 M-KCl glass micro-electrodes. The steady-state membrane potential was found to depend on the extracellular concentrations of Na, K and Cl ions. 2. The resting membrane potential (3.5 mM-[K]o, 160 mM-[Cl]o) was -74 +/- 1 mV (mean +/- S.E.) and a reduction in [Cl]o to 3.5 mM caused a reversible steady-state hyperpolarization to -94 +/- 1 mV (mean +/- S.E.). 3. The steady-state membrane potentials recorded in fibres exposed to different [K]o and zero [Cl]o were consistent with potentials predicted by the Goldman, Hodgkin & Katz (GHK) equation for Na and K. The results of similar experiments done with Cl as the major external anion could not be fitted by the same equation. 4. The GHK equation for Na, K and Cl did fit data obtained from fibres in solutions containing different [K]o with Cl as the major external anion if the intracellular Cl concentration was allowed to be out of equilibrium with the steady-state membrane potential. 5. It is suggested that an active influx of Cl ions controls the intracellular Cl concentrations in these fibres and hence maintains the Cl equilibrium potential at a depolarized value with respect to the resting membrane potential. 6. The steady-state membrane potential of rat diaphragm fibres was independent of [Cl]o and it seems likely that the intracellular Cl concentration of these fibres is not controlled by active Cl transport. PMID:650497

  14. Muscle performance and physical function are associated with voluntary rate of neuromuscular activation in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participants were recruited to three experimental groups: middle-aged healthy adults (MH), older healthy adults (OH), and older adults with mobility limitations (OML). OH and OML were primarily differentiated by performance on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Muscle performance (accele...

  15. Na,K-ATPase α2 activity in mammalian skeletal muscle T-tubules is acutely stimulated by extracellular K+

    PubMed Central

    Hakimjavadi, Hesamedin; Lingrel, Jerry B.

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase α2 isoform is the predominant Na,K-ATPase in adult skeletal muscle and the sole Na,K-ATPase in the transverse tubules (T-tubules). In quiescent muscles, the α2 isozyme operates substantially below its maximal transport capacity. Unlike the α1 isoform, the α2 isoform is not required for maintaining resting ion gradients or the resting membrane potential, canonical roles of the Na,K-ATPase in most other cells. However, α2 activity is stimulated immediately upon the start of contraction and, in working muscles, its contribution is crucial to maintaining excitation and resisting fatigue. Here, we show that α2 activity is determined in part by the K+ concentration in the T-tubules, through its K+ substrate affinity. Apparent K+ affinity was determined from measurements of the K1/2 for K+ activation of pump current in intact, voltage-clamped mouse flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers. Pump current generated by the α2 Na,K-ATPase, Ip, was identified as the outward current activated by K+ and inhibited by micromolar ouabain. Ip was outward at all potentials studied (−90 to −30 mV) and increased with depolarization in the subthreshold range, −90 to −50 mV. The Q10 was 2.1 over the range of 22–37°C. The K1/2,K of Ip was 4.3 ± 0.3 mM at −90 mV and was relatively voltage independent. This K+ affinity is lower than that reported for other cell types but closely matches the dynamic range of extracellular K+ concentrations in the T-tubules. During muscle contraction, T-tubule luminal K+ increases in proportion to the frequency and duration of action potential firing. This K1/2,K predicts a low fractional occupancy of K+ substrate sites at the resting extracellular K+ concentration, with occupancy increasing in proportion to the frequency of membrane excitation. The stimulation of preexisting pumps by greater K+ site occupancy thus provides a rapid mechanism for increasing α2 activity in working muscles. PMID:26371210

  16. Effect of postnatal development on calcium currents and slow charge movement in mammalian skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Beam, KG; Knudson, CM

    1988-01-01

    Single- (whole-cell patch) and two-electrode voltage-clamp techniques were used to measure transient (Ifast) and sustained (Islow) calcium currents, linear capacitance, and slow, voltage-dependent charge movements in freshly dissociated fibers of the flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle of rats of various postnatal ages. Peak Ifast was largest in FDB fibers of neonatal (1-5 d) rats, having a magnitude in 10 mM external Ca of 1.4 +/- 0.9 pA/pF (mean +/- SD; current normalized by linear fiber capacitance). Peak Ifast was smaller in FDB fibers of older animals, and by approximately 3 wk postnatal, it was so small as to be unmeasurable. By contrast, the magnitudes of Islow and charge movement increased substantially during postnatal development. Peak Islow was 3.6 +/- 2.5 pA/pF in FDB fibers of 1-5-d rats and increased to 16.4 +/- 6.5 pA/pF in 45-50-d-old rats; for these same two age groups, Qmax, the total mobile charge measurable as charge movement, was 6.0 +/- 1.7 and 23.8 +/- 4.0 nC/microF, respectively. As both Islow and charge movement are thought to arise in the transverse-tubular system, linear capacitance normalized by the area of fiber surface was determined as an indirect measure of the membrane area of the t-system relative to that of the fiber surface. This parameter increased from 1.5 +/- 0.2 microF/cm2 in 2-d fibers to 2.9 +/- 0.4 microF/cm2 in 44-d fibers. The increases in peak Islow, Qmax, and normalized linear capacitance all had similar time courses. Although the function of Islow is unknown, the substantial postnatal increase in its magnitude suggests that it plays an important role in the physiology of skeletal muscle. PMID:2458430

  17. Thermal stress and Ca-independent contractile activation in mammalian skeletal muscle fibers at high temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W

    1994-01-01

    Temperature dependence of the isometric tension was examined in chemically skinned, glycerinated, rabbit Psoas, muscle fibers immersed in relaxing solution (pH approximately 7.1 at 20 degrees C, pCa approximately 8, ionic strength 200 mM); the average rate of heating/cooling was 0.5-1 degree C/s. The resting tension increased reversibly with temperature (5-42 degrees C); the tension increase was slight in warming to approximately 25 degrees C (a linear thermal contraction, -alpha, of approximately 0.1%/degree C) but became more pronounced above approximately 30 degrees C (similar behavior was seen in intact rat muscle fibers). The extra tension rise at the high temperatures was depressed in acidic pH and in the presence of 10 mM inorganic phosphate; it was absent in rigor fibers in which the tension decreased with heating (a linear thermal expansion, alpha, of approximately 4 x 10(-5)/degree C). Below approximately 20 degrees C, the tension response after a approximately 1% length increase (complete < 0.5 ms) consisted of a fast decay (approximately 150.s-1 at 20 degrees C) and a slow decay (approximately 10.s-1) of tension. The rate of fast decay increased with temperature (Q10 approximately 2.4); at 35-40 degrees C, it was approximately 800.s-1, and it was followed by a delayed tension rise (stretch-activation) at 30-40.s-1. The linear rise of passive tension in warming to approximately 25 degrees C may be due to increase of thermal stress in titin (connectin)-myosin composite filament, whereas the extra tension above approximately 30 degrees C may arise from cycling cross-bridges; based on previous findings from regulated actomyosin in solution (Fuchs, 1975), it is suggested that heating reversibly inactivates the troponin-tropomyosin control mechanism and leads to Ca-independent thin filament activation at high temperatures. Additionally, we propose that the heating-induced increase of endo-sarcomeric stress within titin-myosin composite filament makes the

  18. Muscle Weakness Thresholds for Prediction of Diabetes in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark D.; Zhang, Peng; Choksi, Palak; Markides, Kyriakos S.; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the known links between weakness and early mortality, what remains to be fully understood is the extent to which strength preservation is associated with protection from cardiometabolic diseases such as diabetes. Purpose The purposes of this study were to determine the association between muscle strength and diabetes among adults, and to identify age- and sex-specific thresholds of low strength for detection of risk. Methods A population-representative sample of 4,066 individuals, aged 20–85 years, was included from the combined 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey datasets. Strength was assessed using a hand-held dynamometer, and the single largest reading from either hand was normalized to body mass. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association between normalized grip strength and risk of diabetes, as determined by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (≥6.5% [≥48 mmol/mol]), while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measures, and television viewing time. Results For every 0.05 decrement in normalized strength, there was a 1.26 times increased adjusted odds for diabetes in men and women. Women were at lower odds of having diabetes (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.29–0.82), whereas age, waist circumference and lower income were inversely associated. Optimal sex- and age-specific weakness thresholds to detect diabetes were 0.56, 0.50, and 0.45 for men, and 0.42, 0.38, and 0.33 for women, for ages 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and 60–80 years. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance We present thresholds of strength that can be incorporated into a clinical setting for identifying adults that are at risk for developing diabetes, and that might benefit from lifestyle interventions to reduce risk. PMID:26744337

  19. Reversible inhibition of contractions of mammalian cardiomyocytes and of smooth muscle by the protistan parasite Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, R

    2005-11-25

    Myotropic neuropeptides have been isolated from vertebrates and invertebrates. Recently, a myoinhibitory peptide from the protist Leishmaniamajor was isolated, and its function in the sand fly vector was described. Similar lysates of cultured L. major were tested for their ability to inhibit contractions in mammalian cell and tissue preparations. L. major proteins (LMP) (34 microg/ml) completely stopped spontaneous contractions of cultured rat cardiomyocytes; cells resumed contracting after a saline wash. An application of 880 microg/ml LMP significantly decreased force of contractions (36%) in strips of guinea pig ileum precontracted with nicotine (p<0.01) but not with acetylcholine (p>0.01). Ileal strips rinsed with Tyrode's solution and again stimulated with nicotine contracted normally. Contractile force of ileal strips electrically stimulated with 40 V was reduced in a dose-dependent manner (30, 76, and 100%) (p<0.01) by increasing concentrations of LMP (220, 440, and 880 microg/ml). This ileal preparation resumed contracting after rinsing with Tyrode's solution. Oxytocin-induced contractions of guinea pig uterine strips were reduced significantly in a dose-dependent manner (21 and 55%) (p<0.01) by increasing concentrations (170 and 310 microg/ml) of LMP and resumed contracting normally after rinsing with Tyrode's solution. Modes of action for L. major myoinhibitory factors may include either decreasing Ca(2+) influx or increasing Ca(2+) efflux in susceptible muscle. Protistan-induced inotropism is discussed in light of exacerbating pathology of disease.

  20. Prevalence of reduced muscle strength in older U.S. adults: United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Looker, Anne C; Wang, Chia-Yih

    2015-01-01

    Five percent of adults aged 60 and over had weak muscle strength and 13% had intermediate muscle strength, as defined by the new FNIH criteria. Weak muscle strength is clinically relevant because it is associated with slow gait speed, an important mobility impairment. It is also linked to an increased risk of death. The prevalence of reduced muscle strength increased with age and was higher in non-Hispanic Asian and Hispanic persons than in non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic black persons. Decreasing muscle strength was linked with increased difficulty in rising from an armless chair, which is another important type of mobility impairment. PMID:25633238

  1. Muscle-Derived Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases 1 and 2 Are Required for the Maintenance of Adult Myofibers and Their Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Seaberg, Bonnie; Henslee, Gabrielle; Wang, Shuo; Paez-Colasante, Ximena; Landreth, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Ras–extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) pathway appears to be important for the development, maintenance, aging, and pathology of mammalian skeletal muscle. Yet no gene targeting of Erk1/2 in muscle fibers in vivo has been reported to date. We combined a germ line Erk1 mutation with Cre-loxP Erk2 inactivation in skeletal muscle to produce, for the first time, mice lacking ERK1/2 selectively in skeletal myofibers. Animals lacking muscle ERK1/2 displayed stunted postnatal growth, muscle weakness, and a shorter life span. Their muscles examined in this study, sternomastoid and tibialis anterior, displayed fragmented neuromuscular synapses and a mixture of modest fiber atrophy and loss but failed to show major changes in fiber type composition or absence of cell surface dystrophin. Whereas the lack of only ERK1 had no effects on the phenotypes studied, the lack of myofiber ERK2 explained synaptic fragmentation in the sternomastoid but not the tibialis anterior and a decrease in the expression of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon subunit gene mRNA in both muscles. A reduction in AChR protein was documented in line with the above mRNA results. Evidence of partial denervation was found in the sternomastoid but not the tibialis anterior. Thus, myofiber ERK1/2 are differentially required for the maintenance of myofibers and neuromuscular synapses in adult mice. PMID:25605336

  2. Enzyme immunoassay and proteomic characterization of troponin I as a marker of mammalian muscle compounds in raw meat and some meat products.

    PubMed

    Zvereva, Elena A; Kovalev, Leonid I; Ivanov, Alexei V; Kovaleva, Marina A; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Shishkin, Sergey S; Lisitsyn, Andrey B; Chernukha, Irina M; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2015-07-01

    The skeletal muscle protein troponin I (TnI) has been characterized as a potential thermally stable and species-specific biomarker of mammalian muscle tissues in raw meat and meat products. This study proposed a technique for the quantification of TnI comprising protein extraction and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The technique is characterized by a TnI detection limit of 4.8 ng/ml with quantifiable concentrations ranging from 8.7 to 52 ng/ml. The method was shown to be suitable for detection of TnI in mammalian (beef, pork, lamb, and horse) meat but not in poultry (chicken, turkey, and duck) meat. In particular, the TnI content in beef was 0.40 3 ± 0.058 mg/g of wet tissue. The TnI estimations obtained for the pork and beef samples using ELISA were comparable to the proteomic analysis results. Thus, the quantitative study of TnI can be a convenient way to assess the mammalian muscle tissue content of various meat products.

  3. Expression and identification of 10 sarcomeric MyHC isoforms in human skeletal muscles of different embryological origin. Diversity and similarity in mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Mascarello, Francesco; Toniolo, Luana; Cancellara, Pasqua; Reggiani, Carlo; Maccatrozzo, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    In the mammalian genome, among myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms a family can be identified as sarcomeric based on their molecular structure which allows thick filament formation. In this study we aimed to assess the expression of the 10 sarcomeric isoforms in human skeletal muscles, adopting this species as a reference for comparison with all other mammalian species. To this aim, we set up the condition for quantitative Real Time PCR assay to detect and quantify MyHC mRNA expression in a wide variety of human muscles from somitic, presomitic and preotic origin. Specific patterns of expression of the following genes MYH1, MYH2, MYH3, MYH4, MYH6, MYH7, MYH8, MYH13, MYH14/7b and MYH15 were demonstrated in various muscle samples. On the same muscle samples which were analysed for mRNA expression, the corresponding MyHC proteins were studied with SDS PAGE and Western blot. The mRNA-protein comparison allowed the identification of 10 distinct proteins based on the electrophoretic migration rate. Three groups were formed based on the migration rate: fast migrating comprising beta/slow/1, alpha cardiac and fast 2B, slow migrating comprising fast 2X, fast 2A and two developmental isoforms (NEO and EMB), intermediate migrating comprising EO MyHC, slow B (product of MYH15), slow tonic (product of MYH14/7b). Of special interest was the demonstration of a protein band corresponding to 2B-MyHC in laryngeal muscles and the finding that all 10 isoforms are expressed in extraocular muscles. These latter muscles are the unique localization for extraocular, slow B (product of MYH15) and slow tonic (product of MYH14/7b).

  4. Impact of longus colli muscle massage on the strength and endurance of the deep neck flexor muscle of adults.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wontae

    2013-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of longus colli muscle massage on the strength and endurance of the deep neck flexor muscle in adults. [Subjects] A total of 60 subjects were divided into an experimental group of 30 subjects and a control group of 30 subjects. [Methods] The experimental group received massage of the longus colli muscle, which is the deep neck flexor muscle, and the control group received superficial neck muscle massage. The strength and endurance of both the experimental group and the control group were measured before and after the intervention using a pressure biofeedback unit (PBU). [Results] After the experiment, the strength of DNF of the experimental group showed a statistically significant increase, and the endurance of DNF of the experimental group showed an increase in its average value. The independent sample t-test revealed no statistically significant differences in the groups. [Conclusion] Massage of the longus colli muscle, which is the deep neck flexor, was shown to improve its strength and endurance, which are measures of neck stabilization. Therefore, longus colli muscle massage can be performed for patients who cannot perform neck-stabilizing exercises or before performing other neck-stabilizing exercises.

  5. An In Vitro Adult Mouse Muscle-nerve Preparation for Studying the Firing Properties of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Joy A.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Hochman, Shawn; Wilkinson, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle sensory neurons innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs encode length and force changes essential to proprioception. Additional afferent fibers monitor other characteristics of the muscle environment, including metabolite buildup, temperature, and nociceptive stimuli. Overall, abnormal activation of sensory neurons can lead to movement disorders or chronic pain syndromes. We describe the isolation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and nerve for in vitro study of stretch-evoked afferent responses in the adult mouse. Sensory activity is recorded from the nerve with a suction electrode and individual afferents can be analyzed using spike sorting software. In vitro preparations allow for well controlled studies on sensory afferents without the potential confounds of anesthesia or altered muscle perfusion. Here we describe a protocol to identify and test the response of muscle spindle afferents to stretch. Importantly, this preparation also supports the study of other subtypes of muscle afferents, response properties following drug application and the incorporation of powerful genetic approaches and disease models in mice. PMID:25285602

  6. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Song, Sang Heon; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Bae, Sun Sik

    2015-08-14

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs.

  7. Profiling the role of mammalian target of rapamycin in the vascular smooth muscle metabolome in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashova, Tatiana V.; Goncharov, Dmitry A.; Pena, Andressa; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; DeLisser, Horace; Kawut, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased proliferation and resistance to apoptosis of pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (PAVSMCs), coupled with metabolic reprogramming, are key components of pulmonary vascular remodeling, a major and currently irreversible pathophysiological feature of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We recently reported that activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a key role in increased energy generation and maintenance of the proliferative, apoptosis-resistant PAVSMC phenotype in human PAH, but the downstream effects of mTOR activation on PAH PAVSMC metabolism are not clear. Using liquid and gas chromatography–based mass spectrometry, we performed pilot metabolomic profiling of human microvascular PAVSMCs from idiopathic-PAH subjects before and after treatment with the selective adenosine triphosphate–competitive mTOR inhibitor PP242 and from nondiseased lungs. We have shown that PAH PAVSMCs have a distinct metabolomic signature of altered metabolites—components of fatty acid synthesis, deficiency of sugars, amino sugars, and nucleotide sugars—intermediates of protein and lipid glycosylation, and downregulation of key biochemicals involved in glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism. We also report that mTOR inhibition attenuated or reversed the majority of the PAH-specific abnormalities in lipogenesis, glycosylation, glutathione, and NAD metabolism without affecting altered polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism. Collectively, our data demonstrate a critical role of mTOR in major PAH PAVSMC metabolic abnormalities and suggest the existence of de novo lipid synthesis in PAVSMCs in human PAH that may represent a new, important component of disease pathogenesis worthy of future investigation. PMID:26697174

  8. Identification of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors That Target Neonatal and Adult Mammalian Inner Ear Cell Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yilai; Tao, Yong; Wang, Zhengmin; Tang, Yong; Li, Huawei; Dai, Pu; Gao, Guangping; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-09-01

    The mammalian inner ear consists of diverse cell types with important functions. Gene mutations in these diverse cell types have been found to underlie different forms of genetic hearing loss. Targeting these mutations for gene therapy development represents a future therapeutic strategy to treat hearing loss. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have become the vector of choice for gene delivery in animal models in vivo. To identify AAV vectors that target inner ear cell subtypes, we systemically screened 12 AAV vectors with different serotypes (AAV1, 2, 5, 6, 6.2, 7, 8, 9, rh.8, rh.10, rh.39, and rh.43) that carry a reporter gene GFP in neonatal and adult mice by microinjection in vivo. We found that most AAVs infect both neonatal and adult inner ear, with different specificities and expression levels. The inner ear cochlear sensory epithelial region, which includes auditory hair cells and supporting cells, is most frequently targeted for gene delivery. Expression of the transgene is sustained, and neonatal inner ear delivery does not adversely affect hearing. Adult inner ear injection of AAV has a similar infection pattern as the younger inner ear, with the exception that outer hair cell death caused by the injection procedure can lead to hearing loss. In the adult, more so than in the neonatal mice, cell types infected and efficiency of infection are correlated with the site of injection. Most infected cells survive in neonatal and adult inner ears. The study adds to the list of AAV vectors that transduce the mammalian inner ear efficiently, providing the tools that are important to study inner ear gene function and for the development of gene therapy to treat hearing loss. PMID:27342665

  9. Myogenin Regulates Exercise Capacity but Is Dispensable for Skeletal Muscle Regeneration in Adult mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Klein, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most prevalent inherited childhood muscle disorder in humans. mdx mice exhibit a similar pathophysiology to the human disorder allowing for an in-depth investigation of DMD. Myogenin, a myogenic regulatory factor, is best known for its role in embryonic myogenesis, but its role in adult muscle maintenance and regeneration is still poorly understood. Here, we generated an mdx:Myogflox/flox mouse harboring a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase transgene, which was used to conditionally delete Myog during adult life. After tamoxifen treatment, three groups of mice were created to study the effects of Myog deletion: mdx:Myogflox/flox mice (mdx), Myogflox/flox mice (wild-type), and mdx:MyogfloxΔ/floxΔ:Cre-ER mice (mdx:Myog-deleted). mdx:Myog-deleted mice exhibited no adverse phenotype and behaved normally. When run to exhaustion, mdx:Myog-deleted mice demonstrated an enhanced capacity for exercise compared to mdx mice, running nearly as far as wild-type mice. Moreover, these mice showed the same signature characteristics of muscle regeneration as mdx mice. Unexpectedly, we found that myogenin was dispensable for muscle regeneration. Factors associated with muscle fatigue, metabolism, and proteolysis were significantly altered in mdx:Myog-deleted mice, and this might contribute to their increased exercise capacity. Our results reveal novel functions for myogenin in adult muscle and suggest that reducing Myog expression in other muscle disease models may partially restore muscle function. PMID:21264243

  10. Validation of Manual Muscle Testing and a Subset of Eight Muscles (MMT8) for Adult and Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Lisa G.; Koziol, Deloris; Giannini, Edward H.; Jain, Minal S.; Smith, Michaele R.; Whitney-Mahoney, Kristi; Feldman, Brian M.; Wright, Susan J.; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Villalba, Maria L.; Lovell, Daniel J.; Bowyer, Suzanne L.; Plotz, Paul H.; Miller, Frederick W.; Hicks, Jeanne E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To validate manual muscle testing (MMT) for strength assessment in juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM). Methods Seventy-three children and 45 adult DM/PM patients were assessed at baseline and reevaluated 6–9 months later. We compared Total MMT (a group of 24 proximal, distal, and axial muscles) and Proximal MMT (7 proximal muscle groups) tested bilaterally on a 0–10 scale with 144 subsets of six and 96 subsets of eight muscle groups tested unilaterally. Expert consensus was used to rank the best abbreviated MMT subsets for face validity and ease of assessment. Results The Total, Proximal and best MMT subsets had excellent internal reliability (rs:Total MMT 0.91–0.98), and consistency (Cronbach’s α 0.78–0.97). Inter- and intra-rater reliability were acceptable (Kendall’s W 0.68–0.76; rs 0.84–0.95). MMT subset scores correlated highly with Total and Proximal MMT scores and with the Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale, and correlated moderately with physician global activity, functional disability, magnetic resonance imaging, axial and distal MMT scores and, in adults, with creatine kinase. The standardized response mean for Total MMT was 0.56 in juveniles and 0.75 in adults. Consensus was reached to use a subset of eight muscles (neck flexors, deltoids, biceps, wrist extensors, gluteus maximus and medius, quadriceps and ankle dorsiflexors) that performed as well as the Total and Proximal MMT, and had good face validity and ease of assessment. Conclusions These findings aid in standardizing the use of MMT for assessing strength as an outcome measure for myositis. PMID:20391500

  11. Aging-Related Geniohyoid Muscle Atrophy Is Related to Aspiration Status in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background. Age-related muscle weakness due to atrophy and fatty infiltration in orofacial muscles may be related to swallowing deficits in older adults. An important component of safe swallowing is the geniohyoid (GH) muscle, which helps elevate and stabilize the hyoid bone, thus protecting the airway. This study aimed to explore whether aging and aspiration in older adults were related to GH muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration. Method. Eighty computed tomography scans of the head and neck from 40 healthy older (average age 78 years) and 40 younger adults (average age 32 years) were analyzed. Twenty aspirators and 20 nonaspirators from the 40 older adults had been identified previously. Two-dimensional views in the sagittal and coronal planes were used to measure the GH cross-sectional area and fatty infiltration. Results. GH cross-sectional area was larger in men than in women (p < .05). Decreased cross-sectional area was associated with aging (p < .05), and cross-sectional area was significantly smaller in aspirators compared with nonaspirators, but only among the older men (p < .01). Increasing fatty infiltration was associated with aging in the middle (p < .05) and posterior (p < .01) portions of the GH muscle. There was no significant difference in fatty infiltration of the GH muscle among aspirators and nonaspirators. Conclusion. GH muscle atrophy was associated with aging and aspiration. Fatty infiltration in the GH muscle was increased with aging but not related to aspiration status. These findings suggest that GH muscle atrophy may be a component of decreased swallowing safety and aspiration in older adults and warrants further investigation. PMID:23112114

  12. Relationship Between Respiratory Muscle Strength and Conventional Sarcopenic Indices in Young Adults: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Hee Joon; Lee, Sang Yoon; Seo, Kyung Mook; Kang, Si Hyun; Suh, Hoon Chang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationships between respiratory muscle strength and conventional sarcopenic indices such as skeletal muscle mass and limb muscle strength. Methods Eighty-nine young adult volunteers who had no history of medical or musculoskeletal disease were enrolled. Skeletal muscle mass was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and expressed as a skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). Upper and lower limb muscle strength were evaluated by hand grip strength (HGS) and isometric knee extensor muscle strength, respectively. Peak expiratory flow (PEF), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) were evaluated using a spirometer to demonstrate respiratory muscle strength. The relationships between respiratory muscle strength and sarcopenic indices were investigated using Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression analysis adjusted by age, height, and body mass index. Results MIP showed positive correlations with SMI (r=0.457 in men, r=0.646 in women; both p<0.01). MIP also correlated with knee extensor strength (p<0.01 in both sexes) and HGS (p<0.05 in men, p<0.01 in women). However, PEF and MEP had no significant correlations with these sarcopenic variables. In multivariate regression analysis, MIP was the only independent factor related to SMI (p<0.01). Conclusion Among the respiratory muscle strength variables, MIP was the only value associated with skeletal muscle mass. PMID:26798601

  13. Motor activity affects adult skeletal muscle re-innervation acting via tyrosine kinase receptors.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Stefano; Bartolini, Fanny; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Betti, Michele; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Lattanzi, Davide; Di Palma, Michael; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2013-05-01

    Recently, muscle expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein under activity control has been reported. BDNF is a neurotrophin known to be involved in axon sprouting in the CNS. Hence, we set out to study the effect of chronic treadmill mid-intensity running on adult rat muscle re-innervation, and to explore the involvement of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors. After nerve crush, muscle re-innervation was evaluated using intracellular recordings, tension recordings, immunostaining and Western blot analyses. An enhanced muscle multiple innervation was found in running rats that was fully reversed to control values blocking Trk receptors or interrupting the running activity. An increase in muscle multiple innervation was also found in sedentary rats treated with a selective TrkB receptor agonist. The expression of TrkB receptors by intramuscular axons was demonstrated, and increased muscle expression of BDNF was found in running animals. The increase in muscle multiple innervation was consistent with the faster muscle re-innervation that we found in running animals. We conclude that, when regenerating axons contact muscle cells, muscle activity progressively increases modulating BDNF and possibly other growth factors, which in turn, acting via Trk receptors, induce axon sprouting to re-innervate skeletal muscle.

  14. Characteristic muscle activity patterns during gait initiation in the healthy younger and older adults.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, Roya; Talebian, Saeed; Hadian, Mohammad Reza; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Bagheri, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that gait initiation (GI) might be an optimal task for identifying postural control deficiencies. Thus, the aim of this study was to clarify the strategies adopted by older subjects during this task. 16 healthy younger and 15 healthy older adults participated in the study. Subjects were instructed to begin forward stepping with their dominant limb in response to an auditory stimulus. The mean muscle activity, co-contraction index, and intra-subject coefficients of variation (intra-subject CVs) of dominant limb muscles in different phases of GI were measured. The level of association between the co-contraction index and intra-subject CV of muscles was also explored. This study showed that in the anticipatory phase, the younger group had larger amplitudes and more intra-subject CVs than older the group, particularly for the tibialis anterior muscle. However, the co-contraction index was greater in older subjects relative to younger subjects. During the weight transition phase, tibialis anterior, semitendinosus and vastus lateralis muscles of older adults had a lower amplitude as compared to younger adults. However, during the locomotor phase, the activity of tibialis anterior was greater in comparison to younger adults. Also, during this phase, similar to the anticipatory phase, the co-contraction index between tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles was greater in older subjects relative to younger subjects. Additionally, the larger co-contraction index of some muscles was associated with smaller intra-subject CV. These findings suggest that muscle behaviors are altered with aging and older adults employ different strategies in the different phases of GI as compared to younger adults.

  15. Relationships between metabolic rate, muscle electromyograms, and swim performance of adult chinook salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R. ); Brown, Richard S. ); Cullinan, Valerie I. ); Mesa, Matthew G.; VanderKooi, S P.; McKinstry, Craig A. )

    2003-10-01

    We measured oxygen consumption rates of adult spring Chinook salmon and compared these values to other species of Pacific salmon. Our results indicated that adult salmon achieve their maximum level of oxygen consumption at about their upper critical swim speed. It is also at this speed that the majority of the energy supplied to the swimming fish switches from red muscle (powered by aerobic metabolism) to white muscle (powered by anaerobic metabolism). Determining the swimming performance of adult salmon will assist managers in developing fishways and other means to safely pass fish over hydroelectric dams and other man-made structures.

  16. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Its Role in Early Neural Development and in Adult and Aged Brain Function.

    PubMed

    Garza-Lombó, Carla; Gonsebatt, María E

    2016-01-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates signals triggered by energy, stress, oxygen levels, and growth factors. It regulates ribosome biogenesis, mRNA translation, nutrient metabolism, and autophagy. mTOR participates in various functions of the brain, such as synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, memory, and learning. mTOR is present during early neural development and participates in axon and dendrite development, neuron differentiation, and gliogenesis, among other processes. Furthermore, mTOR has been shown to modulate lifespan in multiple organisms. This protein is an important energy sensor that is present throughout our lifetime its role must be precisely described in order to develop therapeutic strategies and prevent diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to present our current understanding of the functions of mTOR in neural development, the adult brain and aging. PMID:27378854

  17. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Its Role in Early Neural Development and in Adult and Aged Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Lombó, Carla; Gonsebatt, María E.

    2016-01-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates signals triggered by energy, stress, oxygen levels, and growth factors. It regulates ribosome biogenesis, mRNA translation, nutrient metabolism, and autophagy. mTOR participates in various functions of the brain, such as synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, memory, and learning. mTOR is present during early neural development and participates in axon and dendrite development, neuron differentiation, and gliogenesis, among other processes. Furthermore, mTOR has been shown to modulate lifespan in multiple organisms. This protein is an important energy sensor that is present throughout our lifetime its role must be precisely described in order to develop therapeutic strategies and prevent diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to present our current understanding of the functions of mTOR in neural development, the adult brain and aging. PMID:27378854

  18. Upper Limb Strength and Muscle Volume in Healthy Middle-Aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Saul, Katherine R; Vidt, Meghan E; Gold, Garry E; Murray, Wendy M

    2015-12-01

    Our purpose was to characterize shoulder muscle volume and isometric moment, as well as their relationship, for healthy middle- aged adults. Muscle volume and maximum isometric joint moment were assessed for 6 functional muscle groups of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist in 10 middle-aged adults (46–60 y, 5M, 5F). Compared with young adults, shoulder abductors composed a smaller percentage of total muscle volume (P = .0009) and there was a reduction in shoulder adductor strength relative to elbow flexors (P = .012). We observed a consistent ordering of moment-generating capacity among functional groups across subjects. Although total muscle volume spanned a 2.3-fold range, muscle volume was distributed among functional groups in a consistent manner across subjects. On average, 72% of the variation in joint moment could be explained by the corresponding functional group muscle volume. These data are useful for improved modeling of upper limb musculoskeletal performance in middle-aged subjects, and may improve computational predictions of function for this group. PMID:26155870

  19. Impact of nutrition on muscle mass, strength, and performance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Mithal, A; Bonjour, J-P; Boonen, S; Burckhardt, P; Degens, H; El Hajj Fuleihan, G; Josse, R; Lips, P; Morales Torres, J; Rizzoli, R; Yoshimura, N; Wahl, D A; Cooper, C; Dawson-Hughes, B

    2013-05-01

    Muscle strength plays an important role in determining risk for falls, which result in fractures and other injuries. While bone loss has long been recognized as an inevitable consequence of aging, sarcopenia-the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with advancing age-has recently received increased attention. A review of the literature was undertaken to identify nutritional factors that contribute to loss of muscle mass. The role of protein, acid-base balance, vitamin D/calcium, and other minor nutrients like B vitamins was reviewed. Muscle wasting is a multifactorial process involving intrinsic and extrinsic alterations. A loss of fast twitch fibers, glycation of proteins, and insulin resistance may play an important role in the loss of muscle strength and development of sarcopenia. Protein intake plays an integral part in muscle health and an intake of 1.0-1.2 g/kg of body weight per day is probably optimal for older adults. There is a moderate [corrected] relationship between vitamin D status and muscle strength. Chronic ingestion of acid-producing diets appears to have a negative impact on muscle performance, and decreases in vitamin B12 and folic acid intake may also impair muscle function through their action on homocysteine. An adequate nutritional intake and an optimal dietary acid-base balance are important elements of any strategy to preserve muscle mass and strength during aging.

  20. Rapamycin does not improve insulin sensitivity despite elevated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity in muscles of ob/ob mice

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew M.; Brestoff, Jonathan R.; Phelps, Charles B.; Berk, E. Zachary; Reynolds, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of cultured cells have indicated that the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) mediates the development of insulin resistance. Because a role for mTORC1 in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance has not been established, we studied mTORC1 activity in skeletal muscles of ob/ob (OB) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. In vivo insulin action was assessed in muscles of mice 15 min following an intraperitoneal injection of insulin or an equivalent volume of saline. In the basal state, the phosphorylation of S6K on Thr389, mTOR on Ser2448, and PRAS40 on Thr246 were increased significantly in muscles from OB mice compared with WT mice. The increase in basal mTORC1 signaling was associated with an increase in basal PKB phosphorylation on Thr308 and Ser473. In the insulin-stimulated state, no differences existed in the phosphorylation of S6K on Thr389, but PKB phosphorylation on Thr308 and Ser473 was significantly reduced in muscles of OB compared with WT mice. Despite elevated mTORC1 activity in OB mice, rapamycin treatment did not improve either glucose tolerance or insulin tolerance. These results indicate that the insulin resistance of OB mice is mediated, in part, by factors other than mTORC1. PMID:18768766

  1. Proprioceptive acuity predicts muscle co-contraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis in older adults' dynamic postural control.

    PubMed

    Craig, C E; Goble, D J; Doumas, M

    2016-05-13

    Older adults use a different muscle strategy to cope with postural instability, in which they 'co-contract' the muscles around the ankle joint. It has been suggested that this is a compensatory response to age-related proprioceptive decline however this view has never been assessed directly. The current study investigated the association between proprioceptive acuity and muscle co-contraction in older adults. We compared muscle activity, by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles, in young (aged 18-34) and older adults (aged 65-82) during postural assessment on a fixed and sway-referenced surface at age-equivalent levels of sway. We performed correlations between muscle activity and proprioceptive acuity, which was assessed using an active contralateral matching task. Despite successfully inducing similar levels of sway in the two age groups, older adults still showed higher muscle co-contraction. A stepwise regression analysis showed that proprioceptive acuity measured using variable error was the best predictor of muscle co-contraction in older adults. However, despite suggestions from previous research, proprioceptive error and muscle co-contraction were negatively correlated in older adults, suggesting that better proprioceptive acuity predicts more co-contraction. Overall, these results suggest that although muscle co-contraction may be an age-specific strategy used by older adults, it is not to compensate for age-related proprioceptive deficits.

  2. Proprioceptive acuity predicts muscle co-contraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis in older adults' dynamic postural control.

    PubMed

    Craig, C E; Goble, D J; Doumas, M

    2016-05-13

    Older adults use a different muscle strategy to cope with postural instability, in which they 'co-contract' the muscles around the ankle joint. It has been suggested that this is a compensatory response to age-related proprioceptive decline however this view has never been assessed directly. The current study investigated the association between proprioceptive acuity and muscle co-contraction in older adults. We compared muscle activity, by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles, in young (aged 18-34) and older adults (aged 65-82) during postural assessment on a fixed and sway-referenced surface at age-equivalent levels of sway. We performed correlations between muscle activity and proprioceptive acuity, which was assessed using an active contralateral matching task. Despite successfully inducing similar levels of sway in the two age groups, older adults still showed higher muscle co-contraction. A stepwise regression analysis showed that proprioceptive acuity measured using variable error was the best predictor of muscle co-contraction in older adults. However, despite suggestions from previous research, proprioceptive error and muscle co-contraction were negatively correlated in older adults, suggesting that better proprioceptive acuity predicts more co-contraction. Overall, these results suggest that although muscle co-contraction may be an age-specific strategy used by older adults, it is not to compensate for age-related proprioceptive deficits. PMID:26905952

  3. Clinico pathological study of adult dermatomyositis: Importance of muscle histology in the diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Karri, Sudhir Babu; Kannan, Meena Anga Muthu; Rajashekhar, Liza; Uppin, Megha S.; Challa, Sundaram

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To study the histological features on muscle biopsy and correlate them with clinical features, other laboratory data in adult patients to make a diagnosis of dermatomyositis (DM), applying the European Neuromuscular center (ENMC) criteria. Materials and Methods: Adult patients who fulfilled clinical, laboratory, and muscle biopsy findings according to ENMC criteria for DM during the period 2010–2013 were included in the study. Cryostat sections of muscle biopsy were reviewed with emphasis on Perifascicular atrophy (PFA), perivascular/endomysial inflammation. Muscular dystrophies and metabolic myopathies were excluded by appropriate immunohistochemistry and special stains. Results: The diagnosis of adult DM was made in 45 patients out of 170 clinically suspected idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. These included 33 definite, 4 probable, 7 possible sine dermatitis, and 1 amyopathic DM. All patients with definite DM had typical rash and proximal muscle weakness and muscle biopsy showed PFA with or without inflammation. Thirteen patients had quadriparesis, neck muscle weakness, dysphagia/dysphonia at presentation. Patients with probable DM had rash and showed perivascular/endomysial inflammation with no PFA. Possible DM sine dermatitis showed PFA with perivascular/endomysial infiltrates. One patient of amyopathic DM had typical heliotrope rash and characteristic skin biopsy. Conclusions: Histological features are important for the diagnosis of DM. Relying on PFA for diagnosis of definite DM underestimates the true frequency of DM. PMID:26019418

  4. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their relation with bone and muscle health in adults.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Kelsey M; Sahni, Shivani; Kerstetter, Jane E; Kenny, Anne M; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-09-01

    Age-related bone and muscle loss are major public health problems. Investigational therapies to reduce these losses include anti-inflammatory dietary supplementations, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Surprisingly, this topic has received little attention in the osteoporosis community. Recent research highlights the role of PUFA in inflammatory regulation of bone remodeling via cellular pathways. Emerging research suggests significant roles for PUFA in reducing bone and muscle loss with aging; however, findings are conflicted for PUFA and fracture risk. Limited studies suggest a relation between higher omega-3 FA and better muscle/bone in older adults. This review highlights new research since 2008 and synthesizes our current understanding of PUFA in relation to bone and muscle. Across study designs, evidence indicates that PUFA has positive effects upon bone. As data are sparse, future clinical trials and prospective studies are important to determine the long term benefits of PUFA supplementation upon bone and muscle outcomes. PMID:23857286

  5. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their relation with bone and muscle health in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Kelsey M; Sahni, Shivani; Kerstetter, Jane E; Kenny, Anne M; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-01-01

    Age-related bone and muscle loss are major public health problems. Investigational therapies to reduce these losses include anti-inflammatory dietary supplementations, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Surprisingly, this topic has received little attention in the osteoporosis community. Recent research highlights the role of PUFA in inflammatory regulation of bone remodeling via cellular pathways. Emerging research suggests significant roles for PUFA in reducing bone and muscle loss with aging; however, findings are conflicted for PUFA and fracture risk. Limited studies suggest a relation between higher omega-3 FA and better muscle/bone in older adults. This review highlights new research since 2008 and synthesizes our current understanding of PUFA in relation to bone and muscle. Across study designs, evidence indicates that PUFA has positive effects upon bone. As data are sparse, future clinical trials and prospective studies are important to determine the long term benefits of PUFA supplementation upon bone and muscle outcomes. PMID:23857286

  6. Synergist Ablation as a Rodent Model to Study Satellite Cell Dynamics in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    In adult skeletal muscles, satellite cells are the primary myogenic stem cells involved in myogenesis. Normally, they remain in a quiescent state until activated by a stimulus, after which they proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into an existing myofiber or form a de novo myofiber. To study satellite cell dynamics in adult murine models, most studies utilize regeneration models in which the muscle is severely damaged and requires the participation from satellite cells in order to repair. Here, we describe a model to study satellite cell behavior in muscle hypertrophy that is independent of muscle regeneration.Synergist ablation surgery involves the surgical removal of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles resulting in functional overload of the remaining plantaris muscle. This functional overload results in myofiber hypertrophy, as well as the activation, proliferation, and fusion of satellite cells into the myofibers. Within 2 weeks of functional overload, satellite cell content increases approximately 275 %, an increase that is accompanied with a ~60 % increase in the number of myonuclei. Therefore, this can be used as an alternative model to study satellite cell behavior in adulthood that is different from regeneration, and capable of revealing new satellite cell functions in regulating muscle adaptation. PMID:27492164

  7. Synergist Ablation as a Rodent Model to Study Satellite Cell Dynamics in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    In adult skeletal muscles, satellite cells are the primary myogenic stem cells involved in myogenesis. Normally, they remain in a quiescent state until activated by a stimulus, after which they proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into an existing myofiber or form a de novo myofiber. To study satellite cell dynamics in adult murine models, most studies utilize regeneration models in which the muscle is severely damaged and requires the participation from satellite cells in order to repair. Here, we describe a model to study satellite cell behavior in muscle hypertrophy that is independent of muscle regeneration.Synergist ablation surgery involves the surgical removal of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles resulting in functional overload of the remaining plantaris muscle. This functional overload results in myofiber hypertrophy, as well as the activation, proliferation, and fusion of satellite cells into the myofibers. Within 2 weeks of functional overload, satellite cell content increases approximately 275 %, an increase that is accompanied with a ~60 % increase in the number of myonuclei. Therefore, this can be used as an alternative model to study satellite cell behavior in adulthood that is different from regeneration, and capable of revealing new satellite cell functions in regulating muscle adaptation.

  8. Bi-parental care contributes to sexually dimorphic neural cell genesis in the adult mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Mak, Gloria K; Antle, Michael C; Dyck, Richard H; Weiss, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Early life events can modulate brain development to produce persistent physiological and behavioural phenotypes that are transmissible across generations. However, whether neural precursor cells are altered by early life events, to produce persistent and transmissible behavioural changes, is unknown. Here, we show that bi-parental care, in early life, increases neural cell genesis in the adult rodent brain in a sexually dimorphic manner. Bi-parentally raised male mice display enhanced adult dentate gyrus neurogenesis, which improves hippocampal neurogenesis-dependent learning and memory. Female mice display enhanced adult white matter oligodendrocyte production, which increases proficiency in bilateral motor coordination and preference for social investigation. Surprisingly, single parent-raised male and female offspring, whose fathers and mothers received bi-parental care, respectively, display a similar enhancement in adult neural cell genesis and phenotypic behaviour. Therefore, neural plasticity and behavioural effects due to bi-parental care persist throughout life and are transmitted to the next generation.

  9. Cholesterol removal from adult skeletal muscle impairs excitation-contraction coupling and aging reduces caveolin-3 and alters the expression of other triadic proteins.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Genaro; Llanos, Paola; Hidalgo, Jorge; Bolaños, Pura; Caputo, Carlo; Riquelme, Alexander; Sánchez, Gina; Quest, Andrew F G; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol and caveolin are integral membrane components that modulate the function/location of many cellular proteins. Skeletal muscle fibers, which have unusually high cholesterol levels in transverse tubules, express the caveolin-3 isoform but its association with transverse tubules remains contentious. Cholesterol removal impairs excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in amphibian and mammalian fetal skeletal muscle fibers. Here, we show that treating single muscle fibers from adult mice with the cholesterol removing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased fiber cholesterol by 26%, altered the location pattern of caveolin-3 and of the voltage dependent calcium channel Cav1.1, and suppressed or reduced electrically evoked Ca(2+) transients without affecting membrane integrity or causing sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium depletion. We found that transverse tubules from adult muscle and triad fractions that contain ~10% attached transverse tubules, but not SR membranes, contained caveolin-3 and Cav1.1; both proteins partitioned into detergent-resistant membrane fractions highly enriched in cholesterol. Aging entails significant deterioration of skeletal muscle function. We found that triad fractions from aged rats had similar cholesterol and RyR1 protein levels compared to triads from young rats, but had lower caveolin-3 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and increased Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase protein levels. Both triad fractions had comparable NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity and protein content of NOX2 subunits (p47(phox) and gp91(phox)), implying that NOX activity does not increase during aging. These findings show that partial cholesterol removal impairs E-C coupling and alters caveolin-3 and Cav1.1 location pattern, and that aging reduces caveolin-3 protein content and modifies the expression of other triadic proteins. We discuss the possible implications of these findings for skeletal muscle function in young and aged animals.

  10. CuZnSOD gene deletion targeted to skeletal muscle leads to loss of contractile force but does not cause muscle atrophy in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Davis, Carol; Sakellariou, George K.; Shi, Yun; Kayani, Anna C.; Pulliam, Daniel; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Richardson, Arlan; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne; Brooks, Susan V.; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that deletion of CuZnSOD in mice (Sod1−/− mice) leads to accelerated loss of muscle mass and contractile force during aging. To dissect the relative roles of skeletal muscle and motor neurons in this process, we used a Cre-Lox targeted approach to establish a skeletal muscle-specific Sod1-knockout (mKO) mouse to determine whether muscle-specific CuZnSOD deletion is sufficient to cause muscle atrophy. Surprisingly, mKO mice maintain muscle masses at or above those of wild-type control mice up to 18 mo of age. In contrast, maximum isometric specific force measured in gastrocnemius muscle is significantly reduced in the mKO mice. We found no detectable increases in global measures of oxidative stress or ROS production, no reduction in mitochondrial ATP production, and no induction of adaptive stress responses in muscle from mKO mice. However, Akt-mTOR signaling is elevated and the number of muscle fibers with centrally located nuclei is increased in skeletal muscle from mKO mice, which suggests elevated regenerative pathways. Our data demonstrate that lack of CuZnSOD restricted to skeletal muscle does not lead to muscle atrophy but does cause muscle weakness in adult mice and suggest loss of CuZnSOD may potentiate muscle regenerative pathways.—Zhang, Y., Davis, C., Sakellariou, G.K., Shi, Y., Kayani, A.C., Pulliam, D., Bhattacharya, A., Richardson, A., Jackson, M.J., McArdle, A., Brooks, S.V., Van Remmen, H. CuZnSOD gene deletion targeted to skeletal muscle leads to loss of contractile force but does not cause muscle atrophy in adult mice. PMID:23729587

  11. STAT3 Regulates Self-Renewal of Adult Muscle Satellite Cells during Injury-Induced Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Han; Xiao, Fang; Wang, Gang; Wei, Xiuqing; Jiang, Lei; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Haixia; Diao, Yarui; Wang, Huating; Ip, Nancy Y; Cheung, Tom H; Wu, Zhenguo

    2016-08-23

    Recent studies have shown that STAT3 negatively regulates the proliferation of muscle satellite cells (MuSCs) and injury-induced muscle regeneration. These studies have been largely based on STAT3 inhibitors, which may produce off-target effects and are not cell type-specific in vivo. Here, we examine the role of STAT3 in MuSCs using two different mouse models: a MuSC-specific Stat3 knockout line and a Stat3 (MuSC-specific)/dystrophin (Dmd) double knockout (dKO) line. Stat3(-/-) MuSCs from both mutant lines were defective in proliferation. Moreover, in both mutant strains, the MuSC pool shrank, and regeneration was compromised after injury, with defects more pronounced in dKO mice along with severe muscle inflammation and fibrosis. We analyzed the transcriptomes of MuSCs from dKO and Dmd(-/-) control mice and identified multiple STAT3 target genes, including Pax7. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of STAT3 in adult MuSCs that regulates their self-renewal during injury-induced muscle regeneration. PMID:27524611

  12. Insulin Resistance Is Associated With Decreased Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Nondiabetic Adults Aged ≥70 Years

    PubMed Central

    Barzilay, Joshua I.; Cotsonis, George A.; Walston, Jeremy; Schwartz, Ann V.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Miljkovic, Iva; Harris, Tamara B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Lower-limb muscle strength is reduced in many people with diabetes. In this study, we examined whether quadriceps muscle strength is reduced in relation to insulin resistance in well-functioning ambulatory nondiabetic individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants (age ≥70 years) underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning to ascertain muscle and fat mass, tests of quadriceps strength, computed tomography scanning of the quadriceps to gauge muscle lipid content, and fasting insulin and glucose level measurements from which homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was derived. RESULTS In regression analysis, quadriceps strength per kilogram of muscle mass was negatively associated (P < 0.0001) with HOMA-IR independent of other factors negatively associated with strength such as increased age, female sex, low-physical activity, impaired fasting glucose, and increased total body fat. Muscle lipid content was not associated with strength. CONCLUSIONS A small decrease in quadriceps muscle force is associated with increased HOMA-IR in well-functioning nondiabetic adults, suggesting that diminished quadriceps muscle strength begins before diabetes. PMID:19171728

  13. Mutations in mammalian tolloid-like 1 gene detected in adult patients with ASD

    PubMed Central

    Stańczak, Paweł; Witecka, Joanna; Szydło, Anna; Gutmajster, Ewa; Lisik, Małgorzata; Auguściak-Duma, Aleksandra; Tarnowski, Maciej; Czekaj, Tomasz; Czekaj, Hanna; Sieroń, Aleksander L

    2009-01-01

    Atrial septal defect (ASD) is an incomplete septation of atria in human heart causing circulatory problems. Its frequency is estimated at one per 10 000. Actions of numerous genes have been linked to heart development. However, no single gene defect causing ASD has yet been identified. Incomplete heart septation similar to ASD was reported in transgenic mice with both inactive alleles of gene encoding mammalian zinc metalloprotease a mammalian tolloid-like 1 (tll1). Here, we have screened 19 ASD patients and 15 healthy age-matched individuals for mutations in TLL1 gene. All 22 exons were analyzed exon by exon for heteroduplex formation. Subsequently, DNA fragments forming heteroduplexes were sequenced. In four nonrelated patients, three missense mutations in coding sequence, and one single base change in the 5′UTR have been detected. Two mutations (Met182Leu, and Ala238Val) were detected in ASD patients with the same clinical phenotype. As the second mutation locates immediately upstream of the catalytic zinc-binding signature, it might change the enzyme substrate specificity. The third change, Leu627Val in the CUB3 domain, has been found in an ASD patient with interatrial septum aneurysm in addition to ASD. The CUB3 domain is important for substrate-specific recognition. In the remaining 15 patients as well as in 15 reference samples numerous base substitutions, deletions, and insertions have been detected, but no mutations changing the coding sequence have been found. Lack of mutations in relation to ASD of these patients could possibly be because of genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome. PMID:18830233

  14. A simple assessment model to quantifying the dynamic hippocampal neurogenic process in the adult mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minee L; Begeti, Faye; Barker, Roger A; Kim, Namho

    2016-04-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a highly dynamic process in which new cells are born, but only some of which survive. Of late it has become clear that these surviving newborn neurons have functional roles, most notably in certain forms of memory. Conventional methods to look at adult neurogenesis are based on the quantification of the number of newly born neurons using a simple cell counting methodology. However, this type of approach fails to capture the dynamic aspects of the neurogenic process, where neural proliferation, death and differentiation take place continuously and simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a simple mathematical approach to better understand the adult neurogenic process in the hippocampus which in turn will allow for a better analysis of this process in disease states and following drug therapies. PMID:26443687

  15. Abdominal muscle strength is related to the quality of life among older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Suenimeire; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Brandino, Hugo Evangelista; Ferreira, Vânia Tie Koga; Scheicher, Marcos Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the association between abdominal muscle strength and quality of life among older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis. A blind, cross-sectional study was conducted involving 40 older adults: 20 with lumbar osteoarthritis (12 women and 8 men, mean age of 65.90 ± 4.80 years) and 20 controls (14 women and 6 men, mean age of 67.90 ± 4.60 years). The volunteers were submitted to an abdominal muscle strength test. Quality of life was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire. Both abdominal muscle strength and quality of life scores were significantly lower in the group with lumbar osteoarthritis in comparison to the controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, significant and positive associations were found between abdominal muscle strength and the subscales of the SF-36 questionnaire (p < 0.05, 0.421 ≥ rs ≤ 0.694). Based on the present findings, older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis with greater abdominal muscle strength have a better quality of life.

  16. The Mammalian Adult Neurogenesis Gene Ontology (MANGO) Provides a Structural Framework for Published Information on Genes Regulating Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Overall, Rupert W.; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Kempermann, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not a single phenotype, but consists of a number of sub-processes, each of which is under complex genetic control. Interpretation of gene expression studies using existing resources often does not lead to results that address the interrelatedness of these processes. Formal structure, such as provided by ontologies, is essential in any field for comprehensive interpretation of existing knowledge but, until now, such a structure has been lacking for adult neurogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings We have created a resource with three components 1. A structured ontology describing the key stages in the development of adult hippocampal neural stem cells into functional granule cell neurons. 2. A comprehensive survey of the literature to annotate the results of all published reports on gene function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (257 manuscripts covering 228 genes) to the appropriate terms in our ontology. 3. An easy-to-use searchable interface to the resulting database made freely available online. The manuscript presents an overview of the database highlighting global trends such as the current bias towards research on early proliferative stages, and an example gene set enrichment analysis. A limitation of the resource is the current scope of the literature which, however, is growing by around 100 publications per year. With the ontology and database in place, new findings can be rapidly annotated and regular updates of the database will be made publicly available. Conclusions/Significance The resource we present allows relevant interpretation of gene expression screens in terms of defined stages of postnatal neuronal development. Annotation of genes by hand from the adult neurogenesis literature ensures the data are directly applicable to the system under study. We believe this approach could also serve as an example to other fields in a ‘bottom-up’ community effort complementing the already successful

  17. Wii balance board exercise improves balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults.

    PubMed

    Siriphorn, Akkradate; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The potential health benefits of the Nintendo Wii balance board exercise have been widely investigated. However, no study has been conducted to examine the benefits of Wii exercise for overweight young adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise performed on a Nintendo Wii balance board on the balance and lower limb muscle strength in overweight young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Within-subject repeated measures analysis was used. Sixteen young adults (aged 21.87±1.13 years, body mass index 24.15 ± 0.50 kg/m(2)) were recruited. All subjects performed an exercise program on a Wii balance board for 8 weeks (30 min/session, twice a week for 8 weeks). A NeuroCom Balance Master and a hand-held dynamometer were used to measure balance performance and lower limb muscle strength. [Results] According to the comparison of pre- and post-intervention measurements, the Wii balance board exercise program significantly improved the limit of stability parameters. There was also a significant increase in strength of four lower-limb muscle groups: the hip flexor, knee flexor, ankle dorsiflexor and ankle plantarflexor. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that a Wii balance board exercise program can be used to improve the balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults. PMID:25642034

  18. Wii balance board exercise improves balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults.

    PubMed

    Siriphorn, Akkradate; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The potential health benefits of the Nintendo Wii balance board exercise have been widely investigated. However, no study has been conducted to examine the benefits of Wii exercise for overweight young adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise performed on a Nintendo Wii balance board on the balance and lower limb muscle strength in overweight young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Within-subject repeated measures analysis was used. Sixteen young adults (aged 21.87±1.13 years, body mass index 24.15 ± 0.50 kg/m(2)) were recruited. All subjects performed an exercise program on a Wii balance board for 8 weeks (30 min/session, twice a week for 8 weeks). A NeuroCom Balance Master and a hand-held dynamometer were used to measure balance performance and lower limb muscle strength. [Results] According to the comparison of pre- and post-intervention measurements, the Wii balance board exercise program significantly improved the limit of stability parameters. There was also a significant increase in strength of four lower-limb muscle groups: the hip flexor, knee flexor, ankle dorsiflexor and ankle plantarflexor. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that a Wii balance board exercise program can be used to improve the balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults.

  19. Secondary muscle pathology and metabolic dysregulation in adults with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Paul M.; Hurvitz, Edward A.; Burant, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is caused by an insult to or malformation of the developing brain which affects motor control centers and causes alterations in growth, development, and overall health throughout the life span. In addition to the disruption in development caused by the primary neurological insult, CP is associated with exaggerated sedentary behaviors and a hallmark accelerated progression of muscle pathology compared with typically developing children and adults. Factors such as excess adipose tissue deposition and altered partitioning, insulin resistance, and chronic inflammation may increase the severity of muscle pathology throughout adulthood and lead to cardiometabolic disease risk and/or early mortality. We describe a model of exaggerated health risk represented in adults with CP and discuss the mechanisms and secondary consequences associated with chronic sedentary behavior, obesity, aging, and muscle spasticity. Moreover, we highlight novel evidence that implicates aberrant inflammation in CP as a potential mechanism linking both metabolic and cognitive dysregulation in a cyclical pattern. PMID:22912367

  20. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  1. Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Two Distinct Classes of Erythroblastic Island Isolated from Adult Mammalian Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jia Hao; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Fraser, Stuart T

    2016-04-01

    Erythroblastic islands are multicellular clusters in which a central macrophage supports the development and maturation of red blood cell (erythroid) progenitors. These clusters play crucial roles in the pathogenesis observed in animal models of hematological disorders. The precise structure and function of erythroblastic islands is poorly understood. Here, we have combined scanning electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of surface proteins to develop a better understanding of the ultrastructure of these multicellular clusters. The erythroid-specific surface antigen Ter-119 and the transferrin receptor CD71 exhibited distinct patterns of protein sorting during erythroid cell maturation as detected by immuno-gold labeling. During electron microscopy analysis we observed two distinct classes of erythroblastic islands. The islands varied in size and morphology, and the number and type of erythroid cells interacting with the central macrophage. Assessment of femoral marrow isolated from a cavid rodent species (guinea pig, Cavis porcellus) and a marsupial carnivore species (fat-tailed dunnarts, Sminthopsis crassicaudata) showed that while the morphology of the central macrophage varied, two different types of erythroblastic islands were consistently identifiable. Our findings suggest that these two classes of erythroblastic islands are conserved in mammalian evolution and may play distinct roles in red blood cell production. PMID:26898901

  2. Inducible depletion of satellite cells in adult, sedentary mice impairs muscle regenerative capacity without affecting sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Fry, Christopher S; Lee, Jonah D; Mula, Jyothi; Kirby, Tyler J; Jackson, Janna R; Liu, Fujun; Yang, Lin; Mendias, Christopher L; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2015-01-01

    A key determinant of geriatric frailty is sarcopenia, the age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. Although the etiology of sarcopenia is unknown, the correlation during aging between the loss of activity of satellite cells, which are endogenous muscle stem cells, and impaired muscle regenerative capacity has led to the hypothesis that the loss of satellite cell activity is also a cause of sarcopenia. We tested this hypothesis in male sedentary mice by experimentally depleting satellite cells in young adult animals to a degree sufficient to impair regeneration throughout the rest of their lives. A detailed analysis of multiple muscles harvested at various time points during aging in different cohorts of these mice showed that the muscles were of normal size, despite low regenerative capacity, but did have increased fibrosis. These results suggest that lifelong reduction of satellite cells neither accelerated nor exacerbated sarcopenia and that satellite cells did not contribute to the maintenance of muscle size or fiber type composition during aging, but that their loss may contribute to age-related muscle fibrosis.

  3. Response of the JAK-STAT pathway to mammalian hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrel striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Logan, Samantha M; Tessier, Shannon N; Tye, Joann; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-03-01

    Over the course of the torpor-arousal cycle, hibernators must make behavioral, physiological, and molecular rearrangements in order to keep a very low metabolic rate and retain organ viability. 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) remain immobile during hibernation, and although the mechanisms of skeletal muscle survival are largely unknown, studies have shown minimal muscle loss in hibernating organisms. Additionally, the ground squirrel heart undergoes cold-stress, reversible cardiac hypertrophy, and ischemia-reperfusion without experiencing fatal impairment. This study examines the role of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway in the regulation of cell stress in cardiac and skeletal muscles, comparing euthermic and hibernating ground squirrels. Immunoblots showed a fivefold decrease in JAK3 expression during torpor in skeletal muscle, along with increases in STAT3 and 5 phosphorylation and suppressors of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) protein levels. Immunoblots also showed coordinated increases in STAT1, 3 and 5 phosphorylation and STAT1 inhibitor protein expression in cardiac muscle during torpor. PCR analysis revealed that the activation of these pro-survival signaling cascades did not result in coordinate changes in downstream genes such as anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family gene expression. Overall, these results indicate activation of the JAK-STAT pathway in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, suggesting a response to cellular stress during hibernation. PMID:26885984

  4. Response of the JAK-STAT pathway to mammalian hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrel striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Logan, Samantha M; Tessier, Shannon N; Tye, Joann; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-03-01

    Over the course of the torpor-arousal cycle, hibernators must make behavioral, physiological, and molecular rearrangements in order to keep a very low metabolic rate and retain organ viability. 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) remain immobile during hibernation, and although the mechanisms of skeletal muscle survival are largely unknown, studies have shown minimal muscle loss in hibernating organisms. Additionally, the ground squirrel heart undergoes cold-stress, reversible cardiac hypertrophy, and ischemia-reperfusion without experiencing fatal impairment. This study examines the role of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway in the regulation of cell stress in cardiac and skeletal muscles, comparing euthermic and hibernating ground squirrels. Immunoblots showed a fivefold decrease in JAK3 expression during torpor in skeletal muscle, along with increases in STAT3 and 5 phosphorylation and suppressors of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) protein levels. Immunoblots also showed coordinated increases in STAT1, 3 and 5 phosphorylation and STAT1 inhibitor protein expression in cardiac muscle during torpor. PCR analysis revealed that the activation of these pro-survival signaling cascades did not result in coordinate changes in downstream genes such as anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family gene expression. Overall, these results indicate activation of the JAK-STAT pathway in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, suggesting a response to cellular stress during hibernation.

  5. Effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoguang; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Kim, Bokun; Katayama, Yasutomi; Wakaba, Kyousuke; Wang, Zhennan; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity and to verify whether the rate of change in foot structure is related to that in ankle muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven adults with obesity completed a 12-week program in which the intensity of physical activity performed was gradually increased. Physical activity was monitored using a three-axis accelerometer. Foot structure was assessed using a three-dimensional foot scanner, while ankle muscle strength was measured using a dynamometry. [Results] With the increasing physical activity, the participants’ feet became thinner (the rearfoot width, instep height, and girth decreased) and the arch became higher (the arch height index increased) and stiffer (the arch stiffness index increased); the ankle muscle strength also increased after the intervention. Additionally, the changes in the arch height index and arch stiffness index were not associated with changes in ankle muscle strength. [Conclusion] Increasing physical activity may be one possible approach to improve foot structure and function in individuals with obesity.

  6. Effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoguang; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Kim, Bokun; Katayama, Yasutomi; Wakaba, Kyousuke; Wang, Zhennan; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity and to verify whether the rate of change in foot structure is related to that in ankle muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven adults with obesity completed a 12-week program in which the intensity of physical activity performed was gradually increased. Physical activity was monitored using a three-axis accelerometer. Foot structure was assessed using a three-dimensional foot scanner, while ankle muscle strength was measured using a dynamometry. [Results] With the increasing physical activity, the participants' feet became thinner (the rearfoot width, instep height, and girth decreased) and the arch became higher (the arch height index increased) and stiffer (the arch stiffness index increased); the ankle muscle strength also increased after the intervention. Additionally, the changes in the arch height index and arch stiffness index were not associated with changes in ankle muscle strength. [Conclusion] Increasing physical activity may be one possible approach to improve foot structure and function in individuals with obesity. PMID:27630426

  7. The effects of sling exercise using vibration on trunk muscle activities of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngin; Kang, Hyungkyu

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of sling exercises with and without vibration on the muscular activity of the internal oblique (IO), rectus abdominis (RA), multifidus (MF), and erector spinae (ES) muscles of healthy adults. [Methods] Eleven healthy university students (11 men) with a mean age of 22.8 years were enrolled in this study. Subjects performed supine and prone bridge exercises with the knees flexed using a sling suspension system with and without vibration. The amplitudes of the EMG activities of selected trunk muscles (internal oblique, rectus abdominis, erector spinae, multifidus) were recorded. Two types of exercise conditions were executed in a random sequence for 5 seconds each. The signals detected from the middle 3 seconds (after discarding the signals of the first and the last one seconds) were used in the analysis. A 3-minute break was given after each exercise to minimize muscle fatigue. [Results] During the supine bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES muscles were significantly higher than those of the supine bridge exercise without vibration. Additionally, during the prone bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES were significantly higher than those of the prone bridge exercise without vibration. [Conclusion] Sling exercises with vibration improved the trunk muscle activities of healthy adults compared to the sling exercises without vibration. The information presented here is important for clinicians who use lumbar stabilization exercises as an evaluation tool or a rehabilitation exercise. PMID:24259778

  8. Effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoguang; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Kim, Bokun; Katayama, Yasutomi; Wakaba, Kyousuke; Wang, Zhennan; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity and to verify whether the rate of change in foot structure is related to that in ankle muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven adults with obesity completed a 12-week program in which the intensity of physical activity performed was gradually increased. Physical activity was monitored using a three-axis accelerometer. Foot structure was assessed using a three-dimensional foot scanner, while ankle muscle strength was measured using a dynamometry. [Results] With the increasing physical activity, the participants’ feet became thinner (the rearfoot width, instep height, and girth decreased) and the arch became higher (the arch height index increased) and stiffer (the arch stiffness index increased); the ankle muscle strength also increased after the intervention. Additionally, the changes in the arch height index and arch stiffness index were not associated with changes in ankle muscle strength. [Conclusion] Increasing physical activity may be one possible approach to improve foot structure and function in individuals with obesity. PMID:27630426

  9. The effects of sling exercise using vibration on trunk muscle activities of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngin; Kang, Hyungkyu

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of sling exercises with and without vibration on the muscular activity of the internal oblique (IO), rectus abdominis (RA), multifidus (MF), and erector spinae (ES) muscles of healthy adults. [Methods] Eleven healthy university students (11 men) with a mean age of 22.8 years were enrolled in this study. Subjects performed supine and prone bridge exercises with the knees flexed using a sling suspension system with and without vibration. The amplitudes of the EMG activities of selected trunk muscles (internal oblique, rectus abdominis, erector spinae, multifidus) were recorded. Two types of exercise conditions were executed in a random sequence for 5 seconds each. The signals detected from the middle 3 seconds (after discarding the signals of the first and the last one seconds) were used in the analysis. A 3-minute break was given after each exercise to minimize muscle fatigue. [Results] During the supine bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES muscles were significantly higher than those of the supine bridge exercise without vibration. Additionally, during the prone bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES were significantly higher than those of the prone bridge exercise without vibration. [Conclusion] Sling exercises with vibration improved the trunk muscle activities of healthy adults compared to the sling exercises without vibration. The information presented here is important for clinicians who use lumbar stabilization exercises as an evaluation tool or a rehabilitation exercise.

  10. IP(3)-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2010-10-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5-7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP(3)R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10-20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP(3)R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP(3)R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP(3)R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  11. IP3-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5–7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP3R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10–20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP3R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP3R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP3R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  12. Metabolic profile of the perivertebral muscles in small therian mammals: implications for the evolution of the mammalian trunk musculature.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Nadja

    2009-01-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the ancestral properties of the perivertebral muscles of mammals, this study investigated the fiber type composition of these muscles in six small, extant therians (two metatherians and four eutherians) similar in body shape to early mammals. Despite a few species-specific differences, the investigated species were very similar in their overall distribution of fiber types indicating similar functional demands on the back muscles in mammals of this body size and shape. Deep and short, mono- or multisegmental muscles (i.e., mm. interspinales, intermammillares, rotatores et intertransversarii) consistently showed the highest percentage of slow, oxidative fibers implying a function as local stabilizers of the vertebral column. Superficial and large, polysegmental muscles (i.e., mm. multifidus, sacrospinalis, iliopsoas et psoas minor) were predominantly composed of fast, glycolytic fibers suggesting they function to both globally stabilize and mobilize the spine during rapid non-locomotor and locomotor activities. Some muscles contained striking accumulations of oxidative fibers in specific regions (mm. longissimus et quadratus lumborum). These regions are hypothesized to function independently from the rest of the muscle belly and may be comparable in their functionality to regionalized limb muscles. The deep, central oxidative region in the m. longissimus lumborum appears to be a general feature of mammals and likely serves a proprioceptive function to control the postural equilibrium of the pelvic girdle and lumbar spine. The potential functions of the m. quadratus lumborum during ventilation and ventral stabilization of the vertebral column are discussed. Because representatives of the stem lineage of mammals were comparable in their body proportions and probably also locomotor parameters to the species investigated here, I suggest that the described fiber type distribution is representative of the ancestral condition in

  13. Leg and trunk muscle coordination and postural sway during increasingly difficult standing balance tasks in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Kurz, Eduard; Roth, Ralf; Zahner, Lukas; Faude, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Ageing impairs body balance and increases older adults' fall risk. Balance training can improve intrinsic fall risk factors. However, age comparisons of muscle activity responses during balance tasks are lacking. This study investigated relative muscle activity, muscle coordination and postural sway during various recommended static balance training tasks. Muscle activity (%MVC), amplitude ratios (AR) and co-activity (CAI) were determined during standing tasks for 30s (1: double limb stance on a foam surface, eyes open; 2: double limb stance on firm ground, eyes closed; 3: double limb stance, feet in step position on a foam surface, eyes open; 4: double limb stance, feet in step position on firm ground, eyes closed; 5: single limb stance on firm ground, eyes open) in 20 healthy young adults (24±2 y) and 20 older adults (73±6 y). Surface electromyography (SEMG) was applied (SENIAM guidelines) to ankle (tibialis anterior, soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus) and thigh (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus) muscles (non-dominant leg). Electrodes over trunk (multifidus and internal oblique) muscles were applied bilaterally. Two- to six-fold higher levels of relative muscle activity were found in older adults for ankle (0.0002muscles. Co-activation was elevated in young adults for the trunk (0.001adults for the ankle (0.009muscle coordination patterns during all stance conditions at the ankle (0.06<ηp(2)<0.28) and the trunk (0.14<ηp(2)<0.23). Older adults had higher electrophysiological costs for all stance conditions. Muscle coordination showed inverse activity patterns at the ankle and trunk. Optimal balance and strength training programs should take into account age-specific alterations in muscle activity.

  14. Epigenetic Gene Regulation in the Adult Mammalian Brain: Multiple roles in Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Farah D.

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) is one of numerous gene products necessary for long-term memory formation and dysregulation of bdnf has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive and mental disorders. Recent work indicates that epigenetic-regulatory mechanisms including the markings of histone proteins and associated DNA remain labile throughout the lifespan and represent an attractive molecular process contributing to gene regulation in the brain. In this review, important information will be discussed on epigenetics as a set of newly identified dynamic transcriptional mechanisms serving to regulate gene expression changes in the adult brain with particular emphasis on bdnf transcriptional readout in learning and memory formation. This review will also highlight evidence for the role of epigenetics in aberrant bdnf gene regulation in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction associated with seizure disorders, Rett syndrome, Schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Such research offers novel concepts for understanding epigenetic transcriptional mechanisms subserving adult cognition and mental health, and furthermore promises novel avenues for therapeutic approach in the clinic. PMID:21419233

  15. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype.

  16. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype. PMID:23321639

  17. Nebulin deficiency in adult muscle causes sarcomere defects and muscle-type-dependent changes in trophicity: novel insights in nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Frank; Buck, Danielle; De Winter, Josine; Kolb, Justin; Meng, Hui; Birch, Camille; Slater, Rebecca; Escobar, Yael Natelie; Smith, John E; Yang, Lin; Konhilas, John; Lawlor, Michael W; Ottenheijm, Coen; Granzier, Henk L

    2015-09-15

    Nebulin is a giant filamentous protein that is coextensive with the actin filaments of the skeletal muscle sarcomere. Nebulin mutations are the main cause of nemaline myopathy (NEM), with typical adult patients having low expression of nebulin, yet the roles of nebulin in adult muscle remain poorly understood. To establish nebulin's functional roles in adult muscle, we studied a novel conditional nebulin KO (Neb cKO) mouse model in which nebulin deletion was driven by the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promotor. Neb cKO mice are born with high nebulin levels in their skeletal muscles, but within weeks after birth nebulin expression rapidly falls to barely detectable levels Surprisingly, a large fraction of the mice survive to adulthood with low nebulin levels (<5% of control), contain nemaline rods and undergo fiber-type switching toward oxidative types. Nebulin deficiency causes a large deficit in specific force, and mechanistic studies provide evidence that a reduced fraction of force-generating cross-bridges and shortened thin filaments contribute to the force deficit. Muscles rich in glycolytic fibers upregulate proteolysis pathways (MuRF-1, Fbxo30/MUSA1, Gadd45a) and undergo hypotrophy with smaller cross-sectional areas (CSAs), worsening their force deficit. Muscles rich in oxidative fibers do not have smaller weights and can even have hypertrophy, offsetting their specific-force deficit. These studies reveal nebulin as critically important for force development and trophicity in adult muscle. The Neb cKO phenocopies important aspects of NEM (muscle weakness, oxidative fiber-type predominance, variable trophicity effects, nemaline rods) and will be highly useful to test therapeutic approaches to ameliorate muscle weakness. PMID:26123491

  18. Nebulin deficiency in adult muscle causes sarcomere defects and muscle-type-dependent changes in trophicity: novel insights in nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Frank; Buck, Danielle; De Winter, Josine; Kolb, Justin; Meng, Hui; Birch, Camille; Slater, Rebecca; Escobar, Yael Natelie; Smith, John E.; Yang, Lin; Konhilas, John; Lawlor, Michael W.; Ottenheijm, Coen; Granzier, Henk L.

    2015-01-01

    Nebulin is a giant filamentous protein that is coextensive with the actin filaments of the skeletal muscle sarcomere. Nebulin mutations are the main cause of nemaline myopathy (NEM), with typical adult patients having low expression of nebulin, yet the roles of nebulin in adult muscle remain poorly understood. To establish nebulin's functional roles in adult muscle, we studied a novel conditional nebulin KO (Neb cKO) mouse model in which nebulin deletion was driven by the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promotor. Neb cKO mice are born with high nebulin levels in their skeletal muscles, but within weeks after birth nebulin expression rapidly falls to barely detectable levels Surprisingly, a large fraction of the mice survive to adulthood with low nebulin levels (<5% of control), contain nemaline rods and undergo fiber-type switching toward oxidative types. Nebulin deficiency causes a large deficit in specific force, and mechanistic studies provide evidence that a reduced fraction of force-generating cross-bridges and shortened thin filaments contribute to the force deficit. Muscles rich in glycolytic fibers upregulate proteolysis pathways (MuRF-1, Fbxo30/MUSA1, Gadd45a) and undergo hypotrophy with smaller cross-sectional areas (CSAs), worsening their force deficit. Muscles rich in oxidative fibers do not have smaller weights and can even have hypertrophy, offsetting their specific-force deficit. These studies reveal nebulin as critically important for force development and trophicity in adult muscle. The Neb cKO phenocopies important aspects of NEM (muscle weakness, oxidative fiber-type predominance, variable trophicity effects, nemaline rods) and will be highly useful to test therapeutic approaches to ameliorate muscle weakness. PMID:26123491

  19. The effect of basketball training on the muscle strength of adults with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Tsimaras, Vasilios K; Samara, Christina A; Kotzamanidou, Marianna C; Bassa, Eleni I; Fotiadou, Eleni G; Kotzamanidis, Christos M

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of basketball training on the muscle strength of adults with mental retardation (MR). Twenty-four adults with and without MR were separated into 3 groups. Eight adults (mean age 25.4 years) with normal IQ constituted the control group (NIQ). Eight adults (mean age 26.5 years) with MR and all participating in a 4-year systematic basketball exercise program constituted the trained group (MR-T), and 8 adults (mean age 25.3 years) with MR exercised occasionally for recreational reasons formed the MR-R group. Parameters measured were isometric and isokinetic concentric and eccentric muscle strength. All subjects performed a leg strength test on a Cybex Norm isokinetic dynamometer. Analysis of variance was used to examine mean differences between the values of the 3 groups. A significance level of 0.05 was used for all tests. The NIQ group showed a statistically significant difference in all measured values compared to the MR groups. The MR-T group presented higher absolute and relative torque scores for both knee extensors and flexors than the MR-R group, whereas the MR-R group presented statistically higher antagonistic activity for both knee extensors and flexors than the MR-T group. In addition, both MR groups presented statistically higher antagonistic activity for both knee extensors and flexors compared to the NIQ group. Data support participation on a systematic and well-designed basketball training program to improve muscle strength levels of adults with MR. Participation in basketball without necessarily focusing on developing specific fitness components may be an effective training strategy for the promotion of strength of adults with MR.

  20. Six1 regulates MyoD expression in adult muscle progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yubing; Chakroun, Imane; Yang, Dabo; Horner, Ellias; Liang, Jieyi; Aziz, Arif; Chu, Alphonse; De Repentigny, Yves; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Kothary, Rashmi; Blais, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent satellite cells are myogenic progenitors that enable regeneration of skeletal muscle. One of the early events of satellite cell activation following myotrauma is the induction of the myogenic regulatory factor MyoD, which eventually induces terminal differentiation and muscle function gene expression. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which MyoD is induced during activation of satellite cells in mouse muscle undergoing regeneration. We show that Six1, a transcription factor essential for embryonic myogenesis, also regulates MyoD expression in muscle progenitor cells. Six1 knock-down by RNA interference leads to decreased expression of MyoD in myoblasts. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays reveal that Six1 binds the Core Enhancer Region of MyoD. Further, transcriptional reporter assays demonstrate that Core Enhancer Region reporter gene activity in myoblasts and in regenerating muscle depends on the expression of Six1 and on Six1 binding sites. Finally, we provide evidence indicating that Six1 is required for the proper chromatin structure at the Core Enhancer Region, as well as for MyoD binding at its own enhancer. Together, our results reveal that MyoD expression in satellite cells depends on Six1, supporting the idea that Six1 plays an important role in adult myogenesis, in addition to its role in embryonic muscle formation. PMID:23840772

  1. Effects of bridge exercises with a sling and vibrations on abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Gong, Won-tae

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine the changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (Io) muscles using ultrasonography in adults who performed bridge exercises with the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and a sling and received micro vibrations. In total, 32 subjects were divided into a therapy (n= 16) and control (n= 16) groups. The therapy group completed nine sets, with four repetitions, of bridge exercises with the sling and received vibrations. The control group completed nine sets, with four repetitions, of bridge exercises with the sling and did not receive vibrations. The thicknesses of the TrA and Io muscles were measured in both groups using ultrasonography before and after therapy. According to the pressure applied to the biofeedback unit, both groups showed significant changes in the thicknesses of the TrA and Io muscles after therapy (P< 0.05). The change in the thickness of the TrA muscle after therapy was significantly different between the 2 groups when the pressures applied at 38, 42, and 46 mmHg (P< 0.05). Moreover, the change in the thickness of the Io muscle did not significantly different between the 2 groups at any of the pressures applied (P> 0.05). These findings indicate that approximately 15 minutes of vibrations during bridge exercises on unstable surfaces with a sling facilitates the activation of the deep trunk muscles and further enhances the activation of the TrA.

  2. The specific contributions of force and velocity to muscle power in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pojednic, Rachele M; Clark, David J; Patten, Carolynn; Reid, Kieran; Phillips, Edward M; Fielding, Roger A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relative importance of the force-based and velocity-based measures of muscle performance to explain inter-individual differences in power production capability and functional task performance. Participants included seventy-nine men and women: middle-aged healthy adults (MH: 40-55years), older healthy adults (OH: 70-85years), and older adults with mobility limitations (OML: 70-85years). Muscle power at 180°/s, isometric maximal torque, and maximal contraction velocity at 40% 1RM were measured during unilateral leg extension. The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) was used to differentiate between healthy and mobility limited older adults. Functional task performance was assessed using multiple chair rise and stair climb tests. Leg extensor force (torque), but not maximal contraction velocity, was significantly associated with muscle power in MH. Both torque and velocity were significantly associated with muscle power in OH. Maximal velocity, but not torque, was associated with power in OML. Maximal velocity demonstrated an association with multiple chair rise time and stair climb time in OML, but not MH or OH. It is concluded that movement velocity is an increasingly important determinant of maximal power output with advancing age. Furthermore, movement velocity is also a critical component of functional task performance with aging and may contribute to functional deficits. These findings help to explain why the rate-dependent variable power has emerged as a critical component of both assessment and rehabilitation of muscular performance and physical function in older adults.

  3. Muscle dynamics differences between legs in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Eamonn P; Harrison, Andrew J

    2007-02-01

    Differences in muscle dynamics between the preferred and nonpreferred jumping legs of subjects in maximal, explosive exercise were examined. Eight subjects performed nonfatiguing bouts of single-legged drop jumps and rebound jumps on a force sledge apparatus. Measures of flight time, reactive strength index, peak vertical force, and vertical leg-spring stiffness were obtained for 3 drop jumps and 3 rebound jumps on both legs. Subjects utilized a stiffer leg spring and a more explosive jumping action in the nonpreferred leg when performing a cyclical rebound jumping task in comparison to a single drop jump task (observed through differences in vertical leg-spring stiffness, peak vertical force, and reactive strength index, p < 0.05). The preferred leg performed equally well in both tasks. Between-leg analysis showed no differences in dependent variables between the preferred and the nonpreferred leg in the rebound jumping protocol. However, the drop jump protocol showed significant performance differences, with flight time and reactive strength index greater in the preferred leg than the nonpreferred leg (p < 0.05). We hypothesize that, throughout the lifespan, both legs are equally trained in cyclical rebound jumping tasks through running. However, because a preferred leg must be selected when performing any one-off, single-legged jump, imbalances in this specific task develop over time with consistent selection of a preferred jumping leg. The data demonstrate that the rebound jump protocol is representative of the symmetrical mechanics of forward running and that leg-spring stiffness is modulated depending on the demands of the specific task involved. Strength and conditioning practitioners should give careful consideration to appropriate jump protocol selection and should exercise caution when comparing laboratory results to data gathered in field testing. PMID:17313262

  4. What is the Optimal Amount of Protein to Support Post-Exercise Skeletal Muscle Reconditioning in the Older Adult?

    PubMed

    Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Holwerda, Andrew M; Phillips, Stuart M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-09-01

    Hyperaminoacidemia following protein ingestion enhances the anabolic effect of resistance-type exercise by increasing the stimulation of muscle protein synthesis and attenuating the exercise-mediated increase in muscle protein breakdown rates. Although factors such as the source of protein ingested and the timing of intake relative to exercise can impact post-exercise muscle protein synthesis rates, the amount of protein ingested after exercise appears to be the key nutritional factor dictating the magnitude of the muscle protein synthetic response during post-exercise recovery. In younger adults, muscle protein synthesis rates after resistance-type exercise respond in a dose-dependent manner to ingested protein and are maximally stimulated following ingestion of ~20 g of protein. In contrast to younger adults, older adults are less sensitive to smaller doses of ingested protein (less than ~20 g) after exercise, as evidenced by an attenuated increase in muscle protein synthesis rates during post-exercise recovery. However, older muscle appears to retain the capacity to display a robust stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in response to the ingestion of greater doses of protein (~40 g), and such an amount may be required for older adults to achieve a robust stimulation of muscle protein synthesis during post-exercise recovery. The aim of this article is to discuss the current state of evidence regarding the dose-dependent relationship between dietary protein ingestion and changes in skeletal muscle protein synthesis during recovery from resistance-type exercise in older adults. We provide recommendations on the amount of protein that may be required to maximize skeletal muscle reconditioning in response to resistance-type exercise in older adults. PMID:26894275

  5. Detection, characterization, and spontaneous differentiation in vitro of very small embryonic-like putative stem cells in adult mammalian ovary.

    PubMed

    Parte, Seema; Bhartiya, Deepa; Telang, Jyoti; Daithankar, Vinita; Salvi, Vinita; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to detect, characterize, and study differentiation potential of stem cells in adult rabbit, sheep, monkey, and menopausal human ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Two distinct populations of putative stem cells (PSCs) of variable size were detected in scraped OSE, one being smaller and other similar in size to the surrounding red blood cells in the scraped OSE. The smaller 1-3 μm very small embryonic-like PSCs were pluripotent in nature with nuclear Oct-4 and cell surface SSEA-4, whereas the bigger 4-7 μm cells with cytoplasmic localization of Oct-4 and minimal expression of SSEA-4 were possibly the tissue committed progenitor stem cells. Pluripotent gene transcripts of Oct-4, Oct-4A, Nanog, Sox-2, TERT, and Stat-3 in human and sheep OSE were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The PSCs underwent spontaneous differentiation into oocyte-like structures, parthenote-like structures, embryoid body-like structures, cells with neuronal-like phenotype, and embryonic stem cell-like colonies, whereas the epithelial cells transformed into mesenchymal phenotype by epithelial-mesenchymal transition in 3 weeks of OSE culture. Germ cell markers like c-Kit, DAZL, GDF-9, VASA, and ZP4 were immuno-localized in oocyte-like structures. In conclusion, as opposed to the existing view of OSE being a bipotent source of oocytes and granulosa cells, mammalian ovaries harbor distinct very small embryonic-like PSCs and tissue committed progenitor stem cells population that have the potential to develop into oocyte-like structures in vitro, whereas mesenchymal fibroblasts appear to form supporting granulosa-like somatic cells. Research at the single-cell level, including complete gene expression profiling, is required to further confirm whether postnatal oogenesis is a conserved phenomenon in adult mammals.

  6. Regulatory Mechanism of Muscle Disuse Atrophy in Adult Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    lowered levels of spermatid formation. Hormonal changes due to testes atrophy must be considered in future experiments where related effects may modify muscle, bone or other tissue changes. Also, some new assessments of past results (published by many researchers) may warrant revised interpretations. The blood pressure studies and the testicular function results were presented and reviewed during an invited lecture at the University of Bordeaux II during the Animals in Space Symposium in March 1993. In summary, each of these three projects complied with the objectives of the proposal and serve to demonstrate the utility of animal models in preparations and interpretations of space flight results. All funding has been expended in accordance with the approved budget.

  7. Undernutrition during pregnancy in mice leads to dysfunctional cardiac muscle respiration in adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Thrush, A. Brianne; Quizi, Jessica; Antoun, Ghadi; McIntosh, Nathan; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y.; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with an increased risk of developing obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. However, its effect on energetics in heart remains unknown. In the present study, we examined respiration in cardiac muscle and liver from adult mice that were undernourished in utero. We report that in utero undernutrition is associated with impaired cardiac muscle energetics, including decreased fatty acid oxidative capacity, decreased maximum oxidative phosphorylation rate and decreased proton leak respiration. No differences in oxidative characteristics were detected in liver. We also measured plasma acylcarnitine levels and found that short-chain acylcarnitines are increased with in utero undernutrition. Results reveal the negative impact of suboptimal maternal nutrition on adult offspring cardiac energy metabolism, which may have life-long implications for cardiovascular function and disease risk. PMID:26182362

  8. Cotransport of sodium and chloride by the adult mammalian choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, C.E.; Sweeney, S.M.; Parmelee, J.T.; Epstein, M.H. )

    1990-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid formation stems primarily from the transport of Na and Cl in choroid plexus (CP). To characterize properties and modulation of choroidal transporters, we tested diuretics and other agents for ability to alter ion transport in vitro. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were the source of CPs preincubated with drug for 20 min and then transferred to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) medium containing 22Na or 36Cl with (3H)mannitol (extracellular correction). Complete base-line curves were established for cellular uptake of Na and Cl at 37 degrees C. The half-maximal uptake occurred at 12 s, so it was used to assess drug effects on rate of transport (nmol Na or Cl/mg CP). Bumetanide (10(-5) and 10(-4) M) decreased uptake of Na and Cl with maximal inhibition (up to 45%) at 10(-5) M. Another cotransport inhibitor, furosemide (10(-4) M), reduced transport of Na by 25% and Cl by 33%. However, acetazolamide (10(-4) M) and atriopeptin III (10(-7) M) significantly lowered uptake of Na (but not Cl), suggesting effect(s) other than on cotransport. The disulfonic stilbene 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS; 10(-4) M), known to inhibit Cl-HCO3 exchange, substantially reduced the transport of 36Cl. Bumetanide plus DIDS (both 10(-4) M) caused additive inhibition of 90% of Cl uptake, which provides strong evidence for the existence of both cotransport and antiport Cl carriers. Overall, this in vitro analysis, uncomplicated by variables of blood flow and neural tone, indicates the presence in rat CP of the cotransport of Na and Cl in addition to the established Na-H and Cl-HCO3 exchangers.

  9. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have demonstrated altered neuromuscular function and decreased muscle strength when compared with healthy counterparts without a history of ankle sprain. Up to this point, muscle volumes have not been analyzed in patients with CAI to determine whether deficits in muscle size are present following recurrent sprain. Purpose: To analyze intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle muscle volumes and 4-way ankle strength in young adults with and without CAI. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with CAI (mean age, 23.0 ± 4 years; 1 male, 4 females) and 5 healthy controls (mean age, 23.8 ± 4.5 years; 1 male, 4 females) volunteered for this study. Novel fast-acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to scan from above the femoral condyles through the foot and ankle. The perimeter of each muscle was outlined on each axial slice and then the 2-dimensional area was multiplied by the slice thickness (5 mm) to calculate the muscle volume. Plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion isometric strength were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Patients with CAI were compared with healthy controls on all measures of muscle volume and strength. Extrinsic muscle volumes of patients with CAI were also compared with a normative database of healthy controls (n = 24) by calculating z scores for each muscle individually for each CAI subject. Results: The CAI group had smaller total shank, superficial posterior compartment, soleus, adductor hallucis obliqus, and flexor hallucis brevis muscle volumes compared with healthy controls as indicated by group means and associated 90% CIs that did not overlap. Cohen d effect sizes for the significant group differences were all large and ranged from 1.46 to 3.52, with 90% CIs that did not cross zero. The CAI group had lower eversion, dorsiflexion, and 4-way composite ankle strength, all with group means and associated 90

  10. An analysis of the temperature dependence of force, during steady shortening at different velocities, in (mammalian) fast muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Roots, H.

    2008-01-01

    We examined, over a wide range of temperatures (10–35°C), the isometric tension and tension during ramp shortening at different velocities (0.2–4 L0/s) in tetanized intact fibre bundles from a rat fast (flexor hallucis brevis) muscle; fibre length (L0) was 2.2 mm and sarcomere length ~2.5 μm. During a ramp shortening, the tension change showed an initial inflection of small amplitude (P1), followed by a larger exponential decline towards an approximate steady level; the tension continued to decline slowly afterwards and the approximate steady tension at a given velocity was estimated as the tension (P2) at the point of intersection between two linear slopes, as previously described (Roots et al. 2007). At a given temperature, the tension P2 declined to a lower level and at a faster rate (from an exponential curve fit) as the shortening velocity was increased; the temperature sensitivity of the rate of tension decline during ramp shortening at different velocities was low (Q10 0.9–1.5). The isometric tension and the P2 tension at a given shortening velocity increased with warming so that the relation between tension and (reciprocal) temperature was sigmoidal in both. In isometric muscle, the temperature T0.5 for half-maximal tension was ~10°C, activation enthalpy change (∆H) was ~100 kJ mol−1 and entropy change (∆S) ~350 J mol−1 K−1. In shortening, these were increased with increase of velocity so that at a shortening velocity (~4 L0/s) producing maximal power at 35°C, T0.5 was ~28°C, ∆H was ~200 kJ mol−1 and ∆S ~ 700 J mol−1 K−1; the same trends were seen in the tension data from isotonic release experiments on intact muscle and in ramp shortening experiments on maximally Ca-activated skinned fibres. In general, our findings show that the sigmoidal relation between force and temperature can be extended from isometric to shortening muscle; the implications of the findings are discussed in relation to the crossbridge cycle

  11. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Rigby, Peter W J; Carvajal, Jaime J; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  12. Characterization of diverse forms of myosin heavy chain expressed in adult human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Saez, L; Leinwand, L A

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to define myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene organization and expression in adult human skeletal muscle, we have isolated and characterized genomic sequences corresponding to different human sarcomeric MHC genes (1). In this report, we present the complete DNA sequence of two different adult human skeletal muscle MHC cDNA clones, one of which encodes the entire light meromyosin (LMM) segment of MHC and represents the longest described MHC cDNA sequence. Additionally, both clones provide new sequence data from a 228 amino acid segment of the MHC tail for which no protein or DNA sequence has been previously available. One clone encodes a "fast" form of skeletal muscle MHC while the other clone most closely resembles a MHC form described in rat cardiac ventricles. We show that the 3' untranslated region of skeletal MHC cDNAs are homologous from widely separated species as are cardiac MHC cDNAs. However, there is no homology between the 3' untranslated region of cardiac and skeletal muscle MHCs. Isotype-specific preservation of MHC 3' untranslated sequences during evolution suggests a functional role for these regions. Images PMID:2421254

  13. Angiotensin-II blockage, muscle strength, and exercise capacity in physically independent older adults

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Vinícius A.; Probst, Vanessa S.; Nogari, Bruna M.; Teixeira, Denilson C.; Felcar, Josiane M.; Santos, Denis C.; Gomes, Marcus Vinícius M.; Andraus, Rodrigo A. C.; Fernandes, Karen B. P.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the exercise capacity and muscle strength in elderly people using drugs for angiotensin-II blockage. [Subjects and Methods] Four hundred and seven older adults were recruited for this study. Data about comorbidities and medication use were recorded and the individuals were divided into three groups: control group- elderly people with normal exercise capacity (n=235); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group − individuals using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (n=140); and angiotensin-II receptor blocker group- patients using angiotensin-II receptor blockers (n= 32). Exercise capacity was evaluated by a 6-minute walking test and muscle strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. [Results] Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 99 ± 12%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 101 ± 14%) showed higher predicted values in the 6-minute walking test than the control group patients (mean: 96 ± 10%). Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 105 ± 19%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 105.1 ± 18.73%) showed higher predicted values of muscle strength than control group patients (mean: 98.15 ± 18.77%). [Conclusion] Older adults using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers have better functional exercise capacity and muscle strength. PMID:27065543

  14. Angiotensin-II blockage, muscle strength, and exercise capacity in physically independent older adults.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Vinícius A; Probst, Vanessa S; Nogari, Bruna M; Teixeira, Denilson C; Felcar, Josiane M; Santos, Denis C; Gomes, Marcus Vinícius M; Andraus, Rodrigo A C; Fernandes, Karen B P

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the exercise capacity and muscle strength in elderly people using drugs for angiotensin-II blockage. [Subjects and Methods] Four hundred and seven older adults were recruited for this study. Data about comorbidities and medication use were recorded and the individuals were divided into three groups: control group- elderly people with normal exercise capacity (n=235); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group - individuals using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (n=140); and angiotensin-II receptor blocker group- patients using angiotensin-II receptor blockers (n= 32). Exercise capacity was evaluated by a 6-minute walking test and muscle strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. [Results] Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 99 ± 12%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 101 ± 14%) showed higher predicted values in the 6-minute walking test than the control group patients (mean: 96 ± 10%). Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 105 ± 19%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 105.1 ± 18.73%) showed higher predicted values of muscle strength than control group patients (mean: 98.15 ± 18.77%). [Conclusion] Older adults using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers have better functional exercise capacity and muscle strength.

  15. Mef2 Interacts with the Notch Pathway during Adult Muscle Development in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Charlotte; Kasherov, Petar; Silber, Joël; Lalouette, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Myogenesis of indirect flight muscles (IFMs) in Drosophila melanogaster follows a well-defined cellular developmental scheme. During embryogenesis, a set of cells, the Adult Muscle Precursors (AMPs), are specified. These cells will become proliferating myoblasts during the larval stages which will then give rise to the adult IFMs. Although the cellular aspect of this developmental process is well studied, the molecular biology behind the different stages is still under investigation. In particular, the interactions required during the transition from proliferating myoblasts to differentiated myoblasts ready to fuse to the muscle fiber. It has been previously shown that the Notch pathway is active in proliferating myoblasts, and that this pathway is inhibited in developing muscle fibers. Furthermore, the Myocyte Enhancing Factor 2 (Mef2), Vestigial (Vg) and Scalloped (Sd) transcription factors are necessary for IFM development and that Vg is required for Notch pathway repression in differentiating fibers. Here we examine the interactions between Notch and Mef2 and mechanisms by which the Notch pathway is inhibited during differentiation. We show that Mef2 is capable of inhibiting the Notch pathway in non myogenic cells. A previous screen for Mef2 potential targets identified Delta a component of the Notch pathway. Dl is expressed in Mef2 and Sd-positive developing fibers. Our results show that Mef2 and possibly Sd regulate a Dl enhancer specifically expressed in the developing IFMs and that Mef2 is required for Dl expression in developing IFMs. PMID:25247309

  16. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A.; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Rigby, Peter W. J.; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  17. Rapamycin-mediated inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin in skeletal muscle cells reduces glucose utilization and increases fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sipula, Ian J; Brown, Nicholas F; Perdomo, German

    2006-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that plays an important role in cell growth and metabolism. mTOR has been postulated as a nutrient sensor, but its role in the regulation of fatty acid and glucose metabolism is poorly understood. For the first time, we show that mTOR inhibition in skeletal muscle cells has pronounced effects on intermediary metabolism. Rapamycin, a uniquely specific mTOR inhibitor with clinical applications, increased fatty acid oxidation by 60% accompanied by increased activities of carnitine palmitoyltransferases I and II, the former believed to be the primary intracellular regulatory enzyme of the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Furthermore, glucose transport capacity, glycogen synthesis, and glycolysis were reduced by approximately 40% under the same conditions. In addition, in the presence of rapamycin, hyperinsulinemic conditions (100 nmol/L insulin, 24 hours) were unable to suppress fatty acid oxidation in L6 myotubes. Rapamycin treatment also decreased baseline phosphorylation of mTOR residues S2448 and S2481 by 30% and almost completely abolished p70 S6 kinase phosphorylation. These results show that rapamycin causes a metabolic shift from glucose utilization to fatty acid oxidation in model muscle cells in the presence of nutrient abundance and underline the importance of mTOR as a key regulator in glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:17142137

  18. Muscle Strength, Physical Activity, and Functional Limitations in Older Adults with Central Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Cassandra M.; Batsis, John A.; Vasquez, Elizabeth; McQuoid, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity and muscle weakness are independently associated with increased risk of physical and functional impairment in older adults. It is unknown whether physical activity (PA) and muscle strength combined provide added protection against functional impairment. This study examines the association between muscle strength, PA, and functional outcomes in older adults with central obesity. Methods. Prevalence and odds of physical (PL), ADL, and IADL limitation were calculated for 6,388 community dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 with central obesity. Individuals were stratified by sex-specific hand grip tertiles and PA. Logistic models were adjusted for age, education, comorbidities, and body-mass index and weighted. Results. Overall prevalence of PL and ADL and IADL limitations were progressively lower by grip category. Within grip categories, prevalence was lower for individuals who were active than those who were inactive. Adjusted models showed significantly lower odds of PL OR 0.42 [0.31, 0.56]; ADL OR 0.60 [0.43, 0.84], and IADL OR 0.46 [0.35, 0.61] for those in the highest grip strength category as compared to those in the lowest grip category. Conclusion. Improving grip strength in obese elders who are not able to engage in traditional exercise is important for reducing odds of physical and functional impairment. PMID:27034833

  19. Muscle mechanical properties of adult and older rats submitted to exercise after immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Fábio Yoshikazu; Camargo, Regina Celi Trindade; Job, Aldo Eloizo; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Koike, Tatiana Emy; Camargo Filho, José Carlos Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the effects of immobilization, free remobilization and remobilization by physical exercise about mechanical properties of skeletal muscle of rats of two age groups. Methods 56 Wistar rats divided into two groups according to age, an adult group (five months) and an older group (15 months). These groups were subdivided in: control, immobilized, free remobilized and remobilized by physical exercise. The pelvic limb of rats was immobilized for seven days. The exercise protocol consisted of five swimming sessions, once per day and 25 minutes per session. The gastrocnemius muscle was subjected to tensile tests, and evaluated the properties: load at the maximum limit, stretching at the maximum limit and stiffness. Results The immobilization reduced the values of load at the maximum limit and the remobilization protocols were not sufficient to restore control levels in adult group and older rats. The stretching at the maximum limit differs only in the older group. Conclusions The immobilization reduces the muscle's ability to bear loads and exercise protocol tends to restore the default at control values in adult and older rats. The age factor only interfered in the stretching at the maximum limit, inducing a reduction of this property in the post-immobilization. Level of Evidence II, Investigating the Results of Treatment. PMID:24453606

  20. Silencing of Dok-7 in Adult Rat Muscle Increases Susceptibility to Passive Transfer Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Alejandro M; Stevens, Jo A A; Mané-Damas, Marina; Molenaar, Peter; Duimel, Hans; Verheyen, Fons; Cossins, Judith; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc H; Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2016-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by autoantibodies that target proteins at the neuromuscular junction, primarily the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and the muscle-specific kinase. Because downstream of kinase 7 (Dok-7) is essential for the full activation of muscle-specific kinase and consequently for dense clustering of AChRs, we hypothesized that reduced levels of Dok-7 increase the susceptibility to passive transfer MG. To test this hypothesis, Dok-7 expression was reduced by transfecting shRNA-coding plasmids into the tibialis anterior muscle of adult rats by in vivo electroporation. Subclinical MG was subsequently induced with a low dose of anti-AChR monoclonal antibody 35. Neuromuscular transmission was significantly impaired in Dok-7-siRNA-electroporated legs compared with the contralateral control legs, which correlated with a reduction of AChR protein levels at the neuromuscular junction (approximately 25%) in Dok-7-siRNA-electroporated muscles, compared with contralateral control muscles. These results suggest that a reduced expression of Dok-7 may play a role in the susceptibility to passive transfer MG, by rendering AChR clusters less resistant to the autoantibody attack. PMID:27658713

  1. The role of diacylglycerol kinase ζ and phosphatidic acid in the mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    You, Jae-Sung; Lincoln, Hannah C; Kim, Chan-Ran; Frey, John W; Goodman, Craig A; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-01-17

    The activation of mTOR signaling is essential for mechanically induced changes in skeletal muscle mass, and previous studies have suggested that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling through a phospholipase D (PLD)-dependent increase in the concentration of phosphatidic acid (PA). Consistent with this conclusion, we obtained evidence which further suggests that mechanical stimuli utilize PA as a direct upstream activator of mTOR signaling. Unexpectedly though, we found that the activation of PLD is not necessary for the mechanically induced increases in PA or mTOR signaling. Motivated by this observation, we performed experiments that were aimed at identifying the enzyme(s) that promotes the increase in PA. These experiments revealed that mechanical stimulation increases the concentration of diacylglycerol (DAG) and the activity of DAG kinases (DGKs) in membranous structures. Furthermore, using knock-out mice, we determined that the ζ isoform of DGK (DGKζ) is necessary for the mechanically induced increase in PA. We also determined that DGKζ significantly contributes to the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling, and this is likely driven by an enhanced binding of PA to mTOR. Last, we found that the overexpression of DGKζ is sufficient to induce muscle fiber hypertrophy through an mTOR-dependent mechanism, and this event requires DGKζ kinase activity (i.e. the synthesis of PA). Combined, these results indicate that DGKζ, but not PLD, plays an important role in mechanically induced increases in PA and mTOR signaling. Furthermore, this study suggests that DGKζ could be a fundamental component of the mechanism(s) through which mechanical stimuli regulate skeletal muscle mass. PMID:24302719

  2. The role of diacylglycerol kinase ζ and phosphatidic acid in the mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    You, Jae-Sung; Lincoln, Hannah C; Kim, Chan-Ran; Frey, John W; Goodman, Craig A; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-01-17

    The activation of mTOR signaling is essential for mechanically induced changes in skeletal muscle mass, and previous studies have suggested that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling through a phospholipase D (PLD)-dependent increase in the concentration of phosphatidic acid (PA). Consistent with this conclusion, we obtained evidence which further suggests that mechanical stimuli utilize PA as a direct upstream activator of mTOR signaling. Unexpectedly though, we found that the activation of PLD is not necessary for the mechanically induced increases in PA or mTOR signaling. Motivated by this observation, we performed experiments that were aimed at identifying the enzyme(s) that promotes the increase in PA. These experiments revealed that mechanical stimulation increases the concentration of diacylglycerol (DAG) and the activity of DAG kinases (DGKs) in membranous structures. Furthermore, using knock-out mice, we determined that the ζ isoform of DGK (DGKζ) is necessary for the mechanically induced increase in PA. We also determined that DGKζ significantly contributes to the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling, and this is likely driven by an enhanced binding of PA to mTOR. Last, we found that the overexpression of DGKζ is sufficient to induce muscle fiber hypertrophy through an mTOR-dependent mechanism, and this event requires DGKζ kinase activity (i.e. the synthesis of PA). Combined, these results indicate that DGKζ, but not PLD, plays an important role in mechanically induced increases in PA and mTOR signaling. Furthermore, this study suggests that DGKζ could be a fundamental component of the mechanism(s) through which mechanical stimuli regulate skeletal muscle mass.

  3. Non-genomic mechanism of 17 beta-oestradiol-induced inhibition of contraction in mammalian vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, T; Hamada, E; Kitazawa, K; Gaznabi, A K

    1997-01-01

    17 beta-Oestradiol (E2) at 0.1-10 microM directly inhibited various tonic and phasic smooth muscle contractions. The mechanism(s) of oestrogen-induced inhibition of contraction was studied using intact and permeabilized strips and isolated single cells of smooth muscle. 2. In endothelium-denuded vascular smooth muscle, E2 attenuated high K(+)-induced force development and myosin light chain phosphorylation, and produced rapid and reversible relaxation. There were no significant differences in these inhibitory effects between tissue types (femoral artery vs. portal vein), species (rat vs. rabbit) or sexes. 3. The inhibitory potencies of several steroidal and non-steroidal oestrogen analogues were examined and their effects were for the most part stereo-specific. However, two steroids with negligible affinities for the nuclear oestrogen receptor also strongly inhibited high K(+)-induced contraction. 4. Genomic modulators including a protein synthesis inhibitor, an RNA synthesis inhibitor, and oestrogen receptor antagonists did not affect the inhibitory actions of E2. Inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases did not reduce the E2 effect. 5. Ca2+ release from intracellular stores by agonists and by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) does not appear to be modulated by E2. Neither pretreatment with ryanodine nor with thapsigargin affected the E2-induced inhibition of high K(+)-induced contraction. 6. E2 had no effect on either normal or GTP gamma S-increased Ca2+ sensitivity of the regulatory and contractile apparatus. 7. E2 and its analogues rapidly inhibited voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel currents in isolated smooth muscle cells. Repetitive stimulation was not required for E2-induced inhibition of the currents. 8. This study strongly suggests that at pharmacological concentrations oestrogen primarily reduces Ca2+ influx through inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels in a non-genomic manner and decreases myosin light chain phosphorylation and

  4. Improved knee extensor strength with resistance training associates with muscle specific miRNAs in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María L; Marsh, Anthony P; Leng, Iris; Nicklas, Barbara J; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-02-01

    Regular exercise, particularly resistance training (RT), is the only therapy known to consistently improve muscle strength and quality (force per unit of mass) in older persons, but there is considerable variability in responsiveness to training. Identifying sensitive diagnostic biomarkers of responsiveness to RT may inform the design of a more efficient exercise regimen to improve muscle strength in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We quantified six muscle specific miRNAs (miR-1, -133a, -133b, -206, -208b and -499) in both muscle tissue and blood plasma, and their relationship with knee extensor strength in seven older (age=70.5 ± 2.5 years) adults before and after 5 months of RT. MiRNAs differentially responded to RT; muscle miR-133b decreased, while all plasma miRNAs tended to increase. Percent changes in knee extensor strength with RT showed strong positive correlations with percent changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 and with percent changes in plasma and plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio. Baseline level of plasma or plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio further predicts muscle response to RT, while changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 may correlate with muscle TNNT1 gene alternative splicing in response to RT. Our results indicate that RT alters muscle specific miRNAs in muscle and plasma, and that these changes account for some of the variation in strength responses to RT in older adults.

  5. Activation and propagation of Ca2+ release from inside the sarcoplasmic reticulum network of mammalian skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cully, Tanya R; Edwards, Joshua N; Launikonis, Bradley S

    2014-09-01

    Skeletal muscle fibres are large and highly elongated cells specialized for producing the force required for posture and movement. The process of controlling the production of force within the muscle, known as excitation-contraction coupling, requires virtually simultaneous release of large amounts of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) at the level of every sarcomere within the muscle fibre. Here we imaged Ca(2+) movements within the SR, tubular (t-) system and in the cytoplasm to observe that the SR of skeletal muscle is a connected network capable of allowing diffusion of Ca(2+) within its lumen to promote the propagation of Ca(2+) release throughout the fibre under conditions where inhibition of SR ryanodine receptors (RyRs) was reduced. Reduction of cytoplasmic [Mg(2+)] ([Mg(2+)]cyto) induced a leak of Ca(2+) through RyRs, causing a reduction in SR Ca(2+) buffering power argued to be due to a breakdown of SR calsequestrin polymers, leading to a local elevation of [Ca(2+)]SR. The local rise in [Ca(2+)]SR, an intra-SR Ca(2+) transient, induced a local diffusely rising [Ca(2+)]cyto. A prolonged Ca(2+) wave lasting tens of seconds or more was generated from these events. Ca(2+) waves were dependent on the diffusion of Ca(2+) within the lumen of the SR and ended as [Ca(2+)]SR dropped to low levels to inactivate RyRs. Inactivation of RyRs allowed re-accumulation of [Ca(2+)]SR and the activation of secondary Ca(2+) waves in the persistent presence of low [Mg(2+)]cyto if the threshold [Ca(2+)]SR for RyR opening could be reached. Secondary Ca(2+) waves occurred without an abrupt reduction in SR Ca(2+) buffering power. Ca(2+) release and wave propagation occurred in the absence of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. These observations are consistent with the activation of Ca(2+) release through RyRs of lowered cytoplasmic inhibition by [Ca(2+)]SR or store overload-induced Ca(2+) release. Restitution of SR Ca(2+) buffering power to its initially high value required

  6. Hypothyroid-mediated changes in adult rat diaphragm muscle contractile properties and MHC isoform expression.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, L E; Zhan, W Z; Sieck, G C

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of acute hypothyroidism on myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition and contractile properties in the adult rat diaphragm muscle. Hypothyroidism was induced by the addition of propylthiouracil (0.05%) in the drinking water for a period of 3 wk. MHC isoform composition of control and hypothyroid diaphragm muscles was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In vitro isometric contractile properties of midcostal diaphragm muscle segements were measured at 26 degrees C, whereas the maximal unloaded shortening velocity was measured at 15 degrees C with the "slack test" method. Serum triiodothyronine and thyroxine values were significantly lower in the hypothyroid compared with the control group. A small but significant increase in the percentage of slow MHC isoform in the diaphragm was observed with acute hypothyroidism, whereas the percentage of the fast MHC isoforms (2A, 2X, and 2B) did not significantly differ between groups. Peak twitch force did not differ between groups. However, twitch contraction and half-relaxation times were significantly prolonged in the hypothyroid group compared with control. Maximal specific force was reduced in the hypothyroid compared with the control group, averaging 15.7 and 19.8 N/cm2, respectively (P < 0.05). The maximal unloaded shortening velocity averaged 4.3 and 8.2 muscle lengths/s in the hypothyroid and control groups, respectively (P < 0.05). We conclude that acute hypothyroidism results in alterations in adult diaphragm muscle contractile properties that cannot be attributed solely to changes in MHC isoform composition.

  7. Propofol and AZD3043 Inhibit Adult Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Jonsson Fagerlund, Malin; Krupp, Johannes; Dabrowski, Michael A

    2016-02-06

    Propofol is a widely used general anaesthetic with muscle relaxant properties. Similarly as propofol, the new general anaesthetic AZD3043 targets the GABAA receptor for its anaesthetic effects, but the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has not been investigated. Notably, there is a gap of knowledge about the interaction between propofol and the nAChRs found in the adult neuromuscular junction. The objective was to evaluate whether propofol or AZD3043 interact with the α1β1δε, α3β2, or α7 nAChR subtypes that can be found in the neuromuscular junction and if there are any differences in affinity for those subtypes between propofol and AZD3043. Human nAChR subtypes α1β1δε, α3β2, and α7 were expressed into Xenopus oocytes and studied with an automated voltage-clamp. Propofol and AZD3043 inhibited ACh-induced currents in all of the nAChRs studied with inhibitory concentrations higher than those needed for general anaesthesia. AZD3043 was a more potent inhibitor at the adult muscle nAChR subtype compared to propofol. Propofol and AZD3043 inhibit nAChR subtypes that can be found in the adult NMJ in concentrations higher than needed for general anaesthesia. This finding needs to be evaluated in an in vitro nerve-muscle preparation and suggests one possible explanation for the muscle relaxant effect of propofol seen during higher doses.

  8. Propofol and AZD3043 Inhibit Adult Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson Fagerlund, Malin; Krupp, Johannes; Dabrowski, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Propofol is a widely used general anaesthetic with muscle relaxant properties. Similarly as propofol, the new general anaesthetic AZD3043 targets the GABAA receptor for its anaesthetic effects, but the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has not been investigated. Notably, there is a gap of knowledge about the interaction between propofol and the nAChRs found in the adult neuromuscular junction. The objective was to evaluate whether propofol or AZD3043 interact with the α1β1δε, α3β2, or α7 nAChR subtypes that can be found in the neuromuscular junction and if there are any differences in affinity for those subtypes between propofol and AZD3043. Human nAChR subtypes α1β1δε, α3β2, and α7 were expressed into Xenopus oocytes and studied with an automated voltage-clamp. Propofol and AZD3043 inhibited ACh-induced currents in all of the nAChRs studied with inhibitory concentrations higher than those needed for general anaesthesia. AZD3043 was a more potent inhibitor at the adult muscle nAChR subtype compared to propofol. Propofol and AZD3043 inhibit nAChR subtypes that can be found in the adult NMJ in concentrations higher than needed for general anaesthesia. This finding needs to be evaluated in an in vitro nerve-muscle preparation and suggests one possible explanation for the muscle relaxant effect of propofol seen during higher doses. PMID:26861354

  9. Impaired glucose metabolism and exercise capacity with muscle-specific glycogen synthase 1 (gys1) deletion in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Xirouchaki, Chrysovalantou E.; Mangiafico, Salvatore P.; Bate, Katherine; Ruan, Zheng; Huang, Amy M.; Tedjosiswoyo, Bing Wilari; Lamont, Benjamin; Pong, Wynne; Favaloro, Jenny; Blair, Amy R.; Zajac, Jeffrey D.; Proietto, Joseph; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Muscle glucose storage and muscle glycogen synthase (gys1) defects have been associated with insulin resistance. As there are multiple mechanisms for insulin resistance, the specific role of glucose storage defects is not clear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of muscle-specific gys1 deletion on glucose metabolism and exercise capacity. Methods Tamoxifen inducible and muscle specific gys-1 KO mice were generated using the Cre/loxP system. Mice were subjected to glucose tolerance tests, euglycemic/hyperinsulinemic clamps and exercise tests. Results gys1-KO mice showed ≥85% reduction in muscle gys1 mRNA and protein concentrations, 70% reduction in muscle glycogen levels, postprandial hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia and impaired glucose tolerance. Under insulin-stimulated conditions, gys1-KO mice displayed reduced glucose turnover and muscle glucose uptake, indicative of peripheral insulin resistance, as well as increased plasma and muscle lactate levels and reductions in muscle hexokinase II levels. gys1-KO mice also exhibited markedly reduced exercise and endurance capacity. Conclusions Thus, muscle-specific gys1 deletion in adult mice results in glucose intolerance due to insulin resistance and reduced muscle glucose uptake as well as impaired exercise and endurance capacity. In brief This study demonstrates why the body prioritises muscle glycogen storage over liver glycogen storage despite the critical role of the liver in supplying glucose to the brain in the fasting state and shows that glycogen deficiency results in impaired glucose metabolism and reduced exercise capacity. PMID:26977394

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 2 Signaling Provokes Adverse Cardiac Remodeling in the Adult Mammalian Heart

    PubMed Central

    Divakaran, Vijay G.; Evans, Sarah; Topkara, Veli K.; Diwan, Abhinav; Burchfield, Jana; Gao, Feng; Dong, Jianwen; Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Barger, Philip M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily ligands that provoke a dilated cardiac phenotype signal through a common scaffolding protein termed TNF receptor associated factor 2 (TRAF2); however, virtually nothing is known with regard to TRAF2 signaling in the adult mammalian heart. Methods and Results We generated multiple founder lines of mice with cardiac restricted overexpression of TRAF2 and characterized the phenotype of mice with higher expression levels of TRAF2 (MHC-TRAF2HC). MHC-TRAF2HC transgenic mice developed a time-dependent increase in cardiac hypertrophy, LV dilation and adverse LV remodeling, and a significant decrease in LV +dP/dt and −dP/dt when compared to littermate (LM) controls (p < 0.05 compared to LM). During the early phases of LV remodeling there was a significant increase in total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity that corresponded with a decrease in total myocardial fibrillar collagen content. As the MHC-TRAF2HC mice aged, there was a significant decrease in total MMP activity accompanied by an increase in total fibrillar collagen content and an increase in myocardial tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels. There was a significant increase in NF-κB activation at 4 – 12 weeks and JNK activation at 4 weeks in the MHCs TRAF2HC mice. Transciptional profiling revealed that > 95% of the hypertrophic/dilated cardiomyopathy-related genes that were significantly upregulated genes in the MHC-TRAF2HC hearts contained κB elements in their promoters. Conclusions These results show for the first time that targeted overexpression of TRAF2 is sufficient to mediate adverse cardiac remodeling in the heart. PMID:23493088

  11. Use of ion-sensitive microelectrodes to study intracellular free magnesium concentration and its regulation in mammalian cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Hall, S K; Fry, C H; Buri, A; McGuigan, J A

    Ion-sensitive microelectrodes (ISEs) have been used to measure intracellular [Mg2+] ([Mg2+]i) in cardiac muscle, although most measurements have tended to overestimate the value due to the poor selectivity of the Mg2+ ionophore in the sarcoplasm and to inaccurate collation of individual ISE measurements. This paper highlights the correct method for analysis of data from multiple ISE experiments. Since [Mg2+]i is constrained at a lower concentration than would be expected by passive distribution of the ion, some of the possible mechanisms underlying Mg2+ extrusion from ferret ventricular myocardium were investigated. During elevation of the extracellular [Mg], mean [Mg2+]i rose from 1.61 to 1.91 mM. The same intervention had no significant effect on membrane potential, intracellular [Na+] or pH measured with ISEs, and there was no change in resting [Ca2+], as assessed from fura-2 fluorescence. The data are not consistent with a simple mechanism for Na(+)-Mg2+ exchange as the primary mode of Mg2+ regulation in cardiac muscle or with an Mg2+ extrusion mechanism involving steady-state ion exchange.

  12. Effects of chronic overload on muscle hypertrophy and mTOR signaling in adult and aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effect of 28 days of overload on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in young adult (Y; 6 mo old) and aged (O; 30 mo old) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats subjected to bilateral synergist ablation (SA) of two-thirds of the gas...

  13. Mechanical stretch activates mammalian target of rapamycin and AMP-activated protein kinase pathways in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Naoya; Kawano, Fuminori; Nakata, Ken

    2015-08-01

    Cellular protein synthesis is believed to be antagonistically regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined the relationship between mTOR/p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) and AMPK in response to mechanical stretch. C2C12 myoblasts were grown on a silicone elastomer chamber to confluence and further cultured in differentiation medium for 4 days to form multinucleated myotubes. Cells were subjected to 15% cyclic uniaxial stretch for 4 h at a frequency of 1 Hz. Phosphorylation of p70S6K at threonine 389 and AMPK at threonine 172 of the catalytic α subunit were concomitantly increased by mechanical stretch. Stimulation of the mTOR pathway by adding leucine and insulin increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K without inactivation of AMPK. In contrast, addition of compound C, a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK, increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K in stretched cells. Activation of AMPK by the addition of 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide ribonucleoside reduced the phosphorylation of p70S6K in response to mechanical stretch. In conclusion, crosstalk between mTOR and AMPK signaling was not tightly regulated in response to physiological stimuli, such as mechanical stress and/or nutrients. However, pharmacological modulation of AMPK influenced the mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. PMID:25971373

  14. Prolongation of Relaxation Time in Extraocular Muscles With Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Adult Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Krysta R.; Stevens, Shanlee M.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that short-term treatment with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) would alter the contractile characteristics of rabbit extraocular muscle (EOM). Methods One week after injections of BDNF in adult rabbit superior rectus muscles, twitch properties were determined in treated and control muscles in vitro. Muscles were also examined for changes in mean cross-sectional areas, neuromuscular junction size, and percent of myofibers expressing specific myosin heavy chain isoforms, and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCA) 1 and 2. Results Brain derived neurotrophic factor–treated muscles had prolonged relaxation times compared with control muscles. Time to 50% relaxation, time to 100% relaxation, and maximum rate of relaxation were increased by 24%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. No significant differences were seen in time to peak force, twitch force, or maximum rate of contraction. Brain derived neurotrophic factor treatment significantly increased mean cross-sectional areas of slow twitch and tonic myofibers, with increased areas ranging from 54% to 146%. Brain derived neurotrophic factor also resulted in an increased percentage of slow twitch myofibers in the orbital layers, ranging from 54% to 77%, and slow-tonic myofibers, ranging from 44% to 62%. No significant changes were seen SERCA1 or 2 expression or in neuromuscular junction size. Conclusions Short-term treatment with BDNF significantly prolonged the duration and rate of relaxation time and increased expression of both slow-twitch and slow-tonic myosin-expressing myofibers without changes in neuromuscular junctions or SERCA expression. The changes induced by BDNF treatment might have potential therapeutic value in dampening/reducing uncontrolled eye oscillations in nystagmus. PMID:27802489

  15. Upper extremity muscle volumes and functional strength after resistance training in older adults.

    PubMed

    Daly, Melissa; Vidt, Meghan E; Eggebeen, Joel D; Simpson, W Greg; Miller, Michael E; Marsh, Anthony P; Saul, Katherine R

    2013-04-01

    Aging leads to a decline in strength and an associated loss of independence. The authors examined changes in muscle volume, maximum isometric joint moment, functional strength, and 1-repetition maximum (1RM) after resistance training (RT) in the upper extremity of older adults. They evaluated isometric joint moment and muscle volume as predictors of functional strength. Sixteen healthy older adults (average age 75 ± 4.3 yr) were randomized to a 6-wk upper extremity RT program or control group. The RT group increased 1RM significantly (p < .01 for all exercises). Compared with controls, randomization to RT led to greater functional pulling strength (p = .003), isometric shoulder-adduction moment (p = .041), elbow-flexor volume (p = .017), and shoulder-adductor volume (p = .009). Shoulder-muscle volumes and isometric moments were good predictors of functional strength. The authors conclude that shoulder strength is an important factor for performing functional reaching and pulling tasks and a key target for upper extremity RT interventions. PMID:22952203

  16. Upper extremity muscle volumes and functional strength after resistance training in older adults.

    PubMed

    Daly, Melissa; Vidt, Meghan E; Eggebeen, Joel D; Simpson, W Greg; Miller, Michael E; Marsh, Anthony P; Saul, Katherine R

    2013-04-01

    Aging leads to a decline in strength and an associated loss of independence. The authors examined changes in muscle volume, maximum isometric joint moment, functional strength, and 1-repetition maximum (1RM) after resistance training (RT) in the upper extremity of older adults. They evaluated isometric joint moment and muscle volume as predictors of functional strength. Sixteen healthy older adults (average age 75 ± 4.3 yr) were randomized to a 6-wk upper extremity RT program or control group. The RT group increased 1RM significantly (p < .01 for all exercises). Compared with controls, randomization to RT led to greater functional pulling strength (p = .003), isometric shoulder-adduction moment (p = .041), elbow-flexor volume (p = .017), and shoulder-adductor volume (p = .009). Shoulder-muscle volumes and isometric moments were good predictors of functional strength. The authors conclude that shoulder strength is an important factor for performing functional reaching and pulling tasks and a key target for upper extremity RT interventions.

  17. [The electrical resistance and impedance of mammalian muscles during the first days after slaughter. I: bovine diaphragm].

    PubMed

    Brini, R; Brusco, A; Massari, M; Pallotti, C

    1980-08-15

    In the view of characterizing the animal tissues with respect to their physical properties, the AA. have investigated on the behaviour of the electrical responses of bovine diaphragmatic muscle. In particolar the resistance and the impedance (at a fixed frequency of 20 Hz, sinusoidal wave) have been checked in samples from the 4th up to the 148th hour after slaughter. The results of these experiments show that, during the maturation of the meat, there is a decrease of the values of the resistance and of the capacitive reactance. On the basis of the data acquired, the only hypothesis explaining the course of the research could be that the electrical properties of the meat are greatly influenced in a very relevant way by capacitive structures and in lower degree by a pure resistive medium.

  18. Acetylcholine receptors and sodium channels in denervated and botulinum-toxin-treated adult rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bambrick, L; Gordon, T

    1987-01-01

    1. The number of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors and Na channels was measured in adult rat hind-limb muscles after denervation or injection of botulinum toxin type A (BoTX), using specific binding of radiolabelled neurotoxins. 2. Denervation by sciatic nerve section increased the number of [125I]iodo-alpha-bungarotoxin ([125I]BTX) binding sites from low, unmeasurable levels to 39 +/- 3 fmol of toxin bound per milligram muscle protein at 21 days. 3. Subcutaneous injection of BoTX produced complete neuromuscular blockade for 11-14 days over which time the number of [125I]BTX binding sites increased with the same time course and to the same extent as following denervation. 4. Neither denervation nor BoTX treatment significantly altered the number of tritiated saxitoxin ([3H]STX) binding sites from normal values of 7.8 fmol/mg muscle weight or 57 +/- 3 fmol/mg homogenate protein. This may, however, correspond to a lower density of [3H]STX sites in the muscle membrane. 5. It was concluded that neuromuscular blockade with BoTX is equivalent to denervation in its effects on synthesis of ACh receptors. Numbers of Na channels are more stable than ACh receptors but may also be modulated by neuromuscular activity. PMID:2442368

  19. Effects of balance training by knee joint motions on muscle activity in adult men with functional ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung-min; Kim, Won-bok; Yun, Chang-kyo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of balance training by applying knee joint movements on muscle activity in male adults with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] 28 adults with functional ankle instability, divided randomly into an experimental group, which performed balance training by applying knee joint movements for 20 minutes and ankle joint exercises for 10 minutes, and a control group, which performed ankle joint exercise for 30 minutes. Exercises were completed three times a week for 8 weeks. Electromyographic values of the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, and the lateral gastrocnemius muscles were obtained to compare and analyze muscle activity before and after the experiments in each group. [Results] The experimental group had significant increases in muscle activity in the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and lateral gastrocnemius muscles, while muscle activity in the peroneus brevis increased without significance. The control group had significant increases in muscle activity in the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus, while muscle activity in the peroneus brevis and lateral gastrocnemius muscles increased without significance. [Conclusion] In conclusion, balance training by applying knee joint movements can be recommended as a treatment method for patients with functional ankle instability. PMID:27313386

  20. Sex hormones establish a reserve pool of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Han, Gi-Chan; Seo, Ji-Yun; Park, Inkuk; Park, Wookjin; Jeong, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Su Hyeon; Bae, Sung-Hwan; Seong, Jinwoo; Yum, Min-Kyu; Hann, Sang-Hyeon; Kwon, Young-Guen; Seo, Daekwan; Choi, Man Ho; Kong, Young-Yun

    2016-09-01

    Quiescent satellite cells, known as adult muscle stem cells, possess a remarkable ability to regenerate skeletal muscle following injury throughout life. Although they mainly originate from multipotent stem/progenitor cells of the somite, the mechanism underlying the establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations is unknown. Here, we show that sex hormones induce Mind bomb 1 (Mib1) expression in myofibres at puberty, which activates Notch signalling in cycling juvenile satellite cells and causes them to be converted into adult quiescent satellite cells. Myofibres lacking Mib1 fail to send Notch signals to juvenile satellite cells, leading to impaired cell cycle exit and depletion. Our findings reveal that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis drives Mib1 expression in the myofibre niche. Moreover, the same axis regulates the re-establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations following injury. Our data show that sex hormones establish adult quiescent satellite cell populations by regulating the myofibre niche at puberty and re-establish them during regeneration.

  1. Effect of training on the muscle strength and dynamic balance ability of adults with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsimaras, Vassilios K; Fotiadou, Eleni G

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of training on the muscle strength and dynamic balance ability of adults with Down syndrome (DS). Twenty-five adults with DS were separated into 2 groups. Fifteen subjects (mean age, 24.5 years) constituted the experiment group, whereas 10 subjects (mean age, 24.7 years) were in the control group of the study. Parameters measured were peak torque, isokinetic muscle endurance, and dynamic balance ability. All subjects performed a leg strength test on a Cyber II isokinetic dynamometer. In addition, the subjects' dynamic balance ability was measured by means of a balance deck (Lafayette). The experimental group followed a 12-week training program. As the results indicated, the experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in all measured values when compared with the control group. It is concluded that adults with DS can improve their physical and kinetic abilities with the application of a systematic and well-designed training program.

  2. Sex hormones establish a reserve pool of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Han, Gi-Chan; Seo, Ji-Yun; Park, Inkuk; Park, Wookjin; Jeong, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Su Hyeon; Bae, Sung-Hwan; Seong, Jinwoo; Yum, Min-Kyu; Hann, Sang-Hyeon; Kwon, Young-Guen; Seo, Daekwan; Choi, Man Ho; Kong, Young-Yun

    2016-09-01

    Quiescent satellite cells, known as adult muscle stem cells, possess a remarkable ability to regenerate skeletal muscle following injury throughout life. Although they mainly originate from multipotent stem/progenitor cells of the somite, the mechanism underlying the establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations is unknown. Here, we show that sex hormones induce Mind bomb 1 (Mib1) expression in myofibres at puberty, which activates Notch signalling in cycling juvenile satellite cells and causes them to be converted into adult quiescent satellite cells. Myofibres lacking Mib1 fail to send Notch signals to juvenile satellite cells, leading to impaired cell cycle exit and depletion. Our findings reveal that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis drives Mib1 expression in the myofibre niche. Moreover, the same axis regulates the re-establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations following injury. Our data show that sex hormones establish adult quiescent satellite cell populations by regulating the myofibre niche at puberty and re-establish them during regeneration. PMID:27548913

  3. Nutritional intervention restores muscle but not kidney phenotypes in adult calcineurin Aα null mice.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kirsten; Reddy, Ramesh N; Price, S Russ; Williams, Clintoria R; Gooch, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Mice lacking the α isoform of the catalytic subunit of calcineurin (CnAα) were first reported in 1996 and have been an important model to understand the role of calcineurin in the brain, immune system, bones, muscle, and kidney. Research using the mice has been limited, however, by failure to thrive and early lethality of most null pups. Work in our laboratory led to the rescue of CnAα-/- mice by supplemental feeding to compensate for a defect in salivary enzyme secretion. The data revealed that, without intervention, knockout mice suffer from severe caloric restriction. Since nutritional deprivation is known to significantly alter development, it is imperative that previous conclusions based on CnAα-/- mice are revisited to determine which aspects of the phenotype were attributable to caloric restriction versus a direct role for CnAα. In this study, we find that defects in renal development and function persist in adult CnAα-/- mice including a significant decrease in glomerular filtration rate and an increase in blood urea nitrogen levels. These data indicate that impaired renal development we previously reported was not due to caloric restriction but rather a specific role for CnAα in renal development and function. In contrast, we find that rather than being hypoglycemic, rescued mice are mildly hyperglycemic and insulin resistant. Examination of muscle fiber types shows that previously reported reductions in type I muscle fibers are no longer evident in rescued null mice. Rather, loss of CnAα likely alters insulin response due to a reduction in insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS2) expression and signaling in muscle. This study illustrates the importance of re-examining the phenotypes of CnAα-/- mice and the advances that are now possible with the use of adult, rescued knockout animals. PMID:23638102

  4. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 +/- 4, n = 22, 12 females) w...

  5. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Methods Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years) with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain for a duration of at least 30 days during the previous year and a pain intensity of at least 2 on a modified VAS-scale of 0-10 participated. Exclusion criteria were traumatic injuries or other serious chronic disease. Using a standardized finger pressure of 2 kg, palpable tenderness were performed of eight anatomical neck/shoulder locations in the left and right side on a scale of 'no tenderness', 'some tenderness' and 'severe tenderness'. Results In women, the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus showed the highest prevalence of severe tenderness (18-30%). In comparison, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the upper trapezius, occipital border and supraspinatus was 13-19%. Severe tenderness of the medial deltoid was least prevalent (0-1%). In men, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the levator scapulae was 13-21%, and ranged between 0-8% in the remainder of the examined anatomical locations. Conclusions A high prevalence of tenderness exists in several anatomical locations of the neck/shoulder complex among adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Future research should focus on several neck/shoulder muscles, including the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus, and not only the upper trapezius. Trial Registration ISRCTN60264809 PMID:21777478

  6. Muscle weakness is related to slip-initiated falls among community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Yang, Feng

    2016-01-25

    The purposes of this study were (1) to investigate the relationship between muscle weakness and slip-related falls among community-dwelling older adults, and (2) to determine optimal cut-off values with respect to the knee strength capacity which can be used to identify individuals at high risk of falls. Thirty-six healthy older adults participated in this study. Their muscle strength (torque) was assessed at the right knee under maximum voluntary isometric (flexion and extension) contractions. They were then moved to a special treadmill. After walking regularly five times on the treadmill, they experienced an identical and unannounced slip during walking on the treadmill with the protection of a safety harness. This treadmill could be considered a standardized platform, inducing an unexpected slip. Accuracy of predicting slip outcome (fall vs. recovery) was examined for both strength measurements (i.e., the strength capacity of knee extensor and flexor) using univariate logistic regressions. The optimal cutoff values for the two strength measurements were determined by the receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results showed that fallers displayed significantly lower knee strength capacities compared to their recovery counterpart (1.10 vs. 1.44Nm/kg, p<0.01, effect size Cohen׳s d=0.95 for extensor; 0.93 vs. 1.13Nm/kg, p<0.05, d=0.69 for flexor). Such results suggested that muscle weakness contributes to falls initiated by a slip during gait. Our findings could provide guidance to identify individuals at increased risk of falling using the derived optimal cutoff values of knee strength capacity among older adults.

  7. Leg and trunk muscle coordination and postural sway during increasingly difficult standing balance tasks in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Kurz, Eduard; Roth, Ralf; Zahner, Lukas; Faude, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Ageing impairs body balance and increases older adults' fall risk. Balance training can improve intrinsic fall risk factors. However, age comparisons of muscle activity responses during balance tasks are lacking. This study investigated relative muscle activity, muscle coordination and postural sway during various recommended static balance training tasks. Muscle activity (%MVC), amplitude ratios (AR) and co-activity (CAI) were determined during standing tasks for 30s (1: double limb stance on a foam surface, eyes open; 2: double limb stance on firm ground, eyes closed; 3: double limb stance, feet in step position on a foam surface, eyes open; 4: double limb stance, feet in step position on firm ground, eyes closed; 5: single limb stance on firm ground, eyes open) in 20 healthy young adults (24±2 y) and 20 older adults (73±6 y). Surface electromyography (SEMG) was applied (SENIAM guidelines) to ankle (tibialis anterior, soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus) and thigh (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus) muscles (non-dominant leg). Electrodes over trunk (multifidus and internal oblique) muscles were applied bilaterally. Two- to six-fold higher levels of relative muscle activity were found in older adults for ankle (0.0002muscles. Co-activation was elevated in young adults for the trunk (0.001adults for the ankle (0.009muscle coordination patterns during all stance conditions at the ankle (0.06<ηp(2)<0.28) and the trunk (0.14<ηp(2)<0.23). Older adults had higher electrophysiological costs for all stance conditions. Muscle coordination showed inverse activity patterns at the ankle and trunk. Optimal balance and strength training programs should take into account age-specific alterations in muscle activity. PMID:27451322

  8. The delayed rectifier potassium conductance in the sarcolemma and the transverse tubular system membranes of mammalian skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quinonez, Marbella

    2012-01-01

    A two-microelectrode voltage clamp and optical measurements of membrane potential changes at the transverse tubular system (TTS) were used to characterize delayed rectifier K currents (IKV) in murine muscle fibers stained with the potentiometric dye di-8-ANEPPS. In intact fibers, IKV displays the canonical hallmarks of KV channels: voltage-dependent delayed activation and decay in time. The voltage dependence of the peak conductance (gKV) was only accounted for by double Boltzmann fits, suggesting at least two channel contributions to IKV. Osmotically treated fibers showed significant disconnection of the TTS and displayed smaller IKV, but with similar voltage dependence and time decays to intact fibers. This suggests that inactivation may be responsible for most of the decay in IKV records. A two-channel model that faithfully simulates IKV records in osmotically treated fibers comprises a low threshold and steeply voltage-dependent channel (channel A), which contributes ∼31% of gKV, and a more abundant high threshold channel (channel B), with shallower voltage dependence. Significant expression of the IKV1.4 and IKV3.4 channels was demonstrated by immunoblotting. Rectangular depolarizing pulses elicited step-like di-8-ANEPPS transients in intact fibers rendered electrically passive. In contrast, activation of IKV resulted in time- and voltage-dependent attenuations in optical transients that coincided in time with the peaks of IKV records. Normalized peak attenuations showed the same voltage dependence as peak IKV plots. A radial cable model including channels A and B and K diffusion in the TTS was used to simulate IKV and average TTS voltage changes. Model predictions and experimental data were compared to determine what fraction of gKV in the TTS accounted simultaneously for the electrical and optical data. Best predictions suggest that KV channels are approximately equally distributed in the sarcolemma and TTS membranes; under these conditions, >70% of IKV

  9. Relationships Between Metabolic Rate, Muscle Electromyograms and Swim Performance of Adult Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Brown, Richard S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Mesa, Matthew G.; VanderKooi, S P.; McKinstry, Craig A.

    2003-10-01

    In 2000 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated a two-year study to investigate the metabolic rate and swimming performance and to estimate the total energy used (i.e., aerobic and anaerobic) by adult spring Chinook salmon migrating upstream through a large hydropower dam on the Columbia River. The investigation involved one year of laboratory study and one year of field study at Bonneville Dam. The objectives of the laboratory study, reported here, were to (1) measure active rates of oxygen consumption of adult spring chinook salmon at three water temperatures over a range of swimming speeds; (2) estimate the Ucrit of adult spring chinook salmon; and (3) monitor EMGs of red and white muscle in the salmon over a range of swimming speeds. Future papers will report on the results of the field study. Our results indicated that the rate of oxygen consumption and red and white muscle activity in adult spring chinook salmon were strongly correlated with swimming speed over a range of fish sizes and at three different temperatures. Active oxygen consumption increased linearly with swim speed before leveling off at speeds at or above Ucrit. This pattern was similar at each water temperature and indicated that fish were approaching their maximal aerobic oxygen consumption at higher swim speeds. Modeling showed that temperature, but not size or sex, influenced the relation between V02 and swim speed, thus a V02-swim speed model based on temperature (but independent of sex and size) should be a biologically relevant way of estimating the energy use of fish in the wild.

  10. Surface electromyography activity of the rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles during forced expiration in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenichi; Nonaka, Koji; Ogaya, Shinya; Ogi, Atsushi; Matsunaka, Chiaki; Horie, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to characterize rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscle activity in healthy adults under expiratory resistance using surface electromyography. We randomly assigned 42 healthy adult subjects to 3 groups: 30%, 20%, and 10% maximal expiratory intraoral pressure (PEmax). After measuring 100% PEmax and muscle activity during 100% PEmax, the activity and maximum voluntary contraction of each muscle during the assigned experimental condition were measured. At 100% PEmax, the external oblique (p<0.01) and internal oblique (p<0.01) showed significantly elevated activity compared with the rectus abdominis muscle. Furthermore, at 20% and 30% PEmax, the external oblique (p<0.05 and<0.01, respectively) and the internal oblique (p<0.05 and<0.01, respectively) showed significantly elevated activity compared with the rectus abdominis muscle. At 10% PEmax, no significant differences were observed in muscle activity. Although we observed no significant difference between 10% and 20% PEmax, activity during 30% PEmax was significantly greater than during 20% PEmax (external oblique: p<0.05; internal oblique: p<0.01). The abdominal oblique muscles are the most active during forced expiration. Moreover, 30% PEmax is the minimum intensity required to achieve significant, albeit very slight, muscle activity during expiratory resistance.

  11. The Na conductance in the sarcolemma and the transverse tubular system membranes of mammalian skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    DiFranco, Marino; Vergara, Julio L

    2011-10-01

    understanding of the radial and longitudinal propagation of the action potential, which ultimately govern the mechanical activation of muscle in normal and diseased conditions. PMID:21948948

  12. Protein Considerations for Optimising Skeletal Muscle Mass in Healthy Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Witard, Oliver C.; Wardle, Sophie L.; Macnaughton, Lindsay S.; Hodgson, Adrian B.; Tipton, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is critical for human health. Protein feeding, alongside resistance exercise, is a potent stimulus for muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and is a key factor that regulates skeletal muscle mass (SMM). The main purpose of this narrative review was to evaluate the latest evidence for optimising the amino acid or protein source, dose, timing, pattern and macronutrient coingestion for increasing or preserving SMM in healthy young and healthy older adults. We used a systematic search strategy of PubMed and Web of Science to retrieve all articles related to this review objective. In summary, our findings support the notion that protein guidelines for increasing or preserving SMM are more complex than simply recommending a total daily amount of protein. Instead, multifactorial interactions between protein source, dose, timing, pattern and macronutrient coingestion, alongside exercise, influence the stimulation of MPS, and thus should be considered in the context of protein recommendations for regulating SMM. To conclude, on the basis of currently available scientific literature, protein recommendations for optimising SMM should be tailored to the population or context of interest, with consideration given to age and resting/post resistance exercise conditions. PMID:27023595

  13. Effect of an Eight-Week Ballroom Dancing Program on Muscle Architecture in Older Adults Females.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Christina C P; Lodovico, Angélica; Fowler, Neil; Rodacki, André L F

    2015-10-01

    Aging is related to a progressive remodeling of the neuromuscular system, which includes muscle mass, strength, and power reductions. This study investigated the effect of an eight-week dance program on fascicle pennation angle, fascicle length, and thickness of the vastus lateralis (VL), tibialis anterior (TA), biceps femoris (BF), and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles using ultrasound images. Thirty-four healthy older women were randomly assigned to either a dancing (DG: n = 19, 69.1 ± 6.5 years, 72.5 ± 11.7 kg) or control group (CG: n = 15, 71.5 ± 7.4 years, 70.9 ± 9.3 kg). After training, the DG showed greater (p < .05) thickness for VL (16%), TA (17%), BF (19%), and GM (15%); pennation angle for VL (21%), TA (23%), BF (21%), and GM (17%); and fascicle length for VL (11%), TA (12%), BF (10%), and GM (10%). These findings suggest that dance training was effective to change the lower limb muscle architecture in older female adults.

  14. Resistance exercise training and in vitro skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Flack, Kyle D; Davy, Brenda M; DeBerardinis, Martin; Boutagy, Nabil E; McMillan, Ryan P; Hulver, Matthew W; Frisard, Madlyn I; Anderson, Angela S; Savla, Jyoti; Davy, Kevin P

    2016-07-01

    Whether resistance exercise training (RET) improves skeletal muscle substrate oxidative capacity and reduces mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species in older adults remains unclear. To address this, 19 older males (≥60 years) were randomized to a RET (n = 11) or to a waitlist control group (n = 8) that remained sedentary for 12 weeks. RET was comprised of three upper body and four lower body movements on resistance machines. One set of 8-12 repetitions to failure of each movement was performed on three nonconsecutive days/week. Improvements in chest press and leg press strength were assessed using a three-repetition maximum (3 RM). Body composition was assessed via dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle at baseline and at both 3 weeks and 12 weeks. Palmitate and pyruvate oxidation rates were measured from the (14)CO2 produced from [1-(14)C] palmitic acid and [U-(14)C] pyruvate, respectively, during incubation of muscle homogenates. PGC-1α, TFAM, and PPARδ levels were quantified using qRT-PCR Citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed using the Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide/Peroxidase assay. There were no significant changes in body weight or body composition following the intervention. Chest press and leg press strength (3RM) increased ~34% (both P < 0.01) with RET There were no significant changes in pyruvate or fatty acid oxidation or in the expression of target genes with the intervention. There was a modest increase (P < 0.05) in βHAD activity with RET at 12 weeks but the change in CS enzyme activity was not significant. In addition, there were no significant changes in ROS production in either group following RET Taken together, the findings of this study suggest that 12 weeks of low volume RET does not increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacity or reduce ROS

  15. Ratio of C-Reactive Protein to Albumin Predicts Muscle Mass in Adult Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Tong; Wu, Pei-Yu; Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Hsu, Yung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the ratio of C-reactive protein to albumin (CRP–Alb ratio) is associated with clinical outcomes in patients with disease. We examined the predictive value of this ratio in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). In this cross-sectional study, 91 eligible adult HD patients were analyzed, and the correlation between the CRP–Alb ratio and skeletal muscle mass normalized for body weight (SMM/wt; estimated using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer) was investigated. The mean age of the study participants was 54.9 ± 6.6 years (ranging from 27 to 64 years); 43 (47.2%) were men. The mean values for the SMM/wt were 39.1% ± 5.4%. The CRP–Alb ratio was found to be negatively correlated with SMM/wt (r = −0.33, P = 0.002) and creatinine (r = −0.20, P = 0.056). All the univariate significant and nonsignificant relevant covariates were selected for multivariable stepwise regression analysis. We determined that the homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance and CRP–Alb ratio were independent risk determinants for SMM/wt (βHOMA-IR = −0.18 and βCRP–Alb ratio = −3.84, adjusted R2 = 0.32). This study indicated that the CRP–Alb ratio may help clinicians in predicting muscle mass in adult patients undergoing HD. PMID:27768746

  16. Maternal protein restriction impairs the transcriptional metabolic flexibility of skeletal muscle in adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    da Silva Aragão, Raquel; Guzmán-Quevedo, Omar; Pérez-García, Georgina; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul; Bolaños-Jiménez, Francisco

    2014-08-14

    Skeletal muscle exhibits a remarkable flexibility in the usage of fuel in response to the nutrient intake and energy demands of the organism. In fact, increased physical activity and fasting trigger a transcriptional programme in skeletal muscle cells leading to a switch from carbohydrate to lipid oxidation. Impaired metabolic flexibility has been reported to be associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes, but it is not known whether the disability to adapt to metabolic demands is a cause or a consequence of these pathological conditions. Inasmuch as a poor nutritional environment during early life is a predisposing factor for the development of metabolic diseases in adulthood, in the present study, we aimed to determine the long-term effects of maternal malnutrition on the metabolic flexibility of offspring skeletal muscle. To this end, the transcriptional responses of the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles to fasting were evaluated in adult rats born to dams fed a control (17 % protein) or a low-protein (8 % protein, protein restricted (PR)) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. With the exception of reduced body weight and reduced plasma concentrations of TAG, PR rats exhibited a metabolic profile that was the same as that of the control rats. In the fed state, PR rats exhibited an enhanced expression of key regulatory genes of fatty acid oxidation including CPT1a, PGC-1α, UCP3 and PPARα and an impaired expression of genes that increase the capacity for fat oxidation in response to fasting. These results suggest that impaired metabolic inflexibility precedes and may contribute to the development of metabolic disorders associated with early malnutrition. PMID:24823946

  17. Evaluating the relationship between muscle and bone modeling response in older adults.

    PubMed

    Reider, Lisa; Beck, Thomas; Alley, Dawn; Miller, Ram; Shardell, Michelle; Schumacher, John; Magaziner, Jay; Cawthon, Peggy M; Barbour, Kamil E; Cauley, Jane A; Harris, Tamara

    2016-09-01

    Bone modeling, the process that continually adjusts bone strength in response to prevalent muscle-loading forces throughout an individual's lifespan, may play an important role in bone fragility with age. Femoral stress, an index of bone modeling response, can be estimated using measurements of DXA derived bone geometry and loading information incorporated into an engineering model. Assuming that individuals have adapted to habitual muscle loading forces, greater stresses indicate a diminished response and a weaker bone. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the associations of lean mass and muscle strength with the femoral stress measure generated from the engineering model and to examine the extent to which lean mass and muscle strength account for variation in femoral stress among 2539 healthy older adults participating in the Health ABC study using linear regression. Mean femoral stress was higher in women (9.51, SD=1.85Mpa) than in men (8.02, SD=1.43Mpa). Percent lean mass explained more of the variation in femoral stress than did knee strength adjusted for body size (R(2)=0.187 vs. 0.055 in men; R(2)=0.237 vs. 0.095 in women). In models adjusted for potential confounders, for every percent increase in lean mass, mean femoral stress was 0.121Mpa lower (95% CI: -0.138, -0.104; p<0.001) in men and 0.139Mpa lower (95% CI: -0.158, -0.121; p<0.001) in women. The inverse association of femoral stress with lean mass and with knee strength did not differ by category of BMI. Results from this study provide insight into bone modeling differences as measured by femoral stress among older men and women and indicate that lean mass may capture elements of bone's response to load. PMID:27352990

  18. Evaluating the relationship between muscle and bone modeling response in older adults.

    PubMed

    Reider, Lisa; Beck, Thomas; Alley, Dawn; Miller, Ram; Shardell, Michelle; Schumacher, John; Magaziner, Jay; Cawthon, Peggy M; Barbour, Kamil E; Cauley, Jane A; Harris, Tamara

    2016-09-01

    Bone modeling, the process that continually adjusts bone strength in response to prevalent muscle-loading forces throughout an individual's lifespan, may play an important role in bone fragility with age. Femoral stress, an index of bone modeling response, can be estimated using measurements of DXA derived bone geometry and loading information incorporated into an engineering model. Assuming that individuals have adapted to habitual muscle loading forces, greater stresses indicate a diminished response and a weaker bone. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the associations of lean mass and muscle strength with the femoral stress measure generated from the engineering model and to examine the extent to which lean mass and muscle strength account for variation in femoral stress among 2539 healthy older adults participating in the Health ABC study using linear regression. Mean femoral stress was higher in women (9.51, SD=1.85Mpa) than in men (8.02, SD=1.43Mpa). Percent lean mass explained more of the variation in femoral stress than did knee strength adjusted for body size (R(2)=0.187 vs. 0.055 in men; R(2)=0.237 vs. 0.095 in women). In models adjusted for potential confounders, for every percent increase in lean mass, mean femoral stress was 0.121Mpa lower (95% CI: -0.138, -0.104; p<0.001) in men and 0.139Mpa lower (95% CI: -0.158, -0.121; p<0.001) in women. The inverse association of femoral stress with lean mass and with knee strength did not differ by category of BMI. Results from this study provide insight into bone modeling differences as measured by femoral stress among older men and women and indicate that lean mass may capture elements of bone's response to load.

  19. CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression in adult mice is associated with extrasynaptic utrophin in skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Durko, Margaret; Allen, Carol; Nalbantoglu, Josephine; Karpati, George

    2010-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic muscle disease characterized by the absence of sub-sarcolemmal dystrophin that results in muscle fibre necrosis, progressive muscle wasting and is fatal. Numerous experimental studies with dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, an animal model for the disease, have demonstrated that extrasynaptic upregulation of utrophin, an analogue of dystrophin, can prevent muscle fibre deterioration and reduce or negate the dystrophic phenotype. A different approach for ectopic expression of utrophin relies on augmentation of CT-GalNAc transferase in muscle fibre. We investigated whether CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression in adult mice influence appearance of utrophin in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma. After electrotransfer of plasmid DNA carrying an expression cassette of CT-GalNAc transferase into tibialis anterior muscle of wild type and dystrophic mice, muscle sections were examined by immunofluorescence. CT-GalNAc transgene expression augmented sarcolemmal carbohydrate glycosylation and was accompanied by extrasynaptic utrophin. A 6-week time course study showed that the highest efficiency of utrophin overexpression in a plasmid harboured muscle fibres was 32.2% in CD-1 and 52% in mdx mice, 2 and 4 weeks after CT-GalNAc gene transfer, respectively. The study provides evidence that postnatal CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression stimulates utrophin upregulation that is inherently beneficial for muscle structure and strength restoration. Thus CT-GalNAc may provide an important therapeutic molecule for treatment of dystrophin deficiency in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  20. Muscle dissatisfaction and muscle-enhancing substance use: a population-based twin study in young adult men.

    PubMed

    Raevuori, Anu; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Rose, Richard J; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2006-06-01

    In the population-based Finn Twin 16 study, proportions of genetic and environmental factors contributing to muscle dissatisfaction and muscle-enhancing substance use were assessed in 319 pairs of twin brothers: 141 monozygotic (MZ) and 178 dizygotic (DZ) pairs. In addition there were 86 twin individuals from pairs in which only one co-twin responded. Of all respondents, 30% experienced high muscle dissatisfaction. The corresponding proportion of muscle-enhancing substance use was 10%. The subjects were similar in age (23.8 years, 95% confidence interval [CI] 23.76-23.84), body mass index (23.7, 95% CI 23.5-23.9), and waist circumference (84.5 cm, 95% CI 83.7-85.2), independent of their muscle dissatisfaction or muscle-enhancing substance use status and independent of their zygosity. The MZ polychoric correlation for muscle dissatisfaction was .39 (95% CI .17-.58) and .27 for DZ pairs (95% CI .07-.46). The MZ tetrachoric correlation for muscle-enhancing substance use was .65 (95% CI .28-.87) and .56 for DZ pairs (95% CI .26-.78). The AE model, where additive genetic factors (A) accounted for 42% (95% CI .23-.59) and unique environmental factors (E) 58% (95% CI .41-.77) of the liability, provided the best fit for muscle dissatisfaction. The CE model, where common environmental factors (C) accounted for 60% (95% CI .37-.77) and unique environmental factors (E) 40% (95% CI .23-.63) of the liability, provided the best fit for muscle-enhancing substance use. Both genetic and unique (nonfamilial) environmental factors are involved in muscle dissatisfaction in the population. Nongenetic factors (both familial and nonfamilial) appear to best explain the use of muscle-enhancing substances.

  1. Constitutive expression of Yes-associated protein (Yap) in adult skeletal muscle fibres induces muscle atrophy and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Judson, Robert N; Gray, Stuart R; Walker, Claire; Carroll, Andrew M; Itzstein, Cecile; Lionikas, Arimantas; Zammit, Peter S; De Bari, Cosimo; Wackerhage, Henning

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the Hippo pathway member Yes-associated protein (Yap, gene name Yap1) in skeletal muscle fibres in vivo. Specifically we bred an inducible, skeletal muscle fibre-specific knock-in mouse model (MCK-tTA-hYAP1 S127A) to test whether the over expression of constitutively active Yap (hYAP1 S127A) is sufficient to drive muscle hypertrophy or stimulate changes in fibre type composition. Unexpectedly, after 5-7 weeks of constitutive hYAP1 S127A over expression, mice suddenly and rapidly lost 20-25% body weight and suffered from gait impairments and kyphosis. Skeletal muscles atrophied by 34-40% and the muscle fibre cross sectional area decreased by ≈40% when compared to control mice. Histological analysis revealed evidence of skeletal muscle degeneration and regeneration, necrotic fibres and a NADH-TR staining resembling centronuclear myopathy. In agreement with the histology, mRNA expression of markers of regenerative myogenesis (embryonic myosin heavy chain, Myf5, myogenin, Pax7) and muscle protein degradation (atrogin-1, MuRF1) were significantly elevated in muscles from transgenic mice versus control. No significant changes in fibre type composition were detected using ATPase staining. The phenotype was largely reversible, as a cessation of hYAP1 S127A expression rescued body and muscle weight, restored muscle morphology and prevented further pathological progression. To conclude, high Yap activity in muscle fibres does not induce fibre hypertrophy nor fibre type changes but instead results in a reversible atrophy and deterioration. PMID:23544078

  2. Constitutive Expression of Yes-Associated Protein (Yap) in Adult Skeletal Muscle Fibres Induces Muscle Atrophy and Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Robert N.; Gray, Stuart R.; Walker, Claire; Carroll, Andrew M.; Itzstein, Cecile; Lionikas, Arimantas; Zammit, Peter S.; De Bari, Cosimo; Wackerhage, Henning

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the Hippo pathway member Yes-associated protein (Yap, gene name Yap1) in skeletal muscle fibres in vivo. Specifically we bred an inducible, skeletal muscle fibre-specific knock-in mouse model (MCK-tTA-hYAP1 S127A) to test whether the over expression of constitutively active Yap (hYAP1 S127A) is sufficient to drive muscle hypertrophy or stimulate changes in fibre type composition. Unexpectedly, after 5–7 weeks of constitutive hYAP1 S127A over expression, mice suddenly and rapidly lost 20–25% body weight and suffered from gait impairments and kyphosis. Skeletal muscles atrophied by 34–40% and the muscle fibre cross sectional area decreased by ≈40% when compared to control mice. Histological analysis revealed evidence of skeletal muscle degeneration and regeneration, necrotic fibres and a NADH-TR staining resembling centronuclear myopathy. In agreement with the histology, mRNA expression of markers of regenerative myogenesis (embryonic myosin heavy chain, Myf5, myogenin, Pax7) and muscle protein degradation (atrogin-1, MuRF1) were significantly elevated in muscles from transgenic mice versus control. No significant changes in fibre type composition were detected using ATPase staining. The phenotype was largely reversible, as a cessation of hYAP1 S127A expression rescued body and muscle weight, restored muscle morphology and prevented further pathological progression. To conclude, high Yap activity in muscle fibres does not induce fibre hypertrophy nor fibre type changes but instead results in a reversible atrophy and deterioration. PMID:23544078

  3. Fish oil–derived n–3 PUFA therapy increases muscle mass and function in healthy older adults1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon I; Julliand, Sophie; Reeds, Dominic N; Sinacore, David R; Klein, Samuel; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Age-associated declines in muscle mass and function are major risk factors for an impaired ability to carry out activities of daily living, falls, prolonged recovery time after hospitalization, and mortality in older adults. New strategies that can slow the age-related loss of muscle mass and function are needed to help older adults maintain adequate performance status to reduce these risks and maintain independence. Objective: We evaluated the efficacy of fish oil–derived n–3 (ω-3) PUFA therapy to slow the age-associated loss of muscle mass and function. Design: Sixty healthy 60–85-y-old men and women were randomly assigned to receive n–3 PUFA (n = 40) or corn oil (n = 20) therapy for 6 mo. Thigh muscle volume, handgrip strength, one-repetition maximum (1-RM) lower- and upper-body strength, and average power during isokinetic leg exercises were evaluated before and after treatment. Results: Forty-four subjects completed the study [29 subjects (73%) in the n–3 PUFA group; 15 subjects (75%) in the control group]. Compared with the control group, 6 mo of n–3 PUFA therapy increased thigh muscle volume (3.6%; 95% CI: 0.2%, 7.0%), handgrip strength (2.3 kg; 95% CI: 0.8, 3.7 kg), and 1-RM muscle strength (4.0%; 95% CI: 0.8%, 7.3%) (all P < 0.05) and tended to increase average isokinetic power (5.6%; 95% CI: −0.6%, 11.7%; P = 0.075). Conclusion: Fish oil–derived n–3 PUFA therapy slows the normal decline in muscle mass and function in older adults and should be considered a therapeutic approach for preventing sarcopenia and maintaining physical independence in older adults. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01308957. PMID:25994567

  4. Mammalian sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  5. Age- and sex-associated differences in isokinetic knee muscle endurance between young children and adults.

    PubMed

    De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Deighan, Martine A; Ratel, Sebastien; Armstrong, Neil

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the age- and sex-associated differences of repeated isokinetic knee extension and flexion. Fifty one participants, 30 young children (16 boys and 14 girls; aged 11 and 12 years) and 21 adults (9 males and 12 females; aged 18-35 years), agreed to participate in the study. Isokinetic concentric peak knee extension (PET) and flexion (PFT) torque were measured using a calibrated Biodex System 3. Participants performed 4 concentric extension-flexion cycles with maximum effort; after a 2 min rest, 50 continuous concentric cycles were performed at 1.56 rad.s-1. Total work of the extensors (WKEX) and flexors (WKFL) for the complete 50 repetitions was recorded. Average peak torque and average work for the first and last 3 repetitions were calculated to represent the percentage decline in torque and work. There were no significant differences between groups in the peak torque generated during the pretrial and endurance task, suggesting that participants gave a maximal effort at the start of the endurance task. There was a significant interaction effect in the total work done for both extensors and flexors, with adult males producing the greatest amount of work (6622 and 3444 J, respectively). When total work was divided by body mass, there were no significant sex effects, only main effects for group. The percentage decline for PET (40% vs. 60%), PFT (50% vs. 65%), WKET (43% vs. 61%), and WKFL (60% vs. 69%) demonstrated significant main effects for group, with greater fatigue in adults. We found no significant sex effect for fatigue. This study concludes that females do not resist fatigue from repeated isokinetic muscle actions to a greater extent than males, and that the greater fatigue in adults than in children is probably a product of greater initial torque production and work performed. PMID:19767809

  6. Effects of vibration training and detraining on balance and muscle strength in older adults.

    PubMed

    Marín, Pedro J; Martín-López, Aurora; Vicente-Campos, Davinia; Angulo-Carrere, Mt; García-Pastor, Teresa; Garatachea, Nuria; Chicharro, José L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of 2 days/week versus 4 days/week of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) during eight weeks of WBV training on health-related quality of life (SF-36), balance and lower body strength, as well as short-term detraining (3 weeks) on balance and lower body strength among older adults. Thirty-four older adults were randomly assigned to a control group (Control; n = 11) or to one of the vibration training groups: WBV 2 days/week (WBV_2d; n = 11) or WBV 4 days/week (WBV_4d; n = 12). The WBV groups exercised for 8 weeks, following 3 weeks of detraining. Lower body strength increased significantly (p < 0.05) for both groups, WBV_2d and WBV_4d, after 8-week training. A significant reduction in strength was observed following 3 weeks of detraining only in WBV_2d group (p < 0.05). All variables of the SF-36 and the balance test did not change after intervention in any group. 2 days/week and 4 days/week of WBV during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength. 3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV. Key points2 days and 4 days per week of WBV training during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength.3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV exercise.3 weeks of detraining did reverse the gains in strength made during 16 sessions of WBV exercise.

  7. Effects of Vibration Training and Detraining on Balance and Muscle Strength in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Pedro J.; Martín-López, Aurora; Vicente-Campos, Davinia; Angulo-Carrere, MT; García-Pastor, Teresa; Garatachea, Nuria; Chicharro, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of 2 days/week versus 4 days/week of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) during eight weeks of WBV training on health-related quality of life (SF-36), balance and lower body strength, as well as short-term detraining (3 weeks) on balance and lower body strength among older adults. Thirty-four older adults were randomly assigned to a control group (Control; n = 11) or to one of the vibration training groups: WBV 2 days/week (WBV_2d; n = 11) or WBV 4 days/week (WBV_4d; n = 12). The WBV groups exercised for 8 weeks, following 3 weeks of detraining. Lower body strength increased significantly (p < 0.05) for both groups, WBV_2d and WBV_4d, after 8-week training. A significant reduction in strength was observed following 3 weeks of detraining only in WBV_2d group (p < 0.05). All variables of the SF-36 and the balance test did not change after intervention in any group. 2 days/week and 4 days/week of WBV during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength. 3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV. Key points 2 days and 4 days per week of WBV training during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength. 3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV exercise. 3 weeks of detraining did reverse the gains in strength made during 16 sessions of WBV exercise. PMID:24150633

  8. Relationships between metabolic rate, muscle electromyograms and swim performance of adult chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, D.R.; Brown, R.S.; Cullinan, V.I.; Mesa, M.G.; VanderKooi, S.P.; McKinstry, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen consumption rates of adult spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha increased with swim speed and, depending on temperature and fish mass, ranged from 609 mg O2 h-1 at 30 cm s-1 (c. 0.5 BLs-1) to 3347 mg O2 h-1 at 170 cm s -1 (c. 2.3 BLs-1). Corrected for fish mass, these values ranged from 122 to 670 mg O2 kg-1 h-1, and were similar to other Oncorhynchus species. At all temperatures (8, 12.5 and 17??C), maximum oxygen consumption values levelled off and slightly declined with increasing swim speed >170 cm s-1, and a third-order polynomial regression model fitted the data best. The upper critical swim speed (Ucrit) of fish tested at two laboratories averaged 155 cm s -1 (2.1 BLs-1), but Ucrit of fish tested at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were significantly higher (mean 165 cm s-1) than those from fish tested at the Columbia River Research Laboratory (mean 140 cm s-1). Swim trials using fish that had electromyogram (EMG) transmitters implanted in them suggested that at a swim speed of c. 135 cm s-1, red muscle EMG pulse rates slowed and white muscle EMG pulse rates increased. Although there was significant variation between individual fish, this swim speed was c. 80% of the Ucrit for the fish used in the EMG trials (mean Ucrit 168.2 cm s-1). Bioenergetic modelling of the upstream migration of adult chinook salmon should consider incorporating an anaerobic fraction of the energy budget when swim speeds are ???80% of the Ucrit. ?? 2003 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. ‘Fast’ and ‘slow’ muscle fibres in hindlimb muscles of adult rats regenerate from intrinsically different satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalhovde, JM; Jerkovic, R; Sefland, I; Cordonnier, C; Calabria, E; Schiaffino, S; Lømo, T

    2005-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was examined in regenerating fast extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow soleus (SOL) muscles of adult rats. Myotoxic bupivacaine was injected into SOL and EDL and the muscles were either denervated or neuromuscularly blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX) on the sciatic nerve. Three to 10 or 30 days later, denervated SOL or EDL, or innervated but neuromuscularly blocked EDL received a slow 20 Hz stimulus pattern through electrodes implanted on the muscles or along the fibular nerve to EDL below the TTX block. In addition, denervated SOL and EDL received a fast 100 Hz stimulus pattern. Denervated EDL and SOL stimulated with the same slow stimulus pattern expressed different amounts of type 1 MyHC protein (8%versus 35% at 10 days, 13%versus 87% at 30 days). Stimulated denervated and stimulated innervated (TTX blocked) EDL expressed the same amounts of type 1, 2A, 2X and 2B MyHC proteins. Cross-sections treated for in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry showed expression of type 1 MyHC in all SOL fibres but only in some scattered single or smaller groups of fibres in EDL. The results suggest that muscle fibres regenerate from intrinsically different satellite cells in EDL and SOL and within EDL. However, induction by different extrinsic factors arising in extracellular matrix or from muscle position and usage in the limb has not been excluded. No evidence for nerve-derived trophic influences was obtained. PMID:15564285

  10. Range of motion, muscle length, and balance performance in older adults with normal, pronated, and supinated feet

    PubMed Central

    Justine, Maria; Ruzali, Dhiya; Hazidin, Ezzaty; Said, Aisyah; Bukry, Saiful Adli; Manaf, Haidzir

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the lower limb joint range of motion and muscle length between different types of foot posture, and determine the correlation of range of motion and muscle length with balance performance. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety individuals (age, 65.2±4.6 years) were assessed using the Foot Posture Index to determine their type of foot (Normal [0 to +5], pronated [+6 to +9], and supinated [−1 to −4]; n=30 per group). The range of motion (goniometer), muscle length (goniometer and tape measure), and balance performance (functional reach test and four square step test) were measured for each participant. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman’s rank-order correlation. [Results] No significant differences were found in range of motion, muscle length, and balance performance among different types of foot posture, except for right and left ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. Balance performance was significantly correlated with selected muscle length and range of motion, especially in the supinated foot. [Conclusion] Range of motion and muscle length of the lower limb may be associated with balance performance in older adults with foot deformities. These findings may guide physiotherapists in choosing intervention based on specific assessments for older adults with foot deformity. PMID:27134384

  11. Increases in muscle strength and balance using a resistance training program administered via a telecommunications system in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Resistance training programs have been found to improve muscle strength, physical function, and depressive symptoms in middle-aged and older adults. These programs have typically been provided in clinical facilities, health clubs, and senior centers, which may be inconvenient and/or cos...

  12. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  13. Early Stress History Alters Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 and Impairs Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Adult Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Banerjee, K K; Vaidya, V A; Kolthur-Seetharam, U

    2016-09-01

    Early-life adversity is associated with an enhanced risk for adult psychopathology. Psychiatric disorders such as depression exhibit comorbidity for metabolic dysfunction, including obesity and diabetes. However, it is poorly understood whether, besides altering anxiety and depression-like behaviour, early stress also evokes dysregulation of metabolic pathways and enhances vulnerability for metabolic disorders. We used the rodent model of the early stress of maternal separation (ES) to examine the effects of early stress on serum metabolites, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signalling, and muscle mitochondrial content. Adult ES animals exhibited dyslipidaemia, decreased serum IGF1 levels, increased expression of liver IGF binding proteins, and a decline in the expression of specific metabolic genes in the liver and muscle, including Pck1, Lpl, Pdk4 and Hmox1. These changes occurred in the absence of alterations in body weight, food intake, glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance or insulin levels. ES animals also exhibited a decline in markers of muscle mitochondrial content, such as mitochondrial DNA levels and expression of TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial). Furthermore, the expression of several genes involved in mitochondrial function, such as Ppargc1a, Nrf1, Tfam, Cat, Sesn3 and Ucp3, was reduced in skeletal muscle. Adult-onset chronic unpredictable stress resulted in overlapping and distinct consequences from ES, including increased circulating triglyceride levels, and a decline in the expression of specific metabolic genes in the liver and muscle, with no change in the expression of genes involved in muscle mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results indicate that a history of early adversity can evoke persistent changes in circulating IGF-1 and muscle mitochondrial function and content, which could serve to enhance predisposition for metabolic dysfunction in adulthood. PMID:27196416

  14. Stereoselective effects of mexiletine enantiomers on sodium currents and excitability characteristics of adult skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Natuzzi, F; Lentini, G; Franchini, C; Tortorella, V; Conte Camerino, D

    1995-12-01

    drugs on adult skeletal muscle sodium channels. The constant eudismic ratios between the enantiomers during both tonic and use-dependent block suggest that the increase in the apparent affinity of the receptor during state-dependent conformational changes of the channel does not enhance its stereospecificity. The decrease in effective concentration upon high frequency stimulation supports the potential usefulness of low doses of R-(-) mexiletine in the treatment of the abnormal hyperexcitability of the myotonic muscles, with a likely reduction of unwanted side effects.

  15. Botulinum toxin in masticatory muscles: Short- and long-term effects on muscle, bone, and craniofacial function in adult rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Katherine L.; Liu, Zi Jun; Ye, Wenmin; Navarrete, Alfonso L.; Nguyen, Thao Tuong; Salamati, Atriya; Herring, Susan W.

    2012-01-01

    Paralysis of the masticatory muscles using botulinum toxin (BTX) is a common treatment for cosmetic reduction of the masseters as well as for conditions involving muscle spasm and pain. The effects of this treatment on mastication have not been evaluated, and claims that the treatment unloads the jaw joint and mandible have not been validated. If BTX treatment does decrease mandibular loading, osteopenia might ensue as an adverse result. Rabbits received a single dose of BTX or saline into one randomly chosen masseter muscle and were followed for 4 or 12 weeks. Masticatory muscle activity was assessed weekly, and incisor bite force elicited by stimulation of each masseter was measured periodically. At the endpoint, strain gages were installed on the neck of the mandibular condyle and on the molar area of the mandible for in vivo bone strain recording during mastication and muscle stimulation. After termination, muscles were weighed and mandibular segments were scanned with micro CT. BTX paralysis of one masseter did not alter chewing side or rate, in part because of compensation by the medial pterygoid muscle. Masseter-induced bite force was dramatically decreased. Analysis of bone strain data suggested that at 4 weeks, the mandibular condyle of the BTX-injected side was underloaded, as were both sides of the molar area. Bone quantity and quality were severely decreased specifically at these underloaded locations, especially the injection-side condylar head. At 12 weeks, most functional parameters were near their pre-injection levels, but the injected masseter still exhibited atrophy and percent bone area was still low in the condylar head. In conclusion, although the performance of mastication was only minimally harmed by BTX paralysis of the masseter, the resulting underloading was sufficient to cause notable and persistent bone loss, particularly at the temporomandibular joint. PMID:22155510

  16. Chronic disuse and skeletal muscle structure in older adults: sex-specific differences and relationships to contractile function

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Damien M.; Tourville, Timothy W.; Miller, Mark S.; Hackett, Sarah B.; Sharma, Himani; Cruickshank, Nicholas C.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Savage, Patrick D.; Ades, Philip A.; Maughan, David W.; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    In older adults, we examined the effect of chronic muscle disuse on skeletal muscle structure at the tissue, cellular, organellar, and molecular levels and its relationship to muscle function. Volunteers with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA, n = 16) were recruited to reflect the effects of chronic lower extremity muscle disuse and compared with recreationally active controls (n = 15) without knee OA but similar in age, sex, and health status. In the OA group, quadriceps muscle and single-fiber cross-sectional area were reduced, with the largest reduction in myosin heavy chain IIA fibers. Myosin heavy chain IIAX fibers were more prevalent in the OA group, and their atrophy was sex-specific: men showed a reduction in cross-sectional area, and women showed no differences. Myofibrillar ultrastructure, myonuclear content, and mitochondrial content and morphology generally did not differ between groups, with the exception of sex-specific adaptations in subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondria, which were driven by lower values in OA women. SS mitochondrial content was also differently related to cellular and molecular functional parameters by sex: greater SS mitochondrial content was associated with improved contractility in women but reduced function in men. Collectively, these results demonstrate sex-specific structural phenotypes at the cellular and organellar levels with chronic disuse in older adults, with novel associations between energetic and contractile systems. PMID:25810256

  17. Drosophila adult muscle precursors form a network of interconnected cells and are specified by the rhomboid-triggered EGF pathway.

    PubMed

    Figeac, Nicolas; Jagla, Teresa; Aradhya, Rajaguru; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2010-06-01

    In Drosophila, a population of muscle-committed stem-like cells called adult muscle precursors (AMPs) keeps an undifferentiated and quiescent state during embryonic life. The embryonic AMPs are at the origin of all adult fly muscles and, as we demonstrate here, they express repressors of myogenic differentiation and targets of the Notch pathway known to be involved in muscle cell stemness. By targeting GFP to the AMP cell membranes, we show that AMPs are tightly associated with the peripheral nervous system and with a subset of differentiated muscles. They send long cellular processes running along the peripheral nerves and, by the end of embryogenesis, form a network of interconnected cells. Based on evidence from laser ablation experiments, the main role of these cellular extensions is to maintain correct spatial positioning of AMPs. To gain insights into mechanisms that lead to AMP cell specification, we performed a gain-of-function screen with a special focus on lateral AMPs expressing the homeobox gene ladybird. Our data show that the rhomboid-triggered EGF signalling pathway controls both the specification and the subsequent maintenance of AMP cells. This finding is supported by the identification of EGF-secreting cells in the lateral domain and the EGF-dependent regulatory modules that drive expression of the ladybird gene in lateral AMPs. Taken together, our results reveal an unsuspected capacity of embryonic AMPs to form a cell network, and shed light on the mechanisms governing their specification and maintenance.

  18. Children and adults minimise activated muscle volume by selecting gait parameters that balance gross mechanical power and work demands.

    PubMed

    Hubel, Tatjana Y; Usherwood, James R

    2015-09-01

    Terrestrial locomotion on legs is energetically expensive. Compared with cycling, or with locomotion in swimming or flying animals, walking and running are highly uneconomical. Legged gaits that minimise mechanical work have previously been identified and broadly match walking and running at appropriate speeds. Furthermore, the 'cost of muscle force' approaches are effective in relating locomotion kinetics to metabolic cost. However, few accounts have been made for why animals deviate from either work-minimising or muscle-force-minimising strategies. Also, there is no current mechanistic account for the scaling of locomotion kinetics with animal size and speed. Here, we report measurements of ground reaction forces in walking children and adult humans, and their stance durations during running. We find that many aspects of gait kinetics and kinematics scale with speed and size in a manner that is consistent with minimising muscle activation required for the more demanding between mechanical work and power: spreading the duration of muscle action reduces activation requirements for power, at the cost of greater work demands. Mechanical work is relatively more demanding for larger bipeds--adult humans--accounting for their symmetrical M-shaped vertical force traces in walking, and relatively brief stance durations in running compared with smaller bipeds--children. The gaits of small children, and the greater deviation of their mechanics from work-minimising strategies, may be understood as appropriate for their scale, not merely as immature, incompletely developed and energetically sub-optimal versions of adult gaits. PMID:26400978

  19. Children and adults minimise activated muscle volume by selecting gait parameters that balance gross mechanical power and work demands

    PubMed Central

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Usherwood, James R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Terrestrial locomotion on legs is energetically expensive. Compared with cycling, or with locomotion in swimming or flying animals, walking and running are highly uneconomical. Legged gaits that minimise mechanical work have previously been identified and broadly match walking and running at appropriate speeds. Furthermore, the ‘cost of muscle force’ approaches are effective in relating locomotion kinetics to metabolic cost. However, few accounts have been made for why animals deviate from either work-minimising or muscle-force-minimising strategies. Also, there is no current mechanistic account for the scaling of locomotion kinetics with animal size and speed. Here, we report measurements of ground reaction forces in walking children and adult humans, and their stance durations during running. We find that many aspects of gait kinetics and kinematics scale with speed and size in a manner that is consistent with minimising muscle activation required for the more demanding between mechanical work and power: spreading the duration of muscle action reduces activation requirements for power, at the cost of greater work demands. Mechanical work is relatively more demanding for larger bipeds – adult humans – accounting for their symmetrical M-shaped vertical force traces in walking, and relatively brief stance durations in running compared with smaller bipeds – children. The gaits of small children, and the greater deviation of their mechanics from work-minimising strategies, may be understood as appropriate for their scale, not merely as immature, incompletely developed and energetically sub-optimal versions of adult gaits. PMID:26400978

  20. Acquisition of multiple nuclei and the activity of DNA polymerase alpha and reinitiation of DNA replication in terminally differentiated adult cardiac muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, W.C.; Bradshaw, H.D. Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Terminally differentiated ventricular cardiac muscle cells isolated from the adult rat and maintained in cell culture have been observed to acquire multiple nuclei. In one cultured myocyte as many as 10 nuclei have been counted. Apparently, these multiple nuclei are formed by DNA replication followed by karyokinesis; the cells must then fail to complete mitosis and divide. To investigate whether DNA synthesis was occurring, the cells were cultured in the presence of (3H)thymidine and then processed for autoradiography. Mononucleated, binucleated, and multinucleated cells incorporate (3H)thymidine into DNA as evidenced by the high concentration of silver grains over their nuclei. Peak periods of incorporation were observed to occur at 10- to 12-day intervals; at 11, 23, and 33 days after initially placing the cells in culture. When the cells were maintained in the presence of (3H)thymidine continuously from Day 7 to Day 17 of culture, 23% of the cells became labeled. If the cells were cultured continuously for 30 days in the presence of (3H)thymidine, from Day 10 to Day 40, 56% of the cells were labeled. Isopycnic gradient analysis indicates that this thymidine incorporation was into DNA that was being replicated semiconservatively; these experiments did not eliminate the possibility, however, that this incorporation was due to amplification of specific genes, such as those coding for the contractile proteins. The activity of DNA polymerase alpha also returns to these cells. These studies demonstrate that the terminally differentiated mammalian ventricular cardiac muscle cell, previously thought to have permanently lost the capacity to replicate DNA during early development, is able to reinitiate semiconservative DNA replication when grown in culture.

  1. Correlation between vitamin D levels and muscle fatigue risk factors based on physical activity in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Al-Eisa, Einas S; Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of serum vitamin D levels with physical activity, obesity, muscle fatigue biomarkers, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in healthy older adults. Methods A total of 85 healthy older subjects aged 64–96 years were recruited in this study. Based on estimated energy expenditure scores, the participants were classified into three groups: inactive (n=25), moderate (n=20), and physically active (n=35). Serum 25(OH)D (25-hydroxy vitamin D) levels, metabolic syndrome parameters, TAC activity, muscle fatigue biomarkers (Ca, creatine kinase, lactic acid dehydrogenase, troponin I, hydroxyproline), physical activity, body fatness, and fatigue score (visual analog scale) were estimated using immunoassay techniques and prevalidated questionnaires, respectively. Results Physical activity was estimated in 64.6% of the participants. Males showed higher physical activity (42.5%) compared to females (26.25%). Compared to participants with lower activity, significant reduction in body mass index, waist circumference, hips, fasting blood sugar, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol were observed in moderate and physically active participants. Also, significant increase in the levels of serum 25(OH)D concentrations, calcium, and TAC activity along with reduction in the levels of muscle fatigue biomarkers: creatine kinase, lactic acid dehydrogenase, troponin I, hydroxyproline, and fatigue scores (visual analog scale) were reported in physically active participants compared to those of lower physical activity. In all participants, serum 25(OH)D concentrations correlated positively with Ca, TAC, physical activity scores, and negatively with body mass index, lipid profile, fatigue scores (visual analog scale), and muscle fatigue biomarkers. Stepwise regression analysis showed that serum 25(OH)D concentrations, physical activity, Ca, TAC, and demographic parameters explained

  2. Relationships of ultrasound measures of intrinsic foot muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume with maximum toe flexor muscle strength and physical performance in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takashi; Tayashiki, Kota; Nakatani, Miyuki; Watanabe, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationships between toe flexor muscle strength with (TFS-5-toes) and without (TFS-4-toes) the contribution of the great toe, anatomical and physiological muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of intrinsic toe flexor muscle and physical performance were measured. [Subjects] Seventeen men (82% sports-active) and 17 women (47% sports-active), aged 20 to 35 years, volunteered. [Methods] Anatomical CSA was measured in two intrinsic toe flexor muscles (flexor digitorum brevis [FDB] and abductor hallucis) by ultrasound. Muscle volume and muscle length of the FDB were also estimated, and physiological CSA was calculated. [Results] Both TFS-5-toes and TFS-4-toes correlated positively with walking speed in men (r=0.584 and r=0.553, respectively) and women (r=0.748 and r=0.533, respectively). Physiological CSA of the FDB was significantly correlated with TFS-5-toes (r=0.748) and TFS-4-toes (r=0.573) in women. In men, physiological CSA of the FDB correlated positively with TFS-4-toes (r=0.536), but not with TFS-5-toes (r=0.333). [Conclusion] Our results indicate that physiological CSA of the FDB is moderately associated with TFS-4-toes while toe flexor strength correlates with walking performance. PMID:26957721

  3. Comparison of pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of spinal curvature of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Eung; Lee, Hye Young; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] Degree of curvature on the spine is known to affect respiratory function and back muscle activation. We compared pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of curvature of the spine of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled. They were divided into two groups according to the degree of curvature of the spine: the below 2° group, and the above 2° group. The degree of curvature was assessed using the Adams forward bending test and a scoliometer. A pulmonary function test (PFT) was conducted, and back muscle strength was measured. [Results] No significant differences in PFT were found between the below 2° group and the above 2° group, in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), or peak expiratory flow (PEF). However, back muscle strength in the below 2 group was significantly higher than that of the above 2 group. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that the degree of curvature of the spine is associated with back muscle strength in subjects who have spinal curvature within the normal range. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of back muscle strength might be helpful for preventing the progress of curvature of the spine in adolescents with potential scoliosis. PMID:26180321

  4. Repression of cyclin D1 expression is necessary for the maintenance of cell cycle exit in adult mammalian cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tane, Shoji; Kubota, Misae; Okayama, Hitomi; Ikenishi, Aiko; Yoshitome, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Noriko; Satoh, Yukio; Kusakabe, Aoi; Ogawa, Satoko; Kanai, Ayumi; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2014-06-27

    The hearts of neonatal mice and adult zebrafish can regenerate after injury through proliferation of preexisting cardiomyocytes. However, adult mammals are not capable of cardiac regeneration because almost all cardiomyocytes exit their cell cycle. Exactly how the cell cycle exit is maintained and how many adult cardiomyocytes have the potential to reenter the cell cycle are unknown. The expression and activation levels of main cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes are extremely low or undetectable at adult stages. The nuclear DNA content of almost all cardiomyocytes is 2C, indicating the cell cycle exit from G1-phase. Here, we induced expression of cyclin D1, which regulates the progression of G1-phase, only in differentiated cardiomyocytes of adult mice. In these cardiomyocytes, S-phase marker-positive cardiomyocytes and the expression of main cyclins and CDKs increased remarkably, although cyclin B1-CDK1 activation was inhibited in an ATM/ATR-independent manner. The phosphorylation pattern of CDK1 and expression pattern of Cdc25 subtypes suggested that a deficiency in the increase in Cdc25 (a and -b), which is required for M-phase entry, inhibited the cyclin B1-CDK1 activation. Finally, analysis of cell cycle distribution patterns showed that >40% of adult mouse cardiomyocytes reentered the cell cycle by the induction of cyclin D1. The cell cycle of these binucleated cardiomyocytes was arrested before M-phase, and many mononucleated cardiomyocytes entered endoreplication. These data indicate that silencing the cyclin D1 expression is necessary for the maintenance of the cell cycle exit and suggest a mechanism that involves inhibition of M-phase entry.

  5. Muscle-Strengthening Activities and Participation among Adults in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustalot, Fleetwood; Carlson, Susan A.; Kruger, Judy; Buchner, David M.; Fulton, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe those who reported meeting the "2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans" ("2008 Guidelines") muscle-strengthening standard of 2 or more days per week, including all seven muscle groups, and to assess the type and location of muscle-strengthening activities performed. Method: Data from HealthStyles…

  6. Time to Maximal Voluntary Isometric Contraction (MVC) for Five Different Muscle Groups in College Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, A. F.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    College men and women were studied to ascertain the force-time components of a rapid voluntary muscle contraction for five muscle groups. Researchers found that the time required for full contraction differs: (1) in men and women; and (2) among the five muscle groups. (Authors/PP)

  7. Effects of Age, Sex, and Body Position on Orofacial Muscle Tone in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietsch, Angela M.; Clark, Heather M.; Steiner, Jessica N.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of tissue stiffness may facilitate identification of abnormalities in orofacial muscle tone and thus contribute to differential diagnosis of dysarthria. Tissue stiffness is affected by muscle tone as well as age-related changes in muscle and connective tissue. Method: The Myoton-3 measured tissue stiffness in 40 healthy…

  8. Perm1 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative capacity, and fatigue resistance in adult skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoshitake; Hazen, Bethany C; Gandra, Paulo G; Ward, Samuel R; Schenk, Simon; Russell, Aaron P; Kralli, Anastasia

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity are important determinants of muscle function and whole-body health. Mitochondrial content and function are enhanced by endurance exercise and impaired in states or diseases where muscle function is compromised, such as myopathies, muscular dystrophies, neuromuscular diseases, and age-related muscle atrophy. Hence, elucidating the mechanisms that control muscle mitochondrial content and oxidative function can provide new insights into states and diseases that affect muscle health. In past studies, we identified Perm1 (PPARGC1- and ESRR-induced regulator, muscle 1) as a gene induced by endurance exercise in skeletal muscle, and regulating mitochondrial oxidative function in cultured myotubes. The capacity of Perm1 to regulate muscle mitochondrial content and function in vivo is not yet known. In this study, we use adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to increase Perm1 expression in skeletal muscles of 4-wk-old mice. Compared to control vector, AAV1-Perm1 leads to significant increases in mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity (by 40-80%). Moreover, AAV1-Perm1-transduced muscles show increased capillary density and resistance to fatigue (by 33 and 31%, respectively), without prominent changes in fiber-type composition. These findings suggest that Perm1 selectively regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function, and implicate Perm1 in muscle adaptations that also occur in response to endurance exercise. PMID:26481306

  9. Native myosin from adult rabbit skeletal muscle: isoenzymes and states of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Morel, J E; D'hahan, N; Taouil, K; Francin, M; Aguilar, A; Dalbiez, J P; Merah, Z; Grussaute, H; Hilbert, B; Ollagnon, F; Selva, G; Piot, F

    1998-04-21

    The globular heads of skeletal muscle myosin have been shown to exist as isoenzymes S1 (A1) and S1 (A2), and there are also isoforms of the heavy chains. Using capillary electrophoresis, we found two dominant isoenzymes of the whole native myosin molecule, in agreement with what has previously been found by various techniques for native and nondenatured myosin from adult rabbits. Findings about possible states of aggregation of myosin and its heads are contradictory. By analytical ultracentrifugation, we confirmed the existence of a tail-tail dimer. By laser light scattering, we found a head-head dimer in the presence of MgATP. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with analytical ultracentrifugation and laser light scattering led us to refine these results. We found tail-tail dimers in a conventional buffer. We found tail-tail and head-head dimers in the presence of 0.5 mM MgATP and pure head-head dimers in the presence of 6 mM MgATP. All the dimers were homodimers. Naming the dominant isoenzymes of myosin a and b, we observed tail-tail dimers with isoenzyme a (TaTa) and with isoenzyme b (TbTb) and also head-head dimers with isoenzyme a (HaHa) and with isoenzyme b (HbHb).

  10. Effect of Channel Blockers on the Smooth Muscle of the Adult Crop of the Queen Blowfly, Phormia regina

    PubMed Central

    Stoffolano, John G.; Danai, Laura; Chambers, James

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined the various factors affecting the rate of contraction of the supercontractile muscles of the crop lobes of adult Phormia regina Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Using an in situ bioassay of the crop organ, various ion channel blockers were tested and it was demonstrated that in all cases the blockers (i.e., against the following conductances: Cl- , Ca2+ , Na+, and a FMRF-amide action) significantly reduced the contraction rates of the crop lobes, which were filled with 4.5 µL of 1.0 M sucrose containing 10 mM of the dye amaranth. Benzyltrimethylammonium chloride, never before reported for its effect on insect muscle, was as effective in suppressing crop muscle contraction as benzethonium chloride, which is a reported agonist of dromyosuppressin. PMID:24205919

  11. The Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale: A factorial analysis of validity and reliability for its use on adult Chinese male weightlifters.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinhong; Jin, Yahong; Zhou, Shi; Li, Xinhao; Yang, Shun-Nan; Yang, Donglin; Nieuwoudt, Johanna E; Yao, Jiaxin

    2015-06-01

    Muscle dysmorphia (MD) is the distorted perception of men's own muscle appearance. The increasing popularity of weightlifting in Chinese men suggests the presence of MD. The study assessed the validity and reliability of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale (MASS) for its use on adult Chinese males. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of responses from 225 and 592 participants confirmed the same five factors for the 17-item Chinese version as the original MASS (CFI=.931, RMSEA=.052). The internal consistency for all factors were acceptable (Cronbach's α=.636 to .737). Correlation levels of its subscales with converging measurements indicated that the revised MASS is effective in assessing MD in Chinese male weightlifters. Differences in the importance of the factors suggest an influence of Chinese culture in the symptoms of MD and the need of assessing the MASS with populations from distinct demographics in China and from different cultures. PMID:25939132

  12. Skeletal myofiber VEGF regulates contraction-induced perfusion and exercise capacity but not muscle capillarity in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Amy E; Goldberg, Daniel; Delavar, Hamid; Trisko, Breanna M; Tang, Kechun; Hogan, Michael C; Wagner, Peter D; Breen, Ellen C

    2016-07-01

    A single bout of exhaustive exercise signals expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the exercising muscle. Previous studies have reported that mice with life-long deletion of skeletal myofiber VEGF have fewer capillaries and a severe reduction in endurance exercise. However, in adult mice, VEGF gene deletion conditionally targeted to skeletal myofibers limits exercise capacity without evidence of capillary regression. To explain this, we hypothesized that adult skeletal myofiber VEGF acutely regulates skeletal muscle perfusion during muscle contraction. A tamoxifen-inducible skeletal myofiber-specific VEGF gene deletion mouse (skmVEGF-/-) was used to reduce skeletal muscle VEGF protein by 90% in adult mice. Three weeks after inducing deletion of the skeletal myofiber VEGF gene, skmVEGF-/- mice exhibited diminished maximum running speed (-10%, P < 0.05) and endurance capacity (-47%; P < 0.05), which did not persist after 8 wk. In skmVEGF-/- mice, gastrocnemius complex time to fatigue measured in situ was 71% lower than control mice. Contraction-induced perfusion measured by optical imaging during a period of electrically stimulated muscle contraction was 85% lower in skmVEGF-/- than control mice. No evidence of capillary rarefication was detected in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) up to 8 wk after tamoxifen-induced VEGF ablation, and contractility and fatigue resistance of the soleus measured ex vivo were also unchanged. The force-frequency of the EDL showed a small right shift, but fatigue resistance did not differ between EDL from control and skmVEGF-/- mice. These data suggest myofiber VEGF is required for regulating perfusion during periods of contraction and may in this manner affect endurance capacity.

  13. Skeletal myofiber VEGF regulates contraction-induced perfusion and exercise capacity but not muscle capillarity in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Amy E; Goldberg, Daniel; Delavar, Hamid; Trisko, Breanna M; Tang, Kechun; Hogan, Michael C; Wagner, Peter D; Breen, Ellen C

    2016-07-01

    A single bout of exhaustive exercise signals expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the exercising muscle. Previous studies have reported that mice with life-long deletion of skeletal myofiber VEGF have fewer capillaries and a severe reduction in endurance exercise. However, in adult mice, VEGF gene deletion conditionally targeted to skeletal myofibers limits exercise capacity without evidence of capillary regression. To explain this, we hypothesized that adult skeletal myofiber VEGF acutely regulates skeletal muscle perfusion during muscle contraction. A tamoxifen-inducible skeletal myofiber-specific VEGF gene deletion mouse (skmVEGF-/-) was used to reduce skeletal muscle VEGF protein by 90% in adult mice. Three weeks after inducing deletion of the skeletal myofiber VEGF gene, skmVEGF-/- mice exhibited diminished maximum running speed (-10%, P < 0.05) and endurance capacity (-47%; P < 0.05), which did not persist after 8 wk. In skmVEGF-/- mice, gastrocnemius complex time to fatigue measured in situ was 71% lower than control mice. Contraction-induced perfusion measured by optical imaging during a period of electrically stimulated muscle contraction was 85% lower in skmVEGF-/- than control mice. No evidence of capillary rarefication was detected in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) up to 8 wk after tamoxifen-induced VEGF ablation, and contractility and fatigue resistance of the soleus measured ex vivo were also unchanged. The force-frequency of the EDL showed a small right shift, but fatigue resistance did not differ between EDL from control and skmVEGF-/- mice. These data suggest myofiber VEGF is required for regulating perfusion during periods of contraction and may in this manner affect endurance capacity. PMID:27225953

  14. Wnt Regulates Proliferation and Neurogenic Potential of Müller Glial Cells via a Lin28/let-7 miRNA-Dependent Pathway in Adult Mammalian Retinas.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kai; Qiu, Suo; Tian, Lin; Snider, William D; Flannery, John G; Schaffer, David V; Chen, Bo

    2016-09-27

    In cold-blooded vertebrates such as zebrafish, Müller glial cells (MGs) readily proliferate to replenish lost retinal neurons. In mammals, however, MGs lack regenerative capability as they do not spontaneously re-enter the cell cycle unless the retina is injured. Here, we show that gene transfer of β-catenin in adult mouse retinas activates Wnt signaling and MG proliferation without retinal injury. Upstream of Wnt, deletion of GSK3β stabilizes β-catenin and activates MG proliferation. Downstream of Wnt, β-catenin binds to the Lin28 promoter and activates transcription. Deletion of Lin28 abolishes β-catenin-mediated effects on MG proliferation, and Lin28 gene transfer stimulates MG proliferation. We further demonstrate that let-7 miRNAs are critically involved in Wnt/Lin28-regulated MG proliferation. Intriguingly, a subset of cell-cycle-reactivated MGs express markers for amacrine cells. Together, these results reveal a key role of Wnt-Lin28-let7 miRNA signaling in regulating proliferation and neurogenic potential of MGs in the adult mammalian retina. PMID:27681429

  15. Whole-body vibration increases upper and lower body muscle activity in older adults: potential use of vibration accessories.

    PubMed

    Marín, Pedro J; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Santin-Medeiros, Fernanda; Vicente-Rodriguez, German; Casajús, Jose A; Hazell, Tom J; Garatachea, Nuria

    2012-06-01

    The current study examined the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on upper and lower body muscle activity during static muscle contractions (squat and bicep curls). The use of WBV accessories such as hand straps attached to the platform and a soft surface mat were also evaluated. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was measured for the medial gastrocnemius (MG), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps brachii (BB) muscles in fourteen healthy older adults (74.8±4.5 years; mean±SD) with a WBV stimulus at an acceleration of 40 m s(-2) (30 Hz High, 2.5 mm or 46 Hz Low, 1.1 mm). WBV increased lower body (VL and MG) sEMG vs baseline (no WBV) though this was decreased with the use of the soft mat. The addition of the bicep curl with hand straps had no effect on lower body sEMG. WBV also increased BB sEMG vs baseline which was further increased when using the hand straps. There was no upper body effect of the soft mat. This study demonstrates WBV increases both lower and upper body muscle activity in healthy older adults. Moreover, WBV accessories such as hand straps attached to the platform or a soft surface mat may be used to alter exercise intensity.

  16. Diaphragmatic amplitude and accessory inspiratory muscle activity in nasal and mouth-breathing adults: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Maria Elaine; Boufleur, Jalusa; Soares, Juliana Corrêa; Haygert, Carlos Jesus Pereira; Ries, Lilian Gerdi Kittel; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the electromyographic activity of the accessory inspiratory muscles and the diaphragmatic amplitude (DA) in nasal and mouth-breathing adults. The study evaluated 38 mouth-breathing (MB group) and 38 nasal-breathing (NB group) adults, from 18 to 30years old and both sexes. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was used to evaluate the amplitude and symmetry (POC%) of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and upper trapezius (UT) muscles at rest, during nasal slow inspiration at Lung Total Capacity (LTC) and, during rapid and abrupt inspiration: Sniff, Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow (PNIF) and Maximum Inspiratory Pressure (MIP). M-mode ultrasonography assessed the right diaphragm muscle amplitude in three different nasal inspirations: at tidal volume (TV), Sniff and inspiration at LTC. The SCM activity was significantly lower in the MB group during Sniff, PNIF (p<0.01, Mann-Whitney test) and MIP (p<0.01, t-test). The groups did not differ during rest and inspiration at LTC, regarding sEMG amplitude and POC%. DA was significantly lower in the MB group at TV (p<0.01, Mann-Whitney) and TLC (p=0.03, t-test). Mouth breathing reflected on lower recruitment of the accessory inspiratory muscles during fast inspiration and lower diaphragmatic amplitude, compared to nasal breathing.

  17. Differential effects of insulin and dietary amino acids on muscle protein synthesis in adult and old rats

    PubMed Central

    Prod'homme, Magali; Balage, Michèle; Debras, Elisabeth; Farges, Marie-Chantal; Kimball, Scott; Jefferson, Leonard; Grizard, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The potential roles of insulin and dietary amino acids in the regulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis were examined in adult and old rats. Animals were fed over 1 h with either a 25% or a 0% amino acid/protein meal. In each nutritional condition, postprandial insulin secretion was either maintained or blocked with diazoxide injections. Protein synthesis in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was assessed in vivo using the flooding dose method. Insulin suppression decreased protein synthesis in both muscles irrespective of the nutritional condition and age of the rats. Moreover, reduced insulinaemia was associated with 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation, enhanced assembly of the 4E-BP1−eIF4E inactive complex and hypophosphorylation of eIF4E, p70S6k and protein kinase B, key intermediates in the regulation of translation initiation and protein synthesis. Old rats did not differ from adult rats. The lack of amino acids in the meal of insulin-suppressed rats did not result in any additional decrease in protein synthesis. In the presence of insulin secretion, dietary amino acid suppression significantly decreased gastrocnemius protein synthesis in adult but not in old rats. Amino acid suppression was associated with reduced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and p70S6k in adults. Along with protein synthesis, only the inhibition of p70S6k phosphorylation was abolished in old rats. We concluded that insulin is required for the regulation of muscle protein synthesis irrespective of age and that the effect of dietary amino acids is blunted in old rats. PMID:15513948

  18. Expression of developmental myosin and morphological characteristics in adult rat skeletal muscle following exercise-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, H K; Plyley, M J; Rodgers, C D; McKee, N H

    1999-07-01

    The extent and stability of the expression of developmental isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHCd), and their association with cellular morphology, were determined in adult rat skeletal muscle fibres following injury induced by eccentrically-biased exercise. Adult female Wistar rats [274 (10) g] were either assigned as non-exercised controls or subjected to 30 min of treadmill exercise (grade, -16 degrees; speed, 15 m x min(-1)), and then sacrificed following 1, 2, 4, 7, or 12 days of recovery (n = 5-6 per group). Histologically and immunohistologically stained serial, transverse cryosections of the soleus (S), vastus intermedius (VI), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were examined using light microscopy and digital imaging. Fibres staining positively for MHCd (MHCd+) were seldom detected in the TA. In the VI and S, higher proportions of MHCd+ fibres (0.8% and 2.5%, respectively) were observed in rats at 4 and 7 days post-exercise, in comparison to all other groups combined (0.2%, 1.2%; P < or = 0.01). In S, MHCd+ fibres were observed less frequently by 12 days (0.7%) than at 7 days (2.6%) following exercise. The majority (85.1%) of the MHCd+ fibres had morphological characteristics indicative of either damage, degeneration, repair or regeneration. Most of the MHCd+ fibres also expressed adult slow, and/or fast myosin heavy chain. Quantitatively, the MHCd+ fibres were smaller (< 2500 microm2) and more angular than fibres not expressing MHCd. Thus, there was a transient increase in a small, but distinct population of MHCd+ fibres following unaccustomed, functional exercise in adult rat S and VI muscles. The observed close coupling of MHCd expression with morphological changes within muscle fibres suggests that these characteristics have a common, initial exercise-induced injury-related stimulus.

  19. Chiton myogenesis: perspectives for the development and evolution of larval and adult muscle systems in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Wanninger, Andreas; Haszprunar, Gerhard

    2002-02-01

    We investigated muscle development in two chiton species, Mopalia muscosa and Chiton olivaceus, from embryo hatching until 10 days after metamorphosis. The anlagen of the dorsal longitudinal rectus muscle and a larval prototroch muscle ring are the first detectable muscle structures in the early trochophore-like larva. Slightly later, a ventrolaterally situated pair of longitudinal muscles appears, which persists through metamorphosis. In addition, the anlagen of the putative dorsoventral shell musculature and the first fibers of a muscular grid, which is restricted to the pretrochal region and consists of outer ring and inner diagonal muscle fibers, are generated. Subsequently, transversal muscle fibers form underneath each future shell plate and the ventrolateral enrolling muscle is established. At metamorphic competence, the dorsoventral shell musculature consists of numerous serially repeated, intercrossing muscle fibers. Their concentration into seven (and later eight) functional shell plate muscle bundles starts after the completion of metamorphosis. The larval prototroch ring and the pretrochal muscle grid are lost at metamorphosis. The structure of the apical grid and its atrophy during metamorphosis suggests ontogenetic repetition of (parts of) the original body-wall musculature of a proposed worm-shaped molluscan ancestor. Moreover, our data show that the "segmented" character of the polyplacophoran shell musculature is a secondary condition, thus contradicting earlier theories that regarded the Polyplacophora (and thus the entire phylum Mollusca) as primarily eumetameric (annelid-like). Instead, we propose an unsegmented trochozoan ancestor at the base of molluscan evolution.

  20. Adaptations to exercise training within skeletal muscle in adults with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Simar, David; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to review morphological and metabolic adaptations within skeletal muscle to exercise training in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A comprehensive, systematic database search for manuscripts was performed from 1966 to March 2008 using computerized databases, including Medline, Premedline, CINAHL, AMED, EMBASE and SportDiscus. Three reviewers independently assessed studies for potential inclusion (exposure to exercise training, T2DM or IGT, muscle biopsy performed). A total of 18 exercise training studies were reviewed. All morphological and metabolic outcomes from muscle biopsies were collected. The metabolic outcomes were divided into six domains: glycogen, glucose facilitated transporter 4 (GLUT4) and insulin signalling, enzymes, markers of inflammation, lipids metabolism and so on. Beneficial adaptations to exercise were seen primarily in muscle fiber area and capillary density, glycogen, glycogen synthase and GLUT4 protein expressions. Few randomized controlled trials including muscle biopsy data existed, with a small number of subjects involved. More trials, especially robustly designed exercise training studies, are needed in this field. Future research should focus on the insulin signalling pathway to better understand the mechanism of the improvements in insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis in response to various modalities and doses of exercise in this cohort.

  1. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that TGF-beta is a cell-type-specific regulator of proteoglycan synthesis in human blood vessels and may contribute to the myo-intimal accumulation of proteoglycan in atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:3474655

  2. Safe and bodywide muscle transduction in young adult Duchenne muscular dystrophy dogs with adeno-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yongping; Pan, Xiufang; Hakim, Chady H; Kodippili, Kasun; Zhang, Keqing; Shin, Jin-Hong; Yang, Hsiao T; McDonald, Thomas; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-10-15

    The ultimate goal of muscular dystrophy gene therapy is to treat all muscles in the body. Global gene delivery was demonstrated in dystrophic mice more than a decade ago using adeno-associated virus (AAV). However, translation to affected large mammals has been challenging. The only reported attempt was performed in newborn Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) dogs. Unfortunately, AAV injection resulted in growth delay, muscle atrophy and contracture. Here we report safe and bodywide AAV delivery in juvenile DMD dogs. Three ∼2-m-old affected dogs received intravenous injection of a tyrosine-engineered AAV-9 reporter or micro-dystrophin (μDys) vector at the doses of 1.92-6.24 × 10(14) viral genome particles/kg under transient or sustained immune suppression. DMD dogs tolerated injection well and their growth was not altered. Hematology and blood biochemistry were unremarkable. No adverse reactions were observed. Widespread muscle transduction was seen in skeletal muscle, the diaphragm and heart for at least 4 months (the end of the study). Nominal expression was detected in internal organs. Improvement in muscle histology was observed in μDys-treated dogs. In summary, systemic AAV gene transfer is safe and efficient in young adult dystrophic large mammals. This may translate to bodywide gene therapy in pediatric patients in the future. PMID:26264580

  3. Safe and bodywide muscle transduction in young adult Duchenne muscular dystrophy dogs with adeno-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yongping; Pan, Xiufang; Hakim, Chady H; Kodippili, Kasun; Zhang, Keqing; Shin, Jin-Hong; Yang, Hsiao T; McDonald, Thomas; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-10-15

    The ultimate goal of muscular dystrophy gene therapy is to treat all muscles in the body. Global gene delivery was demonstrated in dystrophic mice more than a decade ago using adeno-associated virus (AAV). However, translation to affected large mammals has been challenging. The only reported attempt was performed in newborn Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) dogs. Unfortunately, AAV injection resulted in growth delay, muscle atrophy and contracture. Here we report safe and bodywide AAV delivery in juvenile DMD dogs. Three ∼2-m-old affected dogs received intravenous injection of a tyrosine-engineered AAV-9 reporter or micro-dystrophin (μDys) vector at the doses of 1.92-6.24 × 10(14) viral genome particles/kg under transient or sustained immune suppression. DMD dogs tolerated injection well and their growth was not altered. Hematology and blood biochemistry were unremarkable. No adverse reactions were observed. Widespread muscle transduction was seen in skeletal muscle, the diaphragm and heart for at least 4 months (the end of the study). Nominal expression was detected in internal organs. Improvement in muscle histology was observed in μDys-treated dogs. In summary, systemic AAV gene transfer is safe and efficient in young adult dystrophic large mammals. This may translate to bodywide gene therapy in pediatric patients in the future.

  4. Spaceflight effects on adult rat muscle protein, nucleic acids, and amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1986-01-01

    Exposure to conditions of weightlessness has been associated with decrements in muscle mass and strength. The present studies were undertaken to determine muscle responses at the cellular level. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (360-410 g) were exposed to 7 days of weightlessness during the Spacelab-3 shuttle flight (May 1985). Animals were killed 12 h postflight, and soleus (S), gastrocnemius (G), and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were excised. Muscle protein, RNA, and DNA were extracted and quantified. Differential muscle atrophy was accompanied by a significant (P less than 0.05) reduction in total protein only in S muscles. There were no significant changes in protein concentration (mg/g) in the muscles examined. In S muscles from flight animals, sarcoplasmic protein accounted for a significantly greater proportion of total protein that in ground controls (37.5 vs. 32.5%). Tissue concentrations (nmol/g) of asparagine-aspartate, glutamine-glutamate, glycine, histidine, and lysine were significantly reduced (from 17 to 63%) in S muscles from flight animals, but only glutamine-glutamate levels were decreased in the G and EDL. Muscle DNA content (microgram) was unchanged in the tissues examined, but S muscle DNA concentration (micrograms/mg) increased 27%. RNA content (micrograms) was significantly (P less than 0.025) reduced in S (-28%) and G(-22%) muscles following spaceflight. These results identify specific alterations in rat skeletal muscle during short term (7-day) exposure to weightlessness and compare favorably with observations previously obtained from ground-based suspension simulations.

  5. Reduced rate of knee extensor torque development in older adults with knee osteoarthritis is associated with intrinsic muscle contractile deficits.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Damien M; Tourville, Timothy W; Slauterbeck, James R; Ades, Philip A; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer; Beynnon, Bruce D; Toth, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    We examined the effect of knee osteoarthritis on the rate of torque development (RTD) of the knee extensors in older adults with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA; n=15) and recreationally-active controls (n=15) of similar age, sex and health status, as well as the relationship between RTD and the size and contractility of single muscle fibers. OA participants had lower RTD when expressed in absolute terms (Nm/ms). There were sex differences in peak RTD (P<0.05), with greater RTD in men, but no group by sex interaction effects for any variables. The lower RTD in OA versus controls was not explained by variation between groups in the fiber type admixture of the muscle, and was mitigated when RTD was normalized to peak torque (PT). In knee OA volunteers, we found strong correlations between the RTD expressed relative to PT and the velocity of contraction of single myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and IIA/X muscle fibers (r=0.652 and 0.862; both P<0.05) and power output of MHC I fibers (r=0.642; P<0.05). In controls, RTD relative to PT was related to fiber cross-sectional area of MHC IIA/X fibers (r=0.707; P<0.05), but not measures of single fiber contractile performance. To our knowledge, these results represent the first demonstration that variation in whole muscle contractile kinetics in patients with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults is related, in part, to the size and function of single muscle fibers.

  6. Role of Growth Factors in Modulation of the Microvasculature in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Post-natal skeletal muscle is a highly plastic tissue that has the capacity to regenerate rapidly following injury, and to undergo significant modification in tissue mass (i.e. atrophy/hypertrophy) in response to global metabolic changes. These processes are reliant largely on soluble factors that directly modulate muscle regeneration and mass. However, skeletal muscle function also depends on an adequate blood supply. Thus muscle regeneration and changes in muscle mass, particularly hypertrophy, also demand rapid changes in the microvasculature. Recent evidence clearly demonstrates a critical role for soluble growth factors in the tight regulation of angiogenic expansion of the muscle microvasculature. Furthermore, exogenous modulation of these factors has the capacity to impact directly on angiogenesis and thus, indirectly, on muscle regeneration, growth and performance. This chapter reviews recent developments in understanding the role of growth factors in modulating the skeletal muscle microvasculature, and the potential therapeutic applications of exogenous angiogenic and anti-angiogenic mediators in promoting effective growth and regeneration, and ameliorating certain diseases, of skeletal muscle. PMID:27003400

  7. Expression of the Troponin C at 41C Gene in Adult Drosophila Tubular Muscles Depends upon Both Positive and Negative Regulatory Inputs.

    PubMed

    Chechenova, Maria B; Maes, Sara; Cripps, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Most animals express multiple isoforms of structural muscle proteins to produce tissues with different physiological properties. In Drosophila, the adult muscles include tubular-type muscles and the fibrillar indirect flight muscles. Regulatory processes specifying tubular muscle fate remain incompletely understood, therefore we chose to analyze the transcriptional regulation of TpnC41C, a Troponin C gene expressed in the tubular jump muscles, but not in the fibrillar flight muscles. We identified a 300-bp promoter fragment of TpnC41C sufficient for the fiber-specific reporter expression. Through an analysis of this regulatory element, we identified two sites necessary for the activation of the enhancer. Mutations in each of these sites resulted in 70% reduction of enhancer activity. One site was characterized as a binding site for Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2. In addition, we identified a repressive element that prevents activation of the enhancer in other muscle fiber types. Mutation of this site increased jump muscle-specific expression of the reporter, but more importantly reporter expression expanded into the indirect flight muscles. Our findings demonstrate that expression of the TpnC41C gene in jump muscles requires integration of multiple positive and negative transcriptional inputs. Identification of the transcriptional regulators binding the cis-elements that we identified will reveal the regulatory pathways controlling muscle fiber differentiation.

  8. Potential of adult mammalian lumbosacral spinal cord to execute and acquire improved locomotion in the absence of supraspinal input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Prober, R. J.; de Guzman, C. P.; de Leon, R.

    1992-01-01

    The neural circuitry of the lumbar spinal cord can generate alternating extension and flexion of the hindlimbs. The hindlimbs of adult cats with complete transection of the spinal cord at a low thoracic level (T12-T13) can perform full weight-supporting locomotion on a treadmill belt moving at a range of speeds. Some limitations in the locomotor capacity can be associated with a deficit in the recruitment level of the fast extensors during the stance phase and the flexors during the swing phase of a step cycle. The level of locomotor performance, however, can be enhanced by daily training on a treadmill while emphasizing full weight-support stepping and by providing appropriately timed sensory stimulation, loading, and/or pharmacologic stimulation of the hindlimb neuromuscular apparatus. Furthermore, there appears to be an interactive effect of these interventions. For example, the maximum treadmill speed that a spinal adult cat can attain and maintain is significantly improved with daily full weight-supporting treadmill training, but progressive recruitment of fast extensors becomes apparent only when the hindlimbs are loaded by gently pulling down on the tail during the stepping. Stimulation of the sural nerve at the initiation of the flexion phase of the step cycle can likewise markedly improve the locomotor capability. Administration of clonidine, in particular in combination with an elevated load, resulted in the most distinct and consistent alternating bursts of electromyographic activity during spinal stepping. These data indicate that the spinal cord has the ability to execute alternating activation of the extensor and flexor musculature of the hindlimbs (stepping) and that this ability can be improved by several interventions such as training, sensory stimulation, and use of some pharmacologic agents. Thus, it appears that the spinal cord, without supraspinal input, is highly plastic and has the potential to "learn," that is, to acquire and improve its

  9. Regulatory mechanisms and the role of calcium and potassium channels controlling supercontractile crop muscles in adult Phormia regina.

    PubMed

    Solari, Paolo; Stoffolano, John G; Fitzpatrick, Joanna; Gelperin, Alan; Thomson, Alan; Talani, Giuseppe; Sanna, Enrico; Liscia, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Bioassays and electrophysiological recordings were conducted in the adult blowfly Phormia regina to provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms governing the crop filling and emptying processes of the supercontractile crop muscles. The cibarial pump drives ingestion. Simultaneous multisite extracellular recordings show that crop lobe (P5) distension during ingestion of a 4.7 μl sugar meal does not require muscle activity by any of the other pumps of the system. Conversely, pumping of fluids toward the anterior of the crop system during crop emptying is brought about by active muscle contraction, in the form of a highly coordinated peristaltic wave starting from P5 and progressively propagating to P6, P4 and P3 pumps, with P5 contracting with a frequency about 3.4 times higher than the other pumps. The crop contraction rate is also modulated by hemolymph-borne factors such as sugars, through ligand recognition at a presumptive receptor site rather than by an osmotic effect, as assessed by both behavioural and electrophysiological experiments. In this respect, sugars of equal osmolarity produce different effects, glucose being inhibitory and mannose ineffective for crop muscles, while trehalose enhances crop activity. Finally, voltage and current clamp experiments show that the muscle action potentials (mAPs) at the P4 pump are sustained by a serotonin-sensitive calcium conductance. Serotonin enhances calcium entry into the muscle cells and this could lead, as an indirect modulatory effect, to activation of a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) conductance (IK(Ca)), which sustains the following mAP repolarization phase in such a way that further mAPs can be generated early and the frequency consequently increased. PMID:23834826

  10. Stem Cells in Mammalian Gonads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Ding, Xinbao; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have great value in clinical application because of their ability to self-renew and their potential to differentiate into many different cell types. Mammalian gonads, including testes for males and ovaries for females, are composed of germline and somatic cells. In male mammals, spermatogonial stem cells maintain spermatogenesis which occurs continuously in adult testis. Likewise, a growing body of evidence demonstrated that female germline stem cells could be found in mammalian ovaries. Meanwhile, prior studies have shown that somatic stem cells exist in both testes and ovaries. In this chapter, we focus on mammalian gonad stem cells and discuss their characteristics as well as differentiation potentials.

  11. Impact on nutrition on muscle strength and performance in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle strength plays an important role in determining risk for falls, which result in fractures and other injuries. While bone loss has long been recognized as an inevitable consequence of aging, sarcopenia-the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with advancing age-has rec...

  12. Effects of hip abductor muscle fatigue on gait control and hip position sense in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Arvin, Mina; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Burger, Bart J; Rispens, Sietse M; Verschueren, Sabine M P; van Dieën, Jaap H; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally investigated whether unilateral hip abductor muscle fatigue affected gait control and hip position sense in older adults. Hip abductor muscles were fatigued unilaterally in side-lying position in 17 healthy older adults (mean age 73.2 SD 7.7 years). Hip joint position sense was assessed by an active-active repositioning test while standing and was expressed as absolute and relative errors. Participants walked on a treadmill at their preferred walking speed, while 3D linear accelerations were collected by an inertial sensor at the lower back. Gait parameters, including step and stride time, local divergence exponents and harmonic ratio were quantified. In fatigued gait, stride time variability and step-to-step asymmetry in the frontal plane were significantly increased. Also a significantly slower mediolateral trunk movement in fatigued leg late stance toward the non-fatigued leg was observed. Despite these temporal and symmetry changes, gait stability in terms of the local divergence exponents was not affected by fatigue. Hip position sense was also affected by fatigue, as indicated by an increased relative error of 0.7° (SD 0.08) toward abduction. In conclusion, negative effects of fatigue on gait variability, step-to-step symmetry, mediolateral trunk velocity control and hip position sense indicate the importance of hip abductor muscles for gait control.

  13. Effect of duration of smartphone use on muscle fatigue and pain caused by forward head posture in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Yeol; Koo, Sung-Ja

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of duration of smartphone use on neck and shoulder muscle fatigue and pain was investigated in adults with forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-four adults with forward head posture were classified into groups by duration of smartphone use: 11 used a smartphone for 10 minutes each (group 1), 12 for 20 minutes each (group 2), and 11 for 30 minutes each (group 3). Fatigue cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius muscles was measured by electromyography, and pain before and after the experiment was evaluated using Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores. [Results] There was a significant difference in the degree of fatigue in the left upper trapezius muscles in group 2 and left cervical erector spinae and bilateral upper trapeziuses group 3. There was a significant difference in fatigue in the left upper trapezius in groups 1 and 3. The VAS showed significant differences in all groups before and after the experiment and between groups 1 and 3. [Conclusion] Pain and fatigue worsened with longer smartphone use. This study provided data on the proper duration of smartphone use. Correct posture and breaks of at least 20 minutes are recommend when using smartphones. PMID:27390391

  14. Comparative analysis of skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in children and adults: a 31P-MRS study.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien; Tonson, Anne; Le Fur, Yann; Cozzone, Patrick; Bendahan, David

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the oxidative capacity of the forearm flexor muscles in vivo between children and adults using 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Seven boys (11.7 +/- 0.6 y) and 10 men (35.6 +/- 7.8 year) volunteered to perform a 3 min dynamic finger flexions exercise against a standardized weight (15% of the maximal voluntary contraction). Muscle oxidative capacity was quantified on the basis of phosphocreatine (PCr) post-exercise recovery kinetics analysis. End-of-exercise pH was not significantly different between children and adults (6.6 +/- 0.2 vs. 6.5 +/- 0.2), indicating that indices of PCr recovery kinetics can be reliably compared. The rate constant of PCr recovery (kPCr) and the maximum rate of aerobic ATP production were about 2-fold higher in young boys than in men (kPCr: 1.7 +/- 1.2 vs. 0.7 +/- 0.2 min(-1); Vmax: 49.7 +/- 24.6 vs. 29.4 +/- 7.9 mmol.L(-1).min(-1), p < 0.05). Our results clearly illustrate a greater mitochondrial oxidative capacity in the forearm flexor muscles of young children. This larger ATP regeneration capacity through aerobic mechanisms in children could be one of the factors accounting for their greater resistance to fatigue during high-intensity intermittent exercise. PMID:18641715

  15. Flight Capacity of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) Adult Females Based on Flight Mill Studies and Flight Muscle Ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Yuan, Ruiling; Wang, Xiaowei; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is considered a major economic threat in many regions worldwide. To better comprehend flight capacity of B. dorsalis and its physiological basis, a computer-monitored flight mill was used to study flight capacity of B. dorsalis adult females of various ages, and the changes of its flight muscle ultrastructures were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The flight capacity (both speed and distance) changed significantly with age of B. dorsalis female adults, peaking at about 15 d; the myofibril diameter of the flight muscle of test insects at 15-d old was the longest, up to 1.56 µm, the sarcomere length at 15-d old was the shortest, averaging at 1.37 µm, volume content of mitochondria of flight muscle at 15-d old reached the peak, it was 32.64%. This study provides the important scientific data for better revealing long-distance movement mechanism of B. dorsalis. PMID:26450591

  16. Flight capacity of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) adult females based on flight mill studies and flight muscle ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Chen, Peng; Ye, Hui; Yuan, Ruiling; Wang, Xiaowei; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is considered a major economic threat in many regions worldwide. To better comprehend flight capacity of B. dorsalis and its physiological basis, a computer-monitored flight mill was used to study flight capacity of B. dorsalis adult females of various ages, and the changes of its flight muscle ultrastructures were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The flight capacity (both speed and distance) changed significantly with age of B. dorsalis female adults, peaking at about 15 d; the myofibril diameter of the flight muscle of test insects at 15-d old was the longest, up to 1.56 µm, the sarcomere length at 15-d old was the shortest, averaging at 1.37 µm, volume content of mitochondria of flight muscle at 15-d old reached the peak, it was 32.64%. This study provides the important scientific data for better revealing long-distance movement mechanism of B. dorsalis.

  17. Self-regulatory strength depletion and muscle-endurance performance: a test of the limited-strength model in older adults.

    PubMed

    Bray, Steven R; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Woodgate, Jennifer

    2011-07-01

    Self-regulation consumes a form of strength or energy. The authors investigated aftereffects of self-regulation depletion on muscle-endurance performance in older adults. Participants (N = 61, mean age = 71) were randomized to a self-regulation-depletion or control group and completed 2 muscle-endurance performance tasks involving isometric handgrip squeezing that were separated by a cognitive-depletion task. The depletion group showed greater deterioration of muscle-endurance performance than controls, F(1, 59) = 7.31, p = .009. Results are comparable to those of younger adults in a similar study and support Baumeister et al.'s limited-strength model. Self-regulation may contribute to central-nervous-system fatigue; however, biological processes may allow aging muscle to offset depletion of self-regulatory resources affecting muscle-endurance performance.

  18. Exposure to environmentally persistent free radicals during gestation lowers energy expenditure and impairs skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Erin J; Ragauskas, Alyse; Jaligama, Sridhar; Redd, JeAnna R; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Peloquin, Matthew J; Saravia, Jordy; Han, Joan C; Cormier, Stephania A; Bridges, Dave

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the effects of in utero exposure to environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) on growth, metabolism, energy utilization, and skeletal muscle mitochondria in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Pregnant mice were treated with laboratory-generated, combustion-derived particular matter (MCP230). The adult offspring were placed on a high-fat diet for 12 wk, after which we observed a 9.8% increase in their body weight. The increase in body size observed in the MCP230-exposed mice was not associated with increases in food intake but was associated with a reduction in physical activity and lower energy expenditure. The reduced energy expenditure in mice indirectly exposed to MCP230 was associated with reductions in skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA copy number, lower mRNA levels of electron transport genes, and reduced citrate synthase activity. Upregulation of key genes involved in ameliorating oxidative stress was also observed in the muscle of MCP230-exposed mice. These findings suggest that gestational exposure to MCP230 leads to a reduction in energy expenditure at least in part through alterations to mitochondrial metabolism in the skeletal muscle.

  19. Effects of Nordic walking on pelvis motion and muscle activities around the hip joints of adults with hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Daisuke; Jigami, Hirofumi; Sato, Naritoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Increased compensatory pelvic movement is remarkable in limping patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). However, a method of improving limping has not been established. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of two types of Nordic walking by analyzing the pelvic movement and muscle activities of adults with hip OA. [Subjects and Methods] Ten patients with OA of the hip performed Japanese-style Nordic walking (JS NW), European-style Nordic walking (ES NW), and Ordinary walking (OW), and the muscle activities around the hip joint and pelvic movements were analyzed. [Results] The pelvic rotation angle was significantly larger in ES NW than in JS NW. In the stance phase, hip abductor muscle activity was significantly decreased in JS NW compared to both OW and ES NW. In the swing phase, rectus abdominis muscle activity was significantly increased in both JS NW and ES NW compared to OW and lumbar erector spinae activity was significantly lower in JS NW than in OW. [Conclusion] JS NW style may reduce the compensatory pelvic rotation in patients with hip OA. JS NW might be better for joint protection and prevention of secondary disorders of the hip in OA patients. PMID:27190455

  20. Effects of Nordic walking on pelvis motion and muscle activities around the hip joints of adults with hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Homma, Daisuke; Jigami, Hirofumi; Sato, Naritoshi

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] Increased compensatory pelvic movement is remarkable in limping patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). However, a method of improving limping has not been established. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of two types of Nordic walking by analyzing the pelvic movement and muscle activities of adults with hip OA. [Subjects and Methods] Ten patients with OA of the hip performed Japanese-style Nordic walking (JS NW), European-style Nordic walking (ES NW), and Ordinary walking (OW), and the muscle activities around the hip joint and pelvic movements were analyzed. [Results] The pelvic rotation angle was significantly larger in ES NW than in JS NW. In the stance phase, hip abductor muscle activity was significantly decreased in JS NW compared to both OW and ES NW. In the swing phase, rectus abdominis muscle activity was significantly increased in both JS NW and ES NW compared to OW and lumbar erector spinae activity was significantly lower in JS NW than in OW. [Conclusion] JS NW style may reduce the compensatory pelvic rotation in patients with hip OA. JS NW might be better for joint protection and prevention of secondary disorders of the hip in OA patients.

  1. No evidence for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Ca2+ release in isolated fibers of adult mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Bert; Del Piccolo, Paola; Rodriguez, Laura; Hernandez Gonzalez, Victor-Hugo; Agatea, Lisa; Solagna, Francesca; Mammano, Fabio; Pozzan, Tullio; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2012-08-01

    The presence and role of functional inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptors (IP(3)Rs) in adult skeletal muscle are controversial. The current consensus is that, in adult striated muscle, the relative amount of IP(3)Rs is too low and the kinetics of Ca(2+) release from IP(3)R is too slow compared with ryanodine receptors to contribute to the Ca(2+) transient during excitation-contraction coupling. However, it has been suggested that IP(3)-dependent Ca(2+) release may be involved in signaling cascades leading to regulation of muscle gene expression. We have reinvestigated IP(3)-dependent Ca(2+) release in isolated flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle fibers from adult mice. Although Ca(2+) transients were readily induced in cultured C2C12 muscle cells by (a) UTP stimulation, (b) direct injection of IP(3), or (c) photolysis of membrane-permeant caged IP(3), no statistically significant change in calcium signal was detected in adult FDB fibers. We conclude that the IP(3)-IP(3)R system does not appear to affect global calcium levels in adult mouse skeletal muscle.

  2. NF-KappaB in Long-Term Memory and Structural Plasticity in the Adult Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Kaltschmidt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) is a well-known regulator of inflammation, stress, and immune responses as well as cell survival. In the nervous system, NF-κB is one of the crucial components in the molecular switch that converts short- to long-term memory—a process that requires de novo gene expression. Here, the researches published on NF-κB and downstream target genes in mammals will be reviewed, which are necessary for structural plasticity and long-term memory, both under normal and pathological conditions in the brain. Genetic evidence has revealed that NF-κB regulates neuroprotection, neuronal transmission, and long-term memory. In addition, after genetic ablation of all NF-κB subunits, a severe defect in hippocampal adult neurogenesis was observed during aging. Proliferation of neural precursors is increased; however, axon outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and tissue homeostasis of the dentate gyrus are hampered. In this process, the NF-κB target gene PKAcat and other downstream target genes such as Igf2 are critically involved. Therefore, NF-κB activity seems to be crucial in regulating structural plasticity and replenishment of granule cells within the hippocampus throughout the life. In addition to the function of NF-κB in neurons, we will discuss on a neuroinflammatory role of the transcription factor in glia. Finally, a model for NF-κB homeostasis on the molecular level is presented, in order to explain seemingly the contradictory, the friend or foe, role of NF-κB in the nervous system. PMID:26635522

  3. Effects of level of nutrient intake and age on mammalian target of rapamycin, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 gene network expression in skeletal muscle of young Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Drackley, J K; Stamey-Lanier, J A; Keisler, D; Loor, J J

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which level of nutrient intake enhances skeletal muscle growth in young ruminants are not fully understood. We examined mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene network expression in semitendinosus muscle tissue of young male Holstein calves fed a conventional milk replacer plus conventional starter (CON) or an enhanced milk replacer plus high-protein starter (ENH) for 5 wk followed by a conventional starter or a high-protein starter until 10 wk of age. Feeding ENH led to greater concentration of plasma IGF-1 and leptin and greater carcass protein and fat mass throughout the study. Despite the greater plasma IGF-1 and protein mass at wk 5, calves fed ENH had lower expression of IGF1R, INSR, and RPS6KB1 but greater expression of IRS1 and PDPK1 in muscle tissue. Except for IGF1R expression, which did not differ at wk 10, these differences persisted at wk 10, suggesting a long-term effect of greater nutrient intake on physiological and molecular mechanisms. Components of mTOR complex (mTORC)1 and mTORC2 (RICTOR and RPTOR) and FOXO1 expression decreased by wk 10 regardless of diet. Overall, the present data revealed that greater nutrient intake throughout the milk-fed and early postweaning phase alters body mass composition partly by altering hormonal and molecular profiles of genes associated with glucose and amino acid signaling. Those networks may play a crucial role in coordinating neonatal muscle growth and metabolism in response to level of nutrient intake.

  4. Rapid evolution of larval life history, adult immune function and flight muscles in a poleward-moving damselfly.

    PubMed

    Therry, L; Nilsson-Örtman, V; Bonte, D; Stoks, R

    2014-01-01

    Although a growing number of studies have documented the evolution of adult dispersal-related traits at the range edge of poleward-expanding species, we know little about evolutionary changes in immune function or traits expressed by nondispersing larvae. We investigated differentiation in larval (growth and development) and adult traits (immune function and flight-related traits) between replicated core and edge populations of the poleward-moving damselfly Coenagrion scitulum. These traits were measured on individuals reared in a common garden experiment at two different food levels, as allocation trade-offs may be easier to detect under energy shortage. Edge individuals had a faster larval life history (growth and development rates), a higher adult immune function and a nearly significant higher relative flight muscle mass. Most of the differentiation between core and edge populations remained and edge populations had a higher relative flight muscle mass when corrected for latitude-specific thermal regimes, and hence could likely be attributed to the range expansion process per se. We here for the first time document a higher immune function in individuals at the expansion front of a poleward-expanding species and documented the rarely investigated evolution of faster life histories during range expansion. The rapid multivariate evolution in these ecological relevant traits between edge and core populations is expected to translate into changed ecological interactions and therefore has the potential to generate novel eco-evolutionary dynamics at the expansion front. PMID:24313892

  5. Changes in neurotrophic factors of adult rat laryngeal muscles during nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Morato, Ignacio; Sharma, Sansar; Pitman, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) leads to the loss of ipsilateral laryngeal fold movement, with dysphonia, and occasionally dysphagia. Functional movement of the vocal folds is never restored due to misrouting of regenerating axons to agonist and antagonist laryngeal muscles. Changes of neurotrophic factor expression within denervated muscles occur after nerve injury and may influence nerve regeneration, axon guidance and muscle reinnervation. This study investigates the expression of certain neurotrophic factors in the laryngeal muscles during the course of axonal regeneration using RT-PCR. The timing of neurotrophic factor expression was correlated to the reinnervation of the laryngeal muscles by motor axons. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Netrin-1 (NTN-1) increased their expression levels in laryngeal muscles after nerve section and during regeneration of RLN. The upregulation of trophic factors returned to control levels following regeneration of RLN. The expression levels of the neurotrophic factors were correlated with the innervation of regenerating axons into the denervated muscles. The results suggest that certain neurotrophic factor expression is strongly correlated to the reinnervation pattern of the regenerating RLN. These factors may be involved in guidance and neuromuscular junction formation during nerve regeneration. In the future, their manipulation may enhance the selective reinnervation of the larynx. PMID:27421227

  6. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  7. Erythropoietin Does Not Enhance Skeletal Muscle Protein Synthesis Following Exercise in Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lamon, Séverine; Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Gatta, Paul A. Della; Ghobrial, Lobna; Gerlinger-Romero, Frederico; Garnham, Andrew; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Erythropoietin (EPO) is a renal cytokine that is primarily involved in hematopoiesis while also playing a role in non-hematopoietic tissues expressing the EPO-receptor (EPOR). The EPOR is present in human skeletal muscle. In mouse skeletal muscle, EPO stimulation can activate the AKT serine/threonine kinase 1 (AKT) signaling pathway, the main positive regulator of muscle protein synthesis. We hypothesized that a single intravenous EPO injection combined with acute resistance exercise would have a synergistic effect on skeletal muscle protein synthesis via activation of the AKT pathway. Methods: Ten young (24.2 ± 0.9 years) and 10 older (66.6 ± 1.1 years) healthy subjects received a primed, constant infusion of [ring-13C6] L-phenylalanine and a single injection of 10,000 IU epoetin-beta or placebo in a double-blind randomized, cross-over design. 2 h after the injection, the subjects completed an acute bout of leg extension resistance exercise to stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis. Results: Significant interaction effects in the phosphorylation levels of the members of the AKT signaling pathway indicated a differential activation of protein synthesis signaling in older subjects when compared to young subjects. However, EPO offered no synergistic effect on vastus lateralis mixed muscle protein synthesis rate in young or older subjects. Conclusions: Despite its ability to activate the AKT pathway in skeletal muscle, an acute EPO injection had no additive or synergistic effect on the exercise-induced activation of muscle protein synthesis or muscle protein synthesis signaling pathways. PMID:27458387

  8. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  9. Effects of slow-release urea and rumen-protected methionine and histidine on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and ubiquitin proteasome-related gene expression in skeletal muscle of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sadri, H; Giallongo, F; Hristov, A N; Werner, J; Lang, C H; Parys, C; Saremi, B; Sauerwein, H

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a major regulator of protein synthesis, whereas the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is regarded as the main proteolytic pathway in skeletal muscle. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of slow-release urea and rumen-protected (RP) Met and His supplementation of a metabolizable protein (MP)-deficient diet on the abundance of key components of the mTOR pathway and of the UPS in skeletal muscle of dairy cows. Sixty Holstein cows were blocked based on days in milk and milk yield and were randomly assigned within block to 1 of 5 diets in a 10-wk experiment (including the first 2 wk as covariate period) as follows: (1) MP-adequate diet (AMP; 107% of MP requirements, based on the National Research Council requirements); (2) MP-deficient diet (DMP; 95% of MP requirements); (3) DMP supplemented with slow-release urea (DMPU); (4) DMPU supplemented with RPMet (DMPUM); and (5) DMPUM supplemented with RPHis (DMPUMH). Muscle biopsies were collected from longissimus dorsi during the last week of the experiment. The mRNA abundance of key mTOR signaling genes was not affected by the treatments. The phosphorylated (P)-mTOR protein was or tended to be greater for DMP compared with DMPU and AMP, respectively. The P-mTOR protein in DMPUMH was decreased when compared against DMPUM. The P-ribosomal protein S6 tended to be increased by DMPUM compared with DMPU. The abundance of total-S6 was or tended to be greater for DMP compared with AMP and DMPU, respectively. The mRNA abundance of ubiquitin activating and conjugating enzymes was not affected by the treatments, whereas that of muscle ring-finger protein 1 (MuRF-1) was greater in DMP than DMPU. The increased abundance of mTOR-associated signaling proteins and MuRF-1 mRNA abundance indicates a higher rate of protein turnover in muscle of DMP-fed cows. The reduced abundance of P-mTOR by supplementation of RPHis may suggest that His is likely partitioned to the

  10. Impaired voluntary neuromuscular activation limits muscle power in mobility-limited older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Age-related alterations of neuromuscular activation may contribute to deficits in muscle power and mobility function. This study assesses whether impaired activation of the agonist quadriceps and antagonist hamstrings, including amplitude- and velocity-dependent characteristics of activa...

  11. The influence of occlusion on jaw and neck muscle activity: a surface EMG study in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Tartaglia, G M; Galletta, A; Grassi, G P; Sforza, C

    2006-05-01

    The electromyographic (EMG) characteristics of masseter, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles during maximum voluntary teeth clench were assessed in 27 male and 35 female healthy young adults. Subjects were divided into two groups: (i) 'complete' Angle Class I (bilateral, symmetric canine and molar Class I relationships), and (ii) 'partial' Angle Class I (one to three canine/molar Class I relationships, the remaining relationships were Class II or Class III). On average, standardized muscular symmetry ranged 80.7-87.9%. During maximum voluntary teeth clench, average co-contraction of SCM muscle was 13.7-23.5% of its maximum contraction. On average, all torque coefficients (potential lateral displacing component) were >90%, while all antero-posterior coefficients (relative activities of masseter and temporalis muscles) were >85%. The average integrated areas of the masseter and temporalis EMG potentials over time ranged 87.4-106.8 muV/muV s%. Standardized contractile muscular activities did not differ between 'complete' and 'partial' Angle Class I, and between sexes (two-way analysis of variance). A trend toward a larger intragroup variability in EMG indices was observed in the subjects with 'partial' Angle Class I than in those with 'complete' Angle Class I (significant difference for the temporalis muscle symmetry, P = 0.013, analysis of variance). In conclusion, the presence of a complete or partial Angle occlusal Class I did not seem to influence the standardized contractile activities of masseter, temporalis and SCM muscles during a maximum voluntary clench. Subjects with a 'complete' Angle Class I were somewhat a more homogenous group than subjects with 'partial' Angle Class I.

  12. Increased Skeletal Muscle Capillarization After Aerobic Exercise Training and Weight Loss Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Adults With IGT

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Steven J.; Blumenthal, Jacob B.; Katzel, Leslie I.; Goldberg, Andrew P.; Ryan, Alice S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Transcapillary transport of insulin is one determinant of glucose uptake by skeletal muscle; thus, a reduction in capillary density (CD) may worsen insulin sensitivity. Skeletal muscle CD is lower in older adults with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) compared with those with normal glucose tolerance and may be modifiable through aerobic exercise training and weight loss (AEX+WL). We tested the hypothesis that 6-month AEX+WL would increase CD to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in older adults with IGT. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixteen sedentary, overweight-obese (BMI 27–35 kg/m2), older (63 ± 2 years) men and women with IGT underwent hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps to measure insulin sensitivity, oral glucose tolerance tests, exercise and body composition testing, and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies to determine CD before and after 6-month AEX+WL. RESULTS Insulin sensitivity (M) and 120-min postprandial glucose (G120) correlated with CD at baseline (r = 0.58 and r = −0.60, respectively, P < 0.05). AEX+WL increased maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) 18% (P = 0.02) and reduced weight and fat mass 8% (P < 0.02). CD increased 15% (264 ± 11 vs. 304 ± 14 capillaries/mm2, P = 0.01), M increased 21% (42.4 ± 4.0 vs. 51.4 ± 4.3 µmol/kg FFM/min, P < 0.05), and G120 decreased 16% (9.35 ± 0.5 vs. 7.85 ± 0.5 mmol/L, P = 0.008) after AEX+WL. Regression analyses showed that the AEX+WL-induced increase in CD independently predicted the increase in M (r = 0.74, P < 0.01) as well as the decrease in G120 (r = −0.55, P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Six-month AEX+WL increases skeletal muscle CD in older adults with IGT. This represents one mechanism by which AEX+WL improves insulin sensitivity in older adults with IGT. PMID:24595633

  13. Ultrasound estimates of muscle quality in older adults: reliability and comparison of Photoshop and ImageJ for the grayscale analysis of muscle echogenicity.

    PubMed

    Harris-Love, Michael O; Seamon, Bryant A; Teixeira, Carla; Ismail, Catheeja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quantitative diagnostic ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a method of estimating muscle quality using measures of echogenicity. The Rectangular Marquee Tool (RMT) and the Free Hand Tool (FHT) are two types of editing features used in Photoshop and ImageJ for determining a region of interest (ROI) within an ultrasound image. The primary objective of this study is to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of Photoshop and ImageJ for the estimate of muscle tissue echogenicity in older adults via grayscale histogram analysis. The secondary objective is to compare the mean grayscale values obtained using both the RMT and FHT methods across both image analysis platforms. Methods. This cross-sectional observational study features 18 community-dwelling men (age = 61.5 ± 2.32 years). Longitudinal views of the rectus femoris were captured using B-mode ultrasound. The ROI for each scan was selected by 2 examiners using the RMT and FHT methods from each software program. Their reliability is assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the standard error of the measurement (SEM). Measurement agreement for these values is depicted using Bland-Altman plots. A paired t-test is used to determine mean differences in echogenicity expressed as grayscale values using the RMT and FHT methods to select the post-image acquisition ROI. The degree of association among ROI selection methods and image analysis platforms is analyzed using the coefficient of determination (R (2)). Results. The raters demonstrated excellent intrarater and interrater reliability using the RMT and FHT methods across both platforms (lower bound 95% CI ICC = .97-.99, p < .001). Mean differences between the echogenicity estimates obtained with the RMT and FHT methods was .87 grayscale levels (95% CI [.54-1.21], p < .0001) using data obtained with both programs. The SEM for Photoshop was .97 and 1.05 grayscale levels when using the RMT and FHT ROI selection methods

  14. Ultrasound estimates of muscle quality in older adults: reliability and comparison of Photoshop and ImageJ for the grayscale analysis of muscle echogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Seamon, Bryant A.; Teixeira, Carla; Ismail, Catheeja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quantitative diagnostic ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a method of estimating muscle quality using measures of echogenicity. The Rectangular Marquee Tool (RMT) and the Free Hand Tool (FHT) are two types of editing features used in Photoshop and ImageJ for determining a region of interest (ROI) within an ultrasound image. The primary objective of this study is to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of Photoshop and ImageJ for the estimate of muscle tissue echogenicity in older adults via grayscale histogram analysis. The secondary objective is to compare the mean grayscale values obtained using both the RMT and FHT methods across both image analysis platforms. Methods. This cross-sectional observational study features 18 community-dwelling men (age = 61.5 ± 2.32 years). Longitudinal views of the rectus femoris were captured using B-mode ultrasound. The ROI for each scan was selected by 2 examiners using the RMT and FHT methods from each software program. Their reliability is assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the standard error of the measurement (SEM). Measurement agreement for these values is depicted using Bland-Altman plots. A paired t-test is used to determine mean differences in echogenicity expressed as grayscale values using the RMT and FHT methods to select the post-image acquisition ROI. The degree of association among ROI selection methods and image analysis platforms is analyzed using the coefficient of determination (R2). Results. The raters demonstrated excellent intrarater and interrater reliability using the RMT and FHT methods across both platforms (lower bound 95% CI ICC = .97–.99, p < .001). Mean differences between the echogenicity estimates obtained with the RMT and FHT methods was .87 grayscale levels (95% CI [.54–1.21], p < .0001) using data obtained with both programs. The SEM for Photoshop was .97 and 1.05 grayscale levels when using the RMT and FHT ROI selection methods

  15. Eccentric Torque-Producing Capacity is Influenced by Muscle Length in Older Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ruth C; Takahashi, Anielle C M; Quitério, Robison J; Salvini, Tânia F; Catai, Aparecida M

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of muscle strength to functional capacity in the elderly, the study investigated the effects of age on isokinetic performance and torque production as a function of muscle length. Eleven younger (24.2 ± 2.9 years) and 16 older men (62.7 ± 2.5 years) were subjected to concentric and eccentric isokinetic knee extension/flexion at 60 and 120° · s(-1) through a functional range of motion. The older group presented lower peak torque (in newton-meters) than the young group for both isokinetic contraction types (age effect, p < 0.001). Peak torque deficits in the older group were near 30 and 29% for concentric and eccentric contraction, respectively. Concentric peak torque was lower at 120° · s(-1) than at 60° · s(-1) for both groups (angular velocity effect, p < 0.001). Eccentric knee extension torque was the only exercise tested that showed an interaction effect between age and muscle length (p < 0.001), which suggested different torque responses to the muscle length between groups. Compared with the young group, the eccentric knee extension torque was 22-56% lower in the older group, with the deficits being lower in the shortened muscle length (22-27%) and higher (33-56%) in the stretched muscle length. In older men, the production of eccentric knee strength seems to be dependent on the muscle length. At more stretched positions, older subjects lose the capacity to generate eccentric knee extension torque. More studies are needed to assess the mechanisms involved in eccentric strength preservation with aging and its relationship with muscle length.

  16. Age-related changes in neuromuscular function of the quadriceps muscle in physically active adults.

    PubMed

    Mau-Moeller, Anett; Behrens, Martin; Lindner, Tobias; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2013-06-01

    Substantial evidence exists for the age-related decline in maximal strength and strength development. Despite the importance of knee extensor strength for physical function and mobility in the elderly, studies focusing on the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms of the quadriceps muscle weakness are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the contributions of age-related neural and muscular changes in the quadriceps muscle to decreases in isometric maximal voluntary torque (iMVT) and explosive voluntary strength. The interpolated twitch technique and normalized surface electromyography (EMG) signal during iMVT were analyzed to assess changes in neural drive to the muscles of 15 young and 15 elderly volunteers. The maximal rate of torque development as well as rate of torque development, impulse and neuromuscular activation in the early phase of contraction were determined. Spinal excitability was estimated using the H reflex technique. Changes at the muscle level were evaluated by analyzing the contractile properties and lean mass. The age-related decrease in iMVT was accompanied by a decline in voluntary activation and normalized surface EMG amplitude. Mechanical parameters of explosive voluntary strength were reduced while the corresponding muscle activation remained primarily unchanged. The spinal excitability of the vastus medialis was not different while M wave latency was longer. Contractile properties and lean mass were reduced. In conclusion, the age-related decline in iMVT of the quadriceps muscle might be due to a reduced neural drive and changes in skeletal muscle properties. The decrease in explosive voluntary strength seemed to be more affected by muscular than by neural changes. PMID:23453325

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  18. Ascaridole-less infusions of Chenopodium ambrosioides contain a nematocide(s) that is(are) not toxic to mammalian smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, D; VanCrey, K; Harrison, P; Rangachari, P K; Rosenfeld, J; Warren, C; Sorger, G

    2004-06-01

    Infusions of Chenopodium ambrosioides (L.) have been used for centuries in the Americas as a popular remedy against intestinal worm infections. The essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides contains high levels of ascaridole, which is a potent anthelmintic, but which has also been responsible for human fatalities, leading to its disuse. Almost 90% of the nematocidal activity of Chenopodium ambrosioides infusions was due to a hydrophilic component different from ascaridole. Synthetic ascaridole and the ascaridole from infusions, extracted into hexane, caused a reduction of carbachol-induced contractions in rat gastrointestinal smooth muscle at concentrations required to kill Caenorhabditis elegans (L.). The herbal infusion and the ascaridole-free hexane-extracted aqueous residue of the above infusion, at nematocidal concentrations, had no detectable effect on smooth muscle contraction in the above system. It would appear that the traditional form of usage of Chenopodium ambrosioides infusions as a vermifuge is safer than the use of the herb's essential oil.

  19. Prior swimming exercise favors muscle recovery in adult female rats after joint immobilization.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Ana Claudia; Ramos, Douglas Massoni; Gomes de Oliveira, Luana; Alberto da Silva, Carlos; Pertille, Adriana

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the efficacy of pre-exercise on immobilization and subsequent recovery of white gastrocnemius (WG) and soleus (SOL) muscles of female rats. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty, 8-month-old, female Wistar rats were randomly and evenly allocated to six groups: sedentary (S); immobilized sedentary (IS); immobilized/rehabilitated sedentary (IRS); trained (T); immobilized trained (IT); and immobilized/rehabilitated trained (IRT). For four months, T, IT and IRT group animals performed swimming exercise (three sessions per week, 60 minutes per session), while S, IS and IRS groups animals remained housed in cages. After this period, the left hindlimb of the animals from the IS, IRS, IT and IRT groups was immobilized for five days, with the ankle at 90°. After removal of the orthosis, animals from the IRS and IRT groups followed a rehabilitation program based on swimming (five sessions per week, 60 minutes per session) for two weeks. [Results] Immobilization significantly reduced the cross-sectional area of the white gastrocnemius muscle; no changes were observed in the soleus muscles of the trained animals. Transforming growth factor-β1 protein levels were similar among the trained groups. [Conclusion] Prior swimming prevents hypotrophy of the soleus muscle after immobilization, and protein levels reflected the adaptive capacity of the skeletal muscle. PMID:27512267

  20. Prior swimming exercise favors muscle recovery in adult female rats after joint immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Ana Claudia; Ramos, Douglas Massoni; Gomes de Oliveira, Luana; Alberto da Silva, Carlos; Pertille, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the efficacy of pre-exercise on immobilization and subsequent recovery of white gastrocnemius (WG) and soleus (SOL) muscles of female rats. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty, 8-month-old, female Wistar rats were randomly and evenly allocated to six groups: sedentary (S); immobilized sedentary (IS); immobilized/rehabilitated sedentary (IRS); trained (T); immobilized trained (IT); and immobilized/rehabilitated trained (IRT). For four months, T, IT and IRT group animals performed swimming exercise (three sessions per week, 60 minutes per session), while S, IS and IRS groups animals remained housed in cages. After this period, the left hindlimb of the animals from the IS, IRS, IT and IRT groups was immobilized for five days, with the ankle at 90°. After removal of the orthosis, animals from the IRS and IRT groups followed a rehabilitation program based on swimming (five sessions per week, 60 minutes per session) for two weeks. [Results] Immobilization significantly reduced the cross-sectional area of the white gastrocnemius muscle; no changes were observed in the soleus muscles of the trained animals. Transforming growth factor-β1 protein levels were similar among the trained groups. [Conclusion] Prior swimming prevents hypotrophy of the soleus muscle after immobilization, and protein levels reflected the adaptive capacity of the skeletal muscle. PMID:27512267

  1. Determine the effect of neck muscle fatigue on dynamic visual acuity in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Al Saif, Amer A; Al Senany, Samira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine whether neck muscle fatigue affects dynamic visual acuity in healthy young participants. [Subjects and Methods] This study was a double-blinded, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Thirty healthy young subjects (ages 21 to 30 years) participated in the study. Participants were randomly divided into an experimental group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The experimental group performed an exercise designed to induce neck muscle fatigue and the control group preformed non-fatiguing sham exercises. [Results] There were significant differences in mean dynamic visual acuity between the two groups (0.26±0.11 LogMar versus 0.003±0.02 LogMar). Subjects in the experimental group showed a significant decline in their dynamic visual acuity compared with the control group. Dynamic visual acuity strongly correlated with neck muscle fatigue (r = 0.79). No significant differences in joint position error were observed between the two groups and no significant correlations between joint position error and neck muscle fatigue were observed (r = 0.23). [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that neck muscle fatigue negatively impacts dynamic visual acuity. Although not statistically significant, cervical spine proprioception as measured by the joint position error in the experimental group was diminished after fatigue.

  2. The role of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in neonatal uterine smooth muscle: enhanced role compared to adult rat

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Karen; Wray, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about contractile activity, response to agonists or excitation-contraction coupling in neonatal smooth muscle. We have therefore investigated 10-day rat uterus to better understand these processes, and compared it to adult uterus to elucidate how control of contractility develops. Spontaneous contractions are present in the 10-day neonatal uterus, although they are not as large or as regular as those present in adult tissues. External Ca2+ entry via L-type Ca2+ channels is the sole source of Ca2+ and is essential for the spontaneous activity. The neonatal uterus was responsive to carbachol or prostaglandin F2α application; it showed a marked stimulation and a clear dissociation between the force and Ca2+ changes. Such sensitization was not apparent in adult rat myometrium. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) had more releasable Ca2+ and contributed more to the response to agonists in neonatal compared to adult tissues. Thus, Ca2+ entry as opposed to SR Ca2+ release contributed much less to the uterine response to agonists in the neonatal, compared to adult tissues. Inhibition of the SR by cyclopiazonic acid also caused a more vigorous increase in Ca2+ and contractile activity, particularly frequency, in the neonatal compared to the adult uterus. Taken together these data suggest that: (1) spontaneous activity is already present by day 10, (2) receptor-coupling and excitation-contraction signalling pathways are functional, (3) the SR and Ca2+ sensitization mechanisms play a more prominent role in the neonate, and (4) there is a shift to a greater reliance on Ca2+ entry and excitability with development of the myometrium. PMID:12456834

  3. Heterogeneity in vascular smooth muscle cell embryonic origin in relation to adult structure, physiology, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R.; Bader, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Regional differences in vascular physiology and disease response exist throughout the vascular tree. While these differences in physiology and disease correspond to regional vascular environmental conditions, there is also compelling evidence that the embryonic origins of the smooth muscle inherent to the vessels may play a role. Here we review what is known regarding the role of embryonic origin of vascular smooth muscle cells during vascular development. The focus of this review is to highlight the heterogeneity in the origins of vascular smooth muscle cells and the resulting regional physiologies of the vessels. Our goal is to stimulate future investigation into this area and provide a better understanding of vascular organogenesis and disease. PMID:25546231

  4. Analytes and metabolites associated with muscle quality in young, healthy adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Identification of mechanisms that underlie lower extremity muscle quality (leg press one repetition maximum/total lean mass; LP/Lean) may be important for individuals interested in optimizing fitness and sport performance. The purpose of the current study was to provide observational insigh...

  5. Validity of muscle-to-fat ratio as a predictor of adult metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongsuk; Kim, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was aimed at determining the validity of the muscle-to-fat ratio as an indicator for the prevention and management of metabolic syndrome by establishing an optimal cutoff value. [Subjects and Methods] Data from the first and second year of the fifth Korea National Health Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted by the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare and Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, were used. A total of 6,256 subjects were included in the study. Diagnostic accuracy was measured by using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. [Results] The receiver operating characteristic curve for the muscle-to-fat ratio, which represents the diagnostic power for predicting metabolic syndrome, was 0.713 in men and 0.721 in women. The optimal cutoff value for the prediction and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was 3.09 kg/kg in men and 1.83 kg/kg in women. Intergroup differences based on the muscle-to-fat ratio indicated that the low-ratio group had higher values for all indicators of metabolic syndrome than the high-ratio group. [Conclusion] The muscle-to-fat ratio can be used as an indicator for the prediction and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, and early prevention and management of metabolic syndrome can help in improving public health. PMID:27134408

  6. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  7. Resistance Training Enhances Skeletal Muscle Innervation Without Modifying the Number of Satellite Cells or their Myofiber Association in Obese Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Messi, María Laura; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhong-Min; Marsh, Anthony P; Nicklas, Barbara; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-10-01

    Studies in humans and animal models provide compelling evidence for age-related skeletal muscle denervation, which may contribute to muscle fiber atrophy and loss. Skeletal muscle denervation seems relentless; however, long-term, high-intensity physical activity appears to promote muscle reinnervation. Whether 5-month resistance training (RT) enhances skeletal muscle innervation in obese older adults is unknown. This study found that neural cell-adhesion molecule, NCAM+ muscle area decreased with RT and was inversely correlated with muscle strength. NCAM1 and RUNX1 gene transcripts significantly decreased with the intervention. Type I and type II fiber grouping in the vastus lateralis did not change significantly but increases in leg press and knee extensor strength inversely correlated with type I, but not with type II, fiber grouping. RT did not modify the total number of satellite cells, their number per area, or the number associated with specific fiber subtypes or innervated/denervated fibers. Our results suggest that RT has a beneficial impact on skeletal innervation, even when started late in life by sedentary obese older adults. PMID:26447161

  8. Resistance Training Enhances Skeletal Muscle Innervation Without Modifying the Number of Satellite Cells or their Myofiber Association in Obese Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Messi, María Laura; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhong-Min; Marsh, Anthony P; Nicklas, Barbara; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-10-01

    Studies in humans and animal models provide compelling evidence for age-related skeletal muscle denervation, which may contribute to muscle fiber atrophy and loss. Skeletal muscle denervation seems relentless; however, long-term, high-intensity physical activity appears to promote muscle reinnervation. Whether 5-month resistance training (RT) enhances skeletal muscle innervation in obese older adults is unknown. This study found that neural cell-adhesion molecule, NCAM+ muscle area decreased with RT and was inversely correlated with muscle strength. NCAM1 and RUNX1 gene transcripts significantly decreased with the intervention. Type I and type II fiber grouping in the vastus lateralis did not change significantly but increases in leg press and knee extensor strength inversely correlated with type I, but not with type II, fiber grouping. RT did not modify the total number of satellite cells, their number per area, or the number associated with specific fiber subtypes or innervated/denervated fibers. Our results suggest that RT has a beneficial impact on skeletal innervation, even when started late in life by sedentary obese older adults.

  9. The validity of anthropometric leg muscle volume estimation across a wide spectrum: from able-bodied adults to individuals with a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Layec, Gwenael; Venturelli, Massimo; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of muscle volume, and changes over time, have significant clinical and research-related implications. Methods to assess muscle volume vary from simple and inexpensive to complex and expensive. Therefore this study sought to examine the validity of muscle volume estimated simply by anthropometry compared with the more complex proton magnetic resonance imaging ((1)H-MRI) across a wide spectrum of individuals including those with a spinal cord injury (SCI), a group recognized to exhibit significant muscle atrophy. Accordingly, muscle volume of the thigh and lower leg of eight subjects with a SCI and eight able-bodied subjects (controls) was determined by anthropometry and (1)H-MRI. With either method, muscle volumes were significantly lower in the SCI compared with the controls (P < 0.05) and, using pooled data from both groups, anthropometric measurements of muscle volume were strongly correlated to the values assessed by (1)H-MRI in both the thigh (r(2) = 0.89; P < 0.05) and lower leg (r(2) = 0.98; P < 0.05). However, the anthropometric approach systematically overestimated muscle volume compared with (1)H-MRI in both the thigh (mean bias = 2407cm(3)) and the lower (mean bias = 170 cm(3)) leg. Thus with an appropriate correction for this systemic overestimation, muscle volume estimated from anthropometric measurements is a valid approach and provides acceptable accuracy across a spectrum of adults with normal muscle mass to a SCI and severe muscle atrophy. In practical terms this study provides the formulas that add validity to the already simple and inexpensive anthropometric approach to assess muscle volume in clinical and research settings.

  10. Age-related changes in expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule in skeletal muscle: a comparative study of newborn, adult and aged rats.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, A M; Olsen, M; Zhernosekov, D; Gaardsvoll, H; Krog, L; Linnemann, D; Bock, E

    1993-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is expressed by muscle and involved in muscle-neuron and muscle-muscle cell interactions. The expression in muscle is regulated during myogenesis and by the state of innervation. In aged muscle, both neurogenic and myogenic degenerative processes occur. We here report quantitative and qualitative changes in NCAM protein and mRNA forms during aging in normal rat skeletal muscle. Determination of the amount of NCAM by e.l.i.s.a. showed that the level decreased from perinatal to adult age, followed by a considerable increase in 24-month-old rat muscle. Thus NCAM concentration in aged muscle was sixfold higher than in young adult muscle. In contrast with previous reports, NCAM polypeptides of 200, 145, 125 and 120 kDa were observed by immunoblotting throughout postnatal development and aging, the relative proportions of the individual NCAM polypeptides remaining virtually unchanged at all ages examined. However, changes in the extent of sialylation of NCAM were demonstrated. Even though the relative amounts of the various NCAM polypeptides were unchanged during aging, distinct changes in NCAM mRNA classes were observed. Three NCAM mRNA classes of 6.7, 5.2 and 2.9 kb were present in perinatal and young adult skeletal muscle, whereas only the 5.2 and 2.9 kb mRNA classes could be demonstrated in aged muscle. This indicates that metabolism of the various NCAM polypeptides is individually regulated during aging. Alternative splicing of NCAM mRNA in skeletal muscle was studied by Northern blotting using DNA oligonucleotide probes specifically hybridizing to selected exons or exon combinations. Exon VASE, which has previously been shown to be present in both brain and heart NCAM mRNA, was virtually absent from skeletal muscle at all ages studied. In contrast, the majority of NCAM mRNA in postnatal skeletal muscle was shown to contain extra exons inserted between exons 12 and 13. Of the various possible exon combinations at this splice site

  11. Smooth muscle filamin A is a major determinant of conduit artery structure and function at the adult stage.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, Kevin; Arhatte, Malika; Demolombe, Sophie; Jodar, Martine; Baudrie, Véronique; Offermanns, Stefan; Feng, Yuanyi; Patel, Amanda; Honoré, Eric; Duprat, Fabrice

    2016-07-01

    Human mutations in the X-linked FLNA gene are associated with a remarkably diverse phenotype, including severe arterial morphological anomalies. However, the role for filamin A (FlnA) in vascular cells remains partially understood. We used a smooth muscle (sm)-specific conditional mouse model to delete FlnA at the adult stage, thus avoiding the developmental effects of the knock-out. Inactivation of smFlnA in adult mice significantly lowered blood pressure, together with a decrease in pulse pressure. However, both the aorta and carotid arteries showed a major outward hypertrophic remodeling, resistant to losartan, and normally occurring in hypertensive conditions. Notably, arterial compliance was significantly enhanced in the absence of smFlnA. Moreover, reactivity of thoracic aorta rings to a variety of vasoconstrictors was elevated, while basal contractility in response to KCl depolarization was reduced. Enhanced reactivity to the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U46619 was fully reversed by the ROCK inhibitor Y27632. We discuss the possibility that a reduction in arterial stiffness upon smFlnA inactivation might cause a compensatory increase in conduit artery diameter for normalization of parietal tension, independently of the ROCK pathway. In conclusion, deletion of smFlnA in adult mice recapitulates the vascular phenotype of human bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia, culminating in aortic dilatation. PMID:27023351

  12. Muscle force steadiness in older adults before and after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica W; Marcus, Robin L; Peters, Christopher L; Pelt, Christopher E; Tracy, Brian L; LaStayo, Paul C

    2014-06-01

    The ability to control submaximal muscle forces has been shown to be associated with age-related decreases in physical function, such as increased tendency to fall. This study compared quadriceps muscle force steadiness (MFS) in individuals with knee OA before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to an age-matched group of controls. Lower extremity MFS was measured in 13 subjects with knee OA before and at six months after TKA (TKA-GROUP) and compared to an age-matched control group (CONTROL-GROUP). MFS was significantly more impaired in the TKA-GROUP at the pre-operative, but not post-operative visit, and significantly improved between the pre-operative and post-operative visits. Further research is warranted to evaluate the relation between this MFS measurement and physical functional performance in those at high risk for falling.

  13. [An Adult Case of Transperineal Repair of Congenital Rectourethral Fistula Using Gracilis Muscle Flap Interposition].

    PubMed

    Yo, Toeki; Kanematsu, Akihiro; Hanasaki, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Yukako; Togo, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Toru; Higuchi, Yoshihide; Nojima, Michio; Yamamoto, Shingo; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2015-07-01

    A man in his 50s was referred to our hospital after recurrent severe urinary tract infection. He had undergone anoplasty for anorectal malformation during early infancy. He noticed urinary leakage from the anus for a long time. Under diagnosis of congenital rectourethral fistula, we performed fistula closure. The fistula was transsected via transperineal incision and each stump was closed. A gracilis muscle flap approximately 30 cm long was harvested from the left thigh, brought into the deepest part between the separated rectum and urethra through a subcutaneous tunnel and fixed there. The urinary leakage from the anus disappeared, and the infection resolved. Application of gracilis muscle flap for congenital diseases is rare, but was useful in the present case. PMID:26278215

  14. Gene expression analyses of essential catch factors in the smooth and striated adductor muscles of larval, juvenile and adult great scallop (Pecten maximus).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Øivind; Torgersen, Jacob S; Pagander, Helene H; Magnesen, Thorolf; Johnston, Ian A

    2009-01-01

    The scallop adductor muscle consists of striated fibres responsible for the fast closure of the shells, and smooth fibres able to maintain tension in a prolonged state of contraction called catch. Formation of the force-bearing catch linkages has been demonstrated to be initiated by dephosphorylation of the key catch-regulating factor twitchin by a calcineurin-like phosphatase, while the involvement of other thick filament proteins is uncertain. Here we report on the development of catchability of the adductor smooth muscle in the great scallop (Pecten maximus) by analysing the spatio-temporal gene expression patterns of the myosin regulatory light chain (MLCr), twitchin, myorod and calcineurin using whole mount in situ hybridization and real-time quantitative PCR. The MLCr signal was identified in the retractor and adductor muscles of the pediveliger larvae, and the juvenile and adult scallop displayed abundant mRNA levels of MLCr in the smooth and striated adductor muscles. Twitchin was mainly expressed in the smooth adductor muscle during metamorphosis, whereas the adult striated adductor muscle contained seven-folds higher twitchin mRNA levels compared to the smooth portion. Calcineurin expression predominated in the gonads and in the smooth adductor, and five-folds higher mRNA levels were measured in the smooth than in the striated fibres at the adult stage. In contrast to the other genes examined, the expression of myorod was confined to the smooth adductor muscle suggesting that myorod plays a permissive role in the molluscan catch muscles, which are first required at the vulnerable settlement stage as a component of the predator defence system.

  15. Feasibility of resistance training in adult McArdle patients: clinical outcomes and muscle strength and mass benefits

    PubMed Central

    Santalla, Alfredo; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Brea-Alejo, Lidia; Pagola-Aldazábal, Itziar; Díez-Bermejo, Jorge; Fleck, Steven J.; Ara, Ignacio; Lucia, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of a 4-month resistance (weight lifting) training program followed by a 2-month detraining period in 7 adult McArdle patients (5 female) on: muscle mass (assessed by DXA), strength, serum creatine kinase (CK) activity and clinical severity. Adherence to training was ≥84% in all patients and no major contraindication or side effect was noted during the training or strength assessment sessions. The training program had a significant impact on total and lower extremities’ lean mass (P < 0.05 for the time effect), with mean values increasing with training by +855 g (95% confidence interval (CI): 30, 1679) and +547 g (95%CI: 116, 978), respectively, and significantly decreasing with detraining. Body fat showed no significant changes over the study period. Bench press and half-squat performance, expressed as the highest value of average muscle power (W) or force (N) in the concentric-repetition phase of both tests showed a consistent increase over the 4-month training period, and decreased with detraining. Yet muscle strength and power detraining values were significantly higher than pre-training values, indicating that a training effect was still present after detraining. Importantly, all the participants, with no exception, showed a clear gain in muscle strength after the 4-month training period, e.g., bench press: +52 W (95% CI: 13, 91); half-squat: +173 W (95% CI: 96, 251). No significant time effect (P > 0.05) was noted for baseline or post strength assessment values of serum CK activity, which remained essentially within the range reported in our laboratory for McArdle patients. All the patients changed to a lower severity class with training, such that none of them were in the highest disease severity class (3) after the intervention and, as such, they did not have fixed muscle weakness after training. Clinical improvements were retained, in all but one patient, after detraining, such that after detraining all patients were classed as

  16. Feasibility of resistance training in adult McArdle patients: clinical outcomes and muscle strength and mass benefits.

    PubMed

    Santalla, Alfredo; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Brea-Alejo, Lidia; Pagola-Aldazábal, Itziar; Díez-Bermejo, Jorge; Fleck, Steven J; Ara, Ignacio; Lucia, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of a 4-month resistance (weight lifting) training program followed by a 2-month detraining period in 7 adult McArdle patients (5 female) on: muscle mass (assessed by DXA), strength, serum creatine kinase (CK) activity and clinical severity. Adherence to training was ≥84% in all patients and no major contraindication or side effect was noted during the training or strength assessment sessions. The training program had a significant impact on total and lower extremities' lean mass (P < 0.05 for the time effect), with mean values increasing with training by +855 g (95% confidence interval (CI): 30, 1679) and +547 g (95%CI: 116, 978), respectively, and significantly decreasing with detraining. Body fat showed no significant changes over the study period. Bench press and half-squat performance, expressed as the highest value of average muscle power (W) or force (N) in the concentric-repetition phase of both tests showed a consistent increase over the 4-month training period, and decreased with detraining. Yet muscle strength and power detraining values were significantly higher than pre-training values, indicating that a training effect was still present after detraining. Importantly, all the participants, with no exception, showed a clear gain in muscle strength after the 4-month training period, e.g., bench press: +52 W (95% CI: 13, 91); half-squat: +173 W (95% CI: 96, 251). No significant time effect (P > 0.05) was noted for baseline or post strength assessment values of serum CK activity, which remained essentially within the range reported in our laboratory for McArdle patients. All the patients changed to a lower severity class with training, such that none of them were in the highest disease severity class (3) after the intervention and, as such, they did not have fixed muscle weakness after training. Clinical improvements were retained, in all but one patient, after detraining, such that after detraining all patients were classed as

  17. Characterization of ion channels on the surface membrane of adult rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Chua, M; Betz, W J

    1991-01-01

    The channels present on the surface membrane of isolated rat flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers were surveyed using the patch clamp technique. 85 out of 139 fibers had a novel channel which excluded the anions chloride, sulfate, and isethionate with a permeability ratio of chloride to sodium of less than 0.05. The selectivity sequence for cations was Na+ = K+ = Cs+ greater than Ca++ = Mg++ greater than N-Methyl-D-Glucamine. The channel remained closed for long periods, and had a large conductance of approximately 320 pS with several subconductance states at approximately 34 pS levels. Channel activity was not voltage dependent and the reversal potential for cations in muscle fibers of approximately 0 mV results in the channel's behaving as a physiological leakage conductance. Voltage activated potassium channels were present in 65 of the cell attached patches and had conductances of mostly 6, 12, and 25 pS. The voltage sensitivity of the potassium channels was consistent with that of the delayed rectifier current. Only three patches contained chloride channels. The scarcity of chloride channels despite the known high chloride conductance of skeletal muscle suggests that most of the chloride channels must be located in the transverse tubular system. PMID:1714780

  18. Identification and localization of caldesmon in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Woo, G C; Walsh, M P; Ikebe, M; Kargacin, G J

    1998-01-01

    Caldesmon has been detected in smooth muscle and in a number of non-muscle cells. It binds both actin and myosin and may act as a regulator of contraction or a structural element in smooth muscle. The presence of caldesmon in striated muscle has not been well established. To address this issue, polyclonal antibodies and a panel of monoclonal antibodies were raised against chicken gizzard smooth muscle caldesmon and used to demonstrate that caldesmon is present in adult cardiac muscle of a variety of mammalian species. Western-blot analysis revealed the presence of caldesmon in ventricular myocytes isolated from rat heart. The epitopes for the individual monoclonal antibodies were mapped to the caldesmon primary structure using chymotryptic and 2-nitro-5-thiocyanatobenzoic acid fragments. Bovine and rat cardiac caldesmons were recognized only by a subset of these monoclonal antibodies, indicating primary sequence differences from the chicken smooth muscle protein. Immunofluorescence labelling of isolated myocytes from rat, rabbit and guinea pig cardiac muscle revealed a striated pattern of fluorescence labelling. Dual labelling of caldesmon and myosin or caldesmon and alpha-actinin demonstrated that caldesmon was present at the centre of the I-band rather than in the A-band, as might have been expected from the myosin binding properties of the smooth muscle protein. These results suggest a structural role for caldesmon in cardiac muscle cells. PMID:9693116

  19. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  20. Reinnervation by axon collaterals from single facial motoneurons to multiple muscle targets following axotomy in the adult guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Kudo, M

    1994-01-01

    To study the process of recovery from facial palsy experimentally, the location of cranial motoneurons supplying the posterior belly of the digastric muscle (PDG) and the extratemporal portion of the facial nerve trunk was examined in a double-labeling paradigm using two retrograde tracers in the adult guinea pig of which the facial nerve had been surgically injured. In different stages after the induced facial palsy had recovered functionally (4-13 weeks after the surgical operation), wheat germ-agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was injected into the PDG and Fluoro-Ruby (FR) was applied to the proximal cut end of the extratemporal portion of the facial nerve trunk. Distribution of neurons retrogradely labeled with WGA-HRP and/or FR was plotted in the brainstem and compared with that of the controls. In the intact cases, HRP-labeled neurons were restrictedly seen in the accessory facial nucleus (Acs7), while FR-labeled neurons were found within the main facial nucleus (FMN). In the axotomized cases: (1) HRP-labeled neurons were seen diffusely in the Acs7 as well as in the FMN, where normal myotopical representation no longer seemed to be maintained. (2) FR-labeled neurons were also observed diffusely in the FMN and the Acs7. (3) A considerable number of neurons were doubly labeled with WGA-HRP and FR in both the Acs and the FMN in cases with shorter survival periods (4-7 weeks), but not in cases with longer survival periods (12-13 weeks). Thus, new findings show that connections are temporarily maintained by single, facial motoneurons with axon collaterals to multiple muscle targets in adult mammals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Symptoms of muscle dysmorphia, body dysmorphic disorder, and eating disorders in a nonclinical population of adult male weightlifters in Australia.

    PubMed

    Nieuwoudt, Johanna E; Zhou, Shi; Coutts, Rosanne A; Booker, Ray

    2015-05-01

    The current study aimed to (a) determine the rates of symptoms of muscle dysmorphia (MD), body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), and eating disorder; (b) determine the relationships among symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders; and (c) provide a comprehensive comparison of symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders in a nonclinical population of adult male weightlifters in Australia. The participants (N = 648, mean age = 29.5 years, SD = 10.1) participated in an online survey, consisting of Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale, the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire, and the Eating Attitude Test-26. Results indicated that 110 participants (17%) were at risk of having MD, 69 participants (10.6%) were at risk of having BDD, and 219 participants (33.8%) were at risk of having an eating disorder. Furthermore, 36 participants (5.6%) were found at risk of having both MD and BDD, and 60 participants (9.3%) were at risk of having both MD and an eating disorder. Significant correlations and associations were found between symptoms of MD and BDD, and symptoms of MD and eating disorders. Support was provided for the comorbidity of, and symptomatic similarities between, symptoms of MD and BDD, and symptoms of MD and eating disorders. This may reflect a shared pathogenesis between symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders. Strength and conditioning professionals, exercise scientists, athletic trainers, and personal trainers should be aware that adult males who are working out with weights (i.e., free weights or machines) may be at increased risk of having MD, BDD, and eating disorders. PMID:25909960

  2. Symptoms of muscle dysmorphia, body dysmorphic disorder, and eating disorders in a nonclinical population of adult male weightlifters in Australia.

    PubMed

    Nieuwoudt, Johanna E; Zhou, Shi; Coutts, Rosanne A; Booker, Ray

    2015-05-01

    The current study aimed to (a) determine the rates of symptoms of muscle dysmorphia (MD), body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), and eating disorder; (b) determine the relationships among symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders; and (c) provide a comprehensive comparison of symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders in a nonclinical population of adult male weightlifters in Australia. The participants (N = 648, mean age = 29.5 years, SD = 10.1) participated in an online survey, consisting of Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale, the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire, and the Eating Attitude Test-26. Results indicated that 110 participants (17%) were at risk of having MD, 69 participants (10.6%) were at risk of having BDD, and 219 participants (33.8%) were at risk of having an eating disorder. Furthermore, 36 participants (5.6%) were found at risk of having both MD and BDD, and 60 participants (9.3%) were at risk of having both MD and an eating disorder. Significant correlations and associations were found between symptoms of MD and BDD, and symptoms of MD and eating disorders. Support was provided for the comorbidity of, and symptomatic similarities between, symptoms of MD and BDD, and symptoms of MD and eating disorders. This may reflect a shared pathogenesis between symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders. Strength and conditioning professionals, exercise scientists, athletic trainers, and personal trainers should be aware that adult males who are working out with weights (i.e., free weights or machines) may be at increased risk of having MD, BDD, and eating disorders.

  3. Sodium/calcium exchange modulates intracellular calcium overload during posthypoxic reoxygenation in mammalian working myocardium. Evidence from aequorin-loaded ferret ventricular muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, Y; Sasayama, S; Inoko, M; Morgan, J P

    1994-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the intracellular Ca2+ overload of ventricular myocardium during the period of posthypoxic reoxygenation is mediated by transsarcolemmal Ca2+ influx via Na+/Ca2+ exchange. In aequorin-loaded, ferret right ventricular papillary muscles, blockers of the sarcolemmal and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ channels, slowed the Cai2+ transient, producing a convex ascent during membrane depolarization, followed by a concave descent during repolarization. The magnitude of the Cai2+ transient was affected by changes in the membrane potential, Nai+, Nao+, and Cao2+, and was blocked by Ni2+, or dichlorbenzamil. The calculated Na+/Ca2+ exchange current was in the reverse mode (Ca2+ influx) during the ascending phase of the Cai2+ transient, and was abruptly switched to the forward mode (Ca2+ efflux) at repolarization, matching the time course of the Cai2+ transient. During hypoxic superfusion, the Cai2+ transient was abbreviated, which was associated with a shorter action potential duration. In contrast, immediately after reoxygenation, the Cai2+ transient increased to a level greater than that of the control, even though the action potential remained abbreviated. This is the first demonstration on a beat-to-beat basis that, during reoxygenation, Ca2+ influx via Na+/Ca2+ exchange is augmented and transports a significant amount of Ca2+ into the ventricular myocardial cell. The activation of the exchanger at the time of reoxygenation appears to be mediated by Nai+ accumulation, which occurs during hypoxia. PMID:8132766

  4. Efficacy of whey protein supplementation on resistance exercise-induced changes in muscle strength, lean mass, and function in mobility-limited older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein supplementation may augment resistance exercise-induced increases in muscle strength and mass. Further studies are required to determine whether this effect extends to functionally compromised older adults. The objectives of the study were to compare the effects of whey protein concent...

  5. Botulinum toxin in masticatory muscles of the adult rat induces bone loss at the condyle and alveolar regions of the mandible associated with a bone proliferation at a muscle enthesis.

    PubMed

    Kün-Darbois, Jean-Daniel; Libouban, Hélène; Chappard, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    In man, botulinum toxin type A (BTX) is injected in masticatory muscles for several indications such as trismus, bruxism, or masseter hypertrophy. Bone changes in the mandible following BTX injections in adult animal have therefore became a subject of interest. The aim of this study was to analyze condylar and alveolar bone changes following BTX unilateral injections in masseter and temporal muscles in adult rats. Mature male rats (n = 15) were randomized into 2 groups: control (CTRL; n = 6) and BTX group (n= 9). Rats of the BTX group received a single injection of BTX into right masseter and temporal muscles. Rats of the CTRL group were similarly injected with saline solution. Rats were sacrificed 4 weeks after injections. Masticatory muscles examination and microcomputed tomography (microCT) were performed. A significant difference of weight was found between the 2 groups at weeks 2, 3 and 4 (p < 0.05). Atrophy of the right masseter and temporal muscles was observed in all BTX rats. MicroCT analysis showed significant bone loss in the right alveolar and condylar areas in BTX rats. Decrease in bone volume reached -20% for right alveolar bone and -35% for right condylar bone. A hypertrophic bone metaplasia at the digastric muscle enthesis was found on every right hemimandible in the BTX group and none in the CTRL group. BTX injection in masticatory muscles leads to a significant and major mandible bone loss. These alterations can represent a risk factor for fractures in human. The occurrence of a hypertrophic bone metaplasia at the Mus Digastricus enthesis may constitute an etiological factor for tori.

  6. Percutaneous phenol blocks to motor points of spastic forearm muscles in head-injured adults.

    PubMed

    Garland, D E; Lilling, M; Keenan, M A

    1984-05-01

    The motor points of spastic wrist and finger flexors were identified using a nerve stimulator. These motor points were injected percutaneously with either a 3% or 5% aqueous solution of phenol in 11 patients with brain injury. The effectiveness of the blocks was assessed by recording the resting angle of the wrist, active extension of the wrist, and passive extension of the wrist--first with the fingers flexed and then with the fingers extended. The blocks were repeated once in two patients and twice in one patient for return of muscle tone which interfered with hand function. Relaxation of muscle tone persisted for up to two months following the injections. The resting angle of the wrist improved a mean of 25 degrees. Active wrist extension improved an average of 30 degrees. The changes in wrist measurements represent the effects of different processes: 1) the neurolytic effect of the phenol block; 2) improvement in the neurologic status of the patient; and 3) regeneration of the motor end plate. This procedure is an effective method of temporarily controlling spasticity and allowing functional hand training while neurologic recovery is occurring.

  7. Protecting Skeletal Muscle with Protein and Amino Acid during Periods of Disuse

    PubMed Central

    Galvan, Elfego; Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Lamon, Séverine; Paddon-Jones, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Habitual sedentary behavior increases risk of chronic disease, hospitalization and poor quality of life. Short-term bed rest or disuse accelerates the loss of muscle mass, function, and glucose tolerance. Optimizing nutritional practices and protein intake may reduce the consequences of disuse by preserving metabolic homeostasis and muscle mass and function. Most modes of physical inactivity have the potential to negatively impact the health of older adults more than their younger counterparts. Mechanistically, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and muscle protein synthesis are negatively affected by disuse. This contributes to reduced muscle quality and is accompanied by impaired glucose regulation. Simply encouraging increased protein and/or energy consumption is a well-intentioned, but often impractical strategy to protect muscle health. Emerging evidence suggests that leucine supplemented meals may partially and temporarily protect skeletal muscle during disuse by preserving anabolism and mitigating reductions in mass, function and metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27376322

  8. Protecting Skeletal Muscle with Protein and Amino Acid during Periods of Disuse.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Elfego; Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Lamon, Séverine; Paddon-Jones, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Habitual sedentary behavior increases risk of chronic disease, hospitalization and poor quality of life. Short-term bed rest or disuse accelerates the loss of muscle mass, function, and glucose tolerance. Optimizing nutritional practices and protein intake may reduce the consequences of disuse by preserving metabolic homeostasis and muscle mass and function. Most modes of physical inactivity have the potential to negatively impact the health of older adults more than their younger counterparts. Mechanistically, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and muscle protein synthesis are negatively affected by disuse. This contributes to reduced muscle quality and is accompanied by impaired glucose regulation. Simply encouraging increased protein and/or energy consumption is a well-intentioned, but often impractical strategy to protect muscle health. Emerging evidence suggests that leucine supplemented meals may partially and temporarily protect skeletal muscle during disuse by preserving anabolism and mitigating reductions in mass, function and metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27376322

  9. Influence of Botulinumtoxin A on the Expression of Adult MyHC Isoforms in the Masticatory Muscles in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice (Mdx-Mice)

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Teodor

    2016-01-01

    The most widespread animal model to investigate Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the mdx-mouse. In contrast to humans, phases of muscle degeneration are replaced by regeneration processes; hence there is only a restricted time slot for research. The aim of the study was to investigate if an intramuscular injection of BTX-A is able to break down muscle regeneration and has direct implications on the gene expression of myosin heavy chains in the corresponding treated and untreated muscles. Therefore, paralysis of the right masseter muscle was induced in adult healthy and dystrophic mice by a specific intramuscular injection of BTX-A. After 21 days the mRNA expression and protein content of MyHC isoforms of the right and left masseter, temporal, and the tongue muscle were determined using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot technique. MyHC-IIa and MyHC-I-mRNA expression significantly increased in the paralyzed masseter muscle of control-mice, whereas MyHC-IIb and MyHC-IIx/d-mRNA were decreased. In dystrophic muscles no effect of BTX-A could be detected at the level of MyHC. This study suggests that BTX-A injection is a suitable method to simulate DMD-pathogenesis in healthy mice but further investigations are necessary to fully analyse the BTX-A effect and to generate sustained muscular atrophy in mdx-mice.

  10. Influence of Botulinumtoxin A on the Expression of Adult MyHC Isoforms in the Masticatory Muscles in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice (Mdx-Mice)

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Teodor

    2016-01-01

    The most widespread animal model to investigate Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the mdx-mouse. In contrast to humans, phases of muscle degeneration are replaced by regeneration processes; hence there is only a restricted time slot for research. The aim of the study was to investigate if an intramuscular injection of BTX-A is able to break down muscle regeneration and has direct implications on the gene expression of myosin heavy chains in the corresponding treated and untreated muscles. Therefore, paralysis of the right masseter muscle was induced in adult healthy and dystrophic mice by a specific intramuscular injection of BTX-A. After 21 days the mRNA expression and protein content of MyHC isoforms of the right and left masseter, temporal, and the tongue muscle were determined using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot technique. MyHC-IIa and MyHC-I-mRNA expression significantly increased in the paralyzed masseter muscle of control-mice, whereas MyHC-IIb and MyHC-IIx/d-mRNA were decreased. In dystrophic muscles no effect of BTX-A could be detected at the level of MyHC. This study suggests that BTX-A injection is a suitable method to simulate DMD-pathogenesis in healthy mice but further investigations are necessary to fully analyse the BTX-A effect and to generate sustained muscular atrophy in mdx-mice. PMID:27689088

  11. Intradetrusor injection of adult muscle-derived cells for the treatment of underactive bladder: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Levanovich, Peter E; Diokno, Ananias; Hasenau, Deborah L; Lajiness, Michelle; Pruchnic, Ryan; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-03-01

    We conducted the first-regenerative medicine cellular therapy for underactive bladder (UAB) in an FDA-approved, compassionate-use IND trial to evaluate treatment safety and potential clinical efficacy of autologous muscle-derived stem cells (AMDC) on a patient with UAB. No study-related adverse events or side effects were reported. In the 1-year follow-up period, the subject denied any gross hematuria, urgency, frequency or infection. A reduction in maximum cystometric capacity from 844 to 663 mL was observed, and the patient was able to void small amounts but continues to require self-catheterization 1 year after AMDC injection. Intradetrusor injection of AMDC is safe, minimally invasive and a promising treatment option for the UAB.

  12. The effect of nitrate supplementation on muscle contraction in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hoon, Matthew W; Fornusek, Ché; Chapman, Phillip G; Johnson, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of dietary supplementation with inorganic nitrate ([Formula: see text] ) on markers of contractile function in human knee extensors. In a double-blinded, randomized cross-over design, 18 (12 M) healthy participants undertook four days of supplementation with either nitrate-rich beetroot juice (NITRATE; days 1-3: 525 mg [Formula: see text], day 4: 1050 mg [Formula: see text]) or nitrate-depleted beetroot juice (PLACEBO). On the fourth day, isometric knee extension force was assessed during a series of voluntary and electrically evoked (stimulation) tests. In addition, muscular fatigue was examined in two separate continuous-stimulation (0.8 s tetanus with a 1:1 work:rest ratio for 102.4 s) fatigue tests, one with and one without blood flow restriction. There were no differences for maximum voluntary contraction, peak twitch force, half-relaxation time and the force-frequency relationship for stimulations up to 100 Hz between the NITRATE and PLACEBO trials. No differences between trials were observed in the non-restricted fatigue test, however NITRATE was found to attenuate the decline in force during the restricted test, such that the force at the 80 s mark (PLACEBO: 66 ± 11 vs. NITRATE 74 ± 9% of initial force; P = .01) and 102 s mark (PLACEBO: 47 ± 8% vs. NITRATE 55 ± 8%; P < .01) were significantly higher. These results suggest that four days of [Formula: see text] supplementation elicits peripheral responses in muscle that attenuate muscular fatigue during exhaustive exercise under hypovolemic conditions. This ergogenic action is likely attributable to improved Ca(2+) handling in the muscle, or enhanced perfusion during ischemia. PMID:26681629

  13. DNA methylation dynamics in muscle development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrió, Elvira; Suelves, Mònica

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic modification for mammalian development and is crucial for the establishment and maintenance of cellular identity. Traditionally, DNA methylation has been considered as a permanent repressive epigenetic mark. However, the application of genome-wide approaches has allowed the analysis of DNA methylation in different genomic contexts revealing a more dynamic regulation than originally thought, since active DNA methylation and demethylation occur during cellular differentiation and tissue specification. Satellite cells are the primary stem cells in adult skeletal muscle and are responsible for postnatal muscle growth, hypertrophy, and muscle regeneration. This review outlines the published data regarding DNA methylation changes along the skeletal muscle program, in both physiological and pathological conditions, to better understand the epigenetic mechanisms that control myogenesis. PMID:25798107

  14. Regional thermal specialisation in a mammal: temperature affects power output of core muscle more than that of peripheral muscle in adult mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    James, Rob S; Tallis, Jason; Angilletta, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    In endotherms, such as mammals and birds, internal organs can specialise to function within a narrow thermal range. Consequently, these organs should become more sensitive to changes in body temperature. Yet, organs at the periphery of the body still experience considerable fluctuations in temperature, which could select for lower thermal sensitivity. We hypothesised that the performance of soleus muscle taken from the leg would depend less on temperature than would the performance of diaphragm muscle taken from the body core. Soleus and diaphragm muscles were isolated from mice and subjected to isometric and work-loop studies to analyse mechanical performance at temperatures between 15 and 40 °C. Across this thermal range, soleus muscle took longer to generate isometric force and longer to relax, and tended to produce greater normalised maximal force (stress) than did diaphragm muscle. The time required to produce half of maximal force during isometric tetanus and the time required to relax half of maximal force were both more sensitive to temperature in soleus than they were in diaphragm. However, thermal sensitivities of maximal force during isometric tetani were similar for both muscles. Consistent with our hypothesis, power output (the product of speed and force) was greater in magnitude and more thermally sensitive in diaphragm than it was in soleus. Our findings, when combined with previous observations of muscles from regionally endothermic fish, suggest that endothermy influences the thermal sensitivities of power output in core and peripheral muscles.

  15. Jaw Dysfunction Related to Pterygoid and Masseter Muscle Dosimetry After Radiation Therapy in Children and Young Adults With Head-and-Neck Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Krasin, Matthew J.; Wiese, Kristin M.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Hua, Chia-ho; Daw, Najat; Navid, Fariba; Davidoff, Andrew M.; McGregor, Lisa; Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; McCrarey, Lola; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between jaw function, patient and treatment variables, and radiation dosimetry of the mandibular muscles and joints in children and young adults receiving radiation for soft-tissue and bone sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four pediatric and young adult patients with head-and-neck sarcomas were treated on an institutional review board-approved prospective study of focal radiation therapy for local tumor control. Serial jaw depression measurements were related to radiation dosimetry delivered to the medial and lateral pterygoid muscles, masseter muscles, and temporomandibular joints to generate mathematical models of jaw function. Results: Baseline jaw depression was only influenced by the degree of surgical resection. In the first 12 weeks from initiation of radiation, surgical procedures greater than a biopsy, administration of cyclophosphamide containing chemotherapy regimes, and large gross tumor volumes adversely affected jaw depression. Increasing dose to the pterygoid and masseter muscles above 40 Gy predicted loss of jaw function over the full course of follow-up. Conclusions: Clinical and treatment factors are related to initial and subsequent jaw dysfunction. Understanding these complex interactions and the affect of specific radiation doses may help reduce the risk for jaw dysfunction in future children and young adults undergoing radiation therapy for the management of soft-tissue and bone sarcomas.

  16. Does the Amount of Fat Mass Predict Age-Related Loss of Lean Mass, Muscle Strength, and Muscle Quality in Older Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jingzhong; Stenholm, Sari; Caserotti, Paolo; Houston, Denise K.; Nicklas, Barbara J.; You, Tongjian; Lee, Jung Sun; Visser, Marjolein; Newman, Anne B.; Schwartz, Ann V.; Cauley, Jane A.; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Harris, Tamara B.

    2011-01-01

    Background. An excessive amount of adipose tissue may contribute to sarcopenia and may be one mechanism underlying accelerated loss of muscle mass and strength with aging. We therefore examined the association of baseline total body fat with changes in leg lean mass, muscle strength, and muscle quality over 7 years of follow-up and whether this link was explained by adipocytokines and insulin resistance. Methods. Data were from 2,307 men and women, aged 70–79 years, participating in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study. Total fat mass was acquired from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Leg lean mass was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in Years 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8. Knee extension strength was measured by isokinetic dynamometer in Years 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8. Muscle quality was calculated as muscle strength divided by leg lean mass. Results. Every SD greater fat mass was related to 1.3 kg more leg lean mass at baseline in men and 1.5 kg in women (p < .01). Greater fat mass was also associated with a greater decline in leg lean mass in both men and women (0.02 kg/year, p < .01), which was not explained by higher levels of adipocytokines and insulin resistance. Larger fat mass was related to significantly greater muscle strength but significantly lower muscle quality at baseline (p < .01). No significant differences in decline of muscle strength and quality were found. Conclusions. High fatness was associated with lower muscle quality, and it predicts accelerated loss of lean mass. Prevention of greater fatness in old age may decrease the loss of lean mass and maintain muscle quality and thereby reducing disability and mobility impairments. PMID:21572082

  17. Fourteen days of bed rest induces a decline in satellite cell content and robust atrophy of skeletal muscle fibers in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily J; English, Kirk L; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-04-15

    Bed rest, a ground-based spaceflight analog, induces robust atrophy of skeletal muscle, an effect that is exacerbated with increasing age. We examined the effect of 14 days of bed rest on skeletal muscle satellite cell content and fiber type atrophy in middle-aged adults, an understudied age demographic with few overt signs of muscle aging that is representative of astronauts who perform long-duration spaceflight. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis of healthy middle-aged adults [n= 7 (4 male, 3 female); age: 51 ± 1 yr] before (Pre-BR) and after (Post-BR) 14 days of bed rest. Immunohistochemical analyses were used to quantify myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform expression, cross-sectional area (CSA), satellite cell and myonuclear content, and capillary density. Peak oxygen consumption, knee extensor strength, and body composition were also measured Pre-BR and Post-BR. Post-BR MyHC type 2a fiber percentage was reduced, and mean CSA decreased in all fiber types (-24 ± 5%;P< 0.05). Satellite cell content was also reduced Post-BR (-39 ± 9%;P< 0.05), and the change in satellite cell content was significantly correlated with the change in mean fiber CSA (r(2)= 0.60;P< 0.05). A decline in capillary density was observed Post-BR (-23 ± 6%;P< 0.05), and Post-BR capillary content was significantly associated with Post-BR peak aerobic capacity (r(2)= 0.59;P< 0.05). A subtle decline in myonuclear content occurred during bed rest (-5 ± 1%;P< 0.05). The rapid maladaptation of skeletal muscle to 14 days of mechanical unloading in middle-aged adults emphasizes the need for robust countermeasures to preserve muscle function in astronauts. PMID:26796754

  18. Temperature- and exercise-induced gene expression and metabolic enzyme changes in skeletal muscle of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Grant B; Craig, Paul M; Dhekney, Kalindi; Dipardo, Shawn

    2006-01-01

    Both exercise training and cold acclimatization induce muscle remodelling in vertebrates, producing a more aerobic phenotype. In ectothermic species exercise training and cold-acclimatization represent distinct stimuli. It is currently unclear if these stimuli act through a common mechanism or if different mechanisms lead to a common phenotype. The goal of this study was to survey responses that represent potential mechanisms responsible for contraction- and temperature-induced muscle remodelling, using an ectothermic vertebrate. Separate groups of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) were either swim trained or cold acclimatized for 4 weeks. We found that the mitochondrial marker enzyme citrate synthase (CS) was increased by 1.5× in cold and by 1.3× with exercise (P < 0.05). Cytochrome c oxidase (COx) was increased by 1.2× following exercise training (P < 0.05) and 1.2× (P = 0.07) with cold acclimatization. However, only cold acclimatization increased β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) compared to exercise-trained (by 1.3×) and pyruvate kinase (PK) relative to control zebrafish. We assessed the whole-animal performance outcomes of these treatments. Maximum absolute sustained swimming speed (Ucrit) was increased in the exercise trained group but not in the cold acclimatized group. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that increases in CS are primarily transcriptionally regulated with exercise but not with cold treatments. Both treatments showed increases in nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 mRNA which was increased by 2.3× in cold-acclimatized and 4× in exercise-trained zebrafish above controls. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α mRNA levels were decreased in both experimental groups while PPAR-β1 declined in exercise training only. Moreover, PPAR-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α mRNA was not changed by either treatment. In zebrafish, both temperature and exercise produce a more aerobic phenotype, but there are stimulus-dependent responses

  19. Simple equations to predict concentric lower-body muscle power in older adults using the 30-second chair-rise test: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Wesley N; Rossi, Gianluca Del; Adams, Jessica B; Abderlarahman, KZ; Asfour, Shihab A; Roos, Bernard A; Signorile, Joseph F

    2010-01-01

    Although muscle power is an important factor affecting independence in older adults, there is no inexpensive or convenient test to quantify power in this population. Therefore, this pilot study examined whether regression equations for evaluating muscle power in older adults could be derived from a simple chair-rise test. We collected data from a 30-second chair-rise test performed by fourteen older adults (76 ± 7.19 years). Average (AP) and peak (PP) power values were computed using data from force-platform and high-speed motion analyses. Using each participant’s body mass and the number of chair rises performed during the first 20 seconds of the 30-second trial, we developed multivariate linear regression equations to predict AP and PP. The values computed using these equations showed a significant linear correlation with the values derived from our force-platform and high-speed motion analyses (AP: R = 0.89; PP: R = 0.90; P < 0.01). Our results indicate that lower-body muscle power in fit older adults can be accurately evaluated using the data from the initial 20 seconds of a simple 30-second chair-rise test, which requires no special equipment, preparation, or setting. PMID:20711436

  20. Angle-specific torques of thigh muscles: variability analysis in 200 healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Kaplan, M

    1991-12-01

    This study evaluated the variability of the isokinetic angle-specific torques (ASTs) at 15 and 75 degrees of knee flexion and assessed the relationship between them and the isokinetic peak torque (PT) in 200 healthy adults. The results showed that the value of these AST measurements was lower than of the PT measurements. This was due to larger variability of the AST (male and female coefficient of variation [cv] 34 and 43% in the ASTs vs. 19 and 31% in the PTs); unequal variation in the results between men and women (mean cv 27% in men vs. 34% in women); and fairly poor prediction of the ASTs from the PT (PT accounted for only 39 and 62% for the variation seen in the men's and women's AST results). Furthermore, in regression analysis the standard errors of the estimates were unacceptably high, averaging 26%. AST measurements should not be used routinely.

  1. Enrichment of vital adult cardiac muscle cells by continuous silica sol gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Maisch, B

    1981-01-01

    A major improvement in the isolation of vital adult cardiocytes was achieved by isopycnic preformed continuous silica sol gradient centrifugation after perfusion of the heart with collagenase. Vital rat cardiocytes were enriched to 90-95% vital cells reproducibly and constantly by one- or two-step gradient centrifugations. The isolated cardiocytes were tolerant to calcium concentrations up to 0.03 mmol/l, to diluted human serum, and to human complement. Gentamycin (50 microgram/ml) exerted a cytotoxic effect on myocytes, whereas Penicillium and Streptomycin in concentrations of 50 IU/ml did not induce cytolysis of vital cells. Digoxin 15 ng/ml) decreased the natural decay of myocytes of 20% in 25 hours to 8%. Enriched of vital cardiocytes by silica sol gradient centrifugation following their isolation by perfusion with collagenase may be helpful for investigations depending on a high yield of vital myocardial cells. PMID:6277294

  2. Increased Skeletal Muscle Capillarization Independently Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Older Adults After Exercise Training and Detraining.

    PubMed

    Prior, Steven J; Goldberg, Andrew P; Ortmeyer, Heidi K; Chin, Eva R; Chen, Dapeng; Blumenthal, Jacob B; Ryan, Alice S

    2015-10-01

    Intramuscular signaling and glucose transport mechanisms contribute to improvements in insulin sensitivity after aerobic exercise training. This study tested the hypothesis that increases in skeletal muscle capillary density (CD) also contribute to exercise-induced improvements in whole-body insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose uptake per unit plasma insulin [M/I]) independent of other mechanisms. The study design included a 6-month aerobic exercise training period followed by a 2-week detraining period to eliminate short-term effects of exercise on intramuscular signaling and glucose transport. Before and after exercise training and detraining, 12 previously sedentary older (65 ± 3 years) men and women underwent research tests, including hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and vastus lateralis biopsies. Exercise training increased Vo2max (2.2 ± 0.2 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2 L/min), CD (313 ± 13 vs. 349 ± 18 capillaries/mm(2)), and M/I (0.041 ± 0.005 vs. 0.051 ± 0.007 μmol/kg fat-free mass/min) (P < 0.05 for all). Exercise training also increased the insulin activation of glycogen synthase by 60%, GLUT4 expression by 16%, and 5' AMPK-α1 expression by 21%, but these reverted to baseline levels after detraining. Conversely, CD and M/I remained 15% and 18% higher after detraining, respectively (P < 0.05), and the changes in M/I (detraining minus baseline) correlated directly with changes in CD in regression analysis (partial r = 0.70; P = 0.02). These results suggest that an increase in CD is one mechanism contributing to sustained improvements in glucose metabolism after aerobic exercise training. PMID:26068543

  3. Increased Skeletal Muscle Capillarization Independently Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Older Adults After Exercise Training and Detraining

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Andrew P.; Ortmeyer, Heidi K.; Chin, Eva R.; Chen, Dapeng; Blumenthal, Jacob B.; Ryan, Alice S.

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular signaling and glucose transport mechanisms contribute to improvements in insulin sensitivity after aerobic exercise training. This study tested the hypothesis that increases in skeletal muscle capillary density (CD) also contribute to exercise-induced improvements in whole-body insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose uptake per unit plasma insulin [M/I]) independent of other mechanisms. The study design included a 6-month aerobic exercise training period followed by a 2-week detraining period to eliminate short-term effects of exercise on intramuscular signaling and glucose transport. Before and after exercise training and detraining, 12 previously sedentary older (65 ± 3 years) men and women underwent research tests, including hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and vastus lateralis biopsies. Exercise training increased Vo2max (2.2 ± 0.2 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2 L/min), CD (313 ± 13 vs. 349 ± 18 capillaries/mm2), and M/I (0.041 ± 0.005 vs. 0.051 ± 0.007 μmol/kg fat-free mass/min) (P < 0.05 for all). Exercise training also increased the insulin activation of glycogen synthase by 60%, GLUT4 expression by 16%, and 5′ AMPK-α1 expression by 21%, but these reverted to baseline levels after detraining. Conversely, CD and M/I remained 15% and 18% higher after detraining, respectively (P < 0.05), and the changes in M/I (detraining minus baseline) correlated directly with changes in CD in regression analysis (partial r = 0.70; P = 0.02). These results suggest that an increase in CD is one mechanism contributing to sustained improvements in glucose metabolism after aerobic exercise training. PMID:26068543

  4. Effects of pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy on passive stiffness in isolated adult cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Koide, M.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the changes in myocardial stiffness induced by chronic hemodynamic overloading are dependent on changes in the passive stiffness of the cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte). However, no previous studies have examined the passive constitutive properties of cardiocytes isolated from animals with myocardial hypertrophy. Accordingly, changes in relative passive stiffness of cardiocytes isolated from animals with chronic pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy were determined by examining the effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiocyte size. Anisosmotic stress was produced by altering superfusate osmolarity. Hypertrophied cardiocytes were enzymatically isolated from 16 adult cats with right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) and from 6 adult cats with RV volume-overload hypertrophy induced by creating an atrial septal defect (ASD). Left ventricular (LV) cardiocytes from each cat served as nonhypertrophied, normally loaded, same-animal controls. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 305 +/- 3 to 135 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 645 +/- 4 mosM. During anisosmotic stress, there were no significant differences between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes in pressure overload PAB cats with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area (47 +/- 2% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), diameter (46 +/- 3% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), or length (2.4 +/- 0.2% in RV vs. 2.0 +/- 0.3% in LV), or sarcomere length (1.5 +/- 0.1% in RV vs. 1.3 +/- 0.3% in LV). Likewise, there were no significant differences in cardiocyte strain between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes from ASD cats. In conclusion, chronic pressure-overload hypertrophy and chronic volume-overload hypertrophy did not alter the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress. Thus chronic overload hypertrophy did not alter relative passive cardiocyte stiffness.

  5. Nutritional status induces divergent variations of GLUT4 protein content, but not lipoprotein lipase activity, between adipose tissues and muscles in adult cattle.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Muriel; Faulconnier, Yannick; Hocquette, Jean-François; Bocquier, François; Leroux, Christine; Martin, Patrice; Chilliard, Yves

    2004-10-01

    Metabolic adaptations to variations in food supply are incompletely understood in ruminant animal adipose tissue (AT) and muscle. To explore this, we studied lipid metabolism and glucose transport potential in one internal and one external AT, as well as in one oxidative and one glycolytic muscle from control, 7 d underfed and 21 d refed adult cows. Refeeding increased (+79 to +307 %) the activities of enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis (fatty acid synthase, malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) in perirenal and subcutaneous AT; underfeeding did not modify these variables. Underfeeding decreased the activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in perirenal AT (-70 %) and cardiac muscle (-67 %), but did not modify the activities in subcutaneous AT and longissimus thoracis. Refeeding increased LPL activities in all tissues (+40 to +553 %) to levels comparable with (cardiac muscle) or greater than (AT, longissimus thoracis) those observed in control cows. Such variations in perirenal and cardiac muscle LPL activities did not result from variations in LPL mRNA levels, but suggest a post-transcriptional regulation of LPL in these nutritional conditions. Underfeeding did not modify GLUT4 contents in perirenal AT and muscles, while refeeding increased it only in perirenal AT (+250 %). Our present results contrast with previous results in rats, where LPL is regulated in opposite directions in AT and muscles, and GLUT4 is generally increased by fasting and decreased by refeeding in skeletal muscles. The present results highlight the bovine specificity of the response, which probably arises in part from peculiarities of ruminant animals for nutrient digestion and absorption.

  6. Regulation of gene expression mediating indeterminate muscle growth in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Ahammad, A K Shakur; Asaduzzaman, Md; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo; Kinoshita, Shigeharu

    2015-08-01

    Teleosts are unique among vertebrates due to their indeterminate muscle growth, i.e., continued production of neonatal muscle fibers until death. However, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying this property is unknown. Here, we focused on the torafugu (Takifugu rubripes) myosin heavy chain gene, MYHM2528-1, which is specifically expressed in neonatal muscle fibers produced by indeterminate muscle growth. We examined the flanking region of MYHM2528-1 through an in vivo reporter assay using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and identified a 2100 bp 5'-flanking sequence that contained sufficient promoter activity to allow specific gene expression. The effects of enhanced promoter activity were observed at the outer region of the fast muscle and the dorsal edge of slow muscle in zebrafish larvae. At the juvenile stage, the promoter was specifically activated in small diameter muscle fibers scattered throughout fast muscle and in slow muscle near the septum separating slow and fast muscles. This spatio-temporal promoter activity overlapped with known myogenic zones involved in teleost indeterminate muscle growth. A deletion mutant analysis revealed that the -2100 to -600 bp 5'flanking sequence of MYHM2528-1 is essential for promoter activity. This region contains putative binding sites for several representative myogenesis-related transcription factors and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), a transcription activator involved in regeneration of mammalian adult skeletal muscle. A significant reduction in the promoter activity of the MYHM2528-1 deletion constructs was observed in accordance with a reduction in the number of these binding sites, suggesting the involvement of specific transcription factors in indeterminate muscle growth.

  7. Effect of a high intensity quadriceps fatigue protocol on knee joint mechanics and muscle activation during gait in young adults.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Gillian Hatfield; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of impaired quadriceps function on knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular function during gait. Surface electromyograms, three-dimensional motion and ground reaction forces were collected during gait before and after 20 healthy adults completed a high intensity quadriceps fatigue protocol. Pattern recognition techniques were utilized to examine changes in amplitude and temporal characteristics of all gait variables. The fatigue protocol resulted in decreased knee extensor torque generation and quadriceps median power frequencies for 18 of 20 participants (p < 0.05). The gait data from these 18 participants was analyzed. The knee external rotation angle increased (p < 0.05), the net external flexion and external rotation moments decreased (p < 0.05), and the net external adduction moment increased (p < 0.05). Post-fatigue changes in periarticular muscle activation patterns were consistent with the biomechanical changes, but were not significantly altered. Even for this low demand task of walking the knee motion and loading characteristics were altered following a high intensity fatigue protocol in a manner that may place the knee joint at greater risk for joint pathology and injury.

  8. Comparative effects of horse exercise versus traditional exercise programs on gait, muscle strength, and body balance in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Aranda-García, Silvia; Iricibar, Albert; Planas, Antoni; Prat-Subiran, Joan A; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa M

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the separate effect and retention of 12-week traditional (TE) and horse (HE) exercise programs on physical function in healthy older participants (61 to 87 years old). Thirty-eight participants were randomly assigned to three groups: TE (n = 17), HE (n = 10), and control group (n = 11). TE and HE underwent a supervised exercise program (3 day/week). Maximal gait speed, muscle strength, and body balance were assessed at weeks 0, 12, and 16. Only TE and HE displayed significant improvements (P < .05) in knee extensor strength, and only HE had faster gait speed. Marginal balance improvements were found only in HE in the medial-lateral direction. However, TE showed larger improvements in handgrip than HE. The largest retention was in knee extensor strength but most of the exercise effects were lost in the follow-up. Besides TE, exercise with a horse may be an alternative option to older adults, provided that they want to interact with the animal. PMID:24425454

  9. Comparative effects of horse exercise versus traditional exercise programs on gait, muscle strength, and body balance in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Aranda-García, Silvia; Iricibar, Albert; Planas, Antoni; Prat-Subiran, Joan A; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa M

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the separate effect and retention of 12-week traditional (TE) and horse (HE) exercise programs on physical function in healthy older participants (61 to 87 years old). Thirty-eight participants were randomly assigned to three groups: TE (n = 17), HE (n = 10), and control group (n = 11). TE and HE underwent a supervised exercise program (3 day/week). Maximal gait speed, muscle strength, and body balance were assessed at weeks 0, 12, and 16. Only TE and HE displayed significant improvements (P < .05) in knee extensor strength, and only HE had faster gait speed. Marginal balance improvements were found only in HE in the medial-lateral direction. However, TE showed larger improvements in handgrip than HE. The largest retention was in knee extensor strength but most of the exercise effects were lost in the follow-up. Besides TE, exercise with a horse may be an alternative option to older adults, provided that they want to interact with the animal.

  10. Periexercise coingestion of branched-chain amino acids and carbohydrate in men does not preferentially augment resistance exercise-induced increases in phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway markers indicative of muscle protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria Pontes; Li, Rui; Cooke, Matthew; Kreider, Richard B; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2014-03-01

    The effects of a single bout of resistance exercise (RE) in conjunction with periexercise branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) and carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion on skeletal muscle signaling markers indicative of muscle protein synthesis were determined. It was hypothesized that CHO + BCAA would elicit a more profound effect on these signaling markers compared with CHO. Twenty-seven males were randomly assigned to CHO, CHO + BCAA, or placebo (PLC) groups. Four sets of leg presses and leg extensions were performed at 80% 1 repetition maximum. Supplements were ingested 30 minutes and immediately before and after RE. Venous blood and muscle biopsy samples were obtained immediately before supplement ingestion and 0.5, 2, and 6 hours after RE. Serum insulin and glucose and phosphorylated levels of muscle insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), protein kinase B, mammalian target of rapamycin, phosphorylated 70S6 kinase, and 4E binding protein 1 were assessed. Data were analyzed by 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. Significant group × time interactions were observed for glucose and insulin (P < .05) showing that CHO and CHO + BCAA were significantly greater than PLC. Significant time main effects were observed for IRS-1 (P = .001), protein kinase B (P = .031), mammalian target of rapamycin (P = .003), and phosphorylated 70S6 kinase (P = .001). Carbohydrate and CHO + BCAA supplementation significantly increased IRS-1 compared with PLC (P = .002). However, periexercise coingestion of CHO and BCAA did not augment RE-induced increases in skeletal muscle signaling markers indicative of muscle protein synthesis when compared with CHO.

  11. Distribution patterns of the glucose transporters GLUT4 and GLUT1 in skeletal muscles of rats (Rattus norvegicus), pigs (Sus scrofa), cows (Bos taurus), adult goats, goat kids (Capra hircus), and camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Duehlmeier, R; Sammet, K; Widdel, A; von Engelhardt, W; Wernery, U; Kinne, J; Sallmann, H-P

    2007-02-01

    Earlier studies demonstrated that forestomach herbivores are less insulin sensitive than monogastric omnivores. The present study was carried out to determine if different distribution patterns of the glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4 may contribute to these different insulin sensitivities. Western blotting was used to measure GLUT1 and GLUT4 protein contents in oxidative (masseter, diaphragm) and glycolytic (longissimus lumborum, semitendinosus) skeletal muscle membranes of monogastric omnivores (rats and pigs), and of forestomach herbivores (cows, adult goats, goat kids, and camels). Muscles were characterized biochemically. Comparing red and white muscles, the isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) activity was 1.5-15-times higher in oxidative muscles of all species, whereas lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was 1.4-4.4-times higher in glycolytic muscles except in adult goats. GLUT4 levels were 1.5-6.3-times higher in oxidative muscles. GLUT1 levels were 2.2-8.3-times higher in glycolytic muscles in forestomach herbivores but not in monogastric animals. We conclude that GLUT1 may be the predominant glucose transporter in glycolytic muscles of ruminating animals. The GLUT1 distribution patterns were identical in adult and pre-ruminant goats, indicating that GLUT1 expression among these muscles is determined genetically. The high blood glucose levels of camels cited in literature may be due to an "NIDDM-like" impaired GLUT4 activity in skeletal muscle.

  12. Sociodemographic Correlates of Meeting US Department of Health and Human Services Muscle Strengthening Recommendations in Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Der Ananian, Cheryl A.; Greenberg, Edward; Kurka, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A growing body of evidence demonstrates the health benefits of muscular strength training. Physical activity recommendations encourage all adults to participate regularly in muscle strengthening activities. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of meeting the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) muscular strengthening recommendations by middle-aged and older adults and the sociodemographic characteristics associated with meeting these recommendations, using data from the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Methods Data from the 2011 BRFSS were used to examine the prevalence of meeting the DHHS muscle strengthening recommendations by adults older than 45. Simple and multiple regression analyses were used to examine the sociodemographic characteristics associated with meeting the recommendations. Results Of respondents to the muscle strengthening question (N = 333,507), 79,029 (23.7%) reported meeting the muscle strengthening recommendations. Respondents who were female (odds ratio [OR] = 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78–0.83), widowed (OR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.66–0.72), 85 or older (OR = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.58–0.68), Hispanic (OR = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.67–0.78), with a body mass index of 30.0 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.47; 95% CI, 0.45–0.49), and with less than a high school education (OR = 0.32, 95% CI, 0.30–0.35) were less likely to meet the recommendations than their counterparts. Conclusion Sociodemographic characteristics such as sex, age, education, and race/ethnicity are significantly associated with meeting the muscle strengthening recommendations, suggesting a need to create tailored interventions and messages to promote participation in strength training. PMID:25232749

  13. Core Muscle Activity during TRX Suspension Exercises with and without Kinesiology Taping in Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: Implications for Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Tam, Y. T.; Macfarlane, Duncan J.; Ng, Shamay S. M.; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Chan, Eleanor W. Y.; Guo, X.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of kinesiology taping (KT) and different TRX suspension workouts on the amplitude of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the core muscles among people with chronic low back pain (LBP). Each participant (total n = 21) was exposed to two KT conditions: no taping and taping, while performing four TRX suspension exercises: (1) hamstring curl, (2) hip abduction in plank, (3) chest press, and (4) 45-degree row. Right transversus abdominis/internal oblique (TrAIO), rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and superficial lumbar multifidus (LMF) activity was recorded with surface EMG and expressed as a percentage of the EMG amplitude recorded during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the respective muscles. Hip abduction in plank increased TrAIO, RA, and LMF EMG amplitude compared with other TRX positions (P < 0.008). Only the hamstring curl was effective in inducing a high EMG amplitude of LMF (P < 0.001). No significant difference in EMG magnitude was found between the taping and no taping conditions overall (P > 0.05). Hip abduction in plank most effectively activated abdominal muscles, whereas the hamstring curl most effectively activated the paraspinal muscles. Applying KT conferred no immediate benefits in improving the core muscle activation during TRX training in adults with chronic LBP. PMID:26185520

  14. Core Muscle Activity during TRX Suspension Exercises with and without Kinesiology Taping in Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: Implications for Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Tam, Y T; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Ng, Shamay S M; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Chan, Eleanor W Y; Guo, X

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of kinesiology taping (KT) and different TRX suspension workouts on the amplitude of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the core muscles among people with chronic low back pain (LBP). Each participant (total n = 21) was exposed to two KT conditions: no taping and taping, while performing four TRX suspension exercises: (1) hamstring curl, (2) hip abduction in plank, (3) chest press, and (4) 45-degree row. Right transversus abdominis/internal oblique (TrAIO), rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and superficial lumbar multifidus (LMF) activity was recorded with surface EMG and expressed as a percentage of the EMG amplitude recorded during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the respective muscles. Hip abduction in plank increased TrAIO, RA, and LMF EMG amplitude compared with other TRX positions (P < 0.008). Only the hamstring curl was effective in inducing a high EMG amplitude of LMF (P < 0.001). No significant difference in EMG magnitude was found between the taping and no taping conditions overall (P > 0.05). Hip abduction in plank most effectively activated abdominal muscles, whereas the hamstring curl most effectively activated the paraspinal muscles. Applying KT conferred no immediate benefits in improving the core muscle activation during TRX training in adults with chronic LBP.

  15. The effects of performing a one-legged bridge with hip abduction and use of a sling on trunk and lower extremity muscle activation in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyuju; Bak, Jongwoo; Cho, Minkwon; Chung, Yijung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the changes in the muscle activities of the trunk and lower limbs of healthy adults during a one-legged bridge exercise using a sling, and with the addition of hip abduction. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven healthy individuals participated in this study (14 males and 13 females). The participants were instructed to perform the bridge exercises under five different conditions. Trunk and lower limb muscle activation of the erector spinae (ES), external oblique (EO), gluteus maximus (GM), and biceps femoris (BF) was measured using surface electromyography. Data analysis was performed using the mean scores of three trials performed under each condition. [Results] There was a significant increase in bilateral EO and contralateral GM with the one-legged bridge compared with the one-legged bridge with sling exercise. Muscle activation of the ipsilateral GM and BF was significantly less during the one-legged bridge exercise compared to the one-legged bridge with sling exercise, and was significantly greater during the one-legged bridge with hip abduction compared to the one-legged bridge exercise. The muscle activation of the contralateral GM and BF was significantly greater with the one-legged bridge with hip abduction compared to the general bridge exercise. [Conclusion] With the one-legged bridge with hip abduction, the ipsilateral EO, GM and BF muscle activities were significantly greater than those of the one-legged bridge exercise. The muscle activation of all trunk and contralateral lower extremity muscles increased with the bridge with sling exercises compared with general bridge exercises. PMID:27799708

  16. Nitric Oxide Stimulates Matrix Synthesis and Deposition by Adult Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells Within Three-Dimensional Cocultures

    PubMed Central

    Simmers, Phillip; Gishto, Arsela; Vyavahare, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Vascular diseases are characterized by the over-proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) within the vessel wall, leading to compromise in cell–cell and cell–matrix signaling pathways. Tissue engineering approaches to regulate SMC over-proliferation and enhance healthy ECM synthesis showed promise, but resulted in low crosslinking efficiency. Here, we report the benefits of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) cues, delivered from S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), to cell proliferation and matrix deposition by adult human aortic SMCs (HA-SMCs) within three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic cocultures. A coculture platform with two adjacent, permeable 3D culture chambers was developed to enable paracrine signaling between vascular cells. HA-SMCs were cultured in these chambers within collagen hydrogels, either alone or in the presence of human aortic endothelial cells (HA-ECs) cocultures, and exogenously supplemented with varying GSNO dosages (0–100 nM) for 21 days. Results showed that EC cocultures stimulated SMC proliferation within GSNO-free cultures. With increasing GSNO concentration, HA-SMC proliferation decreased in the presence or absence of EC cocultures, while HA-EC proliferation increased. GSNO (100 nM) significantly enhanced the protein amounts synthesized by HA-SMCs, in the presence or absence of EC cocultures, while lower dosages (1–10 nM) offered marginal benefits. Multi-fold increases in the synthesis and deposition of elastin, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronic acid, and lysyl oxidase crosslinking enzyme (LOX) were noted at higher GSNO dosages, and coculturing with ECs significantly furthered these trends. Similar increases in TIMP-1 and MMP-9 levels were noted within cocultures with increasing GSNO dosages. Such increases in matrix synthesis correlated with NO-stimulated increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression within EC

  17. Enobosarm (GTx-024) Modulates Adult Skeletal Muscle Mass Independently of the Androgen Receptor in the Satellite Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Saunders, Philippa T K; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Androgens increase skeletal muscle mass, but their clinical use is hampered by a lack of tissue selectivity and subsequent side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators elicit muscle-anabolic effects while only sparingly affecting reproductive tissues. The selective androgen receptor modulator, GTx-024 (enobosarm), is being investigated for cancer cachexia, sarcopenia, and muscle wasting diseases. Here we investigate the role of muscle androgen receptor (AR) in the anabolic effect of GTx-024. In mice lacking AR in the satellite cell lineage (satARKO), the weight of the androgen-sensitive levator ani muscle was lower but was decreased further upon orchidectomy. GTx-024 was as effective as DHT in restoring levator ani weights to sham levels. Expression of the muscle-specific, androgen-responsive genes S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and myostatin was decreased by orchidectomy and restored by GTx-024 and DHT in control mice, whereas the expression was low and unaffected by androgen status in satARKO. In contrast, insulin-like growth factor 1Ea expression was not different between satARKO and control muscle, decreased upon castration, and was restored by DHT and GTx-024 in both genotypes. These data indicate that GTx-024 does not selectively modulate AR in the satellite cell lineage and that cells outside this lineage remain androgen responsive in satARKO muscle. Indeed, residual AR-positive cells were present in satARKO muscle, coexpressing the fibroblast-lineage marker vimentin. AR positive, muscle-resident fibroblasts could therefore be involved in the indirect effects of androgens on muscle. In conclusion, both DHT and GTx-024 target AR pathways in the satellite cell lineage, but cells outside this lineage also contribute to the anabolic effects of androgens.

  18. Enobosarm (GTx-024) Modulates Adult Skeletal Muscle Mass Independently of the Androgen Receptor in the Satellite Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Saunders, Philippa T K; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Androgens increase skeletal muscle mass, but their clinical use is hampered by a lack of tissue selectivity and subsequent side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators elicit muscle-anabolic effects while only sparingly affecting reproductive tissues. The selective androgen receptor modulator, GTx-024 (enobosarm), is being investigated for cancer cachexia, sarcopenia, and muscle wasting diseases. Here we investigate the role of muscle androgen receptor (AR) in the anabolic effect of GTx-024. In mice lacking AR in the satellite cell lineage (satARKO), the weight of the androgen-sensitive levator ani muscle was lower but was decreased further upon orchidectomy. GTx-024 was as effective as DHT in restoring levator ani weights to sham levels. Expression of the muscle-specific, androgen-responsive genes S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and myostatin was decreased by orchidectomy and restored by GTx-024 and DHT in control mice, whereas the expression was low and unaffected by androgen status in satARKO. In contrast, insulin-like growth factor 1Ea expression was not different between satARKO and control muscle, decreased upon castration, and was restored by DHT and GTx-024 in both genotypes. These data indicate that GTx-024 does not selectively modulate AR in the satellite cell lineage and that cells outside this lineage remain androgen responsive in satARKO muscle. Indeed, residual AR-positive cells were present in satARKO muscle, coexpressing the fibroblast-lineage marker vimentin. AR positive, muscle-resident fibroblasts could therefore be involved in the indirect effects of androgens on muscle. In conclusion, both DHT and GTx-024 target AR pathways in the satellite cell lineage, but cells outside this lineage also contribute to the anabolic effects of androgens. PMID:26393303

  19. Unchanged [3H]ouabain binding site content but reduced Na+-K+ pump α2-protein abundance in skeletal muscle in older adults.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Michael J; Perry, Ben D; Serpiello, Fabio R; Caldow, Marissa K; Levinger, Pazit; Cameron-Smith, David; Levinger, Itamar

    2012-11-01

    Aging is associated with reduced muscle mass, weakness, and increased fatigability. In skeletal muscle, the Na(+)-K(+) pump (NKA) is important in regulating Na(+)-K(+) gradients, membrane excitability, and thus contractility, but the effects of aging on muscle NKA are unclear. We investigated whether aging is linked with reduced muscle NKA by contrasting muscle NKA isoform gene expression and protein abundance, and NKA total content in 17 Elderly (66.8 ± 6.4 yr, mean ± SD) and 16 Young adults (23.9 ± 2.2 yr). Participants underwent peak oxygen consumption assessment and a vastus lateralis muscle biopsy, which was analyzed for NKA α(1)-, α(2)-, α(3)-, β(1)-, β(2)-, and β(3)-isoform gene expression (real-time RT-PCR), protein abundance (immunoblotting), and NKA total content ([(3)H]ouabain binding sites). The Elderly had lower peak oxygen consumption (-36.7%, P = 0.000), strength (-36.3%, P = 0.001), NKA α(2)- (-24.4%, 11.9 ± 4.4 vs. 9.0 ± 2.7 arbitrary units, P = 0.049), and NKA β(3)-protein abundance (-23.0%, P = 0.041) than Young. The β(3)-mRNA was higher in Elderly compared with Young (P = 0.011). No differences were observed between groups for other NKA isoform mRNA or protein abundance, or for [(3)H]ouabain binding site content. Thus skeletal muscle in elderly individuals was characterized by decreased NKA α(2)- and β(3)-protein abundance, but unchanged α(1) abundance and [(3)H]ouabain binding. The latter was likely caused by reduced α(2) abundance with aging, preventing an otherwise higher [(3)H]ouabain binding that might occur with a greater membrane density in smaller muscle fibers. Further study is required to verify reduced muscle NKA α(2) with aging and possible contributions to impaired exercise capability and daily living activities. PMID:22936730

  20. Single adult rabbit and rat cardiac myocytes retain the Ca2+- and species-dependent systolic and diastolic contractile properties of intact muscle

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The systolic and diastolic properties of single myocytes and intact papillary muscles isolated from hearts of adult rats and rabbits were examined at 37 degrees C over a range of stimulation frequencies and bathing [Ca2+]o (Cao). In both rabbit myocytes and intact muscles bathed in 1 mM Cao, increasing the frequency of stimulation from 6 to 120 min-1 resulted in a positive staircase of twitch performance. During stimulation at 2 min-1, twitch performance also increased with increases in Cao up to 20 mM. In the absence of stimulation, both rabbit myocytes and muscles were completely quiescent in less than 15 mM Cao. Further increases in Cao caused the appearance of spontaneous asynchronous contractile waves in myocytes and in intact muscles caused scattered light intensity fluctuations (SLIF), which were previously demonstrated to be caused by Ca2+-dependent spontaneous contractile waves. In contrast to rabbit preparations, intact rat papillary muscles exhibited SLIF in 1.0 mM Cao. Two populations of rat myocytes were observed in 1 mM Cao: approximately 85% of unstimulated cells exhibited low-frequency (3-4 min-1) spontaneous contractile waves, whereas 15%, during a 1-min observation period, were quiescent. In a given Cao, the contractile wave frequency in myocytes and SLIF in intact muscles were constant for long periods of time. In both intact rat muscles and myocytes with spontaneous waves, in 1 mM Cao, increasing the frequency of stimulation from 6 to 120 min-1 resulted, on the average, in a 65% reduction in steady state twitch amplitude. Of the rat myocytes that did not manifest waves, some had a positive, some had a flat, and some had a negative staircase; the average steady state twitch amplitude of these cells during stimulation at 120 min-1 was 30% greater than that at 6 min-1. In contrast to rabbit preparations, twitch performance during stimulation at 2 min-1 saturated at 1.5 mM Cao in both intact rat muscles and in the myocytes with spontaneous waves. We

  1. Elevated Serum Uric Acid Is Associated with Greater Bone Mineral Density and Skeletal Muscle Mass in Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    He, Juan; Wang, Chen; Qiu, Rui; Chen, Yu-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Previous studies have suggested a positive link between serum uric acid (UA) and bone mineral density (BMD). In this study, we re-examined the association between UA and BMD and further explored whether this was mediated by skeletal muscle mass in a general Chinese population. Method This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 3079 (963 men and 2116 women) Chinese adults aged 40–75 years. Face-to-face interviews and laboratory analyses were performed to determine serum UA and various covariates. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess the BMD and appendicular skeletal muscle mass. The skeletal muscle mass index (SMI = ASM/Height2, kg/m2) for the total limbs, arms, and legs was then calculated. Results The serum UA was graded and, in general, was significantly and positively associated with the BMD and muscle mass, after adjustment for multiple covariates in the total sample. Compared with participants in lowest quartile of UA, those participants in highest quartile showed a 2.3%(whole body), 4.1%(lumbar spine), 2.4%(total hip), and 2.0% (femoral neck) greater BMDs. The mean SMIs in the highest (vs. lowest) quartile increased by 2.7% (total), 2.5% (arm), 2.7% (leg) respectively. In addition, path analysis suggested that the favorable association between UA and BMD might be mediated by increasing SMI. Conclusion The elevated serum UA was associated with a higher BMD and a greater muscle mass in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population and the UA-BMD association was partly mediated by muscle mass. PMID:27144737

  2. Eccentric contraction-induced injury to type I, IIa, and IIa/IIx muscle fibers of elderly adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscles of old laboratory rodents experience exaggerated force losses after eccentric contractile activity. We extended this line of inquiry to humans and investigated the influence of fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content on the injury process. Skinned muscle fiber segments, prepared from ...

  3. Determination of malachite green residues in the eggs, fry, and adult muscle-tissue of rainbow-trout (Oncorhynchus-mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, John L.; Gofus, J.E.; Meinertz, Jeffery R.

    1994-01-01

    Malachite green, an effective antifungal therapeutant used in fish culture, is a known teratogen. We developed a method to simultaneously detect both the chromatic and leuco forms of malachite green residues in the eggs, fry, and adult muscle tissue of rainbow trout (oncorhynchus mykiss). Homogenates of these tissues were fortified with [c-14] malachite green chloride and extracted with 1% (v/v) acetic acid in acetonitrile or in methanol. The extracts were partitioned with chloroform, dried, redissolved in mobile phase, and analyzed by liquid chromatography (lc) with postcolumn oxidation of leuco malachite green to the chromatic form. Lc fractions were collected every 30 s for quantitation by scintillation counting. Recoveries of total [c-14] malachite green chloride residue were 85 and 98% in eggs fortified with labeled malachite green at concentrations of 0.5 And 1.00 Mug/g, respectively; 68% in fry similarly fortified at a concentration of 0.65 Mug/g; and 66% in muscle homogenate similarly fortified at a level of 1.00 Mug/g. The method was tested under operational conditions by exposing adult rainbow trout to 1.00 Mg/l [c-14] malachite green chloride bath for 1 h. Muscle samples analyzed by sample oxidation and scintillation counting contained 1.3 And 0.5 Mug/g total malachite green chloride residues immediately after exposure and after a 5-day withdrawal period, respectively.

  4. The effects of squatting with visual feedback on the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique and the vastus lateralis in young adults with an increased quadriceps angle

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Pil-Neo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of performing squat exercises with visual feedback on the activation of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in young adults with an increased quadriceps angle (Q-angle). [Subjects] This study used a motion analysis program (Dartfish, Switzerland) to select 20 young adults with an increased Q-angle, who were then divided into a squat group that received visual feedback (VSG, n=10) and a squat group that received no visual feedback (SG, n=10). [Methods] The intensity of exercises was increased every two weeks over a six-week exercise period in both groups. A visual marker was attached to the patella of the subjects in the VSG, and they then performed squat exercises with a maximum of 90° of knee flexion within a route marked on a mirror. The SG performed squat exercises with a maximum 90° of knee flexion without attaching a visual feedback device. [Results] Analysis of the muscle activation due to 90° squat exercises indicated that both groups had statistically significant increases in activation of the VL. The VSG exhibited statistically significant increases in activation of the VMO. [Conclusion] This study confirmed that squat exercises with visual feedback are effective in activation of the VMO and VL muscles. The findings are meaningful in terms of preventing the occurrence of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26157251

  5. Selective expression of the type 3 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca{sup 2+} release channel (RyR3) in a subset of slow fibers in diaphragm and cephalic muscles of adult rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, Antonio; Reggiani, Carlo; Sorrentino, Vincenzo . E-mail: v.sorrentino@unisi.it

    2005-11-11

    The expression pattern of the RyR3 isoform of Ca{sup 2+} release channels was analysed by Western blot in neonatal and adult rabbit skeletal muscles. The results obtained show that the expression of the RyR3 isoform is developmentally regulated. In fact, RyR3 expression was detected in all muscles analysed at 2 and 15 days after birth while, in adult animals, it was restricted to a subset of muscles that includes diaphragm, masseter, pterygoideus, digastricus, and tongue. Interestingly, all of these muscles share a common embryonic origin being derived from the somitomeres or from the cephalic region of the embryo. Immunofluorescence analysis of rabbit skeletal muscle cross-sections showed that RyR3 staining was detected in all fibers of neonatal muscles. In contrast, in those adult muscles expressing RyR3 only a fraction of fibers was labelled. Staining of these muscles with antibodies against fast and slow myosins revealed a close correlation between expression of RyR3 and fibers expressing slow myosin isoform.

  6. NAC1, a POZ/BTB protein present in the adult mammalian brain, triggers apoptosis after adenovirus-mediated overexpression in PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Korutla, Laxminarayana; Neustadter, Jason H; Fournier, Keith M; Mackler, Scott A

    2003-05-01

    POZ/BTB proteins influence cellular development and in some examples act as oncoproteins. However, several POZ/BTB transcription factors have been found in terminally differentiated neurons, where their functions remain unknown. One example is NAC1, a constitutively-expressed protein that can regulate behaviors associated with cocaine use. The present study represents an initial attempt to understand the actions of NAC1 within neurons by using adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into differentiated PC-12 cells. Cell survival in PC-12 cells overexpressing NAC1 was greatly reduced compared with cells infected by a control Ad-GFP. The morphological appearance of the dying cells was consistent with programmed cell death. Fragmentation of genomic DNA occurred in PC-12 cells infected with adenoviruses encoding NAC1 but not control viruses. NAC1 over expression was followed by the down regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-2-xl. Concurrently, levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and p53 increased following NAC1 overexpression. These observations suggest that NAC1expression in PC-12 cells induces apoptosis by altering the expression of these upstream mediators of the execution phase of programmed cell death. These findings raise the possibility that aberrantly regulated NAC1 expression in the mammalian brain may contribute to programmed cell death.

  7. Lower Maternal Body Condition During Pregnancy Affects Skeletal Muscle Structure and Glut-4 Protein Levels But Not Glucose Tolerance in Mature Adult Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Paula M.; Hollis, Lisa J.; Cripps, Roselle L.; Bearpark, Natasha; Patel, Harnish P.; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Cooper, Cyrus; Hanson, Mark A.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Suboptimal maternal nutrition and body composition are implicated in metabolic disease risk in adult offspring. We hypothesized that modest disruption of glucose homeostasis previously observed in young adult sheep offspring from ewes of a lower body condition score (BCS) would deteriorate with age, due to changes in skeletal muscle structure and insulin signaling mechanisms. Ewes were fed to achieve a lower (LBCS, n = 10) or higher (HBCS, n = 14) BCS before and during pregnancy. Baseline plasma glucose, glucose tolerance and basal glucose uptake into isolated muscle strips were similar in male offspring at 210 ± 4 weeks. Vastus total myofiber density (HBCS, 343 ± 15; LBCS, 294 ± 14 fibers/mm2, P < .05) and fast myofiber density (HBCS, 226 ± 10; LBCS 194 ± 10 fibers/mm2, P < .05), capillary to myofiber ratio (HBCS, 1.5 ± 0.1; LBCS 1.2 ± 0.1 capillary:myofiber, P < .05) were lower in LBCS offspring. Vastus protein levels of Akt1 were lower (83% ± 7% of HBCS, P < .05), and total glucose transporter 4 was increased (157% ± 6% of HBCS, P < .001) in LBCS offspring, Despite the reduction in total myofiber density in LBCS offspring, glucose tolerance was normal in mature adult life. However, such adaptations may lead to complications in metabolic control in an overabundant postnatal nutrient environment. PMID:23420826

  8. A correlation of reactive oxygen species accumulation by depletion of superoxide dismutases with age-dependent impairment in the nervous system and muscles of Drosophila adults.

    PubMed

    Oka, Saori; Hirai, Jun; Yasukawa, Takashi; Nakahara, Yasuyuki; Inoue, Yoshihiro H

    2015-08-01

    The theory that accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in internal organs is a major promoter of aging has been considered negatively. However, it is still controversial whether overexpression of superoxide dismutases (SODs), which remove ROS, extends the lifespan in Drosophila adults. We examined whether ROS accumulation by depletion of Cu/Zn-SOD (SOD1) or Mn-SOD (SOD2) influenced age-related impairment of the nervous system and muscles in Drosophila. We confirmed the efficient depletion of Sod1 and Sod2 through RNAi and ROS accumulation by monitoring of ROS-inducible gene expression. Both RNAi flies displayed accelerated impairment of locomotor activity with age and shortened lifespan. Similarly, adults with nervous system-specific depletion of Sod1 or Sod2 also showed reduced lifespan. We then found an accelerated loss of dopaminergic neurons in the flies with suppressed SOD expression. A half-dose reduction of three pro-apoptotic genes resulted in a significant suppression of the neuronal loss, suggesting that apoptosis was involved in the neuronal loss caused by SOD silencing. In addition, depletion of Sod1 or Sod2 in musculature is also associated with enhancement of age-related locomotion impairment. In indirect flight muscles from SOD-depleted adults, abnormal protein aggregates containing poly-ubiquitin accumulated at an early adult stage and continued to increase as the flies aged. Most of these protein aggregates were observed between myofibril layers. Moreover, immuno-electron microscopy indicated that the aggregates were predominantly localized in damaged mitochondria. These findings suggest that muscular and neuronal ROS accumulation may have a significant effect on age-dependent impairment of the Drosophila adults.

  9. FE65 and FE65L1 amyloid precursor protein–binding protein compound null mice display adult-onset cataract and muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jaehong; Moncaster, Juliet A.; Wang, Lirong; Hafeez, Imran; Herz, Joachim; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Guénette, Suzanne Y.

    2015-01-01

    FE65 and FE65L1 are cytoplasmic adaptor proteins that bind a variety of proteins, including the amyloid precursor protein, and that mediate the assembly of multimolecular complexes. We previously reported that FE65/FE65L1 double knockout (DKO) mice display disorganized laminin in meningeal fibroblasts and a cobblestone lissencephaly-like phenotype in the developing cortex. Here, we examined whether loss of FE65 and FE65L1 causes ocular and muscular deficits, 2 phenotypes that frequently accompany cobblestone lissencephaly. Eyes of FE65/FE65L1 DKO mice develop normally, but lens degeneration becomes apparent in young adult mice. Abnormal lens epithelial cell migration, widespread small vacuole formation, and increased laminin expression underneath lens capsules suggest impaired interaction between epithelial cells and capsular extracellular matrix in DKO lenses. Cortical cataracts develop in FE65L1 knockout (KO) mice aged 16 months or more but are absent in wild-type or FE65 KO mice. FE65 family KO mice show attenuated grip strength, and the nuclei of DKO muscle cells frequently locate in the middle of muscle fibers. These findings reveal that FE65 and FE65L1 are essential for the maintenance of lens transparency, and their loss produce phenotypes in brain, eye, and muscle that are comparable to the clinical features of congenital muscular dystrophies in humans.—Suh, J., Moncaster, J. A., Wang, L., Hafeez, I., Herz, J., Tanzi, R. E., Goldstein, L. E., Guénette, S. Y. FE65 and FE65L1 amyloid precursor protein–binding protein compound null mice display adult-onset cataract and muscle weakness. PMID:25757569

  10. Influence of gender on muscle strength, power and body composition in healthy subjects and mobility-limited older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To explore the influence of gender on the cross-sectional differences in lower-limb strength, power and body composition among 31 healthy middle-aged adults (mean age: 47.2 +/- 5 yrs, 17 females), 28 healthy older adults (74 +/- 4 yrs, 12 females), and 34 older adults with mobility impair...

  11. The lymphocyte secretome from young adults enhances skeletal muscle proliferation and migration, but effects are attenuated in the secretome of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; McPhee, Jamie S; Murgatroyd, Christopher; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Older people experience skeletal muscle wasting, in part due to impaired proliferative capacity of quiescent skeletal muscle satellite cells which can be reversed by exposure to young blood. To investigate the role of immune cells in muscle regeneration, we isolated lymphocytes from whole blood of young and older healthy volunteers and cultured them with, or without, anti-CD3/CD28 activators to induce release of cytokines, interleukins, and growth factors into the media. The secreted proteins were collected to prepare a conditioned media, which was subsequently used to culture C2C12 myoblasts. The conditioned media from the activated young lymphocytes increased the rate of proliferation of myoblasts by around threefold (P < 0.005) and caused an approximate fourfold (P < 0.005) increase in migration compared with nonactivated lymphocyte control media. These responses were characterized by minimal myotube formation (2%), low fusion index (5%), low myosin heavy chain content, and substantial migration. In contrast, myoblasts treated with conditioned media from activated old lymphocytes exhibited a high degree of differentiation, and multi-nucleated myotube formation that was comparable to control conditions, thus showing no effect on proliferation or migration of myoblasts. These results indicate that secreted proteins from lymphocytes of young people enhance the muscle cell proliferation and migration, whereas secreted proteins from lymphocytes of older people may contribute to the attenuated skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration. PMID:26603449

  12. The lymphocyte secretome from young adults enhances skeletal muscle proliferation and migration, but effects are attenuated in the secretome of older adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; McPhee, Jamie S; Murgatroyd, Christopher; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2015-11-01

    Older people experience skeletal muscle wasting, in part due to impaired proliferative capacity of quiescent skeletal muscle satellite cells which can be reversed by exposure to young blood. To investigate the role of immune cells in muscle regeneration, we isolated lymphocytes from whole blood of young and older healthy volunteers and cultured them with, or without, anti-CD3/CD28 activators to induce release of cytokines, interleukins, and growth factors into the media. The secreted proteins were collected to prepare a conditioned media, which was subsequently used to culture C2C12 myoblasts. The conditioned media from the activated young lymphocytes increased the rate of proliferation of myoblasts by around threefold (P < 0.005) and caused an approximate fourfold (P < 0.005) increase in migration compared with nonactivated lymphocyte control media. These responses were characterized by minimal myotube formation (2%), low fusion index (5%), low myosin heavy chain content, and substantial migration. In contrast, myoblasts treated with conditioned media from activated old lymphocytes exhibited a high degree of differentiation, and multi-nucleated myotube formation that was comparable to control conditions, thus showing no effect on proliferation or migration of myoblasts. These results indicate that secreted proteins from lymphocytes of young people enhance the muscle cell proliferation and migration, whereas secreted proteins from lymphocytes of older people may contribute to the attenuated skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration. PMID:26603449

  13. Maternal conjugated linoleic acid supplementation reverses high-fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and inflammation in adult male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, C A; Segovia, S A; Markworth, J F; Gray, C; Zhang, X D; Milan, A M; Mitchell, C J; Barnett, M P G; Roy, N C; Vickers, M H; Reynolds, C M; Cameron-Smith, D

    2016-03-01

    A high-saturated-fat diet (HFD) during pregnancy and lactation leads to metabolic disorders in offspring concomitant with increased adiposity and a proinflammatory phenotype in later life. During the fetal period, the impact of maternal diet on skeletal muscle development is poorly described, despite this tissue exerting a major influence on life-long metabolic health. This study investigated the effect of a maternal HFD on skeletal muscle anabolic, catabolic, and inflammatory signaling in adult rat offspring. Furthermore, the actions of maternal-supplemented conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on these measures of muscle phenotype were investigated. A purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal fat), a CD supplemented with CLA (CLA; 10% kcal fat, 1% total fat as CLA), a high-fat (HFD; 45% kcal fat from lard), or a HFD supplemented with CLA (HFCLA; 45% kcal fat from lard, 1% total fat as CLA) was fed ad libitum to female Sprague-Dawley rats for 10 days before mating and throughout gestation and lactation. Male offspring received a standard chow diet from weaning, and the gastrocnemius was collected for analysis at day 150. Offspring from HF and HFCLA mothers displayed lower muscular protein content accompanied by elevated monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-6, and IL-1β concentrations. Phosphorylation of NF-κBp65 (Ser(536)) and expression of the catabolic E3 ligase muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) were increased in HF offspring, an effect reversed by maternal CLA supplementation. The present study demonstrates the importance of early life interventions to ameliorate the negative effects of poor maternal diet on offspring skeletal muscle development. PMID:26632603

  14. The cholesterol-lowering agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin promotes glucose uptake via GLUT4 in adult muscle fibers and reduces insulin resistance in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Llanos, Paola; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Georgiev, Tihomir; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Espinosa, Alejandra; Hidalgo, Jorge; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2015-02-15

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in adult skeletal muscle by promoting the translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters to the transverse tubule (T-tubule) membranes, which have particularly high cholesterol levels. We investigated whether T-tubule cholesterol content affects insulin-induced glucose transport. Feeding mice a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 wk increased by 30% the T-tubule cholesterol content of triad-enriched vesicular fractions from muscle tissue compared with triads from control mice. Additionally, isolated muscle fibers (flexor digitorum brevis) from HFD-fed mice showed a 40% decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake rates compared with fibers from control mice. In HFD-fed mice, four subcutaneous injections of MβCD, an agent reported to extract membrane cholesterol, improved their defective glucose tolerance test and normalized their high fasting glucose levels. The preincubation of isolated muscle fibers with relatively low concentrations of MβCD increased both basal and insulin-induced glucose uptake in fibers from controls or HFD-fed mice and decreased Akt phosphorylation without altering AMPK-mediated signaling. In fibers from HFD-fed mice, MβCD improved insulin sensitivity even after Akt or CaMK II inhibition and increased membrane GLUT4 content. Indinavir, a GLUT4 antagonist, prevented the stimulatory effects of MβCD on glucose uptake. Addition of MβCD elicited ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium signals in isolated fibers, which were essential for glucose uptake. Our findings suggest that T-tubule cholesterol content exerts a critical regulatory role on insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and glucose transport and that partial cholesterol removal from muscle fibers may represent a useful strategy to counteract insulin resistance.

  15. Assessments of Muscle Oxygenation and Cortical Activity Using Functional Near-infrared Spectroscopy in Healthy Adults During Hybrid Activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-You; Wu, Jin-Shang; Lin, Linda L; Ho, Ting-Chuan; Lin, Pei-Yi; Chen, Jia-Jin J

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid activation (HA), patterned electrical stimulation (ES) superimposed on attempted voluntary movement in close synchrony, can augment muscle force output. It has been proposed for limb function restoration and neuromodulation. Limited studies have been performed to investigate the influences of HA on muscle oxygenation and brain cortical activity. The present study investigates muscle oxygenation and cortical activity during isometric knee extension tasks with voluntary contraction (VOL) only, ES only, and with HA at three stimulation intensities, namely 10 mA (HA-I), 30 mA (HA-II), and 50 mA (HA-III). A frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy system was employed to assess the muscle oxygenation in the vastus lateralis as well as the cortical activity from the bilateral sensorimotor cortices (SMCs), premotor cortices (PMCs), and supplementary motor areas (SMAs). Our results show that the increased ES contribution during HA significantly increased O2 demand in working muscle, implying that the intervention of ES accelerates the muscle metabolism during muscle contraction. For cortical activation, ES only had a similar cortical activation pattern to that during VOL but with lower activation in SMCs, PMCs, and SMAs. Augmented sensorimotor activation was observed during the HA-II condition. The enhanced level of cortical activation during HA was not only affected by the ES contribution within HA but also related to the functional specificity of cortical areas. Our results suggest that HA can effectively enhance the muscle oxygen demand as well as the activation of cortical regions, and that the ES contribution within HA is a key factor.

  16. Myomaker is essential for muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of injured adult skeletal muscle involves fusion of activated satellite cells to form new myofibers. Myomaker is a muscle-specific membrane protein required for fusion of embryonic myoblasts, but its potential involvement in adult muscle regeneration has not been explored. We show that myogenic basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors induce myomaker expression in satellite cells during acute and chronic muscle regeneration. Moreover, genetic deletion of myomaker in adult satellite cells completely abolishes muscle regeneration, resulting in severe muscle destruction after injury. Myomaker is the only muscle-specific protein known to be absolutely essential for fusion of embryonic and adult myoblasts. PMID:25085416

  17. The role of EGFR and ErbB family related proteins in the oligodendrocyte specification in germinal niches of the adult mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y.; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    In the adult brain, multipotent progenitor cells have been identified in three areas: the ventricular-subventricular zone (VZ-SVZ), adjacent to the striatal wall of the lateral ventricles, the subgranular zone (SGZ), located at the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subcallosal zone (SCZ), located between the corpus callosum and the CA1 and CA2 regions of the hippocampus. The neural progenitor cells of these regions express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, ErbB-1 or HER1). EGF, the most important ligand for the EGFR, is a potent mitogenic agent that stimulates proliferation, survival, migration and differentiation into the oligodendrocyte lineage. Other ErbB receptors also activate several intracellular pathways for oligodendrocyte specification, migration and survival. However, the specific downstream pathways related to oligodendrogenesis and the hierarchic interaction among intracellular signaling cascades is not well-known. We summarize the current data regarding the role of EGFR and ErbB family signaling on neural stem cells and the downstream cascades involved in oligodendrogenesis in the neurogenic niches of the adult brain. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate proliferation, differentiation, migration of oligodendrocytes and myelination is of critical importance for the field of neurobiology and constitutes a crucial step in the design of stem-cell-based therapies for demyelinating diseases. PMID:24381541

  18. Acute ascorbic acid ingestion increases skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption via local vasodilation during graded handgrip exercise in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jennifer C.; Crecelius, Anne R.; Larson, Dennis G.

    2015-01-01

    Human aging is associated with reduced skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise, which may be a result of impaired endothelium-dependent dilation and/or attenuated ability to blunt sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction. Intra-arterial infusion of ascorbic acid (AA) increases nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation and forearm blood flow (FBF) during handgrip exercise in older adults, yet it remains unknown whether an acute oral dose can similarly improve FBF or enhance the ability to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction during exercise. We hypothesized that 1) acute oral AA would improve FBF (Doppler ultrasound) and oxygen consumption (V̇o2) via local vasodilation during graded rhythmic handgrip exercise in older adults (protocol 1), and 2) AA ingestion would not enhance sympatholysis in older adults during handgrip exercise (protocol 2). In protocol 1 (n = 8; 65 ± 3 yr), AA did not influence FBF or V̇o2 during rest or 5% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) exercise, but increased FBF (199 ± 13 vs. 248 ± 16 ml/min and 343 ± 24 vs. 403 ± 33 ml/min; P < 0.05) and V̇o2 (26 ± 2 vs. 34 ± 3 ml/min and 43 ± 4 vs. 50 ± 5 ml/min; P < 0.05) at both 15 and 25% MVC, respectively. The increased FBF was due to elevations in forearm vascular conductance (FVC). In protocol 2 (n = 10; 63 ± 2 yr), following AA, FBF was similarly elevated during 15% MVC (∼20%); however, vasoconstriction to reflex increases in sympathetic activity during −40 mmHg lower-body negative pressure at rest (ΔFVC: −16 ± 3 vs. −16 ± 2%) or during 15% MVC (ΔFVC: −12 ± 2 vs. −11 ± 4%) was unchanged. Our collective results indicate that acute oral ingestion of AA improves muscle blood flow and V̇o2 during exercise in older adults via local vasodilation. PMID:25980023

  19. Ref(2)P, the Drosophila melanogaster homologue of mammalian p62, is required for the formation of protein aggregates in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Nezis, Ioannis P; Simonsen, Anne; Sagona, Antonia P; Finley, Kim; Gaumer, Sébastien; Contamine, Didier; Rusten, Tor Erik; Stenmark, Harald; Brech, Andreas

    2008-03-24

    P62 has been proposed to mark ubiquitinated protein bodies for autophagic degradation. We report that the Drosophila melanogaster p62 orthologue, Ref(2)P, is a regulator of protein aggregation in the adult brain. We demonstrate that Ref(2)P localizes to age-induced protein aggregates as well as to aggregates caused by reduced autophagic or proteasomal activity. A similar localization to protein aggregates is also observed in D. melanogaster models of human neurodegenerative diseases. Although atg8a autophagy mutant flies show accumulation of ubiquitin- and Ref(2)P-positive protein aggregates, this is abrogated in atg8a/ref(2)P double mutants. Both the multimerization and ubiquitin binding domains of Ref(2)P are required for aggregate formation in vivo. Our findings reveal a major role for Ref(2)P in the formation of ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates both under physiological conditions and when normal protein turnover is inhibited.

  20. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  1. Myogenic progenitors and imaging single-cell flow analysis: a model to study commitment of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trapecar, Martin; Kelc, Robi; Gradisnik, Lidija; Vogrin, Matjaz; Rupnik, Marjan Slak

    2014-12-01

    Research on skeletal muscles suffers from a lack of appropriate human models to study muscle formation and regeneration on the regulatory level of single cells. This hampers both basic understanding and the development of new therapeutic approaches. The use of imaging multicolour flow cytometry and myogenic stem cells can help fill this void by allowing researchers to visualize and quantify the reaction of individual cultured cells to bioactives or other physiological impulses. As proof of concept, we subjected human CD56+ satellite cells to reference bioactives follistatin and Malva sylvestris extracts and then used imaging multicolor flow cytometry to visualize the stepwise activation of myogenic factors MyoD and myogenin in individual cells. This approach enabled us to evaluate the potency of these bioactives to stimulate muscle commitment. To validate this method, we used multi-photon confocal microscopy to confirm the potential of bioactives to stimulate muscle differentiation and expression of desmin. Imaging multicolor flow cytometry revealed statistically significant differences between treated and untreated groups of myogenic progenitors and we propose the utilization of this concept as an integral part of future muscle research strategies.

  2. Potential use of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize hypermetabolism associated with muscle pain in patients with adult spinal deformity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yuki; Takahashi, Miwako; Matsudaira, Ko; Oka, Hiroyuki; Momose, Toshimitsu

    2016-11-01

    Patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) are surgically treated for pain relief; however, visualization of the exact origin of the pain with imaging modalities is still challenging. We report the first case of a 60-year-old female patient who presented with painful degenerative kyphoscoliosis and was evaluated with flourine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) preoperatively. Because her low back pain was resistant to conservative treatment, she was treated with posterior spinal correction and fusion surgery from Th2 to the ilium. One year after the surgery, her low back pain had disappeared completely. In accordance with her clinical course, (18)F-FDG-PET imaging revealed the uptake of (18)F-FDG in the paravertebral muscles preoperatively and showed the complete absence of uptake at 1 year after surgery. The uptake site coincided with the convex part of each curve of the lumbar spine and was thought to be the result of the increased activity of paravertebral muscles due to their chronic stretched state in the kyphotic posture. This case report suggests the possibility of using (18)F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize increased activity in paravertebral muscles and the ensuing pain in ASD patients. PMID:27562570

  3. Effects of free leucine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and functional status in older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Trabal, Joan; Forga, Maria; Leyes, Pere; Torres, Ferran; Rubio, Jordi; Prieto, Esther; Farran-Codina, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of free leucine supplementation combined with resistance training versus resistance training only on muscle strength and functional status in older adults. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel study with two intervention groups. Thirty older adults were randomly assigned to receive either 10 g leucine/day (leucine group [LG], n=15) or a placebo (control group [CG], n=15), plus resistance training over a 12-week period. Maximal overcoming isometric leg strength, functional status, nutritional status, body composition, health-related quality of life, depression, and dietary intake were assessed at 4 and 12 weeks. Missing data at 12 weeks were handled using mixed models for repeated measurements for data imputation. Results Twenty-four subjects completed the 4-week assessment and eleven completed the 12-week intervention. Clinically significant gains were found in isometric leg strength at both assessment time points. Analysis of the effect size also showed how participants in LG outperformed those in CG for chair stands and the timed up and go test. No significant changes were observed for the rest of the outcomes. Conclusion Our combined analysis showed moderate changes in isometric leg muscle strength and certain components of functional status. The magnitude of changes found on these outcomes should be qualified as a positive effect of the concomitant intervention. PMID:25926725

  4. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-12-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions.

  5. Effects of priming exercise on the speed of adjustment of muscle oxidative metabolism at the onset of moderate-intensity step transitions in older adults.

    PubMed

    De Roia, Gabriela; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Adami, Alessandra; Papadopoulou, Christina; Capelli, Carlo

    2012-05-15

    Aging is associated with a functional decline of the oxidative metabolism due to progressive limitations of both O(2) delivery and utilization. Priming exercise (PE) increases the speed of adjustment of oxidative metabolism during successive moderate-intensity transitions. We tested the hypothesis that such improvement is due to a better matching of O(2) delivery to utilization within the working muscles. In 21 healthy older adults (65.7 ± 5 yr), we measured contemporaneously noninvasive indexes of the overall speed of adjustment of the oxidative metabolism (i.e., pulmonary Vo(2) kinetics), of the bulk O(2) delivery (i.e., cardiac output), and of the rate of muscle deoxygenation (i.e., deoxygenated hemoglobin, HHb) during moderate-intensity step transitions, either with (ModB) or without (ModA) prior PE. The local matching of O(2) delivery to utilization was evaluated by the ΔHHb/ΔVo(2) ratio index. The overall speed of adjustment of the Vo(2) kinetics was significantly increased in ModB compared with ModA (P < 0.05). On the contrary, the kinetics of cardiac output was unaffected by PE. At the muscle level, ModB was associated with a significant reduction of the "overshoot" in the ΔHHb/ΔVo(2) ratio compared with ModA (P < 0.05), suggesting an improved O(2) delivery. Our data are compatible with the hypothesis that, in older adults, PE, prior to moderate-intensity exercise, beneficially affects the speed of adjustment of oxidative metabolism due to an acute improvement of the local matching of O(2) delivery to utilization.

  6. Effects of whole-body vibration training on physical function, bone and muscle mass in adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Gusso, Silmara; Munns, Craig F; Colle, Patrícia; Derraik, José G B; Biggs, Janene B; Cutfield, Wayne S; Hofman, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    We performed a clinical trial on the effects of whole-body vibration training (WBVT) on muscle function and bone health of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy. Forty participants (11.3–20.8 years) with mild to moderate cerebral palsy (GMFCS II–III) underwent 20-week WBVT on a vibration plate for 9 minutes/day 4 times/week at 20 Hz (without controls). Assessments included 6-minute walk test, whole-body DXA, lower leg pQCT scans, and muscle function (force plate). Twenty weeks of WBVT were associated with increased lean mass in the total body (+770 g; p = 0.0003), trunk (+410 g; p = 0.004), and lower limbs (+240 g; p = 0.012). Bone mineral content increased in total body (+48 g; p = 0.0001), lumbar spine (+2.7 g; p = 0.0003), and lower limbs (+13 g; p < 0.0001). Similarly, bone mineral density increased in total body (+0.008 g/cm2; p = 0.013), lumbar spine (+0.014 g/cm2; p = 0.003), and lower limbs (+0.023 g/cm2; p < 0.0001). Participants reduced the time taken to perform the chair test, and improved the distance walked in the 6-minute walk test by 11% and 35% for those with GMFCS II and III, respectively. WBVT was associated with increases in muscle mass and bone mass and density, and improved mobility of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy. PMID:26936535

  7. Antitubulin antibody in healthy adults and patients with infectious mononucleosis and its relationship to smooth muscle antibody (SMA).

    PubMed Central

    Mead, G M; Cowin, P; Whitehouse, J M

    1980-01-01

    Antibody to tubulin in man has been studied using a specific radioimmunoassay, affinity chromatography radioimmunoassay but markedly increased levels were noted in patients with infectious mononucleosis where the antibody was predominantly IgM in type. This finding was confirmed on fluorescence microscopy. Affinity chromatography purified antibody produced characteristic microtubular staining of fixed 3T3 cells, but in addition, produced weak staining of cryostat sections of rat tissue, similar in distribution to that of smooth muscle antibody. Our studies indicate that the IgM smooth muscle antibody found in infectious mononucleosis by IF techniques is at least in part due to an antitubulin antibody. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6993069

  8. Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on the Masticatory Muscles and Physiologic Sleep Variables in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Novel Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Giannasi, Lilian Chrystiane; Matsui, Miriam Yumi; Freitas, Sandra Regina Batista; Caldas, Bruna F.; Grossmann, Eduardo; Amorim, José Benedito O.; dos Santos, Israel dos Reis; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Gomes, Monica Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term employed to define a group of non-progressive neuromotor disorders caused by damage to the immature or developing brain, with consequent limitations regarding movement and posture. CP may impair orapharygeal muscle tone, leading to a compromised chewing function and to sleep disorders (such as obstructive sleep apnea). Thirteen adults with CP underwent bilateral masseter and temporalis neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) therapy. The effects on the masticatory muscles and sleep variables were evaluated using electromyography (EMG) and polysomnography (PSG), respectively, prior and after 2 months of NMES. EMG consisted of 3 tests in different positions: rest, mouth opening and maximum clenching effort (MCE). EMG values in the rest position were 100% higher than values recorded prior to therapy for all muscles analyzed (p < 0.05); mean mouth opening increased from 38.0 ± 8.0 to 44.0 ± 10.0 cm (p = 0.03). A significant difference in MCE was found only for the right masseter. PSG revealed an improved in the AHI from 7.2±7.0/h to 2.3±1.5/h (p < 0.05); total sleep time improved from 185 min to 250 min (p = 0.04) and minimun SaO2 improved from 83.6 ± 3.0 to 86.4 ± 4.0 (p = 0.04). NMES performed over a two-month period led to improvements in the electrical activity of the masticatory muscles at rest, mouth opening, isometric contraction and sleep variables, including the elimination of obstructive sleep apnea events in patients with CP. Trial Registration ReBEC RBR994XFS http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br PMID:26247208

  9. Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on the Masticatory Muscles and Physiologic Sleep Variables in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Novel Therapeutic Approach.

    PubMed

    Giannasi, Lilian Chrystiane; Matsui, Miriam Yumi; Freitas, Sandra Regina Batista; Caldas, Bruna F; Grossmann, Eduardo; Amorim, José Benedito O; dos Santos, Israel Dos Reis; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Gomes, Monica Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term employed to define a group of non-progressive neuromotor disorders caused by damage to the immature or developing brain, with consequent limitations regarding movement and posture. CP may impair orapharygeal muscle tone, leading to a compromised chewing function and to sleep disorders (such as obstructive sleep apnea). Thirteen adults with CP underwent bilateral masseter and temporalis neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) therapy. The effects on the masticatory muscles and sleep variables were evaluated using electromyography (EMG) and polysomnography (PSG), respectively, prior and after 2 months of NMES. EMG consisted of 3 tests in different positions: rest, mouth opening and maximum clenching effort (MCE). EMG values in the rest position were 100% higher than values recorded prior to therapy for all muscles analyzed (p < 0.05); mean mouth opening increased from 38.0 ± 8.0 to 44.0 ± 10.0 cm (p = 0.03). A significant difference in MCE was found only for the right masseter. PSG revealed an improved in the AHI from 7.2±7.0/h to 2.3±1.5/h (p < 0.05); total sleep time improved from 185 min to 250 min (p = 0.04) and minimun SaO2 improved from 83.6 ± 3.0 to 86.4 ± 4.0 (p = 0.04). NMES performed over a two-month period led to improvements in the electrical activity of the masticatory muscles at rest, mouth opening, isometric contraction and sleep variables, including the elimination of obstructive sleep apnea events in patients with CP. Trial registration: ReBEC RBR994XFS http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br.

  10. Three Hierarchies in Skeletal Muscle Fibre Classification Allotype, Isotype and Phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoh, Joseph F. Y.; Hughes, Suzanne; Hugh, Gregory; Pozgaj, Irene

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical analyses using specific anti-myosin antibodies of mammalian muscle fibers during regeneration, development, and after denervation have revealed two distinct myogenic components determining fiber phenotype. The jaw-closing muscles of the cat contain superfast fibers which express a unique myosin not found in limb muscles. When superfast muscle is transplanted into a limb muscle bed, regenerating myotubes synthesize superfast myosin independent of innervation. Reinnervation by the nerve to a fast muscle leads to the expression of superfast and not fast myosin, while reinnervation by the nerve to a slow muscle leads to the expression of a slow myosin. When limb muscle is transplanted into the jaw muscle bed, only limb myosins are synthesized. Thus jaw and limb muscles belong to distinct allotypes, each with a unique range of phenotype options, the expressions of which may be modulated by the nerve. Primary and secondary myotubes in developing jaw and limb muscles are observed to belong to different categories characterized by different patterns of myosin gene expression. By taking into consideration the pattern of myosins synthesized and the changes in fiber size after denervation, 3 types of primary (fast, slow, and intermediate) fibers can be distinguished in rat fast limb muscles. All primaries synthesize slow myosin soon after their formation, but this is withdrawn in fast and intermediate primaries at different times. After neonatal denervation, slow and intermediate primaries express slow primaries hypertrophy with other fibers atrophy. In the mature rat, the number of slow fibers in the EDL is less than the number of slow primaries. Upon denervation, hypertrophic slow fibers matching the number and topographic distribution of slow primaries appear, suggesting that a subpopulation of the slow primaries acquire the fast phenotype during adult life, but reveal their original identity as slow primaries in response to denervation by hypertrophying

  11. Effects of vitamin D and quercetin, alone and in combination, on cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle function in physically active male adults

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Shane D; Sergeev, Igor N; Song, Qingming; Birger, Chad B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D and the antioxidant quercetin, are promising agents for improving physical performance because of their possible beneficial effects on muscular strength and cardiorespiratory fitness. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of increased intakes of vitamin D, quercetin, and their combination on antioxidant status, the steroid hormone regulators of muscle function, and measures of physical performance in apparently healthy male adults engaged in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity exercise training. Methods A total of 40 adult male participants were randomized to either 4,000 IU vitamin D/d, 1,000 mg/d quercetin, vitamin D plus quercetin, or placebo for 8 weeks. Measures of cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle function, blood markers for antioxidant and vitamin D status, and hormones 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) and testosterone were measured pre- and postsupplementation. Results At enrollment, 88.6% of participants were vitamin D sufficient (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D >50 nmol/L) and had normal serum testosterone levels. Supplementation with vitamin D significantly increased serum 25(OH)D concentration (by 87.3% in the vitamin D group, P<0.001) and was associated with an increasing trend of testosterone concentration. There were no changes in concentration of 1,25(OH)2D3 and markers of antioxidant status associated with vitamin D or quercetin supplementation. No improvements in physical performance measures associated with vitamin D and quercetin supplementation were found. Conclusion The findings obtained demonstrate that long-term vitamin D and quercetin supplementation, alone or in combination, does not improve physical performance in male adults with adequate vitamin D, testosterone, and antioxidant status. PMID:26244032

  12. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lefta, Mellani; Wolff, Gretchen; Esser, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all organisms ranging from single cell bacteria to humans exhibit a variety of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical rhythms. In mammals, circadian rhythms control the timing of many physiological processes over a 24-h period, including sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, feeding, and hormone production. This body of research has led to defined characteristics of circadian rhythms based on period length, phase, and amplitude. Underlying circadian behaviors is a molecular clock mechanism found in most, if not all, cell types including skeletal muscle. The mammalian molecular clock is a complex of multiple oscillating networks that are regulated through transcriptional mechanisms, timed protein turnover, and input from small molecules. At this time, very little is known about circadian aspects of skeletal muscle function/metabolism but some progress has been made on understanding the molecular clock in skeletal muscle. The goal of this chapter is to provide the basic terminology and concepts of circadian rhythms with a more detailed review of the current state of knowledge of the molecular clock, with reference to what is known in skeletal muscle. Research has demonstrated that the molecular clock is active in skeletal muscles and that the muscle-specific transcription factor, MyoD, is a direct target of the molecular clock. Skeletal muscle of clock-compromised mice, Bmal1−/− and ClockΔ19 mice, are weak and exhibit significant disruptions in expression of many genes required for adult muscle structure and metabolism. We suggest that the interaction between the molecular clock, MyoD, and metabolic factors, such as PGC-1, provide a potential system of feedback loops that may be critical for both maintenance and adaptation of skeletal muscle. PMID:21621073

  13. Circadian rhythms, the molecular clock, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lefta, Mellani; Wolff, Gretchen; Esser, Karyn A

    2011-01-01

    Almost all organisms ranging from single cell bacteria to humans exhibit a variety of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical rhythms. In mammals, circadian rhythms control the timing of many physiological processes over a 24-h period, including sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, feeding, and hormone production. This body of research has led to defined characteristics of circadian rhythms based on period length, phase, and amplitude. Underlying circadian behaviors is a molecular clock mechanism found in most, if not all, cell types including skeletal muscle. The mammalian molecular clock is a complex of multiple oscillating networks that are regulated through transcriptional mechanisms, timed protein turnover, and input from small molecules. At this time, very little is known about circadian aspects of skeletal muscle function/metabolism but some progress has been made on understanding the molecular clock in skeletal muscle. The goal of this chapter is to provide the basic terminology and concepts of circadian rhythms with a more detailed review of the current state of knowledge of the molecular clock, with reference to what is known in skeletal muscle. Research has demonstrated that the molecular clock is active in skeletal muscles and that the muscle-specific transcription factor, MyoD, is a direct target of the molecular clock. Skeletal muscle of clock-compromised mice, Bmal1(-/-) and Clock(Δ19) mice, are weak and exhibit significant disruptions in expression of many genes required for adult muscle structure and metabolism. We suggest that the interaction between the molecular clock, MyoD, and metabolic factors, such as PGC-1, provide a potential system of feedback loops that may be critical for both maintenance and adaptation of skeletal muscle.

  14. The effects of water temperature on the energetic costs of juvenile and adult California sea lions (Zalophus californianus): the importance of skeletal muscle thermogenesis for thermal balance.

    PubMed

    Liwanag, H E M; Williams, T M; Costa, D P; Kanatous, S B; Davis, R W; Boyd, I L

    2009-12-01

    As highly mobile marine predators, many pinniped species routinely encounter a wide range of water temperatures during foraging and in association with seasonal, geographical and climatic changes. To determine how such variation in environmental temperature may impact energetic costs in otariids, we determined the thermal neutral zone of adult and juvenile California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) by measuring resting metabolic rate using open-flow respirometry. Five adult female (body mass range =82.2-107.2 kg) and four juvenile (body mass=26.2-36.5 kg) sea lions were examined over experimental water temperatures ranging from 0 to 20 degrees C (adults) or 5 to 20 degrees C (juveniles). The metabolic rate of adult sea lions averaged 6.4+/-0.64 ml O(2) kg(-1) min(-1) when resting within the thermal neutral zone. The lower critical temperature of adults was 6.4+/-2.2 degrees C, approximately 4 degrees C lower than sea surface temperatures routinely encountered off coastal California. In comparison, juvenile sea lions did not demonstrate thermal neutrality within the range of water temperatures examined. Resting metabolic rate of the younger animals, 6.3+/-0.53 ml O(2) kg(-1) min(-1), increased as water temperature approached 12 degrees C, and suggested a potential thermal limitation in the wild. To determine whether muscle thermogenesis during activity could mitigate this limitation, we measured the active metabolic rate of juveniles swimming at water temperature (T(water))=5, 12 and 20 degrees C. No significant difference (F=0.377, P=0.583) in swimming metabolic rate was found among water temperatures, suggesting that thermal disadvantages due to small body size in juvenile sea lions may be circumvented by recycling endogenous heat during locomotor activity.

  15. MICROSURGICAL TRANSFER OF THE GRACILIS MUSCLE FOR ELBOW FLEXION IN BRACHIAL PLEXUS INJURY IN ADULTS: RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF EIGHT CASES

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Luiz Koiti; do Nascimento, Alexandre Tadeu; Capócio, Roberto; Mattar, Rames; Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Wei, Teng Hsiang; Torres, Luciano Ruiz; Moya, Fernando Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treating brachial plexus injuries is a major challenge, especially lesions that are presented late, with more than 12 months of evolution. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent one of the possibilities for attempting to restore the function of upper limbs affected under such conditions: microsurgical transfer of the gracilis muscle for elbow flexion. Methods: Eight patients were included, divided into two groups: one in which the procedure consisted of neurorrhaphy of the muscle flap with sural nerve grafting and anastomosis more distally; and the other, in which the neurorrhaphy was performed directly on the spinal accessory nerve, with anastomosis in thoracoacromial vessels. Results: We found a significant difference between the groups. A greater number of satisfactory results (75% M4) were found among patients who underwent direct neurorrhaphy, whereas the procedure using grafts for neurorrhaphy was less successful (25% M4). Conclusion: Patients who underwent microsurgical functional transfer of the gracilis muscle in which vascular anastomoses were performed in thoracoacromial vessels presented better functional outcomes than shown by those whose anastomoses were in the brachial artery with subsequent use of a nerve graft. PMID:27027050

  16. Growth response and expression of muscle growth-related candidate genes in adult zebrafish fed plant and fishmeal protein-based diets.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Pilar E; Peña, Andrea A; Lizama, Carla D; Araneda, Cristian; Iturra, Patricia; Neira, Roberto; Medrano, Juan F

    2013-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the effects of a plant protein- vs. fishmeal-based diet on growth response in a population of 24 families, as well as expression of growth-related genes in the muscle of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio). Each family was split to create two fish populations with similar genetic backgrounds, and the fish were fed either fishmeal (FM diet) or plant protein (PP diet) as the unique protein source in their diets from 35 to 98 days postfertilization (dpf). To understand the effect of the PP diet on gene expression, individuals from three families, representative of the mean weight in both populations, were selected. To understand the effect of familiar variation on gene expression, the same families were evaluated separately. At 98 dpf, growth-related genes Igf1a, Igf2a, mTOR, Pld1a, Mrf4, Myod, Myogenin, and Myostatin1b were evaluated. In males, Myogenin, Mrf4, and Igf2a showed changes attributable to the PP diet. In females, the effect of the PP diet did not modulate the expression in any of the eight genes studied. The effect of familiar variation on gene expression was observed among families. This study shows that PP diet and family variation have effects on gene expression in fish muscle.

  17. Different doses of supplemental vitamin D maintain interleukin-5 without altering skeletal muscle strength: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in vitamin D sufficient adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Supplemental vitamin D modulates inflammatory cytokines and skeletal muscle function, but results are inconsistent. It is unknown if these inconsistencies are dependent on the supplemental dose of vitamin D. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the influence of different doses of supplemental vitamin D on inflammatory cytokines and muscular strength in young adults. Methods Men (n = 15) and women (n = 15) received a daily placebo or vitamin D supplement (200 or 4000 IU) for 28-d during the winter. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), cytokine concentrations and muscular (leg) strength measurements were performed prior to and during supplementation. Statistical significance of data were assessed with a two-way (time, treatment) analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures, followed by a Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference to test multiple pairwise comparisons. Results Upon enrollment, 63% of the subjects were vitamin D sufficient (serum 25(OH)D ≥ 30 ng/ml). Serum 25(OH)D and interleukin (IL)-5 decreased (P < 0.05) across time in the placebo group. Supplemental vitamin D at 200 IU maintained serum 25(OH)D concentrations and increased IL-5 (P < 0.05). Supplemental vitamin D at 4000 IU increased (P < 0.05) serum 25(OH)D without altering IL-5 concentrations. Although serum 25(OH)D concentrations correlated (P < 0.05) with muscle strength, muscle strength was not changed by supplemental vitamin D. Conclusion In young adults who were vitamin D sufficient prior to supplementation, we conclude that a low-daily dose of supplemental vitamin D prevents serum 25(OH)D and IL-5 concentration decreases, and that muscular strength does not parallel the 25(OH)D increase induced by a high-daily dose of supplemental vitamin D. Considering that IL-5 protects against viruses and bacterial infections, these findings could have a broad physiological importance regarding the ability of vitamin D sufficiency to mediate the immune systems protection

  18. Diethyl hexyl phthalate-induced changes in insulin signaling molecules and the protective role of antioxidant vitamins in gastrocnemius muscle of adult male rat

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Chinnapaiyan; Khan, Adam Ismail; Balaji, Venkataraman; Selvaraj, Jayaraman; Balasubramanian, Karundevi

    2011-12-15

    Diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an endocrine disruptor, it influences various organ systems in human beings and experimental animals. DEHP reduced the serum testosterone and increased the blood glucose, estradiol, T{sub 3} and T{sub 4} in rats. However, the effect of DEHP on insulin signaling and glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle is not known. Adult male albino rats were divided into four groups: Group I: Control; Groups II and III: DEHP treated (dissolved in olive oil at a dose of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight, respectively, once daily through gastric intubation for 30 days); and Group IV: DEHP (100 mg/kg body weight) plus vitamins E (50 mg/kg body weight) and C (100 mg/kg body weight) dissolved in olive oil and distilled water, respectively, once daily through gastric intubation for 30 days. On completion of treatment, animals were euthanized and perfused (whole body); gastrocnemius muscle was dissected out and subjected to assessment of various parameters. DEHP treatment increased the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, hydroxyl radical levels and lipid peroxidation which disrupt the membrane integrity and insulin receptor. DEHP impaired the insulin signal transduction, glucose uptake and oxidation through decreased expression of plasma membrane GLUT4, which may partly be responsible for the elevation of fasting blood glucose level. The present study suggests that DEHP exposure affects glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle and is mediated through enhanced lipid peroxidation, impaired insulin signaling and GLUT4 expression in plasma membrane. Antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have a protective role against the adverse effect of DEHP. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP treatment significantly decreased serum insulin and testosterone levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased ROS and decreased glucose uptake were observed in DEHP treated animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired insulin signaling in gastrocnemius muscle was observed in DEHP treatment. Black

  19. Ultrasound-Derived Forearm Muscle Thickness Is a Powerful Predictor for Estimating DXA-Derived Appendicular Lean Mass in Japanese Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Fujita, Eiji; Thiebaud, Robert S; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Akamine, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    To test the validity of published equations, anterior forearm muscle thickness (MT-ulna) of 158 Japanese older adults (72 men and 86 women) aged 50-79 y was measured with ultrasound. Appendicular lean soft tissue mass (aLM) was estimated from MT-ulna using two equations (body height without [eqn 1] and with [eqn 2]) previously published in the literature. Appendicular lean mass was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorption (DXA), and this method served as the reference criterion. There was a strong correlation between DXA-derived and ultrasound-estimated aLM in both equations (r = 0.882 and r = 0.944). Total error was 2.60 kg for eqn (1) and 1.38 kg for eqn (2). A Bland-Altman plot revealed that there was no systematic bias between DXA-derived and ultrasound-estimated aLM; however, eqn (1) overestimated aLM compared with DXA-derived aLM. Our results suggest that an ultrasound MT-ulna equation that includes body height is appropriate and useful for estimating aLM in Japanese adults. PMID:27321173

  20. Long-term hypoxia increases calcium affinity of BK channels in ovine fetal and adult cerebral artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiaoxiao; Lin, Mike T; Thorington, Glyne U; Wilson, Sean M; Longo, Lawrence D; Hessinger, David A

    2015-04-01

    Acclimatization to high-altitude, long-term hypoxia (LTH) reportedly alters cerebral artery contraction-relaxation responses associated with changes in K(+) channel activity. We hypothesized that to maintain oxygenation during LTH, basilar arteries (BA) in the ovine adult and near-term fetus would show increased large-conductance Ca(2+) activated potassium (BK) channel activity. We measured BK channel activity, expression, and cell surface distribution by use of patch-clamp electrophysiology, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy, respectively, in myocytes from normoxic control and LTH adult and near-term fetus BA. Electrophysiological data showed that BK channels in LTH myocytes exhibited 1) lowered Ca(2+) set points, 2) left-shifted activation voltages, and 3) longer dwell times. BK channels in LTH myocytes also appeared to be more dephosphorylated. These differences collectively make LTH BK channels more sensitive to activation. Studies using flow cytometry showed that the LTH fetus exhibited increased BK β1 subunit surface expression. In addition, in both fetal groups confocal microscopy revealed increased BK channel clustering and colocalization to myocyte lipid rafts. We conclude that increased BK channel activity in LTH BA occurred in association with increased channel affinity for Ca(2+) and left-shifted voltage activation. Increased cerebrovascular BK channel activity may be a mechanism by which LTH adult and near-term fetal sheep can acclimatize to long-term high altitude hypoxia. Our findings suggest that increasing BK channel activity in cerebral myocytes may be a therapeutic target to ameliorate the adverse effects of high altitude in adults or of intrauterine hypoxia in the fetus.

  1. Effects of Pilates on muscle strength, postural balance and quality of life of older adults: a randomized, controlled, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Campos de Oliveira, Laís; Gonçalves de Oliveira, Raphael; Pires-Oliveira, Deise Aparecida de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of Pilates on lower leg strength, postural balance and the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of older adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two older adults were randomly allocated either to the experimental group (EG, n = 16; mean age, 63.62 ± 1.02 years), which performed two sessions of Pilates per week for 12 weeks, or to the control group (CG, n = 16; mean age, 64.21 ± 0.80), which performed two sessions of static stretching per week for 12 weeks. The following evaluations were performed before and after the interventions: isokinetic torque of knee extensors and flexors at 300°/s, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, the Berg Balance Scale, and the Health Survey assessment (SF-36). [Results] In the intra-group analysis, the EG demonstrated significant improvement in all variables. In the inter-group analysis, the EG demonstrated significant improvement in most variables. [Conclusion] Pilates exercises led to significant improvement in isokinetic torque of the knee extensors and flexors, postural balance and aspects of the health-related quality of life of older adults. PMID:25931749

  2. Effects of Pilates on muscle strength, postural balance and quality of life of older adults: a randomized, controlled, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Campos de Oliveira, Laís; Gonçalves de Oliveira, Raphael; Pires-Oliveira, Deise Aparecida de Almeida

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of Pilates on lower leg strength, postural balance and the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of older adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two older adults were randomly allocated either to the experimental group (EG, n = 16; mean age, 63.62 ± 1.02 years), which performed two sessions of Pilates per week for 12 weeks, or to the control group (CG, n = 16; mean age, 64.21 ± 0.80), which performed two sessions of static stretching per week for 12 weeks. The following evaluations were performed before and after the interventions: isokinetic torque of knee extensors and flexors at 300°/s, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, the Berg Balance Scale, and the Health Survey assessment (SF-36). [Results] In the intra-group analysis, the EG demonstrated significant improvement in all variables. In the inter-group analysis, the EG demonstrated significant improvement in most variables. [Conclusion] Pilates exercises led to significant improvement in isokinetic torque of the knee extensors and flexors, postural balance and aspects of the health-related quality of life of older adults. PMID:25931749

  3. Mammalian airborne allergens.

    PubMed

    Aalberse, Rob C

    2014-01-01

    Historically, horse dandruff was a favorite allergen source material. Today, however, allergic symptoms due to airborne mammalian allergens are mostly a result of indoor exposure, be it at home, at work or even at school. The relevance of mammalian allergens in relation to the allergenic activity of house dust extract is briefly discussed in the historical context of two other proposed sources of house dust allergenic activity: mites and Maillard-type lysine-sugar conjugates. Mammalian proteins involved in allergic reactions to airborne dust are largely found in only 2 protein families: lipocalins and secretoglobins (Fel d 1-like proteins), with a relatively minor contribution of serum albumins, cystatins and latherins. Both the lipocalin and the secretoglobin family are very complex. In some instances this results in a blurred separation between important and less important allergenic family members. The past 50 years have provided us with much detailed information on the genomic organization and protein structure of many of these allergens. However, the complex family relations, combined with the wide range of post-translational enzymatic and non-enzymatic modifications, make a proper qualitative and quantitative description of the important mammalian indoor airborne allergens still a significant proteomic challenge. PMID:24925404

  4. The brachial plexus branches to the pectoral muscles in adult rats: morphological aspects and morphometric normative data

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Nilo; Domi, Teuta; Lopez, Ignazio Diego; Triolo, Daniela; Fossaghi, Andrea; Dina, Giorgia; Podini, Paola; Comi, Giancarlo; Quattrini, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Animal models provide an important tool to investigate the pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders. In the present study, we analyze fiber composition of the brachial plexus branches to the pectoral muscles: the medial anterior thoracic nerve (MATN) and the lateral anterior thoracic nerve (LATN). The morphological and morphometric characteristics and the percentage of motor fibers within each nerve are here reported, adding information to microscopic anatomy knowledge of the rat brachial plexus. As control, we employed the quadriceps nerve, commonly used for the evaluation of motor fibers at hindlimbs. We demonstrated that the MATN and the LATN are predominantly composed of large motor fibers and therefore could be employed to evaluate the peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement at forelimbs in neurological diseases models, predominantly affecting the motor fiber compartment. PMID:23087618

  5. Repositioning forelimb superficialis muscles: tendon attachment and muscle activity enable active relocation of functional myofibers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Wang, Lingyan; Eyal, Shai; Zelzer, Elazar; Brigande, John V; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2013-09-16

    The muscles that govern hand motion are composed of extrinsic muscles that reside within the forearm and intrinsic muscles that reside within the hand. We find that the extrinsic muscles of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) first differentiate as intrinsic muscles within the hand and then relocate as myofibers to their final position in the arm. This remarkable translocation of differentiated myofibers across a joint is dependent on muscle contraction and muscle-tendon attachment. Interestingly, the intrinsic flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles of the foot are identical to the FDS in tendon pattern and delayed developmental timing but undergo limited muscle translocation, providing strong support for evolutionary homology between the FDS and FDB muscles. We propose that the intrinsic FDB pattern represents the original tetrapod limb and that translocation of the muscles to form the FDS is a mammalian evolutionary addition.

  6. Effects of Tetrodotoxin on the Mammalian Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The human genome encodes nine functional voltage-gated Na+ channels. Three of them, namely Nav1.5, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9, are resistant to nanomolar concentrations of tetrodotoxin (TTX; IC50 ≥ 1 μM). The other isoforms, which are predominantly expressed in the skeletal muscle and nervous system, are highly sensitive to TTX (IC50 ~ 10 nM). During the last two decades, it has become evident that in addition to the major cardiac isoform Nav1.5, several of those TTX sensitive isoforms are expressed in the mammalian heart. Whereas immunohistochemical and electrophysiological methods demonstrated functional expression in various heart regions, the physiological importance of those isoforms for cardiac excitation in higher mammals is still debated. This review summarizes our knowledge on the systemic cardiovascular effects of TTX in animals and humans, with a special focus on cardiac excitation and performance at lower concentrations of this marine drug. Altogether, these data strongly suggest that TTX sensitive Na+ channels, detected more recently in various heart tissues, are not involved in excitation phenomena in the healthy adult heart of higher mammals. PMID:20411124

  7. Effect of age on basal muscle protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling in a large cohort of young and older men and women

    PubMed Central

    Markofski, Melissa M.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Drummond, Micah J.; Fry, Christopher S.; Fujita, Satoshi; Gundermann, David M.; Glynn, Erin L.; Jennings, Kristofer; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Reidy, Paul T.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Timmerman, Kyle L.; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Volpi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The rate of muscle loss with aging is higher in men than women. However, women have smaller muscles throughout the adult life. Protein content is a major determinant of skeletal muscle size. This study was designed to determine if age and sex differentially impact basal muscle protein synthesis and mammalian/mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. We performed a secondary data analysis on a cohort of 215 healthy, non-obese (BMI <30 kg·m−2) young (18–40 y; 74 men, 52 women) and older (60–87 y; 57 men, 32 women) adults. The database contained information on physical characteristics, basal muscle protein fractional synthetic rate (FSR; n=215; stable isotope methodology) and mTORC1 signaling (n=125, Western blotting). FSR and mTORC1 signaling were measured at rest and after an overnight fast. mTORC1 and S6K1 phosphorylation were higher (P<0.05) in older subjects with no sex differences. However, there were no age or sex differences or interaction for muscle FSR (p>0.05). Body mass index, fat free mass, or body fat were not significant covariates and did not influence the results. We conclude that age and sex do not influence basal muscle protein synthesis. However, basal mTORC1 hyperphosphorylation in the elderly may contribute to insulin resistance and the age-related anabolic resistance of skeletal muscle protein metabolism to nutrition and exercise. PMID:25735236

  8. Mammalian development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  9. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  10. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  11. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  12. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the removal of a small piece of muscle tissue for examination. ... dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis Additional conditions ...

  13. FAST CP: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of a 12-week combined Functional Anaerobic and Strength Training programme on muscle properties and mechanical gait deficiencies in adolescents and young adults with spastic-type cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, Jarred G; Lichtwark, Glen A; Boyd, Roslyn N; Barber, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) have muscles that are smaller, weaker and more resistant to stretch compared to typically developing people. Progressive resistance training leads to increases in muscle size and strength. In CP, the benefits of resistance training alone may not transfer to improve other activities such as walking; however, the transfer of strength improvements to improved mobility may be enhanced by performing training that involves specific functional tasks or motor skills. This study aims to determine the efficacy of combined functional anaerobic and strength training in (1) influencing muscle strength, structure and function and (2) to determine if any changes in muscle strength and structure following training impact on walking ability and gross motor functional capacity and performance in the short (following 3 months of training) and medium terms (a further 3 months post-training). Methods and analysis 40 adolescents and young adults with CP will be recruited to undertake a 12-week training programme. The training programme will consist of 3×75 min sessions per week, made up of 5 lower limb resistance exercises and 2–3 functional anaerobic exercises per session. The calf muscles will be specifically targeted, as they are the most commonly impacted muscles in CP and are a key muscle group involved in walking. If, as we believe, muscle properties change following combined strength and functional training, there may be long-term benefits of this type of training in slowing the deterioration of muscle function in people with spastic-type CP. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the ethics committees at The University of Queensland (2014000066) and Children's Health Queensland (HREC/15/QRCH/30). The findings will be disseminated by publications in peer-reviewed journals, conferences and local research organisations’ media. Trial registration number Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials

  14. Muscle development and obesity

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The formation of skeletal muscle from the epithelial somites involves a series of events triggered by temporally and spatially discrete signals resulting in the generation of muscle fibers which vary in their contractile and metabolic nature. The fiber type composition of muscles varies between individuals and it has now been found that there are differences in fiber type proportions between lean and obese animals and humans. Amongst the possible causes of obesity, it has been suggested that inappropriate prenatal environments may ‘program’ the fetus and may lead to increased risks for disease in adult life. The characteristics of muscle are both heritable and plastic, giving the tissue some ability to adapt to signals and stimuli both pre and postnatally. Given that muscle is a site of fatty acid oxidation and carbohydrate metabolism and that its development can be changed by prenatal events, it is interesting to examine the possible relationship between muscle development and the risk of obesity. PMID:19279728

  15. Dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca/sup 2 +/ channels in mammalian skeletal muscle cells in culture: electrophysiological properties and interactions with Ca/sup 2 +/ channel activator (Bay K8644) and inhibitor (PN 200-110)

    SciTech Connect

    Cognard, C.; Romey, G.; Galizzi, J.P.; Fosset, M.; Lazdunski, M.

    1986-03-01

    The whole-cell patch-clamp technique has been used to analyze the properties of the dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca/sup 2 +/ channel in rat skeletal muscle cells (myoballs) in culture. The potential dependence of Ca/sup 2 +/ -channel activation is similar to that observed in cardiac cells. However, the skeletal muscle Ca/sup 2 +/ channel is activated more slowly. The voltage dependence of Ca/sup 2 +/-channel inactivation indicates a half-maximal inactivation (V/sub h0.5/) at -72 mV as compared to V/sub h0.5/ = -35 mV for cardiac cells. Blockade of the skeletal muscle Ca/sup 2 +/ channel by the dihydrophyridine (+)-PN 200-110 is voltage dependent, with a half-maximal effect of 13 nM for an application of the drug to the myoball membrane held at -90 mV and of 0.15 nM for an application at a potential of -65 mV. The 100-fold difference in apparent affinity is interpreted as a preferential association of PN 200-110 with the inactivated form of the Ca/sup 2 +/ channel. The K/sub 0.5/ value found from electrophysiological experiments for the binding to the inactivated state is nearly identical to the equilibrium dissociation constant found from binding experiments with (+)-(/sup 3/H)PN 200-110 using transverse-tubular membranes. The dihydropyridine activator Bay K8644 acts by increasing Ca/sup 2 +/ current amplitude and by slowing down deactivation.

  16. THE IMPACT OF SAGITTAL PLANE HIP POSITION ON ISOMETRIC FORCE OF HIP EXTERNAL ROTATOR AND INTERNAL ROTATOR MUSCLES IN HEALTHY YOUNG ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Anson L. K.; Rickards, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Hip external rotator (ER) and internal rotator (IR) muscle weakness is theorized to be associated with lower extremity injury in athletes including knee ligament tears and patellofemoral pain. Previous studies investigating hip musculature strength have utilized various sagittal plane hip positions for testing. The relationship between results at these different positions is unknown. Methods: Eighty healthy, pain‐free young adults participated in the study: 40 female, mean age 22.90 (± 2.32) years, and 40 male, mean age 23.50 (± 2.15) years. Peak isometric torque of bilateral hip ER and IR were tested at 90° and 0° of hip flexion with an instrumented dynamometer. Peak muscle forces were calculated. Peak forces were normalized by body mass. Mean normalized force was calculated for dominant and non‐dominant limbs for ER and IR in both positions. Male and female data were analyzed separately with paired t‐tests (2‐tailed). Reference values for average muscle force and torque were calculated for dominant and non‐dominant limbs for both hip positions. Results: Hip IR normalized peak force was greater at 90° compared to 0° flexion position bilaterally in both genders (p < .01). Hip ER normalized peak force was greater at 90° compared to 0° flexion in dominant limbs of both genders and in non‐dominant limbs of males (p < .01). Non‐dominant hip ER normalized force in females was greater at 90° versus 0° flexion; however, it was not significant (p = .092). Post hoc analysis of normalized average force (average over 5‐second contraction) yielded similar results. Conclusion: Clinicians and researchers should use consistent positioning for testing of hip ER and IR strength. This will improve certainty of determining if a patient’s strength has changed or if differences between groups are present. Reference values reported will be useful in order to determine if weakness is present and to set goals, particularly in cases of

  17. Digit (2D:4D) ratio is associated with muscle mass (MM) and strength (MS) in older adults: possible effect of in utero androgen exposure.

    PubMed

    Halil, Meltem; Gurel, Esin Ileri; Kuyumcu, Mehmet Emin; Karaismailoglu, Serkan; Yesil, Yusuf; Ozturk, Zeynel Abidin; Yavuz, Burcu Balam; Cankurtaran, Mustafa; Ariogul, Servet

    2013-01-01

    Decline in MM and MS with aging, defined as sarcopenia, is related with physical disability, poor quality of life and death. Its mechanisms are not fully understood. Testosterone increases muscle protein synthesis. However, the effects of in utero androgen exposure to MM and MS in older adults have not been studied. In utero androgen exposure is inversely related with 2D:4D ratio. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between 2D:4D ratio as an indicator of in utero androgen exposure and MM and MS in elderly patients. A total of 151 older adults were included. Calf-circumference (CC) and skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) were used for the assessment of MM and hand grip strength for the assessment of MS. Mean age ± SD of the patients was 73.72 ± 6.23. Fifty-two (34.4%) of patients were male, 99 (65.6%) were female. Right and left 2D:4D were significantly and negatively correlated with hand grip strength (r=-0.365, p=0.018 and r=-0.434, p=0.005, respectively), CC (r=-0.422, p=0.002 and r=-0.459, p=0.001, respectively) and SMI (r=-0.354, p=0.018 and r=-0.348, p=0.022, respectively) in men. In women, right and left 2D:4D were significantly and negatively correlated with hand grip strength (r=-0.252, p=0.022 and r=-0.234, p=0.033, respectively), CC (r=-0.229, p=0.024 and r=-0.302, p=0.003, respectively) and SMI (r=-0.382, p<0.001 and r=-0.431, p<0.001, respectively). In this study, we found that 2D:4D ratio was significantly and negatively correlated with parameters depicting MM and MS which may suggest the possible role of in utero androgen exposure in the development of MM and MS loss in the elderly. PMID:23219021

  18. Mammalian touch catches up

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Carolyn M.; Bautista, Diana M.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2015-01-01

    An assortment of touch receptors innervate the skin and encode different tactile features of the environment. Compared with invertebrate touch and other sensory systems, our understanding of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of mammalian touch lags behind. Two recent breakthroughs have accelerated progress. First, an arsenal of cell-type-specific molecular markers allowed the functional and anatomical properties of sensory neurons to be matched, thereby unraveling a cellular code for touch. Such markers have also revealed key roles of non-neuronal cell types, such as Merkel cells and keratinocytes, in touch reception. Second, the discovery of Piezo genes as a new family of mechanically activated channels has fueled the discovery of molecular mechanisms that mediate and mechanotransduction in mammalian touch receptors. PMID:26100741

  19. Synthetic localized calcium transients directly probe signalling mechanisms in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Lourdes; Shkryl, Vyacheslav M; Zhou, Jingsong; Manno, Carlo; Momotake, Atsuya; Brum, Gustavo; Blatter, Lothar A; Ellis-Davies, Graham C R; Ríos, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) to trigger muscle contraction is controversial. It was studied on isolated muscle fibres using synthetic localized increases in Ca2+ concentration, SLICs, generated by two-photon photorelease from nitrodibenzofuran (NDBF)-EGTA just outside the permeabilized plasma membrane. SLICs provided a way to increase cytosolic µCa2+½ rapidly and reversibly, up to 8 μm, levels similar to those reached during physiological activity. They improve over previous paradigms in rate of rise, locality and reproducibility. Use of NDBF-EGTA allowed for the separate modification of resting µCa2+½, trigger µCa2+½ and resting µMg2+½. In frog muscle, SLICs elicited propagated responses that had the characteristics of CICR. The threshold µCa2+½ for triggering a response was 0.5 μm or less. As this value is much lower than concentrations prevailing near channels during normal activity, the result supports participation of CICR in the physiological control of contraction in amphibian muscle. As SLICs were applied outside cells, the primary stimulus was Ca2+, rather than the radiation or subproducts of photorelease. Therefore the responses qualify as ‘classic’ CICR. By contrast, mouse muscle fibres did not respond unless channel-opening drugs were present at substantial concentrations, an observation contrary to the physiological involvement of CICR in mammalian excitation–contraction coupling. In mouse muscle, the propagating wave had a substantially lower release flux, which together with a much higher threshold justified the absence of response when drugs were not present. The differences in flux and threshold may be ascribed to the absence of ryanodine receptor 3 (RyR3) isoforms in adult mammalian muscle. PMID:22310315

  20. Rheotaxis guides mammalian sperm

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Kiyoshi; Clapham, David E

    2013-01-01

    Background In sea urchins, spermatozoan motility is altered by chemotactic peptides, giving rise to the assumption that mammalian eggs also emit chemotactic agents that guide spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract to the mature oocyte. Mammalian spermatozoa indeed undergo complex adaptations within the female (the process of capacitation) that are initiated by agents ranging from pH to progesterone, but these factors are not necessarily taxic. Currently, chemotaxis, thermotaxis, and rheotaxis have not been definitively established in mammals. Results Here, we show that positive rheotaxis, the ability of organisms to orient and swim against the flow of surrounding fluid, is a major taxic factor for mouse and human sperm. This flow is generated within 4 hours of sexual stimulation and coitus in female mice; prolactin-triggered oviductal fluid secretion clears the oviduct of debris, lowers viscosity, and generates the stream that guides sperm migration in the oviduct. Rheotaxic movement is demonstrated in capacitated and uncapacitated spermatozoa in low and high viscosity medium. Finally, we show that a unique sperm motion we quantify using the sperm head's rolling rate reflects sperm rotation that generates essential force for positioning the sperm in the stream. Rotation requires CatSper channels, presumably by enabling Ca2+ influx. Conclusions We propose that rheotaxis is a major determinant of sperm guidance over long distances in the mammalian female reproductive tract. Coitus induces fluid flow to guide sperm in the oviduct. Sperm rheotaxis requires rotational motion during CatSper channel-dependent hyperactivated motility. PMID:23453951

  1. Muscle senescence in short-lived wild mammals, the soricine shrews Blarina brevicauda and Sorex palustris.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Allyson G; Lawler, John M; Campbell, Kevin L; Horning, Markus

    2009-06-01

    Red-toothed (soricine) shrews are consummate predators exhibiting the highest energy turnovers and shortest life spans (ca. 18 months) of any mammal, yet virtually nothing is known regarding their physiological aging. We assessed the emerging pattern of skeletal muscle senescence (contractile/connective tissue components) in sympatric species, the semi-aquatic water shrew (WS), Sorex palustris, and the terrestrial short-tailed shrew (STS), Blarina brevicauda, to determine if muscle aging occurs in wild, short-lived mammals (H(0): shrews do not survive to an age where senescence occurs), and if so, whether these alterations are species-specific. Gracilis muscles were collected from first-year (n=17) and second-year (n=17) field-caught shrews. Consistent with typical mammalian aging, collagen content (% area) increased with age in both species (S. palustris: approximately 50%; B. brevicauda: approximately 60%). Muscle was dominated by stiffer Type I collagen, and the ratio of collagen Type I:Type III more than doubled with age. The area ratio of muscle:collagen decreased with age in both species, but was considerably lower in adult STS, suggesting species-specificity of senescence. Extracellular space was age-elevated in B. brevicauda, but was preserved in S. palustris ( approximately 50 vs. 10% elevation). Though juvenile interspecific comparisons revealed no significance, adult WS myocytes had 68% larger cross-sectional area and occurred at 28% lower fibers/area than those of adult STS. We demonstrate that age-related muscle senescence does occur in wild-caught, short-lived mammals, and we therefore reject this classic aging theory tenet. Our findings moreover illustrate that differential age adjustments in contractile/connective tissue components of muscle occur in the two species of wild-caught shrews. PMID:19296507

  2. Acute cyclooxygenase inhibition does not alter muscle sympathetic nerve activity or forearm vasodilator responsiveness in lean and obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Jill N.; Charkoudian, Nisha; Matzek, Luke J.; Johnson, Christopher P.; Joyner, Michael J.; Curry, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is often characterized by chronic inflammation that may contribute to increased cardiovascular risk via sympathoexcitation and decreased vasodilator responsiveness. We hypothesized that obese individuals would have greater indices of inflammation compared with lean controls, and that cyclooxygenase inhibition using ibuprofen would reduce muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and increase forearm blood flow in these subjects. We measured MSNA, inflammatory biomarkers (C‐reactive protein [CRP] and Interleukin‐6 [IL‐6]), and forearm vasodilator responses to brachial artery acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside in 13 men and women (7 lean; 6 obese) on two separate study days: control (CON) and after 800 mg ibuprofen (IBU). CRP (1.7 ± 0.4 vs. 0.6 ± 0.3 mg/L; P < 0.05) and IL‐6 (4.1 ± 1.5 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1pg/mL; P < 0.05) were higher in the obese group during CON and tended to decrease with IBU (IL‐6: P < 0.05; CRP: P = 0.14). MSNA was not different between groups during CON (26 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats (lean) versus 26 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats (obese); P = 0.50) or IBU (25 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats (lean) versus 30 ± 5 bursts/100 heart beats (obese); P = 0.25), and was not altered by IBU. Forearm vasodilator responses were unaffected by IBU in both groups. In summary, an acute dose of ibuprofen did not alter sympathetic nerve activity or forearm blood flow responses in healthy obese individuals, suggesting that the cyclooxygenase pathway is not a major contributor to these variables in this group. PMID:25347862

  3. Effects of 96 Weeks of Rosuvastatin on Bone, Muscle, and Fat in HIV-Infected Adults on Effective Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, Kristine M; Jiang, Ying; Debanne, Sara M; McComsey, Grace A

    2016-04-01

    Heightened inflammation and immune activation are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) and lean body mass (LBM) among HIV-infected persons. We hypothesized that a reduction in inflammation with rosuvastatin would be associated with improvements in BMD and LBM. HIV-infected participants on stable antiretroviral therapy without statin indication and with heightened immune activation (≥19% CD8(+)CD38(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells) or inflammation (hsCRP ≥2 mg/liter) were randomized to rosuvastatin 10 mg daily or placebo for 96 weeks. Among 72 participants randomized to rosuvastatin and 75 to placebo, there were no significant differences in the relative changes in BMD (p > 0.29) or in fat (p ≥ 0.19). A trend toward increased LBM (p = 0.059) was seen in the rosuvastatin arm without differences in creatinine kinase or self-reported physical activity (p ≥ 0.10). In a multivariable regression model, rosuvastatin was associated with a significant positive effect on LBM after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, and detectable HIV-1 viral load. Higher baseline sCD163 correlated with increases in LBM from weeks 0 to 96 (p = 0.023); greater changes in total and leg lean mass were seen among statin users with higher compared to lower baseline IP-10 levels (LBM 1.8 vs. -0.3%; p = 0.028 and leg lean mass 2.9 vs. -1.7%; p = 0.012). Rosuvastatin is associated with an absence of toxicity on BMD and a potential benefit on LBM over 96 weeks of therapy. The preservation of LBM in the rosuvastatin arm over the 2 years of the study is of major clinical relevance in delaying loss of muscle mass with aging. PMID:26477698

  4. Short-term exposure to formaldehyde promotes oxidative damage and inflammation in the trachea and diaphragm muscle of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luiza Fagundes; Murta, Giselle Luciane; Bandeira, Ana Carla Balthar; Nardeli, Clarissa Rodrigues; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Bezerra, Frank Silva

    2015-11-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental pollutant widely used in industry. Exposure to FA causes irritation of the respiratory mucosa and is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in the airways. This study aimed at investigating the oxidative effects on the inflammatory response in the trachea and the diaphragm muscle (DM) of rats exposed to different concentrations of formaldehyde. Twenty-eight Fischer male rats were divided into four groups: control group (CG) exposed to the ambient air; and three groups exposed to the following formaldehyde concentrations of 1% (FA1), 5% (FA5) and 10% (FA10), respectively. The exposure occurred for twenty minutes, three times a day for five days. Oxidative stress analyses were performed by carbonyl protein, lipid peroxidation and catalase activity. The assessment of inflammatory cell influx in both organs and the mucus production in the trachea was carried out. There was an increase of lipid peroxidation in the trachea and the DM of FA1 and FA5 groups compared to the CG and FA10. The oxidation of DM proteins increased in FA10 group compared to CG, FA1 and FA5. The catalase enzyme activity in the DM was reduced in FA1, FA5 and FA10 compared to the CG. Meanwhile, there was a reduction in the enzymatic activity of FA10 compared to the CG in the trachea. The morphometric analysis in the DM demonstrated an influx of inflammatory cells in FA10 compared to the CG. In FA10 group, the tracheal epithelium showed metaplasia and ulceration. In addition, the tracheal epithelium showed more mucus deposits in FA5 compared to CG, FA1 and FA10. The results demonstrated that the exposure to formaldehyde at different concentrations in a short period of time promotes oxidative damage and inflammation in the DM and the trachea and causes metaplasia, ulceration and increased mucus at the latter.

  5. Denervation and reinnervation of skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, R. F.; Max, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of the physiological and biochemical changes that occur in mammalian skeletal muscle after denervation and reinnervation. These changes are compared with those observed after altered motor function. Also considered is the nature of the trophic influence by which nerves control muscle properties. Topics examined include the membrane and contractile properties of denervated and reinnervated muscle; the cholinergic proteins, such as choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase, and the acetylcholine receptor; and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

  6. The Performance of Five Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis Prediction Equations against Dual X-ray Absorptiometry in Estimating Appendicular Skeletal Muscle Mass in an Adult Australian Population

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Solomon C. Y.; Powell, Alice; Khow, Kareeann S. F.; Visvanathan, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    Appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) is a diagnostic criterion for sarcopenia. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) offers a bedside approach to measure ASM but the performance of BIA prediction equations (PE) varies with ethnicities and body composition. We aim to validate the performance of five PEs in estimating ASM against estimation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We recruited 195 healthy adult Australians and ASM was measured using single-frequency BIA. Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the predictive accuracy of ASM as determined by BIA against DXA. Precision (root mean square error (RMSE)) and bias (mean error (ME)) were calculated according to the method of Sheiner and Beal. Four PEs (except that by Kim) showed ASM values that correlated strongly with ASMDXA (r ranging from 0.96 to 0.97, p < 0.001). The Sergi equation performed the best with the lowest ME of −1.09 kg (CI: −0.84–−1.34, p < 0.001) and the RMSE was 2.09 kg (CI: 1.72–2.47). In men, the Kyle equation performed better with the lowest ME (−0.32 kg (CI: −0.66–0.02) and RMSE (1.54 kg (CI: 1.14–1.93)). The Sergi equation is applicable in adult Australians (Caucasian) whereas the Kyle equation can be considered in males. The need remains to validate PEs in other ethnicities and to develop equations suitable for multi-frequency BIA. PMID:27043617

  7. The combined effects of diet quality and physical activity on maintenance of muscle strength among diabetic older adults from the NuAge cohort.

    PubMed

    Rahi, Berna; Morais, José A; Dionne, Isabelle J; Gaudreau, Pierrette; Payette, Hélène; Shatenstein, Bryna

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic older adults are at a higher risk of muscle strength (MS) decline than their non-diabetic counterparts. Adequate protein and energy intakes and physical activity (PA) may preserve MS during aging. However, the role of diet quality (DQ) in MS maintenance is still unknown. This study aimed to determine the association between DQ - alone or combined with PA - and changes in MS over 3 years in diabetic participants aged 67 to 84 years at recruitment in a secondary analysis of the longitudinal observational NuAge study. Changes in handgrip, knee extensor and elbow flexor strengths were calculated as the difference between recruitment (T1) and after 3 years (T4) in 156 diabetic older adults. Baseline DQ was calculated from 3 non-consecutive 24-hour dietary recalls collected at T1 using the validated Canadian Healthy Eating Index (C-HEI). Change in PA was calculated from Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) as PASE T4-PASE T1. Four combinations of variables were created: C-HEI<70 with PASE change either < or > median and C-HEI ≥ 70 with PASE change either < or > median. The association between these four categories and MS maintenance was evaluated using General Linear Modeling (GLM). Analyses were stratified by sex and controlled for covariates. Baseline DQ alone was not associated with MS maintenance. Baseline DQ combined with PASE change showed associations with crude and baseline adjusted handgrip strength (p=0.031, p=0.018) and crude and baseline adjusted elbow flexor change (p=0.028, p=0.017) in males only; no significant results were found for knee extensor strength in either males or females. While findings for females were inconclusive, results demonstrate that better adherence to dietary guidelines combined with a more active lifestyle may prevent MS decline among diabetic older males. Additional research is needed on a larger sample since generalization of these results is limited by the small sample size.

  8. The effects of the transcendental mediation technique and progressive muscle relaxation on EEG coherence, stress reactivity, and mental health in black adults.

    PubMed

    Gaylord, C; Orme-Johnson, D; Travis, F

    1989-05-01

    Eighty-three black college students, staff and adults were pretested on EEG coherence, skin potential (SP) habituation to a series of loud tones, psychometric measures of mental health (Tennessee Self-Concept Empirical Scales and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and IQ. They were then randomly assigned to one of the three treatment groups: the Transcendental Meditation technique (TM); Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PR); or cognitive-behavioral strategies (C). Approximately one year later, they were posttested. TM and PR increased significantly on an overall mental health factor (p less than .036) and anxiety (p less than .0006). TM showed a greater reduction in neuroticism than PR and C (p less than .032). TM also showed global increases in alpha and theta coherence among frontal and central leads during the TM period compared to eyes closed (p less than .016), whereas PR and C did not show EEG state changes. The coherence increases during TM were most marked in the right hemisphere (F4C4). TM showed faster SP habituation at posttest compared to pretest (p less than .047) whereas PR did not (data was missing for C). None of the groups showed longitudinal changes in EEG, perhaps due to lack of regularity of participation in the treatment programs.

  9. Fine-Tuning of PI3K/AKT Signalling by the Tumour Suppressor PTEN Is Required for Maintenance of Flight Muscle Function and Mitochondrial Integrity in Ageing Adult Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mensah, Lawrence B.; Davison, Claire; Fan, Shih-Jung; Morris, John F.; Goberdhan, Deborah C. I.; Wilson, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling (IIS), acting primarily through the PI3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT kinase signalling cassette, plays key evolutionarily conserved regulatory roles in nutrient homeostasis, growth, ageing and longevity. The dysfunction of this pathway has been linked to several age-related human diseases including cancer, Type 2 diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains unclear whether minor defects in IIS can independently induce the age-dependent functional decline in cells that accompany some of these diseases or whether IIS alters the sensitivity to other aberrant signalling. We identified a novel hypomorphic allele of PI3K’s direct antagonist, Phosphatase and tensin homologue on chromosome 10 (Pten), in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Adults carrying combinations of this allele, Pten5, combined with strong loss-of-function Pten mutations exhibit subtle or no increase in mass, but are highly susceptible to a wide range of stresses. They also exhibit dramatic upregulation of the oxidative stress response gene, GstD1, and a progressive loss of motor function that ultimately leads to defects in climbing and flight ability. The latter phenotype is associated with mitochondrial disruption in indirect flight muscles, although overall muscle structure appears to be maintained. We show that the phenotype is partially rescued by muscle-specific expression of the Bcl-2 homologue Buffy, which in flies, maintains mitochondrial integrity, modulates energy homeostasis and suppresses cell death. The flightless phenotype is also suppressed by mutations in downstream IIS signalling components, including those in the mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, suggesting that elevated IIS is responsible for functional decline in flight muscle. Our data demonstrate that IIS levels must be precisely regulated by Pten in adults to maintain the function of the highly metabolically active indirect flight muscles

  10. The association between social participation and lower extremity muscle strength, balance, and gait speed in US adults.

    PubMed

    Warren, Meghan; Ganley, Kathleen J; Pohl, Patricia S

    2016-12-01

    Social participation is associated with healthy aging, and although associations have been reported between social participation and demographics, no published studies have examined a relationship between social participation and measures amenable to intervention. The purpose was to explore the association between self-reported social participation and lower extremity strength, balance, and gait speed. A cross-sectional analysis of US adults (n = 2291; n = 1,031 males; mean ± standard deviation age 63.5 ± 0.3 years) from the 2001-2 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was conducted. Two questions about self-reported difficulty with social participation were categorized into limited (yes/no). The independent variables included knee extension strength (n = 1537; classified as tertiles of weak, normal, and strong), balance (n = 1813; 3 tests scored as pass/fail), and gait speed (n = 2025; dichotomized as slow [less than 1.0 m/s] and fast [greater than or equal to 1.0 m/s]). Logistic regression, accounting for the complex survey design and adjusting for age, sex, physical activity, and medical conditions, was used to estimate the odds of limitation in social participation with each independent variable. Alpha was decreased to 0.01 due to multiple tests. Slower gait speed was significantly associated with social participation limitation (odds ratio = 3.1; 99% confidence interval: 1.5-6.2). No significant association was found with social participation and lower extremity strength or balance. The odds of having limitation in social participation were 3 times greater in those with slow gait speed. Prospective studies should examine the effect of improved gait speed on levels of social participation.

  11. The association between social participation and lower extremity muscle strength, balance, and gait speed in US adults.

    PubMed

    Warren, Meghan; Ganley, Kathleen J; Pohl, Patricia S

    2016-12-01

    Social participation is associated with healthy aging, and although associations have been reported between social participation and demographics, no published studies have examined a relationship between social participation and measures amenable to intervention. The purpose was to explore the association between self-reported social participation and lower extremity strength, balance, and gait speed. A cross-sectional analysis of US adults (n = 2291; n = 1,031 males; mean ± standard deviation age 63.5 ± 0.3 years) from the 2001-2 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was conducted. Two questions about self-reported difficulty with social participation were categorized into limited (yes/no). The independent variables included knee extension strength (n = 1537; classified as tertiles of weak, normal, and strong), balance (n = 1813; 3 tests scored as pass/fail), and gait speed (n = 2025; dichotomized as slow [less than 1.0 m/s] and fast [greater than or equal to 1.0 m/s]). Logistic regression, accounting for the complex survey design and adjusting for age, sex, physical activity, and medical conditions, was used to estimate the odds of limitation in social participation with each independent variable. Alpha was decreased to 0.01 due to multiple tests. Slower gait speed was significantly associated with social participation limitation (odds ratio = 3.1; 99% confidence interval: 1.5-6.2). No significant association was found with social participation and lower extremity strength or balance. The odds of having limitation in social participation were 3 times greater in those with slow gait speed. Prospective studies should examine the effect of improved gait speed on levels of social participation. PMID:27413675

  12. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  13. Effects of the hold and relax-agonist contraction technique on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness after exercise in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to verify the effects of the hold relax-agonist contraction and passive straight leg raising techniques on muscle activity, fatigue, and range of motion of the hip joint after the induction of delayed onset muscle soreness in the hamstring muscle. [Subjects] Sixty subjects were randomly assigned to a hold relax-agonist contraction group and a passive straight leg raising group. [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group underwent hold relax-agonist contraction at the hamstring muscle, while subjects in the control group underwent passive straight leg raising at the hamstring muscle. [Results] Subjects in the hold relax-agonist contraction group showed a significant increase in hamstring muscle activity and hip joint angle and a significant decrease in muscle fatigue. In the passive straight leg raising group, the hip joint angle increased significantly after the intervention. In the hold relax-agonist contraction group, hamstring muscle activity increased significantly and muscle fatigue decreased significantly. [Conclusion] We conclude that the hold relax-agonist contraction technique may be beneficial for improving muscle activation and decreasing muscle fatigue. PMID:26644691

  14. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Cheng, Yoyo T Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Yu, Esther Y T; Chow, Gary C C; Chak, Yvonne T C; Chan, Ivy K Y; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  15. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheng, Yoyo T. Y.; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Chow, Gary C. C.; Chak, Yvonne T. C.; Chan, Ivy K. Y.; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  16. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Cheng, Yoyo T Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Yu, Esther Y T; Chow, Gary C C; Chak, Yvonne T C; Chan, Ivy K Y; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  17. Mammalian glycosylation in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Jamey D.; Grewal, Prabhjit K.

    2009-01-01

    Glycosylation produces a diverse and abundant repertoire of glycans, which are collectively known as the glycome. Glycans are one of the four fundamental macromolecular components of all cells, and are highly regulated in the immune system. Their diversity reflects their multiple biological functions that encompass ligands for proteinaceous of receptors known as lectins. Since the discovery that selectins and their glycan ligands are important for the regulation of leukocyte trafficking, it has been shown that additional features of the vertebrate immune system are also controlled by endogenous cellular glycosylation. This Review focuses on the emerging immunological roles of the mammalian glycome. PMID:18846099

  18. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Paves, Heiti; Truve, Erkki

    2004-01-01

    Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area. PMID:15102327

  19. Integrated expression analysis of muscle hypertrophy identifies Asb2 as a negative regulator of muscle mass

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Jonathan R.; Watt, Kevin I.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Chaudhuri, Rima; Ryall, James G.; Cunningham, Louise; Qian, Hongwei; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; James, David E.

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling network is a critical regulator of skeletal muscle mass and function and, thus, is an attractive therapeutic target for combating muscle disease, but the underlying mechanisms of action remain undetermined. We report that follistatin-based interventions (which modulate TGF-β network activity) can promote muscle hypertrophy that ameliorates aging-associated muscle wasting. However, the muscles of old sarcopenic mice demonstrate reduced response to follistatin compared with healthy young-adult musculature. Quantitative proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of young-adult muscles identified a transcription/translation signature elicited by follistatin exposure, which included repression of ankyrin repeat and SOCS box protein 2 (Asb2). Increasing expression of ASB2 reduced muscle mass, thereby demonstrating that Asb2 is a TGF-β network–responsive negative regulator of muscle mass. In contrast to young-adult muscles, sarcopenic muscles do not exhibit reduced ASB2 abundance with follistatin exposure. Moreover, preventing repression of ASB2 in young-adult muscles diminished follistatin-induced muscle hypertrophy. These findings provide insight into the program of transcription and translation events governing follistatin-mediated adaptation of skeletal muscle attributes and identify Asb2 as a regulator of muscle mass implicated in the potential mechanistic dysfunction between follistatin-mediated muscle growth in young and old muscles. PMID:27182554

  20. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  1. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  2. Mitochondria and mammalian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ramalho-Santos, João; Amaral, Sandra

    2013-10-15

    Mitochondria are cellular organelles with crucial roles in ATP synthesis, metabolic integration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis and management, the regulation of apoptosis (namely via the intrinsic pathway), among many others. Additionally, mitochondria in different organs or cell types may have distinct properties that can decisively influence functional analysis. In terms of the importance of mitochondria in mammalian reproduction, and although there are species-specific differences, these aspects involve both energetic considerations for gametogenesis and fertilization, control of apoptosis to ensure the proper production of viable gametes, and ROS signaling, as well as other emerging aspects. Crucially, mitochondria are the starting point for steroid hormone biosynthesis, given that the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone (a common precursor for all steroid hormones) takes place via the activity of the cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) on the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, mitochondrial activity in reproduction has to be considered in accordance with the very distinct strategies for gamete production in the male and female. These include distinct gonad morpho-physiologies, different types of steroids that are more prevalent (testosterone, estrogens, progesterone), and, importantly, the very particular timings of gametogenesis. While spermatogenesis is complete and continuous since puberty, producing a seemingly inexhaustible pool of gametes in a fixed environment; oogenesis involves the episodic production of very few gametes in an environment that changes cyclically. These aspects have always to be taken into account when considering the roles of any common element in mammalian reproduction.

  3. Nerve-muscle interactions during flight muscle development in Drosophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandes, J. J.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    During Drosophila pupal metamorphosis, the motoneurons and muscles differentiate synchronously, providing an opportunity for extensive intercellular regulation during synapse formation. We examined the existence of such interactions by developmentally delaying or permanently eliminating synaptic partners during the formation of indirect flight muscles. When we experimentally delayed muscle development, we found that although adult-specific primary motoneuron branching still occurred, the higher order (synaptic) branching was suspended until the delayed muscle fibers reached a favourable developmental state. In reciprocal experiments we found that denervation caused a decrease in the myoblast pool. Furthermore, the formation of certain muscle fibers (dorsoventral muscles) was specifically blocked. Exceptions were the adult muscles that use larval muscle fibers as myoblast fusion targets (dorsal longitudinal muscles). However, when these muscles were experimentally compelled to develop without their larval precursors, they showed an absolute dependence on the motoneurons for their formation. These data show that the size of the myoblast pool and early events in fiber formation depend on the presence of the nerve, and that, conversely, peripheral arbor development and synaptogenesis is closely synchronized with the developmental state of the muscle.

  4. In vivo assessment of contractile strength distinguishes differential gene function in skeletal muscle of zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brit L; Gallagher, Thomas L; Rastogi, Neha; Davis, Jonathan P; Beattie, Christine E; Amacher, Sharon L; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-10-01

    The accessible genetics and extensive skeletal musculature of the zebrafish make it a versatile and increasingly used model for studying muscle contraction. We here describe the development of an in vivo assay for measuring the contractile force of intact zebrafish at the larval stage. In addition, as proof of applicability, we have used this assay to quantify contractile strength of zebrafish larvae in a morphant model of deranged rbfox function. Average maximum tetanic (180 Hz) whole body forces produced by wild-type larvae at 2, 3, 4, and 5 days postfertilization amounted to 3.0, 7.2, 9.1, and 10.8 mN, respectively. To compare at potentially different stages of muscle development, we developed an immunohistological assay for empirically determining the cross-sectional area of larval trunk skeletal muscle to quantify muscle-specific force per cross-sectional area. At 4-5 days postfertilization, specific force amounts to ∼ 300 mN/mm(2), which is similar to fully developed adult mammalian skeletal muscle. We used these assays to measure contractile strength in zebrafish singly or doubly deficient for two rbfox paralogs, rbfox1l and rbfox2, which encode RNA-binding factors shown previously to modulate muscle function and muscle-specific splicing. We found rbfox2 morphants produce maximal tetanic forces similar to wild-type larvae, whereas rbfox1l morphants demonstrate significantly impaired function. rbfox1l/rbfox2 morphants are paralyzed, and their lack of contractile force production in our assay suggests that paralysis is a muscle-autonomous defect. These quantitative functional results allow measurement of muscle-specific phenotypes independent of neural input.

  5. Metabolomic profiling reveals severe skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of metabolism in aged FBN rats.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sean M; Dugle, Janis E; Kennedy, Adam D; McDunn, Jonathan E; Kline, William; Guo, Lining; Guttridge, Denis C; Pereira, Suzette L; Edens, Neile K

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles exhibit age-related adaptive and pathological remodeling. Several muscles in particular undergo progressive atrophy and degeneration beyond median lifespan. To better understand myocellular responses to aging, we used semi-quantitative global metabolomic profiling to characterize trends in metabolic changes between 15-month-old adult and 32-month-old aged Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (FBN) male rats. The FBN rat gastrocnemius muscle exhibits age-dependent atrophy, whereas the soleus muscle, up until 32 months, exhibits markedly fewer signs of atrophy. Both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed, as well as plasma and urine. Compared to adult gastrocnemius, aged gastrocnemius showed evidence of reduced glycolytic metabolism, including accumulation of glycolytic, glycogenolytic, and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates. Pyruvate was elevated with age, yet levels of citrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide were reduced, consistent with mitochondrial abnormalities. Indicative of muscle atrophy, 3-methylhistidine and free amino acids were elevated in aged gastrocnemius. The monounsaturated fatty acids oleate, cis-vaccenate, and palmitoleate also increased in aged gastrocnemius, suggesting altered lipid metabolism. Compared to gastrocnemius, aged soleus exhibited far fewer changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but did show reductions in several glycolytic intermediates, fumarate, malate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. Plasma biochemicals showing the largest age-related increases included glycocholate, heme, 1,5-anhydroglucitol, 1-palmitoleoyl-glycerophosphocholine, palmitoleate, and creatine. These changes suggest reduced insulin sensitivity in aged FBN rats. Altogether, these data highlight skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of glucose and lipid metabolism consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction in aged FBN rats. PMID:24652515

  6. The mammalian blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Stephen R; de Barros, Flavia R O; Rossant, Janet; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2016-01-01

    The blastocyst is a mammalian invention that carries the embryo from cleavage to gastrulation. For such a simple structure, it exhibits remarkable diversity in its mode of formation, morphology, longevity, and intimacy with the uterine endometrium. This review explores this diversity in the light of the evolution of viviparity, comparing the three main groups of mammals: monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians. The principal drivers in blastocyst evolution were loss of yolk coupled with evolution of the placenta. An important outcome of blastocyst development is differentiation of two extraembryonic lineages (trophoblast and hypoblast) that contribute to the placenta. While in many species trophoblast segregation is often coupled with blastocyst formation, in marsupials and at least some Afrotherians, these events do not coincide. Thus, many questions regarding the conservation of molecular mechanisms controlling these events are of great interest but currently unresolved. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26799266

  7. Nuclear transfer technology in mammalian cloning.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Mitalipov, S; Norgren, R B

    2001-01-01

    The past several years have witnessed remarkable progress in mammalian cloning using nuclear transfer (NT). Until 1997 and the announcement of the successful cloning of sheep from adult mammary gland or fetal fibroblast cells, our working assumption was that cloning by NT could only be accomplished with relatively undifferentiated embryonic cells. Indeed, live offspring were first produced by NT over 15 years ago from totipotent, embryonic blastomeres derived from early cleavage-stage embryos. However, once begun, the progression to somatic cell cloning or NT employing differentiated cells as the source of donor nuclei was meteoric, initially involving differentiated embryonic cell cultures in sheep in 1996 and quickly thereafter, fetal or adult somatic cells in sheep, cow, mouse, goat, and pig. Several recent reviews provide a background for and discussion of these successes. Here we will focus on the potential uses of reproductive cloning along with recent activities in the field and a discussion concerning current interests in human reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  8. Functions of Myosin Light Chain-2 (MYL2) In Cardiac Muscle and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Farah; Lyon, Robert C.; Chen, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Myosin light chain-2 (MYL2, also called MLC-2) is an ∼19 kDa sarcomeric protein that belongs to the EF-hand calcium binding protein superfamily and exists as three major isoforms encoded by three distinct genes in mammalian striated muscle. Each of the three different MLC-2 genes (MLC-2f; fast twitch skeletal isoform, MLC-2v; cardiac ventricular and slow twitch skeletal isoform, MLC-2a; cardiac atrial isoform) has a distinct developmental expression pattern in mammals. Genetic loss-of-function studies in mice demonstrated an essential role for cardiac isoforms of MLC-2, MLC-2v and MLC-2a, in cardiac contractile function during early embryogenesis. In the adult heart, MLC-2v function is regulated by phosphorylation, which displays a specific expression pattern (high in epicardium and low in endocardium) across the heart. These data along with new data from computational models, genetic mouse models, and human studies have revealed a direct role for MLC-2v phosphorylation in cross-bridge cycling kinetics, calcium-dependent cardiac muscle contraction, cardiac torsion, cardiac function and various cardiac diseases. This review focuses on the regulatory functions of MLC-2 in the embryonic and adult heart, with an emphasis on phosphorylation-driven actions of MLC-2v in adult cardiac muscle, which provide new insights into mechanisms regulating myosin cycling kinetics and human cardiac diseases. PMID:26074085

  9. Mammalian enabled (Mena) is a critical regulator of cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Frédérick; Belmonte, Stephen L.; Ram, Rashmi; Noujaim, Sami F.; Dunaevsky, Olga; Protack, Tricia L.; Jalife, Jose; Todd Massey, H.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian enabled (Mena) of the Drosophila enabled/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein gene family is a cytoskeletal protein implicated in actin regulation and cell motility. Cardiac Mena expression is enriched in intercalated discs (ICD), the critical intercellular communication nexus between adjacent muscle cells. We previously identified Mena gene expression to be a key predictor of human and murine heart failure (HF). To determine the in vivo function of Mena in the heart, we assessed Mena protein expression in multiple HF models and characterized the effects of genetic Mena deletion on cardiac structure and function. Immunoblot analysis revealed significant upregulation of Mena protein expression in left ventricle tissue from patients with end-stage HF, calsequestrin-overexpressing mice, and isoproterenol-infused mice. Characterization of the baseline cardiac function of adult Mena knockout mice (Mena−/−) via echocardiography demonstrated persistent cardiac dysfunction, including a significant reduction in percent fractional shortening compared with wild-type littermates. Electrocardiogram PR and QRS intervals were significantly prolonged in Mena−/− mice, manifested by slowed conduction on optical mapping studies. Ultrastructural analysis of Mena−/− hearts revealed disrupted organization and widening of ICD structures, mislocalization of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) to the lateral borders of cardiomyoycytes, and increased Cx43 expression. Furthermore, the expression of vinculin (an adherens junction protein) was significantly reduced in Mena−/− mice. We report for the first time that genetic ablation of Mena results in cardiac dysfunction, highlighted by diminished contractile performance, disrupted ICD structure, and slowed electrical conduction. PMID:21335464

  10. A low-fat yoghurt supplemented with a rooster comb extract on muscle joint function in adults with mild knee pain: a randomized, double blind, parallel, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Solà, Rosa; Valls, Rosa-Maria; Martorell, Isabel; Giralt, Montserrat; Pedret, Anna; Taltavull, Núria; Romeu, Marta; Rodríguez, Àurea; Moriña, David; Lopez de Frutos, Victor; Montero, Manuel; Casajuana, Maria-Carmen; Pérez, Laura; Faba, Jenny; Bernal, Gloria; Astilleros, Anna; González, Roser; Puiggrós, Francesc; Arola, Lluís; Chetrit, Carlos; Martinez-Puig, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Preliminary results suggested that oral-administration of rooster comb extract (RCE) rich in hyaluronic acid (HA) was associated with improved muscle strength. Following these promising results, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of low-fat yoghurt supplemented with RCE rich in HA on muscle function in adults with mild knee pain; a symptom of early osteoarthritis. Participants (n = 40) received low-fat yoghurt (125 mL d(-1)) supplemented with 80 mg d(-1) of RCE and the placebo group (n = 40) consumed the same yoghurt without the RCE, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind, parallel trial over 12 weeks. Using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex System 4), RCE consumption, compared to control, increased the affected knee peak torque, total work and mean power at 180° s(-1), at least 11% in men (p < 0.05) with no differences in women. No dietary differences were noted. These results suggest that long-term consumption of low-fat yoghurt supplemented with RCE could be a dietary tool to improve muscle strength in men, associated with possible clinical significance. However, further studies are needed to elucidate reasons for these sex difference responses observed, and may provide further insight into muscle function.

  11. Sexual dimorphism of perineal muscles and motoneurons in spotted hyenas.

    PubMed

    Forger, N G; Frank, L G; Breedlove, S M; Glickman, S E

    1996-11-11

    Female spotted hyenas are known for their male-like genitalia, high levels of aggression, and dominance over males, characteristics which are attributed to exposure to elevated levels of testosterone in utero. Although the nervous system of spotted hyenas has not previously been examined, one might predict that neural systems which are sexually dimorphic in other mammals would be monomorphic in this species. Spinal motoneurons which innervate muscles associated with the phallus are located in Onuf's nucleus and are more numerous in males than in females in a wide array of mammals. Onuf's nucleus was examined in adult and neonatal spotted hyenas and, contrary to expectation, was found to be sexually dimorphic in the typical mammalian pattern: Males have significantly more motoneurons in Onuf's nucleus than do females. This dimorphism was correlated with a previously undescribed dimorphism in the relevant target musculature. Specifically, the morphology of the bulbocavernosus muscle is distinctly different in male and female spotted hyenas. Pregnant hyenas were treated with anti-androgen in an attempt to interfere with the actions of androgen during fetal development. Motoneuron number in Onuf's nucleus and the morphology of the bulbocavernosus muscle were feminized in males exposed to anti-androgen in utero.

  12. Optimal cutoffs for low skeletal muscle mass related to cardiovascular risk in adults: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yirang; Han, Byoung-Duck; Han, Kyungdo; Shin, Koh Eun; Lee, Halla; Kim, Tae Ri; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Do Hoon; Kim, Yang Hyun; Kim, Hyunjin; Nam, Ga Eun

    2015-11-01

    The possible association between low skeletal muscle mass and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors necessitates estimation of muscle mass even in subjects with normal body mass index (BMI). This study was aimed to investigate optimal cutoffs for skeletal muscle mass reflecting CVD risk factors and to evaluate the relationship between skeletal muscle mass and CVD risk factors in the general population and in subjects with normal BMI using these cutoffs. This cross-sectional study analyzed data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010. We enrolled 5120 men and 6559 women aged ≥20 years. Skeletal muscle index (SMI) was defined as the weight-adjusted appendicular skeletal muscle mass measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Using receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, SMI cutoffs associated with CVD risk factors were determined. Lower SMI was significantly associated with an increased prevalence of CVD risk factors. The first cutoffs in men and women were 32 and 25%, respectively, and the second cutoffs were 30 and 23.5%. Subjects in stage I and stage II SMI categories showed increased prevalence and risk for several CVD risk factors. These tendencies persisted in the association between cardiometabolic characteristics and SMI even in subjects with normal BMI. Using cutoffs of low skeletal muscle mass reflecting CVD risk factors, lower skeletal muscle mass was associated with increased prevalence and risk of several CVD risk factors. A higher prevalence of cardiometabolic abnormalities was observed among subjects with normal BMI but low skeletal muscle mass. PMID:25862070

  13. Mammalian Wax Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jeffrey B.; Russell, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Wax monoesters are synthesized by the esterification of fatty alcohols and fatty acids. A mammalian enzyme that catalyzes this reaction has not been isolated. We used expression cloning to identify cDNAs encoding a wax synthase in the mouse preputial gland. The wax synthase gene is located on the X chromosome and encodes a member of the acyltransferase family of enzymes that synthesize neutral lipids. Expression of wax synthase in cultured cells led to the formation of wax monoesters from straight chain saturated, unsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty alcohols and acids. Polyisoprenols also were incorporated into wax monoesters by the enzyme. The wax synthase had little or no ability to synthesize cholesteryl esters, diacylglycerols, or triacylglycerols, whereas other acyltransferases, including the acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 and 2 enzymes and the acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 and 2 enzymes, exhibited modest wax monoester synthesis activities. Confocal light microscopy indicated that the wax synthase was localized in membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Wax synthase mRNA was abundant in tissues rich in sebaceous glands such as the preputial gland and eyelid and was present at lower levels in other tissues. Coexpression of cDNAs specifying fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 and wax synthase led to the synthesis of wax monoesters. The data suggest that wax monoester synthesis in mammals involves a two step biosynthetic pathway catalyzed by fatty acyl-CoA reductase and wax synthase enzymes. PMID:15220349

  14. Mammalian Wax Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jeffrey B.; Russell, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols is required for the synthesis of wax monoesters and ether lipids. The mammalian enzymes that synthesize fatty alcohols have not been identified. Here, an in silico approach was used to discern two putative reductase enzymes designated FAR1 and FAR2. Expression studies in intact cells showed that FAR1 and FAR2 cDNAs encoded isozymes that reduced fatty acids to fatty alcohols. Fatty acyl-CoA esters were the substrate of FAR1, and the enzyme required NADPH as a cofactor. FAR1 preferred saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of 16 or 18 carbons as substrates, whereas FAR2 preferred saturated fatty acids of 16 or 18 carbons. Confocal light microscopy indicated that FAR1 and FAR2 were localized in the peroxisome. The FAR1 mRNA was detected in many mouse tissues with the highest level found in the preputial gland, a modified sebaceous gland. The FAR2 mRNA was more restricted in distribution and most abundant in the eyelid, which contains wax-laden meibomian glands. Both FAR mRNAs were present in the brain, a tissue rich in ether lipids. The data suggest that fatty alcohol synthesis in mammals is accomplished by two fatty acyl-CoA reductase isozymes that are expressed at high levels in tissues known to synthesize wax monoesters and ether lipids. PMID:15220348

  15. Mammalian Gut Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, Benoit; Kumar, Manish; Baker, Mark T.; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells) and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells) origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a “love–hate relationship.” Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases. PMID:25163502

  16. Compartmental Innervation of the Superior Oblique Muscle in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Le, Alan; Poukens, Vadims; Ying, Howard; Rootman, Daniel; Goldberg, Robert A.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intramuscular innervation of mammalian horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is compartmental. We sought evidence of similar compartmental innervation of the superior oblique (SO) muscle. Methods Three fresh bovine orbits and one human orbit were dissected to trace continuity of SO muscle and tendon fibers to the scleral insertions. Whole orbits were also obtained from four humans (two adults, a 17-month-old child, and a 33-week stillborn fetus), two rhesus monkeys, one rabbit, and one cow. Orbits were formalin fixed, embedded whole in paraffin, serially sectioned in the coronal plane at 10-μm thickness, and stained with Masson trichrome. Extraocular muscle fibers and branches of the trochlear nerve (CN4) were traced in serial sections and reconstructed in three dimensions. Results In the human, the lateral SO belly is in continuity with tendon fibers inserting more posteriorly on the sclera for infraducting mechanical advantage, while the medial belly is continuous with anteriorly inserting fibers having mechanical advantage for incycloduction. Fibers in the monkey superior SO insert more posteriorly on the sclera to favor infraduction, while the inferior portion inserts more anteriorly to favor incycloduction. In all species, CN4 bifurcates prior to penetrating the SO belly. Each branch innervates a nonoverlapping compartment of EOM fibers, consisting of medial and lateral compartments in humans and monkeys, and superior and inferior compartments in cows and rabbits. Conclusions The SO muscle of humans and other mammals is compartmentally innervated in a manner that could permit separate CN4 branches to selectively influence vertical versus torsional action. PMID:26426404

  17. The truncated TrkB receptor influences mammalian sleep

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Adam J.; Henson, Kyle; Dorsey, Susan G.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin hypothesized to play an important role in mammalian sleep expression and regulation. In order to investigate the role of the truncated receptor for BDNF, TrkB.T1, in mammalian sleep, we examined sleep architecture and sleep regulation in adult mice constitutively lacking this receptor. We find that TrkB.T1 knockout mice have increased REM sleep time, reduced REM sleep latency, and reduced sleep continuity. These results demonstrate a novel role for the TrkB.T1 receptor in sleep expression and provide new insights into the relationship between BDNF, psychiatric illness, and sleep. PMID:25502751

  18. Evolution of the mammalian dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hevner, Robert F

    2016-02-15

    The dentate gyrus (DG), a part of the hippocampal formation, has important functions in learning, memory, and adult neurogenesis. Compared with homologous areas in sauropsids (birds and reptiles), the mammalian DG is larger and exhibits qualitatively different phenotypes: 1) folded (C- or V-shaped) granule neuron layer, concave toward the hilus and delimited by a hippocampal fissure; 2) nonperiventricular adult neurogenesis; and 3) prolonged ontogeny, involving extensive abventricular (basal) migration and proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs). Although gaps remain, available data indicate that these DG traits are present in all orders of mammals, including monotremes and marsupials. The exception is Cetacea (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which DG size, convolution, and adult neurogenesis have undergone evolutionary regression. Parsimony suggests that increased growth and convolution of the DG arose in stem mammals concurrently with nonperiventricular adult hippocampal neurogenesis and basal migration of NSPCs during development. These traits could all result from an evolutionary change that enhanced radial migration of NSPCs out of the periventricular zones, possibly by epithelial-mesenchymal transition, to colonize and maintain nonperiventricular proliferative niches. In turn, increased NSPC migration and clonal expansion might be a consequence of growth in the cortical hem (medial patterning center), which produces morphogens such as Wnt3a, generates Cajal-Retzius neurons, and is regulated by Lhx2. Finally, correlations between DG convolution and neocortical gyrification (or capacity for gyrification) suggest that enhanced abventricular migration and proliferation of NSPCs played a transformative role in growth and folding of neocortex as well as archicortex.

  19. Jar-opening challenges. Part 2: estimating the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles in healthy young adults during jar-opening tasks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, L C; Chang, J H; Lin, C F; Hsu, H Y; Ho, K Y; Su, F C

    2009-07-01

    This study discusses the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles during jar-opening tasks using two grip patterns: the power grip and the precision grip. This study develops a three-dimensional biomechanical model of the thumb to predict muscle forces in jar-opening activities based on external forces measured by a custom-designed jar device. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. Each participant turned a jar lid of 66 mm diameter counterclockwise with maximal effort and preferred speed using both grip patterns. The average normal and tangential forces applied by the thumb to the jar lid show that the normal force is the primary contributive force for opening a jar. This normal force is approximately three times the tangential force. Muscular force-generating capacity measurements show that the major active muscles during a jar-opening activity for both grips include the flexor pollicis longus, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis, adductor pollicis, and opponens pollicis. The total muscle force ratios for the precision grip and power grip with respect to externally applied forces are 5.6 and 4.7 respectively. These ratios indicate that the power grip pattern produces less muscle force per unit of external applied load. The technique proposed in this study provides a proper apparatus and model for measuring three-dimensional loads and estimating the force-generating capacity of each muscle and tendon of the thumb during jar-opening tasks. PMID:19623911

  20. The initial effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold of healthy adults: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Ji, Sang Gu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on delayed onset muscle soreness. [Subjects] Forty-five healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: a nerve mobilization group (experimental) and a control group. [Methods] The subjects of the experimental group were administered a median nerve mobilization technique and ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. The subjects in the control group were only administered ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. Muscle fatigue and the pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after the intervention. [Results] The experimental group showed significant improvements in all variables, compared to pre-intervention. Furthermore, the control group showed significant improvements in the pressure pain threshold, compared to pre-intervention. Significant differences in the post-intervention gains in muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold were found between the experimental group and the control group. [Conclusion] Application of the upper extremity neural mobilization technique is considered to have a positive effect on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:27134351

  1. Nonmammalian vertebrate skeletal muscles express two triad junctional foot protein isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, E B; Tanksley, S J; Airey, J A; Beck, C F; Ouyang, Y; Deerinck, T J; Ellisman, M H; Sutko, J L

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles express a single triad junctional foot protein, whereas avian muscles have two isoforms of this protein. We investigated whether either case is representative of muscles from other vertebrate classes. We identified two foot proteins in bullfrog and toadfish muscles on the basis of (a) copurification with [3H]epiryanodine binding; (b) similarity to avian muscle foot proteins in native and subunit molecular weights; (c) recognition by anti-foot protein antibodies. The bullfrog and toadfish proteins exist as homooligomers. The subunits of the bullfrog muscle foot protein isoforms are shown to be unique by peptide mapping. In addition, immunocytochemical localization established that the bullfrog muscle isoforms coexist in the same muscle cells. The isoforms in either bullfrog and chicken muscles have comparable [3H]epiryanodine binding capacities, whereas in toadfish muscle the isoforms differ in their levels of ligand binding. Additionally, chicken thigh and breast muscles differ in the relative amounts of the two isoforms they contain, the amounts being similar in breast muscle and markedly different in thigh muscle. In conclusion, in contrast to mammalian skeletal muscle, two foot protein isoforms are present in amphibian, avian, and piscine skeletal muscles. This may represent a general difference in the architecture and/or a functional specialization of the triad junction in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrate muscles. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:1873458

  2. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  3. Polysome analysis of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    He, Shan L; Green, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    To assess the global translational level of mammalian cells (see similar protocols for bacteria and yeast on Analysis of polysomes from bacteria, Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast and Polysome analysis for determining mRNA and ribosome association in Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

  4. Maturation of the mammalian secretome

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jeremy C; Mateos, Alvaro; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    A recent use of quantitative proteomics to determine the constituents of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex is discussed in the light of other available methodologies for cataloging the proteins associated with the mammalian secretory pathway. PMID:17472737

  5. Relationship of Skeletal Muscle Development and Growth to Breast Muscle Myopathies: A Review.

    PubMed

    Velleman, Sandra G

    2015-12-01

    Selection in meat-type birds has focused on growth rate, muscling, and feed conversion. These strategies have made substantial improvements but have affected muscle structure, repair mechanisms, and meat quality, especially in the breast muscle. The increase in muscle fiber diameters has reduced available connective tissue spacing, reduced blood supply, and altered muscle metabolism in the breast muscle. These changes have increased muscle fiber degeneration and necrosis but have limited muscle repair mechanisms mediated by the adult myoblast (satellite cell) population of cells, likely resulting in the onset of myopathies. This review focuses on muscle growth mechanisms and how changes in the cellular development of the breast muscle may be associated with breast muscle myopathies occurring in meat-type birds.

  6. Age-related changes in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles: analysis of muscle fibers, muscle fiber proteins, and subneural apparatuses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Taguchi, Aki; Motoyoshi, Kazumi; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Desaki, Junzo

    2013-03-01

    We compared age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of aged and young adult rats by determining the number and diameter of muscle fibers, contractile muscle protein (myosin heavy chain isoforms, MHC) composition, and the morphology of the subneural apparatuses. In aged rats, both the numbers and the diameters of muscle fibers decreased in the cricothyroid (CT) muscle. The number of fibers, but not diameter, decreased in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. In the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle, neither the number nor the diameter of fibers changed significantly. Aging was associated with a decrease in type IIB and an increase in type IIA MHC isoform levels in CT muscle, but no such changes were observed in the TA or PCA muscles. Morphological examination of primary synaptic clefts of the subneural apparatus revealed that aging resulted in decreased labyrinthine and increased depression types in only the CT muscle. In the aged group, morphologically immature subneural apparatuses were found infrequently in the CT muscle, indicating continued tissue remodeling. We suggest, therefore, that age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles primarily involve the CT muscle, whereas the structures of the TA and PCA muscles may better resist aging processes and therefore are less vulnerable to functional impairment. This may reflect differences in their roles; the CT muscle controls the tone of the vocal folds, while the TA and PCA muscles play an essential role in vital activities such as respiration and swallowing.

  7. Physiologic and biochemical aspects of skeletal muscle denervation and reinnervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Mayer, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the physiologic and biochemical changes that occur in mammalian skeletal muscle following denervation and reinnervation are considered and some comparisons are made with changes observed following altered motor function. The nature of the trophic influence by which nerves control muscle properties are discussed, including the effects of choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase and the role of the acetylcholine receptor.

  8. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  9. Structure of mammalian metallothionein.

    PubMed Central

    Kägi, J H; Vasák, M; Lerch, K; Gilg, D E; Hunziker, P; Bernhard, W R; Good, M

    1984-01-01

    All mammalian metallothioneins characterized contain a single polypeptide chain of 61 amino acid residues, among them 20 cysteines providing the ligands for seven metal-binding sites. Native metallothioneins are usually heterogeneous in metal composition, with Zn, Cd, and Cu occurring in varying proportions. However, forms containing only a single metal species, i.e., Zn, Cd, Ni, Co, Hg, Pb, Bi, have now been prepared by in vitro reconstitution from the metal-free apoprotein. By spectroscopic analysis of such derivatives it was established that all cysteine residues participate in metal binding, that each metal ion is bound to four thiolate ligands, and that the symmetry of each complex is close to that of a tetrahedron. To satisfy the requirements of the overall Me7(Cys-)20 stoichiometry, the complexes must be combined to form metal-thiolate cluster structures. Experimental proof for the occurrence of such clusters comes from the demonstration of metal-metal interactions by spectroscopic and magnetic means. Thus, in Co(II)7-metallothionein, the Co(II)-specific ESR signals are effectively suppressed by antiferromagnetic coupling of juxtaposed paramagnetic metal ions. By monitoring changes in ESR signal size occurring on stepwise incorporation of Co(II) into the protein, it is possible to follow the building up of the clusters. This process is biphasic. Up to binding of four equivalents of Co(II), the ESR amplitude increases in proportion to the metal content, indicating generation of magnetically noninteracting high-spin complexes. However, upon addition of the remaining three equivalents of Co(II), these features are progressively suppressed, signaling the formation of clusters. The same mode of cluster formation has also been documented for Cd and Hg. The actual spatial organization of the clusters and the polypeptide chain remains to be established. An attractive possibility is the arrangement of the tetrahedral metal-thiolates in adamantane-like structures

  10. Calcium conductance and tension in mammalian ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, W; McDonald, T F; Tripathi, O

    1975-01-01

    Voltage, membrane current and contraction were simultaneously measured in voltage clamp experiments (single sucrose gap) on cat ventricular trabeculae. The pulse programs allowed the determination of the potential dependence of the steady state activation and inactivation as well as the restoration of the calcium-carrying system (slow inward current). 1. The steady state activation variable (d infinity) rose in a sigmoid manner from -50 mV (d infinity nearly 0) to 0 mV (d infinity nearly 1). The experimental values can be described by the function 1/1 + exp [(Vh-V)/S] where half activation (Vh) = -22.5mV and S = 7.6 mV. 2. The steady state inactivation variable (f infinity) declined from 1 at -60mV to 0 at 10mV. The best fit curve is nearly a mirror image of the activation curve with Vh = -28 mV and s = -8.3 mV. 3. The voltage dependence of the (normalized) peak tension was well described by the steady state conductance variables except at potentials positive to +20mV. A "steady state" tension (superimposed on "tonic tension") was found in the potential range where a steady state conductance is predicted by the curves describing steady state activation and inactivation. 5. Following inactivation, the time courses of restoration of the calcium-carrying system and tension were identical. Time courses were exponential with tau = 118 msec at -80 mV, 144 msec at -60 mV, and 198 msec at -40 mV. 6. Two possible models of excitation-contraction coupling in line with the present results are discussed.

  11. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman W.

    1987-01-01

    New muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow embryonic skeletal myofibers which are able to differentiate into more adultlike myofibers. Studies on mechanical simulation of cultured muscle cell growth will now be more directly applicable to mechanically-induced growth in adult muscle, and lead to better models for understanding muscle tissue atrophy caused by disuse in the microgravity of space.

  12. Analysis of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis oblique muscle activation during squat exercise with and without a variety of tools in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Kyung; Park, So-Mi; Yun, Sae-Bom; Lee, Ae-Ran; Lee, Yun-Seob; Yong, Min-Sik

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effects of squat exercises with and without a variety of tools including a gym ball, wedge, and elastic band on the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis oblique muscles. [Subjects and Methods] A total of twenty healthy subjects with no history of neurological, musculoskeletal injury, or pain in the lower extremities were recruited. All subjects performed four types of exercise (conventional squat exercise, squat exercise with a gym ball, squat exercise with a wedge, squat exercise with an elastic band). [Results] There were no significant differences between exercises in comparison of the vastus lateralis muscle activity. In the squat exercise with a wedge, significantly higher activity of the vastus medialis oblique muscle was found compared with in the squat exercise with an elastic band. [Conclusion] The present study suggests that the conventional squat exercise can be one of the useful interventions for patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:27134414

  13. Analysis of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis oblique muscle activation during squat exercise with and without a variety of tools in normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-kyung; Park, So-mi; Yun, Sae-bom; Lee, Ae-ran; Lee, Yun-seob; Yong, Min-sik

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effects of squat exercises with and without a variety of tools including a gym ball, wedge, and elastic band on the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis oblique muscles. [Subjects and Methods] A total of twenty healthy subjects with no history of neurological, musculoskeletal injury, or pain in the lower extremities were recruited. All subjects performed four types of exercise (conventional squat exercise, squat exercise with a gym ball, squat exercise with a wedge, squat exercise with an elastic band). [Results] There were no significant differences between exercises in comparison of the vastus lateralis muscle activity. In the squat exercise with a wedge, significantly higher activity of the vastus medialis oblique muscle was found compared with in the squat exercise with an elastic band. [Conclusion] The present study suggests that the conventional squat exercise can be one of the useful interventions for patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:27134414

  14. The cellular code for mammalian thermosensation.

    PubMed

    Pogorzala, Leah A; Mishra, Santosh K; Hoon, Mark A

    2013-03-27

    Mammalian somatosenory neurons respond to thermal stimuli and allow animals to reliably discriminate hot from cold and to select their preferred environments. Previously, we generated mice that are completely insensitive to temperatures from noxious cold to painful heat (-5 to 55°C) by ablating several different classes of nociceptor early in development. In the present study, we have adopted a selective ablation strategy in adult mice to study this phenotype and have demonstrated that separate populations of molecularly defined neurons respond to hot and cold. TRPV1-expressing neurons are responsible for all behavioral responses to temperatures between 40 and 50°C, whereas TRPM8 neurons are required for cold aversion. We also show that more extreme cold and heat activate additional populations of nociceptors, including cells expressing Mrgprd. Therefore, although eliminating Mrgprd neurons alone does not affect behavioral responses to temperature, when combined with ablation of TRPV1 or TRPM8 cells, it significantly decreases responses to extreme heat and cold, respectively. Ablation of TRPM8 neurons distorts responses to preferred temperatures, suggesting that the pleasant thermal sensation of warmth may in fact just reflect reduced aversive input from TRPM8 and TRPV1 neurons. As predicted by this hypothesis, mice lacking both classes of thermosensor exhibited neither aversive nor attractive responses to temperatures between 10 and 50°C. Our results provide a simple cellular basis for mammalian thermosensation whereby two molecularly defined classes of sensory neurons detect and encode both attractive and aversive cues. PMID:23536068

  15. Regulation of Rap GTPases in mammalian neurons.

    PubMed