Science.gov

Sample records for adult midgut malrotation

  1. Midgut malrotation causing intermittent intestinal obstruction in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Bektasoglu, Huseyin Kazim; Idiz, Ufuk Oguz; Hasbahceci, Mustafa; Yardimci, Erkan; Firat, Yurdakul Deniz; Karatepe, Oguzhan; Muslumanoglu, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    Midgut malrotation is a congenital anomaly of intestinal rotation and fixation that is generally seen in neonatal population. Adult cases are rarely reported. Early diagnosis is crucial to avoid life threatening complications. Here, we present an adulthood case of midgut volvulus as a rare cause of acute abdomen.

  2. Adult midgut malrotation presented with acute bowel obstruction and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Akile; Uçar, Bercis İmge; Düzgün, Şükrü Aydın; Bayhan, Zülfü; Zeren, Sezgin; Yaylak, Faik; Şanal, Bekir; Bayhan, Nilüfer Araz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal malrotation refers to the partial or complete failure of rotation of midgut around the superior mesenteric vessels in embryonic life. Arrested midgut rotation results due to narrow-based mesentery and increases the risk of twisting midgut and subsequent obstruction and necrosis. Presentation of case 40 years old female patient admitted to emergency service with acute abdomen and computerized tomography scan showed dilated large and small intestine segments with air-fluid levels and twisted mesentery around superior mesenteric artery and vein indicating “whirpool sign”. Discussion Malrotation in adults is a rare cause of midgut volvulus as though it should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Even though clinical symptoms are obscure, adult patients usually present with vomiting and recurrent abdominal pain due to chronic partial obstruction. Contrast enhanced radiograph has been shown to be the most accurate method. Typical radiological signs are corkscrew sign, which is caused by the dilatation of various duodenal segments at different levels and the relocation of duodenojejunal junction due to jejunum folding. As malrotation commonly causes intestinal obstruction, patients deserve an elective laparotomy. Conclusion Malrotation should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Surgical intervention should be prompt to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:27015011

  3. Barber Pole Sign in CT Angiography, Adult Presentation of Midgut Malrotation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garcelan-Trigo, Juan Arsenio; Tello-Moreno, Manuel; Rabaza-Espigares, Manuel Jesus; Talavera-Martinez, Ildefonso

    2015-01-01

    Adult midgut volvulus is a challenging diagnosis because of its low incidence and nonspecific symptoms. Diagnostic delay and long-term complaints are frequent in this clinical scenario. We reported a patient referred to our diagnostic imaging unit with intermittent abdominal pain, bloating and episodic vomiting for several years. He underwent barium gastrointestinal transit and abdominal ultrasound, which revealed severe gastric dilatation, food retention and slow transit until a depressed duodenojejunal flexure, with malrotation of the midgut and jejunal loops being located in the right upper quadrant. Computed tomography angiography was performed, showing rotation of the small intestine around the mesentery root, suggestive of midgut malrotation. In addition, an abnormal twisted disposition of superior mesenteric artery with corkscrew appearance was seen, shaping the pole-barber sign which was evident in volume rendering three-dimensional reconstructions. The patient underwent scheduled surgical treatment without any complication and had good outcome after hospital discharge and follow-up. Computed tomography plays an important role in evaluation of adult midgut volvulus. In addition, angiographic reconstructions can help us to assess the anatomic disposition of mesenteric vascular supply. Both of these assessments are useful in preoperative management. PMID:26557278

  4. Appendiceal mucocoele with midgut malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Hassall, J; Williams, GL; McKain, ES

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malrotation of the midgut and appendiceal mucocoele are both extremely rare pathological conditions in adults. To our knowledge, there are only two reported cases in the English literature with a combination of both conditions. Case History A 65-year-old man presented with a 10-day history of upper abdominal pain associated with abdominal bloating and weight loss. He was otherwise fit and healthy with no significant past medical history. On examination, his abdomen was soft with tenderness and palpable fullness over the left upper quadrant. The initial blood test, chest x-ray and abdominal x-ray demonstrated no significant abnormality. Computed tomography showed a 17cm x 8cm x 6cm elongated cystic mass with possible malrotation of the intestines. Histopathology showed a low grade mucinous tumour of the appendix. At 12 months following surgery, there was no evidence of recurrence or postoperative complications and the patient was discharged from the care of the colorectal team. Conclusions We report a patient with a combination of two rare conditions. This case illustrates how a combination of pathologies can present a challenge to the unwary general surgeon. PMID:27269433

  5. Laparoscopic Ileocolic Resection for Crohn's Disease Associated With Midgut Malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Livia; Tema, Giorgia; Porokhnavets, Kristina; Tesauro, Manfredi; Gaspari, Achille L.; Sica, Giuseppe S.

    2014-01-01

    Midgut malrotation is an anomaly of fetal intestinal rotation. Its incidence in adults is rare. A case of midgut malrotation in a 51-year-old man with complicated Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum is presented. Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment are reviewed. Preoperative workup led to correct surgical planning that ultimately allowed a successful laparoscopic resection. PMID:25419109

  6. Aarskog's syndrome with Hirschsprung's disease, midgut malrotation, and dental anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Hassinger, D D; Mulvihill, J J; Chandler, J B

    1980-01-01

    A 23-year-old man with Aarskog's syndrome had Hirschspring's disease, midgut malrotation, a renal cyst, a cartilaginous projection of the pinna, geographic tongue, and dental anomalies. The family history, negative for these features, including several malignancies. Any or all of these features could be considered part of Aarskog's syndrome and may represent anomalies of neural crest development. Images PMID:7401138

  7. Preduodenal portal vein in association with midgut malrotation and duodenal web-triple anomaly?

    PubMed

    Singal, Arbinder Kumar; Ramu, Chithra; Paul, Sarah; Matthai, John

    2009-02-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare anomaly in which the portal vein passes anterior to the duodenum rather than posteriorly. Generally asymptomatic, PDPV may rarely cause duodenal obstruction or may coexist with other anomalies. We report a neonate who presented with duodenal obstruction and was found out to have 3 coexisting anomalies, each of which can lead to duodenal obstruction independently-PDPV, midgut malrotation, and duodenal web. A duodenoduodenostomy and a Ladd procedure were done, and the child recovered uneventfully. The mechanism of obstruction, interesting metabolic aberrations observed, outcome, and relevant literature are presented.

  8. Laparoscopic versus Open Ladd's Procedure for Intestinal Malrotation in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Frasier, Lane L.; Leverson, Glen; Gosain, Ankush; Greenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Background Intestinal malrotation results from errors in fetal intestinal rotation and fixation. While most patients are diagnosed in childhood, some present as adults. Laparoscopic Ladd's procedure is an accepted alternative to laparotomy in children but has not been well-studied in adults. This study was designed to investigate outcomes for adults undergoing laparoscopic Ladd's repair for malrotation. Methods We performed a single-institution retrospective chart review over eleven years. Data collected included: patient age, details of pre-operative work-up and diagnosis, surgical management, complications, rates of re-operation, and symptom resolution. Patients were evaluated on an intent-to-treat basis based on their planned operative approach. Categorical data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Continuous data were analyzed using Student's T-test. Results Twenty-two patients were identified (age range 18-63). Fifteen were diagnosed pre-operatively; of the remaining seven patients, four received an intra-operative malrotation diagnosis during elective surgery for another problem. Most had some type of pre-operative imaging, with Computed Tomography being the most common (77.3%). Comparing patients on an intent-to-treat basis, the two groups were similar with respect to age, operative time, and estimated blood loss. Six patients underwent successful laparoscopic repair; three began laparoscopically but were converted to laparotomy. There was a statistically significant difference in length of stay (LOS) (5.0±2.5d vs 11.6±8.1d, p=0.0148) favoring the laparoscopic approach. Three patients required re-operation: 2 underwent side-to-side duodeno-duodenostomy and 1 underwent a re-do Ladd's procedure. Ultimately, 3 (2 laparoscopic, 1 open) had persistent symptoms of bloating (n=2), constipation (n=2), and/or pain (n=1). Conclusion Laparoscopic repair appears to be safe and effective in adults. While a small sample size limits the power of this study, we found

  9. Utility of the CT Scan in Diagnosing Midgut Volvulus in Patients with Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Morshedi, Mehdi; Baradaran Jamili, Mohammad; Shafizadeh Barmi, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Symptomatic intestinal malrotation first presenting in the adults is rare. Midgut volvulus is the most common complication of malrotation in the adults. Because of more differential diagnosis, Computed Tomography (CT) scan can play an important role in the evaluation of patients with this abnormality. The whirl pattern around the superior mesenteric artery found on CT scan in patients with midgut volvulus is pathognomonic and diagnostic. We describe a case of intestinal malrotation complicated by midgut volvulus in an adult patient. The preoperative CT findings were pathognomonic. PMID:28182093

  10. An unexpected cause of small bowel obstruction in an adult patient: midgut volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Söker, Gökhan; Yılmaz, Cengiz; Karateke, Faruk; Gülek, Bozkurt

    2014-01-01

    The most important complication of intestinal malrotation is midgut volvulus because it may lead to intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. A 29-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain. Ultrasonography (US), colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS), CT and barium studies were carried out. On US and CDUS, twisting of intestinal segments around the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) and alteration of the SMA–SMV relationship were detected. CT demonstrated that the small intestine was making a rotation around the SMA and SMV, which amounted to more than 360°. The upper gastrointestinal barium series revealed a corkscrew appearance of the duodenum and proximal jejunum, which is a pathognomonic finding of midgut volvulus. Prior knowledge of characteristic imaging findings of midgut volvulus is essential in order to reach proper diagnosis and establish proper treatment before the development of intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. PMID:24811563

  11. Intestinal obstruction from midgut volvulus after laparoscopic appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Cuadra, S A; Khalife, M E; Char, D J; Wax, M R; Halpern, D

    2002-01-01

    We present the case of a 30-year-old man who developed a small bowel obstruction from an acute midgut volvulus 8 days after undergoing a laparoscopic appendectomy. There was no evidence of congenital malrotation or midgut volvulus on the initial computed tomography (CT) scan or at laparoscopy. Subsequently, a midgut volvulus developed in the absence of congenital malrotation.

  12. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  13. Malrotation and volvulus associated with heterotaxy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahalik, Santosh K.; Khanna, Sanat; Menon, Prema

    2012-01-01

    A 2-year-old boy with heterotaxy syndrome with associated polysplenia, ventricular septal defect, and malrotation of gut with volvulus is presented. There was delay in diagnosis due to the unusual plain abdominal radiography findings. At laparotomy, the midgut was also found to be enclosed in a thin transparent cocoon. PMID:22869985

  14. Intestinal malrotation presenting outside the neonatal period.

    PubMed Central

    Yanez, R; Spitz, L

    1986-01-01

    We report 37 patients ranging in age from 1 month to 14 years treated for intestinal malrotation during a five year period. The main presenting features consisted of intermittent attacks of vomiting (15 patients), failure to thrive (seven), and recurrent colicky abdominal pain (seven). The diagnosis was confirmed by gastrointestinal contrast studies in all but three patients. A standard Ladd's procedure comprised the definitive surgical treatment. We emphasise the poor nutritional state at the time of operation (49% of the cases were on or below the third centile). In contrast with neonatal presentation, volvulus of the midgut occurred in only five patients (14%) compared with 68% in neonates with malrotation. There were two deaths in the series. Ninety four per cent of the remaining patients responded favourably to the operative procedure. Malrotation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a wide variety of symptoms and should be treated promptly once the diagnosis has been confirmed. PMID:3740908

  15. INTESTINAL MALROTATION IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    VIDAL, Eduardo Arevalo; RENDON, Francisco Abarca; ZAMBRANO, Trino Andrade; GARCÍA, Yudoco Andrade; VITERI, Mario Ferrin; CAMPOS, Josemberg Marins; RAMOS, Manoela Galvão; RAMOS, Almino Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Intestinal malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly. In adults is very difficult to recognize due to the lack of symptoms. Diagnosis is usually incidental during surgical procedures or at autopsy. Aim: To review the occurrence and recognition of uneventful intestinal malrotation discovered during regular cases of bariatric surgeries. Methods: Were retrospectively reviewed the medical registry of 20,000 cases undergoing bariatric surgery, from January 2002 to January 2016, looking for the occurrence of intestinal malrotation and consequences in the intraoperative technique and immediate evolution of the patients. Results: Five cases (0,025%) of intestinal malrotation were found. All of them were males, aging 45, 49, 37,52 and 39 years; BMI 35, 42, 49, 47 and 52 kg/m2, all of them with a past medical history of morbid obesity. The patient with BMI 35 kg/m2 suffered from type 2 diabetes also. All procedures were completed by laparoscopic approach, with no conversions. In one patient was not possible to move the jejunum to the upper abdomen in order to establish the gastrojejunostomy and a sleeve gastrectomy was performed. In another patient was not possible to fully recognize the anatomy due to bowel adhesions and a single anastomosis gastric bypass was preferred. No leaks or bleeding were identified. There were no perioperative complications. All patients were discharged 72 h after the procedure and no immediate 30-day complications were reported. Conclusion: Patients with malrotation can successfully undergo laparoscopic bariatric surgery. May be necessary changes in the surgical original strategy regarding the malrotation. Surgeons must check full abdominal anatomical condition prior to start the division of the stomach. PMID:27683770

  16. Requirement of matrix metalloproteinase-1 for intestinal homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Chung, Hae-Young; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2012-03-10

    Stem cells are tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteolytic enzymes, modulate the turnover of numerous substrates, including cytokine precursors, growth factors, and ECM molecules. However, the roles of MMPs in the regulation of adult stem cells are poorly understood. In the present study, we utilize the Drosophila midgut, which is an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology, to show that Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). The results showed that Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut and that its expression increases with age and with exposure to oxidative stress. Mmp1 knockdown or Timp-overexpressing flies and flies heterozygous for a viable, hypomorphic Mmp1 allele increased ISC proliferation in the gut, as shown by staining with an anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. Reduced Mmp1 levels induced intestinal hyperplasia, and the Mmp1depletion-induced ISC proliferation was rescued by the suppression of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that Mmp1 regulates ISC proliferation through the EGFR signaling pathway. Furthermore, adult gut-specific knockdown and whole-animal heterozygotes of Mmp1 increased additively sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress and shortened lifespan. Our data suggest that Drosophila Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation for maintenance of gut homeostasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1-related ISC proliferation is associated with EGFR signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 in the gut is required for the intestinal homeostasis and longevity.

  17. Hindsight/RREB-1 functions in both the specification and differentiation of stem cells in the adult midgut of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Baechler, Brittany L.; McKnight, Cameron; Pruchnicki, Porsha C.; Biro, Nicole A.; Reed, Bruce H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adult Drosophila midgut is established during the larval/pupal transition from undifferentiated cells known as adult midgut precursors (AMPs). Four fundamental cell types are found in the adult midgut epithelium: undifferentiated intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their committed daughter cells, enteroblasts (EBs), plus enterocytes (ECs) and enteroendocrine cells (EEs). Using the Drosophila posterior midgut as a model, we have studied the function of the transcription factor Hindsight (Hnt)/RREB-1 and its relationship to the Notch and Egfr signaling pathways. We show that hnt is required for EC differentiation in the context of ISC-to-EC differentiation, but not in the context of AMP-to-EC differentiation. In addition, we show that hnt is required for the establishment of viable or functional ISCs. Overall, our studies introduce hnt as a key factor in the regulation of both the developing and the mature adult midgut. We suggest that the nature of these contextual differences can be explained through the interaction of hnt with multiple signaling pathways. PMID:26658272

  18. Study on Fungal Flora in the Midgut of the Larva and Adult of the Different Populations of the Malaria Vector Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Tajedin, L; Hashemi, J; Abaei, MR; Hosseinpour, L; Rafei, F; Basseri, HR

    2009-01-01

    Background Many microorganisms in midgut of mosquito challenge with their host and also other pathogens present in midgut. The aim of this study was presence of non-pathogens microorganisms like fungal flora which may be crucial on interaction between vectors and pathogens. Methods: Different populations of Anopheles stephensi were reared in insectary and objected to determine fungal flora in their midguts. The midgut paunch of mosquito adults and larvae as well as breading water and larval food samples transferred on Subaru-dextrose agar, in order to detect the environment fungus. Results: Although four fungi, Aspergillus, Rhizopus, Geotrichum and Sacharomyces were found in the food and water, but only Aspiragilus observed in the midgut of larvae. No fungus was found in the midgut of adults. This is the first report on fungal flora in the midgut of the adults and larvae of An. stephensi and possible stadial transmission of fungi from immature stages to adults. Conclusion: The midgut environment of adults is not compatible for survivorship of fungi but the larval midgut may contain few fungi as a host or even pathogen. PMID:22808370

  19. Debra-mediated Ci degradation controls tissue homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-02-11

    Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control.

  20. Malrotation-associated cholecystoduodenal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Aybars; Ozaydin, Ismet; Kaya, Murat; Kucuk, Adem; Katranci, Ali Osman

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 16 Final Diagnosis: Malrotation and cholecystoduodenal fistula Symptoms: Abdominal pain • anorexia • fever • nausea • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Anatomical anomaly/variation Background: Cholecystoduodenal fistula (CDF) is the most common cholecystenteric fistula. It is a late complication of gallbladder disease with calculus and is mainly encountered in the elderly and females. Case Report: We report the case of a teenage patient with cholecystoduodenal fistula and malrotation. Direct plain abdominal x-ray demonstrated air in the biliary system. Computed tomography revealed CDF-associated with an anomaly of intestinal malrotation. She had gallstones (with a few stones in the gallbladder) and cholecystitis. CDF is caused by malrotation, and cholecystitis has not been reported before. In this regard our patient is the first and youngest reported case. Conclusions: We suggest that CDF is probably a consequence of malrotation. The patient’s clinical features and operative management are presented and discussed with current literature. PMID:24454977

  1. The fine structural morphology of the midgut of adult Drosophila: A morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Gartner, L P

    1985-01-01

    The midgut of one day old Drosophilia was examined morphometrically at the electron microscopic level. Results suggest that parenchymal cells, with the exception of basal cells, possess identical functions. Drosophilia midgut cells are smaller than those of other insects studied, and the surface densities of the rER was less, indicating that its protein synthetic activity is also less than that of other insects.

  2. Identification of bacterial microflora in the midgut of the larvae and adult of wild caught Anopheles stephensi: a step toward finding suitable paratransgenesis candidates.

    PubMed

    Chavshin, Ali Reza; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Vatandoost, Hasan; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza; Raeisi, Ahmad; Enayati, Ahmad Ali; Mardani, Nadia; Ghoorchian, Sadigheh

    2012-02-01

    To describe the midgut microbial diversity and to find the candidate bacteria for the genetic manipulation for the generation of paratransgenic Anopheline mosquitoes refractory to transmission of malaria, the microbiota of wild larvae and adult Anopheles stephensi mosquito midgut from southern Iran was studied using a conventional cell-free culture technique and analysis of a 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence library. Forty species in 12 genera including seven Gram-negative Myroides, Chryseobacterium, Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Enterobacter and Shewanella and five Gram-positive Exiguobacterium, Enterococcus, Kocuria, Microbacterium and Rhodococcus bacteria were identified in the microbiota of the larvae midgut. Analysis of the adult midgut microbiota revealed presence of 25 Gram-negative species in five genera including Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Bordetella, Myroides and Aeromonas. Pseudomonas and Exiguobacterium with a frequency of 51% and 14% at the larval stage and Pseudomonas and Aeromonas with a frequency of 54% and 20% at the adult stage were the most common midgut symbionts. Pseudomonas, Aeromonas and Myroides genera have been isolated from both larvae and adult stages indicating possible trans-stadial transmission from larva to adult stage. Fast growth in cheap media, Gram negative, and being dominantly found in both larvae and adult stages, and presence in other malaria vectors makes Pseudomonas as a proper candidate for paratransgenesis of An. stephensi and other malaria vectors.

  3. Ubx dynamically regulates Dpp signaling by repressing Dad expression during copper cell regeneration in the adult Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-11-15

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is lined by a series of regionally distinct epithelia. To maintain structure and function of the GI tract, regionally diversified differentiation of somatic stem cell (SC) lineages is critical. The adult Drosophila midgut provides an accessible model to study SC regulation and specification in a regionally defined manner. SCs of the posterior midgut (PM) have been studied extensively, but the control of SCs in the middle midgut (MM) is less well understood. The MM contains a stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) that is regenerated by gastric stem cells (GSSCs) and contains acid-secreting copper cells (CCs). Bmp-like Decapentaplegic (Dpp) signaling determines the identity of GSSCs, and is required for CC regeneration, yet the precise control of Dpp signaling activity in this lineage remains to be fully established. Here, we show that Dad, a negative feedback regulator of Dpp signaling, is dynamically regulated in the GSSC lineage to allow CC differentiation. Dad is highly expressed in GSSCs and their first daughter cells, the gastroblasts (GBs), but has to be repressed in differentiating CCs to allow Dpp-mediated differentiation into CCs. We find that the Hox gene ultrabithorax (Ubx) is required for this regulation. Loss of Ubx prevents Dad repression in the CCR, resulting in defective CC regeneration. Our study highlights the need for dynamic control of Dpp signaling activity in the differentiation of the GSSC lineage and identifies Ubx as a critical regulator of this process.

  4. Isolating intestinal stem cells from adult Drosophila midguts by FACS to study stem cell behavior during aging.

    PubMed

    Tauc, Helen M; Tasdogan, Alpaslan; Pandur, Petra

    2014-12-16

    Aging tissue is characterized by a continuous decline in functional ability. Adult stem cells are crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis particularly in tissues that have a high turnover rate such as the intestinal epithelium. However, adult stem cells are also subject to aging processes and the concomitant decline in function. The Drosophila midgut has emerged as an ideal model system to study molecular mechanisms that interfere with the intestinal stem cells' (ISCs) ability to function in tissue homeostasis. Although adult ISCs can be easily identified and isolated from midguts of young flies, it has been a major challenge to study endogenous molecular changes of ISCs during aging. This is due to the lack of a combination of molecular markers suitable to isolate ISCs from aged intestines. Here we propose a method that allows for successful dissociation of midgut tissue into living cells that can subsequently be separated into distinct populations by FACS. By using dissociated cells from the esg-Gal4, UAS-GFP fly line, in which both ISCs and the enteroblast (EB) progenitor cells express GFP, two populations of cells are distinguished based on different GFP intensities. These differences in GFP expression correlate with differences in cell size and granularity and represent enriched populations of ISCs and EBs. Intriguingly, the two GFP-positive cell populations remain distinctly separated during aging, presenting a novel technique for identifying and isolating cell populations enriched for either ISCs or EBs at any time point during aging. The further analysis, for example transcriptome analysis, of these particular cell populations at various time points during aging is now possible and this will facilitate the examination of endogenous molecular changes that occur in these cells during aging.

  5. Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B regulate intestinal homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yueqin; Li, Zhouhua; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-11-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) tightly regulate stem cells for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Little is known about the regulation of tissue homeostasis by the ECM. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), important components of the ECM, are involved in a variety of biological events. Two heparin sulfate 3-O sulfotransferase (Hs3st) genes, Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B, encode the modification enzymes in heparan sulfate (HS) biosynthesis. Here we demonstrate that Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B are required for adult midgut homeostasis. Depletion of Hs3st-A in enterocytes (ECs) results in increased intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Moreover, increased ISC proliferation is also observed in Hs3st-B null mutant alone, or in combination with Hs3st-A RNAi. Hs3st-A depletion-induced ISC proliferation is effectively suppressed by simultaneous inhibition of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that tissue homeostasis loss in Hs3st-A-deficient intestines is due to increased EGFR signaling. Furthermore, we find that Hs3st-A-depleted ECs are unhealthy and prone to death, while ectopic expression of the antiapoptotic p35 is able to greatly suppress tissue homeostasis loss in these intestines. Together, our data suggest that Drosophila Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B are involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation and midgut homeostasis maintenance.

  6. A subset of neurons controls the permeability of the peritrophic matrix and midgut structure in Drosophila adults.

    PubMed

    Kenmoku, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Ote, Manabu; Kuraishi, Takayuki; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2016-08-01

    The metazoan gut performs multiple physiological functions, including digestion and absorption of nutrients, and also serves as a physical and chemical barrier against ingested pathogens and abrasive particles. Maintenance of these functions and structures is partly controlled by the nervous system, yet the precise roles and mechanisms of the neural control of gut integrity remain to be clarified in Drosophila Here, we screened for GAL4 enhancer-trap strains and labeled a specific subsets of neurons, using Kir2.1 to inhibit their activity. We identified an NP3253 line that is susceptible to oral infection by Gram-negative bacteria. The subset of neurons driven by the NP3253 line includes some of the enteric neurons innervating the anterior midgut, and these flies have a disorganized proventricular structure with high permeability of the peritrophic matrix and epithelial barrier. The findings of the present study indicate that neural control is crucial for maintaining the barrier function of the gut, and provide a route for genetic dissection of the complex brain-gut axis in adults of the model organism Drosophila.

  7. Morphology of the midgut of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae) adult ticks in different feeding stages.

    PubMed

    Remedio, R N; Sampieri, B R; Vendramini, M C R; Souza, N M; Anholeto, L A; Denardo, T A G B; Camargo-Mathias, M I

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cells of ticks are fundamental for their full feeding and reproductive success, besides being considered important sites for the development of pathogens. Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks are known for their great medical and veterinary importance, and for this reason, the knowledge of their intestinal morphology may provide relevant subsidies for the control of these animals, either by direct acaricidal action over these cells or by the production of vaccines. Therefore, this study aimed to describe the midgut morphology of male and female R. sanguineus ticks in different feeding stages, by means of histological analysis. Significant differences were observed between the genders, and such alterations may refer mainly to the distinct demands for nutrients, much higher in females, which need to develop and carry out the egg-laying process. In general, the midgut is coated by a thin muscle layer and presents a pseudostratified epithelium, in which two basic types of cells can be observed, connected to a basal membrane-generative or stem and digestive cells. The latter was classified as follows: residual, deriving from the phase anterior to ecdysis; pinocytic, with vesicles containing liquid or pre-digested components of blood; phagocytic, with entire cells or remnants of nuclear material inside cytoplasmic vesicles; and mature, free in the lumen. Digestion is presumably intracellular and asynchronous and corresponds to a process which starts with the differentiation of generative cells into pinocytic digestive cells, which subsequently start to phagocytize intact blood cells and finally detach from the epithelium, being eliminated with feces.

  8. The Glycolytic Enzymes Activity in the Midgut of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) adult and their Seasonal Changes

    PubMed Central

    Guzik, Joanna; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Tarnawska, Monika; Bereś, Paweł K.; Drzewiecki, Sławomir; Migula, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is an important pest of maize. The diet of the D. virgifera imago is rich in starch and other polysaccharides present in cereals such as maize. Therefore, knowledge about enzymes involved in digestion of such specific food of this pest seems to be important. The paper shows, for the first time, the activities of main glycolytic enzymes in the midgut of D. virgifera imago: endoglycosidases (α-amylase, cellulase, chitinase, licheninase, laminarinase); exoglycosidases (α- and β-glucosidases, α- and β-galactosidases) and disaccharidases (maltase, isomaltase, sucrase, trehalase, lactase, and cellobiase). Activities of α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and maltase were the highest among assayed endoglycosidases, exoglycosidases, and disaccharidases, respectively. This indicates that in the midgut of D. virgifera imago α-amylase, α-glucosidase and maltase are important enzymes in starch hydrolysis and products of its digestion. These results lead to conclusion that inhibition of most active glycolytic enzymes of D. virgifera imago may be another promising method for chemical control of this pest of maize.

  9. Intestinal malrotation with suspected cow’s milk allergy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intestinal malrotation is an incomplete rotation of the intestine. Failure to rotate leads to abnormalities in intestinal positioning and attachment that leave obstructing bands across the duodenum and a narrow pedicle for the midgut loop, thus making it susceptible to volvulus. One of the important differential diagnoses for malrotation is an allergy to cow’s milk. Several studies have described infants with surgical gastrointestinal diseases and cow’s milk allergy. However, to our knowledge, no study has reported infants with intestinal malrotation who have been symptomatic before surgery was performed and have been examined by allergen-specific lymphocyte stimulation test and food challenge tests with long-term follow-up. Case presentation The patient was a Japanese male born at 39 weeks of gestation. He was breast-fed and received commercial cow’s milk supplementation starting the day of birth and was admitted to our hospital at 6 days of age due to bilious vomiting. Plain abdominal radiography showed a paucity of gas in the distal bowel. Because we demonstrated malpositioning of the intestine by barium enema, we repositioned the bowel in a normal position by laparotomy. The patient was re-started on only breast milk 2 days post surgery because we suspected the presence of a cow’s milk allergy, and the results of an allergen-specific lymphocyte stimulation test showed a marked increase in lymphocyte response to kappa-casein. At 5 months of age, the patient was subjected to a cow’s milk challenge test. After the patient began feeding on cow’s milk, he had no symptoms and his laboratory investigations showed no abnormality. In addition, because the patient showed good weight gain and no symptoms with increased cow’s milk intake after discharge, we concluded that the present case was not the result of a cow’s milk allergy. At 1 year, the patient showed favorable growth and development, and serum allergy investigations revealed no

  10. Bacterial diversity analysis of larvae and adult midgut microflora using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods in lab-reared and field-collected Anopheles stephensi-an Asian malarial vector

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes are intermediate hosts for numerous disease causing organisms. Vector control is one of the most investigated strategy for the suppression of mosquito-borne diseases. Anopheles stephensi is one of the vectors of malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax. The parasite undergoes major developmental and maturation steps within the mosquito midgut and little is known about Anopheles-associated midgut microbiota. Identification and characterization of the mosquito midgut flora is likely to contribute towards better understanding of mosquito biology including longevity, reproduction and mosquito-pathogen interactions that are important to evolve strategies for vector control mechanisms. Results Lab-reared and field-collected A. stephensi male, female and larvae were screened by "culture-dependent and culture-independent" methods. Five 16S rRNA gene library were constructed form lab and field-caught A. stephensi mosquitoes and a total of 115 culturable isolates from both samples were analyzed further. Altogether, 68 genera were identified from midgut of adult and larval A. stephensi, 53 from field-caught and 15 from lab-reared mosquitoes. A total of 171 and 44 distinct phylotypes having 85 to 99% similarity with the closest database matches were detected among field and lab-reared A. stephensi midgut, respectively. These OTUs had a Shannon diversity index value of 1.74–2.14 for lab-reared and in the range of 2.75–3.49 for field-caught A. stephensi mosquitoes. The high species evenness values of 0.93 to 0.99 in field-collected adult and larvae midgut flora indicated the vastness of microbial diversity retrieved by these approaches. The dominant bacteria in field-caught adult male A. stephensi were uncultured Paenibacillaceae while in female and in larvae it was Serratia marcescens, on the other hand in lab-reared mosquitoes, Serratia marcescens and Cryseobacterium meninqosepticum bacteria were found to be abundant. Conclusion More than fifty percent of

  11. The midgut of the silkmoth Bombyx mori is able to recycle molecules derived from degeneration of the larval midgut epithelium.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Romanelli, Davide; Caccia, Silvia; Cappellozza, Silvia; Congiu, Terenzio; Rajagopalan, Muthukumaran; Grimaldi, Annalisa; de Eguileor, Magda; Casartelli, Morena; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The midgut represents the middle part of the alimentary canal and is responsible for nutrient digestion and absorption in insect larva. Despite the growing interest in this organ for different purposes, such as studies on morphogenesis and differentiation, stem cell biology, cell death processes and transport mechanisms, basic information on midgut development is still lacking for a large proportion of insect species. Undoubtedly, this lack of data could hinder the full exploitation of practical applications that involve midgut as their primary target. This may represent in particular a significant problem for Lepidoptera, an insect order that includes some of the most important species of high economic importance. With the aim of overcoming this fragmentation of knowledge, we performed a detailed morphofunctional analysis of the midgut of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, a representative model among Lepidoptera, during its development from the larval up to the adult stage, focusing attention on stem cells. Our data demonstrate stem cell proliferation and differentiation, not only in the larval midgut but also in the pupal and adult midgut epithelium. Moreover, we present evidence for a complex trophic relationship between the dying larval epithelium and the new adult one, which is established during metamorphosis. This study, besides representing the first morphological and functional characterization of the changes that occur in the midgut of a lepidopteron during the transition from the larva to the moth, provides a detailed analysis of the midgut of the adult insect, a stage that has been neglected up to now.

  12. Intestinal malrotation in a patient with Pfeiffer syndrome type 2.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Yuri A; Putnam, Philip E; Saal, Howard M

    2010-11-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder characterized by multiple suture craniosynostosis, broad and medially deviated thumbs and great toes, and variable cutaneous syndactyly. We present the case of a 16-month-old boy with Pfeiffer syndrome type 2 who presented with intestinal malrotation for which the diagnosis was delayed. This is a rare complication of Pfeiffer syndrome, with few reported cases in the literature. This case illustrates the importance of recognizing gastrointestinal malrotation as a possible cause of feeding intolerance and persistent vomiting in patients with the severe forms of Pfeiffer syndrome.

  13. [A Case of Cholangiocarcinoma with Intestinal Malrotation Treated with Pancreaticoduodenectomy].

    PubMed

    Saito, Yurina; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Maeda, Sakae; Hama, Naoki; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Miyake, Masakazu; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Miyazaki, Michihiko; Ikeda, Masataka; Hirao, Motohiro; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Nakamori, Shoji

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of cholangiocarcinoma with intestinal malrotation that was treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy. The patient was a 74-year-old man, who underwent laboratory screening and was subsequently found to have elevated γglutamyl transpeptidase levels. Preoperative ultrasonography revealed intrahepatic bile duct dilatation. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography demonstrated a filling defect in the common bile duct and cytology of the bile demonstrated the presence of an adenocarcinoma. On preoperative computed tomography (CT), the SMV was located on the left side of the SMA, which showed the SMV rotation sign. Additionally, the small intestine and the colon were deviated to the right and left side of abdominal cavity, respectively. We diagnosed the patient with cholangiocarcinoma with intestinal malrotation and preduodenal portal vein involvement using the CT scan, and performed pancreaticoduodenectomy. Since the ligament of Treitz was absent during surgery, we diagnosed this as a case of the nonrotation type of malrotation. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged from the hospital 42 days after the surgery. Anomalies of the portal venous system are so rare that recognition of its variation is important in order to avoid accidental injuries during the operation.

  14. Midgut morphological changes and autophagy during metamorphosis in sand flies.

    PubMed

    Malta, Juliana; Heerman, Matthew; Weng, Ju Lin; Fernandes, Kenner M; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2017-03-11

    During metamorphosis, holometabolous insects undergo significant remodeling of their midgut and become able to cope with changes in dietary requirements between larval and adult stages. At this stage, insects must be able to manage and recycle available food resources in order to develop fully into adults, especially when no nutrients are acquired from the environment. Autophagy has been previously suggested to play a crucial role during metamorphosis of the mosquito. Here, we investigate the overall morphological changes of the midgut of the sand fly during metamorphosis and assess the expression profiles of the autophagy-related genes ATG1, ATG6, and ATG8, which are associated with various steps of the autophagic process. Morphological changes in the midgut start during the fourth larval instar, with epithelial degeneration followed by remodeling via the differentiation of regenerative cells in pre-pupal and pupal stages. The changes in the midgut epithelium are paired with the up-regulation of ATG1, ATG6 and ATG8 during the larva-adult transition. Vein, a putative epidermal growth factor involved in regulating epithelial midgut regeneration, is also up-regulated. Autophagy has further been confirmed in sand flies via the presence of autophagosomes residing within the cytoplasmic compartment of the pupal stages. An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of this process should aid the future management of this neglected tropical vector.

  15. Degeneration and cell regeneration in the midgut of Podisus nigrispinus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) during post-embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Aparecida das Dores; Fialho, Maria do Carmo Queiroz; Zanuncio, José Cola; Ramalho, Francisco de Souza; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Cell death, proliferation, and differentiation in some developmental stages of insects have been studied in the midgut of ametabolous, which undergo only continuous growth, and holometabolous, which undergo complete metamorphosis. However, in hemimetabolous insects, evolutionarily intermediate between ametabolous and holometabolous, midgut reorganization during the post-embryonic development has been poorly studied. The present study evaluates the post-embryonic development of the midgut of a hemimetabolous insect, Podisus nigrispinus, to test the hypothesis that these insects have programmed cell death and proliferation followed by differentiation of regenerative cells during midgut growth from nymphs to adult. The morphometrical data showed a 6-fold increase in midgut length from the first instar nymph to the adult, which did not result from an increase in the size of the midgut cells, suggesting that the growth of the midgut occurs by an increase in cell number. Cell death was rarely found in the midgut, whereas proliferation of regenerative cells occurred quite frequently. The growth of the midgut of P. nigrispinus appears to result from the proliferation of regenerative cells present in the epithelium; unlike ametabolous and holometabolous insects, the midgut of P. nigrispinus does not undergo extensive remodeling, as shown by the low frequency of digestive cell death.

  16. Malrotation: Current strategies navigating the radiologic diagnosis of a surgical emergency

    PubMed Central

    Tackett, John J; Muise, Eleanor D; Cowles, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The most accurate and practical imaging algorithm for the diagnosis of intestinal malrotation can be a complex and sometimes controversial topic. Since 1900, significant advances have been made in the radiographic assessment of infants and children suspected to have anomalies of intestinal rotation. We describe the current methods of abdominal imaging of malrotation along with their pros and cons. When associated with volvulus, malrotation is a true surgical emergency requiring rapid diagnosis and treatment. We emphasize the importance of close cooperation and communication between radiology and surgery to perform an effective and efficient diagnostic evaluation allowing prompt surgical decision making. PMID:25276316

  17. Malrotation of the intestine and preduodenal portal vein associated with abdominal situs inversus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Rosa; Lugo-Vicente, Humberto

    2007-03-01

    Abdominal situs inversus is a rare condition usually associated with malformations of asymmetric organs such as the heart, liver, spleen and malrotation of the intestines. A case of abdominal situs inversus with intestinal malrotation and preduodenal portal vein is reported. Patient underwent prophylactic Ladd's procedure and preduodenal portal vein was left undisturbed during surgery. This case highlights the importance of rigorous investigation of anatomic features prior to surgery in a patient with heterotaxia. The authors advocate radiological investigation of patients with heterotaxia and prophylactic Ladd's procedure in those with intestinal malrotation.

  18. Duodenal Obstruction Caused by Acute Appendicitis with Intestinal Malrotation in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Biçer, Şenol; Çelik, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 14 Final Diagnosis: Duodenal obstruction Symptoms: Bilious vomiting Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Laparotomy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: In patients with intestinal malrotation, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis can be difficult due to atypical presentation. Duodenal obstruction caused by acute appendicitis with the presence of malrotation has rarely been reported in children. Case Report: We report the case of a 14-year-old male patient with bilious vomiting and abdominal distension. A diagnosis could not be made by computed tomography, ultrasonography, or endoscopy. We observed a dilated stomach and malrotation in laparotomy. The caecum was in the right upper quadrant, and an inflamed appendix was located in the subhepatic region. After the appendectomy, the cecum was mobilized and fixed in the right lower quadrant. Conclusions: In children with intestinal malrotation, acute appendicitis can present as duodenal obstruction without abdominal pain, and standard imaging methods can miss the correct diagnosis. PMID:26317163

  19. Preduodenal portal vein, malrotation, and high jejunal atresia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baglaj, Maciej; Gerus, Sylwester

    2012-01-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare congenital anomaly. In most patients, it is associated with other congenital defects including situs inversus, malrotation, and biliary atresia or occurs as part of the heterotaxia syndrome or polysplenia syndrome. We describe a newborn affected by high jejunal atresia, malrotation, and a complex cardiac anomaly, in whom PDPV was diagnosed at early relaparotomy because of stenosis of the jejunal anastomosis. Occurrence of PDPV with intestinal atresia has not been previously reported in the literature.

  20. Association of Duodenal Atresia, Malrotation, and Atrial Septal Defect in a Down-Syndrome Patient

    PubMed Central

    Molinaro, F; Sica, M; Mariscoli, F; Bindi, E; Mazzei, O; Ferrara, F; Messina, M

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal atresia is the frequent cause of neonatal intestinal obstruction. The association between duodenal atresia, intestinal malrotation, cardiac anomalies and Down syndrome is infrequently reported. We present a prenatally suspected case of duodenal atresia which was associated with malrotation and atrial septal defect in a patient of Down syndrome. Duodenotomy and resection of web was performed in addition to Ladd’s procedure. Postoperative course remained uneventful. PMID:27170921

  1. Measuring the effect of femoral malrotation on knee joint biomechanics for total knee arthroplasty using computational simulation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, K-T.; Koh, Y-G.; Son, J.; Kwon, O-R.; Baek, C.; Jung, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Malrotation of the femoral component can result in post-operative complications in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), including patellar maltracking. Therefore, we used computational simulation to investigate the influence of femoral malrotation on contact stresses on the polyethylene (PE) insert and on the patellar button as well as on the forces on the collateral ligaments. Materials and Methods Validated finite element (FE) models, for internal and external malrotations from 0° to 10° with regard to the neutral position, were developed to evaluate the effect of malrotation on the femoral component in TKA. Femoral malrotation in TKA on the knee joint was simulated in walking stance-phase gait and squat loading conditions. Results Contact stress on the medial side of the PE insert increased with internal femoral malrotation and decreased with external femoral malrotation in both stance-phase gait and squat loading conditions. There was an opposite trend in the lateral side of the PE insert case. Contact stress on the patellar button increased with internal femoral malrotation and decreased with external femoral malrotation in both stance-phase gait and squat loading conditions. In particular, contact stress on the patellar button increased by 98% with internal malrotation of 10° in the squat loading condition. The force on the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) increased with internal and external femoral malrotations, respectively. Conclusions These findings provide support for orthopaedic surgeons to determine a more accurate femoral component alignment in order to reduce post-operative PE problems. Cite this article: K-T. Kang, Y-G. Koh, J. Son, O-R. Kwon, C. Baek, S. H. Jung, K. K. Park. Measuring the effect of femoral malrotation on knee joint biomechanics for total knee arthroplasty using computational simulation. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:552–559. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.511.BJR-2016-0107.R1. PMID:28094763

  2. Serratia odorifera a Midgut Inhabitant of Aedes aegypti Mosquito Enhances Its Susceptibility to Dengue-2 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Apte-Deshpande, Anjali; Paingankar, Mandar; Gokhale, Mangesh D.; Deobagkar, Dileep N.

    2012-01-01

    Mosquito midgut plays a crucial role in its vector susceptibility and pathogen interaction. Identification of the sustainable microflora of the midgut environment can therefore help in evaluating its contribution in mosquito-pathogen interaction and in turn vector competence. To understand the bacterial diversity in the midgut of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, we conducted a screening study of the gut microbes of these mosquitoes which were either collected from fields or reared in the laboratory “culture-dependent” approach. This work demonstrated that the microbial flora of larvae and adult Ae. aegypti midgut is complex and is dominated by Gram negative proteobacteria. Serratia odorifera was found to be stably associated in the midguts of field collected and laboratory reared larvae and adult females. The potential influence of this sustainable gut microbe on DENV-2 susceptibility of this vector was evaluated by co-feeding S. odorifera with DENV-2 to adult Ae. aegypti females (free of gut flora). The observations revealed that the viral susceptibility of these Aedes females enhanced significantly as compared to solely dengue-2 fed and another gut inhabitant, Microbacterium oxydans co-fed females. Based on the results of this study we proposed that the enhancement in the DENV-2 susceptibility of Ae. aegypti females was due to blocking of prohibitin molecule present on the midgut surface of these females by the polypeptide of gut inhabitant S. odorifera. PMID:22848375

  3. Midgut of the non-hematophagous mosquito Toxorhynchites theobaldi (Diptera, Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Godoy, Raquel S M; Fernandes, Kenner M; Martins, Gustavo F

    2015-10-30

    In most mosquito species, the females require a blood-feeding for complete egg development. However, in Toxorhynchites mosquitoes, the eggs develop without blood-feeding, and both females and males exclusively feed on sugary diets. The midgut is a well-understood organ in blood-feeding mosquitoes, but little is known about it in non-blood-feeding ones. In the present study, the detailed morphology of the midgut of Toxorhynchites theobaldi were investigated using histochemical and ultrastructural methods. The midgut of female and male T. theobaldi adults consists of a long, slender anterior midgut (AMG), and a short, dilated posterior midgut (PMG). The AMG is subdivided into AMG1 (short, with folds) and AMG2 (long, without folds). Nerve branches and enteroendocrine cells are present in AMG and PMG, respectively. Compared with the PMG of blood-feeding female mosquitoes, the PMG of T. theobaldi is smaller; however, in both mosquitoes, PMG seems be the main region of food digestion and absorption, and protein secretion. The epithelial folds present in the AMG of T. theobaldi have not been reported in other mosquitoes; however, the midgut muscle organization and endocrine control of the digestion process are conserved in both T. theobaldi and blood-feeding mosquitoes.

  4. Midgut of the non-hematophagous mosquito Toxorhynchites theobaldi (Diptera, Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Raquel S. M.; Fernandes, Kenner M.; Martins, Gustavo F.

    2015-01-01

    In most mosquito species, the females require a blood-feeding for complete egg development. However, in Toxorhynchites mosquitoes, the eggs develop without blood-feeding, and both females and males exclusively feed on sugary diets. The midgut is a well-understood organ in blood-feeding mosquitoes, but little is known about it in non-blood-feeding ones. In the present study, the detailed morphology of the midgut of Toxorhynchites theobaldi were investigated using histochemical and ultrastructural methods. The midgut of female and male T. theobaldi adults consists of a long, slender anterior midgut (AMG), and a short, dilated posterior midgut (PMG). The AMG is subdivided into AMG1 (short, with folds) and AMG2 (long, without folds). Nerve branches and enteroendocrine cells are present in AMG and PMG, respectively. Compared with the PMG of blood-feeding female mosquitoes, the PMG of T. theobaldi is smaller; however, in both mosquitoes, PMG seems be the main region of food digestion and absorption, and protein secretion. The epithelial folds present in the AMG of T. theobaldi have not been reported in other mosquitoes; however, the midgut muscle organization and endocrine control of the digestion process are conserved in both T. theobaldi and blood-feeding mosquitoes. PMID:26514271

  5. Counterclockwise barber-pole sign on prenatal three-dimensional power Doppler sonography in a case of duodenal obstruction without intestinal malrotation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chin-Yuan; Chiba, Yoshihide; Fukui, On; Sasaki, Yoshihito; Miyashita, Susumu

    2004-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) power Doppler sonographic imaging provides a 3D view of the blood vessels. This technique reportedly has advantages over other forms of sonography in visualizing normal and abnormal fetal vascular anatomy. We report the case of a 36-year-old pregnant woman in whom 3D power Doppler sonography with simultaneous gray-scale imaging was performed at 32 weeks' gestational age to investigate an intestinal obstruction in the fetus that was suspected on the basis of 2-dimensional sonographic findings. The 3D sonograms revealed that the superior mesenteric artery and vein of the fetus were wound counterclockwise, forming the "barber-pole" sign. At 38 weeks' menstrual age, the female infant was delivered vaginally. Only duodenal atresia and annular pancreas, but not intestinal malrotation, were found postnatally. Surgical reconstruction of the duodenum was performed, with no major complications. Previous research suggests that the counterclockwise barber-pole sign is a normal finding. On the basis of our case, we believe that this "negative finding" might be used to exclude the diagnosis of midgut volvulus, a condition that would be expected to cause these vessels to wrap around in a clockwise direction.

  6. A Case of Fetal Intestinal Volvulus Without Malrotation Causing Severe Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Tachibana, Daisuke; Kitada, Kohei; Kurihara, Yasushi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Sakae, Yukari; Morotomi, Yoshiki; Nomura, Shiho; Saito, Mika

    2015-01-01

    Fetal intestinal volvulus without malrotation is a rare, life-threatening disease. Left untreated, hemorrhage from necrotic bowel tissue will lead to severe fetal anemia and even intrauterine death. We encountered a case of fetal intestinal volvulus causing severe anemia, which was diagnosed postnatally and successfully treated with surgical intervention. PMID:25628516

  7. Delayed gastric emptying in gastroesophageal reflux disease: the role of malrotation.

    PubMed

    Demirbilek, Savaş; Karaman, Abdurrahman; Gürünlüoğlu, Kubilay; Akin, Melih; Taş, Erkan; Aksoy, Rauf Tuğrul; Kekilli, Ersoy

    2005-06-01

    The association between gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and intestinal malrotation (IM) has been well described. Delayed or impaired gastric emptying in IM is thought to be a contributing factor in the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The current study assessed the role of malrotation in delayed gastric emptying in children with GERD. We also evaluated the interactions between GERD, malrotation, gastric pH abnormalities, and gastric dysmotility. Sixty-seven patients between 1 and 5 years of age (mean 3.08+/-1.2) and with symptoms of GER, such as emesis, reactive or recurrent lung disease, and/or growth retardation, were studied in 2001-2005. Upper and lower gastrointestinal contrast studies were performed for the diagnosis of malrotation. Gastric motility was evaluated with a liquid gastric emptying protocol. GER was documented by upper gastrointestinal studies, scintigraphy, and/or 24-h pH monitoring. In our series of 44 children with GERD, there was an unexpectedly high incidence of IM: 54.5% (24/44). IM has previously been known to occur in 25% of patients with GERD. GERD was found in 24 (82.7%) of 29 patients with IM. Mean nuclear gastric emptying (MNGE) was 51.6+/-8.04 min in patients with isolated GERD and 96.6+/-20.5 min in children with IM and GERD. There was a statistically significant difference in MNGE time (p<0.05) between children with primary GERD and in those with GERD and IM. Esophageal pH monitoring showed that mean fraction time below pH 4 was 7.06+/-1.1% in patients with isolated GERD and 14.7+/-4.1% in patients with IM and GERD. GERD is common in children between 1 and 5 years old. Using gastric emptying studies and esophageal pH monitoring, we have shown that gastric dysmotility and esophageal pH abnormalities are highly prevalent, especially in children with malrotation compared with children with isolated GERD. These findings suggest that malrotation is an important factor responsible for delayed gastric emptying in GERD

  8. Exploring the midgut proteome of partially fed female cattle tick (Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus).

    PubMed

    Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Josh, Peter; Zhu, Ying; Pearson, Roger; Gough, Joanne; Colgrave, Michelle L

    2010-02-01

    The continued development of effective anti-tick vaccines remains the most promising prospect for the control of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. A vaccine based on midgut proteins could interfere with successful tick feeding and additionally interfere with midgut developmental stages of Babesia parasites, providing opportunities for the control of both the tick and the pathogens it transmits. Midgut proteins from partially fed adult female cattle ticks were analysed using a combination of 2-DE and gel-free LC-MS/MS. Analysis of the urea-soluble protein fraction resulted in the confident identification of 105 gut proteins, while the PBS-soluble fraction yielded an additional 37 R. microplus proteins. The results show an abundance of proteins involved in mitochondrial ATP synthesis, electron transport chain, protein synthesis, chaperone, antioxidant and protein folding and transport activities in midgut tissues of adult female ticks. Among the novel products identified were clathrin-adaptor protein, which is involved in the assembly of clathrin-coated vesicles, and membrane-associated trafficking proteins such as syntaxin 6 and surfeit 4. The observations allow the formulation of hypotheses regarding midgut physiology and will serve as a basis for future vaccine development and tick-host interaction research.

  9. Anopheles Midgut FREP1 Mediates Plasmodium Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Genwei; Niu, Guodong; Franca, Caio M.; Dong, Yuemei; Wang, Xiaohong; Butler, Noah S.; Dimopoulos, George; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Malaria transmission depends on sexual stage Plasmodium parasites successfully invading Anopheline mosquito midguts following a blood meal. However, the molecular mechanisms of Plasmodium invasion of mosquito midguts have not been fully elucidated. Previously, we showed that genetic polymorphisms in the fibrinogen-related protein 1 (FREP1) gene are significantly associated with Plasmodium falciparum infection in Anopheles gambiae, and FREP1 is important for Plasmodium berghei infection of mosquitoes. Here we identify that the FREP1 protein is secreted from the mosquito midgut epithelium and integrated as tetramers into the peritrophic matrix, a chitinous matrix formed inside the midgut lumen after a blood meal feeding. Moreover, we show that the FREP1 can directly bind Plasmodia sexual stage gametocytes and ookinetes. Notably, ablating FREP1 expression or targeting FREP1 with antibodies significantly decreases P. falciparum infection in mosquito midguts. Our data support that the mosquito-expressed FREP1 mediates mosquito midgut invasion by multiple species of Plasmodium parasites via anchoring ookinetes to the peritrophic matrix and enabling parasites to penetrate the peritrophic matrix and the epithelium. Thus, targeting FREP1 can limit malaria transmission. PMID:25991725

  10. Increased centrosome amplification in aged stem cells of the Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joung-Sun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Na, Hyun-Jin; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Kim, Young-Shin; Arking, Robert; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of aged Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of oxidative stressed Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be responsible for abnormal ISC polyploid cells. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be a useful marker for aging stem cells. - Abstract: Age-related changes in long-lived tissue-resident stem cells may be tightly linked to aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. Centrosomes play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. Supernumerary centrosomes are known to be an early event in tumorigenesis and senescence. However, the age-related changes of centrosome duplication in tissue-resident stem cells in vivo remain unknown. Here, using anti-γ-tubulin and anti-PH3, we analyzed mitotic intestinal stem cells with supernumerary centrosomes in the adult Drosophila midgut, which may be a versatile model system for stem cell biology. The results showed increased centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells of aged and oxidatively stressed Drosophila midguts. Increased centrosome amplification was detected by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT in intestinal stem cells/enteroblasts, known to mimic age-related changes including hyperproliferation of intestinal stem cells and hyperplasia in the midgut. Our data show the first direct evidence for the age-related increase of centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells and suggest that the Drosophila midgut is an excellent model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying centrosome amplification in aging adult stem cells in vivo.

  11. RNA-seq analyses of the midgut from blood- and serum-fed Ixodes ricinus ticks

    PubMed Central

    Perner, Jan; Provazník, Jan; Schrenková, Jana; Urbanová, Veronika; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Kopáček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Adult females of the genus Ixodes imbibe blood meals exceeding about 100 times their own weight within 7‒9 days. During this period, ticks internalise components of host blood by endocytic digest cells that line the tick midgut epithelium. Using RNA-seq, we aimed to characterise the midgut transcriptome composition in adult Ixodes ricinus females during early and late phase of engorgement. To address specific adaptations to the haemoglobin-rich diet, we compared the midgut transcriptomes of genetically homogenous female siblings fed either bovine blood or haemoglobin-depleted serum. We noted that tick gut transcriptomes are subject to substantial temporal-dependent expression changes between day 3 and day 8 of feeding. In contrast, the number of transcripts significantly affected by the presence or absence of host red blood cells was low. Transcripts relevant to the processes associated with blood-meal digestion were analysed and involvement of selected encoded proteins in the tick midgut physiology discussed. A total of 7215 novel sequences from I. ricinus were deposited in public databases as an additional outcome of this study. Our results broaden the current knowledge of tick digestive system and may lead to the discovery of potential molecular targets for efficient tick control. PMID:27824139

  12. Brain-midgut short neuropeptide F mechanism that inhibits digestive activity of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana upon starvation.

    PubMed

    Mikani, Azam; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Takeda, Makio

    2012-03-01

    Immunohistochemical reactivity against short neuropeptide F (sNPF) was observed in the brain-corpus cardiacum and midgut paraneurons of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Four weeks of starvation increased the number of sNPF-ir cells in the midgut epithelium but the refeeding decreased the number in 3h. Dramatic rises in sNPF contents in the midgut epithelium and hemolymph of roaches starved for 4 weeks were confirmed by ELISA. Starvation for 4 weeks reduced α-amylase, protease and lipase activities in the midgut of P. americana but refeeding restored these to high levels. Co-incubation of dissected midgut with sNPF at physiological concentrations inhibited α-amylase, protease and lipase activities. sNPF injection into the hemocoel led to a decrease in α-amylase, protease and lipase activities, whereas PBS injection had no effects. The injection of d-(+)-trehalose and l-proline into the hemocoel of decapitated adult male cockroaches that had been starved for 4 weeks had no effect on these digestive enzymes. However, injection into the hemocoel of head-intact starved cockroaches stimulated digestive activity. Injection of d-(+)-trehalose and l-proline into the lumen of decapitated cockroaches that had been starved for 4 weeks increased enzymes activities and suppressed sNPF in the midgut. Our data indicate that sNPF from the midgut paraneurons suppresses α-amylase, protease and lipase activities during starvation. Injection of d-(+)-trehalose/l-proline into the hemocoel of head-intact starved cockroach decreased the hemolymph sNPF content, which suggests that sNPF could be one of the brain factors, demonstrating brain-midgut interplay in the regulation of digestive activities and possibly nutrition-associated behavioral modifications.

  13. Midgut and salivary gland transcriptomes of the arbovirus vector Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Campbell, C L; Vandyke, K A; Letchworth, G J; Drolet, B S; Hanekamp, T; Wilson, W C

    2005-04-01

    Numerous Culicoides spp. are important vectors of livestock or human disease pathogens. Transcriptome information from midguts and salivary glands of adult female Culicoides sonorensis provides new insight into vector biology. Of 1719 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from adult serum-fed female midguts harvested within 5 h of feeding, twenty-eight clusters of serine proteases were derived. Four clusters encode putative iron binding proteins (FER1, FERL, PXDL1, PXDL2), and two clusters encode metalloendopeptidases (MDP6C, MDP6D) that probably function in bloodmeal catabolism. In addition, a diverse variety of housekeeping cDNAs were identified. Selected midgut protease transcripts were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR): TRY1_115 and MDP6C mRNAs were induced in adult female midguts upon feeding, whereas TRY1_156 and CHYM1 were abundant in midguts both before and immediately after feeding. Of 708 salivary gland ESTs analysed, clusters representing two new classes of protein families were identified: a new class of D7 proteins and a new class of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors. Additional cDNAs representing putative immunomodulatory proteins were also identified: 5' nucleotidases, antigen 5-related proteins, a hyaluronidase, a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, mucins and several immune response cDNAs. Analysis by q-PCR showed that all D7 and Kunitz domain transcripts tested were highly enriched in female heads compared with other tissues and were generally absent from males. The mRNAs of two additional protease inhibitors, TFPI1 and TFPI2, were detected in salivary glands of paraffin-embedded females by in situ hybridization.

  14. Genomic Regions Required for Morphogenesis of the Drosophila Embryonic Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Bilder, D.; Scott, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila midgut is an excellent system for studying the cell migration, cell-cell communication, and morphogenetic events that occur in organ formation. Genes representative of regulatory gene families common to all animals, including homeotic, TGFβ, and Wnt genes, play roles in midgut development. To find additional regulators of midgut morphogenesis, we screened a set of genomic deficiencies for midgut phenotypes. Fifteen genomic intervals necessary for proper midgut morphogenesis were identified; three contain genes already known to act in the midgut. Three other genomic regions are required for formation of the endoderm or visceral mesoderm components of the midgut. Nine regions are required for proper formation of the midgut constrictions. The E75 ecdysone-induced gene, which encodes a nuclear receptor superfamily member, is the relevant gene in one region and is essential for proper formation of midgut constrictions. E75 acts downstream of the previously known constriction regulators or in parallel. Temporal hormonal control may therefore work in conjunction with spatial regulation by the homeotic genes in midgut development. Another genomic region is required to activate transcription of the homeotic genes Antp and Scr specifically in visceral mesoderm. The genomic regions identified by this screen provide a map to novel midgut development regulators. PMID:8582615

  15. Biliary Atresia Associated with Polysplenia Syndrome, Dextrocardia, Situs Inversus Totalis and Malrotation of Intestines

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rahul; Soni, Varsha; Ahmed, Reyaz; Goyal, Ram Babu

    2014-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease and the end result of a destructive, inflammatory cholangiopathy, leading to fibrosis and biliary cirrhosis. It is classified into syndromic variety with various congenital anomalies and non-syndromic (isolated anomaly). We present here a 1-month-old female child with the syndromic variety of BA associated with polysplenia syndrome, dextrocardia, situs inversus totalis and malrotation of intestines. She developed jaundice in the first week of life. Kasai operation was performed but she developed cholangitis and septicemia 2.5 months after surgery and succumbed later. PMID:26023480

  16. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K.; Wilson, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  17. Implications for the functions of the four known midgut differentiation factors: An immunohistologic study of Heliothis virescens midgut.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Marcia J; Coronel, Nicholas; Natsukawa, Dai; Takeda, Makio

    2004-05-01

    Antibodies to the peptides that induce differentiation of midgut larval stem cells, the midgut differentiating factors MDF-2, MDF-3, and MDF-4, bind to columnar cells in midgut cultures and in intact midgut of Heliothis virescens, in manners similar to the binding of anti- MDF-1 to those tissues. Antibodies to MDF-2 and MDF-3 also stained droplets in the midgut lumen, suggesting that columnar cells may also release MDF-2- and MDF-3-like cytokines to the lumen. Antibody to MDF-4 exhibited similar staining patterns but also recognized stem and differentiating cells, the presumed targets of peptides that regulate stem cell differentiation. Antibody to MDF-4 also bound to one type of endocrine cell in midgut cultures and in sections of midgut, as well as to the endocrine secretion released both to the midgut lumen and the hemolymph. Antibodies to the MDFs 1, 2, and 3, incubated with cultures of midgut cells, did not appear to prevent differentiation of the stem cells in the cultures but affected viability of mature cells, reflected in increased apoptosis and doubling of the number of differentiating cells compared to controls. Only antibody to MDF-4 induced temporary necrosis and inhibition of population recovery, indicating that MDF4 may be the true differentiation factor. The other MDFs may have additional functions beyond regulation of midgut stem cell differentiation in vivo.

  18. Preduodenal portal vein causing duodenal obstruction associated with situs inversus, intestinal malrotation, and polysplenia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Mordehai, J; Cohen, Z; Kurzbart, E; Mares, A J

    2002-04-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare anomaly described in only 82 patients in the literature. In a few patients, the PDPV was the direct cause of duodenal obstruction. The authors have treated a newborn with PDPV associated with total situs inversus, intestinal malrotation and polysplenia who presented clinically with duodenal obstruction.

  19. Diversity of Cultivable Midgut Microbiota at Different Stages of the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus from Tezpur, India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kamlesh K; Datta, Sibnarayan; Naglot, Ashok; Bora, Ajitabh; Hmuaka, Vanlal; Bhagyawant, Sameer; Gogoi, Hemanta K; Veer, Vijay; Raju, P Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are among the most important vectors of arboviral diseases, worldwide. Recent studies indicate that diverse midgut microbiota of mosquitoes significantly affect development, digestion, metabolism, and immunity of their hosts. Midgut microbiota has also been suggested to modulate the competency of mosquitoes to transmit arboviruses, malaria parasites etc. Interestingly, the midgut microbial flora is dynamic and the diversity changes with the development of vectors, in addition to other factors such as species, sex, life-stage, feeding behavior and geographical origin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the midgut bacterial diversity among larva, adult male, sugar fed female and blood fed female Ae. albopictus collected from Tezpur, Northeastern India. Based on colony morphological characteristics, we selected 113 cultivable bacterial isolates for 16S rRNA gene sequence based molecular identification. Of the 113 isolates, we could identify 35 bacterial species belonging to 18 distinct genera under four major phyla, namely Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes accounted for majority (80%) of the species, while phylum Actinobacteria constituted 17% of the species. Bacteroidetes was the least represented phylum, characterized by a single species- Chryseobacterium rhizoplanae, isolated from blood fed individuals. Dissection of midgut microbiota diversity at different developmental stages of Ae. albopictus will be helpful in better understanding mosquito-borne diseases, and for designing effective strategies to manage mosquito-borne diseases.

  20. Diversity of Cultivable Midgut Microbiota at Different Stages of the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus from Tezpur, India

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Naglot, Ashok; Bora, Ajitabh; Hmuaka, Vanlal; Bhagyawant, Sameer; Gogoi, Hemanta K.; Veer, Vijay; Raju, P. Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are among the most important vectors of arboviral diseases, worldwide. Recent studies indicate that diverse midgut microbiota of mosquitoes significantly affect development, digestion, metabolism, and immunity of their hosts. Midgut microbiota has also been suggested to modulate the competency of mosquitoes to transmit arboviruses, malaria parasites etc. Interestingly, the midgut microbial flora is dynamic and the diversity changes with the development of vectors, in addition to other factors such as species, sex, life-stage, feeding behavior and geographical origin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the midgut bacterial diversity among larva, adult male, sugar fed female and blood fed female Ae. albopictus collected from Tezpur, Northeastern India. Based on colony morphological characteristics, we selected 113 cultivable bacterial isolates for 16S rRNA gene sequence based molecular identification. Of the 113 isolates, we could identify 35 bacterial species belonging to 18 distinct genera under four major phyla, namely Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes accounted for majority (80%) of the species, while phylum Actinobacteria constituted 17% of the species. Bacteroidetes was the least represented phylum, characterized by a single species- Chryseobacterium rhizoplanae, isolated from blood fed individuals. Dissection of midgut microbiota diversity at different developmental stages of Ae. albopictus will be helpful in better understanding mosquito-borne diseases, and for designing effective strategies to manage mosquito-borne diseases. PMID:27941985

  1. Cytotoxic effects of neem oil in the midgut of the predator Ceraeochrysa claveri.

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; Garcia, Ana Silvia Gimenes; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Pinheiro, Patricia Fernanda Felipe; dos Santos, Daniela Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Studies of morphological and ultrastructural alterations in target organs have been useful for evaluating the sublethal effects of biopesticides regarded as safe for non-target organisms in ecotoxicological analyses. One of the most widely used biopesticides is neem oil, and its safety and compatibility with natural enemies have been further clarified through bioassays performed to analyze the effects of indirect exposure by the intake of poisoned prey. Thus, this study examined the cellular response of midgut epithelial cells of the adult lacewing, Ceraeochrysa claveri, to neem oil exposure via intake of neem oil-contaminated prey during the larval stage. C. claveri larvae were fed Diatraea saccharalis eggs treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1% and 2% throughout the larval stage. The adult females obtained from these treatments were used at two ages (newly emerged and at the start of oviposition) in morphological and ultrastructural analyses. Neem oil was found to cause pronounced cytotoxic effects in the adult midgut, such as cell dilation, emission of cytoplasmic protrusions, cell lysis, loss of integrity of the cell cortex, dilation of cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, swollen mitochondria, vesiculated appearance of the Golgi complex and dilated invaginations of the basal labyrinth. Epithelial cells responded to those injuries with various cytoprotective and detoxification mechanisms, including increases in cell proliferation, the number of calcium-containing cytoplasmic granules, and HSP 70 expression, autophagic processes and the development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, but these mechanisms were insufficient for recovery from all of the cellular damage to the midgut. This study demonstrates that neem oil exposure impairs the midgut by causing sublethal effects that may affect the physiological functions of this organ, indicating the importance of studies of different life stages of this species and similar species to evaluate the

  2. Bacterial Communities and Midgut Microbiota Associated with Mosquito Populations from Waste Tires in East-Central Illinois.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lampman, Richard L; Muturi, Ephantus J

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-microbe interactions tend to influence larval nutrition, immunity, and development, as well as fitness and vectorial capacity of adults. Understanding the role of different bacterial species not only improves our knowledge of the physiological and ecological consequences of these interactions, but also provides the basis for developing novel strategies for controlling mosquito-borne diseases. We used culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques to characterize the bacterial composition and abundance in water and midgut samples of larval and adult females of Aedes japonicus (Theobald), Aedes triseriatus (Say), and Culex restuans (Theobald) collected from waste tires at two wooded study sites in Urbana, IL. The phylum-specific real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay revealed a higher proportion of Actinobacteria and a lower proportion of gamma-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes in water samples and larval midguts compared to adult female midguts. Only 15 of the 57 bacterial species isolated in this study occurred in both study sites. The number of bacterial species was highest in water samples (28 species from Trelease Woods; 25 species from South Farms), intermediate in larval midguts (13 species from Ae. japonicus; 12 species from Ae. triseriatus; 8 species from Cx. restuans), and lowest in adult female midguts (2 species from Ae. japonicus; 3 species from Ae. triseriatus). These findings suggest that the composition and richness of bacterial communities varies both between habitats and among mosquito species and that the reduction in bacteria diversity during metamorphosis is more evident among bacteria detected using the culture-dependent method.

  3. Intestinal Malrotation

    MedlinePlus

    ... vomit may contain bile (which is yellow or green in color) or may resemble feces. Additional symptoms ... obstruction because your child has bilious (yellow or green) vomiting, a swollen abdomen, or bloody stools, call ...

  4. The Effect of Malrotation of Tibial Component of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Tibial Insert during High Flexion Using a Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Mitsugu

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common errors of total knee arthroplasty procedure is a malrotation of tibial component. The stress on tibial insert is closely related to polyethylene failure. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of malrotation of tibial component for the stress on tibial insert during high flexion using a finite element analysis. We used Stryker NRG PS for analysis. Three different initial conditions of tibial component including normal, 15° internal malrotation, and 15° external malrotation were analyzed. The tibial insert made from ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene was assumed to be elastic-plastic while femoral and tibial metal components were assumed to be rigid. Four nonlinear springs attached to tibial component represented soft tissues around the knee. Vertical load was applied to femoral component which rotated from 0° to 135° while horizontal load along the anterior posterior axis was applied to tibial component during flexion. Maximum equivalent stresses on the surface were analyzed. Internal malrotation caused the highest stress which arose up to 160% of normal position. External malrotation also caused higher stress. Implanting prosthesis in correct position is important for reducing the risk of abnormal wear and failure. PMID:24895658

  5. Hemalin, a thrombin inhibitor isolated from a midgut cDNA library from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Min; Zhou, Jinlin; Gong, Haiyan; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Shirafuji, Rika; Battur, Banzragch; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2009-02-01

    A full-length sequence of a thrombin inhibitor (designated as hemalin) from the midgut of parthenogenetic Haemaphysalis longicornis has been identified. Sequence analysis shows that this gene belongs to the Kunitz-type family, containing two Kunitz domains with high homology to boophilin, the thrombin inhibitor from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The recombinant protein expressed in insect cells delayed bovine plasma clotting time and inhibited both thrombin-induced fibrinogen clotting and platelet aggregation. A 20-kDa protein was detected from the midgut lysate with antiserum against recombinant hemalin. The gene is expressed at all stages of the tick except for the egg stage, and hemalin mRNA mainly in the midgut of the female adult tick. Real-time PCR analysis shows that this gene has a distinctly high expression level in the rapid bloodsucking period of the larvae, nymphs, and adults. Disruption of the hemalin gene by RNA interference led to a 2-day extension of the tick blood feeding period, and 27.7% of the RNA-treated ticks did not successfully complete the blood feeding. These findings indicate that the newly identified thrombin inhibitor from the midgut of H. longicornis might play an important role in tick blood feeding.

  6. Imidacloprid impairs the post-embryonic development of the midgut in the yellow fever mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, K M; Gonzaga, W G; Pascini, T V; Miranda, F R; Tomé, H V V; Serrão, J E; Martins, G F

    2015-09-01

    The mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae) is a vector for the dengue and yellow fever viruses. As blood digestion occurs in the midgut, this organ constitutes the route of entry of many pathogens. The effects of the insecticide imidacloprid on the survival of St. aegypti were investigated and the sub-lethal effects of the insecticide on midgut development were determined. Third instar larvae were exposed to different concentrations of imidacloprid (0.15, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0 and 15.0 p.p.m.) and survival was monitored every 24 h for 10 days. Midguts from imidacloprid-treated insects at different stages of development were dissected and processed for analyses by transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assays. Imidacloprid concentrations of 3.0 and 15.0 p.p.m. were found to affect midgut development similarly. Digestive cells of the fourth instar larvae (L4) midgut exposed to imidacloprid had more multilamellar bodies, abundantly found in the cell apex, and more electron-lucent vacuoles in the basal region compared with those from untreated insects. Moreover, imidacloprid interfered with the differentiation of regenerative cells, dramatically reducing the number of digestive and endocrine cells and leading to malformation of the midgut epithelium in adults. The data demonstrate that imidacloprid can reduce the survival of mosquitoes and thus indicate its potentially high efficacy in the control of St. aegypti populations.

  7. Female-specific specialization of a posterior end region of the midgut symbiotic organ in Plautia splendens and allied stinkbugs.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshinari; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Meng, Xian-Ying; Koga, Ryuichi; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-04-01

    Many stinkbugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera) are associated with bacterial symbionts in a posterior region of the midgut. In these stinkbugs, adult females excrete symbiont-containing materials from the anus for transmission of the beneficial symbionts to their offspring. For ensuring the vertical symbiont transmission, a variety of female-specific elaborate traits at the cellular, morphological, developmental, and behavioral levels have been reported from diverse stinkbugs of the families Plataspidae, Urostylididae, Parastrachiidae, etc. Meanwhile, such elaborate female-specific traits for vertical symbiont transmission have been poorly characterized for the largest and economically important stinkbug family Pentatomidae. Here, we investigated the midgut symbiotic system of a pentatomid stinkbug, Plautia splendens. A specific gammaproteobacterial symbiont was consistently present extracellularly in the cavity of numerous crypts arranged in four rows on the midgut fourth section. The symbiont was smeared on the egg surface upon oviposition by adult females, orally acquired by newborn nymphs, and thereby transmitted vertically to the next generation and important for growth and survival of the host insects. We found that, specifically in adult females, several rows of crypts at the posterior end region of the symbiotic midgut were morphologically differentiated and conspicuously enlarged, often discharging the symbiotic bacteria from the crypt cavity to the main tract of the symbiotic midgut. The female-specific enlarged end crypts were also found in other pentatomid stinkbugs Plautia stali and Carbula crassiventris. These results suggest that the enlarged end crypts represent a female-specific specialized morphological trait for vertical symbiont transmission commonly found among stinkbugs of the family Pentatomidae.

  8. Female-Specific Specialization of a Posterior End Region of the Midgut Symbiotic Organ in Plautia splendens and Allied Stinkbugs

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Toshinari; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Meng, Xian-Ying; Koga, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Many stinkbugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera) are associated with bacterial symbionts in a posterior region of the midgut. In these stinkbugs, adult females excrete symbiont-containing materials from the anus for transmission of the beneficial symbionts to their offspring. For ensuring the vertical symbiont transmission, a variety of female-specific elaborate traits at the cellular, morphological, developmental, and behavioral levels have been reported from diverse stinkbugs of the families Plataspidae, Urostylididae, Parastrachiidae, etc. Meanwhile, such elaborate female-specific traits for vertical symbiont transmission have been poorly characterized for the largest and economically important stinkbug family Pentatomidae. Here, we investigated the midgut symbiotic system of a pentatomid stinkbug, Plautia splendens. A specific gammaproteobacterial symbiont was consistently present extracellularly in the cavity of numerous crypts arranged in four rows on the midgut fourth section. The symbiont was smeared on the egg surface upon oviposition by adult females, orally acquired by newborn nymphs, and thereby transmitted vertically to the next generation and important for growth and survival of the host insects. We found that, specifically in adult females, several rows of crypts at the posterior end region of the symbiotic midgut were morphologically differentiated and conspicuously enlarged, often discharging the symbiotic bacteria from the crypt cavity to the main tract of the symbiotic midgut. The female-specific enlarged end crypts were also found in other pentatomid stinkbugs Plautia stali and Carbula crassiventris. These results suggest that the enlarged end crypts represent a female-specific specialized morphological trait for vertical symbiont transmission commonly found among stinkbugs of the family Pentatomidae. PMID:25636847

  9. Midgut Microbiota of the Malaria Mosquito Vector Anopheles gambiae and Interactions with Plasmodium falciparum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Boissière, Anne; Tchioffo, Majoline T.; Bachar, Dipankar; Abate, Luc; Marie, Alexandra; Nsango, Sandrine E.; Shahbazkia, Hamid R.; Awono-Ambene, Parfait H.; Levashina, Elena A.; Christen, Richard; Morlais, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The susceptibility of Anopheles mosquitoes to Plasmodium infections relies on complex interactions between the insect vector and the malaria parasite. A number of studies have shown that the mosquito innate immune responses play an important role in controlling the malaria infection and that the strength of parasite clearance is under genetic control, but little is known about the influence of environmental factors on the transmission success. We present here evidence that the composition of the vector gut microbiota is one of the major components that determine the outcome of mosquito infections. A. gambiae mosquitoes collected in natural breeding sites from Cameroon were experimentally challenged with a wild P. falciparum isolate, and their gut bacterial content was submitted for pyrosequencing analysis. The meta-taxogenomic approach revealed a broader richness of the midgut bacterial flora than previously described. Unexpectedly, the majority of bacterial species were found in only a small proportion of mosquitoes, and only 20 genera were shared by 80% of individuals. We show that observed differences in gut bacterial flora of adult mosquitoes is a result of breeding in distinct sites, suggesting that the native aquatic source where larvae were grown determines the composition of the midgut microbiota. Importantly, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae in the mosquito midgut correlates significantly with the Plasmodium infection status. This striking relationship highlights the role of natural gut environment in parasite transmission. Deciphering microbe-pathogen interactions offers new perspectives to control disease transmission. PMID:22693451

  10. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against midgut of ixodid tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Mie; Kodama, Michi; Yanase, Haruko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Mulenga, Albert; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Onuma, Misao

    2003-08-14

    There are concerted efforts toward development of tick vaccines to replace current chemical control strategies that have serious limitations [Parasitologia 32 (1990) 145; Infectious Disease Clinics of North America (1999) 209-226]. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to Haemaphysalis longicornis midgut proteins were produced and characterized. Eight antibody-secreting hybridomas were cloned and the mAbs typed as IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b. On immunoblots, all mAbs reacted with a midgut protein band of about 76 kDa. All mAbs uniformly immunogold-stained the surface or epithelial layers of H. longicornis midgut and endosomes. Adult ticks (50%) that fed on an ascitic mouse producing the IgGs developed a red coloration and did not oviposit. As such, the 76 kDa protein that reacted with the mAbs could, therefore, be a potential candidate for tick vaccine development.

  11. Dynamics of Midgut Microflora and Dengue Virus Impact on Life History Traits in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Casey L.; Sharma, Avinash; Shouche, Yogesh; Severson, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Significant morbidity and potential mortality following dengue virus infection is a re-emerging global health problem. Due to the limited effectiveness of current disease control methods, mosquito biologists have been searching for new methods of controlling dengue transmission. While much effort has concentrated on determining genetic aspects to vector competence, paratransgenetic approaches could also uncover novel vector control strategies. The interactions of mosquito midgut microflora and pathogens may play significant roles in vector biology. However, little work has been done to see how the microbiome influences the host's fitness and ultimately vector competence. Here we investigated the effects of the midgut microbial environment and dengue infection on several fitness characteristics among three strains of the primary dengue virus vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. This included comparisons of dengue infection rates of females with and without their normal midgut flora. According to our findings, few effects on fitness characteristics were evident following microbial clearance or with dengue virus infection. Adult survivorship significantly varied due to strain and in one strain varied due to antibiotic treatment. Fecundity varied in one strain due to microbial clearance by antibiotics but no variation was observed in fertility due to either treatment. We show here that fitness characteristics of Ae. aegypti vary largely between strains, including varying response to microflora presence or absence, but did not vary in response to dengue virus infection. PMID:25193134

  12. Intraoperative cone-beam CT for correction of periaxial malrotation of the femoral shaft: A surface-matching approach

    SciTech Connect

    Khoury, Amal; Whyne, Cari M.; Daly, Michael; Moseley, Douglas; Bootsma, Greg; Skrinskas, Tomas; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Jaffray, David

    2007-04-15

    Limb length, alignment and rotation can be difficult to determine in femoral shaft fractures. Shaft axis rotation is particularly difficult to assess intraoperatively. Femoral malpositioning can cause deformity, pain and secondary degenerative joint damage. The aim of this study is to develop an intraoperative method based on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to guide alignment of femoral shaft fractures. We hypothesize that bone surface matching can predict malrotation even with severe comminution. A cadaveric femur was imaged at 16 femoral periaxial malrotations (-51.2 deg. to 60.1 deg.). The images were processed resulting in an unwrapped bone surface plot consisting of a pattern of ridges and valleys. Fracture gaps were simulated by removing midline CT slices. The gaps were reconstituted by extrapolating the existing proximal and distal fragments to the midline of the fracture. The two bone surfaces were then shifted to align bony features. Periaxial malrotation was accurately assessed using surface matching (r{sup 2}=0.99, slope 1.0). The largest mean error was 2.20 deg. and the average difference between repeated measurements was 0.49 deg. CBCT can provide intraoperative high-resolution images with a large field of view. This quality of imaging enables surface matching algorithms to be utilized even with large areas of comminution.

  13. Chitin is a component of the Rhodnius prolixus midgut.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Evelyn S L; Mansur, Juliana F; Justi, Silvia A; Figueira-Mansur, Janaina; Dos Santos, Vivian M; Lopez, Sheila G; Masuda, Hatisaburo; Lara, Flavio A; Melo, Ana C A; Moreira, Monica F

    2016-02-01

    Chitin is an essential component of the peritrophic matrix (PM), which is a structure that lines the insect's gut and protects against mechanical damage and pathogens. Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) does not have a PM, but it has an analogous structure, the perimicrovillar membrane (PMM); chitin has not been described in this structure. Here, we show that chitin is present in the R. prolixus midgut using several techniques. The FTIR spectrum of the KOH-resistant putative chitin-material extracted from the midgut bolus showed peaks characteristic of the chitin molecule at 3500, 1675 and 1085 cm(1). Both the midgut bolus material and the standard chitin NMR spectra showed a peak at 1.88 ppm, which is certainly due to methyl protons in the acetamide a group. The percentages of radioactive N-acetylglucosamine (CPM) incorporated were 2 and 4% for the entire intestine and bolus, respectively. The KOH-resistant putative chitin-material was also extracted and purified from the N-acetylglucosamine radioactive bolus, and the radioactivity was estimated through liquid scintillation. The intestinal CHS cDNA translated sequence was the same as previously described for the R. prolixus cuticle and ovaries. Phenotypic alterations were observed in the midgut of females with a silenced CHS gene after a blood meal, such as retarded blood meal digestion; the presence of fresh blood that remained red nine days after the blood meal; and reduced trachea and hemozoin content compared with the control. Wheat germ agglutinin (a specific probe that detects chitin) labeling proximal to the intestine (crop and midgut) was much lower in females with a silenced CHS gene, especially in the midgut region, where almost no fluorescence signal was detected compared with the control groups. Midguts from females with a CHS gene silenced by dsRNA-CHS and control midguts pre-treated with chitinase showed that the chitin-derived fluorescence signal decreased in the region around the epithelium

  14. Update on management of midgut neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mehrvarz Sarshekeh, Amir; Halperin, Daniel M; Dasari, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Midgut neuroendocrine tumors are typically indolent but can be fatal when advanced. They can also cause significant morbidity due to the characteristic carcinoid syndrome. Somatostatin analogs continue to be the mainstay of treatment given their antiproliferative properties, as well as inhibitory effects on hormones that cause carcinoid syndrome. There have been several recent advances in the systemic therapy of these tumors including consolidation of somatostatin analogs as the cornerstone of therapy, completion of pivotal trials with mTOR inhibitors, and the establishment of novel approaches including peptide receptor radionuclide therapy and oral inhibitors of peripheral tryptophan hydroxylase in tumor and symptom control, respectively. In this review article, the recent advances are summarized and an updated approach to management is proposed. PMID:27347369

  15. Effect of component mal-rotation on knee loading in total knee arthroplasty using multi-body dynamics modeling under a simulated walking gait.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenxian; Wang, Ling; Liu, Yaxiong; He, Jiankang; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-09-01

    Mal-rotation of the components in total knee arthorplasty (TKA) is a major cause of postoperative complications, with an increased propensity for implant loosening or wear leading to revision. A musculoskeletal multi-body dynamics model was used to perform a parametric study of the effects of the rotational mal-alignments in TKA on the knee loading under a simulated walking gait. The knee contact forces were found to be more sensitive to variations in the varus-valgus rotation of both the tibial and the femoral components and the internal-external rotation of the femoral component in TKA. The varus-valgus mal-rotation of the tibial or femoral component and the internal-external mal-rotation of the femoral component with a 5° variation were found to affect the peak medial contact force by 17.8-53.1%, the peak lateral contact force by 35.0-88.4% and the peak total contact force by 5.2-18.7%. Our findings support the clinical observations that a greater than 3° internal mal-rotation of the femoral component may lead to unsatisfactory pain levels and a greater than 3° varus mal-rotation of the tibial component may lead to medial bone collapse. These findings determined the quantitative effects of the mal-rotation of the components in TKA on the contact load. The effect of such mal-rotation of the components of TKA on the kinematics would be further addressed in future studies.

  16. Injury-stimulated and self-restrained BMP signaling dynamically regulates stem cell pool size during Drosophila midgut regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tian, Aiguo; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2017-03-13

    Many adult organs rely on resident stem cells to maintain homeostasis. Upon injury, stem cells increase proliferation, followed by lineage differentiation to replenish damaged cells. Whether stem cells also change division mode to transiently increase their population size as part of a regenerative program and, if so, what the underlying mechanism is have remained largely unexplored. Here we show that injury stimulates the production of two bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) ligands, Dpp and Gbb, which drive an expansion of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) by promoting their symmetric self-renewing division in Drosophila adult midgut. We find that BMP production in enterocytes is inhibited by BMP signaling itself, and that BMP autoinhibition is required for resetting ISC pool size to the homeostatic level after tissue repair. Our study suggests that dynamic BMP signaling controls ISC population size during midgut regeneration and reveals mechanisms that precisely control stem cell number in response to tissue needs.

  17. The development of malaria parasites in the mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Bennink, Sandra; Kiesow, Meike J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The mosquito midgut stages of malaria parasites are crucial for establishing an infection in the insect vector and to thus ensure further spread of the pathogen. Parasite development in the midgut starts with the activation of the intraerythrocytic gametocytes immediately after take‐up and ends with traversal of the midgut epithelium by the invasive ookinetes less than 24 h later. During this time period, the plasmodia undergo two processes of stage conversion, from gametocytes to gametes and from zygotes to ookinetes, both accompanied by dramatic morphological changes. Further, gamete formation requires parasite egress from the enveloping erythrocytes, rendering them vulnerable to the aggressive factors of the insect gut, like components of the human blood meal. The mosquito midgut stages of malaria parasites are unprecedented objects to study a variety of cell biological aspects, including signal perception, cell conversion, parasite/host co‐adaptation and immune evasion. This review highlights recent insights into the molecules involved in gametocyte activation and gamete formation as well as in zygote‐to‐ookinete conversion and ookinete midgut exit; it further discusses factors that can harm the extracellular midgut stages as well as the measures of the parasites to protect themselves from any damage. PMID:27111866

  18. Painful knee prosthesis: CT scan to assess patellar angle and implant malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Spinarelli, Antonio; Pesce, Vito; Campagna, Caterina; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Moretti, Biagio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background According to literature, the incidence of pain in knee prostheses is on the increase. In the last decade Authors have focused attention on rotational alignment of the prosthetic components. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of a new angle, which we define as patellar angle, in order to achieve early diagnosis of malrotation. Methods We set up a retrospective observational study recruiting 100 subjects who had undergone total knee prosthesis. 50 subjects suffered from knee anterior pain and 50 without any symptoms. Through CAT scan and VITREA software®, we were able to study the rotation of prosthetic components. We defined a new angle, which links the tibial component and the patella margins. The angles were measured by two different orthopaedic surgeons blinded to the study. Results The patella angle ranged from 10 to 28°, with an average value of 23.2° in the control group; in the study group the angle ranged from 26 to 34°, with an average value of 29.9°. Conclusion Our data supported the reproducibility and efficacy of new angular value. It would represent a new method to detect tibial rotational malalignment. Level of evidence IV. PMID:28217567

  19. Biomechanical effects of total knee arthroplasty component malrotation: a computational simulation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Julie A; Hast, Michael W; Granger, Jeffrey F; Piazza, Stephen J; Siston, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    Modern total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an effective procedure to treat pain and disability due to osteoarthritis, but some patients experience quadriceps weakness after surgery and have difficulty performing important activities of daily living. The success of TKA depends on many factors, but malalignment of the prosthetic components is a major cause of postoperative complications. Significant variability is associated with femoral and tibial component rotational alignment, but how this variability translates into functional outcome remains unknown. We used a forward-dynamic computer model of a simulated squatting motion to perform a parametric study of the effects of variations in component rotational alignment in TKA. A cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized version of the same TKA implant were compared. We found that femoral rotation had a greater effect on quadriceps forces, collateral ligament forces, and varus/valgus kinematics, while tibial rotation had a greater effect on anteroposterior translations. Our findings support the tendency for orthopedic surgeons to bias the femoral component into external rotation and avoid malrotation of the tibial component.

  20. Plasmodium ookinetes coopt mammalian plasminogen to invade the mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anil K.; Coppens, Isabelle; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Ploug, Michael; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Ookinete invasion of the mosquito midgut is an essential step for the development of the malaria parasite in the mosquito. Invasion involves recognition between a presumed mosquito midgut receptor and an ookinete ligand. Here, we show that enolase lines the ookinete surface. An antienolase antibody inhibits oocyst development of both Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium falciparum, suggesting that enolase may act as an invasion ligand. Importantly, we demonstrate that surface enolase captures plasminogen from the mammalian blood meal via its lysine motif (DKSLVK) and that this interaction is essential for midgut invasion, because plasminogen depletion leads to a strong inhibition of oocyst formation. Although addition of recombinant WT plasminogen to depleted serum rescues oocyst formation, recombinant inactive plasminogen does not, thus emphasizing the importance of plasmin proteolytic activity for ookinete invasion. The results support the hypothesis that enolase on the surface of Plasmodium ookinetes plays a dual role in midgut invasion: by acting as a ligand that interacts with the midgut epithelium and, further, by capturing plasminogen, whose conversion to active plasmin promotes the invasion process. PMID:21949403

  1. Laminin and the malaria parasite's journey through the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Romanico B G; Lycett, Gareth; Mahairaki, Vassiliki; Siden-Kiamos, Inga; Louis, Christos

    2005-07-01

    During the invasion of the mosquito midgut epithelium, Plasmodium ookinetes come to rest on the basal lamina, where they transform into the sporozoite-producing oocysts. Laminin, one of the basal lamina's major components, has previously been shown to bind several surface proteins of Plasmodium ookinetes. Here, using the recently developed RNAi technique in mosquitoes, we used a specific dsRNA construct targeted against the LANB2 gene (laminin gamma1) of Anopheles gambiae to reduce its mRNA levels, leading to a substantial reduction in the number of successfully developed oocysts in the mosquito midgut. Moreover, this molecular relationship is corroborated by the intimate association of developing P. berghei parasites and laminin in the gut, as observed using confocal microscopy. Our data support the notion of laminin playing a functional role in the development of the malaria parasite within the mosquito midgut.

  2. Schinus terebinthifolius Leaf Extract Causes Midgut Damage, Interfering with Survival and Development of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Procópio, Thamara Figueiredo; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Oliveira, Aline Rafaella Cardoso; Souza, Carolina de Santana; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a leaf extract from Schinus terebinthifolius was evaluated for effects on survival, development, and midgut of A. aegypti fourth instar larvae (L4), as well as for toxic effect on Artemia salina. Leaf extract was obtained using 0.15 M NaCl and evaluated for phytochemical composition and lectin activity. Early L4 larvae were incubated with the extract (0.3–1.35%, w/v) for 8 days, in presence or absence of food. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, hydrolysable tannins, heterosid and aglycone flavonoids, cinnamic acid derivatives, traces of steroids, and lectin activity were detected in the extract, which killed the larvae at an LC50 of 0.62% (unfed larvae) and 1.03% (fed larvae). Further, the larvae incubated with the extract reacted by eliminating the gut content. No larvae reached the pupal stage in treatments at concentrations between 0.5% and 1.35%, while in the control (fed larvae), 61.7% of individuals emerged as adults. The extract (1.0%) promoted intense disorganization of larval midgut epithelium, including deformation and hypertrophy of cells, disruption of microvilli, and vacuolization of cytoplasms, affecting digestive, enteroendocrine, regenerative, and proliferating cells. In addition, cells with fragmented DNA were observed. Separation of extract components by solid phase extraction revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids are involved in larvicidal effect of the extract, being the first most efficient in a short time after larvae treatment. The lectin present in the extract was isolated, but did not show deleterious effects on larvae. The extract and cinnamic acid derivatives were toxic to A. salina nauplii, while the flavonoids showed low toxicity. S. terebinthifolius leaf extract caused damage to the midgut of A. aegypti larvae, interfering with survival and development. The larvicidal effect of the extract can be attributed to cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. The data obtained using A. salina indicates that caution

  3. Damage-Induced Cell Regeneration in the Midgut of Aedes albopictus Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Janeh, Maria; Osman, Dani; Kambris, Zakaria

    2017-01-01

    Mosquito-transmitted diseases cause over one million deaths every year. A better characterization of the vector’s physiology and immunity should provide valuable knowledge for the elaboration of control strategies. Mosquitoes depend on their innate immunity to defend themselves against pathogens. These pathogens are acquired mainly through the oral route, which places the insects’ gut at the front line of the battle. Indeed, the epithelium of the mosquito gut plays important roles against invading pathogens acting as a physical barrier, activating local defenses and triggering the systemic immune response. Therefore, the gut is constantly confronted to stress and often suffers cellular damage. In this study, we show that dividing cells exist in the digestive tract of adult A. albopictus and that these cells proliferate in the midgut after bacterial or chemical damage. An increased transcription of signaling molecules that regulate the EGFR and JAK/STAT pathways was also observed, suggesting a possible involvement of these pathways in the regeneration of damaged guts. This work provides evidence for the presence of regenerative cells in the mosquito guts, and paves the way towards a molecular and cellular characterization of the processes required to maintain mosquito’s midgut homeostasis in both normal and infectious conditions. PMID:28300181

  4. Mitochondria in the midgut epithelial cells of sugarcane borer parasitized by Cotesia flavipes (Cameron, 1891).

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, D O; Silva, M D; Gregório, E A

    2010-02-01

    The sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) has been controlled by Cotesia flavipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae); however, very little is known about the effect of the parasitism in the host organs, including the midgut. This work aims to verify mitochondrial alteration in the different midgut epithelial cells of D. saccharalis parasitized by C. flavipes. Midgut fragments (anterior and posterior region) of both non-parasitized and parasitized larvae were processed for transmission electron microscopy. The mitochondria of midgut epithelial cell in the parasitized larvae exhibit morphological alteration, represented by matrix rarefaction and vacuolisation. These mitochondrial alterations are more pronounced in the anterior midgut region during the parasitism process, mainly in the columnar cell.

  5. Role of cathepsins D in the midgut of Dysdercus peruvianus.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, André C; Fuzita, Felipe J; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Ferreira, Clélia; Terra, Walter R

    2017-02-01

    Hemipteran ancestors probably lost their digestive serine peptidases on adapting to a plant sap diet. On returning to protein ingestion, these insects start using cathepsin (lysosomal) peptidases as digestive enzymes, from which the less known is cathepsin D. Nine of the ten cathepsin D transcribing genes found in Dysdercus peruvianus midgut are expressed exclusively in this tissue and only DpCatD10 is also expressed in other tissues. The main action of cathepsins D is in the first (V1) (from three, V1-3) midgut regions, where 40% of the total proteolytic activity was assigned to aspartic peptidases with an optimum pH of 3.5. The most expressed cathepsins D were identified in the midgut luminal contents by proteomics. The data indicate that D. peruvianus have kept a lysosomal gene expressed in all tissues and evolved another set of genes with a digestive function restricted to midgut. Digestive cathepsins D apparently complement the action of digestive cathepsin L and they are arguably responsible for the hydrolysis of cysteine peptidase inhibitors known to be present in the cotton seeds eaten by the insect, before they meet cathepsin L.

  6. A regulatory network controls nephrocan expression and midgut patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Juan; Wei, Wei; Saund, Ranajeet S.; Xiang, Ping; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Yi, Yuyin; Alder, Olivia; Lu, Daphne Y. D.; Savory, Joanne G. A.; Krentz, Nicole A. J.; Montpetit, Rachel; Cullum, Rebecca; Hofs, Nicole; Lohnes, David; Humphries, R. Keith; Yamanaka, Yojiro; Duester, Gregg; Saijoh, Yukio; Hoodless, Pamela A.

    2014-01-01

    Although many regulatory networks involved in defining definitive endoderm have been identified, the mechanisms through which these networks interact to pattern the endoderm are less well understood. To explore the mechanisms involved in midgut patterning, we dissected the transcriptional regulatory elements of nephrocan (Nepn), the earliest known midgut specific gene in mice. We observed that Nepn expression is dramatically reduced in Sox17−/− and Raldh2−/− embryos compared with wild-type embryos. We further show that Nepn is directly regulated by Sox17 and the retinoic acid (RA) receptor via two enhancer elements located upstream of the gene. Moreover, Nepn expression is modulated by Activin signaling, with high levels inhibiting and low levels enhancing RA-dependent expression. In Foxh1−/− embryos in which Nodal signaling is reduced, the Nepn expression domain is expanded into the anterior gut region, confirming that Nodal signaling can modulate its expression in vivo. Together, Sox17 is required for Nepn expression in the definitive endoderm, while RA signaling restricts expression to the midgut region. A balance of Nodal/Activin signaling regulates the anterior boundary of the midgut expression domain. PMID:25209250

  7. Midgut microbiota and host immunocompetence underlie Bacillus thuringiensis killing mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Caccia, Silvia; Di Lelio, Ilaria; La Storia, Antonietta; Marinelli, Adriana; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Banyuls, Núria; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan; Gigliotti, Silvia; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used bacterial entomopathogen producing insecticidal toxins, some of which are expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops. Surprisingly, the killing mechanism of B. thuringiensis remains controversial. In particular, the importance of the septicemia induced by the host midgut microbiota is still debated as a result of the lack of experimental evidence obtained without drastic manipulation of the midgut and its content. Here this key issue is addressed by RNAi-mediated silencing of an immune gene in a lepidopteran host Spodoptera littoralis, leaving the midgut microbiota unaltered. The resulting cellular immunosuppression was characterized by a reduced nodulation response, which was associated with a significant enhancement of host larvae mortality triggered by B. thuringiensis and a Cry toxin. This was determined by an uncontrolled proliferation of midgut bacteria, after entering the body cavity through toxin-induced epithelial lesions. Consequently, the hemolymphatic microbiota dramatically changed upon treatment with Cry1Ca toxin, showing a remarkable predominance of Serratia and Clostridium species, which switched from asymptomatic gut symbionts to hemocoelic pathogens. These experimental results demonstrate the important contribution of host enteric flora in B. thuringiensis-killing activity and provide a sound foundation for developing new insect control strategies aimed at enhancing the impact of biocontrol agents by reducing the immunocompetence of the host. PMID:27506800

  8. Midgut microbiota and host immunocompetence underlie Bacillus thuringiensis killing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Di Lelio, Ilaria; La Storia, Antonietta; Marinelli, Adriana; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Banyuls, Núria; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan; Gigliotti, Silvia; Ercolini, Danilo; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2016-08-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used bacterial entomopathogen producing insecticidal toxins, some of which are expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops. Surprisingly, the killing mechanism of B. thuringiensis remains controversial. In particular, the importance of the septicemia induced by the host midgut microbiota is still debated as a result of the lack of experimental evidence obtained without drastic manipulation of the midgut and its content. Here this key issue is addressed by RNAi-mediated silencing of an immune gene in a lepidopteran host Spodoptera littoralis, leaving the midgut microbiota unaltered. The resulting cellular immunosuppression was characterized by a reduced nodulation response, which was associated with a significant enhancement of host larvae mortality triggered by B. thuringiensis and a Cry toxin. This was determined by an uncontrolled proliferation of midgut bacteria, after entering the body cavity through toxin-induced epithelial lesions. Consequently, the hemolymphatic microbiota dramatically changed upon treatment with Cry1Ca toxin, showing a remarkable predominance of Serratia and Clostridium species, which switched from asymptomatic gut symbionts to hemocoelic pathogens. These experimental results demonstrate the important contribution of host enteric flora in B. thuringiensis-killing activity and provide a sound foundation for developing new insect control strategies aimed at enhancing the impact of biocontrol agents by reducing the immunocompetence of the host.

  9. Mamestra configurata nucleopolyhedrovirus-A transcriptome from infected host midgut.

    PubMed

    Donly, B Cameron; Theilmann, David A; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Baldwin, Douglas; Erlandson, Martin A

    2014-02-01

    Infection of an insect by a baculovirus occurs in two distinct phases, an initial infection of host midgut by occlusion-derived virions (ODVs) and subsequent systemic infection of other tissues by budded virions (BV). A vast majority of investigations of the infection process have been restricted to cell culture studies using BV that emulate the systemic phase of infection. This is one of the first studies to investigate baculovirus gene expression in ODV infected midgut cells. We have focused on the critical first phase of in vivo infection by Mamestra configurata nucleopolyhedrovirus-A in M. configurata larvae, using qPCR and RNAseq mass sequencing to measure virus gene expression in midgut cells. The earliest genes detected by each method had significant overlap, including known early genes as well as genes unique to MacoNPV-A and genes of unknown function. The RNAseq data also revealed a large range of expression levels across all ORFs, which could not be measured using qPCR. This dataset provides a first whole genome transcriptomic analysis of viral genes required for virus infection in vivo and will provide the basis for functionally analyzing specific genes that may be critical elements in baculovirus midgut infectivity and host range.

  10. Anopheles gambiae collagen IV genes: cloning, phylogeny and midgut expression associated with blood feeding and Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Gare, D C; Piertney, S B; Billingsley, P F

    2003-07-01

    A prerequisite for understanding the role that mosquito midgut extracellular matrix molecules play in malaria parasite development is proper isolation and characterisation of the genes coding for components of the basal lamina. Here we have identified genes coding for alpha1 and alpha2 chains of collagen IV from the major malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. Conserved sequences in the terminal NC1 domain were used to obtain partial gene sequences of this functional region, and full sequence was isolated from a pupal cDNA library. In a DNA-derived phylogeny, the alpha1 and alpha2 chains cluster with dipteran orthologs, and the alpha2 is ancestral. The expression of collagen alpha1(IV) peaked during the pupal stage of mosquito development, and was expressed continuously in the adult female following a blood meal with a further rise detected in older mosquitoes. Collagen alpha1(IV) is also upregulated when the early oocyst of Plasmodium yoelii was developing within the mosquito midgut and may contribute to a larger wound healing response. A model describing the expression of basal lamina proteins during oocyst development is presented, and we hypothesise that the development of new basal lamina between the oocyst and midgut epithelium is akin to a wound healing process.

  11. Midgut Microbial Community of Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquito Populations from India

    PubMed Central

    Chandel, Kshitij; Mendki, Murlidhar J.; Parikh, Rasesh Y.; Kulkarni, Girish; Tikar, Sachin N.; Sukumaran, Devanathan; Prakash, Shri; Parashar, Brahma D.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Veer, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus is a ubiquitous species that serves as a major vector for west nile virus and lymphatic filariasis. Ingestion of bloodmeal by females triggers a series of physiological processes in the midgut and also exposes them to infection by these pathogens. The bacteria normally harbored in the midgut are known to influence physiology and can also alter the response to various pathogens. The midgut bacteria in female Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes collected over a large geographical area from India was studied. Examination of 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons from culturable microflora revealed the presence of 83 bacterial species belonging to 31 bacterial genera. All of these species belong to three phyla i.e. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Phylum Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum (37 species), followed by Firmicutes (33 species) and Actinobacteria (13 species). Phylum Proteobacteria, was dominated by members of γ-proteobacteria class. The genus Staphylococcus was the largest genus represented by 11 species whereas Enterobacter was the most prevalent genus and recovered from all the field stations except Leh. Highest bacterial prevalence was observed from Bhuj (22 species) followed by Nagrota (18 species), Masimpur (18 species) and Hathigarh (16 species). Whereas, least species were observed from Leh (8 species). It has been observed that individual mosquito harbor extremely diverse gut bacteria and have very small overlap bacterial taxa in their gut. This variation in midgut microbiota may be one of the factors responsible for variation in disease transmission rates or vector competence within mosquito population. The present data strongly encourage further investigations to verify the potential role of the detected bacteria in mosquito for the transmission of lymphatic filariasis and west nile virus. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study on midgut microbiota of wild Cx. quinquefasciatus from over a

  12. Left-sided appendicitis in children with congenital gastrointestinal malrotation: a diagnostic pitfall in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Taslakian, Bedros; Issa, Ghada; Hourani, Roula; Akel, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common conditions requiring emergency surgery. However, acute appendicitis presenting with left lower quadrant abdominal pain is extremely rare. Imaging, particularly CT , plays an important role in establishing an accurate and prompt diagnosis, as delay in diagnosis may occur due to lack of uniformity in the clinical signs and symptoms. We report a rare case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with persistent left lower quadrant pain of several days duration, in which the CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was essential in establishing the correct diagnosis. The malpositioned inflamed appendix was clearly identified in the left side of the abdomen, with the characteristic CT findings of uncomplicated intestinal malrotation. Left-sided acute appendicitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of young patients presenting with left lower quadrant pain, in order to avoid delay in diagnosis and guide the surgical intervention. PMID:23761499

  13. A rare case of perforation of the subhepatic appendix by a toothpick in a patient with intestinal malrotation: laparoscopic approach

    PubMed Central

    GRASSI, V.; DESIDERIO, J.; CACURRI, A.; GEMINI, A.; RENZI, C.; CORSI, A.; BARILLARO, I.; PARISI, A.

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion is not an uncommon problem in clinical practice. While most ingested foreign bodies pass uneventfully through the gastrointestinal tract, sharp foreign bodies such as toothpicks should cause intestinal perforation. We reported the case of a perforation of the appendix caused by a toothpick, which also pierced the liver without hepatic damages, in a male with an intestinal malrotation and subhepatic appendix. The patient was admitted to our hospital for abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed the anomalous position of the first portion of the large intestine with inflamed appendix. A laparoscopic appendicectomy and the exploration of the abdominal cavity was performed using minimally invasive technique. PMID:27938532

  14. Side Effects of Neem Oil on the Midgut Endocrine Cells of the Green Lacewing Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, E L; Santos, D C

    2014-04-01

    We described the ultrastructure of Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás) midgut endocrine cells in larva, pupa, and adult, and evaluated the side effects of ingested neem oil, a botanical insecticide obtained from the seeds of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica), on these cells. During the larval period, C. claveri were fed (ad libitum) Diatraea saccharalis (F.) eggs treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1%, or 2%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that two subtypes of endocrine cells, namely granular and vesicular, occurred in the midgut epithelium during the three stages of the life cycle. Both cell types did not reach the midgut lumen and were positioned basally in the epithelium. The endocrine cells did not show extensive infoldings of the basal plasma membrane, and there were numerous secretory granules in the basal region of the cytoplasm. In the granular endocrine cells, the granules were completely filled with a dense matrix. In the vesicular endocrine cells, the main secretory products consisted of haloed vesicles. Ultrastructural examination indicated that only the granular endocrine cells exhibited signs of morphologic changes of cell injury present in all life cycle stages after the larvae were chronically exposed to neem oil by ingestion. The major cellular damage consisted of dilatation and vesiculation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial swelling. Our data suggest that cytotoxic effects on midgut endocrine cells can contribute to a generalized disruption of the physiological processes in this organ due to a general alteration of endocrine function.

  15. Heme crystallization in the midgut of triatomine insects.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcus F; Gandara, Ana Caroline P; Braga, Cláudia M S; Silva, José R; Mury, Flavia B; Dansa-Petretski, Marílvia; Menezes, Diego; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2007-01-01

    Hemozoin (Hz) is a heme crystal produced by several blood-feeding organisms in order to detoxify free heme released upon hemoglobin (Hb) digestion. Here we show that heme crystallization also occurs in three species of triatomine insects. Ultraviolet-visible and infrared light absorption spectra of insoluble pigments isolated from the midgut of three triatomine species Triatoma infestans, Dipetalogaster maximus and Panstrongylus megistus indicated that all produce Hz. Morphological analysis of T. infestans and D. maximus midguts revealed the close association of Hz crystals to perimicrovillar membranes and also as multicrystalline assemblies, forming nearly spherical structures. Heme crystallization was promoted by isolated perimicrovillar membranes from all three species of triatomine bugs in vitro in heat-sensitive reactions. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that Hz formation is an ancestral adaptation of Triatominae to a blood-sucking habit and that the presence of perimicrovillar membranes plays a central role in this process.

  16. Differential expression of chemosensory-protein genes in midguts in response to diet of Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xin; Qi, Jiangwei; Zhou, Xiaofan; Hu, Mei Ying; Zhong, Guo Hua

    2017-03-22

    While it has been well characterized that chemosensory receptors in guts of mammals have great influence on food preference, much remains elusive in insects. Insect chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are soluble proteins that could deliver chemicals to olfactory and gustatory receptors. Recent studies have identified a number of CSPs expressed in midgut in Lepidoptera insects, which started to reveal their roles in chemical recognition and stimulating appetite in midgut. In this study, we examined expression patterns in midgut of 21 Spodoptera litura CSPs (SlitCSPs) characterized from a previously reported transcriptome, and three CSPs were identified to be expressed highly in midgut. The orthologous relationships between midgut expressed CSPs in S. litura and those in Bombyx mori and Plutella xylostella also suggest a conserved pattern of CSP expression in midgut. We further demonstrated that the expression of midgut-CSPs may change in response to different host plants, and SlitCSPs could bind typical chemicals from host plant in vitro. Overall, our results suggested midgut expressed SlitCSPs may have functional roles, likely contributing to specialization and adaption to different ecosystems. Better knowledge of this critical component of the chemsensation signaling pathways in midguts may improve our understanding of food preference processes in a new perspective.

  17. Response of the common cutworm Spodoptera litura to lead stress: changes in sex ratio, Pb accumulations, midgut cell ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yinghua; Zhou, Jialiang; Lu, Kai; Li, Keqing; Zhou, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    When cutworm Spodoptera litura larvae were fed on the diets with different lead (Pb) concentrations for one or five generations, changes in growth and food utilization were recorded; Pb accumulations were detected by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer; changes in midgut cell ultrastructure were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The effects of Pb stress on S. litura growth and food utilization differed significantly between insects of the 1st and 5th generation. The male-female rate of 200mgkg(-1) Pb treatment from the 1st generation and 50mgkg(-1) Pb treatment from the 5th generation was significantly higher than control. No significant difference of Pb accumulations was found in larvae, pupae and adults between the 1st and 5th generation. No significant difference of Pb accumulations in corresponding tissues of larvae was found between male and female. Compared to fat body, hemolymph, head, foregut and hindgut, the highest Pb accumulation was found in migut of larvae exposed to 200mgkg(-1) Pb. TEM showed that expanded intercellular spaces were observed in Pb-treated midgut cells. The nuclei were strongly destroyed by Pb stress, evidenced by chromatin condensation and destroyed nuclear envelope. Mitochondria became swollen with some broken cristae after exposure to Pb. Therefore, neither gender nor progeny difference was present in Pb accumulations of S. litura, although effects of Pb stress on S. litura growth and food utilization differed from different generations and genders. Pb accumulations in midgut caused pathological changes in cells ultrastructure, possibly reflected the growth and food utilization of S. litura.

  18. Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Wheat Germ Agglutinin and Starvation in Drosophila melanogaster Larval Midgut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One function of plant lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is to serve as defenses against herbivorous insects. The midgut is one critical site affected by dietary lectins. We observed marked cellular, structural, and gene expression changes in the midguts of Drosophila melanogaster third-i...

  19. Brugia malayi microfilariae transport alphaviruses across the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Jefferson A; Turell, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent ingestion of microfilariae (MF) and arboviruses by mosquitoes can enhance mosquito transmission of virus compared to when virus is ingested alone. Within hours of being ingested, MF penetrate the mosquito midgut and introduce virus into mosquito hemocoel, creating a disseminated viral infection much sooner than normal. How virus is actually introduced is not known. In this report, we present experimental evidence that suggests that certain alphaviruses may adhere or otherwise associate with sheathed Brugia malayi MF in the blood of a dually-infected host and that the virus is carried into the mosquito hemocoel by the MF during their penetration of the mosquito midgut. The mechanism of MF enhancement may be more complex than simple leakage of viremic blood into the hemocoel during MF penetration. The affinity of arboviruses to adhere to or otherwise associate with MF may depend on the specific combination of the virus and MF involved in a dual host infection. This in turn may determine the relative importance that MF enhancement has within an arbovirus transmission system.

  20. Brugia malayi microfilariae transport alphaviruses across the mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Turell, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent ingestion of microfilariae (MF) and arboviruses by mosquitoes can enhance mosquito transmission of virus compared to when virus is ingested alone. Within hours of being ingested, MF penetrate the mosquito midgut and introduce virus into mosquito hemocoel, creating a disseminated viral infection much sooner than normal. How virus is actually introduced is not known. In this report, we present experimental evidence that suggests that certain alphaviruses may adhere or otherwise associate with sheathed Brugia malayi MF in the blood of a dually-infected host and that the virus is carried into the mosquito hemocoel by the MF during their penetration of the mosquito midgut. The mechanism of MF enhancement may be more complex than simple leakage of viremic blood into the hemocoel during MF penetration. The affinity of arboviruses to adhere to or otherwise associate with MF may depend on the specific combination of the virus and MF involved in a dual host infection. This in turn may determine the relative importance that MF enhancement has within an arbovirus transmission system. PMID:28222120

  1. Morpho-functional characterization and esterase patterns of the midgut of Tribolium castaneum Herbst, 1797 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) parasitized by Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinidae).

    PubMed

    Gigliolli, Adriana A Sinópolis; Lapenta, Ana Silva; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, Maria Claudia Colla; Abrahão, Josielle; Conte, Hélio

    2015-09-01

    Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) is a common pest of stored grains and byproducts and is normally infected by Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinidae). The life cycle of this parasite includes the sporozoite, trophozoite, gamont, gametocyte, and oocyst stages, which occur between the epithelium and lumen of the host's midgut. This study aims to describe the morphofunctional alterations in the midgut and determine the esterase patterns in T. castaneum when parasitized by gregarines. To achieve this purpose, midguts of adult insects were isolated, processed, and analysed using light and electron microscopy. We determined total protein content, amylase activity, and the expression and related activities of the esterases by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The midgut of T. castaneum is formed by digestive, regenerative, and endocrine cells. The effects of parasitism on the digestive cells are severe, because the gregarines remain attached to these cells to absorb all the nutrients they need throughout their development. In these cells, the most common alterations observed include expansion and fragmentation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, development of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, changes in mitochondrial cristae, cytoplasmic vacuolization, formation of myelin structures, spherites, large intercellular spaces, autophagic vesicles, expansion of the basal labyrinth, and cytoplasmic protrusions. Deposits of glycogen granules were also observed. Amylase activity was reduced in parasitized insects. Regenerative cells were found in disorganized crypts and did not differentiate into new cells, thus, compromising the restoration of the damaged epithelium. Though few morphological alterations were observed in the endocrine cells, results suggest that the synthesis and/or release of hormones might be impaired. Nine esterases (EST-1 to 9) were identified in the midgut of T. castaneum and were expressed in varying levels in response

  2. Characterization of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium in the Midgut Epithelium of the Bulrush Bug Chilacis typhae (Heteroptera, Lygaeidae, Artheneinae)▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuechler, Stefan Martin; Dettner, Konrad; Kehl, Siegfried

    2011-01-01

    Many members of the suborder Heteroptera have symbiotic bacteria, which are usually found extracellularly in specific sacs or tubular outgrowths of the midgut or intracellularly in mycetomes. In this study, we describe the second molecular characterization of a symbiotic bacterium in a monophagous, seed-sucking stink bug of the family Lygaeidae (sensu stricto). Chilacis typhae possesses at the end of the first section of the midgut a structure which is composed of circularly arranged, strongly enlarged midgut epithelial cells. It is filled with an intracellular endosymbiont. This “mycetocytic belt” might represent an evolutionarily intermediate stage of the usual symbiotic structures found in stink bugs. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA and the groEL genes showed that the bacterium belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria, and it revealed a phylogenetic relationship with a secondary bacterial endosymbiont of Cimex lectularius and free-living plant pathogens such as Pectobacterium and Dickeya. The distribution and ultrastructure of the rod-shaped Chilacis endosymbiont were studied in adults and nymph stages using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and electron microscopy. The detection of symbionts at the anterior poles of developing eggs indicates that endosymbionts are transmitted vertically. A new genus and species name, “Candidatus Rohrkolberia cinguli,” is proposed for this newly characterized clade of symbiotic bacteria. PMID:21378044

  3. Ultrastructural changes of the midgut epithelium in Isohypsibius granulifer granulifer Thulin, 1928 (Tardigrada: Eutardigrada) during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M; Poprawa, Izabela; Wójtowicz, Maria; Kaczmarek, Lukasz

    2011-04-01

    The midgut epithelium of Isohypsibius granulifer granulifer (Eutardigrada) is composed of columnar digestive cells. At its anterior end, a group of cells with cytoplasm which differs from the cytoplasm of digestive cells is present. Probably, those cells respond to crescent-like cells (midgut regenerative cells) described for some tardigrade species. Their mitotic divisions have not been observed. We analyzed the ultrastructure of midgut digestive cells in relation to five different stages of oogenesis (previtellogenesis, beginning of the vitellogenesis, vitellogenesis--early choriogenesis, vitellogenesis--middle choriogenesis, late choriogenesis). In the midgut epithelium cells, the gradual accumulation of glycogen granules, lipid droplets and structures of varying electron density occurs. During vitellogenesis and choriogenesis, in the cytoplasm of midgut cells we observed the increasing number of organelles which are responsible for the intensive synthesis of lipids, proteins and saccharides such as cisterns of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complexes. At the end of oogenesis, autophagy also intensifies in midgut epithelial cells, which is probably caused by the great amount of reserve material. Midgut epithelium of analyzed species takes part in the yolk precursor synthesis.

  4. Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Suppresses Midgut Immunity to Support Plasmodium Development

    PubMed Central

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Kakani, Parik; Choudhury, Tania Pal; Kumar, Vikas; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    The heme peroxidase HPX15 is an evolutionary conserved anopheline lineage-specific gene. Previously, we found that this gene is present in the genome of 19 worldwide distributed different species of Anopheles mosquito and its orthologs are absent in other mosquitoes, insects, or human. In addition, 65–99% amino acid identity among these 19 orthologs permitted us to hypothesize that the functional aspects of this gene might be also conserved in different anophelines. In this study, we found that Anopheles stephensi AsHPX15 gene is mainly expressed in the midgut and highly induced after uninfected or Plasmodium berghei-infected blood feeding. RNA interference-mediated silencing of midgut AsHPX15 gene drastically reduced the number of developing P. berghei oocysts. An antiplasmodial gene nitric oxide synthase was induced 13-fold in silenced midguts when compared to the unsilenced controls. Interestingly, the induction of antiplasmodial immunity in AsHPX15-silenced midguts is in absolute agreement with Anopheles gambiae. In A. gambiae, AgHPX15 catalyzes the formation of a dityrosine network at luminal side of the midgut that suppresses the activation of mosquito immunity against the bolus bacteria. Thus, a low-immunity zone created by this mechanism indirectly supports Plasmodium development inside the midgut lumen. These indistinguishable functional behaviors and conserved homology indicates that HPX15 might be a potent target to manipulate the antiplasmodial immunity of the anopheline midgut, and it will open new frontiers in the field of malaria control. PMID:28352267

  5. Temporal and spatial expression of caudal-type homeobox proteins in the midgut of human embryos

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Wei-Lin; Yuan, Zheng-Wei; Bai, Yu-Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the spatiotemporal expression of caudal-type homeobox genes (CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4) during development of the midgut in human embryos and to explore the possible roles of CDX genes during the morphogenesis of human midgut. Human embryos (n=28) were sectioned serially and sagittally and CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 proteins were detected on the midline from the 5th to 9th weeks of gestation by immunohistochemical staining. Results: CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 proteins were weakly expressed in epithelium and mesenchyme of the midgut in the 6th and 7th weeks of gestation and reached estimated optimal level on the 8th and 9th weeks of gestation. In the 9th week of gestation, immunoreactivities specific to CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 were restricted in epithelium of the midgut. Conclusions: CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 proteins began to express in human midgut in the 6th week of gestation. From the 6th to 9th week of gastation, the expression of CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 proteins gradually increase and exhibited overlapping expression patterns, suggesting that CDX genes may be involved in early development of the epithelium of human midgut. Cross-regulatory interactions may exist among CDX genes with respect to human midgut development. PMID:26884902

  6. Cadaveric liver transplantation in biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome with the absence of retrohepatic inferior vena cava, preduodenal portal vein, and intestinal malrotation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sen-Oran, E; Yankol, Y; Tuzun, B; Kocak, B; Kanmaz, T; Acarli, K; Kalayoglu, M

    2008-01-01

    A 9-month-old female infant with biliary atresia underwent cadaveric liver transplantation due to progressive cholestatic hepatitis following a Kasai operation. She had biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome (BASM) composed of an absent retrohepatic inferior vena cava with an azygous connection, preduodenal portal vein, polysplenia, and intestinal malrotation. A portal vein thrombosis developed on the 4th postoperative day requiring immediate treatment by thrombectomy. The patient is well with normal liver function at 3 months follow-up. Although BASM may render the transplantation more difficult, the presence of BASM is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation.

  7. Compartmentalization of proteinases and amylases in Nauphoeta cinerea midgut.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Gromenko, V A; Rudenskaya, Y A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Zhuzhikov, D P

    2001-12-01

    Compartmentalization of proteinases, amylases, and pH in the midgut of Nauphoeta cinerea Oliv. (Blattoptera:Blaberidae) was studied in order to understand the organization of protein and starch digestion. Total proteolytic activity measured with azocasein was maximal at pH 11.5 both in anterior (AM) and posterior (PM) halves of the midgut, but the bulk of activity (67%) was found in PM. Total AM and PM preparations were fractionated on a Sephadex G-50 column and further analysed by means of activity electrophoresis and specific inhibitors and activators. The major activity in PM was classified as an unusual SH-dependent proteinase with M(r) 24,000 and pH optimum with synthetic substrate BApNA at 10.0. The enzyme was 43-fold activated in the presence of 1 mM DTT, insensitive to synthetic inhibitors of serine (PMSF, TLCK, TPCK) and cysteine (IAA, E-64) proteinases, strongly inhibited by STI, and displayed four active bands on zymograms. In PM, activities of trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like, and cysteine proteinases were observed. Aspartic and metalloproteinases were not detected. In AM, activity of unusual SH-dependent proteinase also dominated and activity of chymotrypsin-like proteinase was observed, but their levels were much lower than in PM. Distribution of amylase activity, exhibiting an optimum at pH 6.0, was quite the opposite. The major part of it (67%) was located in AM. Treatment of amylase preparation with proteinases from AM and PM reduced amylase activity twofold. pH of the midgut contents was 6.0-7.2 in AM, 6.4-7.6 in the first and 8.8-9.3 in the second halves of PM. Thus, pH in AM is in good agreement with the optimal pH of amylase, located in this compartment, but the activity of proteinases, including the ability to degrade amylase, in such an environment is low. Active proteolysis takes place in the second half of PM, where pH of the gut is close to the optimal pH of proteinases.

  8. Sugar digestion in mosquitoes: identification and characterization of three midgut alpha-glucosidases of the neo-tropical malaria vector Anopheles aquasalis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Souza-Neto, Jayme A; Machado, Fábio P; Lima, José B; Valle, Denise; Ribolla, Paulo E M

    2007-08-01

    Dietary carbohydrates provide an important source of energy for flight, and contribute to longevity and fecundity of mosquitoes. The most common sugar mosquitoes ingest is sucrose, and digestion of this substance is carried out mainly by alpha-glucosidases. In the current work, we tested the efficiency of sucrose on Anopheles aquasalis female diet. The best longevity (days) was reached when sugar was available in the diet, whereas most only blood fed females were dead 6 days after emergence. Three alpha-glucosidase isoforms were detected in the adult female midgut, named alphaGlu1, alphaGlu2 and alphaGlu3. These are acidic alpha-glucosidases with optima pH around pH 5.5. alphaGlu1 and alphaGlu2 are present in both secreted and membrane-bound forms, whereas alpha-Glu3 only in anchored to membranes. The alpha-glucosidase activity is concentrated mainly in the posterior midgut (70%), both in non-fed or 10% sucrose fed females. The single form of these alpha-glucosidases seemed to be approximately 70 kDa polypeptides, although alphaGlu2 is presented in >or=600 kDa self-aggregates. Km values of alphaGlu1, alphaGlu2 and alphaGlu3 differed significantly from each other, supporting the statement that three alpha-glucosidases are produced in the female midgut. Together, all data suggest that sugar is an essential component of A. aquasalis female diet. In addition, alpha-glucosidases are synthesized in the same place where sucrose is digested and absorbed, the midgut.

  9. Antioxidant defenses in caterpillars: role of the ascorbate-recycling system in the midgut lumen.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, R V; Bumgarner, S L; Roosen, E F; Martin, M M

    2001-04-01

    This study demonstrates that an ascorbate-recycling system in the midgut lumen can act as an effective antioxidant defense in caterpillars that feed on prooxidant-rich foods. In tannin-sensitive larvae of the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria (Lasiocampidae), ingested tannic acid is oxidized in the midgut lumen, generating significant quantities of peroxides, including hydrogen peroxide, which readily diffuses across cell membranes and is a powerful cytotoxin. By contrast, in the tannin-tolerant larvae of the white-marked tussock moth, Orgyia leucostigma (Lymantriidae), tannic acid oxidation and the generation of peroxides are suppressed. The superior defense of O. leucostigma against oxidative stress imposed by the oxidation of ingested polyphenols can be explained by the presence of higher concentrations of ascorbate and glutathione in the midgut lumen. In O. leucostigma at least 50% of the ingested ascorbate present in the anterior midgut is still present in the posterior midgut, whereas in M. disstria, only 10% of the ascorbate is present in the posterior half of the midgut. We propose that the maintenance of higher levels of ascorbate in the midgut lumen of O. leucostigma than in M. disstria is explained by the secretion of glutathione into the midgut lumen by O. leucostigma, thereby forming a complete ascorbate-recycling system. The concentration of glutathione in the midgut lumen of O. leucostigma is 3.5-fold higher than in M. disstria and more than double the concentration in the diet. Our results emphasize the importance of a defensive strategy in herbivorous insects based on the maintenance of conditions in the gut lumen that reduce or eliminate the potential prooxidant behavior of ingested phenols.

  10. Calcium tartrate crystals in the midgut of the grape leafhopper.

    PubMed

    Böll, S; Schmitt, T; Burschka, C; Schreier, P; Schwappach, P; Herrmann, J V

    2005-12-01

    Calcium tartrate crystals were observed in the midgut of grape leafhoppers. This unique compound was found for the first time in insects. The size of the crystals varied strongly between and within individuals with a mean length of 153 +/- 87 microm and a mean width of 71 +/- 46 microm. In addition, the number of crystals per individual showed a broad variation and ranged from 1 to 150 crystals/individual. The occurrence of calcium tartrate crystals as well as the number of crystals per individual followed the same seasonal pattern as seasonal vine leaf concentrations of tartaric acid found in a previous study, indicating that calcium tartrate is formed to neutralize the tartaric acid in the gut system. It further implies that the grape leafhopper, rather than being a pure phloem sucker, employs a mixed feeding strategy to satisfy its demands for calcium uptake.

  11. Characterization of a midgut-specific chitin synthase gene (LmCHS2) responsible for biosynthesis of chitin of peritrophic matrix in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Huanhuan; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2012-12-01

    Chitin, an essential component of peritrophic matrix (PM), is produced by a series of biochemical reactions. Chitin synthase plays a crucial role in chitin polymerization in chitin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we identified and characterized a full-length cDNA of chitin synthase 2 gene (LmCHS2) from Locusta migratoria. The cDNA contains an open reading frame of 4569 nucleotides that encode 1523 amino acid residues, and 76- and 373-nucleotides for 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions, respectively. Analysis of LmCHS2 transcript in different tissues of the locust by using real-time quantitative PCR indicated that LmCHS2 was exclusively expressed in midgut and gastric caeca (a part of the midgut). The highest expression was found in the anterior midgut with a decline of the transcript level from the anterior to posterior regions. During growth and development of locusts, there was only a slight expression in eggs, but the expression gradually increased from nymphs to adults. In situ hybridization further revealed that LmCHS2 transcript mainly presented in the apical regions of brush border forming columnar cells of gastric caeca. LmCHS2 dsRNA was injected to fifth-instar nymphs to further explore biological functions of LmCHS2. Significantly down-regulated transcript of LmCHS2 resulted in a cessation of feeding and a high mortality of the insect. However, no visible abnormal morphological change of locusts was observed until insects molted to adults. After dissection, we found that the average length of midguts from the LmCHS2 dsRNA-injected locusts was shorter than that of the control insects that were injected with dsGFP. Furthermore, microsection of midguts showed that the PM of the LmCHS2 dsRNA-injected nymphs was amorphous and thin as compared with the controls. Our results demonstrate that LmCHS2 is responsible for the biosynthesis of chitin associated with PM and plays an essential role in locust growth and development.

  12. Isolation and characterization of bacteria from midgut of the rice water weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Kang, Xiaoying; Jiang, Cong; Lou, Binggan; Jiang, Mingxing; Way, Michael O

    2013-10-01

    Gut bacteria are known to play important and often essential roles in the biology of insects. Theoretically, they can be genetically manipulated, then reintroduced into insects to negatively modify specific biological features. The weevil superfamily Curculionoidea is one of the most species-rich and successful animal groups on earth, but currently the overall knowledge of the bacterial communities in weevils and their associations with hosts is still limited. In this study, we isolated and characterized the bacteria in the midgut of an invasive weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, by culturing methods. Female adults of this weevil were collected from four different geographic regions of the United States and mainland China. Sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons demonstrated that the major culturable gut bacteria of rice water weevil are γ-proteobacteria and Bacilli. The gut bacterial composition differs among regions, with many of the bacteria isolated from only a single region while several were detected from more than one region. Overall, the diversity of gut bacteria in rice water weevil is relatively low. The possible origins of certain bacteria are discussed in relation to the weevil, rice plant, and bacteria.

  13. Anopheles Midgut Epithelium Evades Human Complement Activity by Capturing Factor H from the Blood Meal

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ayman; Barroso, Marta; Miettinen, Tiera; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Hematophagous vectors strictly require ingesting blood from their hosts to complete their life cycles. Exposure of the alimentary canal of these vectors to the host immune effectors necessitates efficient counteractive measures by hematophagous vectors. The Anopheles mosquito transmitting the malaria parasite is an example of hematophagous vectors that within seconds can ingest human blood double its weight. The innate immune defense mechanisms, like the complement system, in the human blood should thereby immediately react against foreign cells in the mosquito midgut. A prerequisite for complement activation is that the target cells lack complement regulators on their surfaces. In this work, we analyzed whether human complement is active in the mosquito midgut, and how the mosquito midgut cells protect themselves against complement attack. We found that complement remained active for a considerable time and was able to kill microbes within the mosquito midgut. However, the Anopheles mosquito midgut cells were not injured. These cells were found to protect themselves by capturing factor H, the main soluble inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Factor H inhibited complement on the midgut cells by promoting inactivation of C3b to iC3b and preventing the activity of the alternative pathway amplification C3 convertase enzyme. An interference of the FH regulatory activity by monoclonal antibodies, carried to the midgut via blood, resulted in increased mosquito mortality and reduced fecundity. By using a ligand blotting assay, a putative mosquito midgut FH receptor could be detected. Thereby, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby mosquitoes can tolerate human blood. PMID:25679788

  14. Comparison of midgut bacterial diversity in tropical caterpillars (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) fed on different diets.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Tomás, Adrián A; Sittenfeld, Ana; Uribe-Lorío, Lorena; Chavarría, Felipe; Mora, Marielos; Janzen, Daniel H; Goodman, Robert M; Simon, Holly M

    2011-10-01

    As primary consumers of foliage, caterpillars play essential roles in shaping the trophic structure of tropical forests. The caterpillar midgut is specialized in plant tissue processing; its pH is exceptionally alkaline and contains high concentrations of toxic compounds derived from the ingested plant material (secondary compounds or allelochemicals) and from the insect itself. The midgut, therefore, represents an extreme environment for microbial life. Isolates from different bacterial taxa have been recovered from caterpillar midguts, but little is known about the impact of these microorganisms on caterpillar biology. Our long-term goals are to identify midgut symbionts and to investigate their functions. As a first step, different diet formulations were evaluated for rearing two species of tropical saturniid caterpillars. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers hybridizing broadly to sequences from the bacterial domain, 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed with midgut DNA extracted from caterpillars reared on different diets. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis indicated that bacterial sequences recovered from the midguts of caterpillars fed on foliage were more diverse than those from caterpillars fed on artificial diet. Sequences related to Methylobacterium sp., Bradyrhizobium sp., and Propionibacterium sp. were detected in all caterpillar libraries regardless of diet, but were not detected in a library constructed from the diet itself. Furthermore, libraries constructed with DNA recovered from surface-sterilized eggs indicated potential for vertical transmission of midgut symbionts. Taken together, these results suggest that microorganisms associated with the tropical caterpillar midgut may engage in symbiotic interactions with these ecologically important insects.

  15. Identification of the Midgut Microbiota of An. stephensi and An. maculipennis for Their Application as a Paratransgenic Tool against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Dinparast Djadid, Navid; Jazayeri, Hoda; Raz, Abbasali; Favia, Guido; Ricci, Ignacio; Zakeri, Sedigheh

    2011-01-01

    The midgut microbiota associated with Anopheles stephensi and Anopheles maculipennis (Diptera: Culicidae) was investigated for development of a paratransgenesis-based approach to control malaria transmission in Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). Here, we present the results of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and biochemical-based approaches to identify the female adult and larvae mosquitoe microbiota of these two major malaria vectors, originated from South Eastern and North of Iran. Plating the mosquito midgut contents from lab-reared and field-collected Anopheles spp. was used for microbiota isolation. The Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial colonies were identified by Gram staining and specific mediums. Selected colonies were identified by differential biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. A number of 10 An. stephensi and 32 An. maculipennis adult mosquitoes and 15 An. stephensi and 7 An. maculipennis larvae were analyzed and 13 sequences of 16S rRNA gene bacterial species were retrieved, that were categorized in 3 classes and 8 families. The majority of the identified bacteria were belonged to the γ-proteobacteria class, including Pseudomonas sp. and Aeromonas sp. and the others were some closely related to those found in other vector mosquitoes, including Pantoea, Acinetobacter, Brevundimonas, Bacillus, Sphingomonas, Lysinibacillus and Rahnella. The 16S rRNA sequences in the current study aligned with the reference strains available in GenBank were used for construction of the phylogenetic tree that revealed the relatedness among the bacteria identified. The presented data strongly encourage further investigations, to verify the potential role of the detected bacteria for the malaria control in Iran and neighboring countries. PMID:22163022

  16. Identification of the midgut microbiota of An. stephensi and An. maculipennis for their application as a paratransgenic tool against malaria.

    PubMed

    Dinparast Djadid, Navid; Jazayeri, Hoda; Raz, Abbasali; Favia, Guido; Ricci, Ignacio; Zakeri, Sedigheh

    2011-01-01

    The midgut microbiota associated with Anopheles stephensi and Anopheles maculipennis (Diptera: Culicidae) was investigated for development of a paratransgenesis-based approach to control malaria transmission in Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). Here, we present the results of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and biochemical-based approaches to identify the female adult and larvae mosquitoe microbiota of these two major malaria vectors, originated from South Eastern and North of Iran. Plating the mosquito midgut contents from lab-reared and field-collected Anopheles spp. was used for microbiota isolation. The gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial colonies were identified by Gram staining and specific mediums. Selected colonies were identified by differential biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. A number of 10 An. stephensi and 32 An. maculipennis adult mosquitoes and 15 An. stephensi and 7 An. maculipennis larvae were analyzed and 13 sequences of 16S rRNA gene bacterial species were retrieved, that were categorized in 3 classes and 8 families. The majority of the identified bacteria were belonged to the γ-proteobacteria class, including Pseudomonas sp. and Aeromonas sp. and the others were some closely related to those found in other vector mosquitoes, including Pantoea, Acinetobacter, Brevundimonas, Bacillus, Sphingomonas, Lysinibacillus and Rahnella. The 16S rRNA sequences in the current study aligned with the reference strains available in GenBank were used for construction of the phylogenetic tree that revealed the relatedness among the bacteria identified. The presented data strongly encourage further investigations, to verify the potential role of the detected bacteria for the malaria control in Iran and neighboring countries.

  17. The midgut epithelium of aquatic arthropods: a critical target organ in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Barry J; Mackie, Ryan S; Mattingly, Kimberly S; Carlson, Jonathan O; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of aquatic arthropods is emerging as an important and toxicologically relevant organ system for monitoring environmental pollution. The peritrophic matrix of aquatic arthropods, which is secreted by the midgut epithelium cells, is perturbed by copper or cadmium. Molecular biological studies have identified and characterized two midgut genes induced by heavy metals in the midgut epithelium. Many other metal-responsive genes (MRGs) await characterization. One of the MRGs codes for an intestinal mucin, which is critical for protecting the midgut from toxins and pathogens. Another codes for a tubulin gene, which is critical for structure and function of the midgut epithelial cells. Perturbation of expression of either gene could condition aquatic arthropod survivorship. Induction of these MRGs is a more sensitive and rapid indicator of heavy-metal pollution than biological assays. Characterization of genes induced by pollutants could provide mechanistic understanding of fundamental cellular responses to pollutants and insight into determinants of aquatic arthropod population genetic structure and survivorship in nature. PMID:12634118

  18. Plant Defense Inhibitors Affect the Structures of Midgut Cells in Drosophila melanogaster and Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Murdock, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce proteins such as protease inhibitors and lectins as defenses against herbivorous insects and pathogens. However, no systematic studies have explored the structural responses in the midguts of insects when challenged with plant defensive proteins and lectins across different species. In this study, we fed two kinds of protease inhibitors and lectins to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and alpha-amylase inhibitors and lectins to the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. We assessed the changes in midgut cell structures by comparing them with such structures in insects receiving normal diets or subjected to food deprivation. Using light and transmission electron microscopy in both species, we observed structural changes in the midgut peritrophic matrix as well as shortened microvilli on the surfaces of midgut epithelial cells in D. melanogaster. Dietary inhibitors and lectins caused similar lesions in the epithelial cells but not much change in the peritrophic matrix in both species. We also noted structural damages in the Drosophila midgut after six hours of starvation and changes were still present after 12 hours. Our study provided the first evidence of key structural changes of midguts using a comparative approach between a dipteran and a coleopteran. Our particular observation and discussion on plant–insect interaction and dietary stress are relevant for future mode of action studies of plant defensive protein in insect physiology. PMID:27594789

  19. Plant Defense Inhibitors Affect the Structures of Midgut Cells in Drosophila melanogaster and Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Murdock, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce proteins such as protease inhibitors and lectins as defenses against herbivorous insects and pathogens. However, no systematic studies have explored the structural responses in the midguts of insects when challenged with plant defensive proteins and lectins across different species. In this study, we fed two kinds of protease inhibitors and lectins to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and alpha-amylase inhibitors and lectins to the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. We assessed the changes in midgut cell structures by comparing them with such structures in insects receiving normal diets or subjected to food deprivation. Using light and transmission electron microscopy in both species, we observed structural changes in the midgut peritrophic matrix as well as shortened microvilli on the surfaces of midgut epithelial cells in D. melanogaster. Dietary inhibitors and lectins caused similar lesions in the epithelial cells but not much change in the peritrophic matrix in both species. We also noted structural damages in the Drosophila midgut after six hours of starvation and changes were still present after 12 hours. Our study provided the first evidence of key structural changes of midguts using a comparative approach between a dipteran and a coleopteran. Our particular observation and discussion on plant-insect interaction and dietary stress are relevant for future mode of action studies of plant defensive protein in insect physiology.

  20. Small Interfering RNA Pathway Modulates Initial Viral Infection in Midgut Epithelium of Insect after Ingestion of Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hanhong; Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Yuyan; Jiang, Chaoyang; Mao, Qianzhuo; Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous viruses are transmitted in a persistent manner by insect vectors. Persistent viruses establish their initial infection in the midgut epithelium, from where they disseminate to the midgut visceral muscles. Although propagation of viruses in insect vectors can be controlled by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) antiviral pathway, whether the siRNA pathway can control viral dissemination from the midgut epithelium is unknown. Infection by a rice virus (Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus [SRBSDV]) of its incompetent vector (the small brown planthopper [SBPH]) is restricted to the midgut epithelium. Here, we show that the siRNA pathway is triggered by SRBSDV infection in continuously cultured cells derived from the SBPH and in the midgut of the intact insect. Knockdown of the expression of the core component Dicer-2 of the siRNA pathway by RNA interference strongly increased the ability of SRBSDV to propagate in continuously cultured SBPH cells and in the midgut epithelium, allowing viral titers in the midgut epithelium to reach the threshold (1.99 × 109 copies of the SRBSDV P10 gene/μg of midgut RNA) needed for viral dissemination into the SBPH midgut muscles. Our results thus represent the first elucidation of the threshold for viral dissemination from the insect midgut epithelium. Silencing of Dicer-2 further facilitated the transmission of SRBSDV into rice plants by SBPHs. Taken together, our results reveal the new finding that the siRNA pathway can control the initial infection of the insect midgut epithelium by a virus, which finally affects the competence of the virus's vector. IMPORTANCE Many viral pathogens that cause significant global health and agricultural problems are transmitted via insect vectors. The first bottleneck in viral infection, the midgut epithelium, is a principal determinant of the ability of an insect species to transmit a virus. Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) is restricted exclusively to the

  1. Midgut Barrier Imparts Selective Resistance to Filarial Worm Infection in Culex pipiens pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Michelle L.; Erickson, Sara M.; Bartholomay, Lyric C.; Christensen, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex thrive in temperate and tropical regions worldwide, and serve as efficient vectors of Bancroftian lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by Wuchereria bancrofti in Asia, Africa, the West Indies, South America, and Micronesia. However, members of this mosquito complex do not act as natural vectors for Brugian LF caused by Brugia malayi, or for the cat parasite B. pahangi, despite their presence in South Asia where these parasites are endemic. Previous work with the Iowa strain of Culex pipiens pipiens demonstrates that it is equally susceptible to W. bancrofti as is the natural Cx. p. pipiens vector in the Nile Delta, however it is refractory to infection with Brugia spp. Here we report that the infectivity barrier for Brugia spp. in Cx. p. pipiens is the mosquito midgut, which inflicts internal and lethal damage to ingested microfilariae. Following per os Brugia exposures, the prevalence of infection is significantly lower in Cx. p. pipiens compared to susceptible mosquito controls, and differs between parasite species with <50% and <5% of Cx. p. pipiens becoming infected with B. pahangi and B. malayi, respectively. When Brugia spp. mf were inoculated intrathoracically to bypass the midgut, larvae developed equally well as in controls, indicating that, beyond the midgut, Cx. p. pipiens is physiologically compatible with Brugia spp. Mf isolated from Cx. p. pipiens midguts exhibited compromised motility, and unlike mf derived from blood or isolated from the midguts of Ae. aegypti, failed to develop when inoculated intrathoracically into susceptible mosquitoes. Together these data strongly support the role of the midgut as the primary infection barrier for Brugia spp. in Cx. p. pipiens. Examination of parasites recovered from the Cx. p. pipiens midgut by vital staining, and those exsheathed with papain, suggest that the damage inflicted by the midgut is subcuticular and disrupts internal tissues. Microscopic studies of these worms

  2. Chitin is a necessary component to maintain the barrier function of the peritrophic matrix in the insect midgut.

    PubMed

    Kelkenberg, Marco; Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In most insects, the peritrophic matrix (PM) partitions the midgut into different digestive compartments, and functions as a protective barrier against abrasive particles and microbial infections. In a previous study we demonstrated that certain PM proteins are essential in maintaining the PM's barrier function and establishing a gradient of PM permeability from the anterior to the posterior part of the midgut which facilitates digestion (Agrawal et al., 2014). In this study, we focused on the effects of a reduction in chitin content on PM permeability in larvae of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Oral administration of the chitin synthesis inhibitor diflubenzuron (DFB) only partially reduced chitin content of the larval PM even at high concentrations. We observed no nutritional effects, as larval growth was unaffected and neutral lipids were not depleted from the fat body. However, the metamorphic molt was disrupted and the insects died at the pharate pupal stage, presumably due to DFB's effect on cuticle formation. RNAi to knock-down expression of the gene encoding chitin synthase 2 in T. castaneum (TcCHS-2) caused a complete loss of chitin in the PM. Larval growth was significantly reduced, and the fat body was depleted of neutral lipids. In situ PM permeability assays monitoring the distribution of FITC dextrans after DFB exposure or RNAi for TcCHS-2 revealed that PM permeability was increased in both cases. RNAi for TcCHS-2, however, led to a higher permeation of the PM by FITC dextrans than DFB treatment even at high doses. Similar effects were observed when the chitin content was reduced by feeding DFB to adult yellow fever mosquitos, Aedes aegypti. We demonstrate that the presence of chitin is necessary for maintaining the PM's barrier function in insects. It seems that the insecticidal effects of DFB are mediated by the disruption of cuticle synthesis during the metamorphic molt rather than by interfering with larval nutrition. However, as DFB

  3. Morphological alterations induced by boric acid and fipronil in the midgut of worker honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) larvae : Morphological alterations in the midgut of A. mellifera.

    PubMed

    da Silva Cruz, Aline; da Silva-Zacarin, Elaine C M; Bueno, Odair C; Malaspina, Osmar

    2010-04-01

    Morphological alterations, by means of histological and ultrastructural analysis, have been used to determine the effects of boric acid and fipronil on midgut tissues of honeybee worker, Apis mellifera L. larvae. In order to observe possible morphological alterations in the midgut, two groups of bioassays were performed. In the first one, the larvae were chronically treated with different concentrations of boric acid added to the food (1.0, 2.5 and 7.5 mg/g). In the second group, the larvae were fed with diets containing different concentrations of fipronil (0.1 and 1 microg/g) and compared with control groups without these chemical compounds. In the first bioassay, the larvae were collected on day 3 and in the second bioassay on day 4, when the mortality rate obtained in the toxicological bioassay was not very high. The larval midguts were removed and processed for morphological analyses using a light and transmission electron microscopy. We observed cytoplasmic vacuolizations, with the absence of autophagic vacuoles, and chromatinic compacting in most of the cells in the groups treated with pesticides. The morphological alterations were far greater in the larvae treated with boric acid than in the larvae treated with fipronil. Our data suggest that the midgut cell death observed was in response to boric acid and fipronil action. This study significantly improves the understanding of the toxicological effect of these insecticides from the ecotoxicological perspective.

  4. Regulation of chitin synthesis in the larval midgut of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Zimoch, L; Hogenkamp, D G; Kramer, K J; Muthukrishnan, S; Merzendorfer, H

    2005-06-01

    In insects, chitin is not only synthesized by ectodermal cells that form chitinous cuticles, but also by endodermal cells of the midgut that secrete a chitinous peritrophic matrix. Using anti-chitin synthase (CHS) antibodies, we previously demonstrated that in the midgut of Manduca sexta, CHS is expressed by two cell types, tracheal cells forming a basal tracheal network and columnar cells forming the apical brush border [Zimoch and Merzendorfer, 2002, Cell Tissue Res. 308, 287-297]. Now, we show that two different genes, MsCHS1 and MsCHS2, encode CHSs of midgut tracheae and columnar cells, respectively. To investigate MsCHS2 expression and activity in the course of the larval development, we monitored chitin synthesis, enzyme levels as well as mRNA amounts. All of the tested parameters were significantly reduced during molting and in the wandering stage when compared to the values obtained from intermolt feeding larvae. By contrast, MsCHS1 appeared to be inversely regulated because its mRNA was detectable only during the molt at the time when tracheal growth occurs at the basal site of the midgut. To further examine midgut chitin synthesis, we measured enzyme activity in crude midgut extracts and different membrane fractions. When we analysed trypsin-mediated proteolytic activation, a phenomenon previously reported for insect and fungal systems, we recognized that midgut chitin synthesis was only activated in crude extracts, but not in the 12,000 g membrane fraction. However, proteolytic activation by trypsin in the 12,000 g membrane fraction could be reconstituted by re-adding a soluble fraction, indicating that limited proteolysis affects an unknown soluble factor, a process that in turn activates chitin synthesis.

  5. DNA damage in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of Steatoda grossa (Theridiidae) spiders exposed to food contaminated with cadmium.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Monika; Wilczek, Grażyna; Wilczek, Piotr; Skowronek, Magdalena; Mędrzak, Monika

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of Cd on haemocytes and midgut gland cells of web-building spiders, Steatoda grossa (Theridiidae), exposed to the metal under laboratory conditions. Analyzes were conducted on adult females and males, fed for four weeks with cadmium-contaminated Drosophila hydei flies, grown on a medium suplemented with 0.25 mM CdCl2. The comet assay, providing a quantitative measure of DNA strand breaks, was used to evaluate the DNA damage caused by the metal. Cadmium content was measured in whole spider bodies by the AAS method. Metal body burden was significantly lower in females (0.25 µgg(-1) dry weight) than in males (3.03 µgg(-1) dry weight), suggesting that females may have more effective mechanisms controlling the uptake of metal, via the digestive tract, or its elimination from the body. Irrespectively of sex, spiders fed prey contaminated with cadmium showed significantly higher values of comet parameters: tail DNA (TDNA), tail length (TL) and olive tail moment (OTM), in comparison with the control. In midgut gland cells, the level of DNA damage was higher for males than females, while in haemocytes the genotoxic effect of cadmium was greater in females. The obtained results indicate that in spiders cadmium displays strong genotoxic effects and may cause DNA damage even at low concentrations, however the severity of damage seems to be sex- and internal organ-dependent. The comet assay can be considered a sensitive tool for measuring the deleterious effect of cadmium on DNA integrity in spiders.

  6. Macrocerebellum, Epilepsy, Intellectual Disability and Gut Malrotation in a Child with a 16q24.1-q24.2 Contiguous Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Andrea H.; Durham, Mark A.; Micale, Mark A.; Wesolowski, Jeffrey; Foerster, Bradley R.; Martin, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Macrocerebellum is an extremely rare condition characterized by enlargement of the cerebellum with conservation of the overall shape and cytoarchitecture. Here, we report a child with a distinctive constellation of clinical features including macrocerebellum, epilepsy, apparent intellectual disability, dysautonomia, gut malrotation, and poor gut motility. Oligonucleotide chromosome microarray analysis identified a 16q24.1-q24.2 deletion that included four OMIM genes (FBXO31, MAP1LC3B, JPH3, and SLC7A5). Review of prior studies describing individuals with similar or overlapping16q24.1-q24.2 deletions identified no other reports of macrocerebellum. These observations highlight a potential genetic cause of this rare disorder and raise the possibility that one or more gene(s) in the 16q24.1-q24.2 interval regulate cerebellar development. PMID:24719385

  7. 46,XY Disorders of Sex Development and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: A Case with Dysmorphic Facies, Truncus Arteriosus, Bifid Thymus, Gut Malrotation, Rhizomelia, and Adactyly

    PubMed Central

    Esplin, Edward D.; Chaib, Hassan; Haney, Michael; Martin, Brock; Homeyer, Margaret; Urban, Alexander E.; Bernstein, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The association of 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD) with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is rare, but has been previously described with and without other congenital anomalies. Literature review identified five cases of 46,XY DSD associated with CDH and other congenital anomalies. These five cases share characteristics including CDH, 46,XY karyotype with external female appearing or ambiguous genitalia, cardiac anomalies, and decreased life span. The present case had novel features including truncus arteriosus, bifid thymus, gut malrotation, and limb anomalies consisting of rhizomelia and adactyly. With this case report, we present a review of the literature of cases of 46,XY DSD and CDH in association with multiple congenital abnormalities. This case may represent a unique syndrome of 46,XY DSD and diaphragmatic hernia or a more severe presentation of a syndrome represented in the previously reported cases. PMID:25898814

  8. Effects of Periplocoside P from Periploca sepium on the Midgut Transmembrane Potential of Mythimna separata Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YingYing; Qi, Zhijun; Qi, Meng; Hu, Zhaonong; Wu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Periplocoside P (PSP) isolated from the root bark of Periploca sepium contains a pregnane glycoside skeleton and possesses high insecticidal properties. Preliminary studies indicated that PSP disrupts epithelial functions in the midgut of lepidopteran larvae. In the present study, we examined the effects of PSP on the apical and basolateral membrane voltages, Va and Vbl, respectively, of cells from (1) midguts isolated from the larvae of the oriental armyworm Mythimna separata that were in vitro incubated with toxins and (2) midguts isolated from M. separata larvae force-fed with PSP. We compared the effects of PSP with the effects of the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ab and inactive periplocoside E (PSE) on the midgut epithelial cells. The results showed that Va rapidly decreased in the presence of PSP in a time- and dose-dependent manner, similar to the effects of Cry1Ab. By contrast, PSE did not affect the Va and Vbl. Additionally, PSP did not influence the Vbl. Given these results, we speculate that PSP may modulate transport mechanisms at the apical membrane of the midgut epithelial cells by inhibiting the V-type H+ ATPase. PMID:27833169

  9. Mod(mdg4) participates in hormonally regulated midgut programmed cell death during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wen; He, Hong-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2012-12-01

    The insect midgut undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) during metamorphosis, but the molecular basis for this phenomenon has not been demonstrated. We report a mod(mdg4) protein [designated as mod(mdg4)1A] that is involved in hormonally regulated insect midgut PCD, from the lepidopteran Helicoverpa armigera. Mod(mdg4)1A is localized in the larval midgut and is highly expressed during metamorphosis. Knockdown of mod(mdg4)1a by feeding dsRNA to the larvae suppressed midgut PCD and delayed metamorphosis. The mechanism is that mod(mdg4)1a knockdown decreased the transcript levels of genes involved in PCD and metamorphosis, but increased the transcript level of inhibitor of apoptosis survivin. The transcript level of mod(mdg4)1a is independently upregulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) or juvenile hormone (JH) analog methoprene. Overlapped 20E and methoprene counteractively regulate the transcript level of mod(mdg4)1a. 20E upregulates the mod(mdg4)1a transcript level not through its nuclear receptor EcRB1. Methoprene upregulates the mod(mdg4)1a transcript level through the juvenile hormone candidate receptor Met. These findings indicate that mod(mdg4)1a participates in midgut PCD and metamorphosis by regulating the transcript levels of a network of genes via different pathways under 20E and JH regulation.

  10. Alterations in the Helicoverpa armigera midgut digestive physiology after ingestion of pigeon pea inducible leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Jadhav, Bhakti R; Giri, Ashok P; Hivrale, Vandana K

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate inducible plant leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is proposed to serve as direct defense in the insect midgut. However, exact functions of inducible plant LAPs in the insect midgut remain to be estimated. In the present investigation, we report the direct defensive role of pigeon pea inducible LAP in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and responses of midgut soluble aminopeptidases and serine proteinases upon LAP ingestion. Larval growth and survival was significantly reduced on the diets supplemented with pigeon pea LAP. Aminopeptidase activities in larvae remain unaltered in presence or absence of inducible LAP in the diet. On the contrary, serine proteinase activities were significantly decreased in the larvae reared on pigeon pea LAP containing diet as compared to larvae fed on diet without LAP. Our data suggest that pigeon pea inducible LAP is responsible for the degradation of midgut serine proteinases upon ingestion. Reduction in the aminopeptidase activity with LpNA in the H. armigera larvae was compensated with an induction of aminopeptidase activity with ApNA. Our findings could be helpful to further dissect the roles of plant inducible LAPs in the direct plant defense against herbivory.

  11. Investigation of the midgut structure and ultrastructure in Cimex lectularius and Cimex pipistrelli (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Vilimova, J; Włodarczyk, A; Sonakowska, L; Kamińska, K; Kaszuba, F; Marchewka, A; Sadílek, D

    2017-02-01

    Cimicidae are temporary ectoparasites, which means that they cannot obtain food continuously. Both Cimex species examined here, Cimex lectularius (Linnaeus 1758) and Cimex pipistrelli (Jenyns 1839), can feed on a non-natal host, C. lectularius from humans on bats, C. pipistrelli on humans, but never naturally. The midgut of C. lectularius and C. pipistrelli is composed of three distinct regions-the anterior midgut (AMG), which has a sack-like shape, the long tube-shaped middle midgut (MMG), and the posterior midgut (PMG). The different ultrastructures of the AMG, MMG, and PMG in both of the species examined suggest that these regions must fulfill different functions in the digestive system. Ultrastructural analysis showed that the AMG fulfills the role of storing food and synthesizing and secreting enzymes, while the MMG is the main organ for the synthesis of enzymes, secretion, and the storage of the reserve material. Additionally, both regions, the AMG and MMG, are involved in water absorption in the digestive system of both Cimex species. The PMG is the part of the midgut in which spherites accumulate. The results of our studies confirm the suggestion of former authors that the structure of the digestive tract of insects is not attributed solely to diet but to the basic adaptation of an ancestor.

  12. Prey digestion in the midgut of the predatory bug Podisus nigrispinus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Fialho, Maria C Q; Moreira, Nathalia R; Zanuncio, José C; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Terra, Walter R; Serrão, José E

    2012-06-01

    Pre-oral digestion is described as the liquefaction of the solid tissues of the prey by secretions of the predator. It is uncertain if pre-oral digestion means pre-oral dispersion of food or true digestion in the sense of the stepwise bond breaking of food polymers to release monomers to be absorbed. Collagenase is the only salivary proteinase, which activity is significant (10%) in relation to Podisus nigrispinus midgut activities. This suggests that pre-oral digestion in P. nigrispinus consists in prey tissue dispersion. This was confirmed by the finding of prey muscles fibers inside P. nigrispinus midguts. Soluble midgut hydrolases from P. nigrispinus were partially purified by ion-exchange chromatography, followed by gel filtration. Two cathepsin L-like proteinases (CAL1 and CAL2) were isolated with the properties: CAL1 (14.7 kDa, pH optimum (pHo) 5.5, km with carbobenzoxy-Phe-Arg-methylcoumarin, Z-FR-MCA, 32 μM); CAL2 (17 kDa, pHo 5.5, km 11 μM Z-FR-MCA). Only a single molecular species was found for the other enzymes with the following properties are: amylase (43 kDa, pHo 5.5, km 0.1% starch), aminopeptidase (125 kDa, pHo 5.5, km 0.11 mM l-Leucine-p-nitroanilide), α-glucosidase (90 kDa, pHo 5.0, km 5mM with p-nitrophenyl α-d-glucoside). CAL molecular masses are probably underestimated due to interaction with the column. Taking into account the distribution of hydrolases along P. nigrispinus midguts, carbohydrate digestion takes place mainly at the anterior midgut, whereas protein digestion occurs mostly in middle and posterior midgut, as previously described in seed- sucker and blood-feeder hemipterans.

  13. Two essential peritrophic matrix proteins mediate matrix barrier functions in the insect midgut.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sinu; Kelkenberg, Marco; Begum, Khurshida; Steinfeld, Lea; Williams, Clay E; Kramer, Karl J; Beeman, Richard W; Park, Yoonseong; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2014-06-01

    The peritrophic matrix (PM) in the midgut of insects consists primarily of chitin and proteins and is thought to support digestion and provide protection from abrasive food particles and enteric pathogens. We examined the physiological roles of 11 putative peritrophic matrix protein (PMP) genes of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (TcPMPs). TcPMP genes are differentially expressed along the length of the midgut epithelium of feeding larvae. RNAi of individual PMP genes revealed no abnormal developmental phenotypes for 9 of the 11 TcPMPs. However, RNAi for two PMP genes, TcPMP3 and TcPMP5-B, resulted in depletion of the fat body, growth arrest, molting defects and mortality. In situ permeability assays after oral administration of different-sized FITC-dextran beads demonstrated that the exclusion size of the larval peritrophic matrix (PM) decreases progressively from >2 MDa to <4 kDa from the anterior to the most posterior regions of the midgut. In the median midguts of control larvae, 2 MDa dextrans were completely retained within the PM lumen, whereas after RNAi for TcPMP3 and TcPMP5-B, these dextrans penetrated the epithelium of the median midgut, indicating loss of structural integrity and barrier function of the larval PM. In contrast, RNAi for TcPMP5-B, but not RNAi for TcPMP3, resulted in breakdown of impermeability to 4 and 40 kDa dextrans in the PM of the posterior midgut. These results suggest that specific PMPs are involved in the regulation of PM permeability, and that a gradient of barrier function is essential for survival and fat body maintenance.

  14. Functional morphology of the midgut of a sandfly as compared to other hematophagous nematocera.

    PubMed

    Rudin, W; Hecker, H

    1982-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of female Lutzomyia longipalpis was investigated by means of electron microscopic morphometry before and during blood digestion. Ultrastructure and cytological changes of the stomach cells upon blood feeding were generally similar to the ones described for Phlebotomus longipes (Gemetchu, 1974) and for mosquitoes (Hecker, 1977). In addition, the quantitative composition of the cells resembled the one of mosquitoes in many respects. Despite some morphological differences in the functional gut cytology, it can be admitted that, in general, digestive processes may run similarly in the midguts of sandflies and mosquitoes.

  15. Detection of heparin in the salivary gland and midgut of Aedes togoi.

    PubMed

    Ha, Young-Ran; Oh, So-Ra; Seo, Eun-Seok; Kim, Bo-Heum; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-04-01

    Mosquitoes secrete saliva that contains biological substances, including anticoagulants that counteract a host's hemostatic response and prevent blood clotting during blood feeding. This study aimed to detect heparin, an anticoagulant in Aedes togoi using an immunohistochemical detection method, in the salivary canal, salivary gland, and midgut of male and female mosquitoes. Comparisons showed that female mosquitoes contained higher concentrations of heparin than male mosquitoes. On average, the level of heparin was higher in blood-fed female mosquitoes than in non-blood-fed female mosquitoes. Heparin concentrations were higher in the midgut than in the salivary gland. This indicates presence of heparin in tissues of A. togoi.

  16. Silencing of Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Activates Diverse Immune Pathways to Regulate the Growth of Midgut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Choudhury, Tania P.; Kakani, Parik; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Anopheles mosquito midgut harbors a diverse group of endogenous bacteria that grow extensively after the blood feeding and help in food digestion and nutrition in many ways. Although, the growth of endogenous bacteria is regulated by various factors, however, the robust antibacterial immune reactions are generally suppressed in this body compartment by a heme peroxidase HPX15 crosslinked mucins barrier. This barrier is formed on the luminal side of the midgut and blocks the direct interactions and recognition of bacteria or their elicitors by the immune reactive midgut epithelium. We hypothesized that in the absence of HPX15, an increased load of exogenous bacteria will enormously induce the mosquito midgut immunity and this situation in turn, can easily regulate mosquito-pathogen interactions. In this study, we found that the blood feeding induced AsHPX15 gene in Anopheles stephensi midgut and promoted the growth of endogenous as well as exogenous fed bacteria. In addition, the mosquito midgut also efficiently regulated the number of these bacteria through the induction of classical Toll and Imd immune pathways. In case of AsHPX15 silenced midguts, the growth of midgut bacteria was largely reduced through the induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene, a downstream effector molecule of the JAK/STAT pathway. Interestingly, no significant induction of the classical immune pathways was observed in these midguts. Importantly, the NOS is a well known negative regulator of Plasmodium development, thus, we proposed that the induction of diverged immune pathways in the absence of HPX15 mediated midgut barrier might be one of the strategies to manipulate the vectorial capacity of Anopheles mosquito. PMID:27630620

  17. Incidentally Detected Situs Ambiguous in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Gyung; Kim, Gee-Hee; Park, Mi-Hee; Hur, Joon; Yu, Jin-Sok; Jung, Soo-Yeon; An, Soe-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Situs ambiguous is rare congenital anomaly in adults. In 2 adult patients who admitted for different cardiac problems, situs ambiguous with polysplenia was detected. A 42-year-old male admitted for radio frequent catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation, and he had left-sided inferior vena cava (IVC), hepatic segment of IVC interruption with hemiazygos continuation, multiple spleens and intestinal malrotation. And in a 52-year-old female case who was hospitalized due to infective endocarditis after implanting pacemaker for sick sinus syndrome, multiple spleens, left-sided stomach, bilateral liver with midline gallbladder, and left-sided IVC were found. Those findings were consistent with situs ambiguous with polysplenia, but their features were distinctive. PMID:22259667

  18. Neem oil (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) affects the ultrastructure of the midgut muscle of Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás, 1911) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; Garcia, Ana Silvia Gimenes; Pinheiro, Patricia Fernanda Felipe; Santos, Daniela Carvalho Dos

    2017-01-01

    Cytomorphological changes, by means of ultrastructural analyses, have been used to determine the effects of the biopesticide neem oil on the muscle fibers of the midgut of the predator Ceraeochrysa claveri. Insects, throughout the larval period, were fed eggs of Diatraea saccharalis treated with neem oil at a concentration of 0.5%, 1% or 2%. In the adult stage, the midgut was collected from female insects at two stages of adulthood (newly emerged and at the start of oviposition) and processed for ultrastructural analyses. In the newly emerged insects obtained from neem oil treatments, muscle fibers showed a reduction of myofilaments as well as swollen mitochondria and an accumulation of membranous structures. Muscular fibers responded to those cellular injuries with the initiation of detoxification mechanisms, in which acid phosphatase activity was observed in large vesicles located at the periphery of the muscle fiber. At the start of oviposition in the neem oil treated insects, muscle fibers exhibited signs of degeneration, containing vacant areas in which contractile myofilaments were reduced or completely absent, and an accumulation of myelin structures, a dilatation of cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondrial swelling and cristolysis were observed. Enzymatic activity for acid phosphatase was present in large vesicles, indicating that mechanisms of lytic activity during the cell injury were utilized but insufficient for recovery from all the cellular damage. The results indicate that the visceral muscle layer is also the target of action of neem oil, and the cytotoxic effects observed may compromise the function of that organ.

  19. Identification of a polymorphic mucin-like gene expressed in the midgut of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, using an integrated bulked segregant and differential display analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Morlais, I; Severson, D W

    2001-01-01

    The identification of putative differentially expressed genes within genome regions containing QTL determining susceptibility of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, to the malarial parasite, Plasmodium gallinaceum, was investigated using an integrated, targeted approach based on bulked segregant and differential display analysis. A mosquito F2 population was obtained from pairwise matings between the parasite-susceptible RED strain and the resistant MOYO-R substrain. DNA from female carcasses was used to genotype individuals at RFLP markers of known chromosomal position around the major QTL (pgs 1). Midguts, dissected 48 hr after an infected blood meal, were used to prepare two RNA bulks, each representing one of the parental genotypes at the QTL interval. The RNA bulks were compared by differential display PCR. A mucin-like protein gene (AeIMUC1) was isolated and characterized. The gene maps within the pgs 1 QTL interval and is expressed in the adult female midgut. AeIMUC1 RNA abundance decreased with time after blood meal ingestion. No differential expression was observed between the two mosquito strains but three different alleles with inter- and intrastrain allelic polymorphisms including indels and SNPs were characterized. The AeIMUC1 gene chromosome location and allelic polymorphisms raise the possibility that the protein might be involved in parasite-mosquito interactions. PMID:11454761

  20. Synergistic mitotoxicity of chloromethanes and fullerene C60 nanoaggregates in Daphnia magna midgut epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Seke, Mariana; Markelic, Milica; Morina, Arian; Jovic, Danica; Korac, Aleksandra; Milicic, Dragana; Djordjevic, Aleksandar

    2016-12-03

    Adsorption of non-polar compounds by suspended fullerene nanoaggregates (nC60) may enhance their toxicity and affect the fate, transformation, and transport of non-polar compounds in the environment. The potential of stable fullerene nanoaggregates as contaminant carriers in aqueous systems and the influence of chloromethanes (trichloromethane and dichloromethane) were studied on the midgut epithelial cells of Daphnia magna by light and electron microscopy. The size and shape of fullerene nanoaggregates were observed and measured using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy. The nC60 in suspension appeared as a bulk of aggregates of irregular shape with a surface consisting of small clumps 20-30 nm in diameter. The presence of nC60 aggregates was confirmed in midgut lumen and epithelial cells of D. magna. After in vivo acute exposure to chloromethane, light and electron microscopy revealed an extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization with disruption and loss of specific structures of D. magna midgut epithelium (mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, microvilli, peritrophic membrane) and increased appearance of necrotic cells. The degree of observed changes depended on the type of treatment: trichloromethane (TCM) induced the most notable changes, whereas fullerene nanoaggregates alone had no negative effects. Transmission electron microscopy also indicated increased lysosomal degradation and severe peroxidative damages of enterocyte mitochondria following combined exposure to chloromethane and fullerene nanoaggregates. In conclusion, the adsorption of chloromethane by fullerene nanoaggregates enhances their toxicity and induces peroxidative mitochondrial damage in midgut enterocytes.

  1. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  2. Determination of pH in regions of the midguts of acaridid mites.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The pH of the guts of mites strongly affects their digestive processes. This study was carried out to determine the pH in the guts of 12 species of stored product and house dust mites. Eighteen pH indicators were chosen and offered to the mites in the feeding biotest. Based on the color changes of the indicators, the gut contents of acaridid mites were determined to be within a pH range of 4 to neutral. The gut contents showed a gradient in pH from the anterior to the posterior part. The anterior midgut (ventriculus and caeca) of most species had a pH ranging from 4.5 to 5, or slightly more alkaline for most of the species, while the middle midgut (intercolon/colon) had a pH of 5 to 6. Finally, the pH of the posterior midgut (postcolon) was between 5.5 and 7. Except for Dermatophagoides spp., no remarkable differences in the pH of the gut were observed among the tested species. Dermatophagoides spp. had a more acidic anterior midgut (a pH of 4 to 5) and colon (a pH of 5) with postcolon (a pH of below 6). The results characterizing in vivo conditions in the mite gut offer useful information to study the activity of mite digestive enzymes including their inhibitors and gut microflora.

  3. Midgut transcriptome profiling of Anoplophora glabripennis, a lignocellulose degrading Cerambycid beetle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Wood-feeding insects often work in collaboration with microbial symbionts to degrade lignin biopolymers and release glucose and other fermentable sugars from recalcitrant plant cell wall carbohydrates, including cellulose and hemicellulose. Here, we present the midgut transcriptome of la...

  4. Localization of two post-proline cleaving peptidases in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two soluble post-proline cleaving peptidase activities, PPCP1 and PPCP2, were demonstrated in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae with the substrate benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanyl-L-proline p-nitroanilide. Both activities were serine peptidases. PPCP1 was active in acidic buffers, with maximum activit...

  5. Midgut epithelium in molting silkworm: A fine balance among cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Casartelli, Morena; D'Antona, Paola; Montali, Aurora; Romanelli, Davide; Cappellozza, Silvia; Caccia, Silvia; Grimaldi, Annalisa; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-07-01

    The midgut of insects has attracted great attention as a system for studying intestinal stem cells (ISCs) as well as cell death-related processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Among insects, Lepidoptera represent a good model to analyze these cells and processes. In particular, larva-larva molting is an interesting developmental phase since the larva must deal with nutrient starvation and its organs are subjected to rearrangements due to proliferation and differentiation events. Several studies have analyzed ISCs in vitro and characterized key factors involved in their division and differentiation during molt. However, in vivo studies performed during larva-larva transition on these cells, and on the whole midgut epithelium, are fragmentary. In the present study, we analyzed the larval midgut epithelium of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, during larva-larva molting, focusing our attention on ISCs. Moreover, we investigated the metabolic changes that occur in the epithelium and evaluated the intervention of autophagy. Our data on ISCs proliferation and differentiation, autophagy activation, and metabolic and functional activities of the midgut cells shed light on the complexity of this organ during the molting phase.

  6. Variation in Vector Competence for Dengue Viruses Does Not Depend on Mosquito Midgut Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan; Brown, Heidi E.; Rico-Hesse, Rebeca

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue virus genotypes of Southeast Asian origin have been associated with higher virulence and transmission compared to other genotypes of serotype 2 (DEN-2). We tested the hypothesis that genetic differences in dengue viruses may result in differential binding to the midgut of the primary vector, Aedes aegypti, resulting in increased transmission or vectorial capacity. Methodology/Principal Finding Two strains of each of the four DEN-2 genotypes (Southeast Asian, American, Indian, and West African) were tested to determine their binding affinity for mosquito midguts from two distinct populations (Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico and McAllen, Texas, USA). Our previous studies demonstrated that Southeast Asian viruses disseminated up to 65-fold more rapidly in Ae. aegypti from Texas and were therefore more likely to be transmitted to humans. Results shown here demonstrate that viruses from all four genotypes bind to midguts at the same rate, in a titer-dependent manner. In addition, we show population differences when comparing binding affinity for DEN-2 between the Tapachula and McAllen mosquito colonies. Conclusions If midgut binding potential is the same for all DEN-2 viruses, then viral replication differences in these tissues and throughout the mosquito can thus probably explain the significant differences in dissemination and vector competence. These conclusions differ from the established paradigms to explain mosquito barriers to infection, dissemination, and transmission. PMID:21610852

  7. Apoptosis and necrosis during the circadian cycle in the centipede midgut.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Chajec, Ł; Vilimova, J; Tajovský, K

    2016-07-01

    Three types of cells have been distinguished in the midgut epithelium of two centipedes, Lithobius forficatus and Scolopendra cingulata: digestive, secretory, and regenerative cells. According to the results of our previous studies, we decided to analyze the relationship between apoptosis and necrosis in their midgut epithelium and circadian rhythms. Ultrastructural analysis showed that these processes proceed in a continuous manner that is independent of the circadian rhythm in L. forficatus, while in S. cingulata necrosis is activated at midnight. Additionally, the description of apoptosis and necrosis showed no differences between males and females of both species analyzed. At the beginning of apoptosis, the cell cytoplasm becomes electron-dense, apparently in response to shrinkage of the cell. Organelles such as the mitochondria, cisterns of endoplasmic reticulum transform and degenerate. Nuclei gradually assume lobular shapes before the apoptotic cell is discharged into the midgut lumen. During necrosis, however, the cytoplasm of the cell becomes electron-lucent, and the number of organelles decreases. While the digestive cells of about 10 % of L. forficatus contain rickettsia-like pathogens, the corresponding cells in S. cingulata are free of rickettsia. As a result, we can state that apoptosis in L. forficatus is presumably responsible for protecting the organism against infections, while in S. cingulata apoptosis is not associated with the elimination of pathogens. Necrosis is attributed to mechanical damage, and the activation of this process coincides with proliferation of the midgut regenerative cells at midnight in S. cingulata.

  8. Characterization of proteinases from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus involved in the generation of antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin is a rich source of biologically active peptides, some of which are potent antimicrobials (hemocidins). A few hemocidins have been purified from the midgut contents of ticks. Nonetheless, how antimicrobials are generated in the tick midgut and their role in immunity is still poorly understood. Here we report, for the first time, the contribution of two midgut proteinases to the generation of hemocidins. Results An aspartic proteinase, designated BmAP, was isolated from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using three chromatographic steps. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that BmAP is restricted to the midgut. The other enzyme is a previously characterized midgut cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase designated BmCL1. Substrate specificities of native BmAP and recombinant BmCL1 were mapped using a synthetic combinatorial peptide library and bovine hemoglobin. BmCL1 preferred substrates containing non-polar residues at P2 subsite and polar residues at P1, whereas BmAP hydrolysed substrates containing non-polar amino acids at P1 and P1'. Conclusions BmAP and BmCL1 generate hemocidins from hemoglobin alpha and beta chains in vitro. We postulate that hemocidins may be important for the control of tick pathogens and midgut flora. PMID:20663211

  9. Midgut Transcriptome of the Cockroach Periplaneta americana and Its Microbiota: Digestion, Detoxification and Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yixi; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    The cockroach, Periplaneta americana, is an obnoxious and notorious pest of the world, with a strong ability to adapt to a variety of complex environments. However, the molecular mechanism of this adaptability is mostly unknown. In this study, the genes and microbiota composition associated with the adaptation mechanism were studied by analyzing the transcriptome and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing of the P. americana midgut, respectively. Midgut transcriptome analysis identified 82,905 unigenes, among which 64 genes putatively involved in digestion (11 genes), detoxification (37 genes) and oxidative stress response (16 genes) were found. Evaluation of gene expression following treatment with cycloxaprid further revealed that the selected genes (CYP6J1, CYP4C1, CYP6K1, Delta GST, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and aminopeptidase) were upregulated at least 2.0-fold at the transcriptional level, and four genes were upregulated more than 10.0-fold. An interesting finding was that three digestive enzymes positively responded to cycloxaprid application. Tissue expression profiles further showed that most of the selected genes were midgut-biased, with the exception of CYP6K1. The midgut microbiota composition was obtained via 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was found to be mainly dominated by organisms from the Firmicutes phylum, among which Clostridiales, Lactobacillales and Burkholderiales were the main orders which might assist the host in the food digestion or detoxification of noxious compounds. The preponderant species, Clostridium cellulovorans, was previously reported to degrade lignocellulose efficiently in insects. The abundance of genes involved in digestion, detoxification and response to oxidative stress, and the diversity of microbiota in the midgut might provide P. americana high capacity to adapt to complex environments. PMID:27153200

  10. Plasmodium falciparum evades mosquito immunity by disrupting JNK-mediated apoptosis of invaded midgut cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramphul, Urvashi N.; Garver, Lindsey S.; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Canepa, Gaspar E.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, must survive and develop in the mosquito vector to be successfully transmitted to a new host. The Plasmodium falciparum Pfs47 gene is critical for malaria transmission. Parasites that express Pfs47 (NF54 WT) evade mosquito immunity and survive, whereas Pfs47 knockouts (KO) are efficiently eliminated by the complement-like system. Two alternative approaches were used to investigate the mechanism of action of Pfs47 on immune evasion. First, we examined whether Pfs47 affected signal transduction pathways mediating mosquito immune responses, and show that the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is a key mediator of Anopheles gambiae antiplasmodial responses to P. falciparum infection and that Pfs47 disrupts JNK signaling. Second, we used microarrays to compare the global transcriptional responses of A. gambiae midguts to infection with WT and KO parasites. The presence of Pfs47 results in broad and profound changes in gene expression in response to infection that are already evident 12 h postfeeding, but become most prominent at 26 h postfeeding, the time when ookinetes invade the mosquito midgut. Silencing of 15 differentially expressed candidate genes identified caspase-S2 as a key effector of Plasmodium elimination in parasites lacking Pfs47. We provide experimental evidence that JNK pathway regulates activation of caspases in Plasmodium-invaded midgut cells, and that caspase activation is required to trigger midgut epithelial nitration. Pfs47 alters the cell death pathway of invaded midgut cells by disrupting JNK signaling and prevents the activation of several caspases, resulting in an ineffective nitration response that makes the parasite undetectable by the mosquito complement-like system. PMID:25552553

  11. Midgut Transcriptome of the Cockroach Periplaneta americana and Its Microbiota: Digestion, Detoxification and Oxidative Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yixi; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    The cockroach, Periplaneta americana, is an obnoxious and notorious pest of the world, with a strong ability to adapt to a variety of complex environments. However, the molecular mechanism of this adaptability is mostly unknown. In this study, the genes and microbiota composition associated with the adaptation mechanism were studied by analyzing the transcriptome and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing of the P. americana midgut, respectively. Midgut transcriptome analysis identified 82,905 unigenes, among which 64 genes putatively involved in digestion (11 genes), detoxification (37 genes) and oxidative stress response (16 genes) were found. Evaluation of gene expression following treatment with cycloxaprid further revealed that the selected genes (CYP6J1, CYP4C1, CYP6K1, Delta GST, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and aminopeptidase) were upregulated at least 2.0-fold at the transcriptional level, and four genes were upregulated more than 10.0-fold. An interesting finding was that three digestive enzymes positively responded to cycloxaprid application. Tissue expression profiles further showed that most of the selected genes were midgut-biased, with the exception of CYP6K1. The midgut microbiota composition was obtained via 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was found to be mainly dominated by organisms from the Firmicutes phylum, among which Clostridiales, Lactobacillales and Burkholderiales were the main orders which might assist the host in the food digestion or detoxification of noxious compounds. The preponderant species, Clostridium cellulovorans, was previously reported to degrade lignocellulose efficiently in insects. The abundance of genes involved in digestion, detoxification and response to oxidative stress, and the diversity of microbiota in the midgut might provide P. americana high capacity to adapt to complex environments.

  12. Composition of the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) Midgut Microbiota as Affected by Rearing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Landry, Mathieu; Comeau, André M; Derome, Nicolas; Cusson, Michel; Levesque, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive forest insect pests in Canada. Little is known about its intestinal microbiota, which could play a role in digestion, immune protection, communication and/or development. The present study was designed to provide a first characterization of the effects of rearing conditions on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the C. fumiferana midgut microbiota, using a culture-independent approach. Three diets and insect sources were examined: larvae from a laboratory colony reared on a synthetic diet and field-collected larvae reared on balsam fir or black spruce foliage. Bacterial DNA from the larval midguts was extracted to amplify and sequence the V6-V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene, using the Roche 454 GS-FLX technology. Our results showed a dominance of Proteobacteria, mainly Pseudomonas spp., in the spruce budworm midgut, irrespective of treatment group. Taxonomic diversity of the midgut microbiota was greater for larvae reared on synthetic diet than for those collected and reared on host plants, a difference that is likely accounted for by several factors. A greater proportion of bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes in insects fed artificial diet constituted the main difference between this group and those reared on foliage; within the phylum Proteobacteria, the presence of the genus Bradyrhizobium was also unique to insects reared on artificial diet. Strikingly, a Bray-Curtis analysis showed important differences in microbial diversity among the treatment groups, pointing to the importance of diet and environment in defining the spruce budworm midgut microbiota.

  13. Composition of the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) Midgut Microbiota as Affected by Rearing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Mathieu; Comeau, André M.; Derome, Nicolas; Cusson, Michel; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive forest insect pests in Canada. Little is known about its intestinal microbiota, which could play a role in digestion, immune protection, communication and/or development. The present study was designed to provide a first characterization of the effects of rearing conditions on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the C. fumiferana midgut microbiota, using a culture-independent approach. Three diets and insect sources were examined: larvae from a laboratory colony reared on a synthetic diet and field-collected larvae reared on balsam fir or black spruce foliage. Bacterial DNA from the larval midguts was extracted to amplify and sequence the V6-V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene, using the Roche 454 GS-FLX technology. Our results showed a dominance of Proteobacteria, mainly Pseudomonas spp., in the spruce budworm midgut, irrespective of treatment group. Taxonomic diversity of the midgut microbiota was greater for larvae reared on synthetic diet than for those collected and reared on host plants, a difference that is likely accounted for by several factors. A greater proportion of bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes in insects fed artificial diet constituted the main difference between this group and those reared on foliage; within the phylum Proteobacteria, the presence of the genus Bradyrhizobium was also unique to insects reared on artificial diet. Strikingly, a Bray-Curtis analysis showed important differences in microbial diversity among the treatment groups, pointing to the importance of diet and environment in defining the spruce budworm midgut microbiota. PMID:26636571

  14. Transporters involved in glucose and water absorption in the Dysdercus peruvianus (Hemiptera: Pyrrhocoridae) anterior midgut.

    PubMed

    Bifano, Thaís D; Alegria, Thiago G P; Terra, Walter R

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about insect intestinal sugar absorption, in spite of the recent findings, and even less has been published regarding water absorption. The aim of this study was to shed light on putative transporters of water and glucose in the insect midgut. Glucose and water absorptions by the anterior ventriculus of Dysdercus peruvianus midgut were determined by feeding the insects with a glucose and a non-absorbable dye solution, followed by periodical dissection of insects and analysis of ventricular contents. Glucose absorption decreases glucose/dye ratios and water absorption increases dye concentrations. Water and glucose transports are activated (water 50%, glucose 33%) by 50 mM K(2)SO(4) and are inhibited (water 46%, glucose 82%) by 0.2 mM phloretin, the inhibitor of the facilitative hexose transporter (GLUT) or are inhibited (water 45%, glucose 35%) by 0.1 mM phlorizin, the inhibitor of the Na(+)-glucose cotransporter (SGLT). The results also showed that the putative SGLT transports about two times more water relative to glucose than the putative GLUT. These results mean that D. peruvianus uses a GLUT-like transporter and an SGLT-like transporter (with K(+) instead of Na(+)) to absorb dietary glucose and water. A cDNA library from D. peruvianus midgut was screened and we found one sequence homologous to GLUT1, named DpGLUT, and another to a sodium/solute symporter, named DpSGLT. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR studies revealed that DpGLUT and DpSGLTs mRNA were expressed in the anterior midgut, where glucose and water are absorbed, but not in fat body, salivary gland and Malpighian tubules. This is the first report showing the involvement of putative GLUT and SGLT in both water and glucose midgut absorption in insects.

  15. Evaluation of the portal vein after duodenoduodenostomy for congenital duodenal stenosis associated with the preduodenal superior mesenteric vein, situs inversus, polysplenia, and malrotation.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Azuma, Takashi; Yoshida, Tatusyuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Nakahira, Masashi; Nishigaki, Kyoichi; Kawahira, Yoichi; Ueno, Takayoshi

    2007-02-01

    A male infant weighting 2970 g with total situs inversus, polysplenia, malrotation, duodenal stenosis, and complex cardiac anomalies, was admitted to our hospital. At 4 days of age, he underwent surgery that revealed a blood vessel passing over the duodenum from the mesenterium to the porta hepatis. A loose overbridging duodenoduodenostomy was performed to prevent compression of the vessel. The cardiac anomalies were corrected, and he could eat unrestricted diets. At the age of 1 year and 3 months, a 3-dimensional computed tomographic scan demonstrated that the vessel on the duodenum was the superior mesenteric vein (SMV), and it formed the portal vein with the splenic vein at the porta hepatis. Further, the scan revealed no compression of the SMV at the anastomosis. Doppler ultrasonography revealed a normal portal blood flow of 118.6 mL/min. This report describes the junction between the SMV and the splenic vein in a patient who had the SMV passing over the duodenum from the mesenterium. Correctly, patients previously diagnosed with a preduodenal portal vein could have a preduodenal SMV. The loose overbridging duodenoduodenostomy had advantages not only in passage of the anastomosis but also in maintenance of the portal blood flow for the congenital duodenal obstruction with the preduodenal SMV.

  16. [Estimation of the biological age in males of the taiga tick (Ixodes persulcatus: Ixodinae) by fat reserves in the midgut].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, L A

    2012-01-01

    Some criteria for the estimation of the biological and calendar age by the fat storage in midgut cells of Ixodes persulcatus males were established on the basis of examination of ticks from the laboratory culture.

  17. Intestinal peptides as circulating hormones: release of tachykinin-related peptide from the locust and cockroach midgut.

    PubMed

    Winther, A M; Nässel, D R

    2001-04-01

    Tachykinin-related peptides (TRPs) in the locust Locusta migratoria and the cockroach Leucophaea maderae have stimulatory effects on some muscles that are not innervated by TRP-containing neurons. Thus, these tissues may be affected by circulating TRPs. Here, we have investigated whether the midgut is the source of circulating TRPs. TRP-immunoreactive material in the locust midgut is found only in the endocrine cells of the gut epithelium. In both species of insect, the endocrine cells contain several isoforms of TRPs, as determined by immunocytochemistry and a combination of chromatography (HPLC) and enzyme immunoassay (ELISA). The release of TRPs was investigated by ELISA using isolated midguts of the locust and cockroach. Elevated levels of K(+) in the bathing saline induced the release of TRP from the midgut of both species. To examine the release of TRPs into the circulation in vivo, we measured haemolymph levels of TRPs in fed and starved locusts. The concentration of TRP-immunoreactive material in fed locusts was estimated to be 0.15 nmol l(-1), and this increased approximately fourfold in insects starved for 24 h. In accordance with this observation, the content of TRP-immunoreactive material in the midgut was lower in starved locusts than in fed locusts. Although part of the increased blood concentration of TRPs may be due to reduced blood volume, our data suggest that TRPs are released as hormones from the midgut of the locust and cockroach and that this release may be linked to nutritional status.

  18. Blocking of malaria parasite development in mosquito and fecundity reduction by midgut antibodies in Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Suneja, Amita; Gulia, Monika; Gakhar, S K

    2003-02-01

    Rabbits were immunized three times with extracts of Anopheles stephensi midgut. Immunized rabbits showed a high titer of antibodies when characterized by ELISA. We investigated the effect of anti-mosquito midgut antibodies on mosquito fecundity, longevity, mortality, engorgement, and the development of the malaria parasite in mosquitoes. Fecundity was reduced significantly (38%) and similarly hatchability by about 43.5%. There was no statistically significant effect on mortality, longevity, and engorgement. When the mosquito blood meal contained anti-midgut antibodies, fewer oocysts of Plasmodium vivax developed in the mosquito midgut and the proportion of mosquitoes becoming infected was significantly reduced. We also found that the midgut antibodies inhibit the development and/or translocation of the sporozoites. Antisera raised against midgut of A. stephensi recognized eight polypeptides (110, 92, 70, 45, 38, 29, 15, 13 kDa) by Western blotting. Cross-reactive antigens/epitopes present in other tissues of A. stephensi were also examined both by Western blotting and in vivo ELISA. Together, these observations open an avenue for research toward the development of a vector-based malaria parasite transmission blocking vaccine and/or anti-mosquito vaccine.

  19. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  20. Aggregation of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A Toxins upon Binding to Target Insect Larval Midgut Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Arthur I.; Geng, Chaoxian; Wu, Lan

    1999-01-01

    During sporulation, Bacillus thuringiensis produces crystalline inclusions comprised of a mixture of δ-endotoxins. Following ingestion by insect larvae, these inclusion proteins are solubilized, and the protoxins are converted to toxins. These bind specifically to receptors on the surfaces of midgut apical cells and are then incorporated into the membrane to form ion channels. The steps required for toxin insertion into the membrane and possible oligomerization to form a channel have been examined. When bound to vesicles from the midguts of Manduca sexta larvae, the Cry1Ac toxin was largely resistant to digestion with protease K. Only about 60 amino acids were removed from the Cry1Ac amino terminus, which included primarily helix α1. Following incubation of the Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac toxins with vesicles, the preparations were solubilized by relatively mild conditions, and the toxin antigens were analyzed by immunoblotting. In both cases, most of the toxin formed a large, antigenic aggregate of ca. 200 kDa. These toxin aggregates did not include the toxin receptor aminopeptidase N, but interactions with other vesicle components were not excluded. No oligomerization occurred when inactive toxins with mutations in amphipathic helices (α5) and known to insert into the membrane were tested. Active toxins with other mutations in this helix did form oligomers. There was one exception; a very active helix α5 mutant toxin bound very well to membranes, but no oligomers were detected. Toxins with mutations in the loop connecting helices α2 and α3, which affected the irreversible binding to vesicles, also did not oligomerize. There was a greater extent of oligomerization of the Cry1Ac toxin with vesicles from the Heliothis virescens midgut than with those from the M. sexta midgut, which correlated with observed differences in toxicity. Tight binding of virtually the entire toxin molecule to the membrane and the subsequent oligomerization are both important steps in toxicity

  1. Histochemical analysis of the goblet cell matrix in the larval midgut of Manduca sexta

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Lozano, G.; Cajina-Quezada, M.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental analyses were made to histochemically determine the composition of the goblet cell matrix material in the larval midgut of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. Techniques employed following fixation in Carnoy fluid were the periodic acid-Schiff reaction and the alcian blue stain at pH 1.0 and pH 2.5 and following methylation and subsequent saponification. The cumulative evidence suggests that the plug material is an acid mucosubstance.

  2. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season.

  3. Responses of midgut amylases of Helicoverpa armigera to feeding on various host plants.

    PubMed

    Kotkar, Hemlata M; Sarate, Priya J; Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2009-08-01

    Midgut digestive amylases and proteinases of Helicoverpa armigera, a polyphagous and devastating insect pest of economic importance have been studied. We also identified the potential of a sorghum amylase inhibitor against H. armigera midgut amylase. Amylase activities were detected in all the larval instars, pupae, moths and eggs; early instars had lower amylase levels which steadily increased up to the sixth larval instar. Qualitative and quantitative differences in midgut amylases of H. armigera upon feeding on natural and artificial diets were evident. Natural diets were categorized as one or more members of legumes, vegetables, flowers and cereals belonging to different plant families. Amylase activity and isoform patterns varied depending on host plant and/or artificial diet. Artificial diet-fed H. armigera larvae had comparatively high amylase activity and several unique amylase isoforms. Correlation of amylase and proteinase activities of H. armigera with the protein and carbohydrate content of various diets suggested that H. armigera regulates the levels of these digestive enzymes in response to macromolecular composition of the diet. These adjustments in the digestive enzymes of H. armigera may be to obtain better nourishment from the diet and avoid toxicity due to nutritional imbalance. H. armigera, a generalist feeder experiences a great degree of nutritional heterogeneity in its diet. An investigation of the differences in enzyme levels in response to macronutrient balance and imbalance highlight their importance in insect nutrition.

  4. Multiple Modes of Action of the Squamocin in the Midgut Cells of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Sérgio Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2016-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins are botanical compounds with good potential for use as insecticides. In the vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae), squamocin (acetogenin) has been reported to be a larvicide and cytotoxic, but the modes of action of this molecule are still poorly understood. This study evaluated the changes in the cell morphology, and in the expression of genes, for autophagy (Atg1 and Atg8), for membrane ion transporter V-ATPase, and for water channel aquaporin-4 (Aqp4) in the midgut of A. aegypti larvae exposed to squamocin from Annona mucosa Jacq. (Annonaceae). Squamocin showed cytotoxic action with changes in the midgut epithelium and digestive cells of A. aegypti larvae, increase in the expression for autophagy gene Atg1 and Atg8, decrease in the expression of V-ATPase, decrease in the expression of Aqp4 gene in LC20 and inhibition of Apq4 genes in the midgut of this vector in LC50. These multiple modes of action for squamocin are described for the first time in insects, and they are important because different sites of action of squamocin from A. mucosa may reduce the possibility of resistance of A. aegypti to this molecule. PMID:27532504

  5. Discovery of midgut genes for the RNA interference control of corn rootworm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xu; Richtman, Nina M.; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Duncan, Keith E.; Niu, Xiping; Procyk, Lisa A.; Oneal, Meghan A.; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Steimel, Joseph P.; Crane, Virginia C.; Sandahl, Gary; Ritland, Julie L.; Howard, Richard J.; Presnail, James K.; Lu, Albert L.; Wu, Gusui

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new technology for corn rootworm control. This paper presents the discovery of new gene targets - dvssj1 and dvssj2, in western corn rootworm (WCR). Dvssj1 and dvssj2 are orthologs of the Drosophila genes snakeskin (ssk) and mesh, respectively. These genes encode membrane proteins associated with smooth septate junctions (SSJ) which are required for intestinal barrier function. Based on bioinformatics analysis, dvssj1 appears to be an arthropod-specific gene. Diet based insect feeding assays using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting dvssj1 and dvssj2 demonstrate targeted mRNA suppression, larval growth inhibition, and mortality. In RNAi treated WCR, injury to the midgut was manifested by “blebbing” of the midgut epithelium into the gut lumen. Ultrastructural examination of midgut epithelial cells revealed apoptosis and regenerative activities. Transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting dvssj1 show insecticidal activity and significant plant protection from WCR damage. The data indicate that dvssj1 and dvssj2 are effective gene targets for the control of WCR using RNAi technology, by apparent suppression of production of their respective smooth septate junction membrane proteins located within the intestinal lining, leading to growth inhibition and mortality. PMID:27464714

  6. Toxoneuron nigriceps parasitization delays midgut replacement in fifth-instar Heliothis virescens larvae.

    PubMed

    Tettamanti, Gianluca; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Pennacchio, Francesco; de Eguileor, Magda

    2008-05-01

    We have analyzed the effects of Toxoneuron nigriceps parasitization on the midgut development of its host Heliothis virescens. In parasitized H. virescens larvae, the midgut epithelium undergoes a complete replacement, which is qualitatively not different to that observed in synchronous unparasitized larvae, with similar temporal profiles of cell death and metabolic activity. However, the whole gut replacement process is significantly delayed in parasitized larvae, with complete differentiation of the new gut epithelium being observed 4 days later than in unparasitized controls. The administration of juvenile hormone before commitment and of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) after commitment delays and fosters, respectively, the replacement process of the midgut epithelium; moreover, the injection of 20E into developmentally arrested and 20E-deficient host last-instar larvae parasitized by T. nigriceps immediately triggers regular gut development. These hormone-based experiments suggest that endocrine alterations in the larval host, induced by T. nigriceps parasitism, are responsible for the temporal alterations in the gut replacement process. The role of this parasitoid-induced developmental change in the host regulation process is discussed.

  7. Cytotoxic effects of thiamethoxam in the midgut and malpighian tubules of Africanized Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Catae, Aline Fernanda; Roat, Thaisa Cristina; De Oliveira, Regiane Alves; Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio Ferreira; Malaspina, Osmar

    2014-04-01

    Due to its expansion, agriculture has become increasingly dependent on the use of pesticides. However, the indiscriminate use of insecticides has had additional effects on the environment. These products have a broad spectrum of action, and therefore the insecticide affects not only the pests but also non-target insects such as bees, which are important pollinators of agricultural crops and natural environments. Among the most used pesticides, the neonicotinoids are particularly harmful. One of the neonicotinoids of specific concern is thiamethoxam, which is used on a wide variety of crops and is toxic to bees. Thus, this study aimed to analyze the effects of this insecticide in the midgut and Malpighian tubule cells of Africanized Apis mellifera. Newly emerged workers were exposed until 8 days to a diet containing a sublethal dose of thiamethoxam equal to 1/10 of LC₅₀ (0.0428 ng a.i./l L of diet). The bees were dissected and the organs were processed for transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that thiamethoxam is cytotoxic to midgut and Malpighian tubules. In the midgut, the damage was more evident in bees exposed to the insecticide on the first day. On the eighth day, the cells were ultrastructurally intact suggesting a recovery of this organ. The Malpighian tubules showed pronounced alterations on the eighth day of exposure of bees to the insecticide. This study demonstrates that the continuous exposure to a sublethal dose of thiamethoxam can impair organs that are used during the metabolism of the insecticide.

  8. Observations on house fly larvae midgut ultrastructure after Brevibacillus laterosporus ingestion.

    PubMed

    Ruiu, Luca; Satta, Alberto; Floris, Ignazio

    2012-11-01

    The pathological and histopathological course caused by Brevibacillus laterosporus on house fly larvae has been investigated conducting observations on insect behavior and midgut ultrastructure. After dissection and fixation, gut tissues were analyzed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to compare in vivo-treated and non-treated (control) fly specimens. Treated larvae showed extensively reduced feeding and growth rate, then became sluggish and died within 72 h. A progressive midgut epithelium deterioration was observed in treated larvae, compared to the control. Ultrastructural changes consisted of microvilli disruption, cytoplasm vacuolization and general disorganization, endoplasmic reticulum deformation, mitochondria alteration. Deterioration became progressively more dramatic until the infected cells released their content into the gut lumen. Disruption was associated also with midgut muscular sheath and connective tissue. These ultrastructural changes are similar to those widely described for other entomopathogenic bacteria, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, against different insect species. The rapid disruption of cellular fine structure supports a hypothesis based on an interaction of toxins with the epithelial cell membranes reminiscent of the specific B. thuringiensis δ-endotoxins mechanism of action on other insect targets.

  9. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season. PMID:26330094

  10. A Lepidopteran-Specific Gene Family Encoding Valine-Rich Midgut Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  11. The fine structure of the midgut epithelium in a centipede, Scolopendra cingulata (Chilopoda, Scolopendridae), with the special emphasis on epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chajec, Lukasz; Sonakowska, Lidia; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M

    2014-01-01

    Scolopendra cingulata has a tube-shaped digestive system that is divided into three distinct regions: fore-, mid- and hindgut. The midgut is lined with a pseudostratified columnar epithelium which is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. Hemocytes also appear between the digestive cells of the midgut epithelium. The ultrastructure of three types of epithelial cells and hemocytes of the midgut has been described with the special emphasis on the role of regenerative cells in the protection of midgut epithelium. The process of midgut epithelium regeneration proceeds due to the ability of regenerative cells to proliferate and differentiate according to a circadian rhythm. The regenerative cells serve as unipotent stem cells that divide in an asymmetric manner. Additionally, two types of hemocytes have been distinguished among midgut epithelial cells. They enter the midgut epithelium from the body cavity. Because of the fact that numerous microorganisms occur in the cytoplasm of midgut epithelial cells, we discuss the role of hemocytes in elimination of pathogens from the midgut epithelium. The studies were conducted with the use of transmission electron microscope and immunofluorescent methods.

  12. Fine structure of the midgut and Malpighian papillae in Campodea (Monocampa) quilisi Silvestri, 1932 (Hexapoda, Diplura) with special reference to the metal composition and physiological significance of midgut intracellular electron-dense granules.

    PubMed

    Pigino, G; Migliorini, M; Paccagnini, E; Bernini, F; Leonzio, C

    2005-06-01

    The fine structure of the midgut and the Malpighian papillae in Campodea (Monocampa) quilisi Silvestri, 1932 (Hexapoda, Diplura) specimens was described. We observed the presence of electron-dense granules (EDGs) in the midgut epithelial cells, similar in genesis, structure and aspect to the type A spherocrystals described in the midgut epithelium of Collembola and Diplopoda. Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis was used to detect the chemical composition of the granules and to relate it to the concentrations of some potential toxic heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn) in soil and litter. Chemical composition of the granules seems strongly influenced by the presence and bioavailability of heavy metals in the external environment. Specimens from a contaminated abandoned mining and smelting area (Colline Metallifere, southern Tuscany) were able to accumulate Fe, Mn, Zn, Pb and Cu in their midgut EDGs. In addition, we observed that C. (M.) quilisi was able to excrete the metal-containing granules into the external medium by the moulting of the intestinal epithelium. This confirms that the process of ionic retention of midgut cells is particularly significant in animals lacking Malpighian tubules.

  13. Two Leptinotarsa uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylases are specialized for chitin synthesis in larval epidermal cuticle and midgut peritrophic matrix.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Feng; Fu, Jia; Mu, Li-Li; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine-pyrophosphorylase (UAP) is involved in the biosynthesis of chitin, an essential component of the epidermal cuticle and midgut peritrophic matrix (PM) in insects. In the present paper, two putative LdUAP genes were cloned in Leptinotarsa decemlineata. In vivo bioassay revealed that 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide activated the expression of the two LdUAPs, whereas a decrease in 20E by RNA interference (RNAi) of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD and a 20E signaling gene LdFTZ-F1 repressed the expression. Juvenile hormone (JH), a JH analog pyriproxyfen and an increase in JH by RNAi of an allatostatin gene LdAS-C downregulated LdUAP1 but upregulated LdUAP2, whereas a decrease in JH by silencing of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT had converse effects. Thus, expression of LdUAPs responded to both 20E and JH. Moreover, knockdown of LdUAP1 reduced chitin contents in whole larvae and integument samples, thinned tracheal taenidia, impaired larval-larval molt, larval-pupal ecdysis and adult emergence. In contrast, silencing of LdUAP2 significantly reduced foliage consumption, decreased chitin content in midgut samples, damaged PM, and retarded larval growth. The resulting larvae had lighter fresh weights, smaller body sizes and depleted fat body. As a result, the development was arrested. Combined knockdown of LdUAP1 and LdUAP2 caused an additive negative effect. Our data suggest that LdUAP1 and LdUAP2 have specialized functions in biosynthesizing chitin in the epidermal cuticle and PM respectively in L. decemlineata.

  14. Midgut-enriched receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP52F is required for Drosophila development during larva-pupa transition.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Abirami; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Chen, Dong-Yuan; Chen, Guang-Chao; Meng, Tzu-Ching

    2013-01-01

    To date our understanding of Drosophila receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPs) in the regulation of signal transduction is limited. Of the seven R-PTPs identified in flies, six are involved in the axon guidance that occurs during embryogenesis. However, whether and how R-PTPs may control key steps of Drosophila development is not clear. In this study we investigated the potential role of Drosophila R-PTPs in developmental processes outside the neuronal system and beyond the embryogenesis stage. Through systematic data mining of available microarray databases, we found the mRNA level of PTP52F to be highly enriched in the midgut of flies at the larva-pupa transition. This finding was confirmed by gut tissue staining with a specific antibody. The unique spatiotemporal expression of PTP52F suggests that it is possibly involved in regulating metamorphosis during the transformation from larva to pupa. To test this hypothesis, we employed RNA interference to examine the defects of transgenic flies. We found that ablation of endogenous PTP52F led to high lethality characterized by the pharate adult phenotype, occurring due to post pupal eclosion failure. These results show that PTP52F plays an indispensable role during the larva-pupa transition. We also found that PTP52F could be reclassified as a member of the subtype R3 PTPs instead of as an unclassified R-PTP without a human ortholog, as suggested previously. Together, these findings suggest that Drosophila R-PTPs may control metamorphosis and other biological processes beyond our current knowledge.

  15. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N.; Martins, Rafael M.; Braz, Gloria R.C.; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  16. Phase 3 Trial of (177)Lu-Dotatate for Midgut Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Strosberg, Jonathan; El-Haddad, Ghassan; Wolin, Edward; Hendifar, Andrew; Yao, James; Chasen, Beth; Mittra, Erik; Kunz, Pamela L; Kulke, Matthew H; Jacene, Heather; Bushnell, David; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Baum, Richard P; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Caplin, Martyn; Lebtahi, Rachida; Hobday, Timothy; Delpassand, Ebrahim; Van Cutsem, Eric; Benson, Al; Srirajaskanthan, Rajaventhan; Pavel, Marianne; Mora, Jaime; Berlin, Jordan; Grande, Enrique; Reed, Nicholas; Seregni, Ettore; Öberg, Kjell; Lopera Sierra, Maribel; Santoro, Paola; Thevenet, Thomas; Erion, Jack L; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Krenning, Eric

    2017-01-12

    Background Patients with advanced midgut neuroendocrine tumors who have had disease progression during first-line somatostatin analogue therapy have limited therapeutic options. This randomized, controlled trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of lutetium-177 ((177)Lu)-Dotatate in patients with advanced, progressive, somatostatin-receptor-positive midgut neuroendocrine tumors. Methods We randomly assigned 229 patients who had well-differentiated, metastatic midgut neuroendocrine tumors to receive either (177)Lu-Dotatate (116 patients) at a dose of 7.4 GBq every 8 weeks (four intravenous infusions, plus best supportive care including octreotide long-acting repeatable [LAR] administered intramuscularly at a dose of 30 mg) ((177)Lu-Dotatate group) or octreotide LAR alone (113 patients) administered intramuscularly at a dose of 60 mg every 4 weeks (control group). The primary end point was progression-free survival. Secondary end points included the objective response rate, overall survival, safety, and the side-effect profile. The final analysis of overall survival will be conducted in the future as specified in the protocol; a prespecified interim analysis of overall survival was conducted and is reported here. Results At the data-cutoff date for the primary analysis, the estimated rate of progression-free survival at month 20 was 65.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50.0 to 76.8) in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group and 10.8% (95% CI, 3.5 to 23.0) in the control group. The response rate was 18% in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group versus 3% in the control group (P<0.001). In the planned interim analysis of overall survival, 14 deaths occurred in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group and 26 in the control group (P=0.004). Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and lymphopenia occurred in 1%, 2%, and 9%, respectively, of patients in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group as compared with no patients in the control group, with no evidence of renal toxic effects during the observed time frame

  17. Protein expression in the midgut of sugar-fed Aedes albopictus females

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus is a vector for several fatal arboviruses in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. The midgut of the mosquito is the first barrier that pathogens must overcome to establish infection and represents one of the main immunologically active sites of the insect. Nevertheless, little is known about the proteins involved in the defense against pathogens, and even in the processing of food, and the detoxification of metabolites. The identification of proteins exclusively expressed in the midgut is the first step in understanding the complex physiology of this tissue and can provide insight into the mechanisms of pathogen-vector interaction. However, identification of the locally expressed proteins presents a challenge because the Ae. albopictus genome has not been sequenced. Methods In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) was combined with liquid chromatography in line with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and data mining to identify the major proteins in the midgut of sugar-fed Ae. albopictus females. Results Fifty-six proteins were identified by sequence similarity to entries from the Ae. aegypti genome. In addition, two hypothetical proteins were experimentally confirmed. According to the gene ontology analysis, the identified proteins were classified into 16 clusters of biological processes. Use of the STRING database to investigate protein functional associations revealed five functional networks among the identified proteins, including a network for carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, a group associated with ATP production and a network of proteins that interact during detoxification of toxic free radicals, among others. This analysis allowed the assignment of a potential role for proteins with unknown function based on their functional association with other characterized proteins. Conclusion Our findings represent the first proteome map of the Ae. albopictus midgut and denotes the first steps towards the

  18. Total management of short gut secondary to midgut volvulus without prolonged total parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J; MacLean, W C; Kolbach, S; Shermeta, D W

    1978-12-01

    Absorption studies in rats have shown that intestinal adaptation after catastrophic injury can be stimulated by early enteral feeding. Using this concept, we have devised a technique of early initiation and advancement of oral feedings that begins with Cho-Free and Polycose and gradually adds sucrose and MCT in increasing proportions. The increasing complexity and caloric density of this diet provide sufficient nutrition to allow weaning from total parenteral alimentation within 2--3 wk. Our preliminary experience in babies with midgut volvulus, necrotizing enterocolitis, and gastroschisis has been successful and uncomplicated. These patients have demonstrated consistent weight gain and have been spared the complications associated with prolonged parenteral alimentation.

  19. Acute exposure of mercury chloride stimulates the tissue regeneration program and reactive oxygen species production in the Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Xiaochun; Luo, Hongjie; Zhao, Lingling; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We used Drosophila as an animal model to study the digestive tract in response to the exposure of inorganic mercury (HgCl2). We found that after oral administration, mercury was mainly sequestered within the midgut. This resulted in increased cell death, which in turn stimulated the tissue regeneration program, including accelerated proliferation and differentiation of the intestinal stem cells (ISCs). We further demonstrated that these injuries correlate closely with the excessive production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), as vitamin E, an antioxidant reagent, efficiently suppressed the HgCl2-induced phenotypes of midgut and improved the viability. We propose that the Drosophila midgut could serve as a suitable model to study the treatment of acute hydrargyrism on the digestive systems.

  20. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of midgut in silkworm infected with Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kun; Deng, Xiang-Yuan; Shang, Meng-Ke; Qin, Guang-Xing; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2017-01-30

    Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) specifically infects the epithelial cells in the midgut of silkworm and causes them to death, which negatively affects the sericulture industry. In order to determine the midgut response at the protein levels to the virus infection, differential proteomes of the silkworm midgut responsive to BmCPV infection were identified with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). 193, 408, 189 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were reliably quantified by iTRAQ analysis in the midgut of BmCPV-infected and control larvae at 24, 48, 72h post infection (hpi) respectively. KEGG enrichment analysis showed that Oxidative phosphorylation, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, steroid hormone biosynthesis were the significant pathways (Q value≤0.05) both at 24 and 48hpi. qRT-PCR was used to further verify gene transcription of 30 DEPs from iTRAQ, showing that the regulations of 24 genes at the transcript level were consistent with those at the proteomic level. Moreover, the cluster analysis of the three time groups showed that there were seven co-regulated DEPs including BGIBMGA002620-PA, which was a putative p62/sequestosome-1 protein in silkworm. It was upregulated at both the mRNA level and the proteomic level and may play an important role in regulating the autophagy and apoptosis (especially apoptosis) induced by BmCPV infection. This was the first report using an iTRAQ approach to analyze proteomes of the silkworm midgut against BmCPV infection, which contributes to understanding the defense mechanisms of silkworm midgut to virus infection.

  1. A midgut lysate of the Riptortus pedestris has antibacterial activity against LPS O-antigen-deficient Burkholderia mutants.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ho Am; Seo, Eun Sil; Seong, Min Young; Lee, Bok Luel

    2017-02-01

    Riptortus pedestris, a common pest in soybean fields, harbors a symbiont Burkholderia in a specialized posterior midgut region of insects. Every generation of second nymphs acquires new Burkholderia cells from the environment. We compared in vitro cultured Burkholderia with newly in vivo colonized Burkholderia in the host midgut using biochemical approaches. The bacterial cell envelope of in vitro cultured and in vivo Burkholderia differed in structure, as in vivo bacteria lacked lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen. The LPS O-antigen deficient bacteria had a reduced colonization rate in the host midgut compared with that of the wild-type Burkholderia. To determine why LPS O-antigen-deficient bacteria are less able to colonize the host midgut, we examined in vitro survival rates of three LPS O-antigen-deficient Burkholderia mutants and lysates of five different midgut regions. The LPS O-antigen-deficient mutants were highly susceptible when cultured with the lysate of a specific first midgut region (M1), indicating that the M1 lysate contains unidentified substance(s) capable of killing LPS O-antigen-deficient mutants. We identified a 17 kDa protein from the M1 lysate, which was enriched in the active fractions. The N-terminal sequence of the protein was determined to be a soybean Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor. These data suggest that the 17 kDa protein, which was originated from a main soybean source of the R. pedestris host, has antibacterial activity against the LPS O-antigen deficient (rough-type) Burkholderia.

  2. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Crava, Cristina M; Jakubowska, Agata K; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity.

  3. A GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase is a functional midgut receptor of Cry11Aa toxin in Aedes aegypti larvae

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Luisa E.; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2005-01-01

    A 65 kDa GPI (glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol)-anchored ALP (alkaline phosphatase) was characterized as a functional receptor of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin in Aedes aegypti midgut cells. Two (a 100 kDa and a 65 kDa) GPI-anchored proteins that bound Cry11Aa toxin were preferentially extracted after treatment of BBMV (brush boder membrane vesicles) from Ae. aegypti midgut epithelia with phospholipase C. The 65 kDa protein was further purified by toxin affinity chromatography. The 65 kDa protein showed ALP activity. The peptide-displaying phages (P1.BBMV and P8.BBMV) that bound to the 65 kDa GPI–ALP (GPI-anchored ALP) and competed with the Cry11Aa toxin to bind to BBMV were isolated by selecting BBMV-binding peptide-phages by biopanning. GPI–ALP was shown to be preferentially distributed in Ae. aegypti in the posterior part of the midgut and in the caeca, by using P1.BBMV binding to fixed midgut tissue sections to determine the location of GPI–ALP. Cry11Aa binds to the same regions of the midgut and competed with P1.BBMV and P8.BBMV to bind to BBMV. The importance of this interaction was demonstrated by the in vivo attenuation of Cry11Aa toxicity in the presence of these phages. Our results shows that GPI–ALP is an important receptor molecule involved in Cry11Aa interaction with midgut cells and toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae. PMID:16255715

  4. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Crava, Cristina M.; Jakubowska, Agata K.; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity. PMID:25993013

  5. [Studies of the biological age in adult taiga ticks Ixodes persulcatus (Ixodinae)].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, L A

    2013-01-01

    The history of studies of the biological age in ixodid ticks is discussed. A method of estimation of the biological age in adult ticks of the genus Ixodes by the degree of fat inclusions in midgut cells and in the fat body is developed. An "age scale" for the determination of the calendar age was assumed.

  6. Restriction of viral dissemination from the midgut determines incompetence of small brown planthopper as a vector of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Hongyan; Mao, Qianzhuo; Liu, Qifei; Wei, Taiyun

    2012-08-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a fijivirus, is transmitted by the white-backed planthopper in a persistent-propagative manner. In this study, we found that another planthopper species, the small brown planthopper (SBPH), could acquire SRBSDV but not transmit it. To identify the transmission barrier for SRBSDV in SBPHs, sequential infection by SRBSDV in the organs of SBPHs was studied with immunofluorescence for viral antigens. SRBSDV initially entered the epithelial cells of the midgut, then viroplasms, the sites for viral replication, formed in the midgut of viruliferous SBPHs. Furthermore, SRBSDV spread within the midgut, but failed to disseminate from the midgut into the hemocoel or into the salivary glands. All these results indicated that the inability of SBPH to transmit SRBSDV could be due to the restriction of viral dissemination from the midgut of SBPH, which led to the failure of viral spread to the salivary glands for virus transmission.

  7. Glutathione S-transferase in the midgut tissue of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars exposed to dietary cadmium.

    PubMed

    Vlahović, Milena; Ilijin, Larisa; Mrdaković, Marija; Todorović, Dajana; Matić, Dragana; Lazarević, Jelica; Mataruga, Vesna Perić

    2016-06-01

    Activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) in midgut of gypsy moth caterpillars exposed to 10 and 30μg Cd/g dry food was examined. Based on the enzyme reaction through conjugation with glutathione, overall activity remained unaltered after acute and chronic treatment. No-observed-effect-concentration (10μg Cd/g dry food) significantly increased activity only after 3-day recovery following cadmium administration. Almost all comparisons of the indices of phenotypic plasticity revealed statistically significant differences. Despite the facts that GST has important role in xenobiotic biotransformation, our results indicate that this enzyme in insect midgut does not represent the key factor in cadmium detoxification.

  8. Mosquito ingestion of antibodies against mosquito midgut microbiota improves conversion of ookinetes to oocysts for Plasmodium falciparum, but not P. yoelii

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Jefferson A.; Pumpuni, Charles B.; Beier, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The mosquito midgut is a site of complex interactions between the mosquito, the malaria parasite and the resident bacterial flora. In laboratory experiments, we observed significant enhancement of Plasmodium falciparum oocyst production when Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes were membrane-fed on infected blood containing gametocytes from in vitro cultures mixed with sera from rabbits immunized with A. gambiae midguts. To identify specific mechanisms, we evaluated whether the immune sera was interfering with the usual limiting activity of gram-negative bacteria in An. gambiae midguts. Enhancement of P. falciparum infection rates occurred at some stage between the ookinete and oocyst stage and was associated with greater numbers of oocysts in mosquitoes fed on immune sera. The same immune sera did not affect the sporogonic development of P. yoelii, a rodent malaria parasite. Not only did antibodies in the immune sera recognize several types of midgut-derived gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas spp. and Cedecea spp.), but gentamicin provided in the sugar meal 3 days before an infectious P. falciparum blood meal mixed with immune sera eliminated the enhancing effect. These results suggest that gram-negative bacteria, which normally impair P. falciparum development between the ookinete and oocyst stage, were altered by specific anti-bacterial antibodies produced by immunizing rabbits with non-antibiotic-treated midgut lysates. Because of the differences in developmental kinetics between human and rodent malaria species, the anti-bacterial antibodies had no effect on P. yoelii because their ookinetes leave the midgut much earlier than P. falciparum and so are not influenced as strongly by resident midgut bacteria. While this study highlights the complex interactions occurring between the parasite, mosquito, and midgut microbiota, the ultimate goal is to determine the influence of midgut microbiota on Plasmodium development in anopheline midguts in malaria

  9. Bacteria in midguts of field-collected Anopheles albimanus block Plasmodium vivax sporogonic development.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ceron, Lilia; Santillan, Frida; Rodriguez, Mario H; Mendez, Domingo; Hernandez-Avila, Juan E

    2003-05-01

    Bacterial infections were investigated in midguts of insectary and field-collected Anopheles albimanus Weidemann from southern Mexico. Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter amnigenus 2, Enterobacter sp., and Serratia sp. were isolated in field samples obtained in 1998, but only Enterobacter sp. was recovered in field samples of 1997 and no bacteria were isolated from insectary specimens. These bacteria were offered along with Plasmodium vivax infected blood to aseptic insectary An. albimanus, and the number of infected mosquitoes as well as the oocyst densities assessed after 7d. Plasmodium vivax infections in mosquitoes co-infected with En. amnigenus 2, En. cloacae, and S. marcensces were 53, 17, and 210 times, respectively, lower than in control mosquitoes, and the mean oocyst density in mosquitoes co-infected with En. cloacae was 2.5 times lower than in controls. Mortality was 13 times higher in S. marcensces-infected mosquitoes compared with controls. The overall midgut bacterial infection in mosquito field populations may influence P. vivax transmission, and could contribute to explain the annual variations in malaria incidence observed in the area.

  10. Modulation of Malaria Infection in Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes Exposed to Natural Midgut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tchioffo, Majoline T.; Boissière, Anne; Churcher, Thomas S.; Abate, Luc; Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Nsango, Sandrine E.; Awono-Ambéné, Parfait H.; Christen, Richard; Berry, Antoine; Morlais, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    The development of Plasmodium falciparum within the Anopheles gambiae mosquito relies on complex vector-parasite interactions, however the resident midgut microbiota also plays an important role in mediating parasite infection. In natural conditions, the mosquito microbial flora is diverse, composed of commensal and symbiotic bacteria. We report here the isolation of culturable midgut bacteria from mosquitoes collected in the field in Cameroon and their identification based on the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We next measured the effect of selected natural bacterial isolates on Plasmodium falciparum infection prevalence and intensity over multiple infectious feedings and found that the bacteria significantly reduced the prevalence and intensity of infection. These results contrast with our previous study where the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae positively correlated with P. falciparum infection (Boissière et al. 2012). The oral infection of bacteria probably led to the disruption of the gut homeostasis and activated immune responses, and this pinpoints the importance of studying microbe-parasite interactions in natural conditions. Our results indicate that the effect of bacterial exposure on P. falciparum infection varies with factors from the parasite and the human host and calls for deeper dissection of these parameters for accurate interpretation of bacterial exposure results in laboratory settings. PMID:24324714

  11. Exosome Secretion by the Parasitic Protozoan Leishmania within the Sand Fly Midgut.

    PubMed

    Atayde, Vanessa Diniz; Aslan, Hamide; Townsend, Shannon; Hassani, Kasra; Kamhawi, Shaden; Olivier, Martin

    2015-11-03

    Despite several studies describing the secretion of exosomes by Leishmania in vitro, observation of their formation and release in vivo has remained a major challenge. Herein, we show that Leishmania constitutively secretes exosomes within the lumen of the sand fly midgut through a mechanism homologous to the mammalian pathway. Through egestion experiments, we demonstrate that Leishmania exosomes are part of the sand fly inoculum and are co-egested with the parasite during the insect's bite, possibly influencing the host infectious process. Indeed, co-inoculation of mice footpads with L. major plus midgut-isolated or in-vitro-isolated L. major exosomes resulted in a significant increase in footpad swelling. Notably, co-injections produced exacerbated lesions through overinduction of inflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-17a. Our data indicate that Leishmania exosomes are an integral part of the parasite's infectious life cycle, and we propose to add these vesicles to the repertoire of virulence factors associated with vector-transmitted infections.

  12. West Nile Virus Infection Alters Midgut Gene Expression in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Smartt, Chelsea T.; Richards, Stephanie L.; Anderson, Sheri L.; Erickson, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in gene expression in the midgut of female Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus exposed to blood meals containing 6.8 logs plaque-forming units/mL of West Nile virus (WNV) were studied by fluorescent differential display. Twenty-six different cDNAs exhibited reproducible differences after feeding on infected blood. Of these, 21 cDNAs showed an increase in expression, and 5 showed a decrease in expression as a result of WNV presence in the blood meal. GenBank database searches showed that one clone with increased expression, CQ G12A2, shares 94% identity with a leucine-rich repeat-containing protein from Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and 32% identity to Toll-like receptors from Aedes aegypti. We present the first cDNA clone isolated from female Cx. p. quinquefasciatus midgut tissue whose expression changes on exposure to WNV. This cDNA represents a mosquito gene that is an excellent candidate for interacting with WNV in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and may play a role in disease transmission. PMID:19635880

  13. Exosome secretion by the parasitic protozoan Leishmania within the sand fly midgut

    PubMed Central

    Atayde, Vanessa Diniz; Suau, Hamide Aslan; Townsend, Shannon; Hassani, Kasra; Kamhawi, Shaden; Olivier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite several studies describing the secretion of exosomes by Leishmania in vitro, observation of their formation and release in vivo has remained a major challenge. Herein, we show that Leishmania constitutively secretes exosomes within the lumen of the sand fly midgut through a mechanism homologous to the mammalian pathway. Through egestion experiments, we demonstrate that Leishmania exosomes are part of the sand fly inoculum and are co-egested with the parasite during the insect’s bite possibly influencing the host infectious process. Indeed, co-inoculation of mice footpads with L. major plus midgut-isolated or in vitro-isolated L. major exosomes resulted in a significant increase in footpad swelling. Notably, co-injections produced exacerbated lesions through overinduction of inflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-17a. Our data indicate that Leishmania exosomes are an integral part of the parasite’s infectious life cycle and propose to add these vesicles to the repertoire of virulence factors associated to vector-transmitted infections. PMID:26565909

  14. Malaria parasites form filamentous cell-to-cell connections during reproduction in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Ingrid; Sologub, Ludmilla; Williamson, Kim C; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Reininger, Luc; Doerig, Christian; Eksi, Saliha; Kombila, Davy U; Frank, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele

    2011-04-01

    Physical contact is important for the interaction between animal cells, but it can represent a major challenge for protists like malaria parasites. Recently, novel filamentous cell-cell contacts have been identified in different types of eukaryotic cells and termed nanotubes due to their morphological appearance. Nanotubes represent small dynamic membranous extensions that consist of F-actin and are considered an ancient feature evolved by eukaryotic cells to establish contact for communication. We here describe similar tubular structures in the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum, which emerge from the surfaces of the forming gametes upon gametocyte activation in the mosquito midgut. The filaments can exhibit a length of > 100 μm and contain the F-actin isoform actin 2. They actively form within a few minutes after gametocyte activation and persist until the zygote transforms into the ookinete. The filaments originate from the parasite plasma membrane, are close ended and express adhesion proteins on their surfaces that are typically found in gametes, like Pfs230, Pfs48/45 or Pfs25, but not the zygote surface protein Pfs28. We show that these tubular structures represent long-distance cell-to-cell connections between sexual stage parasites and demonstrate that they meet the characteristics of nanotubes. We propose that malaria parasites utilize these adhesive "nanotubes" in order to facilitate intercellular contact between gametes during reproduction in the mosquito midgut.

  15. The Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3A lyses midgut epithelium cells of susceptible insects.

    PubMed

    Yu, C G; Mullins, M A; Warren, G W; Koziel, M G; Estruch, J J

    1997-02-01

    The Vip3A protein is a member of a newly discovered class of vegetative insecticidal proteins with activity against a broad spectrum of lepidopteran insects. Histopathological observations indicate that Vip3A ingestion by susceptible insects such as the black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) causes gut paralysis at concentrations as low as 4 ng/cm2 of diet and complete lysis of gut epithelium cells resulting in larval death at concentrations above 40 ng/cm2. The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis), a nonsusceptible insect, does not develop any pathology upon ingesting Vip3A. While proteolytic processing of the Vip3A protein by midgut fluids obtained from susceptible and nonsusceptible insects is comparable, in vivo immunolocalization studies show that Vip3a binding is restricted to gut cells of susceptible insects. Therefore, the insect host range for Vip3A seems to be determined by its ability to bind gut cells. These results indicate that midgut epithelium cells of susceptible insects are the primary target for the Vip3A insecticidal protein and that their subsequent lysis is the primary mechanism of lethality. Disruption of gut cells appears to be the strategy adopted by the most effective insecticidal proteins.

  16. Cadmium-binding proteins in midgut gland of freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.; Torreblanca, A.; Medina, J.; Diza-Mayans, J.

    1989-02-01

    Metallothioneins, metal binding proteins, were originally isolated and characterized by Margoshes and Vallee. These proteins have a high affinity for various heavy metals, particularly cadmium and mercury and have extensively been studied in mammals. Metal binding proteins have been observed in a variety of marine invertebrates; however, there is very little information available on metal binding proteins in freshwater invertebrates, and particularly in freshwater crustaceans. Cadmium is an ubiquitous non essential element which possesses high toxicity to aquatic organisms. Cadmium binding proteins observed in invertebrates have similar characteristics to mammalian metallothioneins. In 1978, the American red crayfish appeared in Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields (Valencia, Spain). Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields waters are subjected to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. In previous reports the authors studied the toxicity and accumulation of cadmium on Procambarus clarkii of Albufera Lake. This crayfish shows a high resistance to cadmium and a great accumulation rate of this metal in several tissues, including midgut gland. Since Procambarus clarkii shows a high resistance to cadmium, the presence of cadmium binding proteins (Cd-BP) in midgut gland of these crayfish would be expected. This report describes results on the characterization of Cd-BPs obtained from cadmium exposed crayfish Procambarus clarkii, demonstrating their presence in this freshwater crayfish.

  17. Identification of Holotrichia oblita midgut proteins that bind to Cry8-like toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis and assembling of H. oblita midgut tissue transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Huang, Ying; Shu, Changlong; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Liu, Chunqing; Song, Fuping; Lai, Jinsheng; Zhang, Jie

    2017-04-07

    The Bacillus thuringiensis strain HBF-18 (CGMCC2070), containing two cry genes (cry8-like and cry8Ga), is toxic to Holotrichia oblita larvae. Both Cry8-like and Cry8Ga proteins are active against this insect pest, while Cry8-like is the more toxic protein. To analyze the binding characteristics of Cry8-like and Cry8Ga proteins to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) in H. oblita larvae, binding assays were conducted with a fluorescent DyLight488-labeled Cry8-like toxin. Results of binding saturation assays demonstrated that Cry8-like binds specifically to binding sites on BBMV from H. oblita and heterologous competition assays revealed that Cry8Ga shared binding sites with Cry8-like. Furthermore, Cry8-like-binding proteins in midgut from H. oblita larvae were identified by pull-down assays, and by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In addition, the H. oblita midgut transcriptome was assembled by high-throughput RNA sequencing and used for identification of Cry8-like binding proteins. Eight Cry8-like-binding proteins were obtained from pull-down assays conducted with BBMV. The LC-MS/MS data of these proteins successfully matched with the H. oblita transcriptome, and the BLASTX results identified five proteins as serine protease, transferrin-like, ATPase catalytic subunit, and actin. These identified Cry8-like-binding proteins were different with those previously confirmed as receptors for Cry1A proteins in lepidopteran insect species such as aminopeptidase, alkaline phosphatase and cadherin.Importance:Holotrichia oblita is one of main soil-dwelling pests in China. The larvae damage the roots of crops, and resulted in significant yield reduction and economic losses. It is difficult to control principally due to its soil living habits. In recent years, some Cry8 toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis were shown to be active against this pest. The study of the mechanism of action of these Cry8 toxins is needed for their effective use in the control

  18. The four serotypes of dengue recognize the same putative receptors in Aedes aegypti midgut and Ae. albopictus cells

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Curiel, Ricardo F; Esquinca-Avilés, Héctor Armando; Tovar, Rosalinda; Díaz-Badillo, Álvaro; Camacho-Nuez, Minerva; Muñoz, María de Lourdes

    2006-01-01

    Background Dengue viruses (DENV) attach to the host cell surface and subsequently enter the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several primary and low affinity co-receptors for this flavivirus have been identified. However, the presence of these binding molecules on the cell surface does not necessarily render the cell susceptible to infection. Determination of which of them serve as bona fide receptors for this virus in the vector may be relevant to treating DENV infection and in designing control strategies. Results (1) Overlay protein binding assay showed two proteins with molecular masses of 80 and 67 kDa (R80 and R67). (2) Specific antibodies against these two proteins inhibited cell binding and infection. (3) Both proteins were bound by all four serotypes of dengue virus. (4) R80 and R67 were purified by affinity chromatography from Ae. aegypti mosquito midguts and from Ae albopictus C6/36 cells. (5) In addition, a protein with molecular mass of 57 kDa was purified by affinity chromatography from the midgut extracts. (6) R80 and R67 from radiolabeled surface membrane proteins of C6/36 cells were immunoprecipitated by antibodies against Ae. aegypti midgut. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that R67 and R80 are receptors for the four serotypes of dengue virus in the midgut cells of Ae. aegypti and in C6/36 Ae. albopictus cells. PMID:17014723

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Strains of Serratia spp. from the Midgut of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Dong; Hill-Clemons, Casey; Carissimo, Guillaume; Yu, Wanqin; Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the annotated draft genome sequences of two strains of Serratia spp., Ag1 and Ag2, isolated from the midgut of two different strains of Anopheles gambiae. The genomes of these two strains are almost identical. PMID:25767231

  20. Effects of periplocoside X on midgut cells and digestive enzymes activity of the soldiers of red imported fire ant.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zeng, Xin-Nian

    2013-07-01

    The pathological effects of ingested periplocoside X, an insecticidal component isolated from the root of Periploca sepium Bunge, on the midgut epithelial cells of the soldiers of red imported fire ant were studied and the symptom was described. The results showed that periplocoside X could induce a severe, time-dependent cytotoxicity in the midgut epithelial cells. An optical microscopy showed that epithelial cells swelled firstly and then lysed. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that numerous swollen lysosomes were appeared, microvilli were disrupted and sloughed off, and the numbers of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria decreased sharply in earlier stage. Numerous vacuoles were observed in the later stage. Finally, periplocoside X resulted in cell death by cytolysis. Assay of main three digestive enzymes activity indicated that amylase activity was significantly inhibited, but no significant changes were seen for lipase activity and total protease activity. So it is suggested that periplocoside X induced mainly to organic damage of midgut epithelium cells of insect. In all, insect midgut is one of targets for periplocoside X.

  1. Morphological abnormalities and cell death in the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) midgut associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    PubMed Central

    Ghanim, Murad; Fattah-Hosseini, Somayeh; Levy, Amit; Cilia, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) is a phloem-limited, gram-negative, fastidious bacterium that is associated with the development of citrus greening disease, also known as Huanglongbing (HLB). CLas is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri, in a circulative manner. Two major barriers to transmission within the insect are the midgut and the salivary glands. We performed a thorough microscopic analysis within the insect midgut following exposure to CLas-infected citrus trees. We observed changes in nuclear architecture, including pyknosis and karyorrhexis as well as changes to the actin cytoskeleton in CLas-exposed midgut cells. Further analyses showed that the changes are likely due to the activation of programmed cell death as assessed by Annexin V staining and DNA fragmentation assays. These results suggest that exposure to CLas-infected trees induces apoptotic responses in the psyllid midgut that should be further investigated. Understanding the adaptive significance of the apoptotic response has the potential to create new approaches for controlling HLB. PMID:27630042

  2. Live imaging of baculovirus infection of midgut epithelium cells: a functional assay of per os infectivity factors.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jingfang; van Lent, Jan W M; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M

    2014-11-01

    The occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) of baculoviruses are responsible for oral infection of insect hosts, whereas budded viruses (BVs) are responsible for systemic infection within the host. The ODV membrane proteins play crucial roles in mediating virus entry into midgut epithelium cells to initiate infection and are important factors in host-range determination. For Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), seven conserved ODV membrane proteins have been shown to be essential for oral infectivity and are called per os infectivity factors (PIFs). Information on the function of the individual PIF proteins in virus entry is limited, partly due to the lack of a good in vitro system for monitoring ODV entry. Here, we constructed a baculovirus with EGFP fused to the nucleocapsid to monitor virus entry into primary midgut epithelium cells ex vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The EGFP-labelled virus showed similar BV virulence and ODV infectivity as WT virus. The ability to bind and enter host cells was then visualized for WT AcMNPV and viruses with mutations in P74 (PIF0), PIF1 or PIF2, showing that P74 is required for ODV binding, whilst PIF1 and PIF2 play important roles in the entry of ODV after binding to midgut cells. This is the first live imaging of ODV entry into midgut cells and complements the genetic and biochemical evidence for the role of PIFs in the oral infection process.

  3. The effects of Bt Cry1Ie toxin on bacterial diversity in the midgut of Apis mellifera ligustica (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hui-Ru; Geng, Li-Li; Li, Yun-He; Wang, Qiang; Diao, Qing-Yun; Zhou, Ting; Dai, Ping-Li

    2016-01-01

    The honey bee has been regarded as a key species in the environmental risk assessment of biotech crops. Here, the potential adverse effects of Cry1Ie toxin on the midgut bacteria of the worker bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) were investigated under laboratory conditions. Newly emerged bees were fed with different concentrations of Cry1Ie toxin syrups (20 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL, and 20 μg/mL), pure sugar syrup, and 48 ppb of imidacloprid syrups, then sampled after 15 and 30 d. We characterized the dominant midgut bacteria and compared the composition and structure of the midgut bacterial community in all samples using the Illumina MiSeq platform targeting the V3–V4 regions of 16S rDNA. No significant differences in the diversity of the midgut bacteria were observed between the five treatments. This work was the first to show the effects of Cry1Ie toxin on honey bees, and our study provided a theoretical basis for the biosafety assessment of transgenic Cry1Ie maize. PMID:27090812

  4. Amino acids trigger down-regulation of superoxide via TORC pathway in the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Gandara, Ana Caroline P.; Oliveira, José Henrique M.; Nunes, Rodrigo D.; Goncalves, Renata L.S.; Dias, Felipe A.; Hecht, Fabio; Fernandes, Denise C.; Genta, Fernando A.; Laurindo, Francisco R.M.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2016-01-01

    Sensing incoming nutrients is an important and critical event for intestinal cells to sustain life of the whole organism. The TORC is a major protein complex involved in monitoring the nutritional status and is activated by elevated amino acid concentrations. An important feature of haematophagy is that huge amounts of blood are ingested in a single meal, which results in the release of large quantities of amino acids, together with the haemoglobin prosthetic group, haem, which decomposes hydroperoxides and propagates oxygen-derived free radicals. Our previous studies demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were diminished in the mitochondria and midgut of the Dengue fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, immediately after a blood meal. We proposed that this mechanism serves to avoid oxidative damage that would otherwise be induced by haem following a blood meal. Studies also performed in mosquitoes have shown that blood or amino acids controls protein synthesis through TORC activation. It was already proposed, in different models, a link between ROS and TOR, however, little is known about TOR signalling in insect midgut nor about the involvement of ROS in this pathway. Here, we studied the effect of a blood meal on ROS production in the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus. We observed that blood meal amino acids decreased ROS levels in the R. prolixus midgut immediately after feeding, via lowering mitochondrial superoxide production and involving the amino acid-sensing TORC pathway. PMID:26945025

  5. Ecdysone-Induced Receptor Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP52F Regulates Drosophila Midgut Histolysis by Enhancement of Autophagy and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Abirami; Peng, Wen-Hsin; Yu, Ya-Ting; Sang, Tzu-Kang

    2014-01-01

    The rapid removal of larval midgut is a critical developmental process directed by molting hormone ecdysone during Drosophila metamorphosis. To date, it remains unclear how the stepwise events can link the onset of ecdysone signaling to the destruction of larval midgut. This study investigated whether ecdysone-induced expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP52F regulates this process. The mutation of the Ptp52F gene caused significant delay in larval midgut degradation. Transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (TER94), a regulator of ubiquitin proteasome system, was identified as a substrate and downstream effector of PTP52F in the ecdysone signaling. The inducible expression of PTP52F at the puparium formation stage resulted in dephosphorylation of TER94 on its Y800 residue, ensuring the rapid degradation of ubiquitylated proteins. One of the proteins targeted by dephosphorylated TER94 was found to be Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (DIAP1), which was rapidly proteolyzed in cells with significant expression of PTP52F. Importantly, the reduced level of DIAP1 in response to inducible PTP52F was essential not only for the onset of apoptosis but also for the initiation of autophagy. This study demonstrates a novel function of PTP52F in regulating ecdysone-directed metamorphosis via enhancement of autophagic and apoptotic cell death in doomed Drosophila midguts. PMID:24550005

  6. Biochemical and histological biomarkers in the midgut of Apis mellifera from polluted environment at Beheira Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Saad, Ahmed M Abu; Kheirallah, Dalia A; El-Samad, Lamia M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of organophosphorus (OP) pollutants on oxidative stress and ultrastructural biomarkers in the midgut of the honeybee Apis mellifera collected from three locations that differ in their extent of spraying load with OP insecticides: a weakly anthropised rural site, Bolin which is considered as a reference site; moderately spraying site, El Kaza; and a strongly anthropised urban site, Tiba with a long history of pesticide use. Results showed that high concentrations of chlorpyrifos, malathion, diazinon, chlorpyrifos-methyl, and pirimiphos-methyl were detected in midgut at locations with extensive pesticide spraying. Reduced glutathione content, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase displayed lowest activities in the heavily sprayed location (Tiba). Lipid peroxidation level in the midgut of honeybees in the sprayed locations was found to be significantly higher compared to the reference values. Meanwhile, various ultrastructural abnormalities were observed in the epithelial cells of midgut of honeybees collected from El Kaza and Tiba, included confluent and disorganized microvilli and destruction of their brush border, the cytoplasm with large vacuoles and alteration of cytoplasmic organelles including the presence of swollen mitochondria with lysis of matrices, disruption of limiting membranes, and disintegration of cristae. The nuclei with indented nuclear envelope and disorganized chromatin were observed. These investigated biomarkers indicated that the surveyed honeybees are being under stressful environmental conditions. So, we suggest using those biomarkers in the assessment of environmental quality using honeybees in future monitoring of ecotoxicological studies.

  7. Identification of Midgut and Salivary Glands as Specific and Distinct Barriers to Efficient Tick-Borne Transmission of Anaplasma marginale▿

    PubMed Central

    Ueti, Massaro W.; Reagan, James O.; Knowles, Donald P.; Scoles, Glen A.; Shkap, Varda; Palmer, Guy H.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the determinants of efficient tick-borne microbial transmission is needed to better predict the emergence of highly transmissible pathogen strains and disease outbreaks. Although the basic developmental cycle of Anaplasma and Ehrlichia spp. within the tick has been delineated, there are marked differences in the ability of specific strains to be efficiently tick transmitted. Using the highly transmissible St. Maries strain of Anaplasma marginale in Dermacentor andersoni as a positive control and two unrelated nontransmissible strains, we identified distinct barriers to efficient transmission within the tick. The Mississippi strain was unable to establish infection at the level of the midgut epithelium despite successful ingestion of infected blood following acquisition feeding on a bacteremic animal host. This inability to colonize the midgut epithelium prevented subsequent development within the salivary glands and transmission. In contrast, A. marginale subsp. centrale colonized the midgut and then the salivary glands, replicating to a titer indistinguishable from that of the highly transmissible St. Maries strain and at least 100 times greater than that previously associated with successful transmission. Nonetheless, A. marginale subsp. centrale was not transmitted, even when a large number of infected ticks was used for transmission feeding. These results establish that there are at least two specific barriers to efficient tick-borne transmission, the midgut and salivary glands, and highlight the complexity of the pathogen-tick interaction. PMID:17420231

  8. FGF control of E-cadherin targeting in the Drosophila midgut impacts on primordial germ cell motility.

    PubMed

    Parés, Guillem; Ricardo, Sara

    2016-01-15

    Embryo formation requires tight regulation and coordination of adhesion in multiple cell types. By undertaking imaging, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and genetic analysis during posterior midgut morphogenesis in Drosophila, we find a new requirement for the conserved fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathway in the maintenance of epithelial cell adhesion through FGF modulation of zygotic E-cadherin. During Drosophila gastrulation, primordial germ cells (PGCs) are transported with the posterior midgut while it undergoes dynamic cell shape changes. In embryos mutant for the FGF signaling pathway components Branchless and Breathless, zygotic E-cadherin is not targeted to adherens junctions, causing midgut pocket collapse, which impacts on PGC movement. We find that the ventral midline also requires FGF signaling to maintain cell-cell adhesion. We show that FGF signaling regulates the distribution of zygotic E-cadherin during early embryonic development to maintain cell-cell adhesion in the posterior midgut and the ventral midline, a role that is likely crucial in other tissues undergoing active cell shape changes with higher adhesive needs.

  9. Ookinete destruction within the mosquito midgut lumen explains Anopheles albimanus refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum (3D7A) oocyst infection.

    PubMed

    Baton, Luke A; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the central American mosquito vector, Anopheles albimanus, is generally refractory to oocyst infection with allopatric isolates of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. However, the reasons for the refractoriness of A. albimanus to infection with such isolates of P. falciparum are unknown. In the current study, we investigated the infectivity of the P. falciparum clone 3D7A to laboratory-reared A. albimanus and another natural vector of human malaria, Anopheles stephensi. Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes grown in vitro were simultaneously fed to both mosquito species and the progress of malaria infection compared. In 22 independent paired experimental feeds, no mature oocysts were observed on the midguts of A. albimanus 10days after bloodfeeding. In contrast, high levels of oocyst infection were found on the midguts of simultaneously fed A. stephensi. Direct immunofluorescence microscopy and light microscopical examination of Giemsa-stained histological sections were used to identify when the P. falciparum clone 3D7A failed to establish mature oocyst infections in A. albimanus. Similar densities of macrogametes/zygotes, and immature retort-form and mature ookinetes were found within the bloodmeals of both mosquito species. However, in A. albimanus, ookinetes were seldom associated with the peritrophic matrix, and were neither observed in the ectoperitrophic space nor the midgut epithelium. In contrast, ookinetes were frequently observed in these midgut compartments in A. stephensi. Additionally, young oocysts were observed on the midguts of A. stephensi but not A. albimanus 2days after bloodfeeding. Vital staining of the immature retort-form and mature ookinetes found within the luminal bloodmeal, demonstrated that a significantly greater proportion of these malaria parasite stages were non-viable in A. albimanus compared with A. stephensi. Overall, our observations indicate that ookinetes of the P. falciparum clone 3D7

  10. Exploring the mialome of ticks: an annotated catalogue of midgut transcripts from the hard tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Acari: Ixodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jennifer M; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2008-01-01

    Background Ticks are obligate blood feeders. The midgut is the first major region of the body where blood and microbes ingested with the blood meal come in contact with the tick's internal tissues. Little is known about protein expression in the digestive tract of ticks. In this study, for analysis of global gene expression during tick attachment and feeding, we generated and sequenced 1,679 random transcripts (ESTs) from cDNA libraries from the midguts of female ticks at varying stages of feeding. Results Sequence analysis of the 1,679 ESTs resulted in the identification of 835 distinct transcripts, from these, a total of 82 transcripts were identified as proteins putatively directly involved in blood meal digestion, including enzymes involved in oxidative stress reduction/antimicrobial activity/detoxification, peptidase inhibitors, protein digestion (cysteine-, aspartic-, serine-, and metallo-peptidases), cell, protein and lipid binding including mucins and iron/heme metabolism and transport. A lectin-like protein with a high match to lectins in other tick species, allergen-like proteins and surface antigens important in pathogen recognition and/or antimicrobial activity were also found. Furthermore, midguts collected from the 6-day-fed ticks expressed twice as many transcripts involved in bloodmeal processing as midguts from unfed/2-day-fed ticks. Conclusion This tissue-specific transcriptome analysis provides an opportunity to examine the global expression of transcripts in the tick midgut and to compare the gut response to host attachment versus blood feeding and digestion. In contrast to those in salivary glands of other Ixodid ticks, most proteins in the D. variabilis midgut cDNA library were intracellular. Of the total ESTs associated with a function, an unusually large number of transcripts were associated with peptidases, cell, lipid and protein binding, and oxidative stress or detoxification. Presumably, this is consistent with their role in

  11. Fluorescence Localization and Comparative Ultrastructural Study of Periplocoside NW from Periploca sepium Bunge in the Midgut of the Oriental Amyworm, Mythimna separata Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mingxing; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Jiwen; Hu, Zhaonong; Wu, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    Periplocoside NW (PSNW) is a novel insecticidal compound isolated from the root bark of Periploca sepium Bunge and has potent stomach toxicity against some insect pests. Previous studies showed that the Mythimna separata larva is sensitive to PSNW, but the Agrotis ispilon larva is insensitive. In this study, preliminary target localization on the midgut of M. separata larvae was conducted via a fluorescence labeling technique. A comparative ultrastructural study on the effects of PSNW on the midguts of M. separata and A. ispilon larvae was performed. Symptom observation results showed that typical stomach toxicity was induced by PSNW in M. separata larvae. Fluorescence localization results showed that PSNW binds to the midgut cells of M. separata larvae. Ultrastructure observations showed destruction of the microvilli, organelle, and cytomembrane in the midgut cells of M. separata larvae, whereas no obvious changes were observed in midgut cells of A. ispilon larvae. These results were consistent with the insecticidal activity of PSNW. Therefore, PSNW might act on the midgut tissues of the insects, and one or more binding sites of PSNW may exist in M. separata larvae midgut cell cytomembranes. PMID:24831268

  12. Humoral responses in Rhodnius prolixus: bacterial feeding induces differential patterns of antibacterial activity and enhances mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides in the midgut

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The triatomine, Rhodnius prolixus, is a major vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. It has a strictly blood-sucking habit in all life stages, ingesting large amounts of blood from vertebrate hosts from which it can acquire pathogenic microorganisms. In this context, the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the midgut of the insect is vital to control possible infection, and to maintain the microbiota already present in the digestive tract. Methods In the present work, we studied the antimicrobial activity of the Rhodnius prolixus midgut in vitro against the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. We also analysed the abundance of mRNAs encoding for defensins, prolixicin and lysozymes in the midgut of insects orally infected by these bacteria at 1 and 7 days after feeding. Results Our results showed that the anterior midgut contents contain a higher inducible antibacterial activity than those of the posterior midgut. We observed that the main AMP encoding mRNAs in the anterior midgut, 7 days after a blood meal, were for lysozyme A, B, defensin C and prolixicin while in the posterior midgut lysozyme B and prolixicin transcripts predominated. Conclusion Our findings suggest that R. prolixus modulates AMP gene expression upon ingestion of bacteria with patterns that are distinct and dependent upon the species of bacteria responsible for infection. PMID:24885969

  13. Dengue virus serotype 2 infection alters midgut and carcass gene expression in the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Kathryn A.; Sundararajan, Anitha; Devitt, Nicholas P.; Schilkey, Faye D.; Hansen, Immo A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus is currently an important vector for dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus, and its role in transmission of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) may increase in the future due to its ability to colonize temperate regions. In contrast to Aedes aegypti, the dominant vector of dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus, genetic responses of Ae. albopictus upon infection with an arbovirus are not well characterized. Here we present a study of the changes in transcript expression in Ae. albopictus exposed to dengue virus serotype 2 via feeding on an artificial bloodmeal. Methodology/Principal findings We isolated midguts and midgut-free carcasses of Ae. albopictus fed on bloodmeals containing dengue virus as well as controls fed on virus-free control meals at day 1 and day 5 post-feeding. We confirmed infection of midguts from mosquitoes sampled on day 5 post-feeding via RT-PCR. RNAseq analysis revealed dynamic modulation of the expression of several putative immunity and dengue virus-responsive genes, some of whose expression was verified by qRT-PCR. For example, a serine protease gene was up-regulated in the midgut at 1 day post infection, which may potentially enhance mosquito susceptibility to dengue infection, while 14 leucine-rich repeat genes, previously shown to be involved in mosquito antiviral defenses, were down-regulated in the carcass at 5 days post infection. The number of significantly modulated genes decreased over time in midguts and increased in carcasses. Conclusion/Significance Dengue virus exposure results in the modulation of genes in a time- and site-specific manner. Previous literature on the interaction between mosquitoes and mosquito-borne pathogens suggests that most of the changes that occurred in Ae. albopictus exposed to DENV would favor virus infection. Many genes identified in this study warrant further characterization to understand their role in viral manipulation of and antiviral response of

  14. A Kazal-type inhibitor is modulated by Trypanosoma cruzi to control microbiota inside the anterior midgut of Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Soares, Tatiane S; Buarque, Diego S; Queiroz, Bruna R; Gomes, Cícera M; Braz, Glória R C; Araújo, Ricardo N; Pereira, Marcos H; Guarneri, Alessandra A; Tanaka, Aparecida S

    2015-05-01

    The triatomine insect, Rhodnius prolixus, is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. The parasite must overcome immune response and microbiota to develop inside the midgut of triatomines. In this study, we expressed, purified and characterized a Kazal-type inhibitor from the midgut of R. prolixus, named RpTI, which may be involved in microbiota - T. cruzi interactions. The qPCR showed that the RpTI transcript was primarily expressed in tissues from the intestinal tract and that it was upregulated in the anterior midgut after T. cruzi infection. A 315-bp cDNA fragment encoding the mature protein was cloned into the pPIC9 vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris system. Recombinant RpTI (rRpTI) was purified on a trypsin-Sepharose column and had a molecular mass of 11.5 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. This protein inhibited trypsin (Ki = 0.42 nM), whereas serine proteases from the coagulation cascade were not inhibited. Moreover, trypanocidal assays revealed that rRpTI did not interfere in the viability of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. The RpTI transcript was also knocked down by RNA interference prior to infection of R. prolixus with T. cruzi. The amount of T. cruzi in the anterior midgut was significantly lower in RpTI knockdown insects compared to the non-silenced groups. We also verified that the bacterial load is higher in the anterior midgut of silenced and infected R. prolixus compared to non-silenced and infected insects. Our results suggest that T. cruzi infection increases the expression of RpTI to mediate microbiota modulation and is important for parasite immediately after infection with R. prolixus.

  15. Salinity alters snakeskin and mesh transcript abundance and permeability in midgut and Malpighian tubules of larval mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Jonusaite, Sima; Donini, Andrew; Kelly, Scott P

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the distribution and localization of the septate junction (SJ) proteins snakeskin (Ssk) and mesh in osmoregulatory organs of larval mosquito (Aedes aegypti), as well as their response to altered environmental salt levels. Ssk and mesh transcripts and immunoreactivity were detected in tissues of endodermal origin such as the midgut and Malpighian tubules of A. aegypti larvae, but not in ectodermally derived hindgut and anal papillae. Immunolocalization of Ssk and mesh in the midgut and Malpighian tubules indicated that both proteins are concentrated at regions of cell-cell contact between epithelial cells. Transcript abundance of ssk and mesh was higher in the midgut and Malpighian tubules of brackish water (BW, 30% SW) reared A. aegypti larvae when compared with freshwater (FW) reared animals. Therefore, [(3)H]polyethylene glycol (MW 400Da, PEG-400) flux was examined across isolated midgut and Malpighian tubule preparations as a measure of their paracellular permeability. It was found that PEG-400 flux was greater across the midgut of BW versus FW larvae while the Malpighian tubules of BW-reared larvae had reduced PEG-400 permeability in conjunction with increased Cl(-) secretion compared to FW animals. Taken together, data suggest that Ssk and mesh are found in smooth SJs (sSJs) of larval A. aegypti and that their abundance alters in association with changes in epithelial permeability when larvae reside in water of differing salt content. This latter observation suggests that Ssk and mesh play a role in the homeostatic control of salt and water balance in larval A. aegypti.

  16. The ultrastructure of the midgut glands in Ligia italica (Isopoda) under different nutritional conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štrus, J.; Burkhardt, P.; Storch, V.

    1985-12-01

    After a period of food deprivation, Ligia italica were refed for 2 days with different diets and their midgut glands were examined under the electron microscope with special reference to the large cells. The predominant features are the following: extended glycogen fields after sucrose-diet; numerous lipid droplets and peroxisome-like vesicles after lipid-diet (butter); swollen mitochondria and a great number of pinocytotic vesicles after protein diet (curds); electron dense vesicles and myelin bodies after the uptake of Escherichia coli. In contrast to amphipods, the intertidal isopod L. italica is not able to digest cellulose, as the cell ultrastructure exhibits all features of starved animals, as well as that following feeding with lignin.

  17. A chymotrypsin-like proteinase from the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B

    2005-08-01

    A chymotrypsin-like proteinase was isolated from the posterior midgut of larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, by ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The enzyme, TmC1, was purified to homogeneity as determined by SDS-PAGE and postelectrophoretic activity detection. TmC1 had a molecular mass of 23.0 kDa, pI of 8.4, a pH optimum of 9.5, and the optimal temperature for activity was 51 degrees C. The proteinase displayed high stability at temperatures below 43 degrees C and in the pH range 6.5-11.2, which is inclusive of the pH of the posterior and middle midgut. The enzyme hydrolyzed long chymotrypsin peptide substrates SucAAPFpNA, SucAAPLpNA and GlpAALpNA and did not hydrolyze short chymotrypsin substrates. Kinetic parameters of the enzymatic reaction demonstrated that the best substrate was SucAAPFpNA, with k(cat app) 36.5 s(-1) and K(m) 1.59 mM. However, the enzyme had a lower K(m) for SucAAPLpNA, 0.5 mM. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) was an effective inhibitor of TmC1, and the proteinase was not inhibited by either tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) or N(alpha)-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK). However, the activity of TmC1 was reduced with sulfhydryl reagents. Several plant and insect proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors were active against the purified enzyme, the most effective being Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI). The N-terminal sequence of the enzyme was IISGSAASKGQFPWQ, which was up to 67% similar to other insect chymotrypsin-like proteinases and 47% similar to mammalian chymotrypsin A. The amino acid composition of TmC1 differed significantly from previously isolated T. molitor enzymes.

  18. Alkalinization in the Isolated and Perfused Anterior Midgut of the Larval Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Horst; Moffett, Stacia B.; Moffett, David F.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, isolated midguts of larval Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) were mounted on perfusion pipettes and bathed in high buffer mosquito saline. With low buffer perfusion saline, containing m-cresol purple, transepithelial voltage was monitored and luminal alkalinization became visible through color changes of m-cresol purple after perfusion stop. Lumen negative voltage and alkalinization depended on metabolic energy and were stimulated in the presence of serotonin (0.2 µmol l-1). In some experiments a pH microelectrode in the lumen recorded pH values up to 10 within minutes after perfusion stop. The V-ATPase inhibitor concanamycin (50 µmol l-1) on the hemolymph side almost abolished Vte and inhibited luminal alkalinization. The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, methazolamide (50 µmol l-1), on either the luminal or hemolymph-side, or the inhibitor of anion transport, DIDS (1 mmol l-1) on the luminal side, had no effect on Vte or alkalinization. Cl- substitution in the lumen or on both sides of the tissue affected Vte, but the color change of m-cresol purple was unchanged from control conditions. Hemolymph-side Na+ substitution or addition of the Na+/H+ exchange inhibitor, amiloride (200 µmol l-1), reduced Vte and luminal alkalinization. Luminal amiloride (200 µmol l-1) was without effects on Vte or alkalinization. High K+ (60 mmol l-1) in the lumen reduced Vte without affecting alkalinization. These results indicate that strong luminal alkalinization in isolated and perfused anterior midgut of larval A. aegypti depends on basolateral V-ATPase, but is apparently independent of carbonic anhydrase, apical Cl-/HCO3- exchange or apical K+/2H+ antiport. PMID:20307229

  19. Interaction between Host Complement and Mosquito-Midgut-Stage Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Margos, Gabriele; Navarette, Sandra; Butcher, Geoff; Davies, Alex; Willers, Christine; Sinden, Robert E.; Lachmann, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    After ingestion by mosquitoes, gametocytes of malaria parasites become activated and form extracellular gametes that are no longer protected by the red blood cell membrane against immune effectors of host blood. We have studied the action of complement on Plasmodium developmental stages in the mosquito blood meal using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei and rat complement as a model. We have shown that in the mosquito midgut, rat complement components necessary to initiate the alternative pathway (factor B, factor D, and C3) as well as C5 are present for several hours following ingestion of P. berghei-infected rat blood. In culture, 30 to 50% of mosquito midgut stages of P. berghei survived complement exposure during the first 3 h of development. Subsequently, parasites became increasingly sensitive to complement lysis. To investigate the mechanisms involved in their protection, we tested for C3 deposition on parasite surfaces and whether host CD59 (a potent inhibitor of the complement membrane attack complex present on red blood cells) was taken up by gametes while emerging from the host cell. Between 0.5 and 22 h, 90% of Pbs21-positive parasites were positive for C3. While rat red and white blood cells stained positive for CD59, Pbs21-positive parasites were negative for CD59. In addition, exposure of parasites to rat complement in the presence of anti-rat CD59 antibodies did not increase lysis. These data suggest that parasite or host molecules other than CD59 are responsible for the protection of malaria parasites against complement-mediated lysis. Ongoing research aims to identify these molecules. PMID:11447187

  20. Avoidance of antinutritive plant defense: Role of midgut pH in Colorado potato beetle.

    PubMed

    Felton, G W; Workman, J; Duffey, S S

    1992-04-01

    The fate of the tomato foliar phenolic, chlorogenic acid, in the digestive systems of Colorado potato beetleLeptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) andHelicoverpa tea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is compared. In larvalH. zea and other lepidopteran species previously examined, approximately 35-50% of the ingested chlorogenic acid was oxidized in the digestive system by foliar phenolic oxidases (i.e., polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase) from the tomato plant. The oxidized form of chlorogenic acid, chlorogenoquinone, is a potent alkylator of dietary protein and can exert a strong antinutritive effect upon larvae through chemical degradation of essential amino acids. In contrast, inL. decemlineata less than 4% of the ingested dose of chlorogenic acid was bound to protein. In vitro experiments to determine the influence of pH on covalent binding of chlorogenic acid to protein showed that 30-45% less chlorogenic acid bound to protein at pHs representative of the beetle midgut (pH 5.5-6.5) than at a pH representing the lepidopteran midgut (pH 8.5). At an acidic pH, considerably more of the alkylatable functional groups of amino acids (-NH2, -SH) are in the nonreactive, protonated state. Hence, polyphenol oxidases are unlikely to have significant antinutritive effects against the Colorado potato beetle and may not be a useful biochemical source of resistance against this insect. The influence of feeding by larval Colorado potato beetle on foliar polyphenol oxidase activity in tomato foliage and its possible significance to interspecific competition is also considered.

  1. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C.; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Almeida, Igor C.; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new

  2. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

    PubMed

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H F; Almeida, Igor C; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new

  3. A Hypothetical Model of Crossing Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus through Its Host Midgut Physical Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Wang, Xue-Yang; Hu, Hao; Killiny, Nabil; Xu, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is a primary pathogen of silkworm (B. mori) that causes severe economic losses each year. However, the molecular mechanisms of silkworm-BmNPV interactions, especially the silkworm proteins that can interact with the virus, are still largely unknown. In this study, the total and membrane proteins of silkworm midguts were displayed using one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. A virus overlay assay was used to detect B. mori proteins that specifically bind to BmNPV particles. Twelve proteins were located and identified using mass spectrometry, and the different expression of the corresponding genes in BmNPV susceptible and resistant silkworm strains also indicated their involvement in BmNPV infection. The 12 proteins are grouped based on their potential roles in viral infection, for example, endocytosis, intracellular transportation, and host responses. Based on these results, we hypothesize the following: I) vacuolar ATP synthase catalytic subunit A and subunit B may be implicated in the process of the membrane fusion of virus and the release of the nucleocapsid into cytoplasm; II) actin, enolase and phosphoglycerate kinase are cytoskeleton associated proteins and may play an important role in BmNPV intracellular transportation; III) mitochondrial prohibitin complex protein 2, ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein, calreticulin, regucalcin-like isoform X1 and 60 kDa heat shock protein are involved in cell apoptosis regulation during BmNPV infection in larvae midguts; IV) ribosomal P0 may be associated with BmNPV infection by regulating gene expression of BmNPV; V) arginine kinase has a role in the antiviral activities against BmNPV. Our work should prove informative by providing multiple protein targets and a novel direction to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the interactions between silkworms and BmNPV. PMID:25502928

  4. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo effects of semipurified proteinase inhibitors from Theobroma seeds on midgut protease activity of Lepidopteran pest insects.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, Luis Cesar Maffei Sartini; Sebbenn, Alexandre Magno; de Carvalho Derbyshire, Maria Tereza Vitral; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles; de Paula Brotto, Marco Aurélio; Figueira, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    We have characterized in vitro and in vivo effects of trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma seeds on the activity of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteins from Lepidopteran pest insects. The action of semipurified trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma was evaluated by the inhibition of bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin activities determined by the hydrolysis of N-Benzoyl-DL-Arginine-p-Nitroanilide (BAPA) and N-Succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pho-Phe p-Nitroanilide (S-(Ala)2ProPhe-pNA). Proteinase inhibitor activities from Theobroma cacao and T. obovatum seeds were the most effective in inhibiting trypsin-like proteins, whereas those from T. obovatum and T. sylvestre were the most efficient against chymotrypsin-like proteins. All larvae midgut extracts showed trypsin-like proteolytic activities, and the putative trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma seeds significantly inhibited purified bovine trypsin. With respect to the influence of Theobroma trypsin inhibitors on intact insects, the inclusion of T. cacao extracts in artificial diets of velvet bean caterpillars (Anticarsia gemmatalis) and sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis) produced a significant increase in the percentage of adult deformation, which is directly related to both the survival rate of the insects and oviposition.

  5. Thorsellia anophelis is the dominant bacterium in a Kenyan population of adult Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Briones, Aurelio M; Shililu, Josephat; Githure, John; Novak, Robert; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2008-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes are not known to harbor endosymbiotic bacteria. Here we show, using nucleic acid-based methods, that 16S rRNA gene sequences specific to a recently described mosquito midgut bacterium, Thorsellia anophelis, is predominant in the midgut of adult An. gambiae s.l. mosquitoes captured in residences in central Kenya, and also occurs in the aquatic rice paddy environment nearby. PCR consistently detected T. anophelis in the surface microlayer of rice paddies, which is also consistent with the surface-feeding behavior of A. gambiae s.l. larvae. Phylogenetic analysis of cloned environmental 16S rRNA genes identified four major Thorsellia lineages, which are closely affiliated to an insect endosymbiont of the genus Arsenophonus. Physiological characterizations support the hypothesis that T. anophelis is well adapted to the female anopheline midgut by utilizing blood and tolerating the alkaline conditions in this environment. The results suggest that aquatically derived bacteria such as T. anophelis can persist through mosquito metamorphosis and become well-established in the adult mosquito midgut.

  6. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania. PMID:25431778

  7. Effect of anti-mosquito midgut antibodies on development of malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax and fecundity in vector mosquito Anopheles culicifacies (Diptera: culicidae).

    PubMed

    Chugh, Manoj; Adak, T; Sehrawat, Neelam; Gakhar, S K

    2011-04-01

    The effect of anti-mosquito-midgut antibodies on the development of the malaria parasite, P. vivax was studied by feeding the vector mosquito, An. culicifacies with infected blood supplemented with serum from immunized rabbits. In order to get antisera, rabbits were immunized with midgut proteins of three siblings species of Anopheles culicifacies, reported to exhibit differential vectorial capacity. The mosquitoes that ingested anti-midgut antibodies along with infectious parasites had significantly fewer oocysts compared to the control group of mosquitoes. The immunized rabbits generated high titer of antibodies. Their cross reactivity amongst various tissues of the same species and with other sibling species was also determined. Immunogenic polypeptides expressed in the midgut of glucose or blood fed An. culicifacies sibling species were identified by Western blotting. One immunogenic polypeptide of 62 kDa was exclusively present in the midgut of species A. Similarly, three polypeptides of 97, 94 and 58 kDa and one polypeptide of 23 kDa were present exclusively in species B and C respectively. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the localization of these antigens on baso-lateral membrane and microvilli. The effects of anti-mosquito midgut antibodies on fecundity, longevity, mortality and engorgement of mosquitoes were studied. Fecundity was also reduced significantly. These observations open an avenue for research toward the development of a vector-based malaria parasite transmission-blocking vaccine.

  8. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods.

  9. Alteration of carbohydrates metabolism and midgut glucose absorption in Gromphadorhina portentosa after subchronic exposure to imidacloprid and fenitrothion.

    PubMed

    Sawczyn, Tomasz; Dolezych, Bogdan; Klosok, Marcin; Augustyniak, Maria; Stygar, Dominika; Buldak, Rafal J; Kukla, Michal; Michalczyk, Katarzyna; Karcz-Socha, Iwona; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that following exposure to insecticides, changes take place in the metabolism of carbohydrates and absorption in the midgut of insects. The Madagascar hissing cockroach (Gromphadorhina portentosa) was chosen for the experiment as a model organism, due to it being easy to breed and its relatively large alimentary tract, which was important when preparing the microperfusion midgut bioassay. In each group of cockroaches treated with imidacloprid and fenitrothion, absorption of glucose, expressed as the area under the curve (AUC), was elevated compared to the control group. Glucose in the hemolymph of the examined insects was present in a vestigial amount, often below the threshold of determination, so the determinable carbohydrate indices were: hemolymph trehalose concentration and fat body glycogen content. The level of trehalose found in the hemolymph of insects when exposed to fenitrothion, and irrespective of the level of concentration mixed into food, were significantly lower when comparing to the control samples. Imidacloprid acted analogically with one exception at the concentration of 10 mg·kg(-1) dry food where trehalose concentration did not differ from the control values. Coupling with fat body glycogen concentration was less visible and appeared only at the concentrations of 5 and 10 mg imidacloprid·kg(-1) dry food. As described in this study changes in the sugar distribution and midgut glucose absorption indicate that insects cover the increased energy needs induced by insecticides; also at the gastrointestinal tract level. The result indicates that the midgut glucose absorption parameters could be considered as a non-specific biomarker of insecticide toxicity.

  10. Characterization of a Digestive α-Amylase in the Midgut of Pieris brassicae L. (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

    PubMed Central

    Sharifloo, Ali; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal J.; Jahroumi, Khalil Talebi

    2016-01-01

    The current study deals with a digestive α-amylase in the larvae of Pieris brassicae L. through purification, enzymatic characterization, gene expression, and in vivo effect of a specific inhibitor, Acarbose. Although α-amylase activity was the highest in the whole gut homogenate of larvae but compartmentalization of amylolytic activity showed an equal activity in posterior midgut (PM) and anterior midgut (AM). A three step purification using ammonium sulfate, Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-Cellulose Fast flow revealed an enzyme with a specific activity of 5.18 U/mg, recovery of 13.20, purification fold of 19.25 and molecular weight of 88 kDa. The purified α-amylase had the highest activity at optimal pH and temperature of 8 and 35°C. Also, the enzyme had Vmax values of 4.64 and 3.02 U/mg protein and Km values of 1.37 and 1.74% using starch and glycogen as substrates, respectively. Different concentrations of acarbose, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, and ethylene glycol-bis (β-aminoethylether) N, N, N′, N′-tetraacetic acid significantly decreased activity of the purified α-amylase. The 4th instar larvae of P. brassicae were fed on the treated leaves of Raphanus sativus L. with 0.22 mM of Acarbose to find in vivo effects on nutritional indices, α-amylase activity, and gene expression. The significant differences were only found in conversion efficiency of digested food, relative growth rate, and metabolic cost of control and fed larvae on Acarbose. Also, amylolytic activity significantly decreased in the treated larvae by both biochemical and native-PAGE experiments. Results of RT-PCR revealed a gene with 621 bp length responsible for α-amylase expression that had 75% identity with Papilio xuthus and P. polytes. Finally, qRT-PCR revealed higher expression of α-amylase in control larvae compared to acarbose-fed ones. PMID:27014094

  11. The effect of starvation and re-feeding on mitochondrial potential in the midgut of Neocaridina davidi (Crustacea, Malacostraca)

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Agnieszka; Sonakowska, Lidia; Kamińska, Karolina; Marchewka, Angelika; Wilczek, Grażyna; Wilczek, Piotr; Student, Sebastian; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The midgut in the freshwater shrimp Neocaridina davidi (previously named N. heteropoda) (Crustacea, Malacostraca) is composed of a tube-shaped intestine and a large hepatopancreas that is formed by numerous blind-ended tubules. The precise structure and ultrastructure of these regions were presented in our previous papers, while here we focused on the ultrastructural changes that occurred in the midgut epithelial cells (D-cells in the intestine, B- and F- cells in the hepatopancreas) after long-term starvation and re-feeding. We used transmission electron microscopy, light and confocal microscopes and flow cytometry to describe all of the changes that occurred due to the stressor with special emphasis on mitochondrial alterations. A quantitative assessment of cells with depolarized mitochondria helped us to establish whether there is a relationship between starvation, re-feeding and the inactivation/activation of mitochondria. The results of our studies showed that in the freshwater shrimp N. davidi that were analyzed, long-term starvation activates the degeneration of epithelial cells at the ultrastructural level and causes an increase of cells with depolarized (non-active) mitochondria. The process of re-feeding leads to the gradual regeneration of the cytoplasm of the midgut epithelial cells; however, these changes were observed at the ultrastructural level. Additionally, re-feeding causes the regeneration of mitochondrial ultrastructure. Therefore, we can state that the increase in the number of cells with polarized mitochondria occurs slowly and does not depend on ultrastructural alterations. PMID:28282457

  12. Phoxim-induced damages of Bombyx mori larval midgut and titanium dioxide nanoparticles protective role under phoxim-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Su, Junju; Li, Bing; Cheng, Shen; Zhu, Zhou; Sang, Xuezi; Gui, Suxin; Xie, Yi; Sun, Qingqing; Cheng, Zhe; Cheng, Jie; Hu, Rengping; Shen, Weide; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping; Hong, Fashui

    2014-12-01

    Phoxim (O,O-diethyl O-(alpha-cyanobenzylideneamino) phosphorothioate) is a powerful organophosphorus pesticide with high potential for Bombyx mori larvae of silkworm exposure. However, it is possible that during the phoxim metabolism, there is generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phoxim may produce oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in an intoxicated silkworm. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) pretreatment has been demonstrated to increase antioxidant capacity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in organisms. This study was, therefore, undertaken to determine phoxim-induced oxidative stress and neurotoxicity to determine whether phoxim intoxication alters the antioxidant system and AChE activity in the B. mori larval midgut, and to determine whether TiO2 NPs pretreatment attenuates phoxim-induced toxicity. The findings suggested that phoxim exposure decreased survival of B. mori larvae, increased malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl and 8-OHdG levels, and ROS accumulation in the midgut. Furthermore, phoxim significantly decreased the activities of AChE, superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and levels of ascorbic acid (AsA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and thiol in the midgut. TiO2 pretreatment, however, could increase AChE activity, and remove ROS via activating SOD, CAT, APX, GR, and GST, and accelerating AsA-GSH cycle, thus attenuated lipid, protein, and DNA peroxidation and improve B. mori larval survival under phoxim-induced toxicity. Moreover, this experimental system would help nanomaterials to be applied in the sericulture.

  13. Dynamics and regulation of glycolysis-tricarboxylic acid metabolism in the midgut of Spodoptera litura during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, D; Luo, W; Fan, L F; Liu, F L; Gu, J; Deng, H M; Zhang, C; Huang, L H; Feng, Q L

    2016-04-01

    Significant changes usually take place in the internal metabolism of insects during metamorphosis. The glycolysis-tricarboxylic acid (glycolysis-TCA) pathway is important for energy metabolism. To elucidate its dynamics, the mRNA levels of genes involved in this pathway were examined in the midgut of Spodoptera litura during metamorphosis, and the pyruvate content was quantified. The expression patterns of these genes in response to starvation were examined, and the interaction between protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and phosphofructokinase (PFK) was studied. The results revealed that the expression or activities of most glycolytic enzymes was down-regulated in prepupae and then recovered in some degree in pupae, and all TCA-related genes were remarkably suppressed in both the prepupae and pupae. Pyruvate was enriched in the pupal midgut. Taken together, these results suggest that insects decrease both glycolysis and TCA in prepupae to save energy and then up-regulate glycolysis but down-regulate TCA in pupae to increase the supply of intermediates for construction of new organs. The expression of all these genes were down-regulated by starvation, indicating that non-feeding during metamorphosis may be a regulator of glycolysis-TCA pathway in the midgut. Importantly, interaction between PP1 and PFK was identified and is suggested to be involved in the regulation of glycolysis.

  14. Roles and regulation of autophagy and apoptosis in the remodelling of the lepidopteran midgut epithelium during metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Davide; Casartelli, Morena; Cappellozza, Silvia; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that autophagy and apoptosis occur in the removal of the lepidopteran larval midgut during metamorphosis. However, their roles in this context and the molecular pathways underlying their activation and regulation were only hypothesized. The results of the present study better clarify the timing of the activation of these two processes: autophagic and apoptotic genes are transcribed at the beginning of metamorphosis, but apoptosis intervenes after autophagy. To investigate the mechanisms that promote the activation of autophagy and apoptosis, we designed a set of experiments based on injections of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Our data demonstrate that autophagy is induced at the end of the last larval stage by the 20E commitment peak, while the onset of apoptosis occurs concomitantly with the 20E metamorphic peak. By impairing autophagic flux, the midgut epithelium degenerated faster, and higher caspase activity was observed compared to controls, whereas inhibiting caspase activation caused a severe delay in epithelial degeneration. Our data demonstrate that autophagy plays a pro-survival function in the silkworm midgut during metamorphosis, while apoptosis is the major process that drives the demise of the epithelium. The evidence collected in this study seems to exclude the occurrence of autophagic cell death in this setting. PMID:27609527

  15. Differential proteomic analysis of midguts from Nosema ceranae-infected honeybees reveals manipulation of key host functions.

    PubMed

    Vidau, Cyril; Panek, Johan; Texier, Catherine; Biron, David G; Belzunces, Luc P; Le Gall, Morgane; Broussard, Cédric; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2014-09-01

    Many invasive pathogens effectively bypass the insect defenses to ensure the completion of their life cycle. Among those, an invasive microsporidian species, Nosema ceranae, can cause nosemosis in honeybees. N. ceranae was first described in the Asian honeybee Apis cerana and is suspected to be involved in Western honeybee (Apis mellifera) declines worldwide. The midgut of honeybees is the first barrier against N. ceranae attacks. To bring proteomics data on honeybee/N. ceranae crosstalk and more precisely to decipher the worker honeybee midgut response after an oral inoculation of N. ceranae (10days post-infection), we used 2D-DIGE (2-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis) combined with mass spectrometry. Forty-five protein spots produced by the infected worker honeybee group were shown to be differentially expressed when compared to the uninfected group; 14 were subsequently identified by mass spectrometry. N. ceranae mainly caused a modulation of proteins involved in three key host biological functions: (i) energy production, (ii) innate immunity (reactive oxygen stress) and (iii) protein regulation. The modulation of these host biological functions suggests that N. ceranae creates a zone of "metabolic habitat modification" in the honeybee midgut favoring its development by enhancing availability of nutrients and reducing the worker honeybee defense.

  16. Roles and regulation of autophagy and apoptosis in the remodelling of the lepidopteran midgut epithelium during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Davide; Casartelli, Morena; Cappellozza, Silvia; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-09-09

    We previously showed that autophagy and apoptosis occur in the removal of the lepidopteran larval midgut during metamorphosis. However, their roles in this context and the molecular pathways underlying their activation and regulation were only hypothesized. The results of the present study better clarify the timing of the activation of these two processes: autophagic and apoptotic genes are transcribed at the beginning of metamorphosis, but apoptosis intervenes after autophagy. To investigate the mechanisms that promote the activation of autophagy and apoptosis, we designed a set of experiments based on injections of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Our data demonstrate that autophagy is induced at the end of the last larval stage by the 20E commitment peak, while the onset of apoptosis occurs concomitantly with the 20E metamorphic peak. By impairing autophagic flux, the midgut epithelium degenerated faster, and higher caspase activity was observed compared to controls, whereas inhibiting caspase activation caused a severe delay in epithelial degeneration. Our data demonstrate that autophagy plays a pro-survival function in the silkworm midgut during metamorphosis, while apoptosis is the major process that drives the demise of the epithelium. The evidence collected in this study seems to exclude the occurrence of autophagic cell death in this setting.

  17. Large accumulations of maize streak virus in the filter chamber and midgut cells of the leafhopper vector Cicadulina mbila.

    PubMed

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Gargani, Daniel; Lett, Jean M; Peterschmitt, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Maize streak virus (MSV, Mastrevirus, Geminiviridae) is persistently transmitted by Cicadulina mbila, apparently without propagation in its leafhopper vector. MSV was shown earlier by quantitative PCR to accumulate in the alimentary canal of C. mbila. We examined the alimentary canals of C. mbila leafhoppers that acquired MSV from diseased plants for various acquisition access periods (AAP) by immunofluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (iCLSM) and by immunogold labelling transmission electron microscopy (iTEM). Following a 7-day AAP and a 7-day inoculation period (IP) on healthy seedlings, MSV was detected by iCLSM mainly in the filter chamber and anterior midgut. Using iTEM, large accumulations of MSV particles, usually enclosed in membranous vesicles, were detected only in cells of the midgut, inside and outside the filter chamber, following 14- or 30-day AAPs, and also following 7-day AAP and 7-day IP on healthy plants. No virus was detected in the control non-vector species C. chinaï. Coated pits or vesicles, typical of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, were not observed. We discuss an alternative endocytosis pathway and suggest that the MSV accumulations are stored in endosomes in the midgut epithelial cells.

  18. Polyphenol-Rich Diets Exacerbate AMPK-Mediated Autophagy, Decreasing Proliferation of Mosquito Midgut Microbiota, and Extending Vector Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Rodrigo Dutra; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Moretti, Débora Monteiro; Medeiros-Castro, Priscilla; Rocha-Santos, Carlucio; Daumas-Filho, Carlos Renato de Oliveira; Bittencourt-Cunha, Paula Rego Barros; Martins-Cardoso, Karina; Cudischevitch, Cecília Oliveira; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo Sadok; Oliveira, José Henrique Maia; Gusmão, Desiely Silva; Alves Lemos, Francisco José; Alviano, Daniela Sales; Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad; Lowenberger, Carl; Majerowicz, David; Oliveira, Ricardo Melo; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Atella, Georgia Correa

    2016-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes feed on plant-derived fluids such as nectar and sap and are exposed to bioactive molecules found in this dietary source. However, the role of such molecules on mosquito vectorial capacity is unknown. Weather has been recognized as a major determinant of the spread of dengue, and plants under abiotic stress increase their production of polyphenols. Results Here, we show that including polyphenols in mosquito meals promoted the activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK positively regulated midgut autophagy leading to a decrease in bacterial proliferation and an increase in vector lifespan. Suppression of AMPK activity resulted in a 6-fold increase in midgut microbiota. Similarly, inhibition of polyphenol-induced autophagy induced an 8-fold increase in bacterial proliferation. Mosquitoes maintained on the polyphenol diet were readily infected by dengue virus. Conclusion The present findings uncover a new direct route by which exacerbation of autophagy through activation of the AMPK pathway leads to a more efficient control of mosquito midgut microbiota and increases the average mosquito lifespan. Our results suggest for the first time that the polyphenol content and availability of the surrounding vegetation may increase the population of mosquitoes prone to infection with arboviruses. PMID:27732590

  19. Starvation suppresses cell proliferation that rebounds after refeeding in the midgut of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Takeda, Makio

    2008-02-01

    Starvation affects behavior, development, metabolism, reproduction, and longevity in almost all animals including insects. In the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, we investigated the effect of starvation on organ size and cell proliferation activity of the midgut, over a period of one month, using anti-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), and anti-phospho-histone H3 antibodies. Under starvation conditions, the midgut became clear and fragile while its length and diameter were reduced. Both the rate of BrdU-uptake in the nucleus and the mitotic activity shown by anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody decreased under long starvation up to half that of the continuously fed control. Refeeding restored BrdU-uptake and mitosis that overshot the fed control. When casein, starch, or cooking oil was fed as representative nutrient sources to the starved cockroaches, all restored BrdU-uptake, but non-nutrient, talc, did not. This study supports the hypothesis that P. americana has a homeostatic mechanism to regulate the cell population of the midgut epithelium according to changes in the nutritional environment.

  20. Recognition and binding of the PF2 lectin to α-amylase from Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera:Bruchidae) larval midgut.

    PubMed

    Lagarda-Diaz, I; Geiser, D; Guzman-Partida, A M; Winzerling, J; Vazquez-Moreno, L

    2014-01-01

    Amylases are an important family of enzymes involved in insect carbohydrate metabolism that are required for the survival of insect larvae. For this reason, enzymes from starch-dependent insects are targets for insecticidal control. PF2 (Olneya tesota) is a lectin that is toxic to Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) larvae. In this study, we evaluated recognition of the PF2 lectin to α-amylases from Z. subfasciatus midgut and the effect of PF2 on α-amylase activity. PF2 caused a decrease of total amylase activity in vitro. Subsequently, several α-amylase isoforms were isolated from insect midgut tissues using ion exchange chromatography. Three enzyme isoforms were verified by an in-gel assay for amylase activity; however, only one isoform was recognized by antiamylase serum and PF2. The identity of this Z. subfasciatus α-amylase was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The findings strongly suggest that a glycosylated α-amylase isoform from larval Z. subfasciatus midgut interacts with PF2, which interferes with starch digestion.

  1. Baculoviral mid-gut gland necrosis (BMN) of kuruma shrimp (Penaeus japonicus) larvae in Japanese intensive culture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, T.; Nishimura, T.; Fukuda, H.; Hayashida, T.; Momoyama, K.

    1984-03-01

    In many shrimp farms in the Kyushu and Chugoku areas of Japan, the so-called mid-gut gland cloudy disease of kuruma shrimp larvae (Penaeus japonicus) has occurred since 1971. The pathological changes associated with this baculoviral mid-gut gland necrosis (BMN) are extensive cellular necrosis, collapse of mid-gut gland cells, nuclear hypertrophy and finally karyorrhexis. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of virions and virogenic stages in the affected nuclei. Average length and diameter of the virions detected was 310 and 72 nm, respectively; nucleocapsids were 250 nm in size. Virions enclosing 2 nucleocapsids within a single envelope were rarely found. The spirally arranged capsomeres were at an angle of 37 to 38° to a horizontal line meeting at right angles with the long axis of the virion. Infectivity trials resulted in high mortality of healthy mysis and juveniles (2nd post-larval stage). Juveniles at the 9th post-larval stage showed no mortality, although they could be infected easily by the agent. Hypertrophied nuclei in squashed and stained preparations of the affected gland cells can be considered to be of reliable presumptive diagnostic character, and fluorescent antibody staining can be employed to confirm the diagnosis of BMN.

  2. Purification and Characterization of Midgut α-Amylase in a Predatory Bug, Andralus spinidens

    PubMed Central

    Sorkhabi-Abdolmaleki, Sahar; Zibaee, Arash; Hoda, Hassan; Fazeli-Dinan, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    α-Amylases are widespread enzymes that catalyze endohydrolysis of long α-1,4-glucan chains such as starch and glycogen. The highest amylolytic activity was found in 5th instar nymphs and midgut of the predatory bug, Andrallus spinidens F. (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). The α-amylase was purified following a three-step procedure. The purified α-amylase had a specific activity of 13.46 U/mg protein, recovery of 4.21, purification fold of 13.87, and molecular weight of 21.3 kDa. The enzyme had optimal pH and temperature of 7 and 45°C, respectively. Na+, Mn+, Mg2+, and Zn2+ significantly decreased activity of the purified α-amylase, but some concentrations of K+, Ca2+, and Cu2+ had the opposite effect. EDTA, EGTA, and DTC significantly decreased enzymatic activity, showing the presence of metal ions in the catalytic site of the enzyme. Kinetic parameters of the purified α-amylase showed a Km of 3.71% in starch and 4.96% for glycogen, suggesting that the enzyme had a higher affinity for starch. PMID:25373212

  3. In vitro lipid transfer between lipoproteins and midgut-diverticula in the spider Polybetes pythagoricus.

    PubMed

    Laino, Aldana; Cunningham, Mónica L; Heras, Horacio; Garcia, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    It has been already reported that most hemolymphatic lipids in the spider Polybetes pythagoricus are transported by HDL1 and VHDL lipoproteins. We studied in vitro the lipid transfer among midgut-diverticula (M-diverticula), and either hemolymph or purified lipoproteins as well as between hemolymphatic lipoproteins. M-diverticula and hemolymph were labeled by in vivo (14)C-palmitic acid injection. In vitro incubations were performed between M-diverticula and either hemolymph or isolated lipoproteins. Hemolymph lipid uptake was associated to HDL1 (67%) and VHDL (32%). Release from hemolymph towards M-diverticula showed the opposite trend, VHDL 75% and HDL1 45%. Isolated lipoproteins showed a similar behavior to that observed with whole hemolymph. Lipid transfer between lipoproteins showed that HDL1 transfer more (14)C-lipids to VHDL than vice versa. Only 38% FFA and 18% TAG were transferred from M-diverticula to lipoproteins, while on the contrary 75% and 73% of these lipids, respectively, were taken up from hemolymph. A similar trend was observed regarding lipoprotein phospholipids. This study supports the hypothesis that HDL1 and hemocyanin-containing VHDL are involved in the uptake and release of FFA, phospholipids and triacylglycerols in the spider P. pythagoricus. The data support a directional flow of lipids from HDL1 and VHDL suggesting a mode of lipid transport between lipoproteins and M-diverticula.

  4. Implication of the Mosquito Midgut Microbiota in the Defense against Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuemei; Manfredini, Fabio; Dimopoulos, George

    2009-01-01

    Malaria-transmitting mosquitoes are continuously exposed to microbes, including their midgut microbiota. This naturally acquired microbial flora can modulate the mosquito's vectorial capacity by inhibiting the development of Plasmodium and other human pathogens through an unknown mechanism. We have undertaken a comprehensive functional genomic approach to elucidate the molecular interplay between the bacterial co-infection and the development of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in its natural vector Anopheles gambiae. Global transcription profiling of septic and aseptic mosquitoes identified a significant subset of immune genes that were mostly up-regulated by the mosquito's microbial flora, including several anti-Plasmodium factors. Microbe-free aseptic mosquitoes displayed an increased susceptibility to Plasmodium infection while co-feeding mosquitoes with bacteria and P. falciparum gametocytes resulted in lower than normal infection levels. Infection analyses suggest the bacteria-mediated anti-Plasmodium effect is mediated by the mosquitoes' antimicrobial immune responses, plausibly through activation of basal immunity. We show that the microbiota can modulate the anti-Plasmodium effects of some immune genes. In sum, the microbiota plays an essential role in modulating the mosquito's capacity to sustain Plasmodium infection. PMID:19424427

  5. Triterpene acids from apple peel inhibit lepidopteran larval midgut lipases and larval growth.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T; McGhie, Tony K; Poulton, Joanne; Markwick, Ngaire P

    2014-07-01

    Fruit extracts from apple, kiwifruit, feijoa, boysenberry, and blueberry were screened for the presence of lipase inhibitory compounds against lepidopteran larval midgut crude extracts. From 120 extracts, six showed significant inhibition with an extract from the peel of Malus × domestica cv. "Big Red" showing highest levels of inhibition. Because this sample was the only apple peel sample in the initial screen, a survey of peels from seven apple cultivars was undertaken and showed that, despite considerable variation, all had inhibitory activity. Successive solvent fractionation and LC-MS of cv. "Big Red" apple peel extract identified triterpene acids as the most important inhibitory compounds, of which ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were the major components and oxo- and hydroxyl-triterpene acids were minor components. When ursolic acid was incorporated into artificial diet and fed to Epiphyas postvittana Walker (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera) larvae at 0.16% w/v, a significant decrease in larval weight was observed after 21 days. This concentration of ursolic acid is less than half the concentration reported in the skin of some apple cultivars.

  6. Starvation induces apoptosis in the midgut nidi of Periplaneta americana: a histochemical and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Park, Pyoyun; Takeda, Makio

    2009-03-01

    The effects of starvation on cell death in the midgut of Periplaneta americana were studied histochemically and ultrastructurally. TUNEL assays showed that cell death began to increase in the columnar cells and nidi, the nests of stem cells and newborn cells from 2 weeks of starvation. A significant increase in cell death occurred in the nidi after 4 weeks of starvation. Cockroaches starved for 4 weeks showed active-caspase-3-like immuno-reactivity both in the columnar cells and nidi, whereas control cockroaches that were fed for 4 weeks showed this reactivity only in the apical cytoplasm of columnar cells. Electron microscopy revealed no chromatin condensation in the nucleus of columnar cells of cockroaches, whether fed or starved for 4 weeks. Starved cockroaches exhibited many small vacuoles in the cytoplasm of some columnar cells and "floating" organelles including nuclei in the lumen. A 4-week starvation induced the appearance of cytoplasmic fragmentation and secondary lysosomes in the nidi. Each fragment contained nuclear derivatives with condensed chromatin, i.e. apoptotic bodies. Mitotic cells were found in some, but not all nidi, even within the same starved sample. Fragmentation was not observed in the nidi of control cockroaches. Thus, starvation increases cell death not only in the columnar cells, but also in the nidi. The cell death in the nidi is presumably apoptosis executed by caspase 3.

  7. Rhynchophorus ferrugineus midgut cell line to evaluate insecticidal potency of different plant essential oils.

    PubMed

    Rizwan-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Aljabr, Ahmed Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    Cell cultures can be a potent and strong tool to evaluate the insecticidal efficiency of natural products. Plant essential oils have long been used as the fragrance or curative products around the world which means that they are safer to be used in close proximity of humans and mammals. In this study, a midgut cell line, developed from Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (RPW-1), was used for screening essential oils from nine different plants. Assays revealed that higher cell mortality was observed at 500 ppm which reached to 86, 65, 60, 59, 56, 54, 54, 53, and 53%, whereas lowest cell mortality at 1 ppm remained at 41, 23, 20, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, and 10%, for Azadirachta indica, Piper nigrum, Mentha spicata, Cammiphora myrrha, Elettaria cardamomum, Zingiber officinale, Curcuma longa, Schinus molle, and Rosmarinus officinalis, respectively. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay revealed the percentage of cell growth inhibition was highest at 500 ppm and remained at 48, 45, 42, 37, 34, 29, 24, 22, and 18% against A. indica, P. nigrum, M. spicata, C. myrrha, E. cardamomum, Z. officinale, C. longa, S. molle, and R. officinalis, respectively. Lowest LC50 value (7.98 ppm) was found for A. indica, whereas the highest LC50 (483.11 ppm) was against R. officinalis. Thus, in this study, essential oils of A. indica exhibited the highest levels of toxicity, whereas those from R. officinalis exhibited the lowest levels of toxicity toward RPW-1 cells.

  8. Bacterial Infection and Immune Responses in Lutzomyia longipalpis Sand Fly Larvae Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Heerman, Matthew; Weng, Ju-Lin; Hurwitz, Ivy; Durvasula, Ravi; Ramalho-Ortigao, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The midgut microbial community in insect vectors of disease is crucial for an effective immune response against infection with various human and animal pathogens. Depending on the aspects of their development, insects can acquire microbes present in soil, water, and plants. Sand flies are major vectors of leishmaniasis, and shown to harbor a wide variety of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Sand fly larval stages acquire microorganisms from the soil, and the abundance and distribution of these microorganisms may vary depending on the sand fly species or the breeding site. Here, we assess the distribution of two bacteria commonly found within the gut of sand flies, Pantoea agglomerans and Bacillus subtilis. We demonstrate that these bacteria are able to differentially infect the larval digestive tract, and regulate the immune response in sand fly larvae. Moreover, bacterial distribution, and likely the ability to colonize the gut, is driven, at least in part, by a gradient of pH present in the gut. PMID:26154607

  9. Screening and Molecular Cloning of a Protective Antigen from the Midgut of Haemaphysalis longicornis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yonghong; Zhang, Jincheng; Yang, Shujie; Wang, Hui; Zeng, Hua; Zhang, Tiantian

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is considered a promising alternative for controlling tick infestations. Haemaphysalis longicornis midgut proteins separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane were screened for protective value against bites. The western blot demonstrated the immunogenicity of 92 kDa protein (P92). The analysis of the P92 amino acid sequence by LC-MS/MS indicated that it was a H. longicornis paramyosin (Hl-Pmy). The full lenghth cDNA of Hl-Pmy was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) which consisted of 2,783 bp with a 161 bp 3' untranslated region. Sequence alignment of tick paramyosin (Pmy) showed that Hl-Pmy shared a high level of conservation among ticks. Comparison with the protective epitope sequence of other invertebrate Pmy, it was calculated that the protective epitope of Hl-Pmy was a peptide (LEEAEGSSETVVEMNKKRDTE) named LEE, which was close to the N-terminal of Hl-Pmy protein. The secondary structure analysis suggested that LEE had non-helical segments within an α-helical structure. These results provide the basis for developing a vaccine against biting H. longicornis ticks. PMID:23864744

  10. Ookinete-induced midgut peroxidases detonate the time bomb in anopheline mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2005-07-01

    Previous analysis of the temporal-spatial relationship between ookinete migration and the cellular localization of genes mediating midgut immune defense responses suggested that, in order to survive, parasites must complete invasion before toxic chemicals ("a bomb") are generated by the invaded cell. Recent studies indicate that ookinete invasion induces tyrosine nitration as a two-step reaction, in which NOS induction is followed by a localized increase in peroxidase activity. Peroxidases utilize nitrite and hydrogen peroxide as substrates, and detonate the time bomb by generating reactive nitrogen intermediates, such as nitrogen dioxide, which mediate nitration. There is evidence that peroxidases also mediate antimicrobial responses to bacteria, fungi and parasites in a broad range of biological systems including humans and plants. Defense reactions that generate toxic chemicals are also potentially harmful to the host mounting the response and often results in apoptosis. The two-step nitration pathway is probably an ancient response, as it has also been described in vertebrate leukocytes and probably evolved as a mechanism to circumscribe the toxic products generated during defense responses involving protein nitration.

  11. The physiology of the midgut of Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz and Neiva 1912): pH in different physiological conditions and mechanisms involved in its control.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vânia C; Araujo, Ricardo N; Machado, Luciane A D; Pereira, Marcos H; Gontijo, Nelder F

    2008-09-01

    Nutrient digestion and absorption after blood feeding are important events for Lutzomyia longipalpis, which uses these nutrients to produce eggs. In this context, the pH inside the digestive tract is an important physiological feature as it can markedly influence the digestive process as well as interfere with Leishmania development in infected phlebotomines. It was described previously that unfed females have an acidic midgut (pH 6). In this study, the pH inside the midgut of blood-fed females was measured. The abdominal midgut (AM) pH varied from 8.15+/-0.31 in the first 10 h post-blood meal to 7.7+/-0.17 after 24 h. While the AM was alkaline during blood digestion, the pH in the thoracic midgut (TM) remained acidic (5.5-6.0). In agreement with these findings, the enzyme alpha-glucosidase, which has an optimum pH of 5.8, is mainly encountered in the acidic TM. The capacity of unfed females to maintain the acidic intestinal pH was also evaluated. Our results showed the presence of an efficient mechanism that maintains the pH almost constant at about 6 in the midgut, but not in the crop. This mechanism is promptly interrupted in the AM by blood ingestion. RT-PCR results indicated the presence of carbonic anhydrase in the midgut cells, which apparently is required to maintain the pH at 6 in the midgut of unfed females. Investigations on the phenomenon of alkalization observed after blood ingestion indicated that two mechanisms are involved: in addition to the alkalization promoted by CO2 volatilization there is a minor contribution from a second mechanism not yet characterized. Some inferences concerning Leishmania development and pH in the digestive tube are presented.

  12. Spatial distribution of digestive proteinases in the midgut of the Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) indicates the existence of endo-ectoperitrophic circulation in Crustacea.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Daniel; Ozório, Renata A; Derner, Roberto B; Fracalossi, Débora M; Oliveira, Gabriel B; Samuels, Richard I; Terra, Walter R; Silva, Carlos P

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dietary protein concentration on the spatial distribution of digestive proteinases in the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei indicates the existence of endo-ectoperitrophic enzyme circulation in this species. Samples recovered from the midgut gland tissues, stomach contents, three different portions of the midgut and feces were used for quantitative and qualitative analyses of the composition and distribution of the digestive proteinases. Animals were divided into three different groups: (1) animals (controls) fed with a commercial 35% protein diet, (2) animals fed with a commercial diet supplemented with ovalbumin to a final protein concentration of 60%; (3) animals fed with an 80% protein diet. Quantitative determinations using different substrates and zymograms showed that increasing protein concentration in the diet alters the distribution of proteinases along the digestive tract. Composition of proteinases in the midgut gland, stomach contents, midgut sections and feces were similar, but not identical. Chymotrypsin and trypsin paralogues were identified in all enzyme sources in a concentration gradient along the midgut in the control shrimp, the expected distribution supporting the existence of a recycling mechanism. The occurrence of a peritrophic membrane in other Decapoda suggests that endo-ectoperitrophic circulation of digestive enzymes and nutrients may also occur in other crustaceans and also extends beyond the Insecta.

  13. Elizabethkingia anophelis sp. nov., isolated from the midgut of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, Peter; Matthews, Holly; Glaeser, Stefanie P; Martin, Karin; Lodders, Nicole; Faye, Ingrid

    2011-11-01

    The taxonomic position, growth characteristics and antibiotic resistance properties of a slightly yellow-pigmented bacterial strain, designated R26(T), isolated from the midgut of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, were studied. The isolate produced rod-shaped cells, which stained Gram-negative. The bacterium had two growth optima at 30-31 °C and 37 °C. Strain R26(T) demonstrated natural antibiotic resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin and tetracycline. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate showed 98.6 % sequence similarity to that of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica ATCC 13253(T) and 98.2 % similarity to that of Elizabethkingia miricola GTC 862(T). The major fatty acids of strain R26(T) were iso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH and summed feature 4 (iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)ω7c/t). Strain R26(T) contained only menaquinone MK-6 and showed a complex polar lipid profile consisting of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, an unknown phospholipid and unknown polar lipids and glycolipids. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments with E. meningoseptica CCUG 214(T) ( = ATCC 13253(T)) and E. miricola KCTC 12492(T) ( = GTC 862(T)) gave relatedness values of 34.5 % (reciprocal 41.5 %) and 35.0 % (reciprocal 25.7 %), respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization results and some differentiating biochemical properties indicate that strain R26(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Elizabethkingia anophelis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is R26(T) ( = CCUG 60038(T) = CCM 7804(T)).

  14. AACE/ACE DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF MIDGUT CARCINOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Laurence; Vinik, Aaron I.; Wong, Richard; Randolph, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a collection of complex tumors that arise from the diffuse endocrine system, primarily from the digestive tract. Carcinoid tumors most commonly originate from the small intestine. These tumors are either referred to as small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors or midgut carcinoids (MGCs). The purpose of this review article is to survey the diagnostic and therapeutic pathways for patients with MGC and provide an overview of the complex multidisciplinary care involved in improving their quality of life, treatment outcomes, and survival. Methods The current literature regarding the diagnosis and management of MGCs was reviewed. Results Dry flushing and secretory diarrhea are the hallmarks of the clinical syndrome of MGC. Managing MGC requires attention to the overall symptom complex, including the physical effects of the tumor and biomarker levels. The somatostatin analogs (SAs) octreotide and lanreotide are highly efficacious for symptomatic improvement. MGCs require resection to encompass the primary tumor and mesenteric lymph node metastases and should include cholecystectomy if the patient is likely to receive SA therapy. Debulking of liver metastasis by resection in combination with ablative therapies and other liver-directed modalities may help palliate symptoms and hormonal overproduction in carefully selected patients. Quality of life is an important measure of patients’ perception of the burden of their disease and impact of treatment modalities and may be a useful guide in deciding changes in therapy to alter apparent health status. Conclusion MGC is a challenging malignancy that requires the input of a multidisciplinary team to develop the best treatment plan. Consultation with expert centers that specialize in NETs may also be indicated for complex cases. With expert care, patients can be cured or live with the disease and enjoy good quality of life. PMID:25962092

  15. Closed gastroschisis, vanishing midgut and extreme short bowel syndrome: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dennison, F A

    2016-08-01

    Gastroschisis alone has excellent survival rates. Occasionally reported is closed gastroschisis, leading to vanishing small bowel and extreme short bowel syndrome. It is believed that the abdominal wall defect can contract or close in utero, which leads to strangulation of the eviscerated bowel and the rare "vanishing gut syndrome." This has a very poor prognosis with mortality as high as 70%. An 18-year-old primigravid patient's 13 week scan diagnosed a large gastroschisis affecting the fetus. After counselling, she decided to continue with the pregnancy. Between 20 and 22 weeks, the gastroschisis disappeared, and the bowel within the abdomen became markedly dilated. Spontaneous labour occurred at 33 + 3 weeks gestation. There was no abdominal wall defect seen at delivery. Imaging and an exploratory laparotomy demonstrated absence of most of the midgut. Because available options for treatment would be very aggressive and risky, palliative care was thought to be the most feasible and practical option. He died at home on day 29 after birth. Extreme short gut syndrome (less than 25 cm of remaining small bowel) is rare. There are 13 reported cases in the literature from year 2000 to 2013. Treatment is aggressive and involves a bowel lengthening procedure or small bowel transplant. All require total parenteral nutrition and liver failure, and liver transplant is a common complication. Of these cases, 12 were born alive and 7 had aggressive treatment. Only two cases were confirmed to still be alive in infancy. If gastroschisis is seen to be reducing and "disappearing" antenatally, parents should be made aware of this rare complication so that they might be prepared if a poor outcome is anticipated.

  16. Transcriptome Analysis of the Midgut of the Chinese Oak Silkworm Antheraea pernyi Infected with Antheraea pernyi Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Liu, Wei; He, Ying-Zi; Wang, Feng-Cheng; Jiang, Yi-Ren; Qin, Li

    2016-01-01

    The Antheraea pernyi nucleopolyhedrovirus (ApNPV) is an exclusive pathogen of A. pernyi. The intense interactions between ApNPV and A. pernyi cause a series of physiological and pathological changes to A. pernyi. However, no detailed report exists regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between ApNPV and A. pernyi. In this study, four cDNA libraries of the A. pernyi midgut, including two ApNPV-infected groups and two control groups, were constructed for transcriptomic analysis to provide new clues regarding the molecular mechanisms that underlie these interactions. The transcriptome of the A. pernyi midgut was de novo assembled using the Trinity platform because of the lack of a genome resource for A. pernyi. Compared with the controls, a total of 5,172 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, including 2,183 up-regulated and 2,989 down-regulated candidates, of which 2,965 and 911 DEGs were classified into different GO categories and KEGG pathways, respectively. The DEGs involved in A. pernyi innate immunity were classified into several categories, including heat-shock proteins, apoptosis-related proteins, serpins, serine proteases and cytochrome P450s. Our results suggested that these genes were related to the immune response of the A. pernyi midgut to ApNPV infection via their essential roles in regulating a variety of physiological processes. Our results may serve as a basis for future research not only on the molecular mechanisms of ApNPV invasion but also on the anti-ApNPV mechanism of A. pernyi. PMID:27820844

  17. CONSTRUCTION OF SILKWORM MIDGUT cDNA LIBRARY FOR SCREEN AND SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF PERITROPHIC MEMBRANE PROTEIN GENES.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi-Jun; Xue, Bin; Li, Yang-Yang; Li, Fan-Chi; Ni, Min; Shen, Wei-De; Gu, Zhi-Ya; Li, Bing; Shen, Wei-De; Gu, Zhi-Ya; Li, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Silkworm is an important economic insect and the model species for Lepidoptera. The midgut of silkworm is an important physiological barrier, as its peritrophic membrane (PM) can resist pathogen invasion. In this study, a silkworm midgut cDNA library was constructed in order to identify silkworm PM genes. The capacity of the initial library was 6.92 × 10(6) pfu/ml, along with a recombination rate of 92.14% and a postamplification titer of 4.10 × 10(9) pfu/ml. Three silkworm PM protein genes were obtained by immunoscreening, two of which were chitin-binding protein (CBP) genes and one of which was a chitin deacetylase (CDA) gene as revealed by sequence analysis. Three genes were named BmCBP02, BmCBP13, and BmCDA17, and their ORF sizes are 678, 1,029, and 645 bp, respectively; all of them contain sequences of chitin-binding domains. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that BmCBP02 has the highest consensus with Mamestra configurata CBP at 61.0%; BmCBP13 has the highest consensus with Loxostege sticticalis PM CBP at 53.35%; BmCDA17 has the highest consensus with Helicoverpa armigera CDA5a at 70.83%. Tissue transcriptional analysis revealed that all three genes were specifically expressed in the midgut, and during the developmental process of fifth-instar silkworms, the transcription of all the genes showed an upward trend. This study laid a foundation for further studies on the functions of silkworm PM genes.

  18. Effects of α-Terthienyl on the midgut detoxification enzymes of the European corn borer,Ostrinia nubilalis.

    PubMed

    Feng, R; Houseman, J G; Downe, A E; Arnason, J T

    1993-09-01

    The biochemical basis for the tolerance of the European corn borer,Ostrinia nubilalis, to the phototoxinα-terthienyl was investigated by measuring the midgut polysubstrate monooxygenases and glutathioneS-transferase activities.α-Terthienyl administered in the diet to the corn borers increased the level of cytochromeb 5, NADH-cytochromec reductase,O-demethylase, and glutathioneS-transferase activities. The induced detoxification enzyme activities should enable the corn borer to metabolizeα-terthienyl more efficiently and therefore render the corn borer highly tolerant toα-terthienyl.

  19. Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 Toxins to the Midgut Brush Border Membrane Vesicles of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Evidence of Shared Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza, L.; Nielsen-Leroux, C.; Goze, E.; Frutos, R.; Charles, J.

    1996-01-01

    Binding and competition among Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, and Cry1Ba toxins were analyzed quantitatively in vitro by using (sup125)I-labeled activated toxins and brush border membrane vesicles isolated from Chilo suppressalis larval midguts. The three toxins bound specifically to the midgut brush border membrane vesicles. Direct binding experiments showed that Cry1Aa and Cry1Ba recognized a single class of binding sites with different affinities, whereas Cry1Aa recognized two classes of binding sites, one with a high affinity and a low concentration and the other with a lower affinity but higher concentration. Competition experiments showed that toxins Cry1Ac and Cry1Ba shared a binding site in the C. suppressalis midgut membranes and that this site was also the low-affinity binding site for Cry1Aa. PMID:16535306

  20. Mechanisms of larval midgut damage following exposure to phoxim and repair of phoxim-induced damage by cerium in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohong; Sun, Qingqing; Li, Bing; Xie, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Hong, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Sang, Xuezi; Gui, Suxin; Wang, Ling; Shen, Weide; Hong, Fashui

    2015-04-01

    Bombyx mori is an important economic animal for silk production. However, it is liable to be infected by organophosphorus pesticide that can contaminate its food and growing environment. It has been known that organophosphorus pesticide including phoxim exposure may damage the digestive systems, produce oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in silkworm B. mori, whereas cerium treatment has been demonstrated to relieve phoxim-induced toxicity in B. mori. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of midgut injury due to phoxim exposure and B. mori protection after cerium pretreatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the midgut damage and its molecular mechanisms, and the protective role of cerium in B. mori following exposure to phoxim. The results showed that phoxim exposure led to severe midgut damages and oxidative stress; whereas cerium relieved midgut damage and oxidative stress caused by phoxim in B. mori. Furthermore, digital gene expression suggested that phoxim exposure led to significant up-regulation of 94 genes and down-regulation of 52 genes. Of these genes, 52 genes were related with digestion and absorption, specifically, the significant alterations of esterase, lysozyme, amylase 48, and lipase expressions. Cerium pretreatment resulted in up-regulation of 116 genes, and down-regulation of 29 genes, importantly, esterase 48, lipase, lysozyme, and α-amylase were up-regulated. Treatment with Phoxim + CeCl3 resulted in 66 genes up-regulation and 39 genes down-regulation; specifically, levels of esterase 48, lipase, lysozyme, and α-amylase expression in the midgut of silkworms were significantly increased. Therefore, esterase 48, lipase, lysozyme, and α-amylase may be potential biomarkers of midgut toxicity caused by phoxim exposure. These findings may expand the application of rare earths in sericulture.

  1. Exploring the midgut transcriptome and brush border membrane vesicle proteome of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker).

    PubMed

    Ma, Weihua; Zhang, Zan; Peng, Chuanhua; Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Fei; Lin, Yongjun

    2012-01-01

    The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is one of the most detrimental pests affecting rice crops. The use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins has been explored as a means to control this pest, but the potential for C. suppressalis to develop resistance to Bt toxins makes this approach problematic. Few C. suppressalis gene sequences are known, which makes in-depth study of gene function difficult. Herein, we sequenced the midgut transcriptome of the rice stem borer. In total, 37,040 contigs were obtained, with a mean size of 497 bp. As expected, the transcripts of C. suppressalis shared high similarity with arthropod genes. Gene ontology and KEGG analysis were used to classify the gene functions in C. suppressalis. Using the midgut transcriptome data, we conducted a proteome analysis to identify proteins expressed abundantly in the brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Of the 100 top abundant proteins that were excised and subjected to mass spectrometry analysis, 74 share high similarity with known proteins. Among these proteins, Western blot analysis showed that Aminopeptidase N and EH domain-containing protein have the binding activities with Bt-toxin Cry1Ac. These data provide invaluable information about the gene sequences of C. suppressalis and the proteins that bind with Cry1Ac.

  2. Fetal Midgut Volvulus with a Cystic Appearance, Accompanying a Sinus Rhythm and an Increased Peak Systolic Velocity without Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kaba, Metin; Oksuzoglu, Aysegul; Kaba, Gokcen; Timur, Hakan; Akbaba, Eren; Turgut, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    A midgut volvulus rarely occurs in a fetus; however, when it does, it requires an immediate diagnosis and surgery. Thirty-week pregnant was referred to our clinic with a diagnosis of a fetal abdominal cystic mass and preterm labor. The initial ultrasound examination revealed a female fetus with a 55 × 50 mm cystic mass in the lower abdomen, which was preliminarily diagnosed as an ovarian cyst. There was a sinusoidal rhythm on cardiography. The middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity was 60.4 cm/sec, compatible with 1.49 MoMs that suggested fetal anemia on Doppler examination. Uterine contractions were observed with tocography and maternal hydration was administered for tocolytic treatment. Despite hydration, uterine contractions continued and the infant was delivered. A newborn ultrasonographic evaluation revealed a 6 cm abdominal cyst, and plain abdominal radiographs revealed distended loops of the small bowel on the left side. Emergency surgery was performed. A midgut volvulus leading to dilatation and necrosis of the small bowel without anatomical causes was observed during laparotomy. The necrotic bowel loop was resected and an end-to-end anastomosis was performed. The newborn died due to multiorgan failure. Obstetricians should be familiar with the appropriate diagnosis and management of a fetal volvulus. PMID:26779358

  3. First insight into the lipid uptake, storage and mobilization in arachnids: role of midgut diverticula and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Laino, Aldana; Cunningham, Mónica L; García, Fernando; Heras, Horacio

    2009-12-01

    The importance of midgut diverticula (M-diverticula) and hemolymph lipoproteins in the lipid homeostasis of Polybetes phythagoricus was studied. Radioactivity distribution in tissues and hemolymph was analyzed either after feeding or injecting [1-(14)C]-palmitate. In both experiments, radioactivity was mostly taken up by M-diverticula that synthesized diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols and phospholipids in a ratio close to its lipid class composition. M-diverticula total lipids represent 8.08% (by wt), mostly triacylglycerols (74%) and phosphatidylcholine (13%). Major fatty acids were (in decreasing order of abundance) 18:1n-9, 18:2n-6, 16:0, 16:1n-7, 18:0, 18:3n-3. Spider hemocyanin-containing lipoprotein (VHDL) transported 83% of the circulating label at short incubation times. After 24h, VHDL and HDL-1 (comparable to insect lipophorin) were found to be involved in the lipid uptake and release from M-diverticula, HDL-2 playing a negligible role. Lipoprotein's labelled lipid changed with time, phospholipids becoming the main circulating lipid after 24h. These results indicate that arachnid M-diverticula play a central role in lipid synthesis, storage and movilization, analogous to insect fat body or crustacean midgut gland. The relative contribution of HDL-1 and VHDL to lipid dynamics indicated that, unlike insects, spider VHDL significantly contributes to the lipid exchange between M-diverticula and hemolymph.

  4. Fz2 and Cdc42 Mediate Melanization and Actin Polymerization but Are Dispensable for Plasmodium Killing in the Mosquito Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Daniel; Hoffmann, Jules A; Levashina, Elena A

    2006-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of the mosquito malaria vector Anopheles is a hostile environment for Plasmodium, with most parasites succumbing to host defenses. This study addresses morphological and ultrastructural features associated with Plasmodium berghei ookinete invasion in Anopheles gambiae midguts to define the sites and possible mechanisms of parasite killing. We show by transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence that the majority of ookinetes are killed in the extracellular space. Dead or dying ookinetes are surrounded by a polymerized actin zone formed within the basal cytoplasm of adjacent host epithelial cells. In refractory strain mosquitoes, we found that formation of this zone is strongly linked to prophenoloxidase activation leading to melanization. Furthermore, we identify two factors controlling both phenomena: the transmembrane receptor frizzled-2 and the guanosine triphosphate–binding protein cell division cycle 42. However, the disruption of actin polymerization and melanization by double-stranded RNA inhibition did not affect ookinete survival. Our results separate the mechanisms of parasite killing from subsequent reactions manifested by actin polymerization and prophenoloxidase activation in the A. gambiae–P. berghei model. These latter processes are reminiscent of wound healing in other organisms, and we propose that they represent a form of wound-healing response directed towards a moribund ookinete, which is perceived as damaged tissue. PMID:17196037

  5. Forces driven by morphogenesis modulate Twist Expression to determine Anterior Mid-gut Differentiation in Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Emmanuel

    2008-03-01

    By combining magnetic tweezers to in vivo laser ablation, we locally manipulate Drosophila embryonic tissues with physiologically relevant forces. We demonstrate that high level of Twist expression in the stomodeal primordium is mechanically induced in response to compression by the 60±20 nN force developed during germ-band extension (GBE). We find that this force triggers the junctional release and nuclear translocation of Armadillo involved in Twist mechanical induction in the stomodeum in a Src42A dependent way. Finally, stomodeal-specific RNAi-mediated silencing of Twist during compression impairs the differentiation of midgut cells, as revealed by strong defects in Dve expression and abnormal larval lethality. Thus, mechanical induction of Twist overexpression in stomodeal cells is necessary for subsequent midgut differentiation. In collaboration with Nicolas Desprat, Willy Supatto, and Philippe-Alexandre Pouille, MGDET, UMR168 CNRS, Institut Curie11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005, Paris, France; and Emmanuel Beaurepaire, LOB, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS and INSERM U 696, 91128 Palaiseau, France.

  6. Malaria parasites co-opt human factor H to prevent complement-mediated lysis in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nina; Lasonder, Edwin; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Kuehn, Andrea; Tews, Sabrina; Fischer, Rainer; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Pradel, Gabriele

    2013-01-16

    Human complement is a first line defense against infection in which circulating proteins initiate an enzyme cascade on the microbial surface that leads to phagocytosis and lysis. Various pathogens evade complement recognition by binding to regulator proteins that protect host cells from complement activation. We show that emerging gametes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum bind the host complement regulator factor H (FH) following transmission to the mosquito to protect from complement-mediated lysis by the blood meal. Human complement is active in the mosquito midgut for approximately 1 hr postfeeding. During this period, the gamete surface protein PfGAP50 binds to FH and uses surface-bound FH to inactivate the complement protein C3b. Loss of FH-mediated protection, either through neutralization of FH or blockade of PfGAP50, significantly impairs gametogenesis and inhibits parasite transmission to the mosquito. Thus, Plasmodium co-opts the protective host protein FH to evade complement-mediated lysis within the mosquito midgut.

  7. Histopathological effects and determination of the putative receptor of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Da toxin in Spodoptera littoralis midgut.

    PubMed

    BenFarhat-Touzri, Dalel; Saadaoui, Marwa; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Saadaoui, Imen; Azzouz, Hichem; Tounsi, Slim

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain HD133, known by its effectiveness against Spodoptera species, produces many insecticidal proteins including Cry1Ab, Cry1Ca and Cry1Da. In the present study, the insecticidal activity of Cry1Da against Spodoptera littoralis was investigated. It showed toxicity with an LC(50) of 224.4 ng/cm(2) with 95% confidence limits of (178.61-270.19) and an LC(90) of 467.77 ng/cm(2) with 95% confidence limits of (392.89-542.65). The midgut histopathology of Cry1Da fed larvae showed vesicle formation in the apical region, vacuolization and destruction of epithelial cells. Biotinylated-activated Cry1Da toxin bound protein of about 65 kDa on blots of S. littoralis brush border membrane preparations. This putative receptor differs in molecular size from those recognized by Cry1C and Vip3A which are active against this polyphagous insect. This difference in midgut receptors strongly supports the use of Cry1Da as insecticidal agent, particularly in case of Cry and/or Vip-resistance management.

  8. Exploring the Midgut Transcriptome and Brush Border Membrane Vesicle Proteome of the Rice Stem Borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker)

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chuanhua; Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Fei; Lin, Yongjun

    2012-01-01

    The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is one of the most detrimental pests affecting rice crops. The use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins has been explored as a means to control this pest, but the potential for C. suppressalis to develop resistance to Bt toxins makes this approach problematic. Few C. suppressalis gene sequences are known, which makes in-depth study of gene function difficult. Herein, we sequenced the midgut transcriptome of the rice stem borer. In total, 37,040 contigs were obtained, with a mean size of 497 bp. As expected, the transcripts of C. suppressalis shared high similarity with arthropod genes. Gene ontology and KEGG analysis were used to classify the gene functions in C. suppressalis. Using the midgut transcriptome data, we conducted a proteome analysis to identify proteins expressed abundantly in the brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Of the 100 top abundant proteins that were excised and subjected to mass spectrometry analysis, 74 share high similarity with known proteins. Among these proteins, Western blot analysis showed that Aminopeptidase N and EH domain-containing protein have the binding activities with Bt-toxin Cry1Ac. These data provide invaluable information about the gene sequences of C. suppressalis and the proteins that bind with Cry1Ac. PMID:22666467

  9. Expression of a sugar clade gustatory receptor, BmGr6, in the oral sensory organs, midgut, and central nervous system of larvae of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Mang, Dingze; Shu, Min; Endo, Haruka; Yoshizawa, Yasutaka; Nagata, Shinji; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-03-01

    Insects taste nonvolatile chemicals through gustatory receptors (Grs) and make choices for feeding, mating, and oviposition. To date, genome projects have identified 69 Gr genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori; however, the expression sites of these Grs remain to be explored. In this study, we used reverse transcription (RT)-PCR to investigate expression of the B. mori Gr-6 (BmGr6) gene, a member of the putative sugar clade gene family in various tissues. BmGr6 is expressed in the midgut, central nervous system (CNS), and oral sensory organs. Moreover, immunohistochemistry using an anti-BmGr6 antiserum demonstrated that BmGr6 is expressed in cells by oral sensory organs, midgut and nervous system. Furthermore, double-immunohistochemistry indicated that BmGr6 is expressed in midgut enteroendocrine cells, also in CNS neurosecretory cells. In particular, a portion of BmGr6-expressing cells, in both midgut and CNS, secretes FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs). These results suggest that BmGr6 functions not only as a taste receptor, but also as a chemical sensor such as for the regulation of gut movement, physiological conditions, and feeding behavior of larvae.

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Elizabethkingia anophelis Strains R26T and Ag1 from the Midgut of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Kukutla, Phanidhar; Lindberg, Bo G; Pei, Dong; Rayl, Melanie; Yu, Wanqin; Steritz, Matthew; Faye, Ingrid; Xu, Jiannong

    2013-12-05

    Elizabethkingia anophelis is a species in the family Flavobacteriaceae. It is a dominant resident in the mosquito gut and also a human pathogen. We present the draft genome sequences of two strains of E. anophelis, R26(T) and Ag1, which were isolated from the midgut of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Elizabethkingia anophelis Strains R26T and Ag1 from the Midgut of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Kukutla, Phanidhar; Lindberg, Bo G.; Pei, Dong; Rayl, Melanie; Yu, Wanqin; Steritz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Elizabethkingia anophelis is a species in the family Flavobacteriaceae. It is a dominant resident in the mosquito gut and also a human pathogen. We present the draft genome sequences of two strains of E. anophelis, R26T and Ag1, which were isolated from the midgut of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. PMID:24309745

  12. Cloning eleven midgut trypsin cDNAs and evaluating the interaction of proteinase inhibitors with Cry1Ac against the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Midgut trypsins are associated with Bt protoxin activation and toxin degradation. Proteinase inhibitors have potential insecticidal toxicity against a wide range of insect species. Proactive action to examine trypsin gene profiles and proteinase inhibitors for interaction with Bt toxin is necessary ...

  13. Molecular characterization and RNA interference of three midgut aminopeptidase N isozymes from bacillus thuringiensis-susceptible and -resistant strains of sugarcane borer diatraea saccharalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) proteins located at the midgut epithelium of some lepidopterous species have been implicated as receptors for insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis. cDNAs of three APN isoforms, DsAPN1, DsAPN2, and DsAPN3, from Cry1Ab-susceptible (Cry1Ab-SS) and -resistant (Cry1Ab-...

  14. Effects of neem oil (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) on the replacement of the midgut epithelium in the lacewing Ceraeochrysa claveri during larval-pupal metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Santos, Daniela Carvalho Dos

    2014-06-01

    Larvae of the lacewing Ceraeochrysa claveri were fed on eggs of Diatraeasaccharalis treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1% and 2% throughout the larval period. Pupae obtained from treated larvae were used in the study at five days after the completion of cocoon spinning to investigate the effects of neem oil on the replacement of the midgut epithelium during the larval-pupal transition. We observed that the old larval epithelium was shed into the midgut lumen and transformed into the yellow body. Old cells from the yellow body were destroyed by apoptosis and autophagy and were not affected by neem oil. However, neem oil did affect the new pupal epithelium. Cells from treated pupae showed cellular injuries such as a loss of microvilli, cytoplasmic vacuolization, an increase of glycogen stores, deformation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and dilation of the perinuclear space. Additionally, the neem oil treatment resulted in the release of cytoplasmic protrusions, rupture of the plasma membrane and leakage of cellular debris into the midgut lumen, characteristics of cell death by necrosis. The results indicate that neem oil ingestion affects the replacement of midgut epithelium, causing cytotoxic effects that can alter the organism's physiology due to extensive cellular injuries.

  15. Brain-midgut cross-talk and autocrine metabolastat via the sNPF/CCAP negative feed-back loop in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Mikani, Azam; Watari, Yasuhiko; Takeda, Makio

    2015-12-01

    Immunohistochemical reactivities against short neuropeptide F (sNPF-ir) and crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP-ir) were detected in both the brain-subesophageal ganglion (Br-SOG) and midgut epithelial cells of the male American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Four weeks of starvation increased the number of sNPF-ir cells and decreased the CCAP-ir cells in the Br-SOG, whereas refeeding reversed these effects. The contents of sNPF in the Br-SOG, midgut and hemolymph titer decreased in response to an injection of CCAP into the hemocoel of normally fed male cockroaches, while CCAP titers/contents decreased in response to an injection of sNPF. The results of a double-labeling experiment demonstrated that sNPF-ir co-existed in CCAP-ir cells in the pars intercerebralis (PI), dorsolateral region of protocerebrum (DL), deutocerebrum (De) and SOG. sNPF-ir and CCAP-ir were also colocalized in the midgut. sNPF and CCAP are neuropeptides and midgut factors that interact with each other. Since the two peptides are known to be secreted by identical cells that affect each other, this constitutes autocrine negative feedback regulation for a quick response to food accessibility/inaccessibility. These peptides not only constitute the switch in the digestive mechanism but also couple digestive adaptation with behavior. A CCAP injection suppressed locomotor activity when cockroaches were starved, whereas sNPF activated it when they were fed.

  16. Digestion in adult females of the leaf-footed bug Leptoglossus zonatus (Hemiptera: Coreidae) with emphasis on the glycoside hydrolases α-amylase, α-galactosidase, and α-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ariane A; Pinto, Carlos J C; Samuels, Richard I; Alexandre, Daniel; Silva, Carlos P

    2014-03-01

    The leaffooted bug, Leptoglossus zonatus (Hemiptera: Coreidae) is an emerging pest of several crops around the World and up to now very little is known of its digestive system. In this article, glycoside hydrolase (carbohydrase) activities in the adult midgut cells and in the luminal contents of L. zonatus adult females were studied. The results showed the distribution of digestive carbohydrases in adults of this heteropteran species in the different intestinal compartments. Determination of the spatial distribution of α-glucosidase activity in L. zonatus midgut showed only one major molecular form, which was not equally distributed between soluble and membrane-bound isoforms, being more abundant as a membrane-bound enzyme. The majority of digestive carbohydrases were found in the soluble fractions. Activities against starch, maltose and the synthetic substrate NPαGlu were found to show the highest levels of activity, followed by enzymes active against galactosyl oligosaccharides. Based on ion-exchange chromatography elution profiles and banding patterns in mildly denaturing electrophoresis, both midgut α-amylases and α-galactosidases showed at least two isoforms. The data suggested that the majority of carbohydrases involved in initial digestion were present in the midgut lumen, whereas final digestion of starch and of galactosyl oligosaccharides takes place partially within the lumen and partially at the cell surface. The complex of carbohydrases here described was qualitatively appropriate for the digestion of free oligosaccharides and oligomaltodextrins released by α-amylases acting on maize seed starch granules.

  17. Brn1/2/4, the predicted midgut regulator of the endo16 gene of the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Yuh, Chiou-Hwa; Dorman, Elizabeth R; Davidson, Eric H

    2005-05-15

    A specific prediction of our detailed cis-regulatory analysis of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Sp) endo16 gene was that the later expression of this gene would be driven by a midgut-specific transcriptional regulator. We have now identified this factor and determined some of its functions. The cDNA sequence reveals it to be a POU domain factor related closely to the mammalian factors Brain-1, -2, and -4. The factor was termed SpBrn1/2/4 (henceforth Brn1/2/4). Quantitative measurements of transcript prevalence show that the gene is first activated in the 20-h blastula, but there remain only about 100 molecules of brn1/2/4 mRNA per embryo (only a few per endoderm cell) until an abrupt 10-fold increase occurs as gastrulation begins. Measured in the same embryos, the late rise in prevalence of endo16 transcripts follows that of brn1/2/4 transcripts. As predicted by the endo16 model, brn1/2/4 expression is confined perfectly to the midgut, coincident with the domain of endo16 expression. The kinetics of accumulation of these transcripts indicates that the switch into the late phase of endo16 expression occurs when the brn1/2/4 transcript level nears its plateau (2000 molecules mRNA per embryo), after which each endo16 gene produces about 1 mRNA every 2 min (about 380 molecules mRNA per min in the whole embryo). Arrest of Brn1/2/4 translation by MASO treatment blocks the late phase of endo16 expression and specifically abolishes expression of cis-regulatory Module B of endo16, while not affecting Module A, also as predicted. The brn1/2/4 gene lies downstream of the regulatory genes executing post-gastrular specification of the midgut, as shown by further gene expression perturbation experiments which provide an initial glimpse of the underlying network architecture.

  18. Spodoptera frugiperda resistance to oral infection by Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus linked to aberrant occlusion-derived virus binding in the midgut.

    PubMed

    Haas-Stapleton, Eric J; Washburn, Jan O; Volkman, Loy E

    2005-05-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda larvae are highly resistant to oral infection by Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) (LD(50), approximately 9200 occlusions), but extremely susceptible to budded virus within the haemocoel (LD(50), <1 p.f.u.). The inability of AcMNPV occlusion-derived virus (ODV) to establish primary infections readily within midgut cells accounts for a major proportion of oral resistance. To determine whether inappropriate binding of AcMNPV ODV to S. frugiperda midgut cells contributes to lack of oral infectivity, the binding and fusion properties of AcMNPV ODV were compared with those of the ODV of a new isolate of Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) obtained from a field-collected larva (oral LD(50), 12 occlusions). By using a fluorescence-dequenching assay conducted in vivo, it was found that AcMNPV ODV bound to the midgut epithelia of S. frugiperda larvae at approximately 15 % of the level of SfMNPV ODV, but that, once bound, the efficiencies of fusion for the two ODVs were similar: 60 % for AcMNPV and 53 % for SfMNPV. Whilst the difference in binding efficiencies was significant, it could not account entirely for the observed differences in infectivity. Competition experiments, however, revealed that, in S. frugiperda larvae, SfMNPV ODV bound to a midgut cell receptor that was not bound by AcMNPV ODV, indicating that ODV interaction with a specific receptor(s) was necessary for productive infection of midgut columnar epithelial cells. Fusion in the absence of this ligand-receptor interaction did not result in productive infections.

  19. The antidiuretic neurohormone RhoprCAPA-2 downregulates fluid transport across the anterior midgut in the blood-feeding insect Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Ianowski, Juan P; Paluzzi, Jean-Paul; Te Brugge, Victoria A; Orchard, Ian

    2010-03-01

    Osmotic balance in insects is regulated by the excretory system, consisting of Malpighian tubules and the gut under the control of diuretic and antidiuretic factors. Terrestrial insects must conserve water, and antidiuresis is the norm, only interrupted by brief diuretic periods. Surprisingly, little is known about antidiuresis in insects. Two antidiuretic strategies have been described. The first antidiuretic mechanism involves the reabsorption of fluid from the primary urine in the hindgut. More recently, a second antidiuretic strategy was reported, consisting of inhibition of primary urine formation by the Malpighian tubules. Recently, we isolated, characterized, and cloned the gene encoding for the antidiuretic neurohormone (the neuropeptide RhoprCAPA-2) acting on the Malpighian tubules of Rhodnius prolixus. Here we describe a third, novel mechanism central to the antidiuretic strategy of R. prolixus, the inhibition of ion and fluid transport across the anterior midgut by RhoprCAPA-2. Our results show that RhoprCAPA-2 (1 micromol/l) reduces serotonin-stimulated fluid transport from 83 +/- 11 to 12 +/- 12 nl/min and equivalent short-circuit current from 20 +/- 4 to 5 +/- 0.7 microA/cm(2) in diuretic hormone-stimulated anterior midgut. RhoprCAPA-2 appears to function independently of intracellular cGMP or Ca(2+) in the midgut. Thus, the antidiuretic neurohormone RhoprCAPA-2 has multiple target tissues, and we hypothesize that RhoprCAPA-2 functions to coordinate the transport activity of the anterior midgut and Malpighian tubules so that the rate of fluid transport into the haemolymph by the anterior midgut matches the transport rate of Malpighian tubules to maintain the volume and ion composition of haemolymph.

  20. Changes in midgut endopeptidase activity of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are responsible for adaptation to soybean proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, L C; Lopes, A R; Cristofoletti, P T; Parra, J R; Terra, W R; Silva-Filho, M C

    2000-06-01

    The development of transgenic maize plants expressing soybean proteinase inhibitors could reduce the economic damage of one of the major maize pests in Brazil, the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797). We examined the influence of soybean proteinase inhibitors on digestive enzyme properties and development of S. frugiperda larvae. The inhibition of trypsin and chymotrypsin activities in vitro by soybean proteinase inhibitors suggested that either Kunitz (SBTI) or Bowman-Birk (SBBI) would have a potential antimetabolic effect when ingested by insect larvae. However, chronic ingestion of semipurified soybean inhibitors did not result in a significant reduction of growth and development of fall armyworm. Therefore, digestive serine proteinase activities (trypsin and chymotrypsin) of fall armyworm larvae were characterized. The results suggest that S. frugiperda was able to physiologically adapt to dietary proteinase inhibitors by altering the complement of proteolytic enzymes in the insect midguts.

  1. T-RFLP analysis of bacterial communities in the midguts of Apis mellifera and Apis cerana honey bees in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Disayathanoowat, Terd; Young, John Peter W; Helgason, Thorunn; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated bacterial community structures in the midguts of Apis mellifera and Apis cerana in Thailand to understand how bacterial communities develop in Apis species. The bacterial species present in replicate colonies from different locations and life stages were analysed. PCR amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses revealed a total of 16 distinct terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs), 12 of which were shared between A. mellifera and A. cerana populations. The T-RFs were affiliated to Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinomycetes. The Gammaproteobacteria were found to be common in all stages of honey bee, but in addition, the Firmicutes group was found to be present in the worker bees. Bacterial community structure showed no difference amongst the replicate colonies, but was affected to some degree by geographical location, life stage and species of honey bees.

  2. Separation of Binding Protein of Celangulin V from the Midgut of Mythimna separata Walker by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lina; Qi, Zhijun; Zhang, Jiwen; Wu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    Celangulin V, an insecticidal compound isolated from the root bark of Chinese bittersweet, can affect the digestive system of insects. However, the mechanism of how Celangulin V induces a series of symptoms is still unknown. In this study, affinity chromatography was conducted through coupling of Celangulin V-6-aminoacetic acid ester to the CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. SDS-PAGE was used to analyze the collected fraction eluted by Celangulin V. Eight binding proteins (Zinc finger protein, Thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), SUMO E3 ligase RanBP2, Transmembrane protein 1, Actin, APN and V-ATPase) were obtained and identified by LC/Q-TOF-MS from the midgut of Mythimna separata larvae. The potential of these proteins to serve as target proteins involved in the insecticidal activity of Celangulin V is discussed. PMID:25996604

  3. Proteomic analysis of silkworm midgut cellular proteins interacting with the 5' end of infectious flacherie virus genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingqian; He, Xinyi; Liu, Han; Fu, Zhangwuke; He, Xiangkang; Lu, Xingmeng

    2015-02-01

    The flacherie disease in the silkworm is caused by the infectious flacherie virus (IFV). IFV relies on its 5' region of genomic RNA to recruit host-related factors to implement viral translation and replication. To identify host proteins bound to the 5'-region of IFV RNA and identify proteins important for its function, mass spectrometry was used to identify proteins from silkworm midgut extracts that were obtained using RNA aptamer-labeled 5' region of IFV RNA. We found 325 protein groups (unique peptide≥2) bound to the 5' region of IFV RNA including translation-related factors (16 ribosomal subunits, 3 eukaryotic initiation factor subunits, 1 elongation factor subunit and 6 potential internal ribosome entry site trans-acting factors), cytoskeleton-related proteins, membrane-related proteins, metabolism enzymes, and other proteins. These results can be used to study the translation and replication related factors of IFV interacting with host silkworm and to control flacherie disease in silkworm.

  4. Differential expression of midgut proteins in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense-stimulated vs. non-stimulated Glossina palpalis gambiensis flies

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Anne; Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Rofidal, Valérie; Decourcelle, Mathilde; Santoni, Véronique; Hem, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The unicellular pathogenic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is responsible for the chronic form of sleeping sickness. This vector-borne disease is transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly of the group Glossina palpalis, including the subspecies G. p. gambiensis, in which the parasite completes its developmental cycle. Sleeping sickness control strategies can therefore target either the human host or the fly vector. Indeed, suppression of one step in the parasite developmental cycle could abolish parasite transmission to humans, with consequences on the spreading of the disease. In order to develop this type of approach, we have identified, at the proteome level, events resulting from the tripartite interaction between the tsetse fly G. p. gambiensis, its microbiome, and the trypanosome. Proteomes were analyzed from four biological replicates of midguts from flies sampled 3 days post-feeding on either a trypanosome-infected (stimulated flies) or a non-infected (non-stimulated flies) bloodmeal. Over 500 proteins were identified in the midguts of flies from both feeding groups, 13 of which were shown to be differentially expressed in trypanosome-stimulated vs. non-stimulated flies. Functional annotation revealed that several of these proteins have important functions that could be involved in modulating the fly infection process by trypanosomes (and thus fly vector competence), including anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic, cellular detoxifying, trypanosome agglutination, and immune stimulating or depressive effects. The results show a strong potential for diminishing or even disrupting fly vector competence, and their application holds great promise for improving the control of sleeping sickness. PMID:26029185

  5. A vacuolar-type proton pump in a vesicle fraction enriched with potassium transporting plasma membranes from tobacco hornworm midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Wieczorek, H.; Weerth, S.; Schindlbeck, M.; Klein, U.

    1989-07-05

    Mg-ATP dependent electrogenic proton transport, monitored with fluorescent acridine orange, 9-aminoacridine, and oxonol V, was investigated in a fraction enriched with potassium transporting goblet cell apical membranes of Manduca sexta larval midgut. Proton transport and the ATPase activity from the goblet cell apical membrane exhibited similar substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity. ATP and GTP were far better substrates than UTP, CTP, ADP, and AMP. Azide and vanadate did not inhibit proton transport, whereas 100 microM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and 30 microM N-ethylmaleimide were inhibitors. The pH gradient generated by ATP and limiting its hydrolysis was 2-3 pH units. Unlike the ATPase activity, proton transport was not stimulated by KCl. In the presence of 20 mM KCl, a proton gradient could not be developed or was dissipated. Monovalent cations counteracted the proton gradient in an order of efficacy like that for stimulation of the membrane-bound ATPase activity: K+ = Rb+ much greater than Li+ greater than Na+ greater than choline (chloride salts). Like proton transport, the generation of an ATP dependent and azide- and vanadate-insensitive membrane potential (vesicle interior positive) was prevented largely by 100 microM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and 30 microM N-ethylmaleimide. Unlike proton transport, the membrane potential was not affected by 20 mM KCl. In the presence of 150 mM choline chloride, the generation of a membrane potential was suppressed, whereas the pH gradient increased 40%, indicating an anion conductance in the vesicle membrane. Altogether, the results led to the following new hypothesis of electrogenic potassium transport in the lepidopteran midgut. A vacuolar-type electrogenic ATPase pumps protons across the apical membrane of the goblet cell, thus energizing electroneutral proton/potassium antiport. The result is a net active and electrogenic potassium flux.

  6. Midgut proteases of the cardamom shoot and capsule borer Conogethes punctiferalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and their interaction with aprotinin.

    PubMed

    Josephrajkumar, A; Chakrabarty, R; Thomas, G

    2006-02-01

    Protease inhibitors cause mortality in a range of insects, and transgenic plants expressing protease inhibitors have been protected against pest attack, particularly internal feeders that are not amenable to control by conventional means. A study of luminal proteases in Conogethes punctiferalis Guenée was performed to identify potential targets for proteinaceous biopesticides, such as protease inhibitors. The midgut protease profile of the gut lumen from C. punctiferalis was studied to determine the conditions for optimal protein hydrolysis. Optimum conditions for peptidase activity were found to be in 50 mm Tris-HCl, pH 10 containing 20 mm CaCl2; incubation for 30 min at 40 degrees C. Four synthetic substrates, i.e. benzoyl-arg-p-nitroanilide, benzoyl-tyr-p-nitroanilide, succinyl-ala-ala-pro-leu-p-nitroanilide (SAAPLpNA) and leu-p-nitroanilide were hydrolysed by C. punctiferalis gut proteases in Tris-HCl buffer pH 10. Trypsin and elastase-like chymotrypsin were the prominent digestive proteases, and age-related modulation of midgut proteases existed for trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase-like chymotrypsin and leucine aminopeptidase. Serine protease inhibitors such as aprotinin, soybean trypsin inhibitor and phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride inhibited peptidase activity. Some metal ions such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Pb(2+) and Co(2+) enhanced BApNA-ase activity whereas others like Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+) and Hg(2+) were inhibitory at 6 mm concentration. Trypsin and elastase-like chymotrypsin were significantly inhibited by 94% and 29%, respectively, by aprotinin (150 nm) under in vitro conditions. A possible incorporation of protease inhibitors into transgenic plants is discussed.

  7. Deltamethrin-Mediated Toxicity and Cytomorphological Changes in the Midgut and Nervous System of the Mayfly Callibaetis radiatus

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Yeisson; Santos, Helen P.; Serrão, José Eduardo; Oliveira, Eugênio E.

    2016-01-01

    Immature instars of mayflies are important constituents of the food web in aquatic ecosystems (especially in Neotropical regions) and they are among the most susceptible arthropods to pyrethroid insecticides. These insecticides have been recognized as important stressors of freshwater ecosystems, but their cellular effects in aquatic insects have been neglected. Here, we assessed the susceptibility to deltamethrin (a typical type II pyrethroid) as well as the deltamethrin-mediated cytomorphological changes in the central nervous system and midgut of the mayfly Callibaetis radiatus. While the deltamethrin LC50 for 24h of exposure was of 0.60 (0.46–0.78) μg of a.i/L, the survival of C. radiatus was significantly reduced in deltamethrin concentrations ≥ 0.25 μg a.i/L at 96h of exposure. Sub-lethal deltamethrin exposure severely affected the cytomorphology of C. radiatus midgut (e.g., muscle layer retraction, cytoplasm vacuolation, nucleus and striated border disorganization) and also induced slight cytomorphological changes in the brain (e.g., presence of pyknotic nuclei) and in the thoracic ganglia (e.g., vacuolation of neurons and presence of pyknotic nuclei) of these insects. However, DNA damage was absent in all of these organs, suggesting that the sublethal cellular stress induced by deltamethrin might disrupt physiological processes (e.g., metabolism or electrical signal transmission) rather than cause cell death (e.g., apoptosis) in C. radiatus. Thus, our findings indicated that deltamethrin actions at cellular levels represent a clear indication of sublethal effects on the C. radiatus survival abilities. PMID:27031238

  8. Variant vicilins from a resistant Vigna unguiculata lineage (IT81D-1053) accumulate inside Callosobruchus maculatus larval midgut epithelium.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriel B; Kunz, Daniele; Peres, Tanara V; Leal, Rodrigo B; Uchôa, Adriana F; Samuels, Richard I; Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Carlini, Célia R; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Terra, Walter R; Xavier-Filho, José; Silva, Carlos P

    2014-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that variant vicilins are the main resistance factor of cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata) against attack by the cowpea beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. There is evidence that the toxic properties of these storage proteins may be related to their interaction with glycoproteins and other microvillar membrane constituents along the digestive tract of the larvae. New findings have shown that following interaction with the microvilli, the vicilins are absorbed across the intestinal epithelium and thus reach the internal environment of the larvae. In the present paper we studied the insecticidal activity of the variant vicilins purified from a resistant cowpea variety (IT81D-1053). Bioassays showed that the seeds of this genotype affected larval growth, causing developmental retardation and 100% mortality. By feeding C. maculatus larvae on susceptible and IT81D-1053 derived vicilins (FITC labelled or unlabelled), followed by fluorescence and immunogold cytolocalization, we were able to demonstrate that both susceptible and variant forms are internalized in the midgut cells and migrate inside vesicular structures from the apex to the basal portion of the enterocytes. However, when larvae were fed with the labelled vicilins for 24h and then returned to a control diet, the concentration of the variant form remained relatively high, suggesting that variant vicilins are not removed from the cells at the same rate as the non-variant vicilins. We suggest that the toxic effects of variant vicilins on midgut cells involve the binding of these proteins to the cell surface followed by internalization and interference with the normal physiology of the enterocytes, thereby affecting larval development in vivo.

  9. Hsp70 and small Hsps are the major heat shock protein members involved in midgut metamorphosis in the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Gu, J; Huang, L-X; Shen, Y; Huang, L-H; Feng, Q-L

    2012-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are important chaperones, which are involved in various signal pathways and regulate lots of physiological processes. Early research suggested that some Hsps are involved in insect development. However, few studies have been carried out to explore the roles of Hsps, especially in larval-pupal metamorphosis. In the present study, 49 Hsp unigenes were identified in the Spodoptera litura transcriptome and their mRNA expression profiles during midgut metamorphosis were examined using a tag-based digital gene expression system. The genes with the most different levels of expression were then cloned and their expression patterns in midguts from sixth instar larvae to pupae were analysed using real time quantitative PCR. The responses of these genes to juvenile hormone (JH) and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) were also studied. The results showed that the mRNA levels of 22 Hsp unigenes changed significantly during midgut metamorphosis. Amongst these 22 unigenes, hsp70, hsp20.4 and hsp20.8 were the most up-regulated members, and hsp15.9, hsp19.3 and hsp22.0 were the most down-regulated ones. Further studies showed that hsp70, hsp20.4 and hsp20.8 were remarkably up-regulated by JH. In addition, 20E slightly increased the mRNA levels of both hsp20.4 and hsp20.8. However, hsp15.9, hsp19.3 and hsp22.0 did not respond to either JH or 20E. These results indicate that Hsp70 and small Hsps (sHsps) are probably the major players in midgut metamorphosis in S. litura. The current findings provide valuable insights into the roles of the Hsp superfamily in insect metamorphosis.

  10. De novo assembly and analysis of midgut transcriptome of Haemaphysalis flava and identification of genes involved in blood digestion, feeding and defending from pathogens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing-Li; Cheng, Tian-Yin; Yang, Hu; Liao, Zhi-Hui

    2016-03-01

    Bioactive components in the midgut of ticks play a key role in tick blood digestion, feeding and pathogen transmission. The study of protein and gene targets in midgut provides opportunities to explore novel tick control strategies. Only a few nucleotide sequences are available in public databases for Haemaphysalis flava, an important disease vector for humans and animals. Knowledge of the process of blood digestion by the ticks and protein expression in the digestive tract is limited. Here, we utilize high-throughput sequencing to characterize the midgut transcriptome of fully engorged (FE, average length of 10mm) and partially engorged (PE, average length of 5mm) female H. flava. 6.8GB and 8.3GB of high-quality sequence data were obtained using Illumina sequencing technology. 54,357,490 and 66,116,050 reads were finally assembled into 76,556 unigenes with mean length of 704bp. The transcripts involved in blood meal digestion were classified into eight large categories, including peptidase inhibitor, peptidase (serine-, metallo-, cysteine-, aspartic-peptidase), phospholipase, carbohydrate digestion/hydrolases, lipid binding, immunity-related proteins, iron/heme metabolism and secreted proteins. A total of 5508 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between FE and PE. To confirm the DEG results, ten genes involved in blood digestion, feeding and defending from pathogens, were validated using qPCR. Our results not only contribute to better understanding of the changes in midgut transcript expression during different blood feeding stages, but also provide a valuable resource for identifying targets for future tick control studies.

  11. Cloning of PaAtg8 and roles of autophagy in adaptation to starvation with respect to the fat body and midgut of the Americana cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Takeda, Makio

    2014-05-01

    Starvation, in particular amino acid deprivation, induces autophagy in trophocytes (adipocytes), the major component of the fat body cell types, in the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the fat body of cockroach has two additional cell types: urocytes depositing uric acid in urate vacuoles as a nitrogen resource and mycetocytes harboring an endosymbiont, Blattabacterium cuenoti, which can synthesize amino acids from the metabolites of the stored uric acid. These cells might complement the roles of autophagy in recycling amino acids in the fat body or other organs of cockroaches under starvation. We investigate the presence of autophagy in tissues such as the fat body and midgut of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, under starvation by immunoblotting with antibody against Atg8, a ubiquitin-like protein required for the formation of autophagosomes and by electron microscopy. Corresponding changes in acid phosphatase activity were also investigated as representing lysosome activity. Starvation increased the level of an autophagic marker, Atg8-II, in both the tissues, extensively stimulating the formation of autophagic compartments in trophocytes of the fat body and columnar cells of the midgut for over 2 weeks. Acid phosphatase showed no significant increase in the fat body of the starved cockroaches but was higher in the midgut of the continuously fed animals. Thus, a distinct autophagic mechanism operates in these tissues under starvation of 2 weeks and longer. The late induction of autophagy implies exhaustion of the stored uric acid in the fat body. High activity of acid phosphatase in the midgut of the fed cockroaches might represent enhanced assimilation and not an autophagy-related function.

  12. Preduodenal portal vein in adult with polysplenia syndrome revisited with a case report.

    PubMed

    G A, Latha; Kagali, Nagaraj A; M, Shridhar; Prasad, B S Satish

    2014-04-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare developmental anomaly. In infants, this is often associated with duodenal obstruction or biliary atresia. It is generally asymptomatic in adults (Ooshima et al., Hepato-Biliary-Pancreat Surg 5(4):455-458, 1998). Here, we report a singular case of adult PDPV that was discovered accidentally during emergency laparotomy for peritonitis due to gastric perforation in a 38-year-old lady. A plethora of congenital anomalies was uncovered, which is consistent with the reported cases of classical polysplenia syndrome, viz., multiple spleens of equal volume, visceral heterotaxia, right (Rt.)-sided stomach, a left (Lt.)-sided or a large midline liver, malrotation of intestine, a short pancreas, PDPV and IVC abnormalities (Gayer et al., Abdom Imaging 24:178-184, 1999). In addition, abnormalities like anamolous origin of Lt. gastric and splenic arteries from the abdominal aorta with absent celiac trunk, hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery, hepatic veins draining directly to Rt. atrium, etc. along with hypertrophic and lipomatous interatrial septum have also been detected during further investigations. As of now, we have come across 29 cases of adult PDPV reported in world literature and we are reporting our unique case with a review of literature on anomalies of visceral organs associated with PDPV.

  13. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 Interactions with Western Corn Rootworm Midgut Membrane Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huarong; Olson, Monica; Lin, Gaofeng; Hey, Timothy; Tan, Sek Yee; Narva, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 are binary insecticidal proteins that are co-expressed in transgenic corn hybrids for control of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Bt crystal (Cry) proteins with limited potential for field-relevant cross-resistance are used in combination, along with non-transgenic corn refuges, as a strategy to delay development of resistant rootworm populations. Differences in insect midgut membrane binding site interactions are one line of evidence that Bt protein mechanisms of action differ and that the probability of receptor-mediated cross-resistance is low. Methodology/Principal Findings Binding site interactions were investigated between Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 and coleopteran active insecticidal proteins Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, and Cry8Ba on western corn rootworm midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Competitive binding of radio-labeled proteins to western corn rootworm BBMV was used as a measure of shared binding sites. Our work shows that 125I-Cry35Ab1 binds to rootworm BBMV, Cry34Ab1 enhances 125I-Cry35Ab1 specific binding, and that 125I-Cry35Ab1 with or without unlabeled Cry34Ab1 does not share binding sites with Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, or Cry8Ba. Two primary lines of evidence presented here support the lack of shared binding sites between Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 and the aforementioned proteins: 1) No competitive binding to rootworm BBMV was observed for competitor proteins when used in excess with 125I-Cry35Ab1 alone or combined with unlabeled Cry34Ab1, and 2) No competitive binding to rootworm BBMV was observed for unlabeled Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1, or a combination of the two, when used in excess with 125I-Cry3Aa, or 125I-Cry8Ba. Conclusions/Significance Combining two or more insecticidal proteins active against the same target pest is one tactic to delay the onset of resistance to either protein. We conclude that Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 are compatible with Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, or Cry8Ba for deployment as insect

  14. Cowpea bruchid midgut transcriptome response to a soybean cystatin--costs and benefits of counter-defence.

    PubMed

    Chi, Y H; Salzman, R A; Balfe, S; Ahn, J-E; Sun, W; Moon, J; Yun, D-J; Lee, S Y; Higgins, T J V; Pittendrigh, B; Murdock, L L; Zhu-Salzman, K

    2009-02-01

    The insect digestive system is the first line of defence protecting cells and tissues of the body from a broad spectrum of toxins and antinutritional factors in its food. To gain insight into the nature and breadth of genes involved in adaptation to dietary challenge, a collection of 20 352 cDNAs was prepared from the midgut tissue of cowpea bruchid larvae (Callosobruchus maculatus) fed on regular diet and diets containing antinutritional compounds. Transcript responses of the larvae to dietary soybean cystatin (scN) were analysed using cDNA microarrays, followed by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) confirmation with selected genes. The midgut transcript profile of insects fed a sustained sublethal scN dose over the larval life was compared with that of insects treated with an acute high dose of scN for 24 h. A total of 1756 scN-responsive cDNAs was sequenced; these clustered into 967 contigs, of which 653 were singletons. Many contigs (451) did not show homology with known genes, or had homology only with genes of unknown function in a Blast search. The identified differentially regulated sequences encoded proteins presumptively involved in metabolism, structure, development, signalling, defence and stress response. Expression patterns of some scN-responsive genes were consistent in each larval stage, whereas others exhibited developmental stage-specificity. Acute (24 h), high level exposure to dietary scN caused altered expression of a set of genes partially overlapping with the transcript profile seen under chronic lower level exposure. Protein and carbohydrate hydrolases were generally up-regulated by scN whereas structural, defence and stress-related genes were largely down-regulated. These results show that insects actively mobilize genomic resources in the alimentary tract to mitigate the impact of a digestive protease inhibitor. The enhanced or restored digestibility that may result is possibly crucial for insect survival, yet may be bought at the cost of

  15. Long-Term Starvation and Posterior Feeding Effects on Biochemical and Physiological Responses of Midgut Gland of Cherax quadricarinatus Juveniles (Parastacidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sacristán, Hernán Javier; Ansaldo, Martín; Franco-Tadic, Luis Marcelo; Fernández Gimenez, Analía Verónica; López Greco, Laura Susana

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of long-term starvation and posterior feeding on energetic reserves, oxidative stress, digestive enzymes, and histology of C. quadricarinatus midgut gland. The crayfish (6.27 g) were randomly assigned to one of three feeding protocols: continuous feeding throughout 80 day, continuous starvation until 80 day, and continuous starvation throughout 50 day and then feeding for the following 30 days. Juveniles from each protocol were weighed, and sacrificed at day 15, 30, 50 or 80. The lipids, glycogen, reduced glutathione (GSH), soluble protein, lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein oxidation (PO), catalase (CAT), lipase and proteinase activities, and histology were measured on midgut gland. Starved crayfish had a lower hepatosomatic index, number of molts, specific growth rate, lipids, glycogen, and GSH levels than fed animals at all assay times. The starvation did not affect the soluble protein, TBARS, PO levels and CAT. In starved juveniles the lipase activity decreased as starvation time increased, whereas proteinase activity decreased only at day 80. The histological analysis of the starved animals showed several signs of structural alterations. After 30 days of feeding, the starved-feeding animals exhibited a striking recovery of hepatosomatic index, number of molts, lipids and glycogen, GSH, lipase activity and midgut gland structure. PMID:27018793

  16. Sequence analysis and molecular characterization of larval midgut cDNA transcripts encoding peptidases from the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, S; Chen, M-S; Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Smith, C M; Marshall, J; Oppert, B

    2007-08-01

    Peptidase sequences were analysed in randomly picked clones from cDNA libraries of the anterior or posterior midgut or whole larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus. Of a total of 1528 sequences, 92 encoded potential peptidases, from which 50 full-length cDNA sequences were obtained, including serine and cysteine proteinases and metallopeptidases. Serine proteinase transcripts were predominant in the posterior midgut, whereas transcripts encoding cysteine and metallopeptidases were mainly found in the anterior midgut. Alignments with other proteinases indicated that 40% of the serine proteinase sequences were serine proteinase homologues, and the remaining ones were identified as either trypsin, chymotrypsin or other serine proteinases. Cysteine proteinase sequences included cathepsin B- and L-like proteinases, and metallopeptidase transcripts were similar to carboxypeptidase A. Northern blot analysis of representative sequences demonstrated the differential expression profile of selected transcripts across five developmental stages of Te. molitor. These sequences provide insights into peptidases in coleopteran insects as a basis to study the response of coleopteran larvae to external stimuli and to evaluate regulatory features of the response.

  17. Comparison of toxin overlay and solid-phase binding assays to identify diverse CryIA(c) toxin-binding proteins in Heliothis virescens midgut.

    PubMed Central

    Cowles, E A; Yunovitz, H; Charles, J F; Gill, S S

    1995-01-01

    The binding proteins, or receptors, for insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki delta-endotoxins are located in the brush border membranes of susceptible insect midguts. The interaction of one of these toxins, CryIA(c), with proteins isolated from Heliothis virescens larval midguts was investigated. To facilitate the identification of solubilized putative toxin-binding proteins, a solid-phase binding assay was developed and compared with toxin overlay assays. The overlay assays demonstrated that a number of proteins of 170, 140, 120, 90, 75, 60, and 50 kDa bound the radiolabeled CryIA(c) toxin. Anion-exchange fractionation allowed the separation of these proteins into three toxin binding fractions, or pools. Toxin overlay assays demonstrated that although the three pools had distinct protein profiles, similar-size proteins could be detected in these three pools. However, determination of toxin affinity by using the solid-phase binding assay showed that only one of the three pools contained high-affinity binding proteins. The Kd obtained, 0.65 nM, is similar to that of the unsolubilized brush border membrane vesicles. Thus, the solid-phase binding assay in combination with the toxin overlay assay facilitates the identification and purification of high-affinity B. thuringiensis toxin-binding proteins from the insect midgut. PMID:7618886

  18. Deletion of a gene encoding an amino acid transporter in the midgut membrane causes resistance to a Bombyx parvo-like virus.

    PubMed

    Ito, Katsuhiko; Kidokoro, Kurako; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nohata, Junko; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kobayashi, Isao; Uchino, Keiro; Kalyebi, Andrew; Eguchi, Ryokitsu; Hara, Wajiro; Tamura, Toshiki; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko

    2008-05-27

    Bombyx mori densovirus type 2 (BmDNV-2), a parvo-like virus, replicates only in midgut columnar cells and causes fatal disease. The resistance expressed in some silkworm strains against the virus is determined by a single gene, nsd-2, which is characterized as nonsusceptibility irrespective of the viral dose. However, the responsible gene has been unknown. We isolated the nsd-2 gene by positional cloning. The virus resistance is caused by a 6-kb deletion in the ORF of a gene encoding a 12-pass transmembrane protein, a member of an amino acid transporter family, and expressed only in midgut. Germ-line transformation with a wild-type transgene expressed in the midgut restores susceptibility, showing that the defective membrane protein is responsible for resistance. Cumulatively, our data show that the membrane protein is a functional receptor for BmDNV-2. This is a previously undescribed report of positional cloning of a mutant gene in Bombyx and isolation of an absolute virus resistance gene in insects.

  19. The effect of the juvenile hormone analog, fenoxycarb, on ecdysone receptor B1 expression in the midgut of Bombyx mori during larval-pupal metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Goncu, Ebru; Parlak, Osman

    2012-04-24

    The Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) midgut undergoes remodeling during the larval-pupal metamorphosis. All metamorphic events in insects are controlled by mainly two hormones: 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). Fenoxycarb, O-ethyl N-(2-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)-ethyl) carbamate, has been shown to be one of the most potent juvenile hormone analogs against a variety of insect species. In this study, the effect of fenoxycarb on EcR-B1 protein expression in the midgut of Bombyx mori during the remodeling processwas investigated. Fenoxycarb was topically treated to the beginning of the fifth instar Bombyx larvae. Its application prolonged the last instar and prevented metamorphic events. Analyses were performed from day 6 of the fifth instar to 24 hr after pupation in controls and to day 14 of the fifth instar in the fenoxycarb treated group. According to our results, the presence of EcR-B1 in the midguts of the fenoxycarb treated group during the feeding period suggested that EcR-B1 was involved in the functioning of larval cells and during this period fenoxycarb did not affect EcR-B1 status. Immediately after termination of the feeding stage, the amount of EcR-B1 protein increased, which indicated that it may strengthen the ecdysone signal for commitment of remodeling process. In the fenoxycarb treated group, its upregulation was delayed, which may be related to the inhibition of ecdysone secretion from the prothoracic gland.

  20. Assessing the genotoxic effects of two lipid peroxidation products (4-oxo-2-nonenal and 4-hydroxy-hexenal) in haemocytes and midgut cells of Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Demir, Eşref; Marcos, Ricard

    2017-03-22

    Lipid peroxidation products can induce tissue damage and are implicated in diverse pathological conditions, including aging, atherosclerosis, brain disorders, cancer, lung and various liver disorders. Since in vivo studies produce relevant information, we have selected Drosophila melanogaster as a suitable in vivo model to characterise the potential risks associated to two lipid peroxidation products namely 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE) and 4-hydroxy-hexenal (4-HHE). Toxicity, intracellular reactive oxygen species production, and genotoxicity were the end-points evaluated. Haemocytes and midgut cells were the evaluated targets. Results showed that both compounds penetrate the intestine of the larvae, affecting midgut cells, and reaching haemocytes. Significant genotoxic effects, as determined by the comet assay, were observed in both selected cell targets in a concentration/time dependent manner. This study highlights the importance of D. melanogaster as a model organism in the study of the different biological effects caused by lipid peroxidation products entering via ingestion. This is the first study reporting genotoxicity data in haemocytes and midgut cells of D. melanogaster larvae for the two selected compounds.

  1. Long-Term Starvation and Posterior Feeding Effects on Biochemical and Physiological Responses of Midgut Gland of Cherax quadricarinatus Juveniles (Parastacidae).

    PubMed

    Sacristán, Hernán Javier; Ansaldo, Martín; Franco-Tadic, Luis Marcelo; Fernández Gimenez, Analía Verónica; López Greco, Laura Susana

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of long-term starvation and posterior feeding on energetic reserves, oxidative stress, digestive enzymes, and histology of C. quadricarinatus midgut gland. The crayfish (6.27 g) were randomly assigned to one of three feeding protocols: continuous feeding throughout 80 day, continuous starvation until 80 day, and continuous starvation throughout 50 day and then feeding for the following 30 days. Juveniles from each protocol were weighed, and sacrificed at day 15, 30, 50 or 80. The lipids, glycogen, reduced glutathione (GSH), soluble protein, lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein oxidation (PO), catalase (CAT), lipase and proteinase activities, and histology were measured on midgut gland. Starved crayfish had a lower hepatosomatic index, number of molts, specific growth rate, lipids, glycogen, and GSH levels than fed animals at all assay times. The starvation did not affect the soluble protein, TBARS, PO levels and CAT. In starved juveniles the lipase activity decreased as starvation time increased, whereas proteinase activity decreased only at day 80. The histological analysis of the starved animals showed several signs of structural alterations. After 30 days of feeding, the starved-feeding animals exhibited a striking recovery of hepatosomatic index, number of molts, lipids and glycogen, GSH, lipase activity and midgut gland structure.

  2. The life cycle of Gregarina cuneata in the midgut of Tribolium castaneum and the effects of parasitism on the development of insects.

    PubMed

    Gigliolli, A A S; Julio, A H F; Conte, H

    2016-04-01

    Tribolium castaneum Herbst 1797 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), an important pest of stored grains and byproducts, is naturally infected by Gregarina cuneata Stein 1848 (Apicomplexa: Gregarinidae). Changes in the life cycle of insects caused by the parasite development in the midgut were studied. Trophozoites, gamonts (solitary and associated), and gametocysts were present in the midgut of the insects. In young trophozoites, the apical region differentiated into an epimerite that firmly attached the parasite to the host epithelial cells. With maturation, trophozoites developed in gamonts that were associated with the initiation of sexual reproduction in the cell cycle, culminating in the formation of the spherical gametocyst. Morpho-functional analyses indicated that gregarines absorb nutrients from infected cells and can occlude the midgut as they develop. Consequently, nutritional depletion may interfere with the host's physiology, causing decreased growth, delayed development, and high mortality rates of the parasitized insects. These results suggest G. cuneata could be an important biological agent for controlling T. castaneum in integrated pest management programs.

  3. Mesenchymal to epithelial transition during tissue homeostasis and regeneration: Patching up the Drosophila midgut epithelium.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Zeus A; Reiff, Tobias; Dominguez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are responsible for preserving morphology and function of adult tissues. Stem cells divide to self-renew and to generate progenitor cells to sustain cell demand from the tissue throughout the organism's life. Unlike stem cells, the progenitor cells have limited proliferation potential but have the capacity to terminally differentiate and thereby to substitute older or damaged mature cells. Recent findings indicate that adult stem cells can adapt their division kinetics dynamically to match changes in tissue demand during homeostasis and regeneration. However, cell turnover not only requires stem cell division but also needs timed differentiation of the progenitor cells, which has been much less explored. In this Extra View article, we discuss the ability of progenitor cells to actively postpone terminal differentiation in the absence of a local demand and how tissue demand activates terminal differentiation via a conserved mesenchymal-epithelial transition program revealed in our recent EMBO J paper and other published and unpublished data. The extent of the significance of these results is discussed for models of tissue dynamics during both homeostasis and regeneration.

  4. Analysis of differentially expressed genes between fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals in midgut of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Qian, Heying; Li, Gang; He, Qingling; Zhang, Huaguang; Xu, Anying

    2016-08-15

    Fluoride tolerance is an economically important trait of silkworm. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) of the dominant endurance to fluoride (Def) gene in Bombyx mori has been constructed before. Here, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of midgut of fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals of Def NILs by using high-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformatics tools, and identified differentially expressed genes between these individuals. A total of 3,612,399 and 3,567,631 clean tags for the libraries of fluoride-endurable and fluoride-sensitive individuals were obtained, which corresponded to 32,933 and 43,976 distinct clean tags, respectively. Analysis of differentially expressed genes indicates that 241 genes are differentially expressed between the two libraries. Among the 241 genes, 30 are up-regulated and 211 are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. Pathway enrichment analysis demonstrates that genes related to ribosomes, pancreatic secretion, steroid biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, steroid biosynthesis, and glycerolipid metabolism are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. qRT-PCR was conducted to confirm the results of the DGE. The present study analyzed differential expression of related genes and tried to find out whether the crucial genes were related to fluoride detoxification which might elucidate fluoride effect and provide a new way in the fluorosis research.

  5. Pyrosequencing the Midgut Transcriptome of the Banana Weevil Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Reveals Multiple Protease-Like Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Arnubio; Wang, Haichuan; Soto, Alberto; Aristizabal, Manuel; Arboleda, Jorge W.; Eyun, Seong-il; Noriega, Daniel D.; Siegfried, Blair

    2016-01-01

    The banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus is an important and serious insect pest in most banana and plantain-growing areas of the world. In spite of the economic importance of this insect pest very little genomic and transcriptomic information exists for this species. In the present study, we characterized the midgut transcriptome of C. sordidus using massive 454-pyrosequencing. We generated over 590,000 sequencing reads that assembled into 30,840 contigs with more than 400 bp, representing a significant expansion of existing sequences available for this insect pest. Among them, 16,427 contigs contained one or more GO terms. In addition, 15,263 contigs were assigned an EC number. In-depth transcriptome analysis identified genes potentially involved in insecticide resistance, peritrophic membrane biosynthesis, immunity-related function and defense against pathogens, and Bacillus thuringiensis toxins binding proteins as well as multiple enzymes involved with protein digestion. This transcriptome will provide a valuable resource for understanding larval physiology and for identifying novel target sites and management approaches for this important insect pest. PMID:26949943

  6. Purification, molecular cloning, and properties of a beta-glycosidase isolated from midgut lumen of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera) larvae.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A H; Marana, S R; Terra, W R; Ferreira, C

    2001-10-01

    Two beta-glycosidases (M(r) 59k) were purified from midgut contents of larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). The two enzymes (betaGly1 and betaGly2) have identical kinetic properties, but differ in hydrophobicity. The two glycosidases were cloned and their sequences differ by only four amino acids. The T. molitor glycosidases are family 1 glycoside hydrolases and have the E379 (nucleophile) and E169 (proton donor) as catalytic amino acids based on sequence alignments. The enzymes share high homology and similarity with other insect, mammalian and plant beta-glycosidases. The two enzymes may hydrolyze several substrates, such as disaccharides, arylglucosides, natural occurring plant glucosides, alkylglucosides, oligocellodextrins and the polymer laminarin. The enzymes have only one catalytic site, as inferred from experiments of competition between substrates and sequence alignments. The observed inhibition by high concentrations of the plant glucoside amygdalin, used as substrate, is an artifact generated by transglucosylation. The active site of each purified beta-glycosidase has four subsites, of which subsites +1 and +2 bind glucose with more affinity. Subsite +2 has more affinity for hydrophobic groups, binding with increasing affinities: glucose, mandelonitrile and nitrophenyl moieties. Subsite +3 has more affinity for glucose than butylene moieties. The intrinsic catalytic constant calculated for hydrolysis of the glucose beta-1,4-glucosidic bond is 21.2 s(-1) x M(-1). The putative physiological role of these enzymes is the digestion of di- and oligosaccharides derived from hemicelluloses.

  7. Specific binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2A insecticidal proteins to a common site in the midgut of Helicoverpa species.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Van Vliet, Adri; Bautsoens, Nadine; Van Rie, Jeroen; Ferré, Juan

    2008-12-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the mode of action of Cry2A toxins was unique and different from that of other three-domain Cry toxins due to their apparent nonspecific and unsaturable binding to an unlimited number of receptors. However, based on the homology of the tertiary structure among three-domain Cry toxins, similar modes of action for all of them are expected. To confirm this hypothesis, binding assays were carried out with (125)I-labeled Cry2Ab. Saturation assays showed that Cry2Ab binds in a specific and saturable manner to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) of Helicoverpa armigera. Homologous-competition assays with (125)I-Cry2Ab demonstrated that this toxin binds with high affinity to binding sites in H. armigera and Helicoverpa zea midgut. Heterologous-competition assays showed a common binding site for three toxins belonging to the Cry2A family (Cry2Aa, Cry2Ab, and Cry2Ae), which is not shared by Cry1Ac. Estimation of K(d) (dissociation constant) values revealed that Cry2Ab had around 35-fold less affinity than Cry1Ac for BBMV binding sites in both insect species. Only minor differences were found regarding R(t) (concentration of binding sites) values. This study questions previous interpretations from other authors performing binding assays with Cry2A toxins and establishes the basis for the mode of action of Cry2A toxins.

  8. Specific Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2A Insecticidal Proteins to a Common Site in the Midgut of Helicoverpa Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Van Vliet, Adri; Bautsoens, Nadine; Van Rie, Jeroen; Ferré, Juan

    2008-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the mode of action of Cry2A toxins was unique and different from that of other three-domain Cry toxins due to their apparent nonspecific and unsaturable binding to an unlimited number of receptors. However, based on the homology of the tertiary structure among three-domain Cry toxins, similar modes of action for all of them are expected. To confirm this hypothesis, binding assays were carried out with 125I-labeled Cry2Ab. Saturation assays showed that Cry2Ab binds in a specific and saturable manner to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) of Helicoverpa armigera. Homologous-competition assays with 125I-Cry2Ab demonstrated that this toxin binds with high affinity to binding sites in H. armigera and Helicoverpa zea midgut. Heterologous-competition assays showed a common binding site for three toxins belonging to the Cry2A family (Cry2Aa, Cry2Ab, and Cry2Ae), which is not shared by Cry1Ac. Estimation of Kd (dissociation constant) values revealed that Cry2Ab had around 35-fold less affinity than Cry1Ac for BBMV binding sites in both insect species. Only minor differences were found regarding Rt (concentration of binding sites) values. This study questions previous interpretations from other authors performing binding assays with Cry2A toxins and establishes the basis for the mode of action of Cry2A toxins. PMID:18931285

  9. Knockdown of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling in the midgut of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes using antisense morpholinos.

    PubMed

    Pietri, J E; Cheung, K W; Luckhart, S

    2014-10-01

    Arthropod-borne infectious diseases are responsible for nearly 1.5 million deaths annually across the globe, with malaria responsible for >50% of these deaths. Recent efforts to enhance malaria control have focused on developing genetically modified Anopheles mosquitoes that are resistant to malaria parasite infection by manipulating proteins that are essential to the immune response. Although this approach has shown promise, the lack of efficient genetic tools in the mosquito makes it difficult to investigate innate immunity using reverse genetics. Current gene knockdown strategies based on small interfering RNA are typically labourious, inefficient, and require extensive training. In the present study, we describe the use of morpholino antisense oligomers to knockdown MEK-ERK signalling in the midgut of Anopheles stephensi through a simple feeding protocol. Anti-MEK morpholino provided in a saline meal was readily ingested by female mosquitoes with minimal toxicity and resulted in knockdown of total MEK protein levels 3-4 days after morpholino feeding. Further, anti-MEK morpholino feeding attenuated inducible phosphorylation of the downstream kinase ERK and, as predicted by previous work, reduced parasite burden in mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first example of morpholino use for target protein knockdown via feeding in an insect vector. Our results suggest this method is not only efficient for studies of individual proteins, but also for studies of phenotypic control by complex cell signalling networks. As such, our protocol is an effective alternative to current methods for gene knockdown in arthropods.

  10. TAT improves in vitro transportation of fortilin through midgut and into hemocytes of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Wenbing; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yanjiao; Ai, Qinghui; Wang, Xiaojie

    2012-06-01

    Fortilin is a multifunctional protein implicated in many important cellular processes. Since injection of Pm-fortilin reduces shrimp mortality caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), there is potential application of fortilin in shrimp culture. In the present study, in order to improve trans-membrane transportation efficiency, the protein transduction domain of the transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide was fused to fortilin. The Pichia pastoris yeast expression system, which is widely accepted in animal feeds, was used for production of recombinant fusion protein. Green fluorescence protein (GFP) was selected as a reporter because of its intrinsic visible fluorescence. The fortilin, TAT and GFP fusion protein were constructed. Their trans-membrane transportation efficiency and effects on immune response of shrimp were analyzed in vitro. Results showed that TAT peptide improved in vitro uptake of fortilin into the hemocytes and midgut of Litopenaeus vannamei. The phenoloxidase (PO) activity of hemocytes incubated with GFP-Fortilin or GFP-Fortilin-TAT was significantly increased compared with that in the control without expressed fortilin. The PO activity of hemocytes incubated with 200 μg mL-1 GFP-Fortilin-TAT was significantly higher than that in the group with the same concentration of GFP-Fortilin. Hemocytes incubated with GFP-Fortilin-TAT at all concentrations showed significantly higher nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity than those in the control or in the GFP-Fortilin treatment. The present in vitro study indicated that TAT fusion protein improved the immune effect of fortilin.

  11. "Candidatus hepatoplasma crinochetorum," a new, stalk-forming lineage of Mollicutes colonizing the midgut glands of a terrestrial isopod.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjie; Stingl, Ulrich; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Geisler, Sabine; Brune, Andreas; Zimmer, Martin

    2004-10-01

    Uncultivated bacteria that densely colonize the midgut glands (hepatopancreas) of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Crustacea: Isopoda) were identified by cloning and sequencing of their 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these symbionts represent a novel lineage of the Mollicutes and are only distantly related (<82% sequence identity) to members of the Mycoplasmatales and Entomoplasmatales. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a specific oligonucleotide probe confirmed that the amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences indeed originated from a homogeneous population of symbionts intimately associated with the epithelial surface of the hepatopancreas. The same probe also detected morphotypically identical symbionts in other crinochete isopods. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed uniform spherical bacterial cells without a cell wall, sometimes interacting with the microvilli of the brush border by means of stalk-like cytoplasmic appendages, which also appeared to be involved in cell division through budding. Based on the isolated phylogenetic position and unique cytological properties, the provisional name "Candidatus Hepatoplasma crinochetorum" is proposed for this new taxon of Mollicutes colonizing the hepatopancreas of P. scaber.

  12. A trypsin-like proteinase in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): purification, characterization, and host plant inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mina; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali

    2014-01-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase was purified and characterized in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae. A purification process that used Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies revealed a proteinase with specific activity of 66.7 μmol/min/mg protein, recovery of 27.04 and purification fold of 23.35. Molecular weight of the purified protein was found to be 35.8 kDa. Optimal pH and temperature were obtained 9 and 20°C for the purified trypsin proteinase, respectively. The purified enzyme was significantly inhibited by PMSF, TLCK, and SBTI as specific inhibitors of trypsins in which TLCK showed the highest inhibitory effect. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors were extracted from four varieties of pomegranate including Brait, Torsh-Sabz, May-Khosh, and Shirin by ion exchange chromatography. It was found that fractions 17-20 of Brait; fractions 18 and 21-26 of Torsh-Sabz; fractions 1-7, 11-17, and 19-21 of May-Khosh and fraction 8 for Shirin showed presence of trypsin inhibitor in these host. Comparison of their inhibitory effects on the purified trypsin proteinase of E. ceratoniae demonstrated that fractions from May-khosh variety had the highest effect on the enzyme among other extracted fractions. Characterization of serine proteinases of insects mainly trypsins is one of the promising methods to decrease population and damages via extracting their inhibitors and providing resistant varieties.

  13. Effects of Fraxinellone on the Midgut Enzyme Activities of the 5th Instar Larvae of Oriental Armyworm, Mythimna separata Walker

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Min; Wu, Wenjun; Liu, Huixia

    2014-01-01

    Isolated from Dictamnus dasycarpus Turcz., fraxinellone exhibited multiple bioactivities against insects. In the present paper, the changes of digestive enzymes and detoxification enzymes of Mythimna separata Walker (5th instar larvae), treated with fraxinellone, were investigated. Compared with those of the control, the α-amylase activity of the fraxinellone-treated 5th instar larvae was inhibited, whereas the level of their protease activity was increased. Based upon further studies on the specific proteases, the levels of the active alkaline trypsin-like enzyme (BApNA as the substrate) and the chymotrypsin-like enzyme (BTEE as the substrate) activities of the treated larvae were declined; however, the level of activity of the weak alkaline trypsin-like enzyme (TAME as the substrate) of the treated ones was increased. Meanwhile, the activities of two detoxification enzymes, such as carboxylesterase (CarE) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), of the treated larvae were increased to some extent, but the activities of NADPH-P450 reductase and O-demethylase of the treated ones declined. Therefore, protease (especially the weak alkaline trypsin-like enzyme), CarE and GST played important roles in the metabolism of fraxinellone in the midgut of Mythimna separata (M. separata). PMID:25216084

  14. The Effect of West Nile Virus Infection on the Midgut Gene Expression of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Smartt, Chelsea T.; Shin, Dongyoung; Anderson, Sheri L.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the mosquito and the invading virus is complex and can result in physiological and gene expression alterations in the insect. The association of West Nile virus (WNV) and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus mosquitoes results in measurable changes in gene expression; 22 gene products were shown previously to have altered expression. Sequence analysis of one product, CQ G1A1, revealed 100% amino acid identity to gram negative bacteria binding proteins (CPQGBP) in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti (70%) and Anopheles gambiae (63%) that function in pathogen recognition. CQ G1A1 also was differentially expressed following WNV infection in two populations of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus colonized from Florida with known differences in vector competence for WNV and showed spatial and temporal gene expression differences in midgut, thorax, and carcass tissues. These data suggest gene expression of CQ G1A1 is influenced by WNV infection and the WNV infection-controlled expression differs between populations and tissues. PMID:27999244

  15. Brush border membrane binding properties of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3A toxin to Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa zea midguts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyong; Miles, Paul; Chen, Jeng-Shong

    2006-01-27

    The binding properties of Vip3A, a new family of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxins, have been examined in the major cotton pests, Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa zea. Vip3A bound specifically to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from both insect larval midguts. In order to examine the cross-resistance potential of Vip3A to the commercially available Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab2 toxins, the membrane binding site relationship among these toxins was investigated. Competition binding assays demonstrated that Vip3A does not inhibit the binding of either Cry1Ac or Cry2Ab2 and vice versa. BBMV protein blotting experiments showed that Vip3A does not bind to the known Cry1Ac receptors. These distinct binding properties and the unique protein sequence of Vip3A support its use as a novel insecticidal agent. This study indicates a very low cross-resistance potential between Vip3A and currently deployed Cry toxins and hence supports its use in an effective resistance management strategy in cotton.

  16. Cantharidin Impedes Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase in the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rashid Ahmed; Liu, Ji Yuan; Rashid, Maryam; Wang, Dun; Zhang, Ya Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have implicated glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) as one of the major reasons for insecticide resistance. Therefore, effectiveness of new candidate compounds depends on their ability to inhibit GSTs to prevent metabolic detoxification by insects. Cantharidin, a terpenoid compound of insect origin, has been developed as a bio-pesticide in China, and proves highly toxic to a wide range of insects, especially lepidopteran. In the present study, we test cantharidin as a model compound for its toxicity, effects on the mRNA transcription of a model Helicoverpa armigera glutathione S-transferase gene (HaGST) and also for its putative inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of GSTs, both in vivo and in vitro in Helicoverpa armigera, employing molecular and biochemical methods. Bioassay results showed that cantharidin was highly toxic to H. armigera. Real-time qPCR showed down-regulation of the HaGST at the mRNA transcript ranging from 2.5 to 12.5 folds while biochemical assays showed in vivo inhibition of GSTs in midgut and in vitro inhibition of rHaGST. Binding of cantharidin to HaGST was rationalized by homology and molecular docking simulations using a model GST (1PN9) as a template structure. Molecular docking simulations also confirmed accurate docking of the cantharidin molecule to the active site of HaGST impeding its catalytic activity. PMID:23528854

  17. Pyrosequencing the Midgut Transcriptome of the Banana Weevil Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Reveals Multiple Protease-Like Transcripts.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Arnubio; Wang, Haichuan; Soto, Alberto; Aristizabal, Manuel; Arboleda, Jorge W; Eyun, Seong-Il; Noriega, Daniel D; Siegfried, Blair

    2016-01-01

    The banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus is an important and serious insect pest in most banana and plantain-growing areas of the world. In spite of the economic importance of this insect pest very little genomic and transcriptomic information exists for this species. In the present study, we characterized the midgut transcriptome of C. sordidus using massive 454-pyrosequencing. We generated over 590,000 sequencing reads that assembled into 30,840 contigs with more than 400 bp, representing a significant expansion of existing sequences available for this insect pest. Among them, 16,427 contigs contained one or more GO terms. In addition, 15,263 contigs were assigned an EC number. In-depth transcriptome analysis identified genes potentially involved in insecticide resistance, peritrophic membrane biosynthesis, immunity-related function and defense against pathogens, and Bacillus thuringiensis toxins binding proteins as well as multiple enzymes involved with protein digestion. This transcriptome will provide a valuable resource for understanding larval physiology and for identifying novel target sites and management approaches for this important insect pest.

  18. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor, but is not essential for binding and fusion of occlusion-derived virus to the host midgut.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Wendy O; Harrison, Robert L; Bonning, Bryony C

    2011-01-05

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein ODV-E56 is essential for oral infection of larvae of Heliothis virescens. Bioassays with recombinant clones of AcMNPV lacking a functional odv-e56 gene showed that ODV-E56 was required for infectivity of both polyhedra and to a lesser extent, purified ODV. However, binding and fusion assays showed that ODV lacking ODV-E56 bound and fused to midgut cells at levels similar to ODV of wild-type virus. Fluorescence microscopy of midguts from larvae inoculated with ODV-E56-positive and -negative viruses that express GFP indicated that ODV-E56 was required for infection of the midgut epithelium. Purified ODV-E56 bound to several proteins in midgut-derived brush border membrane vesicles, but failed to rescue infectivity of ODV-E56-negative viruses in trans. These results indicate that ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor (pif-5) required for primary midgut infection at a point before or after virion binding and fusion.

  19. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor, but is not essential for binding and fusion of occlusion-derived virus to the host midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Wendy O.; Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2011-01-05

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein ODV-E56 is essential for oral infection of larvae of Heliothis virescens. Bioassays with recombinant clones of AcMNPV lacking a functional odv-e56 gene showed that ODV-E56 was required for infectivity of both polyhedra and to a lesser extent, purified ODV. However, binding and fusion assays showed that ODV lacking ODV-E56 bound and fused to midgut cells at levels similar to ODV of wild-type virus. Fluorescence microscopy of midguts from larvae inoculated with ODV-E56-positive and -negative viruses that express GFP indicated that ODV-E56 was required for infection of the midgut epithelium. Purified ODV-E56 bound to several proteins in midgut-derived brush border membrane vesicles, but failed to rescue infectivity of ODV-E56-negative viruses in trans. These results indicate that ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor (pif-5) required for primary midgut infection at a point before or after virion binding and fusion.

  20. Major putative pesticide receptors, detoxification enzymes, and transcriptional profile of the midgut of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu Cheng; Guo, Zibiao; Chen, Ming-Shun; Zhu, Kun Yan; Liu, Xiaofen F; Scheffler, Brian

    2011-02-01

    Insecticide resistance mechanisms, including those for Cry proteins (Bt), in Heliothis virescens are not well understood. Sequencing of midgut transcriptomes may facilitate the discovery of the genes responsible for resistance development. In this study, a total of 5856 Sanger sequences were obtained and assembled to 1687 contigs (464) and singletons (1233) with average length of 507 bp. Blast similarity search showed that 1372 cDNAs from this study matched different genes or cDNAs in the GenBank and other sequence databases. Blast2go annotation identified 611 highly similar proteins with metabolic and cellular processes as major biological functions and catalytic activity and binding as major molecular functions. At least 143 contigs and singletons were associated with pesticide activation, detoxification, and resistance development. These cDNAs, with average length of 601 bp, matched nine groups of pesticide resistance related genes. At least 80 cDNAs coded for Bt resistance related enzymes and potential receptors, including 58 proteinases, 4 cadherins, 13 aminopeptidase, and 5 alkaline phosphatases. Other putative detoxification enzymes included 20 cytochrome P450 oxidases, 11 glutathione S-transferases, 9 esterases, 8 sodium channels, and 15 cytochrome oxidases. Of the 143 contigs and singletons, 111 cDNA sequences seemed to be new resistance candidate gene transcripts in GenBank because they either priorly matched resistance candidate cDNAs of other species, or had low sequence identity with those previously sequenced from H. virescens. This study provides a foundation for future research to develop a gut-specific DNA microarray for analysis of the global changes of gene expression in response to biological and chemical pesticides. Future development resistance management strategies could benefit from this study and help continue research to identify key genes targetable by classic and novel approaches.

  1. Generation of a Transcriptome in a Model Lepidopteran Pest, Heliothis virescens, Using Multiple Sequencing Strategies for Profiling Midgut Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Popham, Holly J. R.; Gould, Fred; Adang, Michael J.; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Heliothine pests such as the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (F.), pose a significant threat to production of a variety of crops and ornamental plants and are models for developmental and physiological studies. The efforts to develop new control measures for H. virescens, as well as its use as a relevant biological model, are hampered by a lack of molecular resources. The present work demonstrates the utility of next-generation sequencing technologies for rapid molecular resource generation from this species for which lacks a sequenced genome. In order to amass a de novo transcriptome for this moth, transcript sequences generated from Illumina, Roche 454, and Sanger sequencing platforms were merged into a single de novo transcriptome assembly. This pooling strategy allowed a thorough sampling of transcripts produced under diverse environmental conditions, developmental stages, tissues, and infections with entomopathogens used for biological control, to provide the most complete transcriptome to date for this species. Over 138 million reads from the three platforms were assembled into the final set of 63,648 contigs. Of these, 29,978 had significant BLAST scores indicating orthologous relationships to transcripts of other insect species, with the top-hit species being the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and silkworm (Bombyx mori). Among identified H. virescens orthologs were immune effectors, signal transduction pathways, olfactory receptors, hormone biosynthetic pathways, peptide hormones and their receptors, digestive enzymes, and insecticide resistance enzymes. As an example, we demonstrate the utility of this transcriptomic resource to study gene expression profiling of larval midguts and detect transcripts of putative Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxin receptors. The substantial molecular resources described in this study will facilitate development of H. virescens as a relevant biological model for functional genomics and for new biological

  2. Dinotefuran-induced morphophysiological changes in the ovaries and midgut of semi-engorged females Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille, 1806 (Acari: Ixodidae) ticks.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa; Remédio, Rafael Neodini; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Anholeto, Luis Adriano; Mathias, Maria Izabel Camargo

    2016-02-01

    The present study demonstrated the effects of dinotefuran (active compound of the Protetor Pet® acaricide) in germ cells and the digestive processes of semi-engorged females of R. sanguineus exposed to different concentrations of the chemical. For this purpose, 120 semi-engorged females were divided into four treatment groups with 30 individuals each: group I or control (distilled water), group II (5000 ppm), group III (6250 ppm), and group IV (8334 ppm of dinotefuran). All ticks were immersed in different concentrations of dinotefuran or in distilled water for 5 min and then were dried and stored in biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator for 7 days. The results show the action of this compound, exhibiting morphohistologic and histochemical changes in the oocytes and the midgut cells of individuals of different groups, which were compared with those of group I (control). The alterations occurred mainly in relation to the size of the germ cells and yolk granules; presence, quantity, size, and location of vacuoles found in the cytoplasm of these germ cells; the damage occurred in the generative cells of the midgut; the size of the digestive cells; the quantity of blood elements captured, accumulated digestive wastes and digestive vacuoles found in the cytoplasm of the digestive cells of the midgut, as well as the amount and distribution of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids of all cells in both organs. So, it has demonstrated the effectiveness of dinotefuran in the reduction of fertility and digestive processes of semi-engorged females of R. sanguineus, data that points the possibility of employing this chemical to control these ectoparasites.

  3. Experimental vaccination of chicks with Plasmodium gallinaceum sporozoites. I. Circumsporozoite proteins are expressed by sporozoites recovered from both salivary glands and midguts of mosquitoes

    SciTech Connect

    Daher, V.R.; Krettli, A.U.

    1987-08-01

    Immunogenicity of Plasmodium gallinaceum sporozoites for chicks and their in vitro reactivity with normal and specific immune sera were studied. Two sporozoite populations recovered from experimentally infected Aedes fluviatilis were used: sporozoites from salivary glands and sporozoites from midgut oocysts. Populations seven to nine days old of sporozoites recovered from salivary glands were infective for all chicks until the chicks were three weeks old; however, sporozoites recovered from midguts containing oocysts infected these chicks only if isolated on days 8-9, but not on day 7 after the mosquitoes' infective blood meal. Infectivity of the sporozoites was lost after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light (30 min) or X-rays (13 krad). Inactivated sporozoites from both sources proved highly immunogenic to chicks that were immunized by several intravenous or intramuscular injections. These parasites elicited a strong humoral immune response in the chicks, as measured by the circumsporozoite precipitation (CSP) reaction. The levels of the CSP antibodies were similar with sporozoites from both sources, there being no detectable differences in the percentage of reactive sporozoites or the intensity of the CSP reaction with sera containing antibodies to either sporozoites from salivary glands or sporozoites from oocysts. These results provide the first evidence that avian malaria sporozoites express the circumsporozoite protein that has been extensively characterized in mammalian malaria (rodent, simian, human sporozoites). Furthermore, we observed that the yields of sporozoites obtained from mosquito midguts, on days 8 and 9 of the P. gallinaceum infection, were at least twice as great as those obtained by salivary gland dissection, even 20 days after a blood meal.

  4. In Vitro Mode of Action and Anti-thrombotic Activity of Boophilin, a Multifunctional Kunitz Protease Inhibitor from the Midgut of a Tick Vector of Babesiosis, Rhipicephalus microplus

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Teresa C.; Ma, Dongying; Mizurini, Daniella M.; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Kotsyfakis, Michail; Monteiro, Robson Q.; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hematophagous mosquitos and ticks avoid host hemostatic system through expression of enzyme inhibitors targeting proteolytic reactions of the coagulation and complement cascades. While most inhibitors characterized to date were found in the salivary glands, relatively few others have been identified in the midgut. Among those, Boophilin is a 2-Kunitz multifunctional inhibitor targeting thrombin, elastase, and kallikrein. However, the kinetics of Boophilin interaction with these enzymes, how it modulates platelet function, and whether it inhibits thrombosis in vivo have not been determined. Methodology/Principal Findings Boophilin was expressed in HEK293 cells and purified to homogeneity. Using amidolytic assays and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we have demonstrated that Boophilin behaves as a classical, non-competitive inhibitor of thrombin with respect to small chromogenic substrates by a mechanism dependent on both exosite-1 and catalytic site. Inhibition is accompanied by blockade of platelet aggregation, fibrin formation, and clot-bound thrombin in vitro. Notably, we also identified Boophilin as a non-competitive inhibitor of FXIa, preventing FIX activation. In addition, Boophilin inhibits kallikrein activity and the reciprocal activation, indicating that it targets the contact pathway. Furthermore, Boophilin abrogates cathepsin G- and plasmin-induced platelet aggregation and partially affects elastase-mediated cleavage of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI). Finally, Boophilin inhibits carotid artery occlusion in vivo triggered by FeCl3, and promotes bleeding according to the mice tail transection method. Conclusion/Significance Through inhibition of several enzymes involved in proteolytic cascades and cell activation, Boophilin plays a major role in keeping the midgut microenvironment at low hemostatic and inflammatory tonus. This response allows ticks to successfully digest a blood meal which is critical for metabolism and egg

  5. Proteolytic processing of native Cry1Ab toxin by midgut extracts and purified trypsins from the Mediterranean corn borer Sesamia nonagrioides.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Farinós, Gema P; Castañera, Pedro; Hernández-Crespo, Pedro; Ortego, Félix

    2007-05-01

    The proteolytic processing of native Cry1Ab toxin by midgut extracts from the Mediterranean corn borer, Sesamia nonagrioides, takes place in successive steps. Several cuts occur until a 74 kDa protein is obtained; this is further digested to give rise to an active form of 69 kDa, which can be again processed to fragments of 67, 66 and 43 kDa. We have shown that three different trypsins (TI, TIIA and TIII) purified from the S. nonagrioides midgut were able to digest Cry1Ab protoxin to obtain the active form of 69 kDa. Interestingly, TI and TIII further hydrolyzed the 69 kDa protein to a fragment of slightly lower molecular mass (67 kDa), while TIIA was able to continue digestion to give fragments of 46 and 43 kDa. These results contrast with those obtained using bovine trypsin, in which the main product of Cry1Ab digestion is a 69 kDa protein. The digestion of the toxin with a "non-trypsin" fraction from S. nonagrioides midgut lumen, mostly containing chymotrypsins and elastases and free of trypsin-like activity, resulted in a different processing pattern, yielding fragments of 79, 77, 71, 69 and 51 kDa. Our results indicate that trypsins and other proteases are involved in the first steps of protoxin processing, but trypsins play the most important role in obtaining the 74 and 69 kDa proteins. All the digestion products, including the proteins of 46 and 43 kDa obtained from the digestion of Cry1Ab by TIIA, were toxic to neonate larvae, indicating that none of the tested proteases contribute to toxin degradation in a significant manner.

  6. Metabolic changes in the midgut of Eri silkworm after Oral administration of 1-deoxynojirimycin: A 1H-NMR-based metabonomic study

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chao-Wei; Dong, Min-Jian; Lin, Qiu-Ting; Zhang, Shang-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) is a natural D-glucose analogue and has a strong physiological activity in inhibiting α-glucosidase in vivo. The antidiabetic effects of DNJ in mice or other mammals were extensively explored, but the physiological and toxic roles of DNJ in insects was seldom reported. In this study, the biological effects of DNJ were examined in midgut extracts of fourth-instar larvae of Eri silkworm (Samia cynthia ricini, Saturniidae). Based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabonomics technology, we analyzed the alterations of glycometabolism, lipids, and energy metabolism pathways in the midgut of S. cynthia ricini caused by DNJ. Pattern recognition analysis (partial least square-discriminant analysis, PLS-DA) showed that four groups of latex, 0.25% DNJ, 0.5% DNJ and the mixture of 0.5% DNJ and latex (1:1) were distinctly different from the control group. Moreover, several metabolic pathways of DNJ-mediated modulation in the midgut were identified. Compared with the control group, alanine, succinate, glutamate, and fumarate concentrations decreased in three groups of 0.5% DNJ, latex, and the mixture, choline levels increased in two DNJ groups, and trehalose levels increased in all experimental groups. Therefore, these results suggest that DNJ modulated lipid metabolism by limiting the hydrolysis pathways of phospholipids metabolism. Additionally, DNJ has a potent negative effect on energy metabolism by inhibiting the hydrolysis of trehalose, glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Overall, DNJ, as a single-ingredient, is an efficient substance for modulating lipid metabolism and inhibiting energy metabolism. PMID:28249023

  7. Diversity of the Bacterial and Fungal Microflora from the Midgut and Cuticle of Phlebotomine Sand Flies Collected in North-Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhoundi, Mohammad; Bakhtiari, Rounak; Guillard, Thomas; Baghaei, Ahmad; Tolouei, Reza; Sereno, Denis; Toubas, Dominique; Depaquit, Jérôme; Abyaneh, Mehdi Razzaghi

    2012-01-01

    Background Phlebotomine sand flies are the vectors of the leishmaniases, parasitic diseases caused by Leishmania spp. Little is known about the prevalence and diversity of sand fly microflora colonizing the midgut or the cuticle. Particularly, there is little information on the fungal diversity. This information is important for development of vector control strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings Five sand fly species: Phlebotomus papatasi, P. sergenti, P. kandelakii, P. perfiliewi and P. halepensis were caught in Bileh Savar and Kaleybar in North-Western Iran that are located in endemic foci of visceral leishmaniasis. A total of 35 specimens were processed. Bacterial and fungal strains were identified by routine microbiological methods. We characterized 39 fungal isolates from the cuticle and/or the midgut. They belong to six different genera including Penicillium (17 isolates), Aspergillus (14), Acremonium (5), Fusarium (1), Geotrichum (1) and Candida (1). We identified 33 Gram-negative bacteria: Serratia marcescens (9 isolates), Enterobacter cloacae (6), Pseudomonas fluorescens (6), Klebsiella ozaenae (4), Acinetobacter sp. (3), Escherichia coli (3), Asaia sp. (1) and Pantoea sp. (1) as well as Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis (5) and Micrococcus luteus (5) in 10 isolates. Conclusion/Significance Our study provides new data on the microbiotic diversity of field-collected sand flies and for the first time, evidence of the presence of Asaia sp. in sand flies. We have also found a link between physiological stages (unfed, fresh fed, semi gravid and gravid) of sand flies and number of bacteria that they carry. Interestingly Pantoea sp. and Klebsiella ozaenae have been isolated in Old World sand fly species. The presence of latter species on sand fly cuticle and in the female midgut suggests a role for this arthropod in dissemination of these pathogenic bacteria in endemic areas. Further experiments are required to clearly delineate the vectorial role

  8. Agrotis segetum midgut putative receptor of Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa16 differs from that of Cry1Ac toxin.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamadou-Charfi, Dorra; Boukedi, Hanen; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Tounsi, Slim; Jaoua, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Considering the fact that Agrotis segetum is one of the most pathogenic insects to vegetables and cereals in the world, particularly in Africa, the mode of action of Vip3Aa16 of Bacillus thuringiensis BUPM95 and Cry1Ac of the recombinant strain BNS3Cry-(pHTcry1Ac) has been examined in this crop pest. A. segetum proteases activated the Vip3Aa16 protoxin (90kDa) yielding three bands of about 62, 45, 22kDa and the activated form of the toxin was active against this pest with an LC50 of about 86ng/cm(2). To be active against A. segetum, Cry1Ac protoxin was activated to three close bands of about 60-65kDa. Homologous and heterologous competition binding experiments demonstrated that Vip3Aa16 bound specifically to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from A. segetum midgut and that it does not inhibit the binding of Cry1Ac. Moreover, BBMV protein blotting experiments showed that the receptor of Vip3Aa16 toxin in A. segetum midgut differs from that of Cry1Ac. In fact, the latter binds to a 120kDa protein whereas the Vip3Aa16 binds to a 65kDa putative receptor. The midgut histopathology of Vip3Aa16 fed larvae showed vacuolization of the cytoplasm, brush border membrane lysis, vesicle formation in the goblet cells and disintegration of the apical membrane. The distinct binding properties and the unique protein sequence of Vip3Aa16 support its use as a novel insecticidal agent to control the crop pest A. segetum.

  9. Larval nutritional stress affects vector immune traits in adult yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti (Stegomyia aegypti).

    PubMed

    Telang, A; Qayum, A A; Parker, A; Sacchetta, B R; Byrnes, G R

    2012-09-01

    We report key physiological traits that link larval nutritional experience to adult immune status in the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti L. (Stegomyia aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae). Many lines of defence make up the innate immune system of mosquitoes. Among defences, the epithelium-lined midgut is the first barrier, circulating haemocytes are cellular components of innate immunity and, when triggered, the Toll and Imd pathways signal production of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) as part of humoral defences. We quantified three lines of defence in Ae. aegypti in response to larval nutritional stress, and our data show that important female immune functions are modified by the larval rearing environment. Adult midgut basal lamina thickness was not affected by larval nutrient stress as has been observed in another Aedes sp. However, nutrient stresses experienced by larvae lead to a reduced number of haemocytes in females. Transcripts of Spaetzle (upstream regulator of Toll pathway that leads to induction of AMPs) and some immune-related genes were less abundant in stressed larvae but showed increased expression in females derived from stressed larvae. Results indicate a potential for compensation by the humoral branch for a reduced cellular branch of innate immunity in adults in response to larval nutrient stress.

  10. Nosema ceranae Can Infect Honey Bee Larvae and Reduces Subsequent Adult Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Eiri, Daren M.; Suwannapong, Guntima; Endler, Matthew; Nieh, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Nosema ceranae causes a widespread disease that reduces honey bee health but is only thought to infect adult honey bees, not larvae, a critical life stage. We reared honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae in vitro and provide the first demonstration that N. ceranae can infect larvae and decrease subsequent adult longevity. We exposed three-day-old larvae to a single dose of 40,000 (40K), 10,000 (10K), zero (control), or 40K autoclaved (control) N. ceranae spores in larval food. Spores developed intracellularly in midgut cells at the pre-pupal stage (8 days after egg hatching) of 41% of bees exposed as larvae. We counted the number of N. ceranae spores in dissected bee midguts of pre-pupae and, in a separate group, upon adult death. Pre-pupae exposed to the 10K or 40K spore treatments as larvae had significantly elevated spore counts as compared to controls. Adults exposed as larvae had significantly elevated spore counts as compared to controls. Larval spore exposure decreased longevity: a 40K treatment decreased the age by which 75% of adult bees died by 28%. Unexpectedly, the low dose (10K) led to significantly greater infection (1.3 fold more spores and 1.5 fold more infected bees) than the high dose (40K) upon adult death. Differential immune activation may be involved if the higher dose triggered a stronger larval immune response that resulted in fewer adult spores but imposed a cost, reducing lifespan. The impact of N. ceranae on honey bee larval development and the larvae of naturally infected colonies therefore deserve further study. PMID:26018139

  11. Nosema ceranae Can Infect Honey Bee Larvae and Reduces Subsequent Adult Longevity.

    PubMed

    Eiri, Daren M; Suwannapong, Guntima; Endler, Matthew; Nieh, James C

    2015-01-01

    Nosema ceranae causes a widespread disease that reduces honey bee health but is only thought to infect adult honey bees, not larvae, a critical life stage. We reared honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae in vitro and provide the first demonstration that N. ceranae can infect larvae and decrease subsequent adult longevity. We exposed three-day-old larvae to a single dose of 40,000 (40K), 10,000 (10K), zero (control), or 40K autoclaved (control) N. ceranae spores in larval food. Spores developed intracellularly in midgut cells at the pre-pupal stage (8 days after egg hatching) of 41% of bees exposed as larvae. We counted the number of N. ceranae spores in dissected bee midguts of pre-pupae and, in a separate group, upon adult death. Pre-pupae exposed to the 10K or 40K spore treatments as larvae had significantly elevated spore counts as compared to controls. Adults exposed as larvae had significantly elevated spore counts as compared to controls. Larval spore exposure decreased longevity: a 40K treatment decreased the age by which 75% of adult bees died by 28%. Unexpectedly, the low dose (10K) led to significantly greater infection (1.3 fold more spores and 1.5 fold more infected bees) than the high dose (40K) upon adult death. Differential immune activation may be involved if the higher dose triggered a stronger larval immune response that resulted in fewer adult spores but imposed a cost, reducing lifespan. The impact of N. ceranae on honey bee larval development and the larvae of naturally infected colonies therefore deserve further study.

  12. Mid-gut ACTH-secreting neuroendocrine tumor unmasked with 18F-dihydroxyphenylalanine-positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Fulgencio; Prior, John O; Boubaker, Ariane; Matter, Maurice; Monti, Matteo; Pu, Yan; Pitteloud, Nelly; Portmann, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ectopic ACTH Cushing's syndrome (EAS) is often caused by neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of lungs, pancreas, thymus, and other less frequent locations. Localizing the source of ACTH can be challenging. A 64-year-old man presented with rapidly progressing fatigue, muscular weakness, and dyspnea. He was in poor condition and showed facial redness, proximal amyotrophy, and bruises. Laboratory disclosed hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and markedly elevated ACTH and cortisol levels. Pituitary was normal on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bilateral inferior petrosal sinus blood sampling with corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation showed no significant central-to-periphery gradient of ACTH. Head and neck, thoracic and abdominal computerized tomography (CT), MRI, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SSRS), and 18F-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) failed to identify the primary tumor. 18F-dihydroxyphenylalanine (F-DOPA)-PET/CT unveiled a 20-mm nodule in the jejunum and a metastatic lymph node. Segmental jejunum resection showed two adjacent NETs, measuring 2.0 and 0.5 cm with a peritoneal metastasis. The largest tumor expressed ACTH in 30% of cells. Following surgery, after a transient adrenal insufficiency, ACTH and cortisol levels returned to normal values and remain normal over a follow-up of 26 months. Small mid-gut NETs are difficult to localize on CT or MRI, and require metabolic imaging. Owing to low mitotic activity, NETs are generally poor candidates for FDG-PET, whereas SSRS shows poor sensitivity in EAS due to intrinsically low tumor concentration of type-2 somatostatin receptors (SST2) or to receptor down regulation by excess cortisol. However, F-DOPA-PET, which is related to amine precursor uptake by NETs, has been reported to have high positive predictive value for occult EAS despite low sensitivity, and constitutes a useful alternative to more conventional methods of tumor localization. Learning points Uncontrolled high

  13. Cadmium Accumulation and Pathological Alterations in the Midgut Gland of Terrestrial Snail Helix pomatia L. from a Zinc Smelter Area: Role of Soil pH.

    PubMed

    Włostowski, Tadeusz; Kozłowski, Paweł; Łaszkiewicz-Tiszczenko, Barbara; Oleńska, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether cadmium (Cd) accumulation and toxicity in the midgut gland of Helix pomatia snails living in a Cd-contaminated area were related to soil pH. Toxic responses in the midgut gland (i.e., increased vacuolization and lipid peroxidation) occurred in H. pomatia snails exhibiting the highest Cd levels in the gland (265-274 µg/g dry wt) and living on acidic soil (pH 5.3-5.5), while no toxicity was observed in snails accumulating less Cd (90 µg/g) and ranging on neutral soil (pH 7.0), despite the fact that total soil Cd was similar in the two cases. The accumulation of Cd in the gland was directly related to the water extractable Cd in soil, which in turn correlated inversely with soil pH, indicating that this factor had a significant effect on tissue Cd. It appeared further that the occurrence of Cd toxicity was associated with low levels of metallothionein in the gland of snails ranging on acidic soil.

  14. P74 mediates specific binding of Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus occlusion-derived virus to primary cellular targets in the midgut epithelia of Heliothis virescens Larvae.

    PubMed

    Haas-Stapleton, Eric J; Washburn, Jan O; Volkman, Loy E

    2004-07-01

    P74, an envelope protein of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), is critical for oral infection of Trichoplusia ni larvae. The role of P74 during primary infection, however, is unknown. Here we provide evidence that P74 facilitates binding of AcMNPV ODV to a specific receptor within the larval midgut epithelia of another host species, Heliothis virescens. We adapted a fluorescence dequenching assay to compare binding, fusion, and competition of wild-type AcMNPV ODV in vivo with itself and with the ODV of a p74-deficient AcMNPV mutant. We found that relative to wild-type ODV, binding and fusion of ODV deficient in P74 were both qualitatively and quantitatively different. Unlike wild-type ODV, an excess of P74-deficient ODV failed to compete effectively with wild-type ODV binding, and the overall binding level of the mutant ODV was one-third that of the wild type. These results implicated P74 as an ODV attachment protein that binds to a specific receptor on primary target cells within the midgut.

  15. Recombinantly expressed isoenzymic aminopeptidases from Helicoverpa armigera (American cotton bollworm) midgut display differential interaction with closely related Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, R; Agrawal, Neema; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Sivakumar, S; Ahmad, Suhail; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2003-01-01

    Several investigators have independently identified membrane-associated aminopeptidases in the midgut of insect larvae as the initial interacting ligand to the insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis. Though several isoenzymes of aminopeptidases have been identified from the midgut of an insect and their corresponding cDNA cloned, only one of the isoform has been expressed heterologously and studied for its binding to Cry toxins. Here we report the cloning and expression of two aminopeptidases N from Helicoverpa armigera (American cotton bollworm) (HaAPNs). The full-length cDNA of H. armigera APN1 (haapn1) is 3205 bp in size and encodes a 1000-amino-acid protein, while H. armigera APN2 (haapn2) is 3116 bp in size and corresponds to a 1012-amino-acid protein. Structurally these proteins show sequence similarity to other insect aminopeptidases and possess characteristic aminopeptidase motifs. Both the genes have been expressed in Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper) cells using a baculovirus expression vector. The expressed aminopeptidases are membrane-associated, catalytically active and glycosylated. Ligand-blot analysis of both these aminopeptidases with bioactive Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac proteins displayed differential interaction. All the three toxins bound to HaAPN1, whereas only Cry1Ac interacted with HaAPN2. This is the first report demonstrating differential Cry-toxin-binding abilities of two different aminopeptidases from a susceptible insect. PMID:12441000

  16. No effect of Bt Cry1Ie toxin on bacterial diversity in the midgut of the Chinese honey bees, Apis cerana cerana (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    PubMed

    Jia, Hui-Ru; Dai, Ping-Li; Geng, Li-Li; Jack, Cameron J; Li, Yun-He; Wu, Yan-Yan; Diao, Qing-Yun; Ellis, James D

    2017-01-31

    Cry1Ie protein derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has been proposed as a promising candidate for the development of a new Bt-maize variety to control maize pests in China. We studied the response of the midgut bacterial community of Apis cerana cerana to Cry1Ie toxin under laboratory conditions. Newly emerged bees were fed one of the following treatments for 15 and 30 days: three concentrations of Cry1Ie toxin (20 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL, and 20 μg/mL) in sugar syrup, pure sugar syrup as a negative control and 48 ng/mL imidacloprid as a positive control. The relative abundance of 16S rRNA genes was measured by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction and no apparent differences were found among treatments for any of these counts at any time point. Furthermore, the midgut bacterial structure and compositions were determined using high-throughput sequencing targeting the V3-V4 regions of the 16S rDNA. All core honey bee intestinal bacterial genera such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Snodgrassella, and Gilliamella were detected, and no significant changes were found in the species diversity and richness for any bacterial taxa among treatments at different time points. These results suggest that Cry1Ie toxin may not affect gut bacterial communities of Chinese honey bees.

  17. Developmental Expression of Ecdysone-Related Genes Associated With Metamorphic Changes During Midgut Remodeling of Silkworm Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera:Bombycidae).

    PubMed

    Goncu, Ebru; Uranlı, Ramazan; Selek, Gozde; Parlak, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone is known as the systemic regulators of insect cells; however, how to impact the fate and function of mature and stem cells is unclear. For the first time, we report ecdysone regulatory cascades in both mature midgut cell and stem cell fractions related to developmental events by using histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and gene expression analysis methods. Ecdysone receptor-B1 (EcR-B1) and ultraspiracle 1 (USP-1) mRNAs were detected mainly in mature cells during programmed cell death (PCD). Lowered E75A and probably BR-C Z4 in mature cells appear to provide a signal to the initiation of PCD. E74B, E75B and BR-C Z2 seem to be early response genes which are involved in preparatory phase of cell death. It is likely that βFTZ-F1, E74A and BR-C Z1 are probably associated with execution of death. EcR-A and USP2 mRNAs were found in stem cells during remodeling processes but EcR-B1, USP1 and E74B genes imply an important role during initial phase of metamorphic events in stem cells. BHR3 mRNAs were determined abundantly in stem cells suggesting its primary role in differentiation. All of these results showed the determination the cell fate in Bombyx mori (Linnaeus) midgut depends on type of ecdysone receptor isoforms and ecdysone-related transcription factors.

  18. Resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis bioinsecticide in a field population of Plutella xylostella is due to a change in a midgut membrane receptor.

    PubMed

    Ferré, J; Real, M D; Van Rie, J; Jansens, S; Peferoen, M

    1991-06-15

    The biochemical mechanism for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins was studied in a field population of diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella) with a reduced susceptibility to the bioinsecticidal spray. The toxicity and binding characteristics of three crystal proteins [CryIA(b), CryIB, and CryIC] were compared between the field population and a laboratory strain. The field population proved resistant (greater than 200-fold compared with the laboratory strain) to CryIA(b), one of the crystal proteins in the insecticidal formulation. Binding studies showed that the two strains differ in a membrane receptor that recognizes CryIA(b). This crystal protein did not bind to the brush-border membrane of the midgut epithelial cells of the field population, either because of strongly reduced binding affinity or because of the complete absence of the receptor molecule. Both strains proved fully susceptible to the CryIB and CryIC crystal proteins, which were not present in the B. thuringiensis formulation used in the field. Characteristics of CryIB and CryIC binding to brush-border membranes of midgut epithelial cells were virtually identical in the laboratory and the field population.

  19. Effects of neem oil (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) on midgut cells of predatory larvae Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás, 1911) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; dos Santos, Daniela Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    The effects of ingested neem oil, a botanical insecticide obtained from the seeds of the neem tree, Azadirachta indica, on the midgut cells of predatory larvae Ceraeochrysa claveri were analyzed. C. claveri were fed on eggs of Diatraea saccharalis treated with neem oil at a concentration of 0.5%, 1% and 2% during throughout the larval period. Light and electron microscopy showed severe damages in columnar cells, which had many cytoplasmic protrusions, clustering and ruptured of the microvilli, swollen cells, ruptured cells, dilatation and vesiculation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, enlargement of extracellular spaces of the basal labyrinth, intercellular spaces and necrosis. The indirect ingestion of neem oil with prey can result in severe alterations showing direct cytotoxic effects of neem oil on midgut cells of C. claveri larvae. Therefore, the safety of neem oil to non-target species as larvae of C. claveri was refuted, thus the notion that plants derived are safer to non-target species must be questioned in future ecotoxicological studies.

  20. Specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxins is correlated with the presence of high-affinity binding sites in the brush border membrane of target insect midguts

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, C.; Vanderbruggen, H.; Hoefte, H.; Van Rie, J.; Jansens, S.; Van Mellaert, H. )

    1988-11-01

    Binding studies were performed with two {sup 125}I-labeled Bacillus thuringiensis {delta}-endotoxins on brush border membrane vesicles prepared from the larval midgut of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta or the cabbage butterfly Pieris brassicae. One {delta}-endotoxin, Bt2-protoxin, is a 130-kDa recombinant crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. berliner. It kills larvae of both insect species. The active Bt2-toxin is a 60-kDa proteolytic fragment of the Bt2-protoxin. It binds saturably and with high affinity to brush border membrane vesicles from the midgut of both species. The other {delta}-endotoxin, Bt4412-protoxin, is a 136-kDa crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis, which is highly toxic for P. brassicae, but not for M. sexta larvae. Bt4412-toxin, obtained after proteolytic activation of Bt4412-protoxin, shows high-affinity saturable binding to P. brassicae vesicles but not to M. sexta vesicles. The correlation between toxicity and specific binding is further strengthened by competition studies. Other B. thuringiensis {delta}-endotoxins active against M. sexta compete for binding of {sup 125}I-labeled Bt2-toxin to M. sexta vesicles, whereas toxins active against dipteran or coleopteran larvae do not compete. Bt2-toxin and Bt4412-toxin bind to different sites on P. brassicae vesicles.

  1. In Vivo and In Vitro Binding of Vip3Aa to Spodoptera frugiperda Midgut and Characterization of Binding Sites by 125I Radiolabeling

    PubMed Central

    Chakroun, Maissa

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vip3A) have been recently introduced in important crops as a strategy to delay the emerging resistance to the existing Cry toxins. The mode of action of Vip3A proteins has been studied in Spodoptera frugiperda with the aim of characterizing their binding to the insect midgut. Immunofluorescence histological localization of Vip3Aa in the midgut of intoxicated larvae showed that Vip3Aa bound to the brush border membrane along the entire apical surface. The presence of fluorescence in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells seems to suggest internalization of Vip3Aa or a fragment of it. Successful radiolabeling and optimization of the binding protocol for the 125I-Vip3Aa to S. frugiperda brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) allowed the determination of binding parameters of Vip3A proteins for the first time. Heterologous competition using Vip3Ad, Vip3Ae, and Vip3Af as competitor proteins showed that they share the same binding site with Vip3Aa. In contrast, when using Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac as competitors, no competitive binding was observed, which makes them appropriate candidates to be used in combination with Vip3A proteins in transgenic crops. PMID:25002420

  2. In vivo and in vitro binding of Vip3Aa to Spodoptera frugiperda midgut and characterization of binding sites by (125)I radiolabeling.

    PubMed

    Chakroun, Maissa; Ferré, Juan

    2014-10-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vip3A) have been recently introduced in important crops as a strategy to delay the emerging resistance to the existing Cry toxins. The mode of action of Vip3A proteins has been studied in Spodoptera frugiperda with the aim of characterizing their binding to the insect midgut. Immunofluorescence histological localization of Vip3Aa in the midgut of intoxicated larvae showed that Vip3Aa bound to the brush border membrane along the entire apical surface. The presence of fluorescence in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells seems to suggest internalization of Vip3Aa or a fragment of it. Successful radiolabeling and optimization of the binding protocol for the (125)I-Vip3Aa to S. frugiperda brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) allowed the determination of binding parameters of Vip3A proteins for the first time. Heterologous competition using Vip3Ad, Vip3Ae, and Vip3Af as competitor proteins showed that they share the same binding site with Vip3Aa. In contrast, when using Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac as competitors, no competitive binding was observed, which makes them appropriate candidates to be used in combination with Vip3A proteins in transgenic crops.

  3. No effect of Bt Cry1Ie toxin on bacterial diversity in the midgut of the Chinese honey bees, Apis cerana cerana (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hui-Ru; Dai, Ping-Li; Geng, Li-Li; Jack, Cameron J.; Li, Yun-He; Wu, Yan-Yan; Diao, Qing-Yun; Ellis, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Cry1Ie protein derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has been proposed as a promising candidate for the development of a new Bt-maize variety to control maize pests in China. We studied the response of the midgut bacterial community of Apis cerana cerana to Cry1Ie toxin under laboratory conditions. Newly emerged bees were fed one of the following treatments for 15 and 30 days: three concentrations of Cry1Ie toxin (20 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL, and 20 μg/mL) in sugar syrup, pure sugar syrup as a negative control and 48 ng/mL imidacloprid as a positive control. The relative abundance of 16S rRNA genes was measured by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction and no apparent differences were found among treatments for any of these counts at any time point. Furthermore, the midgut bacterial structure and compositions were determined using high-throughput sequencing targeting the V3-V4 regions of the 16S rDNA. All core honey bee intestinal bacterial genera such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Snodgrassella, and Gilliamella were detected, and no significant changes were found in the species diversity and richness for any bacterial taxa among treatments at different time points. These results suggest that Cry1Ie toxin may not affect gut bacterial communities of Chinese honey bees. PMID:28139751

  4. Apoptotic and necrotic changes in the midgut glands of the wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) in response to starvation and dimethoate exposure.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, G; Rost-Roszkowska, M; Wilczek, P; Babczyńska, A; Szulińska, E; Sonakowska, L; Marek-Swędzioł, M

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the intensity of degenerative changes (apoptosis, necrosis) in the cells of the midgut glands of male and female wolf spiders, Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae), exposed to natural (starvation) and anthropogenic (the organophosphorous pesticide dimethoate) stressors under laboratory conditions were compared. The spiders were collected from two differentially polluted sites, both located in southern Poland: Katowice-Welnowiec, which is heavily polluted with metals, and Pilica, the reference site. Starvation and dimethoate treatment resulted in enhancement of apoptotic and necrotic changes in the midgut glands of the spiders. The frequency of degenerative changes in starving individuals was twice as high as in the specimens intoxicated with dimethoate. The percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells was higher in starving males than in starving females. A high intensity of necrotic changes, together with increased Cas-3 like activity and a greater percentage of cells with depolarized mitochondria, were typical of starving males from the polluted site. The cell death indices observed in females depended more strongly on the type of stressor than on previous preexposure to pollutants.

  5. Changes in growth and lipid profiles of silk gland, mid-gut biochemical composition of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. on exposure to prostaglandin F2alpha.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yun-gen; Jiang, Li-jun

    2003-01-01

    The growth of the silkworm is influenced by the outside and inside environment. Among them, the category of various endocrine hormone of inside is the main factors that adjust the characters such as growth and propagate. In this experiment, we applied different dosage of prostaglandin to the fourth and fifth instar silkworm to observe the effects of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) on silk gland growth, mid-gut biochemical constituents and the lipid profiles of silkworm larva, Bombyx mori L. The weight of the posterior silk gland increased significantly (P < 0.001) by 20-24% after treatment with PGF2alpha. The increase in the lipid profiles except lipase activity suggests that the silk gland had more synthetic activity that might reflect in active spinning of silkworm larva. The changes of total proteins, free amino acids and alkaline phosphatase in mid-gut of control and PGF2alpha treated silkworm, B. mori L. indicate that PGF2alpha favored stimulatory effect on physiology of digestion, absorption and transportation of nutrients which might influence on the growth and development of larva.

  6. Developmental Expression of Ecdysone-Related Genes Associated With Metamorphic Changes During Midgut Remodeling of Silkworm Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera:Bombycidae)

    PubMed Central

    Goncu, Ebru; Uranlı, Ramazan; Selek, Gozde; Parlak, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone is known as the systemic regulators of insect cells; however, how to impact the fate and function of mature and stem cells is unclear. For the first time, we report ecdysone regulatory cascades in both mature midgut cell and stem cell fractions related to developmental events by using histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and gene expression analysis methods. Ecdysone receptor-B1 (EcR-B1) and ultraspiracle 1 (USP-1) mRNAs were detected mainly in mature cells during programmed cell death (PCD). Lowered E75A and probably BR-C Z4 in mature cells appear to provide a signal to the initiation of PCD. E74B, E75B and BR-C Z2 seem to be early response genes which are involved in preparatory phase of cell death. It is likely that βFTZ-F1, E74A and BR-C Z1 are probably associated with execution of death. EcR-A and USP2 mRNAs were found in stem cells during remodeling processes but EcR-B1, USP1 and E74B genes imply an important role during initial phase of metamorphic events in stem cells. BHR3 mRNAs were determined abundantly in stem cells suggesting its primary role in differentiation. All of these results showed the determination the cell fate in Bombyx mori (Linnaeus) midgut depends on type of ecdysone receptor isoforms and ecdysone-related transcription factors. PMID:27620558

  7. Polysplenia Syndrome Detected after Chest Symptoms in Two Adult Patients: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Güliz; Akpınar, Süha H.; Alıcıoğlu, Banu

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Polisplenia syndrome (PSS) is a rare subtype of heterotaxy syndrome and means ambiguous location of the major thoracic and abdominal organs with vascular anomalies and multiple spleens. We reported on the findings of computed tomography (CT) of PSS in adults, detected incidentally. Case Report Two woman underwent a CT examination of the thorax for different thoracic pathologies. There were common abnormalities such as hyparterial bronchi and absence of middle lobe fissure on CTscans suggesting heterotaxy syndrome. Therefore, the abdominal CTs were performed to detect the accompanying abdominal anomalies. Our two cases defined as PSS were diagnosed with multiple spleens in the normal location in the abdomen. The left-dominant liver and short pancreas with agenesis of the pancreatic tail and lateral part of the body were detected on CT scan. In the first case, the vascular abnormalities were as follows: variant entrance of the main portal vein into the liver and atypically located superior mesenteric vein (SMV) joining with the splenic vein to form the portal vein. In the second case, the preduodenal portal vein and hemiazygos continuation with interruption of the hepatic segment of the inferior vena cava (IVC) were the vascular anomalies. The bowels were malrotated in the second case. Conclusions Although such cases are usually admitted as abdominal emergency, our two cases were detected during examinations for thoracic and cardiac pathologies. The knowledge and awareness of PSS can be helpful to diagnose pathology and plan surgical procedures. PMID:25237401

  8. Lysophosphatidylcholine acts in the constitutive immune defence against American foulbrood in adult honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Riessberger-Gallé, Ulrike; Hernández-López, Javier; Rechberger, Gerald; Crailsheim, Karl; Schuehly, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Honeybee (Apis mellifera) imagines are resistant to the Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae (P. larvae), causative agent of American foulbrood (AFB), whereas honeybee larvae show susceptibility against this pathogen only during the first 48 h of their life. It is known that midgut homogenate of adult honeybees as well as a homogenate of aged larvae exhibit strong anti-P. larvae activity. A bioactivity-guided LC-HRMS analysis of midgut homogenate resulted in the identification of 1-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (LPC) pointing to a yet unknown immune defence in adult honeybees against P. larvae. Antimicrobial activity of LPC was also demonstrated against Melissococcus plutonius, causative agent of European Foulbrood. To demonstrate an AFB-preventive effect of LPC in larvae, artificially reared larvae were supplemented with LPC to evaluate its toxicity and to assess whether, after infection with P. larvae spores, LPC supplementation prevents AFB infection. 10 μg LPC per larva applied for 3 d significantly lowered mortality due to AFB in comparison to controls. A potential delivery route of LPC to the larvae in a colony via nurse bees was assessed through a tracking experiment using fluorescent-labelled LPC. This yet undescribed and non-proteinous defense of honeybees against P. larvae may offer new perspectives for a treatment of AFB without the utilization of classic antibiotics. PMID:27480379

  9. Polymyositis - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash is a sign of a similar condition, dermatomyositis . Common symptoms include: Muscle weakness in the shoulders ... in the treatment of refractory adult and juvenile dermatomyositis and adult polymyositis: a randomized, placebo-phase trial. ...

  10. Single amino acid changes in domain II of Bacillus thuringiensis CryIAb delta-endotoxin affect irreversible binding to Manduca sexta midgut membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, F; Alcantara, E; Lee, M K; Chen, X J; Curtiss, A; Dean, D H

    1995-01-01

    Deletion of amino acid residues 370 to 375 (D2) and single alanine substitutions between residues 371 and 375 (FNIGI) of lepidopteran-active Bacillus thuringiensis CryIAb delta-endotoxin were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis techniques. All mutants, except that with the I-to-A change at position 373 (I373A), produced delta-endotoxin as CryIAb and were stable upon activation either by Manduca sexta gut enzymes or by trypsin. Mutants D2, F371A, and G374A lost most of the toxicity (400 times less) for M. sexta larvae, whereas N372A and I375A were only 2 times less toxic than CryIAb. The results of homologous and heterologous competition binding assays to M. sexta midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) revealed that the binding curves for all mutant toxins were similar to those for the wild-type toxin. However, a significant difference in irreversible binding was observed between the toxic (CryIAb, N372A, and I375A) and less-toxic (D2, F371A, and G374A) proteins. Only 20 to 25% of bound, radiolabeled CryIAb, N372A, and I375A toxins was dissociated from BBMV, whereas about 50 to 55% of the less-toxic mutants, D2, F371A, and G374A, was dissociated from their binding sites by the addition of excess nonlabeled ligand. Voltage clamping experiments provided further evidence that the insecticidal property (inhibition of short-circuit current across the M. sexta midgut) was directly correlated to irreversible interaction of the toxin with the BBMV. We have also shown that CryIAb and mutant toxins recognize 210- and 120-kDa peptides in ligand blotting. Our results imply that mutations in residues 370 to 375 of domain II of CrylAb do not affect overall binding but do affect the irreversible association of the toxin to the midgut columnar epithelial cells of M. sexta. PMID:7730254

  11. Different Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry1Ab on Midgut Cell Transmembrane Potential of Mythimna separata and Agrotis ipsilon Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Hu, Zhaonong; Wu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins from the Cry1A family demonstrate significantly different toxicities against members of the family Noctuidae for unknown reasons. In this study, membrane potential was measured and analyzed in freshly isolated midgut samples from Mythimna separata and Agrotis ipsilon larvae under oral administration and in vitro incubation with Bt toxin Cry1Ab to elucidate the mechanism of action for further control of these pests. Bioassay results showed that the larvae of M. separata achieved a LD50 of 258.84 ng/larva at 24 h after ingestion; M. separata larvae were at least eightfold more sensitive than A. ipsilon larvae to Cry1Ab. Force-feeding showed that the observed midgut apical-membrane potential (Vam) of M. separata larvae was significantly depolarized from −82.9 ± 6.6 mV to −19.9 ± 7.2 mV at 8 h after ingestion of 1 μg activated Cry1Ab, whereas no obvious changes were detected in A. ipsilon larvae with dosage of 5 μg Cry1Ab. The activated Cry1Ab caused a distinct concentration-dependent depolarization of the apical membrane; Vam was reduced by 50% after 14.7 ± 0.2, 9.8 ± 0.4, and 7.6 ± 0.6 min of treatment with 1, 5, and 10 μg/mL Cry1Ab, respectively. Cry1Ab showed a minimal effect on A. ipsilon larvae even at 20 μg/mL, and Vam decreased by 26.3% ± 2.3% after 15 min. The concentrations of Cry1Ab displayed no significant effect on the basolateral side of the epithelium. The Vam of A. ipsilon (−33.19 ± 6.29 mV, n = 51) was only half that of M. separata (−80.94 ± 6.95 mV, n = 75). The different degrees of sensitivity to Cry1Ab were speculatively associated with various habits, as well as the diverse physiological or biochemical characteristics of the midgut cell membranes. PMID:26694463

  12. ' Candidatus Hepatincola porcellionum' gen. nov., sp. nov., a new, stalk-forming lineage of Rickettsiales colonizing the midgut glands of a terrestrial isopod.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjie; Stingl, Ulrich; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Zimmer, Martin; Brune, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    The midgut glands (hepatopancreas) of terrestrial isopods are densely colonized by hitherto uncultivated bacteria. In the case of the Common Woodlouse, Porcellio scaber (Crustacea: Isopoda), the symbionts represent a novel lineage in the alpha-subdivision of Proteobacteria. Based on comparative sequence analysis of their 16S rRNA genes, their closest (albeit distant) relatives were among the Rickettsiales, which are intracellular symbionts or pathogens of many animals. Transmission electron microscopy and in situ hybridization with fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes revealed a homogeneous population of symbionts intimately associated with the endothelium of the hepatopancreas, which apparently interact with the microvilli of the brush border by means of a stalk-like cytoplasmic appendage. Based on isolated phylogenetic position and unique cytological properties, the provisional name ' Candidatus Hepatincola porcellionum' is proposed to classify this new taxon of Rickettsiales colonizing the hepatopancreas of P. scaber.

  13. Study of the Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa16 histopathological effects and determination of its putative binding proteins in the midgut of Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Boukedi, Hanen; Dammak-Karray, Mariam; Sellami-Boudawara, Tahya; Jaoua, Samir; Tounsi, Slim

    2011-02-01

    The bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produces, at the vegetative stage of its growth, Vip3A proteins with activity against a broad spectrum of lepidopteran insects. The Egyptian cotton leaf worm (Spodoptera littoralis) is an important agricultural pest that is susceptible to the Vip3Aa16 protein of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki strain BUPM95. The midgut histopathology of Vip3Aa fed larvae showed vacuolization of the cytoplasm, brush border membrane destruction, vesicle formation in the apical region and cellular disintegration. Biotinylated Vip3Aa toxin bound proteins of 55- and 100-kDa on blots of S. littoralis brush border membrane preparations. These binding proteins differ in molecular size from those recognized by Cry1C, one of the very few Cry proteins active against the polyphagous S. littoralis. This result supports the use of Vip3Aa16 proteins as insecticidal agent, especially in case of Cry-resistance management.

  14. The impact of the Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant on the midgut histology of Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and determination of its putative receptor.

    PubMed

    Ghribi, Dhouha; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Boukedi, Hanen; Elleuch, Mouna; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Tounsi, Slim

    2012-02-01

    SPB1 is a Bacillus subtilis strain producing a lipopeptide biosurfactant. The insecticidal activity of this biosurfactant was evaluated against the Egyptian cotton leaf worm (Spodoptera littoralis). It displayed toxicity with an LC(50) of 251 ng/cm(2). The histopathological changes occurred in the larval midgut of S. littoralis treated with B. subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant were vesicle formation in the apical region, cellular vacuolization and destruction of epithelial cells and their boundaries. Ligand-blotting experiments with S. littoralis brush border membrane vesicles showed binding of SPB1 biosurfactant to a protein of 45 kDa corresponding to its putative receptor. The latter differs in molecular size from those recognized by Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3A and Cry1C toxins, commonly known by their activity against S. littoralis. This result wires the application of B. subtilis biosurfactant for effective control of S. littoralis larvae, particularly in the cases where S. littoralis will develop resistance against B. thuringiensis toxins.

  15. Tsetse GmmSRPN10 Has Anti-complement Activity and Is Important for Successful Establishment of Trypanosome Infections in the Fly Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Cher-Pheng; Haines, Lee R.; Southern, Daniel M.; Lehane, Michael J.; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The complement cascade in mammalian blood can damage the alimentary tract of haematophagous arthropods. As such, these animals have evolved their own repertoire of complement-inactivating factors, which are inadvertently exploited by blood-borne pathogens to escape complement lysis. Unlike the bloodstream stages, the procyclic (insect) stage of Trypanosoma brucei is highly susceptible to complement killing, which is puzzling considering that a tsetse takes a bloodmeal every 2–4 days. In this study, we identified four tsetse (Glossina morsitans morsitans) serine protease inhibitors (serpins) from a midgut expressed sequence tag (EST) library (GmmSRPN3, GmmSRPN5, GmmSRPN9 and GmmSRPN10) and investigated their role in modulating the establishment of a T. brucei infection in the midgut. Although not having evolved in a common blood-feeding ancestor, all four serpins have an active site sharing remarkable homology with the human complement C1-inhibitor serpin, SerpinG1. RNAi knockdown of individual GmmSRPN9 and GmmSRPN10 genes resulted in a significant decreased rate of infection by procyclic form T. brucei. Furthermore, recombinant GmmSRPN10 was both able to inhibit the activity of human complement-cascade serine proteases, C1s and Factor D, and to protect the in vitro killing of procyclic trypanosomes when incubated with complement-activated human serum. Thus, the secretion of serpins, which may be part of a bloodmeal complement inactivation system in tsetse, is used by procyclic trypanosomes to evade an influx of fresh trypanolytic complement with each bloodmeal. This highlights another facet of the complicated relationship between T. brucei and its tsetse vector, where the parasite takes advantage of tsetse physiology to further its chances of propagation and transmission. PMID:25569180

  16. Negligible uptake and transfer of diet-derived pollen microRNAs in adult honey bees.

    PubMed

    Masood, Maryam; Everett, Claire P; Chan, Stephen Y; Snow, Jonathan W

    2016-01-01

    The putative transfer and gene regulatory activities of diet-derived miRNAs in ingesting animals are still debated. Importantly, no study to date has fully examined the role of dietary uptake of miRNA in the honey bee, a critical pollinator in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. After controlled pollen feeding experiments in adult honey bees, we observed that midguts demonstrated robust increases in plant miRNAs after pollen ingestion. However, we found no evidence of biologically relevant delivery of these molecules to proximal or distal tissues of recipient honey bees. Our results, therefore, support the premise that pollen miRNAs ingested as part of a typical diet are not robustly transferred across barrier epithelia of adult honey bees under normal conditions. Key future questions include whether other small RNA species in honey bee diets behave similarly and whether more specialized and specific delivery mechanisms exist for more efficient transport, particularly in the context of stressed barrier epithelia.

  17. The Par complex and integrins direct asymmetric cell division in adult intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Spyros; Conder, Ryan; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2012-10-05

    The adult Drosophila midgut is maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that generate both self-renewing and differentiating daughter cells. How this asymmetry is generated is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that asymmetric ISC division is established by a unique combination of extracellular and intracellular polarity mechanisms. We show that Integrin-dependent adhesion to the basement membrane induces cell-intrinsic polarity and results in the asymmetric segregation of the Par proteins Par-3, Par-6, and aPKC into the apical daughter cell. Cell-specific knockdown and overexpression experiments suggest that increased activity of aPKC enhances Delta/Notch signaling in one of the two daughter cells to induce terminal differentiation. Perturbing this mechanism or altering the orientation of ISC division results in the formation of intestinal tumors. Our data indicate that mechanisms for intrinsically asymmetric cell division can be adapted to allow for the flexibility in lineage decisions that is required in adult stem cells.

  18. Spectrum of renal pathology in adult patients with congenital renal anomalies-a series from a tertiary cancer center.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Jasreman; Mohanty, Sambit K; Kim, Tim; Sexton, Wade J; Powsang, Julio; Spiess, Philippe E

    2014-02-01

    Congenital renal anomalies (CRAs) detected in adults include horseshoe kidney (HK), crossed renal ectopia, and malrotation. Congenital renal anomalies are rare, and renal lesions associated with CRA are rarer. Thirteen patients (11 men and 2 women) were referred to our center with renal masses in the context of CRAs, which included HK (10 cases), crossed renal ectopia (2 cases), and a pelvic kidney (1 case). The mean age at diagnosis was 60 years (37-76 years). All patients were treated with open surgery; 10, partial nephrectomies; 4, radical nephrectomies; and 1, nephroureterectomy with division of the renal isthmus. Pathology ranged from benign (simple cortical cysts, chronic pyelonephritis with secondary hydronephrosis) to malignant (12 cases of renal cell carcinomas [RCCs] and 1 case of urothelial carcinoma). Two patients of HKs presented with bilateral renal masses. The size of the RCC ranged from 2.5 to 13 cm. There were 11 cases of clear cell RCC, 1 case of papillary RCC (type 1), and 1 case of urothelial carcinoma. All the cases of RCC had negative surgical margins. Follow-up available in all patients ranged from 1 month up to 49 months. None of the patients developed any locoregional recurrences or distant metastases. In this patient cohort, the most common congenital anomaly associated with RCC is HK. All tumors behaved in an indolent fashion with prognosis related to pathologic tumor stage. Partial nephrectomy is a safe and effective procedure in appropriately selected patients.

  19. Full-thickness small intestine necrosis with midgut volvulus, distributed in a patchy fashion, is reversible with moderate blood flow: resumption of normal function to non-viable intestine.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hizuru; Uchida, Hiroo; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yujiro; Kishimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Midgut volvulus is a highly life-threatening condition that carries a high risk of short gut syndrome. We report a case of catastrophic neonatal midgut volvulus in which second-look laparotomy revealed apparently non-viable remnant small intestine but with a moderate blood supply. Full-thickness small intestine necrosis was distributed in a patchy fashion, with non-viable and necrotic areas distributed so widely that no portion of the intestine could be resected. A section of full-thickness necrotic intestine preserved at surgery was able to regenerate, and normal function was restored over a period of 1 month. This case indicated that intestinal resumption may be dependent on blood flow. Even when intestinal viability is questionable, preservation enables the chance of regeneration if moderate blood flow is present.

  20. Xenobiotic effects on intestinal stem cell proliferation in adult honey bee (Apis mellifera L) workers.

    PubMed

    Forkpah, Cordelia; Dixon, Luke R; Fahrbach, Susan E; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-01-01

    The causes of the current global decline in honey bee health are unknown. One major group of hypotheses invokes the pesticides and other xenobiotics to which this important pollinator species is often exposed. Most studies have focused on mortality or behavioral deficiencies in exposed honey bees while neglecting other biological functions and target organs. The midgut epithelium of honey bees presents an important interface between the insect and its environment. It is maintained by proliferation of intestinal stem cells throughout the adult life of honey bees. We used caged honey bees to test multiple xenobiotics for effects on the replicative activity of the intestinal stem cells under laboratory conditions. Most of the tested compounds did not alter the replicative activity of intestinal stem cells. However, colchicine, methoxyfenozide, tetracycline, and a combination of coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate significantly affected proliferation rate. All substances except methoxyfenozide decreased proliferation rate. Thus, the results indicate that some xenobiotics frequently used in apiculture and known to accumulate in honey bee hives may have hitherto unknown physiological effects. The nutritional status and the susceptibility to pathogens of honey bees could be compromised by the impacts of xenobiotics on the maintenance of the midgut epithelium. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that more comprehensive testing of xenobiotics may be required before novel or existing compounds can be considered safe for honey bees and other non-target species.

  1. Xenobiotic Effects on Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation in Adult Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L) Workers

    PubMed Central

    Forkpah, Cordelia; Dixon, Luke R.; Fahrbach, Susan E.; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-01-01

    The causes of the current global decline in honey bee health are unknown. One major group of hypotheses invokes the pesticides and other xenobiotics to which this important pollinator species is often exposed. Most studies have focused on mortality or behavioral deficiencies in exposed honey bees while neglecting other biological functions and target organs. The midgut epithelium of honey bees presents an important interface between the insect and its environment. It is maintained by proliferation of intestinal stem cells throughout the adult life of honey bees. We used caged honey bees to test multiple xenobiotics for effects on the replicative activity of the intestinal stem cells under laboratory conditions. Most of the tested compounds did not alter the replicative activity of intestinal stem cells. However, colchicine, methoxyfenozide, tetracycline, and a combination of coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate significantly affected proliferation rate. All substances except methoxyfenozide decreased proliferation rate. Thus, the results indicate that some xenobiotics frequently used in apiculture and known to accumulate in honey bee hives may have hitherto unknown physiological effects. The nutritional status and the susceptibility to pathogens of honey bees could be compromised by the impacts of xenobiotics on the maintenance of the midgut epithelium. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that more comprehensive testing of xenobiotics may be required before novel or existing compounds can be considered safe for honey bees and other non-target species. PMID:24608542

  2. Specific binding of Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus occlusion-derived virus to midgut cells of Heliothis virescens larvae is mediated by products of pif genes Ac119 and Ac022 but not by Ac115.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Taro; Washburn, Jan O; Sitapara, Ronika; Sid, Eric; Volkman, Loy E

    2005-12-01

    Per os infectivity factors PIF1 (Ac119) and PIF2 (Ac022), like P74, are essential for oral infection of lepidopteran larval hosts of Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Here we show that Ac115 also is a PIF (PIF3) and that, unlike PIF1 and PIF2, it does not mediate specific binding of AcMNPV occlusion-derived virus (ODV) to midgut target cells. We used an improved in vivo fluorescence dequenching assay to compare binding, fusion, and competition among control AcMNPV ODV and the ODVs of AcMNPV PIF1, PIF2, and PIF3 deletion mutants. Our results showed that binding and fusion of PIF1 and PIF2 mutants, but not the PIF3 mutant, were both qualitatively and quantitatively different from those of control ODV. Unlike control and PIF3-deficient ODV, an excess of PIF1- or PIF2-deficient ODV failed to compete effectively with control ODV's binding to specific receptors on midgut epithelial cells. Moreover, the levels of PIF1- and PIF2-deficient ODV binding were depressed threefold compared to control levels. Binding, fusion, and competition by PIF3-deficient ODV, however, were all indistinguishable from those of control ODV. These results implicated PIF1 and PIF2 as ODV envelope attachment proteins that mediate specific binding to primary target cells within the midgut. In contrast, PIF3 mediates another unidentified, but critical, early event during primary infection.

  3. CPR: Adult

    MedlinePlus

    Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course ...

  4. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications.

  5. Comparative Subcellular Proteomics Analysis of Susceptible and Near-isogenic Resistant Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera) Larval Midgut Response to BmNPV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-yang; Yu, Hai-zhong; Xu, Jia-ping; Zhang, Shang-zhi; Yu, Dong; Liu, Ming-hui; Wang, Lin-ling

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of silkworm resistance to Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) infection remains largely unclear. Accumulating evidence suggests that subcellular fractionation combined with proteomics is an ideal technique to analyse host antiviral mechanisms. To clarify the anti-BmNPV mechanism of the silkworm, the near-isogenic line BC9 (resistant strain) and the recurrent parent P50 (susceptible strain) were used in a comparative subcellular proteomics study. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) was conducted on proteins extracted from the cytosol, mitochondria, and microsomes of BmNPV-infected and control larval midguts. A total of 87 proteins were successfully identified from the three subcellular fractions. These proteins were primarily involved in energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signalling pathways, disease, and transport. In particular, disease-relevant proteins were especially changed in microsomes. After infection with BmNPV, differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) primarily appeared in the cytosolic and microsomal fractions, which indicated that these two fractions might play a more important role in the response to BmNPV infection. After removing genetic background and individual immune stress response proteins, 16 proteins were identified as potentially involved in repressing BmNPV infection. Of these proteins, the differential expression patterns of 8 proteins according to reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analyses were consistent with the 2-DE results. PMID:28361957

  6. Competition of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins for midgut binding sites: a basis for the development and management of transgenic tropical maize resistant to several stemborers.

    PubMed

    Rang, Cécile; Bergvingson, David; Bohorova, Natasha; Hoisington, David; Frutos, Roger

    2004-07-01

    Binding and competition of five Bacillus thuringiensis toxins--Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ba, Cry1Ca, and Cry1Ea--for midgut binding sites from three pests, Spodoptera frugiperda, Diatraea saccharalis, and Diatraea grandiosella, were investigated as part of a strategy to develop tropical transgenic maize resistant to several stemborers. On S. frugiperda, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac compete for the same binding site; Cry1Ba and Cry1Ca compete for a second binding site. Cry1Ea recognizes a third specific binding site in S. frugiperda and does not compete with any of the other toxins. On D. grandiosella and D. saccharalis, Cry1Ac competes with Cry1Ab and not with Cry1Ba and Cry1Ca. Cry1Ba and Cry1Ca recognize each a specific binding site and do not compete with any of the other four toxins. Cry1Ea does not recognize any binding site on Diatraea species. Combinations of toxins are proposed to develop transgenic maize resistant to the three stemborers while allowing resistance management.

  7. Leucine transport is affected by Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins in brush border membrane vesicles from Ostrinia nubilalis Hb (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Sesamia nonagrioides Lefebvre (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) midgut.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, M Giovanna; Caccia, Silvia; González-Cabrera, Joel; Ferré, Juan; Giordana, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The pore-forming activity of Cry1Ab, Cry1Fa and Cry1Ca toxins and their interaction with leucine transport mediated by the K(+)/leucine cotransporter were studied in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) isolated from the midgut of Ostrinia nubilalis and Sesamia nonagrioides. In both species, as in other Lepidoptera, leucine uptake by BBMVs can take place in the absence of cations, but it can also be driven by a K(+) gradient. Experiments with the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide proved that Cry1Ab, a Bacillus thuringiensis toxin active in vivo, enhanced the membrane permeability to potassium in O. nubilalis BBMVs. This result is in agreement with similar effects observed in S. nonagrioides BBMV incubated with various Cry1 toxins active in vivo. The effect of the above toxins was tested on the initial rate of 0.1 mM: leucine influx. Instead of an increase in leucine influx, a reduction was observed with the Cry1 toxins active in vivo. Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa, but not the inactive toxin Cry1Da, inhibited in a dose-dependent manner leucine uptake both in the absence and in the presence of a K(+) gradient, a clear indication that their effect is independent of the channel formed by the toxins and that this effect is exerted directly on the amino acid transport system.

  8. A single major QTL controls expression of larval Cry1F resistance trait in Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and is independent of midgut receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Coates, Brad S; Sumerford, Douglas V; Lopez, Miriam D; Wang, Haichuan; Fraser, Lisa M; Kroemer, Jeremy A; Spencer, Terrence; Kim, Kyung S; Abel, Craig A; Hellmich, Richard L; Siegfried, Blair D

    2011-08-01

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is an introduced crop pest in North America that causes major damage to corn and reduces yield of food, feed, and biofuel materials. The Cry1F toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) expressed in transgenic hybrid corn is highly toxic to O. nubilalis larvae and effective in minimizing feeding damage. A laboratory colony of O. nubilalis was selected for high levels of Cry1F resistance (>12,000-fold compared to susceptible larvae) and is capable of survival on transgenic hybrid corn. Genetic linkage maps with segregating AFLP markers show that the Cry1F resistance trait is controlled by a single quantitative trait locus (QTL) on linkage group 12. The map position of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers indicated that midgut Bt toxin-receptor genes, alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase N, and cadherin, are not linked with the Cry1F QTL. Evidence suggests that genes within this genome interval may give rise to a novel Bt toxin resistance trait for Lepidoptera that appears independent of known receptor-based mechanisms of resistance.

  9. Affinity purification and characterization of a biodegradable plastic-degrading enzyme from a yeast isolated from the larval midgut of a stag beetle, Aegus laevicollis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ken; Sakamoto, Hironori; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Tabata, Jun; Watanabe, Takashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Koitabashi, Motoo; Fujii, Takeshi; Tsushima, Seiya; Kitamoto, Hiroko K

    2013-09-01

    Two yeast strains, which have the ability to degrade biodegradable plastic films, were isolated from the larval midgut of a stag beetle, Aegus laevicollis. Both of them are most closely related to Cryptococcus magnus and could degrade biodegradable plastic (BP) films made of poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) effectively. A BP-degrading enzyme was purified from the culture broth of one of the isolated strains employing a newly developed affinity purification method based on the binding action of the enzyme to the substrate (emulsified PBSA) and its subsequent degradative action toward the substrate. Partial amino acid sequences of this enzyme suggested that it belongs to the cutinase family, and thus, the enzyme was named CmCut1. It has a molecular mass of 21 kDa and a degradative activity for emulsified PBSA which was significantly enhanced by the simultaneous presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) at a concentration of about 2.5 mM. Its optimal pH was 7.5, and the optimal temperature was 40 °C. It showed a broad substrate specificity for p-nitrophenyl (pNP)-fatty acid esters ranging from pNP-acetate (C2) to pNP-stearate (C18) and films of PBSA, PBS, poly(ε-caprolactone), and poly(lactic acid).

  10. A unique midgut-associated bacterial community hosted by the cave beetle Cansiliella servadeii (Coleoptera: Leptodirini) reveals parallel phylogenetic divergences from universal gut-specific ancestors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cansiliella servadeii (Coleoptera) is an endemic troglobite living in deep carbonate caves in North-Eastern Italy. The beetle constantly moves and browses in its preferred habitat (consisting in flowing water and moonmilk, a soft speleothem colonized by microorganisms) self-preens to convey material from elytra, legs, and antennae towards the mouth. We investigated its inner and outer microbiota using microscopy and DNA-based approaches. Results Abundant microbial cell masses were observed on the external appendages. Cansiliella’s midgut is fully colonized by live microbes and culture-independent analyses yielded nearly 30 different 16S phylotypes that have no overlap with the community composition of the moonmilk. Many of the lineages, dominated by Gram positive groups, share very low similarity to database sequences. However for most cases, notwithstanding their very limited relatedness with existing records, phylotypes could be assigned to bacterial clades that had been retrieved from insect or other animals’ digestive traits. Conclusions Results suggest a history of remote separation from a common ancestor that harboured a set of gut-specific bacteria whose functions are supposedly critical for host physiology. The phylogenetic and coevolutionary implications of the parallel occurrences of these prokaryotic guilds appear to apply throughout a broad spectrum of animal diversity. Their persistence and conservation underlies a possibly critical role of precise bacterial assemblages in animal-bacteria interactions. PMID:23758657

  11. Morphological and molecular effects of 20-hydroxyecdysone and its agonist tebufenozide on CF-203, a midgut-derived cell line from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqi; Cook, Barbara J; Ampasala, Dinakara R; Zheng, Sichun; Caputo, Guido; Krell, Peter J; Retnakaran, Arthur; Arif, Basil M; Feng, Qili

    2004-02-01

    The morphological and molecular responses of a midgut-derived cell line of the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, to 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the nonsteroidal ecdysone agonist, tebufenozide (RH-5992), were investigated. The cells responded to these compounds by clumping, generating filamentous extensions, increased mortality and expression of the transcription factor, Choristoneura hormone receptor 3 (CHR3). This cell line can be used as a model system to study the mode of action of ecdysone and its agonists. With subsequent passaging in ecdysteroid-containing medium, the degree of clumping increased and the clumping could not be reversed by subculturing in ecdysteroid-free medium. Cell numbers of the adapted cell lines in 20E and RH-5992 containing media were not significantly decreased, compared to the control, but both cell lines accumulated less (14)C-labeled RH-5992 and lost the capability of expressing CHR3 in response to these compounds. Taken together, the cell lines appeared to develop a mechanism to adapt to the toxic effects of these compounds. Arch. Insect Biochem. Physiol. 55:68-78, 2004.

  12. Regulation of spblimp1/krox1a, an alternatively transcribed isoform expressed in midgut and hindgut of the sea urchin gastrula.

    PubMed

    Livi, Carolina B; Davidson, Eric H

    2007-01-01

    The sea urchin regulatory gene Spblimp1/krox produces alternatively transcribed and spliced isoforms, 1a and 1b, which have different temporal and spatial patterns of expression. Here we describe a cis-regulatory module that controls the expression of the 1a splice form in the midgut and hindgut at the beginning of gastrulation. Conserved sequence patches revealed by a comparison of the blimp1/krox locus in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus variegatus genomes were tested by gene transfer, in association with GFP or CAT reporter genes. An expression construct containing a conserved sequence patch immediately 5' of exon 1a included the transcription initiation site for blimp1/krox1a. This construct displays specific mid and hindgut expression, indicating that these are the locations of endogenous blimp1/krox1a transcription during the gastrula stage. Its sequence contains binding sites for Brn1/2/4, Otx, and Blimp1/Krox itself, as predicted in a prior regulatory network analysis.

  13. Wildtype adult stem cells, unlike tumor cells, are resistant to cellular damages in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meifang; Zhao, Hang; Zhao, Hanfei; Binari, Richard; Perrimon, Norbert; Li, Zhouhua

    2016-03-15

    Adult stem cells or residential progenitor cells are critical to maintain the structure and function of adult tissues (homeostasis) throughout the lifetime of an individual. Mis-regulation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation often leads to diseases including cancer, however, how wildtype adult stem cells and cancer cells respond to cellular damages remains unclear. We find that in the adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs), unlike tumor intestinal cells, are resistant to various cellular damages. Tumor intestinal cells, unlike wildtype ISCs, are easily eliminated by apoptosis. Further, their proliferation is inhibited upon autophagy induction, and autophagy-mediated tumor inhibition is independent of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibition of tumorigenesis by autophagy is likely through the sequestration and degradation of mitochondria, as compromising mitochondria activity in these tumor models mimics the induction of autophagy and increasing the production of mitochondria alleviates the tumor-suppression capacity of autophagy. Together, these data demonstrate that wildtype adult stem cells and tumor cells show dramatic differences in sensitivity to cellular damages, thus providing potential therapeutic implications targeting tumorigenesis.

  14. Endocrine remodelling of the adult intestine sustains reproduction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Reiff, Tobias; Jacobson, Jake; Cognigni, Paola; Antonello, Zeus; Ballesta, Esther; Tan, Kah Junn; Yew, Joanne Y; Dominguez, Maria; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The production of offspring is energetically costly and relies on incompletely understood mechanisms that generate a positive energy balance. In mothers of many species, changes in key energy-associated internal organs are common yet poorly characterised functionally and mechanistically. In this study, we show that, in adult Drosophila females, the midgut is dramatically remodelled to enhance reproductive output. In contrast to extant models, organ remodelling does not occur in response to increased nutrient intake and/or offspring demands, but rather precedes them. With spatially and temporally directed manipulations, we identify juvenile hormone (JH) as an anticipatory endocrine signal released after mating. Acting through intestinal bHLH-PAS domain proteins Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and Germ cell-expressed (Gce), JH signals directly to intestinal progenitors to yield a larger organ, and adjusts gene expression and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activity in enterocytes to support increased lipid metabolism. Our findings identify a metabolically significant paradigm of adult somatic organ remodelling linking hormonal signals, epithelial plasticity, and reproductive output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06930.001 PMID:26216039

  15. Adult Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischof, Ledford J.

    This volume comprehensively reviews the research on the psychology of the middle aged (ages 40-65). Topics include the concept of maturity and maturation models, the measurement and influences of adult self image; marriage and sexual patterns; intergenerational relationships between and children; vocations and avocations (work, retirement, play,…

  16. Small bowel volvulus in pregnancy with associated superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Esterson, Yonah B; Villani, Robert; Dela Cruz, Ronald A; Friedman, Barak; Grimaldi, Gregory M

    Here we report the case of a pregnant 28-year-old who presented with acute upper abdominal pain. CT demonstrated midgut volvulus with short segment occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Emergent detorsion of the small bowel was performed, at which time underlying intestinal malrotation was discovered. Following detorsion, the SMA had a bounding pulse and did not require thrombectomy or revascularization. Fewer than 25 cases of midgut volvulus during pregnancy have been reported over the past 20years. To our knowledge, this is the first report of maternal midgut volvulus in which imaging captures the resultant occlusion of the SMA.

  17. MAPK signaling pathway alters expression of midgut ALP and ABCC genes and causes resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin in diamondback moth.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Chen, Defeng; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhu, Xun; Baxter, Simon W; Zhou, Xuguo; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-04-01

    Insecticidal crystal toxins derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used as biopesticide sprays or expressed in transgenic crops to control insect pests. However, large-scale use of Bt has led to field-evolved resistance in several lepidopteran pests. Resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), was previously mapped to a multigenic resistance locus (BtR-1). Here, we assembled the 3.15 Mb BtR-1 locus and found high-level resistance to Cry1Ac and Bt biopesticide in four independent P. xylostella strains were all associated with differential expression of a midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP) outside this locus and a suite of ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C (ABCC) genes inside this locus. The interplay between these resistance genes is controlled by a previously uncharacterized trans-regulatory mechanism via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Molecular, biochemical, and functional analyses have established ALP as a functional Cry1Ac receptor. Phenotypic association experiments revealed that the recessive Cry1Ac resistance was tightly linked to down-regulation of ALP, ABCC2 and ABCC3, whereas it was not linked to up-regulation of ABCC1. Silencing of ABCC2 and ABCC3 in susceptible larvae reduced their susceptibility to Cry1Ac but did not affect the expression of ALP, whereas suppression of MAP4K4, a constitutively transcriptionally-activated MAPK upstream gene within the BtR-1 locus, led to a transient recovery of gene expression thereby restoring the susceptibility in resistant larvae. These results highlight a crucial role for ALP and ABCC genes in field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac and reveal a novel trans-regulatory signaling mechanism responsible for modulating the expression of these pivotal genes in P. xylostella.

  18. The novel somatostatin receptor 2/dopamine type 2 receptor chimeric compound BIM-23A758 decreases the viability of human GOT1 midgut carcinoid cells.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Kathrin; Andersen, Sandra; Vlotides, George; Spöttl, Gerald; Zhang, Shengwen; Datta, Rakesh; Culler, Michael; Göke, Burkhard; Auernhammer, Christoph J

    2013-01-01

    The majority of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the gastroenteropancreatic system coexpress somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) and dopamine type 2 receptors (D2R), thus providing a rationale for the use of novel SSTR2/D2R chimeric compounds in NET disease. Here we investigate the antitumor potential of the SSTR2/D2R chimeric compounds BIM-23A760 and BIM-23A758 in comparison to the selective SSTR2 agonist BIM-23023 and the selective D2R agonist BIM-53097 on human NET cell lines of heterogeneous origin. While having only minor effects on human pancreatic and bronchus carcinoid cells (BON1 and NCI-H727), BIM-23A758 induced significant antitumor effects in human midgut carcinoid cells (GOT1). These effects involved apoptosis induction as well as inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt signaling. Consistent with their antitumor response to BIM-23A758, GOT1 cells showed relatively high expression levels of SSTR2 and D2R mRNA. In particular, GOT1 cells highly express the short transcript variant of D2R. In contrast to BIM-23A758, the SSTR2/D2R chimeric compound BIM-23A760 as well as the individual SSTR2 and D2R agonistic compounds BIM-23023 and BIM-53097 induced no or only minor antitumor responses in the examined NET cell lines. Taken together, our findings suggest that the novel SSTR2/D2R chimeric compound BIM-23A758 might be a promising substance for the treatment of NETs highly expressing SSTR2 and D2R. In particular, a sufficient expression of the short transcript variant of DR2 might play a pivotal role for effective treatment.

  19. ADULT EDUCATION OF MIGRANT ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEAL, CATHERINE; AND OTHERS

    UNITS ON MIGRANT ADULT EDUCATION, AND A UNIT ON ORGANIZING INFORMAL GROUPS OF MIGRANT WOMEN TO DISCUSS MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING THEIR TEMPORARY HOMES, ARE PRESENTED. THE GOALS OF THE UNIT ON EDUCATION FOR MIGRANT MEN ARE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE, BETTER HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND BETTER HANDLING OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THE MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE…

  20. Diversity of aminopeptidases, derived from four lepidopteran gene duplications, and polycalins expressed in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera: Identification of proteins binding the δ-endotoxin, Cry1Ac of Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Angelucci, Constanza; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Hunt, Donald F.; Akhurst, Raymond J.; East, Peter D.; Gordon, Karl H.J.; Campbell, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicoverpa armigera midgut proteins that bind the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin Cry1Ac were purified by affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE showed that several proteins were eluted with N-acetylgalactosamine and no further proteins were detected after elution with urea. Tandem mass spectral data for tryptic peptides initially indicated that the proteins resembled aminopeptidases (APNs) from other lepidopterans and cDNA sequences for seven APNs were isolated from H. armigera through a combination of cloning with primers derived from predicted peptide sequences and established EST libraries. Phylogenetic analysis showed lepidopteran APN genes in nine clades of which five were part of a lepidopteran-specific radiation. The Cry1Ac-binding proteins were then identified with four of the seven HaAPN genes. Three of those four APNs are likely orthologs of APNs characterised as Cry1Ac-binding proteins in other lepidopterans. The fourth Cry1Ac-binding APN has orthologs not previously identified as Cry1Ac-binding partners. The HaAPN genes were expressed predominantly in the midgut through larval development. Each showed consistent expression along the length of the midgut but five of the genes were expressed at levels about two orders of magnitude greater than the remaining two. The remaining mass spectral data identified sequences encoding polycalin proteins with multiple lipocalin-like domains. A polycalin has only been previously reported in another lepidopteran, Bombyx mori, but polycalins in both species are now linked with binding of Bt Cry toxins. This is the first report of hybrid, lipocalin-like domains in shorter polycalin sequences that are not present in the longest sequence. We propose that these hybrid domains are generated by alternative splicing of the mRNA. PMID:18549954

  1. Impacts on silkworm larvae midgut proteomics by transgenic Trichoderma strain and analysis of glutathione S-transferase sigma 2 gene essential for anti-stress response of silkworm larvae.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingying; Dou, Kai; Gao, Shigang; Sun, Jianan; Wang, Meng; Fu, Kehe; Yu, Chuanjin; Wu, Qiong; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2015-08-03

    Lepidoptera is a large order of insects that have major impacts on humans as agriculture pests. The midgut is considered an important target for insect control. In the present study, 10 up-regulated, 18 down-regulated, and one newly emerged protein were identified in the transgenic Trichoderma-treated midgut proteome. Proteins related to stress response, biosynthetic process, and metabolism process were further characterized through quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Of all the identified proteins, the glutathione S-transferase sigma 2 (GSTs2) gene displayed enhanced expression when larvae were fed with Trichoderma wild-type or transgenic strains. Down regulation of GSTs2 expression by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in inhibition of silkworm growth when larvae were fed with mulberry leaves treated with the transgenic Trichoderma strain. Weight per larva decreased by 18.2%, 11.9%, and 10.7% in the untreated control, ddH2O, and GFP dsRNA groups, respectively, at 24h, while the weight decrease was higher at 42.4%, 28.8% and 32.4% at 72 h after treatment. Expression of glutathione S-transferase omega 2 (GSTo2) was also enhanced when larvae were fed with mulberry leaves treated with the transgenic Trichoderma strain. These results indicated that there was indeed correlation between enhanced expression of GSTs2 and the anti-stress response of silkworm larvae against Trichoderma. This study represents the first attempt at understanding the effects of transgenic organisms on the midgut proteomic changes in silkworm larvae. Our findings could not only broaden the biological control targets of insect at the molecular level, but also provide a theoretical foundation for biological safety evaluation of the transgenic Trichoderma strain.

  2. Panic Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ...

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  4. Composition of Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae microbiota from larval to adult stages.

    PubMed

    Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Tchioffo, Majoline T; Abate, Luc; Boissière, Anne; Awono-Ambéné, Parfait H; Nsango, Sandrine E; Christen, Richard; Morlais, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    During their immature life stages, malaria mosquitoes are exposed to a wide array of microbes and contaminants from the aquatic habitats. Although prior studies have suggested that environmental exposure shapes the microbial community structure in the adult mosquito, most reports have focused on laboratory-based experiments and on a single mosquito epithelium, the gut. In this study, we investigated the influence of the breeding site on the development of the Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae microbiota in natural conditions. We characterized bacterial communities from aquatic habitats, at surface microlayer and subsurface water levels, to freshly emerge adult mosquitoes using multiplexed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and we separately analyzed the microbiota associated with the different epithelia of adult individual, midguts, ovaries and salivary glands. We found that the distribution of bacterial communities in the aquatic habitats differed according to the depth of water collections. Inter-individual variation of bacterial composition was large in larvae guts but adult mosquitoes from a same breeding site shared quite similar microbiota. Although some differences in bacterial abundances were highlighted between the different epithelia of freshly emerged An. coluzzii and An. gambiae, an intriguing feature from our study is the particular similarity of the overall bacterial communities. Our results call for further investigations on the bacterial population dynamics in the different tissues to determine the distinctive characteristics of each microbiota during the mosquito lifespan and to identify specific interactions between certain key phyla or species and the insect life history traits.

  5. Adult Development and Learning of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This summary of adult development covers a wide range of authors. Adult development is one way of understanding how the internal and external changes in our lives have an impact on learning. Of particular importance in this work are the developmental issues of older adults. I present various theories of adult development such as linear and…

  6. Characterization of a beta-glycosidase highly active on disaccharides and of a beta-galactosidase from Tenebrio molitor midgut lumen.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Alexandre H P; Terra, Walter R; Ferreira, Clélia

    2003-02-01

    The midgut of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae has four beta-glycosidases. The properties of two of these enzymes (betaGly1 and betaGly2) have been described elsewhere. In this paper, the characterization of the other two glycosidases (betaGly3 and betaGly4) is described. BetaGly3 has one active site, hydrolyzes disaccharides, cellodextrins, synthetic substrates and beta-glucosides produced by plants. The enzyme is inhibited by amygdalin, cellotriose, cellotetraose and cellopentaose in high concentrations, probably due to transglycosylation. betaGly3 hydrolyzes beta 1,4-glycosidic linkages with a catalytic rate independent of the substrate polymerization degree (k(int)) of 11.9 s(-1). Its active site is formed by four subsites, where subsites +1 and -1 bind glucose residues with higher affinity than subsite +2. The main role of betaGly3 seems to be disaccharide hydrolysis. BetaGly4 is a beta-galactosidase, since it has highest activity against beta-galactosides. It can also hydrolyze fucosides, but not glucosides, and has Triton X-100 as a non-essential activator (K(a)=15 microM, pH 4.5). betaGly4 has two active sites that can hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl beta-galactoside (NPbetaGal). The one hydrolyzing NPbetaGal with more efficiency is also active against methylumbellipheryl beta-D-galactoside and lactose. The other active site hydrolyzes NPbetaFucoside and binds NPbetaGal weakly. BetaGly4 hydrolyzes hydrophobic substrates with high catalytical efficiency and is able to bind octyl-beta-thiogalactoside in its active site with high affinity. The betaGly4 physiological role is supposed to be the hydrolysis of galactolipids that are found in membranes from vegetal tissues. As the enzyme has a hydrophobic site where Triton X-100 can bind, it might be activated by membrane lipids, thus becoming fully active only at the surface of cell membranes.

  7. Neonatal intestinal volvulus and preduodenal portal vein associated with situs ambiguus: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Nakano, Miwako; Yamazawa, Kazuki; Maeyama, Katsuhiro; Endo, Masao

    2011-05-01

    Situs ambiguus is a rare lateralization anomaly that is frequently associated with other malformations, including preduodenal portal vein (PDPV), intestinal malrotation, and cardiovascular anomalies. This is a case report on a newborn that was clinically diagnosed with situs ambiguus and midgut volvulus. During surgery the patient was found to have intestinal malrotation, Meckel's diverticulum, and PDPV that was not a direct cause of duodenal obstruction. The patient was treated with Ladd's procedure and resection of Meckel's diverticulum. It is important to be familiar with the spectrum of situs anomalies to prevent trauma to the portal vein with serious complications during surgery.

  8. 16S rRNA Gene-Based Identification of Midgut Bacteria from Field-Caught Anopheles gambiae Sensu Lato and A. funestus Mosquitoes Reveals New Species Related to Known Insect Symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Lindh, Jenny M.; Terenius, Olle; Faye, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Field-collected mosquitoes of the two main malaria vectors in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu lato and Anopheles funestus, were screened for their midgut bacterial contents. The midgut from each blood-fed mosquito was screened with two different detection pathways, one culture independent and one culture dependent. Bacterial species determination was achieved by sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. Altogether, 16 species from 14 genera were identified, 8 by each method. Interestingly, several of the bacteria identified are related to bacteria known to be symbionts in other insects. One isolate, Nocardia corynebacterioides, is a relative of the symbiont found in the vector for Chagas' disease that has been proven useful as a paratransgenic bacterium. Another isolate is a novel species within the γ-proteobacteria that could not be phylogenetically placed within any of the known orders in the class but is close to a group of insect symbionts. Bacteria representing three intracellular genera were identified, among them the first identifications of Anaplasma species from mosquitoes and a new mosquito-Spiroplasma association. The isolates will be further investigated for their suitability for a paratransgenic Anopheles mosquito. PMID:16269761

  9. 16S rRNA gene-based identification of midgut bacteria from field-caught Anopheles gambiae sensu lato and A. funestus mosquitoes reveals new species related to known insect symbionts.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Jenny M; Terenius, Olle; Faye, Ingrid

    2005-11-01

    Field-collected mosquitoes of the two main malaria vectors in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu lato and Anopheles funestus, were screened for their midgut bacterial contents. The midgut from each blood-fed mosquito was screened with two different detection pathways, one culture independent and one culture dependent. Bacterial species determination was achieved by sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. Altogether, 16 species from 14 genera were identified, 8 by each method. Interestingly, several of the bacteria identified are related to bacteria known to be symbionts in other insects. One isolate, Nocardia corynebacterioides, is a relative of the symbiont found in the vector for Chagas' disease that has been proven useful as a paratransgenic bacterium. Another isolate is a novel species within the gamma-proteobacteria that could not be phylogenetically placed within any of the known orders in the class but is close to a group of insect symbionts. Bacteria representing three intracellular genera were identified, among them the first identifications of Anaplasma species from mosquitoes and a new mosquito-Spiroplasma association. The isolates will be further investigated for their suitability for a paratransgenic Anopheles mosquito.

  10. [Endoscopic treatment of intestinal malrotation in newborns and infants].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Yu A; Novozhilov, V A; Rasputin, A A; Us, G P; Kuznetsova, N N; Pakel'chuk, A

    Введение. Мы сообщаем результаты сравнения лечения мальротации кишечника у новорожденных и младенцев с использованием лапароскопии и лапаротомии. Материал и методы. В период между январем 2004 г. и декабрем 2013 г. было выполнено 34 операции Ледда. В исследовании сообщаются данные детей, которые подвергнуты лапароскопической (17 пациентов — 1-я группа) и стандартной (17 больных — 2-я группа) операции. Результаты. Группы имели одинаковые демографические и другие предоперационные параметры. Были обнаружены значимые различия в длительности операции между лапароскопическими и открытыми операциями (61 мин против 70 мин). Пациенты начинали раньше питание после миниинвазивного способа лечения (1,5 сут против 3 сут) и имели меньшее время перехода на полное энтеральное питание (4,2 сут против 6,9 сут). Продолжительность пребывания в стационаре была меньше в 1-й группе (7,7 сут против 10,2). Количество ранних послеоперационных осложнений не отличалось в группах. Число поздних осложнений было больше в группе лапаротомии, однако различия не были достоверны. Заключение. Исследование демонстрирует, что эндохирургическая коррекция врожденных аномалий вращения кишечника дает лучшие послеоперационные результаты, чем открытая хирургия, и может быть широко использована у маленьких детей.

  11. Malrotated Subhepatic Caecum with Subhepatic Appendicitis: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hock Chin; Balakrishnan, Dhayal; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Adila, Irene Nur Ibrahim; Syibrah, Khuzaimah Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Subhepatically located caecum and appendix is a very rare entity. It occurs due to the anomaly in fetal gut rotation that results in an incomplete rotation and fixation of the intestine. Appendicitis, which is a common surgical emergency, in combination with the abnormal subhepatic location, presents a great challenge in its diagnosis and management. Here, we describe a 42-year-old male with chronic dyspepsia who presented with sepsis and severe pain at his right hypochondriac and epigastric region. The final diagnosis was acute appendicitis of the subhepatic appendix. Our discussion focuses on the diagnostic approach and clinical and surgical management. We hope that our report will increase the awareness among the clinicians and hasten the management of such rare condition to avoid complications. PMID:27648337

  12. Intrapartum sonographic signs: new diagnostic tools in malposition and malrotation.

    PubMed

    Malvasi, Antonio; Giacci, Francesco; Gustapane, Sarah; Sparic, Radmila; Barbera, Antonio; Tinelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In the past years, numerous studies have been published on the use of ultrasound during labor, showing this is an effective, accurate and objective tool for the assessment of the fetal head position and station. Literature affirmed that traditional transvaginal digital examination is highly subjective and dependent on the operator's experience. On the contrary, the use of intrapartum suprapubic transabdominal ultrasound can improve accuracy in determination of fetal head position and the precise knowledge of the location of specific fetal head landmarks in relationship to maternal pelvis. Intrapartum ultrasound will assist obstetricians in the diagnosis of normal labor progression, suggesting when medical and or operative intervention should be taken in case of complications. During each fetal head movement, there is a very specific relationship between fetal head landmarks and well-identified maternal structures, so the ultrasound diagnosis is performed step by step. In this review, we summarized the clinical situation of the fetal head in the pelvis and the relative ultrasonographic signs. Moreover, we collected all the ultrasonographic measures to diagnose the fetal head progression and rotations in the birth canal.

  13. Preparing Educators of Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Stanley M.; And Others

    Model programs are described for two areas of adult education--the preparation of adult educators and the training conducted by adult educators. In Chapter One, Phyllis Caldwell reviews the literature concerning the preservice training of adult educators, concentrating on the competencies of adult education administrators and teachers. In Chapter…

  14. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  15. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  16. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Adult Day Care Adult Day Care Centers are designed to provide care and ... adults who need assistance or supervision during the day. Programs offer relief to family members and caregivers, ...

  17. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  18. Effects of Midgut-Protein-Preparative and Ligand Binding Procedures on the Toxin Binding Characteristics of BT-R1, a Common High-Affinity Receptor in Manduca sexta for Cry1A Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Keeton, Timothy P.; Francis, Brian R.; Maaty, Walid S. A.; Bulla, Lee A.

    1998-01-01

    The identity of the physiologically important Cry1A receptor protein(s) in the lepidopteran Manduca sexta has been a matter of dispute due to the multiple proteins which bind the Cry1Ac toxin. Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac exhibit essentially identical toxicities toward M. sexta larvae and show a high degree of sequence and presumed structural identities. These similarities make it likely that there is a common mechanism of toxicity in these lepidopteran-specific toxins in terms of both mode of action and the receptor proteins through which these toxins exert their lepidopteran-specific toxicity. Investigators in our laboratory previously demonstrated that the cloned 210-kDa glycoprotein BT-R1 binds all three Cry1A toxins (T. P. Keeton and L. A. Bulla, Jr., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:3419–3425, 1997). This protein remains a common binding protein even after being subjected to various midgut membrane preparation and processing protocols. The method used to isolate proteins from the M. sexta larval midgut in no significant way affects the results of ligand binding and vacuum blotting experiments, and we have been unable to detect specific, high-affinity binding of any Cry1A toxin to Cry1Ac binding proteins other than BT-R1. Alterations in blot substrate and blocking, hybridization, and washing buffers support these conclusions. Collectively, these results indicate that in M. sexta the cadherin-like BT-R1 protein is a common high-affinity receptor protein for the Cry1A family of toxins. PMID:9603829

  19. Field-Evolved Mode 1 Resistance of the Fall Armyworm to Transgenic Cry1Fa-Expressing Corn Associated with Reduced Cry1Fa Toxin Binding and Midgut Alkaline Phosphatase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jakka, Siva R. K.; Gong, Liang; Hasler, James; Banerjee, Rahul; Sheets, Joel J.; Narva, Kenneth; Blanco, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal protein genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are expressed by transgenic Bt crops (Bt crops) for effective and environmentally safe pest control. The development of resistance to these insecticidal proteins is considered the most serious threat to the sustainability of Bt crops. Resistance in fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) populations from Puerto Rico to transgenic corn producing the Cry1Fa insecticidal protein resulted, for the first time in the United States, in practical resistance, and Bt corn was withdrawn from the local market. In this study, we used a field-collected Cry1Fa corn-resistant strain (456) of S. frugiperda to identify the mechanism responsible for field-evolved resistance. Binding assays detected reduced Cry1Fa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Ca toxin binding to midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from the larvae of strain 456 compared to that from the larvae of a susceptible (Ben) strain. This binding phenotype is descriptive of the mode 1 type of resistance to Bt toxins. A comparison of the transcript levels for putative Cry1 toxin receptor genes identified a significant downregulation (>90%) of a membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP), which translated to reduced ALP protein levels and a 75% reduction in ALP activity in BBMV from 456 compared to that of Ben larvae. We cloned and heterologously expressed this ALP from susceptible S. frugiperda larvae and demonstrated that it specifically binds with Cry1Fa toxin. This study provides a thorough mechanistic description of field-evolved resistance to a transgenic Bt crop and supports an association between resistance and reduced Cry1Fa toxin binding and levels of a putative Cry1Fa toxin receptor, ALP, in the midguts of S. frugiperda larvae. PMID:26637593

  20. Adult Recruitment Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Juliet, Ed.; And Others

    Findings of an American College Testing Program 1981 survey on college recruitment of adult students are summarized, and 12 articles on adult recruitment are presented. Titles and authors are as follows: "Adult Recruitment Practices: A Report of a National Survey" (Patricia Spratt, Juliet Kaufmann, Lee Noel); "Three Programs for Adults in Shopping…

  1. Host suitability and diet mixing influence activities of detoxification enzymes in adult Japanese beetles.

    PubMed

    Adesanya, Adekunle; Liu, Nannan; Held, David W

    2016-05-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450, glutathione S transferase (GST), and carboxylesterase (CoE) activity was measured in guts of the scarab Popillia japonica Newman, after consumption of single or mixed plant diets of previously ranked preferred (rose, Virginia creeper, crape myrtle and sassafras) or non-preferred hosts (boxelder, riverbirch and red oak). The goal of this study was to quantify activities of P450, GST and CoE enzymes in the midgut of adult P. japonica using multiple substrates in response to host plant suitability (preferred host vs non-preferred hosts), and single and mixed diets. Non-preferred hosts were only sparingly fed upon, and as a group induced higher activities of P450, GST and CoE than did preferred hosts. However, enzyme activities for some individual plant species were similar across categories of host suitability. Similarly, beetles tended to have greater enzyme activities after feeding on a mixture of plants compared to a single plant type, but mixing per se does not seem as important as the species represented in the mix. Induction of detoxification enzymes on non-preferred hosts, or when switching between hosts, may explain, in part, the perceived feeding preferences of this polyphagous insect. The potential consequences of induced enzyme activities on the ecology of adult Japanese beetles are discussed.

  2. Negligible uptake and transfer of diet-derived pollen microRNAs in adult honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Maryam; Everett, Claire P.; Chan, Stephen Y.; Snow, Jonathan W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The putative transfer and gene regulatory activities of diet-derived miRNAs in ingesting animals are still debated. Importantly, no study to date has fully examined the role of dietary uptake of miRNA in the honey bee, a critical pollinator in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. After controlled pollen feeding experiments in adult honey bees, we observed that midguts demonstrated robust increases in plant miRNAs after pollen ingestion. However, we found no evidence of biologically relevant delivery of these molecules to proximal or distal tissues of recipient honey bees. Our results, therefore, support the premise that pollen miRNAs ingested as part of a typical diet are not robustly transferred across barrier epithelia of adult honey bees under normal conditions. Key future questions include whether other small RNA species in honey bee diets behave similarly and whether more specialized and specific delivery mechanisms exist for more efficient transport, particularly in the context of stressed barrier epithelia. PMID:26680555

  3. Clueless? Adult Mysteries with Young Adult Appeal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John; Morrison, Joanna

    1997-01-01

    Presents a list of adult mystery titles for young adult readers. Includes first titles in a series (for reading in order); new and lesser-known mystery authors' works are the focus. Annotations include plot summary. The rest of each annotation is for professional use (includes date and name of award bestowed). (AEF)

  4. Young Adult Literature for Young Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Sam D.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that young adult literature can play a significant role in the emotional and mental health of an adolescent as well as help young males become more literate. Offers a 19-item annotated list of young adult novels with male protagonists, sorted by themes: nature and adventure stories, sports stories, genre stories, historical stories, and…

  5. Depression in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred; Onedera, Jill D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address selected aspects of depression in older adults. Specifically, symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, and interventions for depression in older adults are reviewed.

  6. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  7. Adult Education Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Clyde W.

    1975-01-01

    Summarized are speeches dealing with adult education's stiff-necked adherence to middle-class values; the need for upgraded management skills; and a report of a study of adult education in area vocational schools in Georgia. (Author/AJ)

  8. Unconventional abdominal uses of FIESTA (CISS) sequence.

    PubMed

    Sen, Anitha

    2013-10-01

    The ability to provide cross-sectional imaging, combined with a lack of ionizing radiation has made magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of abdomen popular. We report four interesting cases: Midgut malrotation with volvulus, sigmoid volvulus, biliary rupture of hydatid cyst, and small bowel lipomatosis, where fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition [FIESTA]/constructive interference into steady state [CISS] sequence helped in clinching the diagnosis.

  9. Adult Education in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Harry; And Others

    Folk high schools, study circles, labor market training, union education, and municipal adult schools are the major providers of adult education in Sweden. For the most part, these programs are financed by the government and are tuition free. Folk high schools, which are the oldest type, were founded to provide young adults with a general civic…

  10. The Adult Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Janet

    The 14 chapters of this textbook chronicle adult development from youth through old age, emphasizing both research and interviews with adults at various stages in their lives. Topics covered include the following: (1) the academic field of adult development; (2) theories and research methods; (3) aging and disease prevention; (4) sexuality and…

  11. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  12. Kids Who Outwit Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.; Brendtro, Larry K.

    Kids who distrust adults are highly skilled at hiding their real nature and resisting change. Most adults shun such youths or get mired in conflict with them. Punitive get tough practices as well as traditional flaw-fixing treatment are reactive strategies that often drive these youths further from adult bonds and reinforce oppositional and…

  13. Urbanization and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, W. Fisher

    1974-01-01

    The impact of urbanization, the main tasks facing the adult educator in an urban context, identifying the casualties of urbanization, recognizing and dealing with social deprivation, and the various agencies involved in adult education are relevant considerations for adult educators. (MW)

  14. Dimensions of Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This broad introduction to adult and postcompulsory education offers an overview of the field for students, adult educators and workplace trainers. The book establishes an analytical framework to emphasize the nature of learning and agency of learners; examines the core knowledge and skills that adult educators need; discusses policy, research and…

  15. Adult Learning: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Peter, Ed.

    This book on adult learning is divided into six sections. Section 1, Cognitive Processes, includes the following chapters: "Cognitive Processes: Contemporary Paradigms of Learning" (Jack Mezirow); "Information Processing, Memory, Age and Adult Learning" (Gillian Boulton-Lewis); "Adult Learners' Metacognitive Behaviour in Higher Education" (Barry…

  16. Adult Education in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmayer, Paul, Ed.; And Others

    This volume contains 13 articles that reflect the development of adult education in Israel during recent years. The material relates to the principal areas with which the Division of Adult Education deals: formal and nonformal education for adults, language and cultural absorption of new immigrants, and training of facilitators for parental…

  17. Adults Role in Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Charles E.; Padgett, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Do adults play a role in bullying? Do parents, teachers, school staff, and community adult leaders influence bullying behavior in children and teenagers? This article will focus on research regarding all adults who have almost daily contact with children and teens and their part in how bullying is identified, addressed, and prevented. This article…

  18. Adult Education in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkos, Alexios

    2008-01-01

    The central aim of this article is to analyse the current situation of adult education in Greece. The article focuses on the following points: (a) the degree of participation in programmes of continuing professional training and general adult education courses, (b) the quality and the outcomes of the adult education provision in Greece, and (c)…

  19. Adult Competency Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of abstracts of 120 current Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) federally supported projects being conducted in 34 States and the District of Columbia, this project profile was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are currently…

  20. Adult Competency Education Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of brief descriptions of 20 current resources for Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) programs, this guide was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are already involved with APL/ACE programs. Each citation contains information…

  1. Adult Academy Volunteer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cora, Marie T., Ed.; Wood, Nicole R., Ed.

    This handbook was written specifically for volunteer tutors but is appropriate for teachers, student interns, coordinators, and others working with Adult Basic Education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) adult learners. It presents an overview of adult and non-traditional education models, some principles of reading and writing, a…

  2. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional…

  3. Young Adult Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boegen, Anne, Ed.

    Designed to offer guidelines, ideas and help to those who provide library service to young adults, this manual includes information about the provision of young adult (YA) services in six sections. The first section, which addresses planning and administration, includes a definition of a young adult and a checklist for determining community needs…

  4. Adult Educators' Core Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned…

  5. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  6. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ...

  7. Effect of Bombyx mori chitinase against Japanese pine sawyer (Monochamus alternatus) adults as a biopesticide.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Khondkar Ehteshamul; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Tado, Hiroyuki; Endo, Katsuhiko; Yamanaka, Akira; Tanaka, Shuhei; Koga, Daizo

    2006-01-01

    Bombyx mori chitinase (Bm-CHI), with a molecular mass of 75 kDa, was investigated on the possibility that it can serve as a biocontrol agent against the adult Japanese pine sawyer (JPS), Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Oral ingestion of purified chitinase at concentrations of 3 microM (11.25 microg/50 microl) and 0.3 micoM (1.125 microg/50 microl) caused high mortality in JPS, a significant decrease in bark consumption, and, only in high concentration, a slight reduction of body weight. Fluorescence assays indicated that peritrophic membrane (PM) chitin is degraded by the action of orally ingested Bm-CHI at 3 microM concentration only. Scanning electron micrographs clearly indicated that the beetles that ingested Bm-CHI of the same high concentration had their PM perforated and disrupted, but ultrastructural studies showed that the ingested chitinase did not affect the midgut epithelium. These findings open up the possibility of using insect chitinase as a biopesticidal enzyme. It should have agronomic potential for insect control.

  8. A phase I trial of the HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir in adults with solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Gideon M.; Gills, Joell J.; Ballas, Marc S.; Bernstein, Wendy B.; Komiya, Takefumi; Dechowdhury, Roopa; Morrow, Betsy; Root, Hyejeong; Chun, Guinevere; Helsabeck, Cynthia; Steinberg, Seth M.; LoPiccolo, Jaclyn; Kawabata, Shigeru; Gardner, Erin R.; Figg, William D.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Nelfinavir is an HIV protease inhibitor being repurposed as an anti-cancer agent in preclinical models and in small oncology trials, yet the MTD of nelfinavir has not been determined. Therefore, we conducted a Phase Ia study to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose limiting toxicities (DLT) of nelfinavir in subjects with advanced solid tumors. Adults with refractory cancers were given oral nelfinavir twice daily with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses. Twenty-eight subjects were enrolled. Nelfinavir was generally well tolerated. Common adverse events included diarrhea, anemia, and lymphopenia, which were mostly mild. The DLT was rapid-onset neutropenia that was reversible. The MTD was established at 3125 mg twice daily. In an expansion cohort at the MTD, one of 11 (9%) evaluable subjects had a confirmed partial response. This, plus two minor responses, occurred in subjects with neuroendocrine tumors of the midgut or pancreatic origin. Thirty-six percent of subjects had stable disease for more than 6 months. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Nelfinavir inhibited AKT and induced markers of ER stress. In summary, nelfinavir is well tolerated in cancer patients at doses 2.5 times the FDA-approved dose for HIV management and showed preliminary activity in tumors of neuroendocrine origin. PMID:25327558

  9. Adult Education Regional Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For more than one hundred and fifty years, until 2008, California was an undisputed national leader in its commitment to adult education. The state's investment in adult learners topped $750 million, a sum greater than the combined total of every other state in the nation. However, for the past several years recession and fiscal crisis have left…

  10. Young Adult Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Bookmark, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Eight articles in this Spring 1985 issue of The Bookmark focus on young adult library services. In addition to these thematic articles, an introduction and three reports are presented. The issue contains: (1) "In Perspective" (E. J. Josey); (2) "Young Adult Literature in the 1980's--Awesome!" (Ellin Chu); (3) "Young Adult…

  11. Toward Transpersonal Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2016-01-01

    As a foundation for discussing transpersonal adult development, the author traces her trajectory, involvement in, and contribution to the modern transpersonal movement and her introduction of it to the adult learning literature, beginning during the early 1980s. Highlighted are the transpersonal domain and a differentiation between transpersonal…

  12. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  13. Adult Tech Prep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaad, Donna

    For over 2 years, Blak Hawk College (Illinois) has provided high school equivalency (GED) candidates and recipients, older returning students, and underprepared high school graduates with a Tech Prep curriculum to give them the skills to make the transition from adult basic education to college or work. The Adult Tech Prep (ATP) core curriculum…

  14. Authenticity in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the relationship between authenticity and adult learning and prompted by some studies in which adult "authentic learning" is a central concept. The implication revealed by them is that real-worldness of learning contexts, learning content and learning tasks is perceived as conferring authenticity on learning. Here,…

  15. Adult Learning and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenson, Kjell, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As individuals and societies try to respond to fundamental economic and social transformation, the field of adult learning and education is rapidly getting increased attention and new topics for research on adult learning have emerged. This collection of articles from the International Encyclopedia of Education 3e offers practitioners and…

  16. Today's Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Who are the adult students in career and technical education (CTE) today? There is not one simple answer to that question. Some are young with little life experience, while others are returning to the workforce and learning new skills to reinvent themselves. Whatever the case, educating adult students is an integral part of ACTE's mission, and the…

  17. Adult Literacy in Zanzibar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saadat, Ahmed H.

    The philosophy behind adult literacy in Zanzibar is that adult literacy is a process whereby the illiterate is empowered to become aware of his or her potential. Literacy activities emphasize a relation to work, sometimes known as functional literacy. Specific objectives of literacy programs are to improve living conditions, impart self-reliant…

  18. Adult Vocational Trajectory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riverin-Simard, Danielle

    1990-01-01

    Proposes a "spatial-temporal" model conceiving adult vocational development as a complex and constant readjustment in always changing perception of personal space-time, based on interviews of 786 adults. Presents two propositions of this model: the continuous alternation between states of instability and interaction of influences.…

  19. Counseling Adult Adoptees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This review presents various resources about working with adult adoptees in order to inform counselors in their practice. Topics covered include basics of adoption, including types of adoption and adoption statistics; possible issues adult adoptees may face; and suggestions and implications for counselors. The article addresses some of the serious…

  20. Alternative Programming for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Thomas A.; Frey, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning is currently cataloguing alternative programming features that are most effective with adult students in a best practices inventory organized around a framework of high-level descriptive principles of effectiveness. This chapter identifies a few interesting features from a quick survey of this…

  1. Adult Education and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinzen, Heribert, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document contains 19 papers on adult education and development worldwide. The following papers are included: "Editorial" (Heribert Hinzen); "Lifelong Learning in Europe: Moving towards EFA (Dakar Framework for Action on Education for All) Goals and the CONFINTEA V Agenda" (Sofia Conference on Adult Education);…

  2. Adult Education in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, Radu

    2006-01-01

    Ever since the first ideas of national independence appeared in Finland, adult education has played an essential role in shaping the destiny of the Finns. With a history of almost 130 years, during which it has continuously increased in quality and quantity, the Finnish adult education system has ensured that Finland stays among the most…

  3. Financing of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, David

    2007-01-01

    The 2008 EFA Global Monitoring Report recognises adult literacy as the most neglected of the EFA goals. It is neglected most obviously in respect of the financial allocations made by governments and donors. This shortage of financing creates a dangerous situation in which adult educators seek to convince politicians to invest, based on false…

  4. Gender Dysphoria in Adults.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J; Lawrence, Anne A; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-01-01

    Gender dysphoria (GD), a term that denotes persistent discomfort with one's biologic sex or assigned gender, replaced the diagnosis of gender identity disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 2013. Subtypes of GD in adults, defined by sexual orientation and age of onset, have been described; these display different developmental trajectories and prognoses. Prevalence studies conclude that fewer than 1 in 10,000 adult natal males and 1 in 30,000 adult natal females experience GD, but such estimates vary widely. GD in adults is associated with an elevated prevalence of comorbid psychopathology, especially mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and suicidality. Causal mechanisms in GD are incompletely understood, but genetic, neurodevelopmental, and psychosocial factors probably all contribute. Treatment of GD in adults, although largely standardized, is likely to evolve in response to the increasing diversity of persons seeking treatment, demands for greater client autonomy, and improved understanding of the benefits and limitations of current treatment modalities.

  5. Shared midgut binding sites for Cry1A.105, Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1Fa proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis in two important corn pests, Ostrinia nubilalis and Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Hernández-Martínez, Patricia; Van Rie, Jeroen; Escriche, Baltasar; Ferré, Juan

    2013-01-01

    First generation of insect-protected transgenic corn (Bt-corn) was based on the expression of Cry1Ab or Cry1Fa proteins. Currently, the trend is the combination of two or more genes expressing proteins that bind to different targets. In addition to broadening the spectrum of action, this strategy helps to delay the evolution of resistance in exposed insect populations. One of such examples is the combination of Cry1A.105 with Cry1Fa and Cry2Ab to control O. nubilalis and S. frugiperda. Cry1A.105 is a chimeric protein with domains I and II and the C-terminal half of the protein from Cry1Ac, and domain III almost identical to Cry1Fa. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the chimeric Cry1A.105 has shared binding sites either with Cry1A proteins, with Cry1Fa, or with both, in O. nubilalis and in S. frugiperda. Brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from last instar larval midguts were used in competition binding assays with (125)I-labeled Cry1A.105, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Fa, and unlabeled Cry1A.105, Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Fa, Cry2Ab and Cry2Ae. The results showed that Cry1A.105, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1Fa competed with high affinity for the same binding sites in both insect species. However, Cry2Ab and Cry2Ae did not compete for the binding sites of Cry1 proteins. Therefore, according to our results, the development of cross-resistance among Cry1Ab/Ac, Cry1A.105, and Cry1Fa proteins is possible in these two insect species if the alteration of shared binding sites occurs. Conversely, cross-resistance between these proteins and Cry2A proteins is very unlikely in such case.

  6. Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults but can have serious consequences. Over half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support. PMID:19327033

  7. Mosquito, adult (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This illustration shows an adult southern house mosquito. This mosquito feeds on blood and is the carrier of many diseases, such as encephalitis, West Nile, dengue fever, yellow fever, and others. ( ...

  8. Older Adults and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA ... are here Home » Alcohol & Your Health » Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders » Older Adults In this Section Underage ...

  9. Speech impairment (adult)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003204.htm Speech impairment (adult) To use the sharing features on ... 2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  10. Motivation and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, J.

    1974-01-01

    The paper examines the role of adult education and the contribution it can make to the solution of current problems in developing countries, particularly the problems of economic under-development and over-population. (Author/AG)

  11. Motivation and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, J. Rodney

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews theories of human motivation: Lewin's force field analysis, Skinner's operant reinforcement theory, and Maslow's hierarchy of needs. He then extracts the implications of these theories for adult learning. SK)

  12. Older Adults and Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... find more information? Reprints Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... depression need treatment to feel better. Types of Depression There are several types of depression. The most ...

  13. Young Adult Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Connie C.

    1987-01-01

    Considers the similarities between science fiction writing and young adult literature, and points out that several well-known authors, such as Robert Heinlein and Jane Yolen, write in both genres. (NKA)

  14. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  15. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  16. [Orthodontic treatment for adults].

    PubMed

    Kuitert, R B

    2000-04-01

    The number of adults undergoing orthodontic treatment has increased strongly and the average age that adult patients undergo orthodontic treatment increased steadily although 3/4 is still younger than 27 years. In adults the facial skeletal pattern can only be changed in a very confined way, consequently in case of an abnormal skeletal pattern one has to choose between a combined orthodontic-surgical approach (which is the case in 18% of the patients) and a compromised orthodontic treatment, if necessary combined with other disciplines. It is still controversial whether tooth movement in adults is slower and more difficult than in adolescents. The same holds true for the risk for loss of periodontal support, for root resorption, for gnathologic problems and for relapse. As related to these variables there appears to be a large individual variation. Many adults show one or more problems in their dentition that may influence their orthodontic treatment. About 60% of the adult patients need a multidisciplinary approach. The development of implantology and of bone regeneration and bone grafting has lead to more combined treatments. The risks of such complex treatment plans are generally larger than those for more simple kinds of treatment. A very careful treatment planning and good communication between the different specialists is essential. Moreover the treatment plan with all its (dis)advantages has to be extensively discussed with the patient.

  17. The State of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Ted

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author looks at the state of adult education in Ireland. He is suggesting that the state here means both the condition in which one now finds adult education and the role of the Irish State in adult education. He briefly outlines some recent developments in adult education, makes some critical comments on the state of adult…

  18. The ABC's of Adult Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roehrig, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy, it is estimated that 93 million adults in the United States have basic or below basic literacy skills. Those individuals found most lacking in literacy skills were adults living in poverty, adults lacking a high school diploma, seniors and the elderly aged 65 and older, the more than one…

  19. Designing an Adult Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Margaret

    Intended for planners of adult education curriculums, this literature review explains the concepts involved in designing an adult education program, provides information about the roles of the people involved in the adult education process, cites some program planning models, and applies the program planning principles to an Adult Basic Education…

  20. The Adult Learner: Four Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Topics concerning the adult learner that are relevant to institutional researchers are addressed in four articles: marketing, predicting success for adult students, enrollment projection, and follow-up studies of adult learners. In "Institutional Research in Support of Marketing the Adult Student," Lydia Jurand notes the importance of…

  1. Rich Environments for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentham, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Unaware of the messages a bare adult learning environment sends and its effect on adult learners, a trainer attends an intensive Reggio Emilia course and learns that the physical environment is the "third teacher"--for adults as well as for children. Using principles of Reggio, she offers suggestions for enhancing adult learning spaces and…

  2. Adult-onset Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Amrinder Jit

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset atopic dermatitis is still an under recognized condition as there are only few studies regarding this entity. As compared to childhood onset atopic dermatitis, clinical features of adult onset atopic dermatitis are still not categorized. Adult atopic dermatitis can present for the first time in adult age with atypical morphology or may progress from childhood onset. This article reviews the characteristic clinical features of adult atopic dermatitis, associated risk factors and management. PMID:27904186

  3. Impact of the Stem Extract of Thevetia neriifolia on the Feeding Potential and Histological Architecture of the Midgut Epithelial Tissue of Early Fourth Instars of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Monika; Gupta, Kamal Kumar; Kumar, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Helicoverpa armigera Hübner is one of the most important agricultural crop pests in the world causing heavy crop yield losses. The continued and indiscriminate use of synthetic insecticides in agriculture for their control has received wide public apprehension because of multifarious problems, including insecticide resistance, resurgence of pest species, environmental pollution, and toxic hazards to humans and nontarget organisms. These problems have necessitated the need to explore and develop alternative strategies using eco-friendly and biodegradable plant products. In view of this, the efficacy of Thevetia neriifolia methanol stem extract was evaluated against the early fourth instars of H. armigera as an antifeedant and stomach poison agent. Feeding of larvae with the diet containing 0.005%–5.0% extract resulted in 2.06%–37.35% antifeedant index; the diet with 5.0% extract caused 54.3% reduced consumption. The negative impact of extract on larval feeding resulted in 37.5%–77.7% starvation, causing adverse effects on the larval weight. Choice between control and experimental diet resulted in feeding preference of larvae for the control diet, leading to 7.3%–42.9% reduced consumption of extract-containing diet. The only exception was the diet with 0.005% extract, which could not cause any deterrence. The midgut histological architecture of H. armigera larvae fed with 0.005%–0.05% extract-containing diet with negligible antifeedant potential showed significant damage, shrinkage, and distortion and vacuolization of gut tissues and peritrophic membrane, causing the disintegration of epithelial, goblet, and regenerative cells; the damage increased with the increase in concentration. These changes in the gut caused negative impact on the digestion and absorption of food and thus nutritional deficiency in the larvae, which could probably affect their growth and development. This study reveal the appreciable stomach poison potential of T. neriifolia stem

  4. Shared Midgut Binding Sites for Cry1A.105, Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1Fa Proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis in Two Important Corn Pests, Ostrinia nubilalis and Spodoptera frugiperda

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Hernández-Martínez, Patricia; Van Rie, Jeroen; Escriche, Baltasar; Ferré, Juan

    2013-01-01

    First generation of insect-protected transgenic corn (Bt-corn) was based on the expression of Cry1Ab or Cry1Fa proteins. Currently, the trend is the combination of two or more genes expressing proteins that bind to different targets. In addition to broadening the spectrum of action, this strategy helps to delay the evolution of resistance in exposed insect populations. One of such examples is the combination of Cry1A.105 with Cry1Fa and Cry2Ab to control O. nubilalis and S. frugiperda. Cry1A.105 is a chimeric protein with domains I and II and the C-terminal half of the protein from Cry1Ac, and domain III almost identical to Cry1Fa. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the chimeric Cry1A.105 has shared binding sites either with Cry1A proteins, with Cry1Fa, or with both, in O. nubilalis and in S. frugiperda. Brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from last instar larval midguts were used in competition binding assays with 125I-labeled Cry1A.105, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Fa, and unlabeled Cry1A.105, Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Fa, Cry2Ab and Cry2Ae. The results showed that Cry1A.105, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1Fa competed with high affinity for the same binding sites in both insect species. However, Cry2Ab and Cry2Ae did not compete for the binding sites of Cry1 proteins. Therefore, according to our results, the development of cross-resistance among Cry1Ab/Ac, Cry1A.105, and Cry1Fa proteins is possible in these two insect species if the alteration of shared binding sites occurs. Conversely, cross-resistance between these proteins and Cry2A proteins is very unlikely in such case. PMID:23861865

  5. Adult onset retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  6. Adult Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic-recurrent inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects adults; however, a more transient infantile form also occurs. The definitive cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown. However, proliferation of Malassezia species has been described as a contributing factor. The adult form of seborrheic dermatitis affects up to approximately five percent of the general population. The disorder commonly affects the scalp, face, and periauricular region, with the central chest, axillae, and genital region also involved in some cases. Pruritus is not always present and is relatively common, especially with scalp disease. A variety of treatments are available including topical corticosteroids, topical antifungal agents, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and more recently, a nonsteroidal “device ”cream. This article reviews the practical topical management of seborrheic dermatitis in the United States, focusing on the adult population. PMID:21607192

  7. Electroporation of adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Madhusudhana; Rambabu, K Murali; Rao, S Harinarayana

    2008-01-01

    We generated transient transgenic zebrafish by applying electrical pulses subsequent to injection of DNA into muscle tissue of 3-6-month old adult zebrafish. Electroporation parameters, such as number of pulses, voltage, and amount of plasmid DNA, were optimized and found that 6 pulses of 40 V/cm at 15 mug/fish increased the luciferase expression by 10-fold compared with those in controls. By measuring the expression of luciferase, in vivo by electroporation in adult zebrafish and in vitro using fish cell line (Xiphophorus xiphidium A2 cells), the strength of three promoters (CMV, human EF-1alpha, and Xenopus EF-1alpha) was compared. Subsequent to electroporation after injecting DNA in the mid region of zebrafish, expression of green fluorescent protein was found far away from the site of injection in the head and the tail sections. Thus, electroporation in adult zebrafish provides a rapid way of testing the behavior of gene sequences in the whole organism.

  8. Back pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stumbo, Jessica R

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a summary of the many causes of back pain in adults. There is an overview of the history and physical examination with attention paid to red flags that alert the clinician to more worrisome causes of low back pain. An extensive differential diagnosis for back pain in adults is provided along with key historical and physical examination findings. The various therapeutic options are summarized with an emphasis on evidence-based findings. These reviewed treatments include medication, physical therapy, topical treatments, injections, and complementary and alternative medicine. The indications for surgery and specialty referral are also discussed.

  9. [Adult oligosymptomatic coeliac disease].

    PubMed

    Cabral Rodríguez, R; Arrieta Blanco, F J; Vicente Sánchez, F; Cordobés Martín, F J; Moreno Caballero, B

    2004-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic pathology of the small intestine. The pathogenic mechanism is caused by gluten intolerance. This disease present a characteristic and unspecific injury that causes nutrients and vitamins malabsorption. In adults is an underdiagnosed entity due to atypical forms. To make a premature diagnosis is basic because gluten-free diet prevent the complications after long-term like the intestinal T lymphoma and other digestives malignancies, and decrease the mortality of these patients. We present a case of adult oligosymptomatic coeliac disease in a patient with iron deficiency anaemia and vaginal bleeding. We study the clinic-nutrition and the alterations evolution of the patient.

  10. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Wang, Zhenghan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the major compartment boundaries of the adult intestine, has essential functions. Wg pathway activation in the intestinal epithelium is required not only to specify cell fate near compartment boundaries during development, but also to control ISC proliferation within compartments during homeostasis. Further, in contrast with the previous focus on Wg pathway activation within ISCs, we demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which Wg signaling regulates ISC proliferation during homeostasis is non-autonomous. Activation of the Wg pathway in absorptive enterocytes is required to suppress JAK-STAT signaling in neighboring ISCs, and thereby their proliferation. We conclude that Wg signaling gradients have essential roles during homeostasis and development of the adult intestine, non-autonomously controlling stem cell proliferation inside compartments, and autonomously specifying cell fate near compartment boundaries. PMID:26845150

  11. The Drosophila Prosecretory Transcription Factor dimmed Is Dynamically Regulated in Adult Enteroendocrine Cells and Protects Against Gram-Negative Infection.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Katherine; Park, Dongkook; Taghert, Paul H; Micchelli, Craig A

    2015-05-20

    The endocrine system employs peptide hormone signals to translate environmental changes into physiological responses. The diffuse endocrine system embedded in the gastrointestinal barrier epithelium is one of the largest and most diverse endocrine tissues. Furthermore, it is the only endocrine tissue in direct physical contact with the microbial environment of the gut lumen. However, it remains unclear how this sensory epithelium responds to specific pathogenic challenges in a dynamic and regulated manner. We demonstrate that the enteroendocrine cells of the adult Drosophila melanogaster midgut display a transient, sensitive, and systemic induction of the prosecretory factor dimmed (dimm) in response to the Gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila (Pe). In enteroendocrine cells, dimm controls the levels of the targets Phm, dcat-4, and the peptide hormone, Allatostatin A. Finally, we identify dimm as a host factor that protects against Pe infection and controls the expression of antimicrobial peptides. We propose that dimm provides "gain" in enteroendocrine output during the adaptive response to episodic pathogen exposure.

  12. Adult Learning Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adults Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Campaigning Alliance for Lifelong Learning is to lobby parliament for the restoration of the 1.5 million adult learning places lost over the past two years. The campaign has attracted supporters from an astonishingly wide range of backgrounds. In this article, Gordon Marsden, Caroline Biggins, Beth Walker, Mike Chaney, Peter Davies, Sian…

  13. Facilitation of Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  14. Hearing Loss in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses hearing loss in adults. It begins with an explanation of the anatomy of the ear and then explains the three types of hearing loss: conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss. Tinnitus, hearing aids, and cochlear implants are also addressed. (CR)

  15. Older Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Jeffrey

    In an effort to improve the quality of life for area senior citizens, De Anza College has established an older adult education program which combines adaptive physical education with holistic health care principles to instruct students in relaxation, nutrition, and physical activity. Classes are held in convalescent hospitals, retirement homes,…

  16. Adult Education in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerio da Educacao e Cultura, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

    The status and goals of adult education programs in Brazil are discussed in this report. Supplemental systems such as the Brazilian Literacy Movement (Mobral) and their results are described and evaluated. Charts detailing the evolution of literacy are shown and priorities in education are suggested. The progress of other educational entities is…

  17. Adult Basic Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet, aimed at adult basic education students, pinpoints and summarizes a few common spelling rules to help make spelling easier, and includes a component on using the dictionary. In the text, each rule is presented with many examples. Exercises follow each spelling rule, allowing students the opportunity to apply the rule to specific…

  18. Police and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Vic

    The literature on adult education for police is reviewed and criticized. Among the publications that have been influential in debating the need for police education are Charles B. Saunder's "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society" (1976), which endorses the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement's recommendations regarding the vital…

  19. Dance for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Diane Milhan, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Dance programs for older adults that encourage exercise and socializing are described in six articles. Program guidelines of the American Alliance Committee on Aging are explained, and other articles emphasize a movement education approach that may involve intergenerational contact. A dance program held in a worship setting is also discussed. (PP)

  20. Migration and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gois, William

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to highlight the role of adult education as a tool in addressing labour migration issues, specifically those concerning the protection of migrant workers' rights and the transformation of the impact of migration into positive holistic developmental gains. The view of labour migration as a means to forge the economic…

  1. How Do Adults Learn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Alan; Illeris, Knud

    2003-01-01

    This dialog between Alan Rogers and Knud Illeris debates arguments Rogers made in a previous article about the differences between adult and child learning. Rogers emphasizes differences in teacher-learner relationships. Illeris believes the differences result from different motivations for learning. (SK)

  2. Encyclopedia of Adult Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert, Ed.

    This encyclopedia contains 106 articles on adult development that were written by more than 75 specialists in such diverse fields as anthropology, communication, education, health sciences, history, and psychology. In a guide to related topics that is presented at the beginning of the encyclopedia, the 106 articles are grouped under the following…

  3. Sinusitis in adults - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000563.htm Sinusitis in adults - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your sinuses are chambers in ... They are filled with air. Sinusitis is an infection of these chambers, which causes ...

  4. Helping Adults to Spell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorhouse, Catherine

    This book presents a range of strategies for adult literacy tutors and offers a wealth of practical advice on teaching spelling within the context of writing. Chapters 1-3 offer basic information on talking with the student about spelling, finding out how the student spells and helping the student to see himself/herself as a "good" speller, and…

  5. Immigration and Adult Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumbaut, Ruben G.; Komaie, Golnaz

    2010-01-01

    Almost 30 percent of the more than 68 million young adults aged eighteen to thirty-four in the United States today are either foreign born or of foreign parentage. As these newcomers make their transitions to adulthood, say Ruben Rumbaut and Golnaz Komaie, they differ significantly not only from one another but also from their native-parentage…

  6. Profiles of Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Library, Springfield.

    Since January 1986, when the Illinois Secretary of State Literacy Grant Program began funding a wide variety of adult literacy programs, more than 30,000 students have sought help with reading. They have been matched with 25,000 tutors who have provided more than 2 million hours of volunteer instruction. The profiles in this booklet are stories of…

  7. Adult Literacy Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C., Ed.; Draper, James A., Ed.

    This book, intended to serve as a professional reference work, proposes to define the field of Adult Basic Education in its evolution, its contribution to professional education, and the principal problems and issues. The volume contains the following treatises: "Definitions and Evolution of the Concepts" (Thomas); "Selected…

  8. Depression - older adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... slowly than in younger adults. To better manage depression at home: Exercise regularly, if the provider says it is OK. Surround yourself with caring, positive people and do fun activities. ... signs of depression, and know how to react if these occur. ...

  9. TRENDS IN ADULT READING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MILLER, JUSTIN H.

    TRENDS EVIDENT IN ADULT READING DURING THE 1960'S IN THE AREAS OF ADMINISTRATION, PROGRAMS, TEACHING, TECHNIQUES, RESEARCH PROJECTS, AND METHODS OF PROMOTION OF READING PROGRAMS ARE DISCUSSED. TWO INSTANCES OF COMMERCIAL EXPLOITATION BASED ON INTENSE AND OFTEN FALLACIOUS ADVERTISING AND ON PUBLIC IGNORANCE ARE CITED. A POSITIVE TREND IN THE AREA…

  10. Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults Related Topics on AIDS.gov Aging with HIV/AIDS National HIV/AIDS ... an Emerging Challenge Last revised: 07/10/2015 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  11. Utah Adult Education Services. Adult Education Report 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Major purposes for the preparation of this report on public school adult education in Utah were: to provide the public with a description of achievements, trends, and needs, and with meaningful cost accounting information; to make comparisons and analyses of adult education by program, school district, and year; and to provide the adult education…

  12. What is Young Adult Literature? (Young Adult Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Chris, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines some of the many confusions about young adult literature. Sheds some light on what young adult literature is (defining it as all genres of literature published since 1967 that are written for and marketed to young adults). Discusses briefly how it can be used in schools. Offers a list of the author's 20 favorite books for teenagers. (SR)

  13. Teaching Nontraditional Adult Students: Adult Learning Theories in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    As the USA experiences rapid growth of nontraditional adult students in higher education, educators and institutions will increasingly need to look beyond the traditional youth-centric educational models to better address adult learning needs. To date, no research has been conducted examining the learning experiences of adult students enrolled in…

  14. Metastatic Midgut Carcinoid in the Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Lois, Konstantinos B; Skinner, Jane; Petrides, George; James, Robert Andrew; Perros, Petros

    2015-09-01

    Metastasis of neuroendocrine tumor to the myocardium is rare. We present a case of 64-year-old woman, who presented initially with abdominal pain and large adnexal mass. The image-guided biopsy showed low-grade neuroendocrine tumor with Ki67 less than 2% within the ovarian tissue. CT staging revealed bilateral adnexal masses, liver metastases, and primary lesion in the terminal ileum. Octreoscan showed marked tracer uptake within the lower esophagus not related to obvious mass on CT scan; the echocardiography confirmed the presence of a 2.7 cm LV/LA mass. In this case, close correlation between ECHO and the octreoscan obviated need for myocardial biopsy.

  15. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  16. Adult Education for Social Mobilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echeverria, Luis

    1981-01-01

    Suggests some ideas that could stimulate and be incentives for defining programs of adult education in the future. These involve changing priorities, developing a framework which allows adult education programs to be established, and managing decision-making processes. (CT)

  17. College-Age & Young Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... Age & Young Adults College Addiction Studies Programs Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ...

  18. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  19. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  20. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccination Recommendations Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... critical for people with health conditions such as liver disease. If you have chronic liver disease, talk ...