Science.gov

Sample records for adult mixed glioma

  1. Genetics of adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Goodenberger, McKinsey L; Jenkins, Robert B

    2012-12-01

    Gliomas make up approximately 30% of all brain and central nervous system tumors and 80% of all malignant brain tumors. Despite the frequency of gliomas, the etiology of these tumors remains largely unknown. Diffuse gliomas, including astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, belong to a single pathologic class but have very different histologies and molecular etiologies. Recent genomic studies have identified separate molecular subtypes within the glioma classification that appear to correlate with biological etiology, prognosis, and response to therapy. The discovery of these subtypes suggests that molecular genetic tests are and will be useful, beyond classical histology, for the clinical classification of gliomas. While a familial susceptibility to glioma has been identified, only a small percentage of gliomas are thought to be due to single-gene hereditary cancer syndromes. Through the use of linkage studies and genome-wide association studies, multiple germline variants have been identified that are beginning to define the genetic susceptibility to glioma.

  2. Occupation and adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Carozza, S E; Wrensch, M; Miike, R; Newman, B; Olshan, A F; Savitz, D A; Yost, M; Lee, M

    2000-11-01

    Lifetime job histories from a population-based, case-control study of gliomas diagnosed among adults in the San Francisco Bay area between August 1991 and April 1994 were evaluated to assess occupational risk factors. Occupational data for 476 cases and 462 controls were analyzed, with adjustment for age, gender, education, and race. Imprecise increased risks were observed for physicians and surgeons (odds ratio (OR) = 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7, 17.6), artists (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.5, 6.5), foundry and smelter workers (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 13.1), petroleum and gas workers (OR = 4.9, 95% CI: 0.6, 42.2), and painters (OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 4.9). Legal and social service workers, shippers, janitors, motor vehicle operators, and aircraft operators had increased odds ratios only with longer duration of employment. Physicians and surgeons, foundry and smelter workers, petroleum and gas workers, and painters showed increased risk for both astrocytic and nonastrocytic tumors. Artists and firemen had increased risk for astrocytic tumors only, while messengers, textile workers, aircraft operators, and vehicle manufacturing workers showed increased risk only for nonastrocytic tumors. Despite study limitations, including small numbers for many of the occupational groups, a high percentage of proxy respondents among cases, and lack of specific exposure information, associations were observed for several occupations previously reported to be at higher risk for brain tumors generally and gliomas specifically.

  3. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  4. Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are called mixed gliomas. Tumors such as “optic nerve glioma” and “brain stem glioma” are named ... Oligodendroglioma: Click here to learn more about oligodendroglioma. Optic Glioma: These tumors may involve any part of ...

  5. Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Low Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Melanocytic Lesion; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  6. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma

  7. Plerixafor After Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High Grade Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglial Tumors; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET)

  8. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  9. Erlotinib and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  10. Understanding inherited genetic risk of adult glioma – a review

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Terri; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Francis, Stephen S.; Wiemels, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    During the past six years, researchers have made major progress identifying common inherited genetic variation that increases risk for primary adult glioma. This paper summarizes knowledge about rare familial cancer syndromes that include adult glioma and reviews the available literature on the more recently discovered common inherited variation. Ten independent inherited variants in eight chromosomal regions have been convincingly associated with increased risk for adult glioma. Most of these variants increase relative risk of primary adult glioma by 20% to 40%, but the TP53 variant rs78378222 confers a two-fold relative risk (ie, 200%), and rs557505857 on chromosome 8 confers a six-fold relative risk of IDH-mutated astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors (ie, 600%). Even with a six-fold relative risk, the overall risk of developing adult glioma is too low for screening for the high-risk variant on chromosome 8. Future studies will help clarify which inherited adult glioma risk variants are associated with subtypes defined by histology and/or acquired tumor mutations. This review also provides an information sheet for primary adult glioma patients and their families. PMID:26941959

  11. Understanding inherited genetic risk of adult glioma - a review.

    PubMed

    Rice, Terri; Lachance, Daniel H; Molinaro, Annette M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Walsh, Kyle M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Ostrom, Quinn T; Francis, Stephen S; Wiemels, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert B; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2016-03-01

    During the past six years, researchers have made major progress identifying common inherited genetic variation that increases risk for primary adult glioma. This paper summarizes knowledge about rare familial cancer syndromes that include adult glioma and reviews the available literature on the more recently discovered common inherited variation. Ten independent inherited variants in eight chromosomal regions have been convincingly associated with increased risk for adult glioma. Most of these variants increase relative risk of primary adult glioma by 20% to 40%, but the TP53 variant rs78378222 confers a two-fold relative risk (ie, 200%), and rs557505857 on chromosome 8 confers a six-fold relative risk of IDH-mutated astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors (ie, 600%). Even with a six-fold relative risk, the overall risk of developing adult glioma is too low for screening for the high-risk variant on chromosome 8. Future studies will help clarify which inherited adult glioma risk variants are associated with subtypes defined by histology and/or acquired tumor mutations. This review also provides an information sheet for primary adult glioma patients and their families.

  12. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive. PMID:20623001

  13. Molecular genetics of adult grade II gliomas: towards a comprehensive tumor classification system.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Bouvier, Corinne; de Paula, André Maues; Mokhtari, Karima; Colin, Carole; Loundou, Anderson; Chinot, Olivier; Metellus, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Adult grade II low-grade gliomas (LGG) are classified according to the WHO as astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas or mixed gliomas. TP53 mutations and 1p19q codeletion are the main molecular abnormalities recorded, respectively, in astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas and in mixed gliomas. Although IDH mutations (IDH1 or IDH2) are recorded in up to 85 % of low-grade gliomas, IDH negative gliomas do occur. We have searched for p53 expression, 1p19q codeletion and IDH status (immunohistochemical detection of the common R132H IDH1 mutation and IDH direct sequencing). Internexin alpha (INA) expression previously recorded to be associated with 1p19q codeletion (1p19q+) gliomas was also analysed. Low-grade gliomas were accurately classified into four groups: group 1, IDH+/p53-/1p19q-; group 2, IDH+/p53-/1p19q+; group 3, IDH+/p53+/1p19q-; and group 4, triple negative gliomas. In contrast to the WHO classification, this molecular classification predicts overall survival on uni- and multivariate analysis (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). Group 4 carries the worst prognosis and group 2 the best. Interestingly, p53 +/INA- expression predicts lack of 1p19q codeletion (specificity 100 %, VPP 100 %). The combined use of these three molecular markers allow for an accurate prediction of survival in LGG. These findings could significantly modify LGG classification and may represent a new tool to guide patient-tailored therapy. Moreover, immunohistochemical detection of p53, INA and mR132H IDH1 expression could represent an interesting prescreening test to be performed before 1p19q codeletion, IDH1 minor mutation and IDH2 mutation detection.

  14. MRI in treatment of adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Henson, John W; Gaviani, Paola; Gonzalez, R Gilberto

    2005-03-01

    Diffuse astrocytomas of the adult cerebral hemispheres are unique among tumours in human beings in the extent to which their imaging features are related to histopathological characteristics and clinical behaviour. However, understanding is still restricted about the value of imaging features in the measurement of response and of progression in these tumours. The present approach used in clinical trials, which consists of an anatomical measurement of the enhancing tumour on MRI, has many problems, and might not be acceptable as a surrogate endpoint for survival in patients with glioblastoma who are enrolled in clinical trials. Dynamic imaging techniques, such as capillary permeability mapping, are being used in studies of new drugs that target specific molecular features of gliomas; however, the validity of these techniques has not been elucidated. Diffusion imaging can be valuable for fibre-tract mapping to assist surgical planning and might become useful in measuring early response to treatment in densely cellular tumours. Functional imaging techniques can be used to localise motor, sensory, and language-control areas before surgery. Intraoperative MRI has produced improvements in the extent of tumour resection, and molecular imaging is another technique on the horizon, which could come to have a role in clinical trials in the near future. Thus, as a rapidly expanding sphere of investigation, brain-tumour imaging is producing great excitement. The aim of these new techniques is to aid the identification of more effective treatments.

  15. Telomere maintenance and the etiology of adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Wiencke, John K; Lachance, Daniel H; Wiemels, Joseph L; Molinaro, Annette M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2015-11-01

    A growing body of epidemiologic and tumor genomic research has identified an important role for telomere maintenance in glioma susceptibility, initiation, and prognosis. Telomere length has long been investigated in relation to cancer, but whether longer or shorter telomere length might be associated with glioma risk has remained elusive. Recent data address this question and are reviewed here. Common inherited variants near the telomerase-component genes TERC and TERT are associated both with longer telomere length and increased risk of glioma. Exome sequencing of glioma patients from families with multiple affected members has identified rare inherited mutations in POT1 (protection of telomeres protein 1) as high-penetrance glioma risk factors. These heritable POT1 mutations are also associated with increased telomere length in leukocytes. Tumor sequencing studies further indicate that acquired somatic mutations of TERT and ATRX are among the most frequent alterations found in adult gliomas. These mutations facilitate telomere lengthening, thus bypassing a critical mechanism of apoptosis. Although future research is needed, mounting evidence suggests that glioma is, at least in part, a disease of telomere dysregulation. Specifically, several inherited and acquired variants underlying gliomagenesis affect telomere pathways and are also associated with increased telomere length.

  16. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  17. Alisertib and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  18. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma or Recurrent or Progressive Meningioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-09

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  19. The H3.3 K27M mutation results in a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas than thalamic gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Hao, Shuyu; Pan, Changcun; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Yan, Hai; Zhang, Liwei; Wan, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Brainstem and thalamic gliomas are rare, and they are poorly understood in adults. Genetic aberrations that occur in these tumors are still unknown. In this study, we investigated whether thalamic gliomas have different genetic aberrations and clinical outcomes compared with brainstem gliomas in adults. Forty-three glioma samples were selected, including 28 brainstem and 15 thalamic gliomas. The frequency of the K27M mutation in adult midline gliomas was 58.1%. High-grade gliomas in the thalamus were statistically significantly more numerous than brainstem gliomas. Patients with K27M mutant brainstem gliomas had a significantly shorter overall survival than patients with wild-type tumors (P = .020) by Cox regression after adjustment for other independent risk factors. However, there was no statistical tendency toward a poorer overall survival in thalamic gliomas containing the K27M mutation compared with wild-type tumors. The presence of the K27M mutation significantly corresponded with mutations in TP53 in thalamic gliomas. Interestingly, the K27M mutation was mutually exclusive with mutations in IDH1, which was detected only in brainstem gliomas. The microarray data identified 86 differentially expressed genes between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with the K27M mutation. The cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) gene, which plays an important role in cancer pathways, was found to be differentially expressed between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with K27M mutations. Although the K27M mutation was frequently observed in adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, this mutation tended to be associated with a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas but not in thalamic gliomas. Brainstem gliomas may present different genetic aberrations from thalamic gliomas. These differences may provide guidance for therapeutic decisions for the treatment of adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, which may have different molecular targets.

  20. Bafetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma

  1. Fluorine F 18 Fluorodopa-Labeled PET Scan in Planning Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High- or Low-Grade Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  2. Gadobutrol Versus Gadopentetate Dimeglumine or Gadobenate Dimeglumine Before DCE-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Multiple Sclerosis, Grade II-IV Glioma, or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-22

    Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Multiple Sclerosis; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm

  3. Radiation combined with temozolomide contraindicated for young adults diagnosed with anaplastic glioma

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jinquan; You, Gan; Wang, Yinyan; Qiu, Xiaoguang; Li, Shouwei; Wu, Chenxing; Yao, Kun; Li, Wenbin; Peng, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Age is a major prognostic factor for malignant gliomas. However, few studies have investigated the management of gliomas in young adults. We determined the role of survival and treatment in young adults with advanced gliomas in a large population from the Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA). Methods This study included 726 adults (age ≥ 18) with histologically proven anaplastic glioma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The overall and progression-free survival was determined in young (age < 50) and older groups (age ≥ 50). Results The study included an older group (OP) of 264 patients and a younger group (YP) of 462patients. In the OP group with GBM and anaplastic glioma, patients treated with RT combined with temozolomide (TMZ) manifested significantly longer OS and PFS compared with patients assigned to RT alone (P < 0.05). In contrast, the YP group diagnosed with anaplastic glioma failed to show any survival advantage with RT plus TMZ compared with RT alone. Conclusions We observed no survival benefit in young adults (age < 50) with anaplastic glioma when treated with TMZ combined with RT. Our findings warrant further investigation of younger patients diagnosed with anaplastic glioma treated with radiotherapy plus TMZ chemotherapy. PMID:27590514

  4. RO4929097, Temozolomide, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

  5. P17.41CLINICAL MANAGEMENT AND OUTCOME OF HISTOLOGICALLY VERIFIED ADULT BRAINSTEM GLIOMAS IN SWITZERLAND: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF 21 PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hundsberger, T.; Tonder, M.; Andreas, H.; Brügge, D.; Roelcke, U.; Putora, P.M.; Stupp, R.; Weller, M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because of low incidence, mixed study populations and paucity of clinical and histological data, the management of adult brainstem gliomas remains non-standardized. We here describe characteristics, treatment and outcome of patients with exclusively histologically confirmed adult brainstem gliomas. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of adults (>age 18 years) was conducted. Brainstem glioma was defined as a glial tumor located in the midbrain, pons or medulla. Characteristics, management and outcome were analyzed. RESULTS: 21 patients (17 males; median age 41 years) were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012 by biopsy (n = 15), partial (n = 4) or complete resection (n = 2). Diagnoses were glioblastoma (WHO grade IV, n = 6), anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO grade III, n = 7), diffuse astrocytoma (WHO grade II, n = 6) and pilocytic astrocytoma (WHO grade I, n = 2). Diffuse gliomas were mainly located in the pons and frequently showed MRI contrast enhancement. Endophytic growth was common (16 versus 5). Postoperative therapy in low-grade (WHO grade I/II) and high-grade gliomas (WHO grade III/IV) consisted of radiotherapy alone (3 in each group), radiochemotherapy (2 versus 6), chemotherapy alone (0 versus 2) or no postoperative therapy (3 versus 1). Median PFS (24.1 versus 5.8 months; log-rank, p = 0.009) and mOS (30.5 versus 11.5 months; log-rank, p = 0.028) was significantly better in WHO grade II than in WHO grade III/IV tumors. Second-line therapy considerably varied. CONCLUSIONS: Histologically verification of adult brainstem glioma is feasible and has an impact on postoperative treatment. Low-grade gliomas can simple be followed or treated with radiotherapy alone. Radiochemotherapy with temozolomide can safely be prescribed for high-grade gliomas without additional CNS toxicities.

  6. Transformation of quiescent adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells into malignant glioma through a multistep reactivation process.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Rui Pedro; Kasina, Anita; McNeill, Robert S; Harbin, Jordan E; Foreman, Oded; Verhaak, Roel G W; Nishiyama, Akiko; Miller, C Ryan; Zong, Hui

    2014-10-07

    How malignant gliomas arise in a mature brain remains a mystery, hindering the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. We previously showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can be transformed into glioma when mutations are introduced perinatally. However, adult OPCs rarely proliferate compared with their perinatal counterparts. Whether these relatively quiescent cells have the potential to transform is unknown, which is a critical question considering the late onset of human glioma. Additionally, the premalignant events taking place between initial mutation and a fully developed tumor mass are particularly poorly understood in glioma. Here we used a temporally controllable Cre transgene to delete p53 and NF1 specifically in adult OPCs and demonstrated that these cells consistently give rise to malignant gliomas. To investigate the transforming process of quiescent adult OPCs, we then tracked these cells throughout the premalignant phase, which revealed a dynamic multistep transformation, starting with rapid but transient hyperproliferative reactivation, followed by a long period of dormancy, and then final malignant transformation. Using pharmacological approaches, we discovered that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is critical for both the initial OPC reactivation step and late-stage tumor cell proliferation and thus might be a potential target for both glioma prevention and treatment. In summary, our results firmly establish the transforming potential of adult OPCs and reveal an actionable multiphasic reactivation process that turns slowly dividing OPCs into malignant gliomas.

  7. The epidemiology of glioma in adults: a "state of the science" review.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Quinn T; Bauchet, Luc; Davis, Faith G; Deltour, Isabelle; Fisher, James L; Langer, Chelsea Eastman; Pekmezci, Melike; Schwartzbaum, Judith A; Turner, Michelle C; Walsh, Kyle M; Wrensch, Margaret R; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2014-07-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumor, representing 81% of malignant brain tumors. Although relatively rare, they cause significant mortality and morbidity. Glioblastoma, the most common glioma histology (∼45% of all gliomas), has a 5-year relative survival of ∼5%. A small portion of these tumors are caused by Mendelian disorders, including neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genomic analyses of glioma have also produced new evidence about risk and prognosis. Recently discovered biomarkers that indicate improved survival include O⁶-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation, isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation, and a glioma cytosine-phosphate-guanine island methylator phenotype. Genome-wide association studies have identified heritable risk alleles within 7 genes that are associated with increased risk of glioma. Many risk factors have been examined as potential contributors to glioma risk. Most significantly, these include an increase in risk by exposure to ionizing radiation and a decrease in risk by history of allergies or atopic disease(s). The potential influence of occupational exposures and cellular phones has also been examined, with inconclusive results. We provide a “state of the science” review of current research into causes and risk factors for gliomas in adults.

  8. Moving toward molecular classification of diffuse gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Theeler, Brett J; Yung, W K Alfred; Fuller, Gregory N; De Groot, John F

    2012-10-30

    Diffuse gliomas are a heterogenous group of neoplasms traditionally classified as grades II to IV based on histologic features, and with prognosis determined mainly by histologic grade and pretreatment clinical factors. Our understanding of the molecular basis of glioma initiation, tumor progression, and treatment failure is rapidly evolving. A molecular profile of diffuse gliomas is emerging. Studies evaluating gene expression and DNA methylation profile have found multiple glioma subtypes and an association between subtype and survival. The recent discovery of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) mutations in glioma has provided reproducible prognostic biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets. Glioblastomas that exhibit CpG island hypermethylator phenotype, proneural gene expression, or IDH1 mutation identify a subset of patients with markedly improved prognosis. Accumulated evidence supports the stratification of both low-grade and anaplastic diffuse gliomas into prognostic groups using 1p/19q codeletion and IDH mutation status. A classification scheme incorporating clinical, pathologic, and molecular information may facilitate improved prognostication for patients treated in the clinic, the development of more effective clinical trials, and rational testing of targeted therapeutics.

  9. Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Adult and Pediatric Gliomas: Toward Personalized Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Harry R.; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that both adult and pediatric glial tumor entities represent collections of neoplastic lesions, each with individual pathological molecular events and treatment responses. In this review, we discuss the current prognostic biomarkers validated for clinical use or with future clinical validity for gliomas. Accurate prognostication is crucial for managing patients as treatments may be associated with high morbidity and the benefits of high risk interventions must be judged by the treating clinicians. We also review biomarkers with predictive validity, which may become clinically relevant with the development of targeted therapies for adult and pediatric gliomas. PMID:24716189

  10. Longer genotypically-estimated leukocyte telomere length is associated with increased adult glioma risk

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kyle M.; Codd, Veryan; Rice, Terri; Nelson, Christopher P.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Hansen, Helen M.; Elhauge, Edward; Ojha, Juhi; Francis, Stephen S.; Madsen, Nils R.; Bracci, Paige M.; Pico, Alexander R.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2015-01-01

    Telomere maintenance has emerged as an important molecular feature with impacts on adult glioma susceptibility and prognosis. Whether longer or shorter leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with glioma risk remains elusive and is often confounded by the effects of age and patient treatment. We sought to determine if genotypically-estimated LTL is associated with glioma risk and if inherited single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with LTL are glioma risk factors. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we assessed differences in genotypically-estimated relative LTL in two independent glioma case-control datasets from the UCSF Adult Glioma Study (652 patients and 3735 controls) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (478 non-overlapping patients and 2559 controls). LTL estimates were based on a weighted linear combination of subject genotype at eight SNPs, previously associated with LTL in the ENGAGE Consortium Telomere Project. Mean estimated LTL was 31bp (5.7%) longer in glioma patients than controls in discovery analyses (P = 7.82×10-8) and 27bp (5.0%) longer in glioma patients than controls in replication analyses (1.48×10-3). Glioma risk increased monotonically with each increasing septile of LTL (O.R.=1.12; P = 3.83×10-12). Four LTL-associated SNPs were significantly associated with glioma risk in pooled analyses, including those in the telomerase component genes TERC (O.R.=1.14; 95% C.I.=1.03-1.28) and TERT (O.R.=1.39; 95% C.I.=1.27-1.52), and those in the CST complex genes OBFC1 (O.R.=1.18; 95% C.I.=1.05-1.33) and CTC1 (O.R.=1.14; 95% C.I.=1.02-1.28). Future work is needed to characterize the role of the CST complex in gliomagenesis and further elucidate the complex balance between ageing, telomere length, and molecular carcinogenesis. PMID:26646793

  11. Longer genotypically-estimated leukocyte telomere length is associated with increased adult glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Codd, Veryan; Rice, Terri; Nelson, Christopher P; Smirnov, Ivan V; McCoy, Lucie S; Hansen, Helen M; Elhauge, Edward; Ojha, Juhi; Francis, Stephen S; Madsen, Nils R; Bracci, Paige M; Pico, Alexander R; Molinaro, Annette M; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchel S; Chang, Susan M; Prados, Michael D; Jenkins, Robert B; Wiemels, Joseph L; Samani, Nilesh J; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2015-12-15

    Telomere maintenance has emerged as an important molecular feature with impacts on adult glioma susceptibility and prognosis. Whether longer or shorter leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with glioma risk remains elusive and is often confounded by the effects of age and patient treatment. We sought to determine if genotypically-estimated LTL is associated with glioma risk and if inherited single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with LTL are glioma risk factors. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we assessed differences in genotypically-estimated relative LTL in two independent glioma case-control datasets from the UCSF Adult Glioma Study (652 patients and 3735 controls) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (478 non-overlapping patients and 2559 controls). LTL estimates were based on a weighted linear combination of subject genotype at eight SNPs, previously associated with LTL in the ENGAGE Consortium Telomere Project. Mean estimated LTL was 31bp (5.7%) longer in glioma patients than controls in discovery analyses (P = 7.82x10-8) and 27bp (5.0%) longer in glioma patients than controls in replication analyses (1.48x10-3). Glioma risk increased monotonically with each increasing septile of LTL (O.R.=1.12; P = 3.83x10-12). Four LTL-associated SNPs were significantly associated with glioma risk in pooled analyses, including those in the telomerase component genes TERC (O.R.=1.14; 95% C.I.=1.03-1.28) and TERT (O.R.=1.39; 95% C.I.=1.27-1.52), and those in the CST complex genes OBFC1 (O.R.=1.18; 95% C.I.=1.05-1.33) and CTC1 (O.R.=1.14; 95% C.I.=1.02-1.28). Future work is needed to characterize the role of the CST complex in gliomagenesis and further elucidate the complex balance between ageing, telomere length, and molecular carcinogenesis.

  12. Occupation and adult gliomas in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Geetha; Felini, Martha; Carozza, Susan E; Miike, Rei; Chew, Terri; Wrensch, Margaret

    2003-06-01

    The etiology of gliomas is not well understood. Some jobs might involve sustained and elevated exposures to carcinogens. This study compares lifetime job histories of 879 glioma cases diagnosed between August 1991 to April 1994 and May 1997 to August 1999 in the San Francisco Bay Area and 864 controls. Logistic analyses compared longest and ever held occupations of 1 year or more for all astrocytic and nonastrocytic cases and controls overall with adjustment for age, gender, and ethnicity and separately for men and women. Two-fold or higher or statistically significant elevated odds ratios were found overall and in men among those with longest held occupations, as firefighters, physicians, material moving equipment operators, and janitors; such elevated odds ratios were also observed for longest-held occupations among male motor vehicle operators and personal service workers and female messengers, legal/social service workers, electronic equipment operators, painters, and food processors. Odds ratios of 0.50 or less, but not statistically significant, were found for those with longest held jobs as writers/journalists, biological scientists, paper workers, mechanics, chemists, and photographers/photoprocessors. This study supports previously observed occupational associations and is one of the few studies with sufficient numbers to separately analyze occupations by gender.

  13. Pseudoprogression in children, adolescents and young adults with non-brainstem high grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Carceller, Fernando; Fowkes, Lucy A; Khabra, Komel; Moreno, Lucas; Saran, Frank; Burford, Anna; Mackay, Alan; Jones, David T W; Hovestadt, Volker; Marshall, Lynley V; Vaidya, Sucheta; Mandeville, Henry; Jerome, Neil; Bridges, Leslie R; Laxton, Ross; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Pfister, Stefan M; Leach, Martin O; Pearson, Andrew D J; Jones, Chris; Koh, Dow-Mu; Zacharoulis, Stergios

    2016-08-01

    Pseudoprogression (PsP) is a treatment-related phenomenon which hinders response interpretation. Its prevalence and clinical impact have not been evaluated in children/adolescents. We assessed the characteristics, risk factors and prognosis of PsP in children/adolescents and young-adults diagnosed with non-brainstem high grade gliomas (HGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG). Patients aged 1-21 years diagnosed with HGG or DIPG between 1995 and 2012 who had completed radiotherapy were eligible. PsP was assessed according to study-specific criteria and correlated with first-line treatment, molecular biomarkers and survival. Ninety-one patients (47 HGG, 44 DIPG) were evaluable. Median age: 10 years (range, 2-20). Eleven episodes of PsP were observed in 10 patients (4 HGG, 6 DIPG). Rates of PsP: 8.5 % (HGG); 13.6 % (DIPG). Two episodes of PsP were based on clinical findings alone; nine episodes had concurrent radiological changes: increased size of lesions (n = 5), new focal enhancement (n = 4). Temozolomide, MGMT methylation or H3F3A mutations were not found to be associated with increased occurrence of PsP. For HGG, 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 41.9 % no-PsP versus 100 % PsP (p = 0.041); differences in 1-year overall survival (OS) were not significant. For DIPG, differences in 1-year PFS and OS were not statistically significant. Hazard ratio (95 %CI) of PsP for OS was 0.551 (0.168-1.803; p = 0.325) in HGG; and 0.308 (0.107-0.882; p = 0.028) in DIPG. PsP occurred in both pediatric HGG and DIPG patients at a comparable rate to adult HGG. PsP was associated with improved 1-yr PFS in HGG patients. PsP had a protective effect upon OS in DIPG patients.

  14. Co-expression modules of NF1, PTEN and sprouty enable distinction of adult diffuse gliomas according to pathway activities of receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yang; Wu, Chenxing; Yao, Kun; Zhang, Chuanbao; Jin, Qiang; Huang, Rong; Li, Jiuyi; Sun, Yingyu; Su, Xiaodong; Jiang, Tao; Fan, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Inter-individual variability causing elevated signaling of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) may have hampered the efficacy of targeted therapies. We developed a molecular signature for clustering adult diffuse gliomas based on the extent of RTK pathway activities. Glioma gene modules co-expressed with NF1 (NF1-M), Sprouty (SPRY-M) and PTEN (PTEN-M) were identified, their signatures enabled robust clustering of adult diffuse gliomas of WHO grades II-IV from five independent data sets into two subtypes with distinct activities of RAS-RAF-MEK-MAPK cascade and PI3K-AKT pathway (named RMPAhigh and RMPAlow subtypes) in a morphology-independent manner. The RMPAhigh gliomas were associated with poor prognosis compared to the RMPAlow gliomas. The RMPAhigh and RMPAlow glioma subtypes harbored unique sets of genomic alterations in the RTK signaling-related genes. The RMPAhigh gliomas were enriched in immature vessel cells and tumor associated macrophages, and both cell types expressed high levels of pro-angiogenic RTKs including MET, VEGFR1, KDR, EPHB4 and NRP1. In gliomas with major genomic lesions unrelated to RTK pathway, high RMPA signature was associated with short survival. Thus, the RMPA signatures capture RTK activities in both glioma cells and glioma microenvironment, and RTK signaling in the glioma microenvironment contributes to glioma progression. PMID:27385209

  15. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  16. Natural history and management of brainstem gliomas in adults. A retrospective Italian study.

    PubMed

    Salmaggi, A; Fariselli, L; Milanesi, I; Lamperti, E; Silvani, A; Bizzi, A; Maccagnano, E; Trevisan, E; Laguzzi, E; Rudà, R; Boiardi, A; Soffietti, R

    2008-02-01

    Brainstem gliomas in adults are rare tumors, with heterogeneous clinical course; only a few studies in the MRI era describe the features in consistent groups of patients. In this retrospective study, we report clinical features at onset, imaging characteristics and subsequent course in a group of 34 adult patients with either histologically proven or clinico-radiologically diagnosed brainstem gliomas followed at two centers in Northern Italy. Of the patients 18 were male, 14 female, with a median age of 31. In 21 of the patients histology was obtained and in 20 it was informative (2 pilocytic astrocytoma, 9 low-grade astrocytoma, 8 anaplastic astrocytoma and 1 glioblastoma). Contrast enhancement at MRI was present in 14 patients. In all of the 9 patients who were investigated with MR spectroscopy, the Cho/NAA ratio was elevated at diagnosis. In 8 of the patients, an initial watch and wait policy was adopted, while 24 were treated shortly after diagnosis with either radiotherapy alone [4] or radiotherapy and chemotherapy [20] (mostly temozolomide). Only minor radiological responses were observed after treatments; in a significant proportion of patients (9 out of 15) clinical improvement during therapy occurred in the context of radiologically (MRI) stable disease. Grade III or IV myelotoxicity was observed in 6 patients. After a follow-up ranging from 9 to 180 months, all but 2 patients have progressed and 14 have died (12 for disease progression, 2 for pulmonary embolism). Median overall survival time was of 59 months. Investigation of putative prognostically relevant parameters showed that a short time between disease onset and diagnosis was related to a shorter survival. Compared with literature data, our study confirms the clinical and radiological heterogeneity of adult brainstem gliomas and underscores the need for multicenter trials in order to assess the efficacy of treatments in these tumors.

  17. O8.04TEMOZOLOMIDE AFTER RADIOTHERAPY IN RECURRENT “LOW-GRADE” DIFFUSE BRAINSTEM GLIOMA IN ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, G.; Laigle-Donadey, F.; Mokhtari, K.; Martin-Duverneuil, N.; Delattre, J.Y.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Diffuse brainstem glioma is a rare disease in adults. Radiotherapy (RT) is frequently used as initial treatment. However, only limited data is available concerning chemotherapy efficacy at relapse after RT. Temozolomide (TMZ) is frequently used in progressive supratentorial gliomas after RT, but its efficacy in diffuse brainstem gliomas in adults has not been reported. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis including patients from our database with non-enhancing diffuse brainstem glioma (histological or MRI criteria compatible with low-grade glioma) who received TMZ at relapse after RT. Tumors localized in the pons, medulla oblongata or midbrain were analyzed excluding supratentorial or infratentorial tumors secondary infiltrating the brainstem. Clinical and radiological responses were assessed and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) time were estimated. RESULTS: In total, 15 adult patients (median age 34 years) were selected. Histological analysis was available in 5 cases showing grade II oligodendroglioma (2 cases), grade II oligoastrocytoma (2 cases), grade II astrocytoma (1 case). Ten patients were selected by MRI criteria only. All patients received RT as initial treatment obtaining a median PFS of 34.2 months (95% CI 24.1-44.2). Median KPS at the time of relapse after RT was 80. TMZ was administered orally at 150-200mg/m2 for 5 days every 28 days at progression disease after RT. Clinical improvement after TMZ was observed in 9 cases (60%) whereas radiological assessment detected 6 partial responses. Estimated median PFS after TMZ was 9.5 months (95% CI 7.9-11) and median OS was 14.4 months (95% CI 10.5-18.2). Grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 26% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: TMZ could be useful in adult patients with progressive diffuse low-grade brainstem glioma after RT failure. Further studies are warranted to detect clinical and biological markers of response to TMZ.

  18. BRAF V600E-mutated diffuse glioma in an adult patient: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuta; Takahashi-Fujigasaki, Junko; Akasaki, Yasuharu; Matsushima, Satoshi; Mori, Ryosuke; Karagiozov, Kostadin; Joki, Tatsuhiro; Ikeuchi, Satoshi; Ikegami, Masahiro; Manome, Yoshinobu; Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology and genome-wide analysis have identified key molecular alterations that are relevant to the diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumors. Molecular information such as mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes or 1p/19q co-deletion status will be more actively incorporated into the histological classification of diffuse gliomas. BRAF V600E mutations are found frequently in circumscribed low-grade gliomas such as pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) and extra-cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, or epithelioid glioblastomas (E-GBM), a rare variant of GBM. This mutation is relatively rare in other types of diffuse gliomas, especially in adult onset cases. Here, we present an adult onset case of IDH wild-type/BRAF V600E-mutated diffuse glioma, evolving from grade III to grade IV. The tumor displayed atypical exophytic growth and had unusual histological features not fully compatible with, but indicative of PXA and E-GBM. We discuss differential diagnosis of the tumor, and review previously described diffuse gliomas with the BRAF V600E mutation.

  19. KIAA1549-BRAF fusions and IDH mutations can coexist in diffuse gliomas of adults.

    PubMed

    Badiali, Manuela; Gleize, Vincent; Paris, Sophie; Moi, Loredana; Elhouadani, Selma; Arcella, Antonietta; Morace, Roberta; Antonelli, Manila; Buttarelli, Francesca Romana; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Kim, Young-Ho; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Mokhtari, Karima; Sanson, Marc; Giangaspero, Felice

    2012-11-01

    KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations are considered two mutually exclusive genetic events in pilocytic astrocytomas and diffuse gliomas, respectively. We investigated the presence of the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene in conjunction with IDH mutations and 1p/19q loss in 185 adult diffuse gliomas. Moreover BRAF(v600E) mutation was also screened. The KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene was evaluated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequencing. We found IDH mutations in 125 out 175 cases (71.4%). There were KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene in 17 out of 180 (9.4%) cases and BRAF(v600E) in 2 out of 133 (1.5%) cases. In 11 of these 17 cases, both IDH mutations and the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion were present, as independent molecular events. Moreover, 6 of 17 cases showed co-presence of 1p/19q loss, IDH mutations and KIAA1549-BRAF fusion. Among the 17 cases with KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene 15 (88.2%) were oligodendroglial neoplasms. Similarly, the two cases with BRAF(v600E) mutation were both oligodendroglioma and one had IDH mutations and 1p/19q co-deletion. Our results suggest that in a small fraction of diffuse gliomas, KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene and BRAF(v600E) mutation may be responsible for deregulation of the Ras-RAF-ERK signaling pathway. Such alterations are more frequent in oligodendroglial neoplasm and may be co-present with IDH mutations and 1p/19q loss.

  20. Intraarterial Infusion Of Erbitux and Bevacizumab For Relapsed/Refractory Intracranial Glioma In Patients Under 22

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Glioblastoma Multiforme; Fibrillary Astrocytoma of Brain; Glioma of Brainstem; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Mixed Oligodendroglioma-Astrocytoma; Brain Stem Glioma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

  1. Incidence of gliomas by anatomic location

    PubMed Central

    Larjavaara, Suvi; Mäntylä, Riitta; Salminen, Tiina; Haapasalo, Hannu; Raitanen, Jani; Jääskeläinen, Juha; Auvinen, Anssi

    2007-01-01

    The anatomic location of a glioma influences prognosis and treatment options. The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of gliomas in different anatomic areas of the brain. A representative population-based sample of 331 adults with glioma was used for preliminary analyses. The anatomic locations for 89 patients from a single center were analyzed in more detail from radiologic imaging and recorded on a three-dimensional 1 × 1 × 1– cm grid. The age-standardized incidence rate of gliomas was 4.7 per 100,000 person-years. The most frequent subtypes were glioblastoma (47%) and grade II–III astrocytoma (23%), followed by oligodendroglioma and mixed glioma. The gliomas were located in the frontal lobe in 40% of the cases, temporal in 29%, parietal in 14%, and occipital lobe in 3%, with 14% in the deeper structures. The difference in distribution between lobes remained after adjustment for their tissue volume: the tumor:volume ratio was 4.5 for frontal, 4.8 for temporal, and 2.3 for parietal relative to the occipital lobe. The area with the densest occurrence was the anterior subcortical brain. Statistically significant spatial clustering was found in the three-dimensional analysis. No differences in location were found among glioblastoma, diffuse astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma. Our results demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in the anatomic distribution of gliomas within the brain. PMID:17522333

  2. Adult infiltrating gliomas with WHO 2016 integrated diagnosis: additional prognostic roles of ATRX and TERT.

    PubMed

    Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Molinaro, Annette M; Walsh, Kyle M; Decker, Paul A; Hansen, Helen; Sicotte, Hugues; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; McCoy, Lucie S; Sarkar, Gobinda; Perry, Arie; Giannini, Caterina; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchel S; Wiemels, Joseph L; Bracci, Paige M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Lachance, Daniel H; Clarke, Jennifer; Taylor, Jennie W; Luks, Tracy; Wiencke, John K; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2017-03-02

    The "integrated diagnosis" for infiltrating gliomas in the 2016 revised World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system requires assessment of the tumor for IDH mutations and 1p/19q codeletion. Since TERT promoter mutations and ATRX alterations have been shown to be associated with prognosis, we analyzed whether these tumor markers provide additional prognostic information within each of the five WHO 2016 categories. We used data for 1206 patients from the UCSF Adult Glioma Study, the Mayo Clinic and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) with infiltrative glioma, grades II-IV for whom tumor status for IDH, 1p/19q codeletion, ATRX, and TERT had been determined. All cases were assigned to one of 5 groups following the WHO 2016 diagnostic criteria based on their morphologic features, and IDH and 1p/19q codeletion status. These groups are: (1) Oligodendroglioma, IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted; (2) Astrocytoma, IDH-mutant; (3) Glioblastoma, IDH-mutant; (4) Glioblastoma, IDH-wildtype; and (5) Astrocytoma, IDH-wildtype. Within each group, we used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations of overall survival with patient age at diagnosis, grade, and ATRX alteration status and/or TERT promoter mutation status. Among Group 1 IDH-mutant 1p/19q-codeleted oligodendrogliomas, the TERT-WT group had significantly worse overall survival than the TERT-MUT group (HR: 2.72, 95% CI 1.05-7.04, p = 0.04). In both Group 2, IDH-mutant astrocytomas and Group 3, IDH-mutant glioblastomas, neither TERT mutations nor ATRX alterations were significantly associated with survival. Among Group 4, IDH-wildtype glioblastomas, ATRX alterations were associated with favorable outcomes (HR: 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.81, p = 0.01). Among Group 5, IDH-wildtype astrocytomas, the TERT-WT group had significantly better overall survival than the TERT-MUT group (HR: 0.48, 95% CI 0.27-0.87), p = 0.02). Thus, we present evidence that in

  3. Involvement of the neural stem cell compartment by pediatric and adult gliomas: a retrospective review of 377 cases.

    PubMed

    Marsh, James C; Goldman, Stewart; Ziel, Ellis; Bregman, Corey; Diaz, Aidnag; Byrne, Richard; Fangusaro, Jason

    2015-03-01

    To assess frequency of neural stem cell compartment (NSC) involvement in adult and pediatric gliomas [World Health Organization (WHO) grades 1-4], and to assess whether NSC involvement at presentation impacts on survival, recurrence rates, and/or transformation from low grade (WHO grade 1-2) to high grade disease (WHO grades 3-4). Cranial MRIs for 154 pediatric and 223 adult glioma patients treated from 2000 to 2012 were reviewed. NSC involvement was documented. Tumors were stratified by age (adult vs. pediatric), histology, tumor grade, tumor location, and involvement of midline structures. Odds ratios (OR) for death were calculated based on NSC status at presentation. Rates of transformation and recurrence rates (ORR) were compared using Fisher's Exact Test. Time to recurrence (TTR) was calculated using student t test. Among recurrent and transformed tumors, we also assessed the rate of NSC involvement at time of recurrence or transformation. 74.8 % of tumors had NSC involvement. Higher rates of NSC involvement were seen among adult (p = .0001); high grade (p = .0001)); grade 2 versus grade 1 (p = .0001) and other grade 1 histologies (p = .0001) versus JPA (juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma) patients); grade 2-4 tumors (p = .0001); and supratentorial tumors (p < .0001). No transformation was noted among pediatric low grade tumors or adult grade 1 tumors. 22/119 (18.5 %) adult grade 2 tumors transformed. Rates of transformation were not impacted by NSC status (p = .47). ORR was 15.1 %, and was greater for NSC+ tumors at presentation (p = .05). 36/41 recurrences (87.8 %) involved NSC at time of recurrence. OR for death was 2.62 (1.16-5.9), p = .02 for NSC+ tumors at presentation. Adult and pediatric gliomas (all grades) frequently involve NSC at presentation, although rates are lower in pediatric JPA and all infratentorial tumors. NSC involvement at presentation increases OR death and reduces TTR for pediatric gliomas (all grades) and adult low grade gliomas, and

  4. 18F-FDOPA PET/CT or PET/MRI in Measuring Tumors in Patients With Newly-Diagnosed or Recurrent Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Protoplasmic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood

  5. Therapeutic Targeting of Histone Modifications in Adult and Pediatric High-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Maria J.; Singleton, Will G. B.; Lowis, Stephen P.; Malik, Karim; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2017-01-01

    Recent exciting work partly through The Cancer Genome Atlas has implicated epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications in the development of both pediatric and adult high-grade glioma (HGG). Histone lysine methylation has emerged as an important player in regulating gene expression and chromatin function. Lysine (K) 27 (K27) is a critical residue in all seven histone 3 variants and the subject of posttranslational histone modifications, as it can be both methylated and acetylated. In pediatric HGG, two critical single-point mutations occur in the H3F3A gene encoding the regulatory histone variant H3.3. These mutations occur at lysine (K) 27 (K27M) and glycine (G) 34 (G34R/V), both of which are involved with key regulatory posttranscriptional modifications. Therefore, these mutations effect gene expression, cell differentiation, and telomere maintenance. In recent years, alterations in histone acetylation have provided novel opportunities to explore new pharmacological targeting, with histone deacetylase (HDAC) overexpression reported in high-grade, late-stage proliferative tumors. HDAC inhibitors have shown promising therapeutic potential in many malignancies. This review focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms propagating pediatric and adult HGGs, as well as summarizing the current advances in clinical trials using HDAC inhibitors.

  6. Mixed Heritage in Young Adult Literature. Scarecrow Studies in Young Adult Literature #32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Nancy Thalia

    2009-01-01

    Mixed-heritage people are one of the fastest-growing groups in the United States, yet culturally they have been largely invisible, especially in young adult literature. "Mixed Heritage in Young Adult Literature" is a critical exploration of how mixed-heritage characters (those of mixed race, ethnicity, religion, and/or adoption) and real-life…

  7. Treatment of Adult Lower-Grade Glioma in the Era of Genomic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Susan M; Cahill, Daniel P; Aldape, Kenneth D; Mehta, Minesh P

    2016-01-01

    By convention, gliomas are histopathologically classified into four grades by the World Health Organization (WHO) legacy criteria, in which increasing grade is associated with worse prognosis and grades also are subtyped by presumed cell of origin. This classification has prognostic value but is limited by wide variability of outcome within each grade, so the classification is rapidly undergoing dramatic re-evaluation in the context of a superior understanding of the biologic heterogeneity and molecular make-up of these tumors, such that we now recognize that some low-grade gliomas behave almost like malignant glioblastoma, whereas other anaplastic gliomas have outcomes comparable to favorable low-grade gliomas. This clinical spectrum is partly accounted for by the dispersion of several molecular genetic alterations inherent to clinical tumor behavior. These molecular biomarkers have become important not only as prognostic factors but also, more critically, as predictive markers to drive therapeutic decision making. Some of these, in the near future, will likely also serve as potential therapeutic targets. In this article, we summarize the key molecular features of clinical significance for WHO grades II and III gliomas and underscore how the therapeutic landscape is changing.

  8. Mixed Glioma (Oligoastrocytoma) in the brain of an African Hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Benneter, S S; Summers, B A; Schulz-Schaeffer, W J; Härtig, W; Mollidor, J; Schöniger, S

    2014-11-01

    This report describes an oligoastrocytoma in the brain of a 3.5-year-old female pet African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) that showed progressive central nervous system signs for 6 months. Microscopical examination of the brain revealed a widely infiltrative, deep-seated glioma within the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres, basal nuclei, hippocampus, thalamus, midbrain, pons and the medulla of the cerebellum with extension of neoplastic cells into the cerebral cortex and overlying leptomeninges. Morphological features of the neoplastic cells, together with variable immunohistochemical expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, Olig-2 and Nogo-A, indicated the presence of intermingled astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumour cells with an astrocytic component of approximately 40% consistent with an oligoastrocytoma. The distribution of the tumour is consistent with gliomatosis cerebri.

  9. Dissecting DNA repair in adult high grade gliomas for patient stratification in the post-genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Christina; Agarwal, Devika; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M.A.; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Grundy, Richard; Auer, Dorothee T.; Walker, David; Lakhani, Ravi; Scott, Ian S.; Chan, Stephen; Ball, Graham; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of multiple DNA repair pathways may contribute to aggressive biology and therapy resistance in gliomas. We evaluated transcript levels of 157 genes involved in DNA repair in an adult glioblastoma Test set (n=191) and validated in ‘The Cancer Genome Atlas’ (TCGA) cohort (n=508). A DNA repair prognostic index model was generated. Artificial neural network analysis (ANN) was conducted to investigate global gene interactions. Protein expression by immunohistochemistry was conducted in 61 tumours. A fourteen DNA repair gene expression panel was associated with poor survival in Test and TCGA cohorts. A Cox multivariate model revealed APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN as independently associated with poor prognosis. A DNA repair prognostic index incorporating APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN stratified patients in to three prognostic sub-groups with worsening survival. APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN also have predictive significance in patients who received chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. ANN analysis of APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN revealed interactions with genes involved in transcription, hypoxia and metabolic regulation. At the protein level, low APE1 and low PTEN remain associated with poor prognosis. In conclusion, multiple DNA repair pathways operate to influence biology and clinical outcomes in adult high grade gliomas. PMID:25026297

  10. Pediatric and Adult High-Grade Glioma Stem Cell Culture Models Are Permissive to Lytic Infection with Parvovirus H-1

    PubMed Central

    Josupeit, Rafael; Bender, Sebastian; Kern, Sonja; Leuchs, Barbara; Hielscher, Thomas; Herold-Mende, Christel; Schlehofer, Jörg R.; Dinsart, Christiane; Witt, Olaf; Rommelaere, Jean; Lacroix, Jeannine

    2016-01-01

    Combining virus-induced cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic effects, oncolytic virotherapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for high-grade glioma (HGG). A clinical trial has recently provided evidence for the clinical safety of the oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) in adult glioblastoma relapse patients. The present study assesses the efficacy of H-1PV in eliminating HGG initiating cells. H-1PV was able to enter and to transduce all HGG neurosphere culture models (n = 6), including cultures derived from adult glioblastoma, pediatric glioblastoma, and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Cytotoxic effects induced by the virus have been observed in all HGG neurospheres at half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) doses of input virus between 1 and 10 plaque forming units per cell. H-1PV infection at this dose range was able to prevent tumorigenicity of NCH421k glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) “stem-like” cells in NOD/SCID mice. Interestingly NCH421R, an isogenic subclone with equal capacity of xenograft formation, but resistant to H-1PV infection could be isolated from the parental NCH421k culture. To reveal changes in gene expression associated with H-1PV resistance we performed a comparative gene expression analysis in these subclones. Several dysregulated genes encoding receptor proteins, endocytosis factors or regulators innate antiviral responses were identified and represent intriguing candidates for to further study molecular mechanisms of H-1PV resistance. PMID:27213425

  11. Pediatric and Adult High-Grade Glioma Stem Cell Culture Models Are Permissive to Lytic Infection with Parvovirus H-1.

    PubMed

    Josupeit, Rafael; Bender, Sebastian; Kern, Sonja; Leuchs, Barbara; Hielscher, Thomas; Herold-Mende, Christel; Schlehofer, Jörg R; Dinsart, Christiane; Witt, Olaf; Rommelaere, Jean; Lacroix, Jeannine

    2016-05-19

    Combining virus-induced cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic effects, oncolytic virotherapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for high-grade glioma (HGG). A clinical trial has recently provided evidence for the clinical safety of the oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) in adult glioblastoma relapse patients. The present study assesses the efficacy of H-1PV in eliminating HGG initiating cells. H-1PV was able to enter and to transduce all HGG neurosphere culture models (n = 6), including cultures derived from adult glioblastoma, pediatric glioblastoma, and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Cytotoxic effects induced by the virus have been observed in all HGG neurospheres at half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) doses of input virus between 1 and 10 plaque forming units per cell. H-1PV infection at this dose range was able to prevent tumorigenicity of NCH421k glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) "stem-like" cells in NOD/SCID mice. Interestingly NCH421R, an isogenic subclone with equal capacity of xenograft formation, but resistant to H-1PV infection could be isolated from the parental NCH421k culture. To reveal changes in gene expression associated with H-1PV resistance we performed a comparative gene expression analysis in these subclones. Several dysregulated genes encoding receptor proteins, endocytosis factors or regulators innate antiviral responses were identified and represent intriguing candidates for to further study molecular mechanisms of H-1PV resistance.

  12. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation.

  13. An Application of the Marketing Mix to Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Wray; Hoy, Frank

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the experience of a major university in applying the concept of the marketing mix to an adult education program. The concept requires the understanding of the interdependence of the four Ps of marketing: product, place, price, and promotion. (JOW)

  14. Dietary factors and the risk of glioma in adults: results of a case-control study in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Giles, G G; McNeil, J J; Donnan, G; Webley, C; Staples, M P; Ireland, P D; Hurley, S F; Salzberg, M

    1994-11-01

    In a population-based case-control study of 416 incident gliomas in adults carried out in Melbourne, Australia, between 1987 and 1991, 409 age-sex-matched case-control pairs (243 male and 166 female) had adequate data available to examine associations between the dietary intake of N-nitroso compounds, N-nitroso precursors, other nutrients including N-nitroso inhibitors, and the risk of glioma. Dietary intakes were based on the reported frequency of consumption of 59 food items. Increased odds ratio (OR) were observed in males who consumed high levels of bacon, corned meats, apples, melons and oil. OR less than unity were observed in men consuming cabbage and cola drinks, and in women who consumed wholegrain bread, pasta, corned meat, bananas, cauliflower, brocoli, cola drinks and nuts. Generally, N-nitroso associations were greater in men and micronutrient associations were greater in women. Elevated OR in men, but not women, were associated with the intake of N-nitroso dimethylamine (NDMA), retinol and vitamin E. The intake of nitrate (largely of vegetable origin) was protective in women but not in men. When analyzed using multiple logistic regression, the association with NDMA intake in males was not modified by dietary micronutrient intakes. In females, beta carotene alone, though not directly associated with risk, modified the effect of NDMA. On balance, this study added only limited support to the N-nitroso hypothesis of glial carcinogenesis.

  15. High-Grade Glioma of the Ventrolateral Medulla in an Adult: Case Presentation and Discussion of Surgical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, Angela; Le, Viet; Konakondla, Sanjay; Miller, Douglas C.; Hopkins, Tamera; Litofsky, N. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background. High-grade gliomas of the brainstem are rare in adults and are particularly rare in the anterolateral medulla. We describe an illustrative case and discuss the diagnostic and treatment issues associated with a tumor in this location, including differential diagnosis, anatomical considerations for options for surgical management, multimodality treatment, and prognosis. Case Description. A 69-year-old woman presented with a 3-week history of progressive right lower extremity weakness. She underwent an open biopsy via a far lateral approach with partial condylectomy, which revealed a glioblastoma. Concurrent temozolomide and radiation were completed; however, she elected to stop her chemotherapy after 5.5 weeks of treatment. She succumbed to her disease 11 months after diagnosis. Conclusions. Biopsy can be performed relatively safely to provide definitive diagnosis to guide treatment, but long-term prognosis is poor. PMID:27242937

  16. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  17. Prognostic significance of IDH mutation in adult low-grade gliomas: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hairui; Yin, Lianhu; Li, Showwei; Han, Song; Song, Guangrong; Liu, Ning; Yan, Changxiang

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have been identified in approximately 65-90 % of low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Various studies examining the relationship between IDH mutation with the clinical outcome in patients with LGGs have yielded inconclusive results. The purpose of the present meta-analysis of literature is to determine this effect. We conducted a meta-analysis of 10 studies (937 patients) that evaluated the correlation between IDH mutation and overall survival (OS). For the quantitative aggregation of the survival results, the IDH mutation effect was measured by hazard ratio (HR). Overall, the pooled HR was 0.585 (95 % CI, 0.376-0.911, p = 0.025, random effect model) for patients with IDH mutation vs patients without IDH mutation. IDH mutation was associated with better overall survival of LGGs. At least this trend was observed in our analysis.

  18. Primary Gliosarcoma of the Optic Nerve: A Unique Adult Optic Pathway Glioma.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Patrick J; Sychev, Yevgeniy V; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Mudumbai, Raghu C; Keene, C Dirk

    2016-10-11

    A 90-year-old woman presented with 1-year history of right-sided progressive proptosis, neovascular glaucoma, blindness, and worsening ocular pain. No funduscopic examination was possible because of a corneal opacity. Head CT scan without contrast demonstrated a heterogeneous 4.1 cm (anterior-posterior) by 1.7 cm (transverse) cylindrical mass arising in the right optic nerve and extending from the retrobulbar globe to the optic canal. She underwent palliative enucleation with subtotal resection of the orbital optic nerve and tumor. Pathological examination showed effacement of the optic nerve by an infiltrative high-grade glial neoplasm with biphasic sarcomeric differentiation. Invasion into the uvea and retina was present. The neoplasm was negative for melan-A, HMB45, tyrosinase, synaptophysin, smooth muscle actin, and epithelial membrane antigen. The glioma had strongly intense, but patchy immunopositivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Multiple foci of neoplastic cells had pericellular reticulin staining. The overall features were diagnostic of a gliosarcoma (World Health Organization grade IV) of the optic nerve. Postoperative MRI demonstrated postsurgical changes and residual gliosarcoma with extension into the optic chiasm. The patient died 2 and a half months after her enucleation surgery at her nursing home. Autopsy was unavailable due to the caregiver wishes, making a definitive cause of death unknown. Gliosarcoma is a rare variant of glioblastoma, and this is the first documented case presenting as a primary neoplasm of the optic nerve.

  19. Updated therapeutic strategy for adult low-grade glioma stratified by resection and tumor subtype.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Iseki, Hiroshi; Ikuta, Soko; Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Taichi; Tamura, Manabu; Chernov, Michael; Watanabe, Atsushi; Okamoto, Saori; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    The importance of surgical resection for patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma (LGG) remains controversial. This retrospective study of patients (n = 153) treated between 2000 to 2010 at a single institution assessed whether increasing the extent of resection (EOR) was associated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Histological subtypes of World Health Organization grade II tumors were as follows: diffuse astrocytoma in 49 patients (32.0%), oligoastrocytoma in 45 patients (29.4%), and oligodendroglioma in 59 patients (38.6%). Median pre- and postoperative tumor volumes and median EOR were 29.0 cm(3) (range 0.7-162 cm(3)) and 1.7 cm(3) (range 0-135.7 cm(3)) and 95%, respectively. Five- and 10-year OS for all LGG patients were 95.1% and 85.4%, respectively. Eight-year OS for diffuse astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma were 70.7%, 91.2%, and 98.3%, respectively. Five-year PFS for diffuse astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma were 42.6%, 71.3%, and 62.7%, respectively. Patients were divided into two groups by EOR ≥90% and <90%, and OS and PFS were analyzed. Both OS and PFS were significantly longer in patients with ≥90% EOR. Increased EOR resulted in better PFS for diffuse astrocytoma but not for oligodendroglioma. Multivariate analysis identified age and EOR as parameters significantly associated with OS. The only parameter associated with PFS was EOR. Based on these findings, we established updated therapeutic strategies for LGG. If surgery resulted in EOR <90%, patients with astrocytoma will require second-look surgery, whereas patients with oligodendroglioma or oligoastrocytoma, which are sensitive to chemotherapy, will be treated with chemotherapy.

  20. Molecular signalling pathways in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, C E; York, D; Higgins, R J; LeCouteur, R A; Dickinson, P J

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we determined the expression of key signalling pathway proteins TP53, MDM2, P21, AKT, PTEN, RB1, P16, MTOR and MAPK in canine gliomas using western blotting. Protein expression was defined in three canine astrocytic glioma cell lines treated with CCNU, temozolamide or CPT-11 and was further evaluated in 22 spontaneous gliomas including high and low grade astrocytomas, high grade oligodendrogliomas and mixed oligoastrocytomas. Response to chemotherapeutic agents and cell survival were similar to that reported in human glioma cell lines. Alterations in expression of key human gliomagenesis pathway proteins were common in canine glioma tumour samples and segregated between oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumour types for some pathways. Both similarities and differences in protein expression were defined for canine gliomas compared to those reported in human tumour counterparts. The findings may inform more defined assessment of specific signalling pathways for targeted therapy of canine gliomas.

  1. Treatment of adult and pediatric high-grade gliomas with Withaferin A: antitumor mechanisms and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marlow, Megan M; Shah, Sumedh S; Véliz, Eduardo A; Ivan, Michael E; Graham, Regina M

    2017-01-01

    Resistance mechanisms employed by high-grade gliomas allow them to successfully evade current standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Withaferin A (WA), utilized in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries, is attracting attention for its antitumor capabilities. Here we review pertinent literature on WA as a high-grade glioma treatment, and discuss the cancerous mechanisms it affects. WA is relatively nontoxic and has shown potential in crossing the blood-brain barrier. WA prevents p53 alterations and inactivates overexpressed MDM2 through ARF and ROS production. Furthermore, WA upregulates Bax, inducing mitochondrial death cascades, inhibits mutated Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB pathways, and inhibits angiogenesis in tumors. Therapy with WA for high-grade gliomas is supported through the literature. Further investigation is warranted and encouraged to fully unearth its abilities against malignant gliomas.

  2. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients.

  3. Proposed therapeutic strategy for adult low-grade glioma based on aggressive tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Ikuta, Soko; Komori, Takashi; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Iseki, Hiroshi; Tamura, Manabu; Saito, Taiichi; Okamoto, Saori; Chernov, Mikhail; Hayashi, Motohiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT There is no standard therapeutic strategy for low-grade glioma (LGG). The authors hypothesized that adjuvant therapy might not be necessary for LGG cases in which total radiological resection was achieved. Accordingly, they established a treatment strategy based on the extent of resection (EOR) and the MIB-1 index: patients with a high EOR and low MIB-1 index were observed without postoperative treatment, whereas those with a low EOR and/or high MIB-1 index received radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy. In the present retrospective study, the authors reviewed clinical data on patients with primarily diagnosed LGGs who had been treated according to the above-mentioned strategy, and they validated the treatment policy. Given their results, they will establish a new treatment strategy for LGGs stratified by EOR, histological subtype, and molecular status. METHODS One hundred fifty-three patients with diagnosed LGG who had undergone resection or biopsy at Tokyo Women's Medical University between January 2000 and August 2010 were analyzed. The patients consisted of 84 men and 69 women, all with ages ≥ 15 years. A total of 146 patients underwent surgical removal of the tumor, and 7 patients underwent biopsy. RESULTS Postoperative RT and nitrosourea-based chemotherapy were administered in 48 and 35 patients, respectively. Extent of resection was significantly associated with both overall survival (OS; p = 0.0096) and progression-free survival (PFS; p = 0.0007) in patients with diffuse astrocytoma but not in those with oligodendroglial subtypes. Chemotherapy significantly prolonged PFS, especially in patients with oligodendroglial subtypes (p = 0.0009). Patients with a mutant IDH1 gene had significantly longer OS (p = 0.034). Multivariate analysis did not identify MIB-1 index or RT as prognostic factors, but it did identify chemotherapy as a prognostic factor for PFS and EOR as a prognostic factor for OS and PFS. CONCLUSIONS The findings demonstrated that EOR was

  4. Seizure characteristics and outcomes in 508 Chinese adult patients undergoing primary resection of low-grade gliomas: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    You, Gan; Sha, Zhi-Yi; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Zhi; Li, Shao-Wu; Sang, Lin; Wang, Zi; Li, Gui-Lin; Li, Shou-Wei; Song, Yi-Jun; Kang, Chun-Sheng; Jiang, Tao

    2012-02-01

    Seizure is a common presenting manifestation and plays an important role in the clinical presentation and quality of life for patients with low-grade gliomas (LGGs). The authors set out to identify factors that influence preoperative seizure characteristics and postoperative seizure control. Cases involving adult patients who had undergone initial surgery for LGGs in a single institution between 2005 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with preoperative seizures and postoperative seizure control. Of the 508 patients in the series, 350 (68.9%) presented with seizures. Age less than 38 years and cortical involvement of tumor were more likely to be associated with seizures (P = .003 and .001, respectively, multivariate logistic analysis). For the cohort of 350 patients with seizures, Engel classification was used to evaluate 6- and 12-month outcome after surgery: completely seizure free (Engel class I), 65.3% and 62.5%; not seizure free (Engel classes II, III, IV), 34.7% and 37.5%. After multivariate logistic analysis, favorable seizure prognosis was more common in patients with secondary generalized seizure (P = .006) and with calcification on MRI (.031). With respect to treatment-related variables, patients achieved much better seizure control after gross total resection than after subtotal resection (P < .0001). Ki67 was an independent molecular marker predicting poor seizure control in the patients with a history of seizure if overexpressed but was not a predictor for those without preoperative seizures. These factors may provide insight into developing effective treatment strategies aimed at prolonging patients' survival.

  5. Circulating levels of the innate and humoral immune regulators CD14 and CD23 are associated with adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Wiemels, Joseph L; Bracci, Paige M; Wrensch, Margaret R; McCoy, Lucie S; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jennette D; Patoka, Joseph S; Wiencke, John K

    2010-10-01

    Allergy history has been consistently inversely associated with glioma risk. Two serologic markers, soluble CD23 (sCD23) and soluble CD14 (sCD14), are part of the innate and adaptive humoral immune systems and modulate allergic responses in opposite directions, with sCD23 enhancing and sCD14 blunting inflammatory responses. We measured sCD23 and sCD14 in serum from blood that was drawn at a single time point from 1,079 glioma patients postdiagnosis and 736 healthy controls. Glioma was strongly associated with high sCD14 [highest versus lowest quartile odds ratio (OR), 3.94; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 2.98-5.21] and low sCD23 (lowest versus highest quartile OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.89-3.23). Results were consistent across glioma histologic types and grades, but were strongest for glioblastoma. Whereas temozolomide treatment was not associated with either sCD14 or sCD23 levels among cases, those taking dexamethasone had somewhat lower sCD23 levels than those not taking dexamethasone. However, sCD23 was associated with case status regardless of dexamethasone treatment. These results augment the long-observed association between allergies and glioma and support a role for the innate and adaptive humoral functions of the immune system, in particular immunoregulatory proteins, in gliomagenesis.

  6. Patterns of diagnostic marker assessment in adult diffuse glioma: a survey of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS).

    PubMed

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Vital, Anne; Hainfellner, Johannes A

    The 2016 update of the WHO classification has introduced an integrated diagnostic approach that incorporates both tumor morphology and molecular information. This conceptual change has far-reaching implications, especially for neuropathologists who are in the forefront of translating molecular markers to routine diagnostic use. Adult diffuse glioma is a prototypic example for a group of tumors that underwent substantial regrouping, and it represents a major workload for surgical neuropathologists. Hence, we conducted a survey among members of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS) in order to assess 1) the extent to which molecular markers have already been incorporated in glioma diagnoses, 2) which molecular techniques are in daily use, and 3) to set a baseline for future surveys in this field. Based on 130 responses from participants across 40 nations neuropathologists uniformly rate molecular marker testing as highly relevant and already incorporate molecular information in their diagnostic assessments. At the same time however, the survey documents substantial differences in access to crucial biomarkers and molecular techniques across geographic regions and within individual countries. Concerns are raised concerning the validity of test assays with MGMT, 1p19q, and ATRX; being perceived as most problematic. Neuropathologists advocate the need for international harmonization of standards and consensus guidelines, and the majority is willing to actively engage in interlaboratory trials aiming at quality control (Figure 1).
.

  7. Patterns of diagnostic marker assessment in adult diffuse glioma: a survey of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS)

    PubMed Central

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Kristensen, Bjarne W.; Vital, Anne; Hainfellner, Johannes A.

    2017-01-01

    The 2016 update of the WHO classification has introduced an integrated diagnostic approach that incorporates both tumor morphology and molecular information. This conceptual change has far-reaching implications, especially for neuropathologists who are in the forefront of translating molecular markers to routine diagnostic use. Adult diffuse glioma is a prototypic example for a group of tumors that underwent substantial regrouping, and it represents a major workload for surgical neuropathologists. Hence, we conducted a survey among members of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS) in order to assess 1) the extent to which molecular markers have already been incorporated in glioma diagnoses, 2) which molecular techniques are in daily use, and 3) to set a baseline for future surveys in this field. Based on 130 responses from participants across 40 nations neuropathologists uniformly rate molecular marker testing as highly relevant and already incorporate molecular information in their diagnostic assessments. At the same time however, the survey documents substantial differences in access to crucial biomarkers and molecular techniques across geographic regions and within individual countries. Concerns are raised concerning the validity of test assays with MGMT, 1p19q, and ATRX; being perceived as most problematic. Neuropathologists advocate the need for international harmonization of standards and consensus guidelines, and the majority is willing to actively engage in interlaboratory trials aiming at quality control (Figure 1). PMID:27966427

  8. Efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATOC Positron Emission Tomography (PET) CT in Children and Young Adults With Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Meningeal Melanocytoma; Newly Diagnosed Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood

  9. Immunohistochemistry on IDH 1/2, ATRX, p53 and Ki-67 substitute molecular genetic testing and predict patient prognosis in grade III adult diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Takano, Shingo; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Matsuda, Masahide; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Noguchi, Masayuki; Kato, Yukinari; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira

    2016-04-01

    The molecular subgrouping of diffuse gliomas was recently found to stratify patients into prognostically distinct groups better than histological classification. Among several molecular parameters, the key molecules for the subtype diagnosis of diffuse gliomas are IDH mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, and ATRX mutation; 1p/19q co-deletion is undetectable by immunohistochemistry, but is mutually exclusive with ATRX and p53 mutation in IDH mutant gliomas. Therefore, we applied ATRX and p53 immunohistochemistry instead of 1p/19q co-deletion analysis. The prognostic value of immunohistochemical diagnosis for Grade III gliomas was subsequently investigated. Then, the same immunohistochmical diagnostic approach was expanded for the evaluation of Grade II and IV diffuse glioma prognosis. The results indicate immunohistochemical analysis including IDH1/2, ATRX, p53, and Ki-67 index is valuable for the classification of diffuse gliomas, which is useful for the evaluation of prognosis, especially Grade III gliomas and lower-grade gliomas (i.e., Grade II and III).

  10. Mixed Methods Research of Adult Family Care Home Residents and Informal Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanty, Guy C.; Hibel, James

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a mixed methods approach used to explore the experiences of adult family care home (AFCH) residents and informal caregivers (IC). A rationale is presented for using a mixed methods approach employing the sequential exploratory design with this poorly researched population. The unique challenges attendant to the sampling…

  11. Mixed Ability Teaching: Meeting Learners' Needs. Netword 3: Teaching Languages to Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainslie, Susan

    This guide, designed for teachers of second languages to adults, discusses instruction for student groups of mixed abilities. The first chapter examines the factors that determine mixed ability, including: student motivation, interests, and needs; linguistic ability; general educational background; learning style; age; external pressures and time…

  12. Impact of epidemiological characteristics of supratentorial gliomas in adults brought about by the 2016 world health organization classification of tumors of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui; Cui, Yong; Wang, Junmei; Lin, Song

    2016-11-24

    The latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) integrates both histological and molecular features in the definition of diagnostic entities. This new approach enrolls novel entities of gliomas. In this study, we aimed to reveal the epidemiological characteristics, including age at diagnosis, gender ratio, tumor distribution and survival, of these new entities. We retrospectively reclassified 1210 glioma samples according to the 2016 CNS WHO diagnostic criteria. In our cohort, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with wildtype isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) was the most common malignant tumor in the brain. Almost all gliomas were more prevalent in males, especially in the cluster of WHO grade III gliomas and IDH-wildtype GBM. Age at diagnosis was directly proportional to tumor grade. With respect to the distribution by histology, we found that gliomas concurrent with IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted or with single IDH-mutant were mainly distributed in frontal lobe, while those with IDH-wildtype were dominant in temporal lobe. Lesions located in insular lobe were more likely to be IDH-mutant astrocytoma. In summary, our results elucidated the epidemiological characteristics as well as the regional constituents of these new gliomas entities, which could bring insights into tumorigenesis and personalized treatment of Chinese glioma population.

  13. Reactive control processes contributing to residual switch cost and mixing cost across the adult lifespan.

    PubMed

    Whitson, Lisa R; Karayanidis, Frini; Fulham, Ross; Provost, Alexander; Michie, Patricia T; Heathcote, Andrew; Hsieh, Shulan

    2014-01-01

    In task-switching paradigms, performance is better when repeating the same task than when alternating between tasks (switch cost) and when repeating a task alone rather than intermixed with another task (mixing cost). These costs remain even after extensive practice and when task cues enable advanced preparation (residual costs). Moreover, residual reaction time mixing cost has been consistently shown to increase with age. Residual switch and mixing costs modulate the amplitude of the stimulus-locked P3b. This mixing effect is disproportionately larger in older adults who also prepare more for and respond more cautiously on these "mixed" repeat trials (Karayanidis et al., 2011). In this paper, we analyze stimulus-locked and response-locked P3 and lateralized readiness potentials to identify whether residual switch and mixing cost arise from the need to control interference at the level of stimulus processing or response processing. Residual mixing cost was associated with control of stimulus-level interference, whereas residual switch cost was also associated with a delay in response selection. In older adults, the disproportionate increase in mixing cost was associated with greater interference at the level of decision-response mapping and response programming for repeat trials in mixed-task blocks. These findings suggest that older adults strategically recruit greater proactive and reactive control to overcome increased susceptibility to post-stimulus interference. This interpretation is consistent with recruitment of compensatory strategies to compensate for reduced repetition benefit rather than an overall decline on cognitive flexibility.

  14. Progress on molecular biomarkers and classification of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanbao; Bao, Zhaoshi; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    2013-06-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Anaplastic gliomas (WHO grade III) and glioblastomas (WHO grade IV) represent the major groups of malignant gliomas in the brain. Several diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic biomarkers for malignant gliomas have been reported over the last few decades, and these markers have made great contributions to the accuracy of diagnosis, therapeutic decision making, and prognosis of patients. However, heterogeneity in patient outcomes may still be observed, which highlights the insufficiency of a classification system based purely on histopathology. Great efforts have been made to incorporate new information about the molecular landscape of gliomas into novel classifications that may potentially guide treatment. In this review, we summarize three distinctive biomarkers, three most commonly altered pathways, and three classifications based on microarray data in malignant gliomas.

  15. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, −9p, and −11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas. PMID:26558387

  16. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, -9p, and -11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas.

  17. White Matter Change Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Il; Kim, Chi Heon; Park, Chul-Kee; Koo, Bang-Bon; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-related white matter change is detected at late stages with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when mass effect or prominent edema is present. We analyzed if diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) white matter change earlier than conventional MRI. Methods Twenty-six patients with gliomas (World Health Organization grade II, 5; grade III, 12; and grade IV, 9) within 2 cm from the posterior limb of the internal capsule (IC) were studied. Fifteen normal adults were enrolled as controls. Fluid attenuation inversion recovery MRI showed a high signal change at the posterior limb of the IC (HSIC) in 9 patients with grade III or IV gliomas. We classified the gliomas as WHO grade II (gliomas II), grade III or IV without HSIC [gliomas III/IV(-)] and grade III or IV with HSIC [gliomas III/IV(+)], as an indicator of the increase in the severity of the white matter changes. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated for the pyramidal tract. Tumor progression along pyramidal tract was evaluated by follow-up MRI in 16 patients at 40±18 months. Results FA showed no significant difference between gliomas II and control (p=0.694), but was lower in gliomas III/IV(-) and gliomas III/IV(+) (p<0.001). ADCs were higher in gliomas II, gliomas III/IV(-) and gliomas III/IV(+) than control (p<0.001). Tumor progression was detected in 2/16 patients. Conclusion DTI detected white matter changes that appeared to be normal in MRI. ADC changed even in low grade glioma, indicating ADC may be a better parameter for the early detection of white matter change. PMID:27867919

  18. Validation of EORTC Prognostic Factors for Adults With Low-Grade Glioma: A Report Using Intergroup 86-72-51

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Thomas B.; Brown, Paul D.; Felten, Sara J.; Wu, Wenting; Buckner, Jan C.; Arusell, Robert M.; Curran, Walter J.; Abrams, Ross A.; Schiff, David; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: A prognostic index for survival was constructed and validated from patient data from two European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) radiation trials for low-grade glioma (LGG). We sought to independently validate this prognostic index with a separate prospectively collected data set (Intergroup 86-72-51). Methods and Materials: Two hundred three patients were treated in a North Central Cancer Treatment Group-led trial that randomized patients with supratentorial LGG to 50.4 or 64.8 Gy. Risk factors from the EORTC prognostic index were analyzed for prognostic value: histology, tumor size, neurologic deficit, age, and tumor crossing the midline. The high-risk group was defined as patients with more than two risk factors. In addition, the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) score, extent of surgical resection, and 1p19q status were also analyzed for prognostic value. Results: On univariate analysis, the following were statistically significant (p < 0.05) detrimental factors for both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS): astrocytoma histology, tumor size, and less than total resection. A Mini Mental Status Examination score of more than 26 was a favorable prognostic factor. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size and MMSE score were significant predictors of OS whereas tumor size, astrocytoma histology, and MMSE score were significant predictors of PFS. Analyzing by the EORTC risk groups, we found that the low-risk group had significantly better median OS (10.8 years vs. 3.9 years, p < 0.0001) and PFS (6.2 years vs. 1.9 years, p < 0.0001) than the high-risk group. The 1p19q status was available in 66 patients. Co-deletion of 1p19q was a favorable prognostic factor for OS vs. one or no deletion (median OS, 12.6 years vs. 7.2 years; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Although the low-risk group as defined by EORTC criteria had a superior PFS and OS to the high-risk group, this is primarily because of the influence of

  19. The interface between glial progenitors and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian brain and spinal cord contain heterogeneous populations of cycling, immature cells. These include cells with stem cell-like properties as well as progenitors in various stages of early glial differentiation. This latter population is distributed widely throughout gray and white matter and numerically represents an extremely large cell pool. In this review, we discuss the possibility that the glial progenitors that populate the adult CNS are one source of gliomas. Indeed, the marker phenotypes, morphologies, and migratory properties of cells in gliomas strongly resemble glial progenitors in many ways. We review briefly some salient features of normal glial development and then examine the similarities and differences between normal progenitors and cells in gliomas, focusing on the phenotypic plasticity of glial progenitors and the responses to growth factors in promoting proliferation and migration of normal and glioma cells, and discussing known mutational changes in gliomas in the context of how these might affect the proliferative and migratory behaviors of progenitors. Finally, we will discuss the “cancer stem cell” hypothesis in light of the possibility that glial progenitors can generate gliomas. PMID:18784926

  20. Epidemiology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Quinn T; Gittleman, Haley; Stetson, Lindsay; Virk, Selene M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary intracranial tumors. Some glioma subtypes cause significant mortality and morbidity that are disproportionate to their relatively rare incidence. A very small proportion of glioma cases can be attributed to inherited genetic disorders. Many potential risk factors for glioma have been studied to date, but few provide explanation for the number of brain tumors identified. The most significant of these factors includes increased risk due to exposure to ionizing radiation, and decreased risk with history of allergy or atopic disease. The potential effect of exposure to cellular phones has been studied extensively, but the results remain inconclusive. Recent genomic analyses, using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) design, have identified several inherited risk variants that are associated with increased glioma risk. The following chapter provides an overview of the current state of research in the epidemiology of intracranial glioma.

  1. Simulated Driving Changes in Young Adults with ADHD Receiving Mixed Amphetamine Salts Extended Release and Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Gary G.; Michaels, M. Alex; Pakull, Barton

    2009-01-01

    Background: Psychostimulant treatment may improve simulated driving performance in young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of simulated driving performance with mixed amphetamine salts--extended release (MAS XR) 50 mg/day (Cohort 1) and…

  2. Exploring Dual Identification among Muslim-American Emerging Adults: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirin, Selcuk R.; Bikmen, Nida; Mir, Madeeha; Fine, Michelle; Zaal, Mayida; Katsiaficas, Dalal

    2008-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored dual identification among Muslim-American emerging adults of immigrant origin. A closer look was taken at the relationship between American and Muslim identifications and how this relationship was influenced by experiences of discrimination, acculturative and religious practices, and whether it varied by gender.…

  3. Ambivalence in Older Parent–Adult Child Relationships: Mixed Feelings, Mixed Measures

    PubMed Central

    Lendon, Jessica P.; Silverstein, Merril; Giarrusso, Roseann

    2014-01-01

    This research compared direct and indirect measures of ambivalence, 2 commonly used strategies for measuring intergenerational ambivalence between older parents and their adult children. Directly and indirectly measured ambivalence, corresponding to felt and potential manifestations of the construct, were contrasted with each other and across generations. Data were derived from 253 older parent–adult child dyads participating in the Longitudinal Study of Generations in 2005. Direct and indirect measures of ambivalence were moderately correlated with each other within each generation. Children expressed greater indirect ambivalence than their parents but were no different than their mothers or fathers in their levels of direct ambivalence. Multivariate regression analyses examining the relationship between each type of ambivalence with individual and relationship characteristics found differences in associations across equations. The results suggest that direct and indirect measures are related but represent 2 distinct conceptions of ambivalence. This research highlights the challenges in understanding the full complexity of intergenerational relations and suggests that both generational perspectives be considered in future research. PMID:25378714

  4. Characteristics of gliomas in patients with somatic IDH mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Charlotte; Thomas, Laure; Psimaras, Dimitri; Bielle, Franck; Vauléon, Elodie; Loiseau, Hugues; Cartalat-Carel, Stéphanie; Meyronet, David; Dehais, Caroline; Honnorat, Jérôme; Sanson, Marc; Ducray, François

    2016-03-31

    IDH mutations are found in the majority of adult, diffuse, low-grade and anaplastic gliomas and are also frequently found in cartilaginous tumors. Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are two enchondromatosis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple benign cartilaginous tumors due to post-zygotic acquisition of IDH mutations. In addition to skeletal tumors, enchondromatosis patients sometimes develop gliomas. The aim of the present study was to determine whether gliomas in enchondromatosis patients might also result from somatic IDH mosaicism and whether their characteristics are similar to those of sporadic IDH-mutated gliomas. For this purpose, we analyzed the characteristics of 6 newly diagnosed and 32 previously reported cases of enchondromatosis patients who developed gliomas and compared them to those of a consecutive series of 159 patients with sporadic IDH-mutated gliomas. As was the case with sporadic IDH mutated gliomas, enchondromatosis gliomas were frequently located in the frontal lobe (54 %) and consisted of diffuse low-grade (73 %) or anaplastic gliomas (21 %). However, they were diagnosed at an earlier age (25.6 years versus 44 years, p < 0.001) and were more frequently multicentric (32 % versus 1 %, p < 0.001) and more frequently located within the brainstem than sporadic IDH mutated gliomas (21 % versus 1 %, p < 0.001). Their molecular profile was characterized by IDH mutations and loss of ATRX expression. In two patients, the same IDH mutation was demonstrated in the glioma and in a cartilaginous tumor. In contrast to sporadic IDH mutated gliomas, no enchondromatosis glioma harbored a 1p/19q co-deletion (0/6 versus 59/123, p = 0.03). The characteristics of gliomas in patients with enchondromatosis suggest that these tumors, as cartilaginous tumors, result from somatic IDH mosaicism and that the timing of IDH mutation acquisition might affect the location and molecular characteristics of gliomas. Early

  5. A glioma classification scheme based on coexpression modules of EGFR and PDGFRA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingyu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dongfeng; Lv, Yuhong; Zheng, Junxiong; Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Ran, Liang; Bao, Zhaoshi; Soneson, Charlotte; Sjögren, Hans Olov; Salford, Leif G; Ji, Jianguang; French, Pim J; Fioretos, Thoas; Jiang, Tao; Fan, Xiaolong

    2014-03-04

    We hypothesized that key signaling pathways of glioma genesis might enable the molecular classification of gliomas. Gene coexpression modules around epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (EM, 29 genes) or platelet derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) (PM, 40 genes) in gliomas were identified. Based on EM and PM expression signatures, nonnegative matrix factorization reproducibly clustered 1,369 adult diffuse gliomas WHO grades II-IV from four independent databases generated in three continents, into the subtypes (EM, PM and EM(low)PM(low) gliomas) in a morphology-independent manner. Besides their distinct patterns of genomic alterations, EM gliomas were associated with higher age at diagnosis, poorer prognosis, and stronger expression of neural stem cell and astrogenesis genes. Both PM and EM(low)PM(low) gliomas were associated with younger age at diagnosis and better prognosis. PM gliomas were enriched in the expression of oligodendrogenesis genes, whereas EM(low)PM(low) gliomas were enriched in the signatures of mature neurons and oligodendrocytes. The EM/PM-based molecular classification scheme is applicable to adult low-grade and high-grade diffuse gliomas, and outperforms existing classification schemes in assigning diffuse gliomas to subtypes with distinct transcriptomic and genomic profiles. The majority of the EM/PM classifiers, including regulators of glial fate decisions, have not been extensively studied in glioma biology. Subsets of these classifiers were coexpressed in mouse glial precursor cells, and frequently amplified or lost in an EM/PM glioma subtype-specific manner, resulting in somatic copy number alteration-dependent gene expression that contributes to EM/PM signatures in glioma samples. EM/PM-based molecular classification provides a molecular diagnostic framework to expedite the search for new glioma therapeutic targets.

  6. Unsupervised analysis of transcriptomic profiles reveals six glioma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Aiguo; Walling, Jennifer; Ahn, Susie; Kotliarov, Yuri; Su, Qin; Quezado, Martha; Oberholtzer, J Carl; Park, John; Zenklusen, Jean C; Fine, Howard A

    2009-03-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumors in adults and a significant cause of cancer-related mortality. Defining glioma subtypes based on objective genetic and molecular signatures may allow for a more rational, patient-specific approach to therapy in the future. Classifications based on gene expression data have been attempted in the past with varying success and with only some concordance between studies, possibly due to inherent bias that can be introduced through the use of analytic methodologies that make a priori selection of genes before classification. To overcome this potential source of bias, we have applied two unsupervised machine learning methods to genome-wide gene expression profiles of 159 gliomas, thereby establishing a robust glioma classification model relying only on the molecular data. The model predicts for two major groups of gliomas (oligodendroglioma-rich and glioblastoma-rich groups) separable into six hierarchically nested subtypes. We then identified six sets of classifiers that can be used to assign any given glioma to the corresponding subtype and validated these classifiers using both internal (189 additional independent samples) and two external data sets (341 patients). Application of the classification system to the external glioma data sets allowed us to identify previously unrecognized prognostic groups within previously published data and within The Cancer Genome Atlas glioblastoma samples and the different biological pathways associated with the different glioma subtypes offering a potential clue to the pathogenesis and possibly therapeutic targets for tumors within each subtype.

  7. Molecular neuropathology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Markus J; Reifenberger, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  8. Mixed emotions across the adult life span in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Stefan; Stone, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    Mixed emotions involve the co-occurrence of positive and negative affect, such that people feel happy and sad at the same time. The purpose of the present study was to investigate age-related differences in the experience of mixed emotions across the adult life span in two nationally representative samples of U.S. residents. Data collected by the Princeton Affect and Time Survey (PATS, n = 3,948) and by the 2010 Wellbeing Module of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS, n = 12,828) were analyzed. In both surveys, respondents (aged 15 years or older) provided a detailed time diary about the preceding day and rated their happiness and sadness for three of the day's episodes. From these reports, three different indices of mixed emotions were derived. Results indicated small, but robust, increases in mixed emotions with age. Linear age increases were consistently evident in both PATS and ATUS, and replicated across the different indices of mixed emotions. There was no significant evidence for curvilinear age trends in either study. Several sociodemographic factors that could plausibly explain age-differences in mixed emotions (e.g., retirement, disability) did not alter the age-effects. The present study adds to the growing literature documenting vital changes in the complexity of emotional experience over the lifespan. PMID:25894487

  9. Outcome of Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant in Cantonese-Speaking Mixed Hearing Loss Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Joannie Ka Yin; Tsang, Willis Sung Shan; Wong, Terence Ka Cheong

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the aided benefits, speech recognition in quiet and in noise, change in hearing and subjective report of satisfaction on mixed hearing loss adults implanted with Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) middle ear implant. Methods Eight Cantonese speaking adult patients with mixed hearing loss were enrolled in a single-subject, repeated measures prospective study design. Audiometric testing, including air and bone conduction and word recognition under sound-field were conducted before surgery. Device activation was arranged 8 weeks after operation. Audiometric testing was taken to evaluate the change in hearing. Patients were asked to wear the device and come back for fine tuning as needed. Outcome measurements were undertaken at 3 and 6 months after device activation. The outcome measures included sound-field thresholds, Cantonese Hearing in Noise Test (CHINT), Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) and International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA). Results The application of the VSB improved the aided thresholds and improved speech intelligibility in quiet and noise without significant changes in hearing thresholds. Conclusion VSB is considered as a safe, effective and reliable auditory rehabilitation option for Cantonese speaking adults with mixed hearing loss. PMID:22701155

  10. Host suitability and diet mixing influence activities of detoxification enzymes in adult Japanese beetles.

    PubMed

    Adesanya, Adekunle; Liu, Nannan; Held, David W

    2016-05-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450, glutathione S transferase (GST), and carboxylesterase (CoE) activity was measured in guts of the scarab Popillia japonica Newman, after consumption of single or mixed plant diets of previously ranked preferred (rose, Virginia creeper, crape myrtle and sassafras) or non-preferred hosts (boxelder, riverbirch and red oak). The goal of this study was to quantify activities of P450, GST and CoE enzymes in the midgut of adult P. japonica using multiple substrates in response to host plant suitability (preferred host vs non-preferred hosts), and single and mixed diets. Non-preferred hosts were only sparingly fed upon, and as a group induced higher activities of P450, GST and CoE than did preferred hosts. However, enzyme activities for some individual plant species were similar across categories of host suitability. Similarly, beetles tended to have greater enzyme activities after feeding on a mixture of plants compared to a single plant type, but mixing per se does not seem as important as the species represented in the mix. Induction of detoxification enzymes on non-preferred hosts, or when switching between hosts, may explain, in part, the perceived feeding preferences of this polyphagous insect. The potential consequences of induced enzyme activities on the ecology of adult Japanese beetles are discussed.

  11. Boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma-correlation between radiation dose and radiation injury and clinical outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Kageji, Teruyoshi . E-mail: kageji@clin.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Nagahiro, Shinji; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Toi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To clarify the correlation between the radiation dose and clinical outcome of sodium borocaptate-based intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy in patients with malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: The first protocol (P1998, n = 8) prescribed a maximal gross tumor volume (GTV) dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a dose-escalated protocol was introduced (P2001, n 11), which prescribed a maximal vascular volume dose of 15 Gy or, alternatively, a clinical target volume (CTV) dose of 18 Gy. Results: The GTV and CTV doses in P2001 were 1.1-1.3 times greater than those in P1998. The maximal vascular volume dose of those with acute radiation injury was 15.8 Gy. The mean GTV and CTV dose in long-term survivors with glioblastoma was 26.4 and 16.5 Gy, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between the GTV dose and median survival time was found. In the 11 glioblastoma patients in P2001, the median survival time was 19.5 months and 1- and 2-year survival rate was 60.6% and 37.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose escalation contributed to the improvement in clinical outcome. To avoid radiation injury, the maximal vascular volume dose should be <12 Gy. For long-term survival in patients with glioblastoma after boron neutron capture therapy, the optimal mean dose of the GTV and CTV was 26 and 16 Gy, respectively.

  12. Pathophysiology of glioma cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Adn, Mahmoudreza; Saikali, Stephan; Guegan, Yvon; Hamlat, Abderrahmane

    2006-01-01

    Fluid filled cystic cavities are accompaniments of some cerebral gliomas. These tumoural cysts together with peritumoural vasogenic brain oedema add to the morbid effects of the gliomas in terms of mass effect and increased intracranial pressure. Although different mechanisms have been suggested as to the pathogenesis of glioma-associated cysts, it is still unclear why these cysts appear in only a limited number of cerebral gliomas while brain oedema, a probable precursor of glioma cysts, is a usual accompaniment of most gliomas. Here, the authors present a two-hit hypothesis of brain glioma cyst formation. We suggest that after the formation of vasogenic tumoural brain oedema, microvascular phenomena may lead to the formation of microcysts, which might later become confluent and grow to form macroscopic cysts. Progress in the understanding of pathogenesis of cerebral glioma cysts might set targets for treatment of brain edema and glioma cysts.

  13. Subjective Quality of Life in Persons with Low-Grade Glioma and Their Next of Kin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edvardsson, Tanja I.; Ahlstrom, Gerd I.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma have a longer survival than patients with highly malignant glioma, and for this reason questions of quality of life (QoL) are of particular importance to such patients as well as to their next of kin. No studies have been found in which both adult patients with low-grade glioma and their next of kin have estimated…

  14. [Histological and molecular classification of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, D; Colin, C; Coulibaly, B; Quilichini, B; Maues De Paula, A; Fernandez, C; Bouvier, C

    2008-01-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent tumors of the central nervous system. The WHO classification, based on the presumed cell origin, distinguishes astrocytic, oligodendrocytic and mixed gliomas. A grading system is based on the presence of the following criteria: increased cellular density, nuclear atypias, mitosis, vascular proliferation and necrosis. The main histological subtype of grade I gliomas are pilocytic astrocytomas, which are benign. Diffuse astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas are low-grade (II) or high-grade (III and IV) tumors. Glioblastomas correspond to grade IV astrocytomas. C. Daumas-Duport et al. have proposed another classification based on histology and imaging data, which distinguishes oligodendrogliomas and mixed gliomas of grade A (without endothelial proliferation and/or contrast enhancement), oligodendrogliomas and mixed gliomas of grade B (with endothelial proliferation or contrast enhancement), glioblastomas and glioneuronal malignant tumors. Both classifications lack reproducibility. Many studies have searched for a molecular classification. Recurrent abnormalities in gliomas have been found. They encompassed recurrent chromosomal alterations, such as lost of chromosome 10, gain of chromosome 7, deletion of chromosome 1p and 19q, but also activation of the Akt pathway (amplification of EGFR), dysregulation of the cell cycle (deletion of p16, p53). These studies have enabled the description of two molecular subtypes for glioblastomas. De novo glioblastomas, which occur in young patients without of a prior history of brain tumor and harbor frequent amplification of EGFR, deletion of p16 and mutation of PTEN while mutation of p53 is infrequent. Secondary glioblastomas occur in the context of a preexisting low-grade glioma and are characterized by more frequent mutation of p53. On the other side, combined complete deletion of 1p and 19q as the result of the translocation t(1;19)(q10;p10) is highly specific of oligodendrogliomas

  15. Mixed care networks of community-dwelling older adults with physical health impairments in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Broese van Groenou, Marjolein; Jacobs, Marianne; Zwart-Olde, Ilse; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2016-01-01

    As part of long-term care reforms, home-care organisations in the Netherlands are required to strengthen the linkage between formal and informal caregivers of home-dwelling older adults. Information on the variety in mixed care networks may help home-care organisations to develop network type-dependent strategies to connect with informal caregivers. This study first explores how structural (size, composition) and functional features (contact and task overlap between formal and informal caregivers) contribute to different types of mixed care networks. Second, it examines to what degree these network types are associated with the care recipients' characteristics. Through home-care organisations in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, we selected 74 frail home-dwelling clients who were receiving care in 2011-2012 from both informal and formal caregivers. The care networks of these older adults were identified by listing all persons providing help with five different types of tasks. This resulted in care networks comprising an average of 9.7 caregivers, of whom 67% were formal caregivers. On average, there was contact between caregivers within 34% of the formal-informal dyads, and both caregivers carried out at least one similar type of task in 29% of these dyads. A principal component analysis of size, composition, contact and task overlap showed two distinct network dimensions from which four network types were constructed: a small mixed care network, a small formal network, a large mixed network and a large formal network. Bivariate analyses showed that the care recipients' activities of daily living level, memory problems, social network, perceived control of care and level of mastery differed significantly between these four types. The results imply that different network types require different actions from formal home-care organisations, such as mobilising the social network in small formal networks, decreasing task differentiation in large formal networks and assigning

  16. Abundance of gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in adult Mosquitofish spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Velez, Jose L; Rodriguez-Alvarado, Melanie; Torres-Vazquez, Irma I; Fraser, Scott E; Yasumura, Thomas; Vanderpool, Kimberly G; Rash, John E; Rosa-Molinar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    "Dye-coupling", whole-mount immunohistochemistry for gap junction channel protein connexin 35 (Cx35), and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling (FRIL) reveal an abundance of electrical synapses/gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in the 14th spinal segment that innervates the adult male gonopodium of Western Mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis (Mosquitofish). To study gap junctions' role in fast motor behavior, we used a minimally-invasive neural-tract-tracing technique to introduce gap junction-permeant or -impermeant dyes into deep muscles controlling the gonopodium of the adult male Mosquitofish, a teleost fish that rapidly transfers (complete in <20 mS) spermatozeugmata into the female reproductive tract. Dye-coupling in the 14th spinal segment controlling the gonopodium reveals coupling between motor neurons and a commissural primary ascending interneuron (CoPA IN) and shows that the 14th segment has an extensive and elaborate dendritic arbor and more gap junctions than do other segments. Whole-mount immunohistochemistry for Cx35 results confirm dye-coupling and show it occurs via gap junctions. Finally, FRIL shows that gap junctions are at mixed synapses and reveals that >50 of the 62 gap junctions at mixed synapses are in the 14th spinal segment. Our results support and extend studies showing gap junctions at mixed synapses in spinal cord segments involved in control of genital reflexes in rodents, and they suggest a link between mixed synapses and fast motor behavior. The findings provide a basis for studies of specific roles of spinal neurons in the generation/regulation of sex-specific behavior and for studies of gap junctions' role in regulating fast motor behavior. Finally, the CoPA IN provides a novel candidate neuron for future studies of gap junctions and neural control of fast motor behaviors.

  17. Abundance of gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in adult Mosquitofish spinal cord neurons

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Velez, Jose L.; Rodriguez-Alvarado, Melanie; Torres-Vazquez, Irma I.; Fraser, Scott E.; Yasumura, Thomas; Vanderpool, Kimberly G.; Rash, John E.; Rosa-Molinar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    “Dye-coupling”, whole-mount immunohistochemistry for gap junction channel protein connexin 35 (Cx35), and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling (FRIL) reveal an abundance of electrical synapses/gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in the 14th spinal segment that innervates the adult male gonopodium of Western Mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis (Mosquitofish). To study gap junctions’ role in fast motor behavior, we used a minimally-invasive neural-tract-tracing technique to introduce gap junction-permeant or -impermeant dyes into deep muscles controlling the gonopodium of the adult male Mosquitofish, a teleost fish that rapidly transfers (complete in <20 mS) spermatozeugmata into the female reproductive tract. Dye-coupling in the 14th spinal segment controlling the gonopodium reveals coupling between motor neurons and a commissural primary ascending interneuron (CoPA IN) and shows that the 14th segment has an extensive and elaborate dendritic arbor and more gap junctions than do other segments. Whole-mount immunohistochemistry for Cx35 results confirm dye-coupling and show it occurs via gap junctions. Finally, FRIL shows that gap junctions are at mixed synapses and reveals that >50 of the 62 gap junctions at mixed synapses are in the 14th spinal segment. Our results support and extend studies showing gap junctions at mixed synapses in spinal cord segments involved in control of genital reflexes in rodents, and they suggest a link between mixed synapses and fast motor behavior. The findings provide a basis for studies of specific roles of spinal neurons in the generation/regulation of sex-specific behavior and for studies of gap junctions’ role in regulating fast motor behavior. Finally, the CoPA IN provides a novel candidate neuron for future studies of gap junctions and neural control of fast motor behaviors. PMID:25018700

  18. Immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue factor, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Blasco, Ester; Fernández, Francisco; Viu, Judit; Añor, Sònia

    2014-06-01

    In human gliomas, tissue factor (TF) is overexpressed, associated with the grade of malignancy and influences tumour biology. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition and activation of the fibrinolytic system also play a role in tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The first aim of the present study was to investigate TF expression and the presence of fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine glioma biopsies, graded according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the central nervous system. The second aim was to investigate the occurrence of intravascular thrombosis (IVT) in canine gliomas, as a potential histological marker of glioma type or grade of malignancy. An immunohistochemical study using antibodies against TF, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers was performed with 24 glioma samples, including 15 oligodendrogliomas, 6 astrocytomas and 3 mixed gliomas. Immunohistochemical data were statistically analysed to determine whether there was any relationship between glioma type and grade of malignancy. All gliomas were moderate to strongly positive for TF and the staining score was significantly higher (P = 0.04) in high-grade (III or IV) than in low-grade (II) gliomas. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition was detected in all tumour biopsies assessed, and D-dimers were detected in 17/24 gliomas. IVT was a frequent finding, but was not linked to a specific glioma type or malignancy grade. TF expression, fibrin/fibrinogen deposition, extravascular fibrinolytic system activation and IVT occur in canine gliomas. Canine glioma might be a suitable model for studying coagulation and fibrinolysis as potential therapeutic targets for human gliomas.

  19. Older Adults Under a Mixed Regime of Infectious and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Michaels-Obregon, Alejandra; Wong, Rebeca; Palloni, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective Analyze the impact of a mixed regime of infectious and chronic conditions among older adults in Mexico on their health progression. Methods A total of 12,207 adults from the Mexican Health and Aging Study were included. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between self-reported health (SRH) and covariates, including infectious and chronic diseases. Changes in SRH between 2001–2003 were analyzed using multinomial analysis. Results Older age, low SES, poor SRH and type of disease at baseline increase the odds of poor SRH at follow-up. Odds of poor SRH are highest for persons with both types of diseases (OR 2.63, SE 0.24), followed by only chronic (OR 1.86; SE 0.12) and finally only infectious (OR 1.55; SE 0.25). Discussion Mexico is experiencing a mixed regime of diseases that affects the health and wellbeing of older adults. Despite the rising importance of chronic diseases in countries like Mexico, it is premature to disregard the relevance of infectious diseases for public health. PMID:23011500

  20. How Depressive Levels Are Related to the Adults' Experiences of Lower-Limb Amputation: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senra, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    The current pilot study aims to explore whether different adults' experiences of lower-limb amputation could be associated with different levels of depression. To achieve these study objectives, a convergent parallel mixed methods design was used in a convenience sample of 42 adult amputees (mean age of 61 years; SD = 13.5). All of them had…

  1. Fatty acid oxidation is required for the respiration and proliferation of malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hua; Patel, Shaan; Affleck, Valerie S.; Wilson, Ian; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Joshi, Abhijit R.; Maxwell, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Background. Glioma is the most common form of primary malignant brain tumor in adults, with approximately 4 cases per 100 000 people each year. Gliomas, like many tumors, are thought to primarily metabolize glucose for energy production; however, the reliance upon glycolysis has recently been called into question. In this study, we aimed to identify the metabolic fuel requirements of human glioma cells. Methods. We used database searches and tissue culture resources to evaluate genotype and protein expression, tracked oxygen consumption rates to study metabolic responses to various substrates, performed histochemical techniques and fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based mitotic profiling to study cellular proliferation rates, and employed an animal model of malignant glioma to evaluate a new therapeutic intervention. Results. We observed the presence of enzymes required for fatty acid oxidation within human glioma tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that this metabolic pathway is a major contributor to aerobic respiration in primary-cultured cells isolated from human glioma and grown under serum-free conditions. Moreover, inhibiting fatty acid oxidation reduces proliferative activity in these primary-cultured cells and prolongs survival in a syngeneic mouse model of malignant glioma. Conclusions. Fatty acid oxidation enzymes are present and active within glioma tissues. Targeting this metabolic pathway reduces energy production and cellular proliferation in glioma cells. The drug etomoxir may provide therapeutic benefit to patients with malignant glioma. In addition, the expression of fatty acid oxidation enzymes may provide prognostic indicators for clinical practice. PMID:27365097

  2. Fall of the Optical Wall: Freedom from the Tyranny of the Microscope Improves Glioma Risk Stratification.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2016-02-08

    A recent study uses an integrated genomic approach to identify biologically defined subgroups of adult diffuse glioma. These results further lay the foundation for a pathological classification scheme for gliomas that incorporates both histology and molecular biomarkers, which appears far more robust than the current scheme, based solely on morphology.

  3. Molecular Profiling Reveals Biologically Discrete Subsets and Pathways of Progression in Diffuse Glioma.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Michele; Barthel, Floris P; Malta, Tathiane M; Sabedot, Thais S; Salama, Sofie R; Murray, Bradley A; Morozova, Olena; Newton, Yulia; Radenbaugh, Amie; Pagnotta, Stefano M; Anjum, Samreen; Wang, Jiguang; Manyam, Ganiraju; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ling, Shiyun; Rao, Arjun A; Grifford, Mia; Cherniack, Andrew D; Zhang, Hailei; Poisson, Laila; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Tirapelli, Daniela Pretti da Cunha; Rao, Arvind; Mikkelsen, Tom; Lau, Ching C; Yung, W K Alfred; Rabadan, Raul; Huse, Jason; Brat, Daniel J; Lehman, Norman L; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Zheng, Siyuan; Hess, Kenneth; Rao, Ganesh; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Cooper, Lee; Akbani, Rehan; Wrensch, Margaret; Haussler, David; Aldape, Kenneth D; Laird, Peter W; Gutmann, David H; Noushmehr, Houtan; Iavarone, Antonio; Verhaak, Roel G W

    2016-01-28

    Therapy development for adult diffuse glioma is hindered by incomplete knowledge of somatic glioma driving alterations and suboptimal disease classification. We defined the complete set of genes associated with 1,122 diffuse grade II-III-IV gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas and used molecular profiles to improve disease classification, identify molecular correlations, and provide insights into the progression from low- to high-grade disease. Whole-genome sequencing data analysis determined that ATRX but not TERT promoter mutations are associated with increased telomere length. Recent advances in glioma classification based on IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion status were recapitulated through analysis of DNA methylation profiles, which identified clinically relevant molecular subsets. A subtype of IDH mutant glioma was associated with DNA demethylation and poor outcome; a group of IDH-wild-type diffuse glioma showed molecular similarity to pilocytic astrocytoma and relatively favorable survival. Understanding of cohesive disease groups may aid improved clinical outcomes.

  4. Decreased Expression of MiRNA-204-5p Contributes to Glioma Progression and Promotes Glioma Cell Growth, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhiqiang; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults and exhibit a spectrum of aberrantly aggressive phenotype. Although increasing evidence indicated that the deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes to tumorigenesis and invasion, little is known about the roles of miR-204-5p in human gliomas. In the present study, the expression of miR-204-5p in clinical glioma tissues was measured by qRT-PCR. The effects of miR-204-5p on glioma cell growth and metastasis were examined by overexpressing or inhibiting miR-204-5p. We found that the expression level of miR-204-5p was significantly reduced in clinical glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. Moreover, we revealed that the introduction of miR-204-5p dramatically suppressed glioma cell growth, migration and invasion. Furthermore, mechanistic investigations revealed that RAB22A, a member of the RAS oncogene family, is a direct functional target of miR-204-5p in gliomas. In vivo, restoring miR-204-5p expression in glioma cells suppressed tumorigenesis and increased overall host survival. Our findings suggest that miR-204-5p is a cancer suppressor miRNA and overexpression of miR-204-5p is a novel glioma treatment strategy. PMID:26134825

  5. Smoking and Glioma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chuan; Zhao, Wei; Qi, Zhenyu; He, Jiaquan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To systematically assess the relationship between smoking and glioma risk. A dose–response meta-analysis of case–control and cohort studies was performed. Pertinent studies were identified by searching database and reference lists. Random-effects model was employed to pool the estimates of the relative risks (RRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 19 case–control and 6 cohort studies were included. Overall, compared with those who never smoked, the pooled RR and 95% CI was 0.98 (0.92–1.05) for ever smoker. The subgroups were not significantly different regarding risk of glioma except the group of age at start smoking (RR = 1.17, 95% CI: 0.93–1.48 for age < 20; RR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02–1.52 for age ≥ 20). Dose–response analysis also suggested no significant association between smoking and the risk of glioma, although some evidence for a linear relationship between smoking and glioma risk was observed. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides little support for a causal relationship between smoking and risk of glioma. PMID:26765433

  6. Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas. METHODS We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes. RESULTS Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma. CONCLUSIONS The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q

  7. Human immunoglobulin G levels of viruses and associated glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Sara; Hjalmars, Ulf; Juto, Per; Wadell, Göran; Hallmans, Göran; Tjönneland, Anne; Halkjaer, Jytte; Manjer, Jonas; Almquist, Martin; Melin, Beatrice S

    2011-09-01

    Few consistent etiological factors have been identified for primary brain tumors. Inverse associations to asthma and low levels of varicella-zoster virus, immunoglobulin (Ig) levels in prevalent cases have indicted a role for the immune system in the development of glioma. Because samples from prevalent cases of glioma could be influenced by treatments such as steroids and chemotherapy, we investigated pre-diagnostic samples from three large Scandinavian cohorts. To test the hypothesis that immune response levels to these viruses are associated etiologically with glioma risk, we investigated pre-diagnostic immunoglobulin levels for cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), adenovirus (Ad), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) including the nuclear antigen (EBNA1) using plasma samples from 197 cases of adult glioma and 394 controls collected from population-based cohorts in Sweden and Denmark. Low VZV IgG levels were marginally significantly more common in glioma cases than the controls (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% CI 0.41-1.13) for the fourth compared with the first quartile (p = 0.06 for trend). These results were more prominent when analyzing cases with blood sampling at least 2 years before diagnosis (OR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.37-1.08) (p = 0.03). No association with glioma risk was observed for CMV, EBV, and adenovirus.

  8. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Progressive Malignant Glioma or Ependymoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Childhood Cerebellar Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma

  9. A Phase I Study of Mebendazole for the Treatment of Pediatric Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Glioma, Astrocytic; Optic Nerve Glioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Gliosarcoma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; DIPG; Low-grade Glioma; Brainstem Glioma

  10. Exploring dual identification among Muslim-American emerging adults: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Selcuk R; Bikmen, Nida; Mir, Madeeha; Fine, Michelle; Zaal, Mayida; Katsiaficas, Dalal

    2008-04-01

    This mixed methods study explored dual identification among Muslim-American emerging adults of immigrant origin. A closer look was taken at the relationship between American and Muslim identifications and how this relationship was influenced by experiences of discrimination, acculturative and religious practices, and whether it varied by gender. Data were gathered from 97 Muslim Americans (ages 18-25) who completed a survey and produced identity maps, a pictorial representation of hyphenated identities. The findings showed that young people found a way of allowing their Muslim and American identities to co-exist, and only a small minority of the participants seemed to experience identity conflict. While religiosity was the only predictor of Muslim identification, young peoples' identification with mainstream United States culture was predicted by discrimination-related stress and acculturative practices. Gender moderated the relationship between Muslim and American identities in both survey measures and identity maps.

  11. Pten signaling in gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Knobbe, Christiane B.; Merlo, Adrian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the PTEN gene (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) was identified as a tumor suppressor gene on the long arm of chromosome 10. Since then, important progress has been made with respect to the understanding of the role of the Pten protein in the normal development of the brain as well as in the molecular pathogenesis of human gliomas. This review summarizes the current state of the art concerning the involvement of aberrant Pten function in the development of different biologic features of malignant gliomas, such as loss of cell-cycle control and uncontrolled cell proliferation, escape from apoptosis, brain invasion, and aberrant neoangiogenesis. Most of the tumor-suppressive properties of Pten are dependent on its lipid phosphatase activity, which inhibits the phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway through dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-triphosphate. The additional function of Pten as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase may also play a role in glioma pathogenesis. Besides the wealth of data elucidating the functional roles of Pten, recent studies suggest a diagnostic significance of PTEN gene alterations as a molecular marker for poor prognosis in anaplastic astrocytomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Furthermore, the possibility of selective targeting of PTEN mutant tumor cells by specific pharmacologic inhibitors of members of the Pten/PI3K/Akt pathway opens up new perspectives for a targeted molecular therapy of malignant gliomas. PMID:12084351

  12. Mixed Hepatoblastoma in a Young Male Adult: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschetti, Valeria; Fiori, Roberto; Gaspari, Eleonora; Crusco, Sonia; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma (HB) is a rare malignant tumour of the liver and usually occurs in the first three years of life. Most of these tumours arise in the embryo; hence it seems to be unusual that hepatoblastoma occurs in adults and is an exceptional cause of primary malignant liver tumour in adult patients. The diagnosis is often overlooked, and patients might be diagnosed at late stages of the disease at risk of increased mortality. In this paper we report a case of a 30-year-old man with mixed hepatoblastoma and abdominal pain, hepatomegaly and fever. The patient under went noninvasive diagnostic methods: duplex scanning, Computed Tomography (CT), and Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI). In our experience, despite the important role of histological sample provided by biopsy in defining the diagnosis, very important was the role of MRI, more than ultrasonography and enhanced CT. The MRI detects tumor features as size, margins, and ratio with neighboring organs in order to get the best surgical approach. PMID:21113306

  13. A mixed methods evaluation of televised health promotion advertisements targeted at older adults.

    PubMed

    Berry, Tanya R; Spence, John C; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Bauman, Adrian; McCargar, Linda; Witcher, Chad; Clark, Marianne; Stolp, Sean

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate television advertisements targeted at 55-70-year olds that promoted physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption. Awareness of the campaign, perceived credibility of the source, intentions to visit a promoted website, and intentions to perform the healthy behaviors were evaluated using mixed methods research. Results from a population level survey (n=1600) showed low unprompted and prompted awareness of the campaign and no differences in intentions or behaviors among those who were aware of the campaign. Unprompted recall resulted in a very wide range of responses including the citation of many commercial advertisers. Qualitative themes that emerged from the focus groups included neutral, positive, and negative comments about the advertisements, source credibility, website considerations specific to seniors, and suggestions about appropriate advertising for older adults. This research showed that the increased attention paid to the advertisements was due in a large part to negative reactions to the character used in the advertisements. Another important finding was the government was not considered to be a credible source of health information. Finally, health promoters should be cautious about websites as the primary source of information, particularly for older adults.

  14. Gliomas Genomics and Epigenomics: Arriving at the Start and Knowing It for the First Time.

    PubMed

    Filbin, Mariella G; Suvà, Mario L

    2016-05-23

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors and occur in both adults and children. Over the past few years, systematic large-scale genomic and epigenomic profiling has provided unprecedented insight into their pathogenesis, uncovering alterations in an unanticipated number of genes and regulatory elements. In this review, we discuss recent discoveries about the genomics and epigenomics of adult and pediatric gliomas and highlight how some of the founding genetic mutations reshape the cancer epigenome. These studies provide an in-depth view of the molecular routes leading to glioma development, offer insight into the cancer stem cell model, help refine classifications, and should lay the foundation for improved clinical care.

  15. Employment Status and Income Generation among Homeless Young Adults: Results from a Five-City, Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J.; Maccio, Elaine M.; Pollio, David

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods study identified correlates of unemployment among homeless young adults in five cities. Two hundred thirty-eight homeless young people from Los Angeles (n = 50), Austin (n = 50), Denver (n = 50), New Orleans (n = 50), and St. Louis (n = 38) were recruited using comparable sampling strategies. Multivariate logistic regression…

  16. Perceptions of Teaching and Learning in an Intergenerational Classroom: A Mixed Methods Study of Traditional and Returning Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Macela

    2012-01-01

    Today's colleges and universities are inundated with both traditional students and returning adult students, including baby boomers and retirees (Hardin, 2008). This study utilized a mixed methods research methodology to explore and analyze the perceptions of faculty members and students regarding the learning characteristics and learning…

  17. Phase I Study of Cellular Immunotherapy for Recurrent/Refractory Malignant Glioma Using Intratumoral Infusions of GRm13Z40-2, An Allogeneic CD8+ Cytolitic T-Cell Line Genetically Modified to Express the IL 13-Zetakine and HyTK and to be Resistant to Glucocorticoids, in Combination With Interleukin-2

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Anaplastic Meningioma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Brain Stem Glioma; Ependymoblastoma; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Grade III Meningioma; Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Mixed Glioma; Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Brain Tumor

  18. Steroid requirements during radiotherapy for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Marantidou, Athina; Levy, Christine; Duquesne, Alyette; Ursu, Renata; Bailon, Olivier; Coman, Irene; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is the standard treatment for high-grade gliomas. However, toxicity may develop during RT, such as brain edema or worsening of neurological symptoms. Surprisingly, no dedicated study had focused on steroid requirements during RT in adult patients with malignant gliomas. We evaluated prospectively all patients with malignant gliomas treated by RT in a single center from July 2006 to May 2009. Age, sex, initial Karnofsky performance status (KPS), tumor localization and histology, type of surgical resection, clinical target volume, total dose and duration of RT, concomitant treatment with temozolomide, and steroid dosage during RT and at 1 and 3 months after RT were recorded in all patients. Most of the 80 patients (70%) were already taking steroids before RT. Half of them (55%) required initiation or further steroids increase during RT. The median time to steroid increase was 8 days. Only 13% of patients remained free of steroids during RT, and the mean maximal dosage of prednisone was 55 ± 48 mg. At 3 months after RT, 29% of patients were free of steroids, and the mean prednisone dosage was 32 ± 50 mg. Unresected tumors and initial KPS ≤80% were the only variables associated with higher steroid requirements on multivariate analysis. In our series, almost all patients required steroids during RT. Poor initial KPS and biopsy were associated with higher steroid requirements.

  19. Circulating glioma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kros, Johan M.; Mustafa, Dana M.; Dekker, Lennard J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Luider, Theo M.; Zheng, Ping-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Validated biomarkers for patients suffering from gliomas are urgently needed for standardizing measurements of the effects of treatment in daily clinical practice and trials. Circulating body fluids offer easily accessible sources for such markers. This review highlights various categories of tumor-associated circulating biomarkers identified in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioma patients, including circulating tumor cells, exosomes, nucleic acids, proteins, and oncometabolites. The validation and potential clinical utility of these biomarkers is briefly discussed. Although many candidate circulating protein biomarkers were reported, none of these have reached the required validation to be introduced for clinical practice. Recent developments in tracing circulating tumor cells and their derivatives as exosomes and circulating nuclear acids may become more successful in providing useful biomarkers. It is to be expected that current technical developments will contribute to the finding and validation of circulating biomarkers. PMID:25253418

  20. Serum proteomics of glioma: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Nijaguna, Mamatha B; Kumar, Durairaj Mohan

    2009-10-01

    The prognosis of patients with glioblastoma, the most malignant adult glial brain tumor, remains poor in spite of advances in treatment procedures, including surgical resection, irradiation and chemotherapy. Genetic heterogeneity of glioblastoma warrants extensive studies in order to gain a thorough understanding of the biology of this tumor. While there have been several studies of global transcript profiling of glioma with the identification of gene signatures for diagnosis and disease management, translation into clinics is yet to happen. Serum biomarkers have the potential to revolutionize the process of cancer diagnosis, grading, prognostication and treatment response monitoring. Besides having the advantage that serum can be obtained through a less invasive procedure, it contains molecules at an extraordinary dynamic range of ten orders of magnitude in terms of their concentrations. While the conventional methods, such as 2DE, have been in use for many years, the ability to identify the proteins through mass spectrometry techniques such as MALDI-TOF led to an explosion of interest in proteomics. Relatively new high-throughput proteomics methods such as SELDI-TOF and protein microarrays are expected to hasten the process of serum biomarker discovery. This review will highlight the recent advances in the proteomics platform in discovering serum biomarkers and the current status of glioma serum markers. We aim to provide the principles and potential of the latest proteomic approaches and their applications in the biomarker discovery process. Besides providing a comprehensive list of available serum biomarkers of glioma, we will also propose how these markers will revolutionize the clinical management of glioma patients.

  1. Joint effects between five identified risk variants, allergy, and autoimmune conditions on glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Rajaraman, Preetha; Hartge, Patricia; Yeager, Meredith; Linet, Martha; Butler, Mary Ann; Ruder, Avima M; Purdue, Mark P; Hsing, Ann; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Hoppin, Jane A; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Inskip, Peter D; Brenner, Alina; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Chanock, Stephen J; Wang, Sophia S

    2013-10-01

    Common variants in two of the five genetic regions recently identified from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of risk of glioma were reported to interact with a history of allergic symptoms. In a pooled analysis of five epidemiologic studies, we evaluated the association between the five GWAS implicated gene variants and allergies and autoimmune conditions (AIC) on glioma risk (851 adult glioma cases and 3,977 controls). We further evaluated the joint effects between allergies and AIC and these gene variants on glioma risk. Risk estimates were calculated as odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI), adjusted for age, gender, and study. Joint effects were evaluated by conducting stratified analyses whereby the risk associations (OR and 95 % CI) with the allergy or autoimmune conditions for glioma were evaluated by the presence or absence of the 'at-risk' variant, and estimated p interaction by fitting models with the main effects of allergy or autoimmune conditions and genotype and an interaction (product) term between them. Four of the five SNPs previously reported by others were statistically significantly associated with increased risk of glioma in our study (rs2736100, rs4295627, rs4977756, and rs6010620); rs498872 was not associated with glioma in our study. Reporting any allergies or AIC was associated with reduced risks of glioma (allergy: adjusted OR = 0.71, 95 % CI 0.55-0.91; AIC: adjusted OR = 0.65, 95 % CI 0.47-0.90). We did not observe differential association between allergic or autoimmune conditions and glioma by genotype, and there were no statistically significant p interactions. Stratified analysis by glioma grade (low and high grade) did not suggest risk differences by disease grade. Our results do not provide evidence that allergies or AIC modulate the association between the four GWAS-identified SNPs examined and risk of glioma.

  2. Inherited predisposition to glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kyritsis, Athanassios P.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rao, Jasti S.; Sioka, Chrissa

    2010-01-01

    In gliomas, germline gene alterations play a significant role during malignant transformation of progenitor glial cells, at least for families with occurrence of multiple cancers or with specific hereditary cancer syndromes. Scientific evidence during the last few years has revealed several constitutive genetic abnormalities that may influence glioma formation. These germline abnormalities are manifested as either gene polymorphisms or hemizygous mutations of key regulatory genes that are involved either in DNA repair or in apoptosis. Such changes, among others, include hemizygous alterations of the neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and p53 genes that are involved in apoptotic pathways, and alterations in multiple DNA repair genes such as mismatch repair (MMR) genes, x-ray cross-complementary genes (XRCC), and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) genes. Subsequent cellular changes include somatic mutations in cell cycle regulatory genes and genes involved in angiogenesis and invasion, leading eventually to tumor formation in various stages. Future molecular diagnosis may identify new genomic regions that could harbor genes important for glioma predisposition and aid in the early diagnosis of these patients and genetic counseling of their families. PMID:20150373

  3. Canine spinal cord glioma.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Barber, Renee; Burnum, Annabelle; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord glioma is uncommonly reported in dogs. We describe the clinicopathologic and diagnostic features of 7 cases of canine spinal cord glioma and briefly review the veterinary literature on this topic. The median age at presentation was 7.2 y. Six females and 1 male were affected and 4 dogs were brachycephalic. The clinical course lasted from 3 d to 12 wk, and clinical signs were progressive and associated with multiple suspected neuroanatomic locations in the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging of 6 cases revealed T2-weighted hyperintense lesions with variable contrast enhancement in the spinal cord. All dogs had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of intraparenchymal neoplasia or myelitis based on history, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Euthanasia was elected in all cases because of poor outcome despite anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment or because of poor prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Tumor location during autopsy ranged from C1 to L6, with no clear predilection for a specific spinal cord segment. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the immunohistochemistry expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and Ki-67. Diagnoses consisted of 4 cases of oligodendroglioma, 2 cases of gliomatosis cerebri, and 1 astrocytoma. This case series further defines the clinicopathologic features of canine spinal glioma and highlights the need for comprehensive immunohistochemistry in addition to routine histopathology to confirm the diagnosis of these tumors.

  4. The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Terakawa, Yuzo; Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A.; Croul, Sidney E.; Rutka, James T.

    2013-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ► Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ► Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ► We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ► Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen promotes malignant glioma cell growth and inhibits cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Gang; Zhan, Yi-Ping; Pan, Shu-Yi; Wang, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Dun-Xiao; Gao, Kai; Qi, Xue-Ling; Yu, Chun-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequently diagnosed intracranial malignant tumor in adults. Clinical studies have indicated that hyperbaric oxygen may improve the prognosis and reduce complications in glioma patients; however, the specific mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. The present study investigated the direct effects of hyperbaric oxygen stimulation on glioma by constructing an intracranial transplanted glioma model in congenic C57BL/6J mice. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was used to assess the growth of intracranial transplanted GL261-Luc glioma cells in vivo, while flow cytometric and immunohistochemical assays were used to detect and compare the expression of the biomarkers, Ki-67, CD34 and TUNEL, reflecting the cell cycle, apoptosis and angiogenesis. BLI demonstrated that hyperbaric oxygen promoted the growth of intracranially transplanted GL261-Luc glioma cells in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that hyperbaric oxygen promoted GL261-Luc glioma cell proliferation and also prevented cell cycle arrest. In addition, hyperbaric oxygen inhibited the apoptosis of the transplanted glioma cells. Immunohistochemical analysis also indicated that hyperbaric oxygen increased positive staining for Ki-67 and CD34, while reducing staining for TUNEL (a marker of apoptosis). The microvessel density was significantly increased in the hyperbaric oxygen treatment group compared with the control group. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen treatment promoted the growth of transplanted malignant glioma cells in vivo and also inhibited the apoptosis of these cells.

  6. Two Unique Glioma Subtypes Revealed.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 1,122 diffuse glioma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed two new subtypes of this common brain cancer, with molecular and clinical features that diverge from the norm. The study findings also support the use of DNA methylation profiles to improve glioma classification and treatment.

  7. Clinicopathologic implications of NF1 gene alterations in diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Vizcaíno, M Adelita; Shah, Smit; Eberhart, Charles G; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have identified somatic alterations in the gene encoding for neurofibromin (NF1) in a subset of glioblastoma (GBM), usually associated with the mesenchymal molecular subtype. To understand the significance of NF1 genetic alterations in diffuse gliomas in general, we evaluated public databases and tested for NF1 copy number alterations in a cohort using fluorescence in situ hybridization. NF1 genetic loss (homozygous NF1 deletions or mutations with predicted functional consequences) was present in 30 (of 281) (11%) GBM and 21 (of 286) (7%) lower-grade gliomas in The Cancer Genome Atlas data. Furthermore, NF1 loss was associated with worse overall and disease-specific survival in the lower-grade glioma, but not GBM, Group in The Cancer Genome Atlas cohort. IDH1 or 2 mutations co-existed in lower-grade gliomas with NF1 loss (36%) but not in GBM. In our cohort studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization, NF1/17q (n = 2) or whole Ch17 (n = 3) losses were only identified in the GBM group (5/86 [6%]). Tumors with NF1/Ch17 loss were predominantly adult GBM (4/5); lacked EGFR amplification (0/4), strong p53 immunolabeling (1/5), or IDH1 (R132H) protein expression (0/5); but expressed the mesenchymal marker podoplanin in 4/5. NF1 genetic loss occurs in a subset of diffuse gliomas, and its significance deserves further exploration.

  8. The molecular biology of WHO grade II gliomas.

    PubMed

    Marko, Nicholas F; Weil, Robert J

    2013-02-01

    The WHO grading scheme for glial neoplasms assigns Grade II to 5 distinct tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage: diffuse astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, oligoastrocytoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, and pilomyxoid astrocytoma. Although commonly referred to collectively as among the "low-grade gliomas," these 5 tumors represent molecularly and clinically unique entities. Each is the subject of active basic research aimed at developing a more complete understanding of its molecular biology, and the pace of such research continues to accelerate. Additionally, because managing and predicting the course of these tumors has historically proven challenging, translational research regarding Grade II gliomas continues in the hopes of identifying novel molecular features that can better inform diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic strategies. Unfortunately, the basic and translational literature regarding the molecular biology of WHO Grade II gliomas remains nebulous. The authors' goal for this review was to present a comprehensive discussion of current knowledge regarding the molecular characteristics of these 5 WHO Grade II tumors on the chromosomal, genomic, and epigenomic levels. Additionally, they discuss the emerging evidence suggesting molecular differences between adult and pediatric Grade II gliomas. Finally, they present an overview of current strategies for using molecular data to classify low-grade gliomas into clinically relevant categories based on tumor biology.

  9. Shifts in case mix and locus of mental health care for Washington State adults with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Semke, J

    1999-01-01

    The author describes outcomes of interventions that were aimed at decreasing high use of state hospitals. Research focused on changes in state hospital case mix and dynamics of use by individuals identified as "high utilizers" before and after the Washington State Mental Health Division (MHD) implemented a series of interventions designed to reduce use. A set of recommendations are offered for policymakers who plan interventions that shift the locus of care for severely and persistently mentally ill adults.

  10. Circulating anti-filamin C autoantibody as a potential serum biomarker for low-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioma is the most common primary malignant central nervous system tumor in adult, and is usually not curable due to its invasive nature. Establishment of serum biomarkers for glioma would be beneficial both for early diagnosis and adequate therapeutic intervention. Filamins are an actin cross-linker and filamin C (FLNC), normally restricted in muscle tissues, offers many signaling molecules an essential communication fields. Recently, filamins have been considered important for tumorigenesis in cancers. Methods We searched for novel glioma-associated antigens by serological identification of antigens utilizing recombinant cDNA expression cloning (SEREX), and found FLNC as a candidate protein. Tissue expressions of FLNC (both in normal and tumor tissues) were examined by immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Serum anti-FLNC autoantibody level was measured by ELISA in normal volunteers and in the patients with various grade gliomas. Results FLNC was expressed in glioma tissues and its level got higher as tumor grade advanced. Anti-FLNC autoantibody was also detected in the serum of glioma patients, but its levels were inversely correlated with the tissue expression. Serum anti-FLNC autoantibody level was significantly higher in low-grade glioma patients than in high-grade glioma patients or in normal volunteers, which was confirmed in an independent validation set of patients’ sera. The autoantibody levels in the patients with meningioma or cerebral infarction were at the same level of normal volunteers, and they were significantly lower than that of low-grade gliomas. Total IgG and anti-glutatione S-transferase (GST) antibody level were not altered among the patient groups, which suggest that the autoantibody response was specific for FLNC. Conclusions The present results suggest that serum anti-FLNC autoantibody can be a potential serum biomarker for early diagnosis of low-grade gliomas while it needs a large-scale clinical study

  11. Melatonergic system-based two-gene index is prognostic in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kinker, Gabriela S; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M; Carvalho-Sousa, Claudia E; Muxel, Sandra M; Marie, Suely K N; Markus, Regina P; Fernandes, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas, the most common primary brain tumors in adults, are classified into four malignancy grades according to morphological features. Recent studies have shown that melatonin treatment induces cytotoxicity in glioma-initiating cells and reduces the invasion and migration of glioma cell lines, inhibiting the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) oncopathway. Given that C6 rat glioma cells produce melatonin, we investigated the correlation between the capacity of gliomas to synthesize/metabolize melatonin and their overall malignancy. We first characterized the melatonergic system of human gliomas cell lines with different grades of aggressiveness (HOG, T98G, and U87MG) and demonstrated that glioma-synthesized melatonin exerts an autocrine antiproliferative effect. Accordingly, the sensitivity to exogenous melatonin was higher for the most aggressive cell line, U87MG, which synthesized/accumulated less melatonin. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas RNAseq data of 351 glioma patients, we designed a predictive model of the content of melatonin in the tumor microenvironment, the ASMT:CYP1B1 index, combining the gene expression levels of melatonin synthesis and metabolism enzymes. The ASMT:CYP1B1 index negatively correlated with tumor grade, as well as with the expression of pro-proliferation and anti-apoptotic NFκB target genes. More importantly, the index was a grade- and histological type-independent prognostic factor. Even when considering only high-grade glioma patients, a low ASMT:CYP1B1 value, which suggests decreased melatonin and enhanced aggressiveness, was strongly associated with poor survival. Overall, our data reveal the prognostic value of the melatonergic system of gliomas and provide insights into the therapeutic role of melatonin.

  12. Interrelationship between differentiation and malignancy-associated properties in glioma.

    PubMed

    Frame, M C; Freshney, R I; Vaughan, P F; Graham, D I; Shaw, R

    1984-03-01

    The phenotypic expression of cells derived from human anaplastic astrocytomas, rat glioma, normal human adult and foetal brain tissue have been examined for differentiated and malignancy-associated properties. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), high affinity glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) uptake and glutamine synthetase were used as indicators of astroglial differentiation. Plasminogen activator and tumour angiogenesis factor were the malignancy-associated markers. The normal adult brain-derived lines showed some differentiated astroglial features and expressed low levels of the malignancy-associated properties. The foetal cultures contained highly differentiated astroglia while the glioma lines showed considerable phenotypic heterogeneity from highly differentiated to undifferentiated. The least differentiated glioma cells exhibited the highest plasminogen activator activities. The density-dependent control of phenotypic expression was also investigated. High affinity GABA uptake, and GFAP in rat C6 glioma cultures, increased with increasing monolayer cell density, events probably mediated by an increase in the formation of cell-cell contacts at confluence. Plasminogen activator activity decreased with increasing cell density.

  13. Interrelationship between differentiation and malignancy-associated properties in glioma.

    PubMed Central

    Frame, M. C.; Freshney, R. I.; Vaughan, P. F.; Graham, D. I.; Shaw, R.

    1984-01-01

    The phenotypic expression of cells derived from human anaplastic astrocytomas, rat glioma, normal human adult and foetal brain tissue have been examined for differentiated and malignancy-associated properties. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), high affinity glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) uptake and glutamine synthetase were used as indicators of astroglial differentiation. Plasminogen activator and tumour angiogenesis factor were the malignancy-associated markers. The normal adult brain-derived lines showed some differentiated astroglial features and expressed low levels of the malignancy-associated properties. The foetal cultures contained highly differentiated astroglia while the glioma lines showed considerable phenotypic heterogeneity from highly differentiated to undifferentiated. The least differentiated glioma cells exhibited the highest plasminogen activator activities. The density-dependent control of phenotypic expression was also investigated. High affinity GABA uptake, and GFAP in rat C6 glioma cultures, increased with increasing monolayer cell density, events probably mediated by an increase in the formation of cell-cell contacts at confluence. Plasminogen activator activity decreased with increasing cell density. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:6200130

  14. Weight-loss interventions for overweight/obese adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a mixed methods systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lesley; Ryan, Cormac; Ells, Louisa Jane; Hamilton, Sharon; Atkinson, Greg; Cooper, Kay; Johnson, Mark I.; Kirwan, John P.; Martin, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Review question/objective The objective of this mixed methods review is to develop an aggregated synthesis of qualitative and quantitative data on weight-loss interventions for overweight/obese adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain in an attempt to derive conclusions and recommendations useful for clinical practice and policy decision making. The objective of the quantitative component of this review is to quantify the effectiveness of weight-loss interventions on weight, pain and physical and/or psychosocial function in overweight/obese adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain. The objectives of the qualitative component of this review are to explore the perceptions and experiences of overweight/obese adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain of the link between their weight and pain, and the effectiveness and appropriateness of weight-loss interventions and sustainability of weight-loss efforts. PMID:27532463

  15. Isolation and culture of adult human microglia within mixed glial cultures for functional experimentation and high-content analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amy M; Gibbons, Hannah M; Lill, Claire; Faull, Richard L M; Dragunow, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are thought to be involved in diseases of the adult human brain as well as normal aging processes. While neonatal and rodent microglia are often used in studies investigating microglial function, there are important differences between rodent microglia and their adult human counterparts. Human brain tissue provides a unique and valuable tool for microglial cell and molecular biology. Routine protocols can now enable use of this culture method in many laboratories. Detailed protocols and advice for culture of human brain microglia are provided here. We demonstrate the protocol for culturing human adult microglia within a mixed glial culture and use a phagocytosis assay as an example of the functional studies possible with these cells as well as a high-content analysis method of quantification.

  16. Association of BCL2-938C>A genetic polymorphism with glioma risk in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Qian, Chunfa; Wang, Linxiong; Teng, Hong; Zhang, Li

    2014-03-01

    Glioma is the most common type of primary brain malignancy in adults. The anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of glioma. This study aimed to evaluate the potential association between BCL2-938C>A genetic polymorphism and glioma susceptibility. This case-control study was conducted in Chinese Han populations consisting of 248 glioma cases and 252 cancer-free controls. The BCL2-938C>A genetic polymorphism was detected by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and verified using DNA sequencing methods. Our data suggested that the genotype/allele of BCL2-938C>A polymorphism were statistically associated with the increased risk of glioma where the risk of glioma for genotype AA or allele A is significantly higher than wild genotype CC (odds ratio (OR) = 2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-4.10, p = 0.009) or allele C (OR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.06-1.82, p = 0.016), respectively. In addition, the BCL2-938AA genotype was significantly more common in patients with glioblastoma and in patients with grade IV glioma. Our findings indicate that the BCL2-938C>A polymorphism is associated with the susceptibility to glioma in Chinese Han populations and might be used as molecular markers for evaluating glioma risk.

  17. Glutamine Metabolism in Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Szeliga, Monika; Albrecht, Jan

    2016-01-01

    By histological, morphological criteria, and malignancy, brain tumors are classified by WHO into grades I (most benign) to IV (highly malignant), and gliomas are the most frequently occurring class throughout the grades. Similar to peripheral tumors, the growth of glia-derived tumor cells largely depends on glutamine (Gln), which is vividly taken up by the cells, using mostly ASCT2 and SN1 as Gln carriers. Tumor growth-promoting effects of Gln are associated with its phosphate-activated glutaminase (GA) (specifically KGA)-mediated degradation to glutamate (Glu) and/or with its entry to the energy- and intermediate metabolite-generating pathways related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. However, a subclass of liver-type GA are absent in glioma cells, a circumstance which allows phenotype manipulations upon their transfection to the cells. Gln-derived Glu plays a major role in promoting tumor proliferation and invasion. Glu is relatively inefficiently recycled to Gln and readily leaves the cells by exchange with the extracellular pool of the glutathione (GSH) precursor Cys mediated by xc- transporter. This results in (a) cell invasion-fostering interaction of Glu with ionotropic Glu receptors in the surrounding tissue, (b) intracellular accumulation of GSH which increases tumor resistance to radio- and chemotherapy.

  18. Population Pharmacokinetics of Selumetinib and Its Metabolite N-desmethyl-selumetinib in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors and Children With Low-Grade Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y T; Daryani, V M; Patel, P; Zhou, D; Fangusaro, J; Carlile, D J; Martin, P D; Aarons, L; Stewart, C F

    2017-03-22

    Selumetinib (AZD6244, ARRY-142886), a mitogen activated protein kinases (MEK1 and 2) inhibitor, has been granted orphan drug designation for differentiated thyroid cancer. The primary aim of this analysis was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of selumetinib and its active metabolite N-desmethyl-selumetinib in patients with cancer. Concentration-time data from adult and pediatric clinical trials were pooled to develop a population pharmacokinetic model using a sequential approach where selumetinib and N-desmethyl-selumetinib data were modeled separately. A sequential zero- and first-order absorption with lag time with a two-compartment model for selumetinib and a two-compartment model for N-desmethyl-selumetinib best described the concentration-time data. Intrapatient variability in absorption was higher than interpatient variability. The apparent drug clearance (CL/F) from the central compartment was 13.5 L/hr (RSE 4.9%). Significant covariates for CL/F were age, alanine aminotransferase, and body surface area. This study confirms that flat dosing is appropriate in adults, whereas body-surface area based dosing should be used in pediatric patients.

  19. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  20. Positron Spectroscopy Investigation of Normal Brain Section and Brain Section with Glioma Derived from a Rat Glioma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, SH.; Ballmann, C.; Quarles, C. A.

    2009-03-01

    The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixed in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.

  1. Positron Spectroscopy Investigation of Normal Brain Section and Brain Section with Glioma Derived from a Rat Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, SH.; Ballmann, C.; Quarles, C. A.

    2009-03-10

    The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixed in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.

  2. Oncolytic virotherapy for malignant glioma: translating laboratory insights into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Auffinger, Brenda; Ahmed, Atique U; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most common and aggressive brain tumors in adults, is highly resistant to currently available therapies and often recurs. Due to its poor prognosis and difficult management, there is an urgent need for the development and translation of new anti-glioma therapeutic approaches into the clinic. In this context, oncolytic virotherapy arises as an exciting treatment option for glioma patients. These natural or genetically engineered viruses are able to effectively infect cancer cells, inducing a specific anti-tumor cytotoxic effect. In addition, some viruses have been redesigned to modulate glioma microenvironment, to express cytokines to boost a systemic anti-glioma immune response and to incorporate angiostatic genes to decrease glioma vasculature. Although recent clinical trials have confirmed the safety of oncolytic virotherapies in the brain, their moderate clinical efficacy has not yet matched the encouraging preclinical laboratory results. In this review, we will discuss the leading anti-glioma virotherapy approaches that are presently under preclinical and clinical evaluation. We will also review different delivery methods, in vivo virus behavior, fate, replication, intratumoral spread, activation of anti-tumor immune response, and targeting of glioma stem cells. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of each therapeutic approach and how to overcome these hurdles to effectively translate exciting laboratory results into promising clinical trials.

  3. Overexpression of FZD7 promotes glioma cell proliferation by upregulating TAZ

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most prevalent type of primary brain tumors in adults, accounting for more than 40% of neoplasm in the central nervous system. Frizzled-7 (FZD7) is a seven-pass trans-membrane Wnt receptor that plays a critical role in the development of various tumors. In this study, we detected high-level FZD7 expression in glioma and its overexpression was associated with advanced tumor stage. In vitro functional assays showed that forced overexpression of FZD7 promoted proliferation of gliomas cells, whereas knockdown of endogenous FZD7 significantly suppressed proliferation ability of these cells. In a xenograft assay, FZD7 was also found to promote the growth of glioma cells. We further found that FZD7 could activate transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), and TAZ was required for FZD7 to promote cell proliferation in glioma. Furthermore, the univariate analysis of survival shows that glioma patients with high FZD7 expression have a shorter survival. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that FZD7 may promote glioma cell proliferation via upregulation of TAZ. PMID:27852064

  4. [Controversy on treatments for gliomas].

    PubMed

    Nomura, K

    1998-09-01

    Gliomas are representative primary malignant brain tumors, and with such tumors it is difficult to define the advanced stage. If the advanced stage indicates no curability by surgery alone, most gliomas would belong to this criterion because of their poor prognosis without any completely effective treatment. In this sense, no one could show a standard therapy to treat these unfortunate patients, for example, patients with glioblastoma, they could permit only 1 year survived even they had any applicable treatments to the lesions, these days. Treatment for low-grade gliomas has been most controversial for a long time, and no standard treatments have been determined so far. In this paper, as the treatment of low-grade gliomas it was intended to report what must be done for this patient and the present results of opinion survey for the treatment of gliomas which was done to professors of 80 institutes, from schools of medicine at all universities and medical colleges in Japan. For high-grade gliomas, some effectiveness of radiation therapy was disclosed as well as chemotherapy from recent papers. Gene therapy was also discussed briefly, its present status and future.

  5. [Anaplastic glioma. Neuropathology, molecular diagnostics and current study concepts].

    PubMed

    Wick, W; Weller, M

    2010-08-01

    According to the current WHO classification anaplastic gliomas comprise pure astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas and mixed tumors. This review summarizes findings, discusses problems and defines new questions from the phase III trials on anaplastic gliomas. The molecular subgroup analyses of the NOA-04 trial identified three molecular parameters, which predict longer progression-free and overall survival independent from the mode of therapy, radiotherapy or alkylating chemotherapy-. These are 1p/19q codeletion, methylation of the promoter of the O(6)-methylguanyl methyltransferase (MGMT) gene and hot-spot mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene. The prognostic relevance of these markers is not lower than that of histopathological subclassification but determination is potentially more robust. Therefore, marker profiles should be included into the next WHO brain tumor classification. The current standard of care for first-line treatment in anaplastic gliomas is radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The next steps, e.g. within the international CATNON trial, are to define the role and optimal sequencing of combined modality treatment focusing on radiotherapy and temozolomide. Inclusion in this trial is already based on the WHO grade and the 1p/19q status and not on the histopathological subtype. Furthermore, anaplastic gliomas are an important group of brain tumors for developing future molecular targeted therapies and should therefore be in the main focus of academic and industrial drug development, which aims at improved efficacy and avoiding long-term side-effects.

  6. The involvement of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in stem cell differentiation and in malignant glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Soumi; Xiong, Anqi; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2016-04-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans (HSPG) are major components of the extracellular matrix. They interact with a plethora of macromolecules that are of physiological importance. The pattern of sulfation of the HS chain determines the specificity of these interactions. The enzymes that synthesize and degrade HS are thus key regulators of processes ranging from embryonic development to tissue homeostasis and tumor development. Formation of the nervous system is also critically dependent on appropriate HSPGs as shown by several studies on the role of HS in neural induction from embryonic stem cells. High-grade glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor among adults, and the prognosis is poor. Neural and glioma stem cells share several traits, including sustained proliferation and highly efficient migration in the brain. There are also similarities between the neurogenic niche where adult neural stem cells reside and the tumorigenic niche, including their interactions with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The levels of many of these components, for example HSPGs and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and modification of HS are attenuated in gliomas. In this paper, HS regulation of pathways involved in neural differentiation and how these may be of importance for brain development are discussed. The literature suggesting that modifications of HS could regulate glioma growth and invasion is reviewed. Targeting the invasiveness of glioma cells by modulating HS may improve upon present therapeutic options, which only marginally enhance the survival of glioma patients.

  7. Photodynamic therapy of supratentorial gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.

    1997-05-01

    We are reporting the results form intraoperative intracavitary PDT treatment in 56 patients with recurrent supratentorial gliomas who had failed previous surgery and radiotherapy. These patients received 2mg/kg Photofin iv. 12-36 hours prior to surgical resection of their tumor or tumor cyst drainage. The median survival times in weeks for glioblastoma (GBM), malignant astrocytoma (MA), malignant mixed astrocytoma-oligodendroglioma and ependymoma were 30, 40, >56 and >174 weeks, respectively. Eight patients with recurrent GBM who received >60 J/cm2 had a median survival of 58 weeks and 24 patients who received <60 J/cm2 survived 29 weeks. The survival of patients with recurrent glioblastoma who undergo surgical treatment alone is only 20 weeks. We are also reporting the results of PDT treatment in 20 patients with newly diagnosed MA or GBM treated with intracavitary Photofin-PDT at the time of their initial craniotomy. The median survival of the whole cohort was 44 weeks with a 1 and 2 year survival of 40 percent and 15 percent, respectively. The median survival of patients with GBM was 37 weeks with a 1 and 2 year actuarial survival of 35 percent and 0 percent, respectively. The median survival of patients with MA as 48 weeks with a 1 and 2 year actuarial survival of 44 percent and 33 percent, respectively. Six patients with a Karnofsky score of >70 who received a light dose of >1260J had a median survival of 92 weeks with a 1 and 2 year survival of 83 percent and 33 percent, respectively. The mortality rate in our total series of 93 PDT treatments or brain tumor is 3 percent. The combined serious mortality-morbidity rate is 8 percent.

  8. Feasibility of School-Based ADHD Interventions: A Mixed-Methods Study of Perceptions of Adolescents and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bussing, Regina; Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka; Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Mason, Dana M.; Ellison, Anne; Noguchi, Kenji; Garvan, Cynthia W.; Albarracin, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Objective Little is known about perceptions surrounding academic interventions for ADHD that determine intervention feasibility. Method As part of a longitudinal mixed-methods research project, representative school district samples of 148 adolescents (54.8%), 161 parents (59.4%), 122 teachers (50.0%), 46 health care providers (53.5%), and 92 school health professionals (65.7%) completed a cross-sectional survey. They also answered open-ended questions addressing undesirable intervention effects, which were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Results Adolescents expressed significantly lower receptivity toward academic interventions than adult respondents. Stigma emerged as a significant threat to ADHD intervention feasibility, as did perceptions that individualized interventions foster inequality. Conclusion Findings suggest that adolescents’ viewpoints must be included in intervention development to enhance feasibility and avoid interventions acceptable to adults, but resisted by adolescents. PMID:24448222

  9. [Molecular Genetics as Best Evidence in Glioma Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Komori, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    The development of a genomic landscape of gliomas has led to the internally consistent, molecularly-based classifiers. However, development of a biologically insightful classification to guide therapy is still ongoing. Further, tumors are heterogeneous, and they change and adapt in response to drugs. The challenge of developing molecular classifiers that provide meaningful ways to stratify patients for therapy remains a major challenge for the field. Therefore, by incorporating molecular markers into the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system, the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria will be replaced by a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis", to define tumor entities as narrowly as possible. We herein review the current status of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on IDH mutation, ATRX mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, and TERT promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as BRAF and H3F3A aberrations in pediatric gliomas, the combination of which will be a promising endeavor to render molecular genetics as a best evidence in the glioma diagnositics.

  10. Gene therapy and targeted toxins for glioma.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maria G; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D; Curtin, James F; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Ghulam Muhammad, A K M; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2011-06-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of 15-18 months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors.

  11. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  12. Gene therapy for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hidehiro; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and devastating primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current treatment modalities, such as surgical resection followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy, only modest improvements in median survival have been achieved. Frequent recurrence and invasiveness of GBM are likely due to the resistance of glioma stem cells to conventional treatments; therefore, novel alternative treatment strategies are desperately needed. Recent advancements in molecular biology and gene technology have provided attractive novel treatment possibilities for patients with GBM. Gene therapy is defined as a technology that aims to modify the genetic complement of cells to obtain therapeutic benefit. To date, gene therapy for the treatment of GBM has demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in pre-clinical studies and promising safety profiles in clinical studies. However, while this approach is obviously promising, concerns still exist regarding issues associated with transduction efficiency, viral delivery, the pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Tumor development and progression involve alterations in a wide spectrum of genes, therefore a variety of gene therapy approaches for GBM have been proposed. Improved viral vectors are being evaluated, and the potential use of gene therapy alone or in synergy with other treatments against GBM are being studied. In this review, we will discuss the most commonly studied gene therapy approaches for the treatment of GBM in preclinical and clinical studies including: prodrug/suicide gene therapy; oncolytic gene therapy; cytokine mediated gene therapy; and tumor suppressor gene therapy. In addition, we review the principles and mechanisms of current gene therapy strategies as well as advantages and disadvantages of each.

  13. Hookah and Alcohol Use among Young Adult Hookah Smokers: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Soule, Eric K.; Barnett, Tracey E.; Curbow, Barbara A.; Moorhouse, Michael D.; Weiler, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Hookah tobacco smoking has grown steadily in popularity among young adults in the United States. Little attention has been given to the relationship between hookah smoking and another behavior that is common among young adults – alcohol use. The purpose of this study was to examine hookah and alcohol use among young adults. Methods Forty young adult hookah smokers (55% female) participated in focus group sessions on hookah use beliefs and a brief survey examining hookah and alcohol use including drinking alcohol before, during, or after smoking hookah. Results Quotes from the focus groups indicated that alcohol use may promote hookah use among individuals who have little or no hookah smoking experience. Alcohol use, binge drinking, and alcohol use before, during, and after hookah use were common among the participants regardless of legal drinking age status. Nearly half of the participants preferred to drink alcohol while smoking hookah due to the improved physical and social effects they associated with combining the 2 behaviors. Conclusions For some young adult hookah smokers, alcohol appears to enhance the hookah smoking experience and may play a role in hookah smoking initiation. Future research and interventions should address the association between hookah and alcohol use. PMID:26248176

  14. Mixed Electrical-Chemical Synapses in Adult Rat Hippocampus are Primarily Glutamatergic and Coupled by Connexin-36.

    PubMed

    Hamzei-Sichani, Farid; Davidson, Kimberly G V; Yasumura, Thomas; Janssen, William G M; Wearne, Susan L; Hof, Patrick R; Traub, Roger D; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Ottersen, Ole P; Rash, John E

    2012-01-01

    Dendrodendritic electrical signaling via gap junctions is now an accepted feature of neuronal communication in mammalian brain, whereas axodendritic and axosomatic gap junctions have rarely been described. We present ultrastructural, immunocytochemical, and dye-coupling evidence for "mixed" (electrical/chemical) synapses on both principal cells and interneurons in adult rat hippocampus. Thin-section electron microscopic images of small gap junction-like appositions were found at mossy fiber (MF) terminals on thorny excrescences of CA3 pyramidal neurons (CA3pyr), apparently forming glutamatergic mixed synapses. Lucifer Yellow injected into weakly fixed CA3pyr was detected in MF axons that contacted four injected CA3pyr, supporting gap junction-mediated coupling between those two types of principal cells. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling revealed diverse sizes and morphologies of connexin-36-containing gap junctions throughout hippocampus. Of 20 immunogold-labeled gap junctions, seven were large (328-1140 connexons), three of which were consistent with electrical synapses between interneurons; but nine were at axon terminal synapses, three of which were immediately adjacent to distinctive glutamate receptor-containing postsynaptic densities, forming mixed glutamatergic synapses. Four others were adjacent to small clusters of immunogold-labeled 10-nm E-face intramembrane particles, apparently representing extrasynaptic glutamate receptor particles. Gap junctions also were on spines in stratum lucidum, stratum oriens, dentate gyrus, and hilus, on both interneurons and unidentified neurons. In addition, one putative GABAergic mixed synapse was found in thin-section images of a CA3pyr, but none were found by immunogold labeling, suggesting the rarity of GABAergic mixed synapses. Cx36-containing gap junctions throughout hippocampus suggest the possibility of reciprocal modulation of electrical and chemical signals in diverse hippocampal neurons.

  15. Exercise and physical activity in older adults with knee pain: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Elaine E.; Young, Julie; Hay, Elaine M.; Foster, Nadine E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To describe and explore current exercise and physical activity behaviour in older adults with knee pain in the UK. Methods. A survey was mailed to 2234 adults ≥50 years of age registered with one general practice within the UK to determine the presence and severity of knee pain and levels of physical activity. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 questionnaire responders with knee pain. Results. The questionnaire response rate was 59% (n = 1276) and 611 respondents reported knee pain. Only ∼40% of individuals with knee pain were sufficiently active to meet physical activity recommendations. Interviews revealed individual differences in the type and setting of physical activity completed and some self-monitored their symptoms in response to physical activity in order to guide future behaviour. Conclusion. Innovative interventions that can be adapted to suit individual needs and preferences are required to help older adults with knee pain become more physically active. PMID:25187640

  16. Rehabilitation of patients with glioma.

    PubMed

    Vargo, Mary; Henriksson, Roger; Salander, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Disabling sequelae occur in a majority of patients diagnosed with brain tumor, including glioma, such as cognitive deficits, weakness, and visual perceptual changes. Often, multiple impairments are present concurrently. Healthcare staff must be aware of the "biographic disruption" the patient with glioma has experienced. While prognostic considerations factor into rehabilitation goals and expectations, regardless of prognosis the treatment team must offer cohesive support, facilitating hope, function, and quality of life. Awareness of family and caregiver concerns plays an important role in the overall care. Inpatient rehabilitation, especially after surgical resection, has been shown to result in functional improvement and homegoing rates on a par with individuals with other neurologic conditions, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury. Community integration comprises a significant element of life satisfaction, as has been shown in childhood glioma survivors. Employment is often affected by the glioma diagnosis, but may be ameliorated, when appropriate, by addressing modifiable factors such as depression, fatigue, or sleep disturbance, or by workplace accommodations. Further research is needed into many facets of rehabilitation in the setting of glioma, including establishing better care models for consistently identifying and addressing functional limitations in this population, measuring outcomes of various levels of rehabilitation care, identifying optimal physical activity strategies, delineating the long-term effects of rehabilitation interventions, and exploring impact of rehabilitation interventions on caregiver burden. The effective elements of cognitive rehabilitation, including transition of cognitive strategies to everyday living, need to be better defined.

  17. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  18. The Case for Mixed Methodologies in Researching the Teacher's Use of Humour in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struthers, John

    2011-01-01

    Inconsistencies within the literature result in teachers not having sufficient guidance to develop their humour use in support of learning without risking their professionalism. This article argues for more comprehensive evidence to guide teachers' use of humour, based on mixed methodological approaches. The case is also made for the Interpersonal…

  19. Differential response of glioma cells to FOXO1-directed therapy.

    PubMed

    Lau, Cara J; Koty, Zaf; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2009-07-01

    Gliomas are the most common adult primary brain tumors, and the most malignant form, glioblastoma multiforme, is invariably fatal. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway is altered in most glioblastoma multiforme. PTEN, an important negative regulator of the PI3K-Akt pathway, is also commonly mutated in glioma, leading to constitutive activation of Akt. One ultimate consequence is phosphorylation and inactivation of FOXO forkhead transcription factors that regulate genes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, nutrient availability, DNA repair, stress, and angiogenesis. We tested the ability of a mutant FOXO1 factor that is not subject to Akt phosphorylation to overcome dysregulated PI3K-Akt signaling in two PTEN-null glioma cell lines, U87 and U251. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of the mutant FOXO1 successfully restored cell cycle arrest and induced cell death in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo in xenograft models of human glioma (33% survival at 1 year of animals bearing U251 tumors). However, U87 were much more resistant than U251 to mutant FOXO1-induced death, showing evidence of increased nuclear export and Akt-independent phosphorylation of FOXO1 at S249. A cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inhibitor decreased phosphorylation of S249 and rendered U87 cells significantly more susceptible to mutant FOXO1-induced death. Our results indicate that targeting FOXO1, which is at the convergence point of several growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase pathways, can effectively induce glioma cell death and inhibit tumor growth. They also highlight the importance of Akt-independent phosphorylation events in the nuclear export of FOXO1.

  20. Meat and haem iron intake in relation to glioma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    PubMed

    Ward, Heather A; Gayle, Alicia; Jakszyn, Paula; Merritt, Melissa; Melin, Beatrice; Freisling, Heinz; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Kyrozis, Andreas; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Mattiello, Amalia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peeters, Petra H; Quirós, José Ramón; Agudo, Antonio; Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel; Larrañaga, Nerea; Huerta, José M; Barricarte, Aurelio; Sonestedt, Emily; Drake, Isabel; Sandström, Maria; Travis, Ruth C; Ferrari, Pietro; Riboli, Elio; Cross, Amanda J

    2016-11-11

    Diets high in red or processed meat have been associated positively with some cancers, and several possible underlying mechanisms have been proposed, including iron-related pathways. However, the role of meat intake in adult glioma risk has yielded conflicting findings because of small sample sizes and heterogeneous tumour classifications. The aim of this study was to examine red meat, processed meat and iron intake in relation to glioma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. In this prospective cohort study, 408 751 individuals from nine European countries completed demographic and dietary questionnaires at recruitment. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine intake of red meat, processed meat, total dietary iron and haem iron in relation to incident glioma. During an average follow-up of 14.1 years, 688 incident glioma cases were diagnosed. There was no evidence that any of the meat variables (red, processed meat or subtypes of meat) or iron (total or haem) were associated with glioma; results were unchanged when the first 2 years of follow-up were excluded. This study suggests that there is no association between meat or iron intake and adult glioma. This is the largest prospective analysis of meat and iron in relation to glioma and as such provides a substantial contribution to a limited and inconsistent literature.

  1. [Genetics and brain gliomas].

    PubMed

    Alentorn, Agusti; Labussière, Marianne; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Chromosome arms 1p and 19q codeletion, corresponding to an unbalanced reciprocal translocation t(1;19)(q10;p10), is seen in oligodendroglial tumours and is associated with better prognosis and better chemosensitivity. BRAF abnormalities are observed in pilocytic astrocytomas (tandem duplication-rearrangement) and in pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas (BRAF V600E mutation). The vast majority of primary or de novo glioblastomas exhibit genetic abnormalities disrupting the intracellular signaling pathways of: transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors to growth factors and their downstream signaling pathways (i.e. NF1-RAS-RAF-MAPK and PTEN-PI3K-AKT-TSC-mTOR); RB and; TP53. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are frequent in diffuse grade II and grade III gliomas and in secondary glioblastomas. They are diagnostic and favorable independent prognostic biomarkers. In contrast, they are rare in primary or de novo glioblastomas and not reported in pilocytic astrocytomas. Germlin mutations in MSH2/MLH1/PMS2/MSH6, CDKN2A, TSC1/TSC2, PTEN, TP53 and NF1/NF2 predispose to glial tumors in the setting of hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in TERT,CCDC26, CDKN2A/CDKN2B, RTEL, EGFR and PHLDB1 confer an inherited susceptibility to glial tumors.

  2. Glutamine Addiction In Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Javier; Alonso, Francisco J; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Campos-Sandoval, José A

    2017-03-09

    Cancer cells develop and succeed by shifting to different metabolic programs compared with their normal cell counterparts. One of the classical hallmarks of cancer cells is their higher glycolysis rate and lactate production even in the presence of abundant O2 (Warburg effect). Another common metabolic feature of cancer cells is a high rate of glutamine (Gln) consumption normally exceeding their biosynthetic and energetic needs. The term Gln addiction is now widely used to reflect the strong dependence shown by most cancer cells for this essential nitrogen substrate after metabolic reprogramming. A Gln/glutamate (Glu) cycle occurs between host tissues and the tumor in order to maximize its growth and proliferation rates. The mechanistic basis for this deregulated tumor metabolism and how these changes are connected to oncogenic and tumor suppressor pathways are becoming increasingly understood. Based on these advances, new avenues of research have been initiated to find novel therapeutic targets and to explore strategies that interfere with glutamine metabolism as anticancer therapies. In this review, we provided an updated overview of glutamine addiction in glioma, the most prevalent type of brain tumor.

  3. Adaptive Strategies and Person-Environment Fit among Functionally Limited Older Adults Aging in Place: A Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Laura L.; Steggell, Carmen D.; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Older adults prefer to age in place, necessitating a match between person and environment, or person-environment (P-E) fit. In occupational therapy practice, home modifications can support independence, but more knowledge is needed to optimize interventions targeting the housing situation of older adults. In response, this study aimed to explore the accessibility and usability of the home environment to further understand adaptive environmental behaviors. Mixed methods data were collected using objective and perceived indicators of P-E fit among 12 older adults living in community-dwelling housing. Quantitative data described objective P-E fit in terms of accessibility, while qualitative data explored perceived P-E fit in terms of usability. While accessibility problems were prevalent, participants’ perceptions of usability revealed a range of adaptive environmental behaviors employed to meet functional needs. A closer examination of the P-E interaction suggests that objective accessibility does not always stipulate perceived usability, which appears to be malleable with age, self-perception, and functional competency. Findings stress the importance of evaluating both objective and perceived indicators of P-E fit to provide housing interventions that support independence. Further exploration of adaptive processes in older age may serve to deepen our understanding of both P-E fit frameworks and theoretical models of aging well. PMID:26404352

  4. Developing and Evaluating a Website to Guide Older Adults in Their Health Information Searches: A Mixed-Methods Approach.

    PubMed

    Fink, Arlene; Beck, John C

    2015-08-01

    This mixed-methods study developed and evaluated an online program to improve older adults' skills in identifying high-quality web-based health information. We conducted focus groups and individual interviews to collect data on older adults' preferences for online instruction and information. We used the findings to develop, pilot test, and evaluate an interactive website which was grounded in health behavior change models, adult education, and website construction. Sixty four participants were randomly assigned to Your Health Online: Guiding eSearches or to an analogous slide-based-tutorial and compared in their knowledge, self-efficacy, and program assessment. Experimental participants assigned significantly higher ratings of usability and learning to the new site than controls did to their tutorial although no differences were found in self-efficacy or knowledge. Experimental participants reported that participation was likely to improve future searches. Information is now needed to examine if such programs actually improve health searches, ehealth literacy, and health outcomes.

  5. Attractive toxic sugar baits mixed with pyriproxyfen sprayed on plants against adult and larval Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Ali; Scott, Jodi M; Qualls, Whitney A; Müller, Günter C; Xue, Rui-De

    2014-07-01

    The effect of spraying a mixture of the insect growth regulator (IGR) pyriproxyfen (1 mg/liter) and either 1% boric acid sugar bait or eugenol sugar bait on croton petra plants (Codiaeum variegatum L.) was evaluated against the container-inhabiting mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse). Treatments were applied to plants and evaluated against adult and larval Ae. albopictus in the laboratory through contact and wash off experiments, respectively. The control treatment lacked an active ingredient and were treated with an attractive sugar bait. The plants treated with attractive toxic sugar baits plus the IGR resulted in 60-100% mortality of laboratory-reared adult Ae. albopictus. The pyriproxyfen solutions collected from the plant wash experiment resulted in 80-100% emergence inhibition to the exposed third- and fourth-instar larvae, compared with the untreated control. Attractive toxic sugar baits mixed with the IGR not only provide effective control of adult mosquitoes, but also provide additional control of larval mosquitoes after being washed off from the treated plants.

  6. Adaptive Strategies and Person-Environment Fit among Functionally Limited Older Adults Aging in Place: A Mixed Methods Approach.

    PubMed

    Lien, Laura L; Steggell, Carmen D; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2015-09-23

    Older adults prefer to age in place, necessitating a match between person and environment, or person-environment (P-E) fit. In occupational therapy practice, home modifications can support independence, but more knowledge is needed to optimize interventions targeting the housing situation of older adults. In response, this study aimed to explore the accessibility and usability of the home environment to further understand adaptive environmental behaviors. Mixed methods data were collected using objective and perceived indicators of P-E fit among 12 older adults living in community-dwelling housing. Quantitative data described objective P-E fit in terms of accessibility, while qualitative data explored perceived P-E fit in terms of usability. While accessibility problems were prevalent, participants' perceptions of usability revealed a range of adaptive environmental behaviors employed to meet functional needs. A closer examination of the P-E interaction suggests that objective accessibility does not always stipulate perceived usability, which appears to be malleable with age, self-perception, and functional competency. Findings stress the importance of evaluating both objective and perceived indicators of P-E fit to provide housing interventions that support independence. Further exploration of adaptive processes in older age may serve to deepen our understanding of both P-E fit frameworks and theoretical models of aging well.

  7. Functional results after Bonebridge implantation in adults and children with conductive and mixed hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Rahne, Torsten; Seiwerth, Ingmar; Götze, Gerrit; Heider, Cornelia; Radetzki, Florian; Herzog, Michael; Plontke, Stefan K

    2015-11-01

    In patients with conductive hearing loss caused by middle ear disorders or atresia of the ear canal, a Bonebridge implantation can improve hearing by providing vibratory input to the temporal bone. The expected results are improved puretone thresholds and speech recognition. In the European Union, approval of the Bonebridge implantation was recently extended to children. We evaluated the functional outcome of a Bonebridge implantation for eight adults and three children. We found significant improvement in the puretone thresholds, with improvement in the air-bone gap. Speech recognition after surgery was significantly higher than in the best-aided situation before surgery. The Bonebridge significantly improved speech recognition in noisy environments and sound localization. In situations relevant to daily life, hearing deficits were nearly completely restored with the Bonebridge implantation in both adults and children.

  8. Mixed Electrical–Chemical Synapses in Adult Rat Hippocampus are Primarily Glutamatergic and Coupled by Connexin-36

    PubMed Central

    Hamzei-Sichani, Farid; Davidson, Kimberly G. V.; Yasumura, Thomas; Janssen, William G. M.; Wearne, Susan L.; Hof, Patrick R.; Traub, Roger D.; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Ottersen, Ole P.; Rash, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Dendrodendritic electrical signaling via gap junctions is now an accepted feature of neuronal communication in mammalian brain, whereas axodendritic and axosomatic gap junctions have rarely been described. We present ultrastructural, immunocytochemical, and dye-coupling evidence for “mixed” (electrical/chemical) synapses on both principal cells and interneurons in adult rat hippocampus. Thin-section electron microscopic images of small gap junction-like appositions were found at mossy fiber (MF) terminals on thorny excrescences of CA3 pyramidal neurons (CA3pyr), apparently forming glutamatergic mixed synapses. Lucifer Yellow injected into weakly fixed CA3pyr was detected in MF axons that contacted four injected CA3pyr, supporting gap junction-mediated coupling between those two types of principal cells. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling revealed diverse sizes and morphologies of connexin-36-containing gap junctions throughout hippocampus. Of 20 immunogold-labeled gap junctions, seven were large (328–1140 connexons), three of which were consistent with electrical synapses between interneurons; but nine were at axon terminal synapses, three of which were immediately adjacent to distinctive glutamate receptor-containing postsynaptic densities, forming mixed glutamatergic synapses. Four others were adjacent to small clusters of immunogold-labeled 10-nm E-face intramembrane particles, apparently representing extrasynaptic glutamate receptor particles. Gap junctions also were on spines in stratum lucidum, stratum oriens, dentate gyrus, and hilus, on both interneurons and unidentified neurons. In addition, one putative GABAergic mixed synapse was found in thin-section images of a CA3pyr, but none were found by immunogold labeling, suggesting the rarity of GABAergic mixed synapses. Cx36-containing gap junctions throughout hippocampus suggest the possibility of reciprocal modulation of electrical and chemical signals in diverse hippocampal neurons. PMID

  9. Adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension-style diet in relation to glioma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Benisi-Kohansal, Sanaz; Shayanfar, Mehdi; Mohammad-Shirazi, Minoo; Tabibi, Hadi; Sharifi, Giuve; Saneei, Parvane; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2016-03-28

    Data on the association of adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style and glioma are scarce. We aimed to examine the association between adherence to the DASH-style diet and glioma in Iranian adults. In this study, 128 pathologically confirmed cases of glioma were recruited from hospitals and 256 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled from other wards of the hospital. Dietary intakes were assessed using a 126-item validated FFQ. Adherence to the DASH-style diet was followed considering the healthy and non-healthy foods emphasised in the DASH dietary pattern. After controlling for potential confounders, individuals with the greatest adherence to the DASH diet were 72 % less likely to have glioma compared with those with the lowest adherence (OR 0·28; 95 % CI 0·13, 0·57). Individuals with the highest consumption of fruits had lower odds for having glioma compared with those with the lowest intake (OR 0·31; 95 % CI 0·14, 0·68). A protective association was also observed between consumption of legumes and nuts and risk of glioma (OR 0·23; 95 % CI 0·10, 0·53). We found a significant positive association between red and processed meat (OR 2·60; 95 % CI 1·16, 5·81) and salt intakes (OR 2·87; 95 % CI 1·30, 6·34) and risk of glioma, after taking all potential confounders into account. Adherence to the DASH-style dietary pattern was inversely associated with glioma. In addition, some components of the DASH diet, including red meats and salt intakes, were positively associated with glioma. Consumption of nuts and legumes as well as fruits was inversely associated with glioma. Prospective cohort studies are required to confirm our findings.

  10. Inhibition of autophagy induced by quercetin at a late stage enhances cytotoxic effects on glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yunke; Shen, Chen; Li, Chenguang; Liu, Yaohua; Gao, Dandan; Shi, Chen; Peng, Fei; Liu, Zhendong; Zhao, Boxian; Zheng, Zhixing; Wang, Xiaoxiong; Hou, Xu; Liu, Huailei; Wu, Jianing; Zou, Huichao; Wang, Kaikai; Zhong, Chen; Zhang, Jiakang; Shi, Changbin; Zhao, Shiguang

    2016-03-01

    Glioma is the most common primary brain tumor in the central nervous system (CNS) with high morbidity and mortality in adults. Although standardized comprehensive therapy has been adapted, the prognosis of glioma patients is still frustrating and thus novel therapeutic strategies are urgently in need. Quercetin (Quer), an important flavonoid compound found in many herbs, is shown to be effective in some tumor models including glioma. Recently, it is reported that adequate regulation of autophagy can strengthen cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs. However, it is not yet fully clear how we should modulate autophagy to achieve a satisfactory therapeutic effect. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA) and Beclin1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were used to inhibit the early stage of autophage while chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit the late stage. MTT assay was implemented to determine cell viability. Transmission electron microscopy, western blot, and immunohistochemistry were adopted to evaluate autophagy. Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to detect apoptosis. C6 glioma xenograft models were established to assess the therapeutic effect (the body weight change, the median survival time, and tumor volume) in vivo. Quercetin can inhibit cell viability and induce autophagy of U87 and U251 glioma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of early-stage autophagy by 3-MA or shRNA against Beclin1 attenuated the quercetin-induced cytotoxicity. In contrast, suppression of autophagy at a late stage by CQ enhanced the anti-glioma efficiency of quercetin. Therapeutic effect of quercetin for malignant glioma can be strengthened by inhibition of autophagy at a late stage, not initial stage, which may provide a novel opportunity for glioma therapy.

  11. Supratotal resection of diffuse gliomas - an overview of its multifaceted implications.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Y N; Duffau, H

    2017-02-06

    Successful management of diffuse low-grade and high-grade gliomas in adults is a challenge for neuro-oncologists. Indeed, due to their highly infiltrative feature, these diseases remain incurable despite therapeutic advances. Nevertheless, the elaboration of individualized therapeutic strategies has led to an improvement of both overall survival and quality of life. In particular, the impact of surgical resection on diffuse glioma survival has been extensively demonstrated. However, this impact is significant only when the resection is total (i.e., complete removal of the T2-hyperintensity in diffuse low-grade gliomas, or complete removal of the enhancement in high-grade gliomas), or at least subtotal. Interestingly, biopsy samples within and beyond the abnormalities, defined by magnetic resonance imaging, have shown that the actual spatial extent of gliomas was underestimated by this conventional imaging modality, since glioma cells were present outside the signal abnormalities. Thus, it was suggested that the removal of a margin around the tumor visible on magnetic resonance imaging, i.e. "supratotal resection", might improve the outcomes in diffuse gliomas. To achieve this type of supramaximal resection, while preserving the quality of life, a new concept is to switch from an image-guided surgery to a functional-guided surgery, i.e. to pursue the resection up to the eloquent neural networks using intraoperative direct electrical stimulation mapping in awake patients. The aim of this article was to review the recent data about supratotal resection, including both oncological and functional results. Favorable outcomes have recently opened the door to the principle of "preventive surgery" in incidentally discovered gliomas, and to the proposal of a medical screening.

  12. KIAA0247 suppresses the proliferation, angiogenesis and promote apoptosis of human glioma through inactivation of the AKT and Stat3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ying; Huang, Ning; Zhang, Xiang; Hu, Jiangang; Cheng, Si; Pi, Li; Cheng, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and aggressive type of primary adult brain tumors. Although KIAA0247 previously is a speculated target of the tumor suppressor gene, little is known about the association between KIAA0247 and glioma. In this study, we clearly demonstrate that KIAA0247 expression is decreased in glioma and was negatively correlated with the histologic grade. Overexpression of KIAA0247 in glioma cells inhibits proliferation, angiogenesis and promoted apoptosis of human glioma cells in vitro. In contrast, knockdown of KIAA0247 increases the proliferation, angiogenesis and decreases apoptosis of these cells. In a tumor xenograft model, overexpression of KIAA0247 suppresses tumor growth of glioma cells in vivo, while KIAA0247 knockdown promotes the tumor growth. Mechanistically, overexpression of KIAA0247 is able to inhibit phosphorylation of AKT and Stat3 in glioma cells, resulting in inactivation of the AKT and Stat3 signaling pathways, this ultimately decreases the expression of PCNA, CyclinD1, Bcl2 and VEGF. Collectively, these data indicate that KIAA0247 may work as a tumor suppressor gene in glioma and a promising therapeutic target for gliomas. PMID:27893430

  13. Mutant IDH1 and thrombosis in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Dusten; Schwarze, Steven R; Khoury, Laith; Thomas, Cheddhi; Wu, Meijing; Chen, Li; Chen, Rui; Liu, Yinxing; Schwartz, Margaret A; Amidei, Christina; Kumthekar, Priya; Benjamin, Carolina G; Song, Kristine; Dawson, Caleb; Rispoli, Joanne M; Fatterpekar, Girish; Golfinos, John G; Kondziolka, Douglas; Karajannis, Matthias; Pacione, Donato; Zagzag, David; McIntyre, Thomas; Snuderl, Matija; Horbinski, Craig

    2016-12-01

    Mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is common in gliomas, and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG). The full effects of IDH1 mutations on glioma biology and tumor microenvironment are unknown. We analyzed a discovery cohort of 169 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II-IV gliomas, followed by a validation cohort of 148 cases, for IDH1 mutations, intratumoral microthrombi, and venous thromboemboli (VTE). 430 gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed for mRNAs associated with coagulation, and 95 gliomas in a tissue microarray were assessed for tissue factor (TF) protein. In vitro and in vivo assays evaluated platelet aggregation and clotting time in the presence of mutant IDH1 or D-2-HG. VTE occurred in 26-30 % of patients with wild-type IDH1 gliomas, but not in patients with mutant IDH1 gliomas (0 %). IDH1 mutation status was the most powerful predictive marker for VTE, independent of variables such as GBM diagnosis and prolonged hospital stay. Microthrombi were far less common within mutant IDH1 gliomas regardless of WHO grade (85-90 % in wild-type versus 2-6 % in mutant), and were an independent predictor of IDH1 wild-type status. Among all 35 coagulation-associated genes, F3 mRNA, encoding TF, showed the strongest inverse relationship with IDH1 mutations. Mutant IDH1 gliomas had F3 gene promoter hypermethylation, with lower TF protein expression. D-2-HG rapidly inhibited platelet aggregation and blood clotting via a novel calcium-dependent, methylation-independent mechanism. Mutant IDH1 glioma engraftment in mice significantly prolonged bleeding time. Our data suggest that mutant IDH1 has potent antithrombotic activity within gliomas and throughout the peripheral circulation. These findings have implications for the pathologic evaluation of gliomas, the effect of altered isocitrate metabolism on tumor microenvironment, and risk assessment of glioma patients for VTE.

  14. IDH-1R132H mutation status in diffuse glioma patients: implications for classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Ning; Song, Hong-Wang; Yao, Kun; Jiang, Tao; Li, Shou-Wei; Yan, Chang-Xiang

    2016-05-24

    WHO2007 grading of diffuse gliomas in adults is well-established. However, IDH mutations make classification of gliomas according to the WHO2007 edition controversial. Here, we characterized IDH-1R132H mut status in a cohort of 670 adult patients with different WHO2007 grades of diffuse glioma. Patient characteristics, clinical data and prognoses were obtained from medical records. Patients with IDH-1R132H mut were younger and had better clinical outcomes than those without mutations. Differences in age among patients with astrocytomas of different WHO2007 grades were eliminated after patients were grouped based on IDH-1R132H status. IDH-1R132H mut was present more often in patients with lower Ki-67 and MGMT protein levels and higher mutant p53 levels. Ki-67 was also strongly associated with WHO2007 grade independently of IDH-1R132H mut status. Moreover, patients with Ki-67<30 survived longer than those with Ki-67≥30, regardless of IDH-1R132H mut status. Patients in the IDH-1R132H mut group with lower MGMT protein levels also had better clinical outcomes than those in other groups. Our results indicate that to better treat gliomas, IDH mutation status should be included when determining WHO2007 grade in glioma patients.

  15. Transcriptome signature of resistance exercise adaptations: mixed muscle and fiber type specific profiles in young and old adults

    PubMed Central

    Raue, Ulrika; Trappe, Todd A.; Estrem, Shawn T.; Qian, Hui-Rong; Helvering, Leah M.; Smith, Rosamund C.

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of acute resistance exercise (RE), progressive resistance training (PRT), and age on the human skeletal muscle Transcriptome. Two cohorts of young and old adults [study A: 24 yr, 84 yr (n = 28); study B: 25 yr, 78 yr (n = 36)] were studied. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained pre- and 4 h post-RE in conjunction with the 1st and 36th (last) training session as part of a 12-wk PRT program in study A, whereas biopsies were obtained in the basal untrained state in study B. Additionally, the muscle fiber type specific (MHC I and MHC IIa) Transcriptome response to RE was examined in a subset of young and old women from study A. Transcriptome profiling was performed using HG U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays. The main findings were 1) there were 661 genes affected by RE during the 1st and 36th training bout that correlated with gains in muscle size and strength with PRT (termed the Transcriptome signature of resistance exercise adaptations); 2) the RE gene response was most pronounced in fast-twitch (MHC IIa) muscle fibers and provided additional insight into the skeletal muscle biology affected by RE; 3) skeletal muscle of young adults is more responsive to RE at the gene level compared with old adults and age also affected basal level skeletal muscle gene expression. These skeletal muscle Transcriptome findings provide further insight into the molecular basis of sarcopenia and the impact of resistance exercise at the mixed muscle and fiber type specific level. PMID:22302958

  16. [Therapeutic strategies and prospects of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Taillibert, Sophie; Pedretti, Marta; Sanson, Marc

    2004-10-23

    The prognosis and the treatment of gliomas depend on age, performance status and histological grade. Symptomatic treatment relies on steroids against cerebral edema, anti-epileptic drugs for seizures and perioperatively, prevention of thrombo-embolism and digestive complications, physiotherapy. Specific therapies include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Surgery is necessary for histological diagnosis. In low grade gliomas, it has a significant impact in terms of survival. In malignant gliomas, surgery provides symptomic relief without clearly improving survival. Radiation therapy has been shown to improve survival in malignant glioma, but not in asymptomatic low grade tumors. Chemotherapy has a modest efficacy in glioblastomas, whereas oligodendrogliomas with 1p 19q deletion are chemosensitive tumors.

  17. Practical molecular pathologic diagnosis of infiltrating gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pekmezci, Melike; Perry, Arie

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to better understanding of glioma tumorigenesis and biology. Numerous glioma biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive value have been identified. Although some of these markers are already part of the routine clinical management of glioma patients, data regarding others are limited and difficult to apply routinely. In addition, multiple methods for molecular subclassification have been proposed either together with or as an alternative to the current morphologic classification and grading scheme. This article reviews the literature regarding glioma biomarkers and offers a few practical suggestions.

  18. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of early myeloid progenitors and precursors at different stages of differentiation into granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Blockade of their differentiation into mature myeloid cells in cancer results in an expansion of this population. High-grade gliomas are the most common malignant tumours of the central nervous system (CNS), with a poor prognosis despite intensive radiation and chemotherapy. Histopathological and flow cytometry analyses of human and rodent experimental gliomas revealed the extensive heterogeneity of immune cells infiltrating gliomas and their microenvironment. Immune cell infiltrates consist of: resident (microglia) and peripheral macrophages, granulocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and T lymphocytes. Intratumoural density of glioma-associated MDSCs correlates positively with the histological grade of gliomas and patient’s survival. MDSCs have the ability to attract T regulatory lymphocytes to the tumour, but block the activation of tumour-reactive CD4+ T helper cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Immunomodulatory mechanisms employed by malignant gliomas pose an appalling challenge to brain tumour immunotherapy. In this mini-review we describe phenotypic and functional characteristics of MDSCs in humans and rodents, and their occurrence and potential roles in glioma progression. While understanding the complexity of immune cell interactions in the glioma microenvironment is far from being accomplished, there is significant progress that may lead to the development of immunotherapy for gliomas. PMID:28373814

  19. Up-regulation of USP2a and FASN in gliomas correlates strongly with glioma grade.

    PubMed

    Tao, Bang-Bao; He, Hua; Shi, Xiu-hua; Wang, Chun-lin; Li, Wei-qing; Li, Bing; Dong, Yan; Hu, Guo-Han; Hou, Li-Jun; Luo, Chun; Chen, Ju-xiang; Chen, Huai-rui; Yu, Yu-hong; Sun, Qing-fang; Lu, Yi-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Gliomas are the most common neoplasms in the central nervous system. The lack of efficacy of glioma therapies necessitates in-depth studies of glioma pathology, especially of the underlying molecular mechanisms that transform normal glial cells into tumor cells. Here we report that a deubiquitinating enzyme, ubiquitin-specific protease 2a (USP2a), and its substrate, fatty acid synthase (FASN), are over-expressed in glioma tissue. Using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression and cellular distribution of USP2a and FASN in human glioma tissues. The expression patterns of USP2a and FASN correlated with the pathologic and clinical characteristics of the patients. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of USP2a and its substrate FASN were higher in high-grade (World Health Organization [WHO] grades III and IV) glioma tissues than in low-grade (WHO grades I and II) glioma tissues. Western blot analysis indicated that the average optical densitometry ratio of USP2a and its substrate FASN in high-grade gliomas was higher than in low-grade gliomas. Moreover, statistical analysis of grade-classified glioma samples showed that the level of USP2a and FASN expression increased with the elevation of the WHO grade of glioma. USP2a protein expression was detected in the nucleus of glioma tissues and an increase in expression was significantly associated with the elevation of the WHO grade of glioma by immunohistochemistry. These findings expand our understanding of the molecular profiling of glioma and could shed light on new diagnostic criteria for gliomas.

  20. Efficiency of Tank-Mixing Insecticide with Defoliant Against Adult Boll Weevil (Coleoptera:Curculionidae) Populations as Determined by Late-Season Field Disturbance Trapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large commercial field plots were used to assess the effect of tank-mixing cyfluthrin with a defoliant applied in preparation for cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., harvest on adult boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, populations in south Texas during 2002 and 2003. The defoliant-insectici...

  1. "What about Me? I'm Not Like Chinese but I'm Not Like American": Heritage-Language Learning and Identity of Mixed-Heritage Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines heritage-language (HL) experience and identity of 12 adults of mixed-heritage backgrounds through in-depth autobiographical interviews. Each participant has an English-speaking American parent and an HL (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, or Vietnamese)-speaking immigrant parent. The interviews explored each participant's…

  2. Genetic therapy in gliomas: historical analysis and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias Alécio; Ramina, Ricardo; Miura, Flavio Key; Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Valiengo, Leandro da Costa

    2005-03-01

    High-grade gliomas are relatively frequent in adults, and consist of the most malignant kind of primary brain tumor. Being resistant to standard treatment modalities such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, it is fatal within 1 to 2 years of onset of symptoms. Although several gene therapy systems proved to be efficient in controlling or eradicating these tumors in animal models, the clinical studies performed so far were not equally successful. Most clinical studies showed that methodologies that increase tumor infection/transduction and, consequently confer more permanent activity against the tumor, will lead to enhanced therapeutic results. Due to the promising practical clinical benefits that can be expected for the near future, an exposition to the practicing neurosurgeon about the basic issues in genetic therapy of gliomas seems convenient. Among the main topics, we shall discuss anti-tumoral mechanisms of various genes that can be transfected, the advantages and drawbacks of the different vectors utilized, the possibilities of tumor targeting by modifications in the native tropism of virus vectors, as well as the different physical methods for vector delivery to the tumors. Along with the exposition we will also review of the history of the genetic therapy for gliomas, with special focus on the main problems found during the advancement of scientific discoveries in this area. A general analysis is also made of the present state of this promising therapeutic modality, with reference to the problems that still must be solved and the new paradigms for future research in this area.

  3. Progress in the application of molecular biomarkers in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Chen, Zhong-ping; To, Shing-shun Tony

    2015-09-11

    Gliomas are a common adult central nervous system tumor, and glioblastoma (GBM), which has a poor prognosis, is the most lethal of all gliomas. The overall survival of GBM patients is only 12-14 months after diagnosis. With progress in the precision of personal medication, therapeutic options for various tumors have become gradually dependent on the molecular profiles of patients. GBM is one of the tumors in which treatment response relies largely on the molecular characteristics of the tumor. Therefore, awareness of the genetic background of each patient will help decision-making regarding the best treatment strategy to use. In this review, a novel molecular classification of gliomas based on recent findings of their genetic characteristics is introduced. Representative molecular markers, such as IDH1 mutation, 1p19q co-deletion, MGMT promoter methylation and EGFRvIII amplification, are described. Furthermore, the development of non-coding RNAs and omics studies of GBM are briefly discussed. Finally, a novel concept for non-invasive detection that could facilitate both diagnosis and treatment monitoring is presented. There is no doubt that the use of molecular profiling by biomarkers will indeed improve the overall survival and quality of life of GBM patients.

  4. ASYMMETRIC CELL DIVISION: IMPLICATIONS FOR GLIOMA DEVELOPMENT AND TREATMENT.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kate Marie; Petritsch, Claudia

    2013-12-01

    Glioma is a heterogeneous disease process with differential histology and treatment response. It was previously thought that the histological features of glial tumors indicated their cell of origin. However, the discovery of continuous neuro-gliogenesis in the normal adult brain and the identification of brain tumor stem cells within glioma have led to the hypothesis that these brain tumors originate from multipotent neural stem or progenitor cells, which primarily divide asymmetrically during the postnatal period. Asymmetric cell division allows these cell types to concurrently self-renew whilst also producing cells for the differentiation pathway. It has recently been shown that increased symmetrical cell division, favoring the self-renewal pathway, leads to oligodendroglioma formation from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. In contrast, there is some evidence that asymmetric cell division maintenance in tumor stem-like cells within astrocytoma may lead to acquisition of treatment resistance. Therefore cell division mode in normal brain stem and progenitor cells may play a role in setting tumorigenic potential and the type of tumor formed. Moreover, heterogeneous tumor cell populations and their respective cell division mode may confer differential sensitivity to therapy. This review aims to shed light on the controllers of cell division mode which may be therapeutically targeted to prevent glioma formation and improve treatment response.

  5. The pathobiology of glioma tumors.

    PubMed

    Gladson, Candece L; Prayson, Richard A; Liu, Wei Michael

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing characterization of the genetic and epigenetic alterations in the gliomas has already improved the classification of these heterogeneous tumors and enabled the development of rodent models for analysis of the molecular pathways underlying their proliferative and invasive behavior. Effective application of the targeted therapies that are now in development will depend on pathologists' ability to provide accurate information regarding the genetic alterations and the expression of key receptors and ligands in the tumors. Here we review the mechanisms that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the gliomas and provide examples of the cooperative nature of the pathways involved, which may influence the initial therapeutic response and the potential for development of resistance.

  6. Unique genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving paediatric diffuse high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris; Baker, Suzanne J

    2014-10-01

    Diffuse high-grade gliomas (HGGs) of childhood are a devastating spectrum of disease with no effective cures. The two-year survival for paediatric HGG ranges from 30%, for tumours arising in the cerebral cortex, to less than 10% for diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs), which arise in the brainstem. Recent genome-wide studies provided abundant evidence that unique selective pressures drive HGG in children compared to adults, identifying novel oncogenic mutations connecting tumorigenesis and chromatin regulation, as well as developmental signalling pathways. These new genetic findings give insights into disease pathogenesis and the challenges and opportunities for improving patient survival in these mostly incurable childhood brain tumours.

  7. A mixed methods approach to improving recruitment and engagement of emerging adults in behavioural weight loss programs

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, K. M.; Lanoye, A.; Tate, D. F.; Robichaud, E.; Caccavale, L. J.; Wing, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Emerging adults ages 18–25 are at high risk for obesity, but are markedly underrepresented in behavioural weight loss (BWL) programs and experience lower engagement and retention relative to older adults. Purpose To utilize a mixed methods approach to inform future efforts to effectively recruit and engage this high‐risk population in BWL programs. Methods We used a convergent parallel design in which quantitative and qualitative data were given equal priority. Study 1 (N = 137, age = 21.8 + 2.2, BMI = 30.1 + 4.7) was a quantitative survey, conducted online to reduce known barriers and minimize bias. Study 2 (N = 7 groups, age = 22.3 + 2.2, BMI = 31.5 + 4.6) was a qualitative study, consisting of in person focus groups to gain greater depth and identify contextual factors unable to be captured in Study 1. Results Weight loss was of interest, but weight itself was not a central motivation; an emphasis on overall lifestyle, self‐improvement and fitness emerged as driving factors. Key barriers were time, motivation and money. Recruitment processes should be primarily online with messages tailored specifically to motivations and preferences of this age group. Preferences for a program were reduced intensity and brief, hybrid format with some in‐person contact, individual level coaching, experiential learning and peer support. Key methods of promoting engagement and retention were autonomy and choice, money and creating an optimal default. Conclusions An individually tailored lifestyle intervention that addresses a spectrum of health behaviours, promotes autonomy and emphasizes activity and fitness may facilitate recruitment and engagement in this population better than traditional BWL protocols. PMID:28090339

  8. Interaction of allergy history and antibodies to specific varicella-zoster virus proteins on glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Tae; Bracci, Paige; Zhou, Mi; Rice, Terri; Wiencke, John; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiemels, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Glioma is the most common cancer of the central nervous system but with few confirmed risk factors. It has been inversely associated with chicken pox, shingles and seroreactivity to varicella virus (VZV), as well as to allergies and allergy-associated IgE. The role of antibody reactivity against individual VZV antigens has not been assessed. Ten VZV-related proteins, selected for high immunogenicity or known function, were synthesized and used as targets for antibody measurements in the sera of 143 glioma cases and 131 healthy controls selected from the San Francisco Bay Area Adult Glioma Study. Glioma cases exhibited significantly reduced seroreactivity compared to controls for six antigens, including proteins IE63 [odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12-0.58, comparing lowest quartile to highest) and the VZV-unique protein ORF2p (OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.21-0.96, lowest quartile to highest). When stratifying the study population into those with low and high self-reported allergy history, VZV protein seroreactivity was only associated inversely with glioma among individuals self-reporting more than two allergies. The data provide insight into both allergy and VZV effects on glioma: strong anti-VZV reactions in highly allergic individuals are associated with reduced occurrence of glioma. This result suggests a role for specificity in the anti-VZV immunity in brain tumor suppression for both individual VZV antigens and in the fine-tuning of the immune response by allergy. Anti-VZV reactions may also be a biomarker of effective CNS immunosurveillance owing to the tropism of the virus.

  9. TRPM7 channels regulate glioma stem cell through STAT3 and Notch signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingli; Inoue, Koichi; Leng, Tiandong; Guo, Shanchun; Xiong, Zhi-gang

    2014-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults with median survival time of 14.6 months. A small fraction of cancer stem cells (CSC) initiate and maintain tumors thus driving glioma tumorigenesis and being responsible for resistance to classical chemo- and radio-therapies. It is desirable to identify signaling pathways related to CSC to develop novel therapies to selectively target them. Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7, also known as TRPM7 is a ubiquitous, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) permeable ion channels that are special in being both an ion channel and a serine/threonine kinase. In studies of glioma cells silenced for TRPM7, we demonstrated that Notch (Notch1, JAG1, Hey2, and Survivin) and STAT3 pathways are down regulated in glioma cells grown in monolayer. Furthermore, phospho-STAT3, Notch target genes and CSC markers (ALDH1 and CD133) were significantly higher in spheroid glioma CSCs when compared with monolayer cultures. The results further show that tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT3 binds and activates the ALDH1 promoters in glioma cells. We found that TRMP7-induced upregulation of ALDH1 expression is associated with increases in ALDH1 activity and is detectable in stem-like cells when expanded as spheroid CSCs. Finally, TRPM7 promotes proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells. These demonstrate that TRPM7 activates JAK2/STAT3 and/or Notch signaling pathways and leads to increased cell proliferation and migration. These findings for the first time demonstrates that TRPM7 (1) activates a previously unrecognized STAT3→ALDH1 pathway, and (2) promotes the induction of ALDH1 activity in glioma cells.

  10. Plexin-B1 indirectly affects glioma invasiveness and angiogenesis by regulating the RhoA/αvβ3 signaling pathway and SRPK1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yingwei; Li, Li; Zhang, Luping; Guo, Xuyan; Feng, Zhuoying; Zhou, Junchen; Zhou, Shuai; Feng, Guoying; Han, Fengchan; Huang, Wenhua; Yang, Jun; Huang, Fei

    2016-08-01

    Gliomas are one of the most common primary brain tumors in adults. They display aggressive invasiveness, are highly vascular, and have a poor prognosis. Plexin-B1 is involved in numerous cellular processes, especially cellular migration and angiogenesis. However, the role and regulatory mechanisms of Plexin-B1 in gliomas are not understood and were thus investigated in this study. By using multiple and diverse experimental techniques, we investigated cell apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell migration and invasion, angiogenesis, PI3K and Akt phosphorylation, and also the levels of SRPK1 and αvβ3 in glioma cells and animal glioma tissues. The results indicated that Plexin-B1 expression in glioma cell lines is increased compared to normal human astrocytes. Plexin-B1 mediates RhoA/integrin αvβ3 involved in the PI3K/Akt pathway and SRPK1 to influence the growth of glioma cell, angiogenesis, and motility in vitro and in vivo. Thus, Plexin-B1 signaling regulates the Rho/αvβ3/PI3K/Akt pathway and SRPK1, which are involved in glioma invasiveness and angiogenesis. Therefore, the new drug research should focus on Plexin-B1 as a target for the treatment of glioma invasion and angiogenesis.

  11. Knockdown of long non-coding RNA HOTAIR inhibits malignant biological behaviors of human glioma cells via modulation of miR-326

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jing; Yao, Yi-long; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yun-hui; Ma, Jun; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiao-bai; Li, Zhi-qing; Wang, Zhen-hua; Xue, Yi-xue

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most common and aggressive primary adult brain tumor. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in a variety of biological properties of cancers. Here, we elucidated the function and the possible molecular mechanisms of lncRNA HOTAIR in human glioma U87 and U251 cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that HOTAIR expression was up-regulated in glioma tissues and cell lines. Knockdown of HOTAIR exerted tumor-suppressive function in glioma cells. Further, HOTAIR was confirmed to be the target of miR-326 and miR-326 mediated the tumor-suppressive effects of HOTAIR knockdown on glioma cell lines. Moreover, over-expressed miR-326 reduced the FGF1 expression which played an oncogenic role in glioma by activating PI3K/AKT and MEK 1/2 pathways. In addition, the in vivo studies also supported the above findings. Taken together, knockdown of HOTAIR up-regulated miR-326 expression, and further inducing the decreased expression of FGF1, these results provided a comprehensive analysis of HOTAIR-miR-326-FGF1 axis in human glioma and provided a new potential therapeutic strategy for glioma treatment. PMID:26183397

  12. Autologous glioma cell vaccine admixed with interleukin-4 gene transfected fibroblasts in the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hideho; Lieberman, Frank S; Walter, Kevin A; Lunsford, L Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas S; Bejjani, Ghassan K; Hamilton, Ronald L; Torres-Trejo, Alejandro; Kalinski, Pawel; Cai, Quan; Mabold, Jennifer L; Edington, Howard D; Butterfield, Lisa H; Whiteside, Theresa L; Potter, Douglas M; Schold, S Clifford; Pollack, Ian F

    2007-01-01

    Background The prognosis for malignant gliomas remains dismal. We addressed the safety, feasibility and preliminary clinical activity of the vaccinations using autologous glioma cells and interleukin (IL)-4 gene transfected fibroblasts. Methods In University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) protocol 95-033, adult participants with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) received gross total resection (GTR) of the recurrent tumors, followed by two vaccinations with autologous fibroblasts retrovirally transfected with TFG-IL4-Neo-TK vector admixed with irradiated autologous glioma cells. In UPCI 99-111, adult participants with newly diagnosed GBM or AA, following GTR and radiation therapy, received two intradermal vaccinations with the TFG-IL4-Neo-TK-transfected fibroblasts admixed with type-1 dendritic cells (DC) loaded with autologous tumor lysate. The participants were evaluated for occurrence of adverse events, immune response, and clinical response by radiological imaging. Results and Discussion In UPCI 95-033, only 2 of 6 participants received the vaccinations. Four other participants were withdrawn from the trial because of tumor progression prior to production of the cellular vaccine. However, both participants who received two vaccinations demonstrated encouraging immunological and clinical responses. Biopsies from the local vaccine sites from one participant displayed IL-4 dose-dependent infiltration of CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells. Interferon (IFN)-γ Enzyme-Linked Immuno-SPOT (ELISPOT) assay in another human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2+ participant demonstrated systemic T-cell responses against an HLA-A2-restricted glioma-associated antigen (GAA) epitope EphA2883–891. Moreover, both participants demonstrated clinical and radiological improvement with no evidence of allergic encephalitis, although both participants eventually succumbed with the tumor recurrence. In 99-111, 5 of 6 enrolled participants received scheduled

  13. Intrinsic protective mechanisms of the neuron-glia network against glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Matsutani, Tomoo; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2016-04-01

    Gliomas arising in the brain parenchyma infiltrate into the surrounding brain and break down established complex neuron-glia networks. However, mounting evidence suggests that initially the network microenvironment of the adult central nervous system (CNS) is innately non-permissive to glioma cell invasion. The main players are inhibitory molecules in CNS myelin, as well as proteoglycans associated with astrocytes. Neural stem cells, and neurons themselves, possess inhibitory functions against neighboring tumor cells. These mechanisms have evolved to protect the established neuron-glia network, which is necessary for brain function. Greater insight into the interaction between glioma cells and the surrounding neuron-glia network is crucial for developing new therapies for treating these devastating tumors while preserving the important and complex neural functions of patients.

  14. Addressing “Nature-Deficit Disorder”: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study of Young Adults Attending a Wilderness Camp

    PubMed Central

    Warber, Sara L.; DeHudy, Ashley A.; Bialko, Matthew F.; Marselle, Melissa R.; Irvine, Katherine N.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Rapid urbanization raises concern about chronic human health issues along with less frequent interaction with the natural world. “Nature-deficit disorder,” a nonclinical term, describes this potential impact on the well-being of youth. We conducted a mixed methods pilot study of young adults attending a four-week wilderness camp to investigate whether nature-based camp experiences would increase connection to nature and promote multiple dimensions of well-being. Methods. Participants completed precamp (n = 46) and postcamp (n = 36) online questionnaires including nature-related and holistic well-being measures. Differences were investigated using paired t-tests. Interviews (n = 16) explored camp experiences and social relations. Results. All nature-related measures—exposure, knowledge, skills, willingness to lead, perceived safety, sense of place, and nature connection—significantly increased. Well-being outcomes also significantly improved, including perceived stress, relaxation, positive and negative emotions, sense of wholeness, and transcendence. Physical activity and psychological measures showed no change. Interviews described how the wilderness environment facilitated social connections. Conclusion. Findings illustrate the change in nature relations and well-being that wilderness camp experiences can provide. Results can guide future research agendas and suggest that nature immersion experiences could address the risk of “nature-deficit disorder,” improve health, and prepare future environmental leaders. PMID:26788110

  15. Interferon-α/β enhances temozolomide activity against MGMT-positive glioma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dong; Guo, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Sai, Ke; Yang, Qun-Ying; Chen, Yin-Sheng; Chen, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jie; Panasci, Lawrence; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Glioma is one of the most common primary tumors of the central nervous system in adults. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal type of glioma, whose 5-year survival is 9.8% at best. Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) play an important role in recurrence and treatment resistance. MGMT is a DNA repair protein that removes DNA adducts and therefore attenuates treatment efficiency. It has been reported that interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β) downregulates the level of MGMT and sensitizes glioma cells to temozolomide. In the present study, we assessed whether IFN-α/β is able to sensitize GSCs to temozolomide by modulating MGMT expression. Upon the treatment of IFN-α/β, the efficacy of temozolomide against MGMT‑positive GSCs was markedly enhanced by combination treatment with IFN-α/β when compared with the temozolomide single agent group, and MGMT expression was markedly decreased at the same time. Further mechanistic study showed that IFN-α/β suppressed the NF-κB activity, which further mediated the sensitization of MGMT‑positive GSCs to temozolomide. Our data therefore demonstrated that the application of IFN-α/β is a promising agent with which to enhance temozolomide efficiency and reduce drug resistance, and our findings shed light on improving clinical outcomes and prolonging the survival of patients with malignant gliomas.

  16. Molecular neuropathology of low-grade gliomas and its clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, M J; Reifenberger, G

    2010-01-01

    The term "low-grade glioma" refers to a heterogeneous group of slowly growing glial tumors corresponding histologically to World Health Organization (WHO) grade I or II. This group includes astrocytic, oligodendroglial, oligoastrocytic and ependymal tumor entities, most of which preferentially manifest in children and young adults. Depending on histological type and WHO grade, growth patterns of low-grade gliomas are quite variable, with some tumors diffusely infiltrating the surrounding central nervous system tissue and others showing well demarcated growth. Furthermore, some entities tend to recur and show spontaneous malignant progression while others remain stable for many years. This review provides a condensed overview concerning the molecular genetics of different glioma entities subsumed under the umbrella of low-grade glioma. For a better understanding the cardinal epidemiological, histological and immunohistochemical features of each entity are shortly outlined. Multiple cytogenetic, chromosomal and genetic alterations have been identified in low-grade gliomas to date, with distinct genetic patterns being associated with the individual tumor subtypes. Some of these molecular alterations may serve as a diagnostic adjunct for tumor classification in cases with ambiguous histological features. However, to date only few molecular changes have been associated with clinical outcome, such as the combined losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q as a favorable prognostic marker in patients with oligodendroglial tumors.

  17. Associations of High-Grade Glioma With Glioma Risk Alleles and Histories of Allergy and Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Daniel H.; Yang, Ping; Johnson, Derek R.; Decker, Paul A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Rice, Terri; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Ali-Osman, Francis; Wang, Frances; Stoddard, Shawn M.; Sprau, Debra J.; Kosel, Matthew L.; Wiencke, John K.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Patoka, Joseph S.; Davis, Faith; McCarthy, Bridget; Rynearson, Amanda L.; Worra, Joel B.; Fridley, Brooke L.; O’Neill, Brian Patrick; Buckner, Jan C.; Il’yasova, Dora; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2011-01-01

    Glioma risk has consistently been inversely associated with allergy history but not with smoking history despite putative biologic plausibility. Data from 855 high-grade glioma cases and 1,160 controls from 4 geographic regions of the United States during 1997–2008 were analyzed for interactions between allergy and smoking histories and inherited variants in 5 established glioma risk regions: 5p15.3 (TERT), 8q24.21 (CCDC26/MLZE), 9p21.3 (CDKN2B), 11q23.3 (PHLDB1/DDX6), and 20q13.3 (RTEL1). The inverse relation between allergy and glioma was stronger among those who did not (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.40, 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.58) versus those who did (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.97; Pinteraction = 0.02) carry the 9p21.3 risk allele. However, the inverse association with allergy was stronger among those who carried (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.44, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 0.68) versus those who did not carry (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.54, 0.86) the 20q13.3 glioma risk allele, but this interaction was not statistically significant (P = 0.14). No relation was observed between glioma risk and smoking (odds ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.77, 1.10; P = 0.37), and there were no interactions for glioma risk of smoking history with any of the risk alleles. The authors’ observations are consistent with a recent report that the inherited glioma risk variants in chromosome regions 9p21.3 and 20q13.3 may modify the inverse association of allergy and glioma. PMID:21742680

  18. Retinoids in the treatment of glioma: a new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mawson, Anthony R

    2012-01-01

    Primary brain tumors are among the top ten causes of cancer-related deaths in the US. Malignant gliomas account for approximately 70% of the 22,500 new cases of malignant primary brain tumors diagnosed in adults each year and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Despite optimal treatment, the prognosis for patients with gliomas remains poor. The use of retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners) in the treatment of certain tumors was originally based on the assumption that these conditions were associated with an underlying deficiency of vitamin A and that supplementation with pharmacological doses would correct the deficiency. Yet the results of retinoid treatment have been only modestly beneficial and usually short-lived. Studies also indicate that vitamin A excess and supplementation have pro-oxidant effects and are associated with increased risks of mortality from cancer and other diseases. The therapeutic role of vitamin A in cancer thus remains uncertain and a new perspective on the facts is needed. The modest and temporary benefits of retinoid treatment could result from a process of feedback inhibition, whereby exogenous retinoid temporarily inhibits the endogenous synthesis of these compounds. In fact, repeated and/or excessive exposure of the tissues to endogenous retinoic acid may contribute to carcinogenesis. Gliomas, in particular, may result from an imbalance in retinoid receptor expression initiated by environmental factors that increase the endogenous production of retinoic acid in glia. At the receptor level, it is proposed that this imbalance is characterized by excessive expression of retinoic acid receptor-α (RARα) and reduced expression of retinoic acid receptor-β (RARβ). This suggests a potential new treatment strategy for gliomas, possibly even at a late stage of the disease, ie, to combine the use of a RARα antagonist and a RARβ agonist. According to this hypothesis, the RARα antagonist would be expected to inhibit RAR

  19. Tubulin nitration in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Gabriella; Di Cristo, Carlo; Monti, Gianluca; Amoresano, Angela; Columbano, Laura; Pucci, Pietro; Cioffi, Fernando A; Di Cosmo, Anna; Palumbo, Anna; d'Ischia, Marco

    2006-02-06

    Immunohistochemical and biochemical investigations showed that significant protein nitration occurs in human gliomas, especially in grade IV glioblastomas at the level of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neurones. Enhanced alpha-tubulin immunoreactivity was co-present in the same elements in the glioblastomas. Proteomic methodologies were employed to identify a nitrated protein band at 55 kDa as alpha-tubulin. Peptide mass fingerprinting procedures demonstrated that tubulin is nitrated at Tyr224 in grade IV tumour samples but is unmodified in grade I samples and in non-cancerous brain tissue. These results provide the first characterisation of endogenously nitrated tubulin from human tumour samples.

  20. Human alloreactive CTL interactions with gliomas and with those having upregulated HLA expression from exogenous IFN-gamma or IFN-gamma gene modification.

    PubMed

    Read, Susana B; Kulprathipanja, Nisha V; Gomez, German G; Paul, David B; Winston, Ken R; Robbins, Joan M; Kruse, Carol A

    2003-07-01

    By flow cytometry, a panel of 18 primary glioma cell explants exhibited high expression of class I HLA-A, B, C, but class II HLA-DR expression was absent. Freshly isolated normal brain cells displayed little or no HLA antigens. Alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (aCTL), sensitized to the HLA of the patient, were generated in a one-way mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). The specificity of aCTL was confirmed to be to target cells (patient glioma cells or lymphoblasts) expressing the relevant HLA antigens. However, nontumor patient-specific aCTL did not lyse normal brain cells. Titration of antibodies to HLA class I into cytotoxicity assays blocked lysis of gliomas by aCTL, confirming aCTL T cell receptor (TCR) interactions with the class I antigen on gliomas. Furthermore, aCTL interactions with glioma cells caused their apoptosis. Coincubations of aCTL with gliomas resulted in upregulated cytokine secretion. Importantly, dexamethasone, an immunosuppressive steroid used for brain edema, did not affect aCTL lytic function against tumor, indicating that steroid-dependent patients may benefit from the immunotherapy. We also explored the use of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) to increase aCTL tumor recognition. Coincubation of gliomas with exogenous IFN-gamma (500 U/ml, 48 h) caused a 3-fold upregulation of HLA class I and a slight induction of class II antigen expression. Gene-modified glioma cells producing IFN-gamma similarly displayed upregulated HLA expression. Glioma cells incubated with exogenous IFN-gamma or IFN-gamma-transduced glioma cells were more susceptible to lysis by aCTL than their parental counterparts, thus supporting the concept of combining IFN-gamma cytokine gene therapy with adoptive aCTL immunotherapy for brain tumor treatment.

  1. PAR1 inhibition suppresses the self-renewal and growth of A2B5-defined glioma progenitor cells and their derived gliomas in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Auvergne, R; Wu, C; Connell, A; Au, S; Cornwell, A; Osipovitch, M; Benraiss, A; Dangelmajer, S; Guerrero-Cazares, H; Quinones-Hinojosa, A; Goldman, SA

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains the most common and lethal intracranial tumor. In a comparison of gene expression by A2B5-defined tumor-initiating progenitor cells (TPCs) to glial progenitor cells derived from normal adult human brain, we found that the F2R gene encoding PAR1 was differentially overexpressed by A2B5-sorted TPCs isolated from gliomas at all stages of malignant development. In this study, we asked if PAR1 is causally associated with glioma progression. Lentiviral knockdown of PAR1 inhibited the expansion and self-renewal of human GBM-derived A2B5+ TPCs in vitro, while pharmacological inhibition of PAR 1 similarly slowed both the growth and migration of A2B5+ TPCs in culture. In addition, PAR1 silencing potently suppressed tumor expansion in vivo, and significantly prolonged the survival of mice following intracranial transplantation of human TPCs. These data strongly suggest the importance of PAR1 to the self-renewal and tumorigenicity of A2B5-defined glioma TPCs; as such, the abrogation of PAR1-dependent signaling pathways may prove a promising strategy for gliomas. PMID:26616854

  2. Connexin36 identified at morphologically mixed chemical/electrical synapses on trigeminal motoneurons and at primary afferent terminals on spinal cord neurons in adult mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, W; McCrea, D A; Nagy, J I

    2014-03-28

    Morphologically mixed chemical/electrical synapses at axon terminals, with the electrical component formed by gap junctions, is common in the CNS of lower vertebrates. In mammalian CNS, evidence for morphologically mixed synapses has been obtained in only a few locations. Here, we used immunofluorescence approaches to examine the localization of the neuronally expressed gap junction forming protein connexin36 (Cx36) in relation to the axon terminal marker vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (vglut1) in the spinal cord and the trigeminal motor nucleus (Mo5) of rat and mouse. In adult rodents, immunolabeling for Cx36 appeared exclusively as Cx36-puncta, and was widely distributed at all rostro-caudal levels in most spinal cord laminae and in the Mo5. A high proportion of Cx36-puncta was co-localized with vglut1, forming morphologically mixed synapses on motoneurons, in intermediate spinal cord lamina, and in regions of medial lamina VII, where vglut1-containing terminals associated with Cx36 converged on neurons adjacent to the central canal. Unilateral transection of lumbar dorsal roots reduced immunolabeling of both vglut1 and Cx36 in intermediate laminae and lamina IX. Further, vglut1-terminals displaying Cx36-puncta were contacted by terminals labeled for glutamic acid decarboxylase65, which is known to be contained in presynaptic terminals on large-diameter primary afferents. Developmentally, mixed synapses begin to emerge in the spinal cord only after the second to third postnatal week and thereafter increase to adult levels. Our findings demonstrate that axon terminals of primary afferent origin form morphologically mixed synapses containing Cx36 in broadly distributed areas of adult rodent spinal cord and Mo5.

  3. Early presentation of de novo high grade glioma with epileptic seizures: electroclinical and neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Rosario; Figus, Andrea; Corraine, Simona

    2010-10-01

    We report the clinical, EEG and neuroradiologic findings from three adult patients who developed new-onset seizure disorders as early clinical manifestations of de novo high grade glioma. The malignancies could not be recognised at the time of the first epileptic seizure because of minimal non-specific brain abnormalities, which showed no signs of necrosis or significant contrast enhancement on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Focal EEG abnormalities were recorded in all cases and appeared consistent with the neuroradiologic findings. The patients regained normal neurological status after the first seizure but rapidly developed space-occupying necrotic lesions. Two patients underwent surgery and received histological diagnoses of the tumours. Another patient was finally diagnosed with a malignant glioma based on the neuroradiologic picture and rapid progression of the cerebral lesion. It should be noted that in adult patients, new-onset epileptic seizures might reveal the presence of malignant gliomas at a very early stage in the tumour formation process. This report indicates that typical anatomoradiologic features of de novo high grade glioma, such as necrosis and rim-contrast enhancement, could be absent at the time of the first epileptic seizure but become clear within a short period after clinical presentation.

  4. A neurocentric perspective on glioma invasion

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Vishnu Anand; Robel, Stefanie; Watkins, Stacey; Sontheimer, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are devastating tumours that frequently kill patients within 1 year of diagnosis. The major obstacle to a cure is diffuse invasion, which enables tumours to escape complete surgical resection and chemo- and radiation therapy. Gliomas use the same tortuous extracellular routes of migration that are travelled by immature neurons and stem cells, frequently using blood vessels as guides. They repurpose ion channels to dynamically adjust their cell volume to accommodate to narrow spaces and breach the blood-brain barrier through disruption of astrocytic endfeet, which envelop blood vessels. The unique biology of glioma invasion provides hitherto unexplored brain-specific therapeutic targets for this devastating disease. PMID:24946761

  5. Surgical management of low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Carter S; Straus, David; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-08-01

    Low-grade gliomas represent a wide spectrum of intra-axial brain tumors with diverse presentations, radiographic and surgical appearances, and prognoses. While there remains a role for biopsy, a growing body of evidence shows that aggressive surgical resection of low-grade gliomas may improve symptoms, extend progression-free survival (PFS), and even cure a select few patients. With the application of preoperative functional imaging, intraoperative navigation, and cortical stimulation, neurosurgeons are able to perform more complete resections while limiting the risk to patients. In this article, we describe the surgical management and current operative techniques used in the treatment of low-grade gliomas.

  6. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F. )

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  7. Pilot study of estramustine added to radiosurgery and radiotherapy for treatment of high grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Landy, Howard; Markoe, Arnold; Potter, Priscilla; Lasalle, Garrett; Marini, Angela; Savaraj, Niramol; Reis, Isildinha; Heros, Deborah; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Feun, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    Patients with high grade glioma generally have poor prognoses. Addition of radiosensitizing agents might improve the response to irradiation. The chemotherapeutic agent estramustine sensitizes experimental gliomas to radiation. Gliomas express estramustine binding proteins, and cytotoxic concentrations of estramustine metabolites are found in gliomas after oral administration. Twenty three patients, aged 25-78, with new or recurrent high grade glioma were treated with estramustine and radiosurgery and/or radiotherapy. Patients with recurrent tumors were treated with estramustine and Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery; eligible tumors were limited to 4 cm maximal diameter. Patients with newly diagnosed tumors were treated with estramustine and fractionated radiotherapy, with radiosurgery also performed if the tumor was less than 4 cm maximal diameter. Estramustine (16 mg/kg per day orally) was started three days prior to radiosurgery, or, if only radiotherapy was performed, on the first day of radiotherapy. Estramustine was continued until the completion of radiosurgery and/or radiotherapy (72 Gy, 60 fractions, 1.2 Gy bid over 6 weeks). Of the 13 patients treated for newly diagnosed glioblastoma, median survival was 16 months with 38% 2-year survival. Of five patients treated for recurrent glioblastoma, survival was 3, 8, 9, 15, and 23 + months. Two patients with recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma survived for 24 and 48+ months. One patient with recurrent anaplastic mixed glioma survived 5+ months. Two patients with newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglioma survived 20 and 42+ months. Four of the new glioblastoma patients developed deep vein thrombosis. The results of this pilot study indicate some benefit, and further investigation incorporating estramustine into clinical trials is suggested.

  8. Molecular voting for glioma classification reflecting heterogeneity in the continuum of cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Gregory N; Mircean, Cristian; Tabus, Ioan; Taylor, Ellen; Sawaya, Raymond; Bruner, Janet M; Shmulevich, Ilya; Zhang, Wei

    2005-09-01

    Gliomas, the most common brain tumors, are generally categorized into two lineages (astrocytic and oligodendrocytic) and further classified as low-grade (astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma), mid-grade (anaplastic astrocytoma and anaplastic oligodendroglioma), and high-grade (glioblastoma multiforme) based on morphological features. A strict classification scheme has limitations because a specific glioma can be at any stage of the continuum of cancer progression and may contain mixed features. Thus, a more comprehensive classification based on molecular signatures may reflect the biological nature of specific tumors more accurately. In this study, we used microarray technology to profile the gene expression of 49 human brain tumors and applied the k-nearest neighbor algorithm for classification. We first trained the classification gene set with 19 of the most typical glioma cases and selected a set of genes that provide the lowest cross-validation classification error with k=5. We then applied this gene set to the 30 remaining cases, including several that do not belong to gliomas such as atypical meningioma. The results showed that not only does the algorithm correctly classify most of the gliomas, but the detailed voting results also provide more subtle information regarding the molecular similarities to neighboring classes. For atypical meningioma, the voting was equally split among the four classes, indicating a difficulty in placement of meningioma into the four classes of gliomas. Thus, the actual voting results, which are typically used only to decide the winning class label in k-nearest neighbor algorithms, provide a useful method for gaining deeper insight into the stage of a tumor in the continuum of cancer development.

  9. Targeting immune checkpoints in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tete; Liu, Yong-Jun; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jingtao

    2017-01-01

    Malignant glioma is the most common and a highly aggressive cancer in the central nervous system (CNS). Cancer immunotherapy, strategies to boost the bodys anti-cancer immune responses instead of directly targeting tumor cells, recently achieved great success in treating several human solid tumors. Although once considered immune privileged and devoid of normal immunological functions, CNS is now considered a promising target for cancer immunotherapy, featuring the recent progresses in neurobiology and neuroimmunology and a highly immunosuppressive state in malignant glioma. In this review, we focus on immune checkpoint inhibitors, specifically, antagonizing monoclonal antibodies for programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). We discuss advances in the working mechanisms of these immune checkpoint molecules, their status in malignant glioma, and current preclinical and clinical trials targeting these molecules in malignant glioma. PMID:27756892

  10. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zoe Z.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Sun, David A.; Zhang, Yi Ping; Hunt, Matthew A.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    A major dilemma in brain-tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture, which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of (1) image-based navigation, (2) intraoperative sampling, (3) electrophysiological monitoring, and (4) enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease. PMID:26284196

  11. Time Out-of-Home and Cognitive, Physical, and Emotional Wellbeing of Older Adults: A Longitudinal Mixed Effects Model

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Time out-of-home has been linked with numerous health outcomes, including cognitive decline, poor physical ability and low emotional state. Comprehensive characterization of this important health metric would potentially enable objective monitoring of key health outcomes. The objective of this study is to determine the relationship between time out-of-home and cognitive status, physical ability and emotional state. Methods and Findings Participants included 85 independent older adults, age 65–96 years (M = 86.36; SD = 6.79) who lived alone, from the Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Changes (ISAAC) and the ORCATECH Life Laboratory cohorts. Factors hypothesized to affect time out-of-home were assessed on three different temporal levels: yearly (cognitive status, loneliness, clinical walking speed), weekly (pain and mood) or daily (time out-of-home, in-home walking speed, weather, and season). Subject characteristics including age, race, and gender were assessed at baseline. Total daily time out-of-home in hours was assessed objectively and unobtrusively for up to one year using an in-home activity sensor platform. A longitudinal tobit mixed effects regression model was used to relate daily time out-of-home to cognitive status, physical ability and emotional state. More hours spend outside the home was associated with better cognitive function as assessed using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale, where higher scores indicate lower cognitive function (βCDR = -1.69, p<0.001). More hours outside the home was also associated with superior physical ability (βPain = -0.123, p<0.001) and improved emotional state (βLonely = -0.046, p<0.001; βLow mood = -0.520, p<0.001). Weather, season, and weekday also affected the daily time out-of-home. Conclusions These results suggest that objective longitudinal monitoring of time out-of-home may enable unobtrusive assessment of cognitive, physical and emotional state. In addition, these results indicate

  12. Photochemical internalization of bleomycin for glioma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Marlon S.; Blickenstaff, Joseph W.; Shih, En-Chung; Zamora, Genesis; Vo, Van; Sun, Chung-Ho; Hirschberg, Henry; Madsen, Steen J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We study the use of photochemical internalization (PCI) for enhancing chemotherapeutic response to malignant glioma cells in vitro. Two models are studied: monolayers consisting of F98 rat glioma cells and human glioma spheroids established from biopsy-derived glioma cells. In both cases, the cytotoxicity of aluminum phthalocyanine disulfonate (AlPcS2a)-based PCI of bleomycin was compared to AlPcS2a-photodynamic therapy (PDT) and chemotherapy alone. Monolayers and spheroids were incubated with AlPcS2a (PDT effect), bleomycin (chemotherapy effect), or AlPcS2a+bleomycin (PCI effect) and were illuminated (670 nm). Toxicity was evaluated using colony formation assays or spheroid growth kinetics. F98 cells in monolayer/spheroids were not particularly sensitive to the effects of low radiant exposure (1.5  J/cm2 @ 5  mW/cm2) AlPcS2a-PDT. Bleomycin was moderately toxic to F98 cells in monolayer at relatively low concentrations—incubation of F98 cells in 0.1  μg/ml for 4 h resulted in 80% survival, but less toxic in human glioma spheroids respectively. In both in vitro systems investigated, a significant PCI effect is seen. PCI using 1.5  J/cm2 together with 0.25  μg/ml bleomycin resulted in approximately 20% and 18% survival of F98 rat glioma cells and human glioma spheroids, respectively. These results show that AlPcS2a-mediated PCI can be used to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents such as bleomycin in malignant gliomas. PMID:22612148

  13. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08 mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical

  14. Genome-Wide Analyses Identify Recurrent Amplifications of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases and Cell-Cycle Regulatory Genes in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Paugh, Barbara S.; Broniscer, Alberto; Qu, Chunxu; Miller, Claudia P.; Zhang, Junyuan; Tatevossian, Ruth G.; Olson, James M.; Geyer, J. Russell; Chi, Susan N.; da Silva, Nasjla Saba; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Baker, Justin N.; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Long-term survival for children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is less than 10%, and new therapeutic targets are urgently required. We evaluated a large cohort of DIPGs to identify recurrent genomic abnormalities and gene expression signatures underlying DIPG. Patients and Methods Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays were used to compare the frequencies of genomic copy number abnormalities in 43 DIPGs and eight low-grade brainstem gliomas with data from adult and pediatric (non-DIPG) glioblastomas, and expression profiles were evaluated using gene expression arrays for 27 DIPGs, six low-grade brainstem gliomas, and 66 nonbrainstem low-grade gliomas. Results Frequencies of specific large-scale and focal imbalances varied significantly between DIPGs and nonbrainstem pediatric glioblastomas. Focal amplifications of genes within the receptor tyrosine kinase–Ras–phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway were found in 47% of DIPGs, the most common of which involved PDGFRA and MET. Thirty percent of DIPGs contained focal amplifications of cell-cycle regulatory genes controlling retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation, and 21% had concurrent amplification of genes from both pathways. Some tumors showed heterogeneity in amplification patterns. DIPGs showed distinct gene expression signatures related to developmental processes compared with nonbrainstem pediatric high-grade gliomas, whereas expression signatures of low-grade brainstem and nonbrainstem gliomas were similar. Conclusion DIPGs comprise a molecularly related but distinct subgroup of pediatric gliomas. Genomic studies suggest that targeted inhibition of receptor tyrosine kinases and RB regulatory proteins may be useful therapies for DIPG. PMID:21931021

  15. Multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes for treating brain glioma along with eliminating glioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-tao; Tang, Wei; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-min; Wang, Yan-hong; Cheng, Lan; Meng, Xian-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain glioma is the most lethal and aggressive type of cancer. Surgery and radiotherapy cannot eliminate all glioma stem cells (GSCs) and blood–brain barrier (BBB) restricts the movement of antitumor drugs from blood to brain, thus leading to the poor prognosis with high recurrence rate. In the present study, the targeting conjugates of cholesterol polyethylene glycol polyethylenimine (CHOL-PEG2000-PEI) and D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate vapreotide (TPGS1000-VAP) were newly synthesized for transporting drugs across the BBB and targeting glioma cells and GSCs. The multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes were constructed by modifying the targeting conjugates. The studies were undertaken on BBB model, glioma cells, GSCs, and glioma-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes with suitable physicochemical property could enhance the transport drugs across the BBB, increase the intracellular uptake, inhibit glioma cells and GSCs, penetrate and destruct the GSCs spheroids, and induce apoptosis via activating related apoptotic proteins. In vivo results demonstrated that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes could significantly accumulate into brain tumor location, show the specificity to tumor sites, and result in a robust overall antitumor efficacy in glioma-bearing mice. These data suggested that the multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes could offer a promising strategy for treating brain glioma. PMID:27029055

  16. Microglia-glioma cross-talk: a two way approach to new strategies against glioma.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, Cataldo; Fioretti, Bernard; Bianchi, Roberta; Mecca, Carmen; Tubaro, Claudia; Beccari, Tommaso; Franciolini, Fabio; Giambanco, Ileana; Donato, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant and aggressive among primary brain tumors, characterized by very low life expectancy. In vivo, glioma and glioblastoma in particular contain large numbers of immune cells (myeloid cells) such as microglia and tumour-infiltrating macrophages (or glioma associated macrophages). These glioma-infiltrating myeloid cells comprise up to 30% of total tumor mass and have been suggested to play several roles in glioma progression including proliferation, survival, motility and immunosuppression. Although tumor microglia and macrophages can acquire proinflammatory (M1) phenotype being capable of releasing proinflammatory cytokines, phagocytosing and presenting antigens, their effector immune function in gliomas appears to be suppressed by the acquisition of an anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. In the present work we review the microglia-glioma interactions to highlight the close relationship between the two cell types and the factors that can influence their properties (chemokines, cytokines, S100B protein). A future therapeutic possibility might be to simultaneously targeting, for example with nanomedicine, glioma cells and microglia to push the microglia towards an antitumor phenotype (M1) and/or prevent glioma cells from "conditioning" by microglia.

  17. Medicaid Adult Dental Benefits Increase Use Of Dental Care, But Impact Of Expansion On Dental Services Use Was Mixed.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Astha; Damiano, Peter; Sabik, Lindsay

    2017-04-01

    Dental coverage for adult enrollees is an optional benefit under Medicaid. Thirty-one states and the District of Columbia have expanded eligibility for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Millions of low-income adults have gained health care coverage and, in states offering dental benefits, oral health coverage as well. Using data for 2010 and 2014 from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined the impact of Medicaid adult dental coverage and eligibility expansions on low-income adults' use of dental care. We found that low-income adults in states that provided dental benefits beyond emergency-only coverage were more likely to have had a dental visit in the past year, compared to low-income adults in states without such benefits. Among states that provided dental benefits and expanded their Medicaid program, regression-based estimates suggest that childless adults had a significant increase (1.8 percentage points) in the likelihood of having had a dental visit, while parents had a significant decline (8.1 percentage points). One possible explanation for the disparity is that after expansion, newly enrolled childless adults might have exhausted the limited dental provider capacity that was available to parents before expansion. Additional policy-level efforts may be needed to expand the dental care delivery system's capacity.

  18. A Mixed-Methods Randomized Controlled Trial of Financial Incentives and Peer Networks to Promote Walking among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kullgren, Jeffrey T.; Harkins, Kristin A.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Gonzales, Amy; Tao, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Jingsan; Volpp, Kevin G.; Asch, David A.; Heisler, Michele; Karlawish, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Background: Financial incentives and peer networks could be delivered through eHealth technologies to encourage older adults to walk more. Methods: We conducted a 24-week randomized trial in which 92 older adults with a computer and Internet access received a pedometer, daily walking goals, and weekly feedback on goal achievement. Participants…

  19. Molecular Diagnostics of Gliomas Using Next Generation Sequencing of a Glioma-Tailored Gene Panel.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Angela; Kaulich, Kerstin; Stepanow, Stefanie; Wolter, Marietta; Köhrer, Karl; Felsberg, Jörg; Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Current classification of gliomas is based on histological criteria according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. Over the past years, characteristic genetic profiles have been identified in various glioma types. These can refine tumor diagnostics and provide important prognostic and predictive information. We report on the establishment and validation of gene panel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the molecular diagnostics of gliomas. We designed a glioma-tailored gene panel covering 660 amplicons derived from 20 genes frequently aberrant in different glioma types. Sensitivity and specificity of glioma gene panel NGS for detection of DNA sequence variants and copy number changes were validated by single gene analyses. NGS-based mutation detection was optimized for application on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens including small stereotactic biopsy samples. NGS data obtained in a retrospective analysis of 121 gliomas allowed for their molecular classification into distinct biological groups, including (i) isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) 1 or 2 mutant astrocytic gliomas with frequent α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) gene mutations, (ii) IDH mutant oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q codeletion, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation and frequent Drosophila homolog of capicua (CIC) gene mutation, as well as (iii) IDH wildtype glioblastomas with frequent TERT promoter mutation, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. Oligoastrocytic gliomas were genetically assigned to either of these groups. Our findings implicate gene panel NGS as a promising diagnostic technique that may facilitate integrated histological and molecular glioma classification.

  20. Bystander effect in glioma suicide gene therapy using bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyi; Gu, Chunyu; Gao, Yun; Amano, Shinji; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    An established rat intracranial glioma was successfully treated through the tumoricidal bystander effect generated by intratumoral injection of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transduced with the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene (BMSCtk cells) followed by systemic ganciclovir administration. In the present study, we tested the bystander effect of this treatment strategy when using human BMSCs as the vector cells. Human BMSCtk cells were mixed with various kinds of brain tumor cell lines (human and rat glioma cells) and examined in vitro and in vivo tumoricidal bystander effects, by co-culture study and co-implantation study in the nude mouse, respectively. A significant in vitro bystander effect was observed between human BMSCtk cells and any of the tumor cells examined in the ganciclovir-containing medium. A potent in vivo bystander effect against human and rat glioma cells was also demonstrated when ganciclovir was administered. Migratory activity of the human BMSCs toward the tumor cells was enhanced by the conditioned media obtained from both human and rat glioma cells compared to the fresh media. The results of this study have demonstrated that the bystander effect generated by BMSCtk cells and ganciclovir is not cell type-specific, suggesting that the strategy would be quite feasible for clinical use.

  1. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs’ role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. PMID:26775840

  2. Network Plasticity and Intraoperative Mapping for Personalized Multimodal Management of Diffuse Low-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ghinda, Cristina Diana; Duffau, Hugues

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumors and include a variety of different histological tumor types and malignancy grades. Recent achievements in terms of molecular and imaging fields have created an unprecedented opportunity to perform a comprehensive interdisciplinary assessment of the glioma pathophysiology, with direct implications in terms of the medical and surgical treatment strategies available for patients. The current paradigm shift considers glioma management in a comprehensive perspective that takes into account the intricate connectivity of the cerebral networks. This allowed significant improvement in the outcome of patients with lesions previously considered inoperable. The current review summarizes the current theoretical framework integrating the adult human brain plasticity and functional reorganization within a dynamic individualized treatment strategy for patients affected by diffuse low-grade gliomas. The concept of neuro-oncology as a brain network surgery has major implications in terms of the clinical management and ensuing outcomes, as indexed by the increased survival and quality of life of patients managed using such an approach. PMID:28197403

  3. Network Plasticity and Intraoperative Mapping for Personalized Multimodal Management of Diffuse Low-Grade Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ghinda, Cristina Diana; Duffau, Hugues

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumors and include a variety of different histological tumor types and malignancy grades. Recent achievements in terms of molecular and imaging fields have created an unprecedented opportunity to perform a comprehensive interdisciplinary assessment of the glioma pathophysiology, with direct implications in terms of the medical and surgical treatment strategies available for patients. The current paradigm shift considers glioma management in a comprehensive perspective that takes into account the intricate connectivity of the cerebral networks. This allowed significant improvement in the outcome of patients with lesions previously considered inoperable. The current review summarizes the current theoretical framework integrating the adult human brain plasticity and functional reorganization within a dynamic individualized treatment strategy for patients affected by diffuse low-grade gliomas. The concept of neuro-oncology as a brain network surgery has major implications in terms of the clinical management and ensuing outcomes, as indexed by the increased survival and quality of life of patients managed using such an approach.

  4. A Case of Angiocentric Glioma with Unusual Clinical and Radiological Features

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Gyung-Jun; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Ju, Myoung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Angiocentric glioma was recently recognized as a distinct clinicopathological entity in the 2007 World Health Organization classification of tumors of the central nervous system. Typically, it presents with seizure in children and young adults. However, our patient did not have a history of seizure. Seizure did not occur up to 6 months after operation. Although it usually does not have calcification brain magnetic resonance imaging in our patient showed T1-hyperintense and T2-hypointense signals with calcification. PMID:21887397

  5. Synthesis and anti-glioma activity of 25(R)-spirostan-3beta,5alpha,6beta,19-tetrol.

    PubMed

    Leng, TianDong; Zhang, JingXia; Xie, Jun; Zhou, ShuJia; Huang, YiJun; Zhou, YueHan; Zhu, WenBo; Yan, GuangMei

    2010-03-01

    Malignant gliomas are common and aggressive brain tumours in adults. The rapid proliferation and diffuse brain migration are the main obstacles to successful treatment. Here, we show 25(R)-spirostan-3beta,5alpha,6beta,19-tetrol, a polyhydroxy steroid, is capable of suppressing proliferation and migration of C6 malignant glioma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound 25(R)-spirostan-3beta,5alpha,6beta,19-tetrol was synthesised by seven steps starting from diosgenin in 8.55% overall yield. The structures of the synthetic compounds were characterised by infrared (IR), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), (13)C NMR spectra and EA.

  6. Analysis of SOX2-Regulated Transcriptome in Glioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acanda de la Rocha, Arlet M.; López-Bertoni, Hernando; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; González-Huarriz, Marisol; Martínez-Vélez, Naiara; Xipell, Enric; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glioblastoma is the most malignant brain tumor in adults and is associated with poor survival despite multimodal treatments. Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) are cells functionally defined by their self-renewal potential and the ability to reconstitute the original tumor upon orthotopic implantation. They have been postulated to be the culprit of glioma chemo- and radio-resistance ultimately leading to relapse. Understanding the molecular circuits governing the GSC compartment is essential. SOX2, a critical transcription regulator of embryonic and neural stem cell function, is deregulated in GSCs however; the precise molecular pathways regulated by this gene in GSCs remain poorly understood. Results We performed a genome-wide analysis of SOX2-regulated transcripts in GSCs, using a microarray. We identified a total of 2048 differentially expressed coding transcripts and 261 non-coding transcripts. Cell adhesion and cell-cell signaling are among the most enriched terms using Gene Ontology (GO) classification. The pathways altered after SOX2 down-modulation includes multiple cellular processes such as amino-acid metabolism and intercellular signaling cascades. We also defined and classified the set of non-coding transcripts differentially expressed regulated by SOX2 in GSCs, and validated two of them. Conclusions We present a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome controlled by SOX2 in GSCs, gaining insights in the understanding of the potential roles of SOX2 in glioblastoma. PMID:27669421

  7. Genome-wide high-density SNP linkage search for glioma susceptibility loci: results from the Gliogene Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Shete, Sanjay; Lau, Ching C; Houlston, Richard S; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Lai, Rose; Il’yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Bernstein, Jonine L; Olson, Sara H; Jenkins, Robert B; Yang, Ping; Vick, Nicholas A; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G; McCarthy, Bridget J; Leung, Eastwood Hon-chiu; Davis, Caleb; Cheng, Rita; Hosking, Fay J; Armstrong, Georgina N; Liu, Yanhong; Yu, Robert K; Henriksson, Roger; Consortium, The Gliogene; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2011-01-01

    Gliomas, which generally have a poor prognosis, are the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults. Recent genome-wide association studies have demonstrated that inherited susceptibility plays a role in the development of glioma. Although first-degree relatives of patients exhibit a two-fold increased risk of glioma, the search for susceptibility loci in familial forms of the disease has been challenging because the disease is relatively rare, fatal, and heterogeneous, making it difficult to collect sufficient biosamples from families for statistical power. To address this challenge, the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium (Gliogene) was formed to collect DNA samples from families with two or more cases of histologically confirmed glioma. In this study, we present results obtained from 46 U.S. families in which multipoint linkage analyses were undertaken using nonparametric (model-free) methods. After removal of high linkage disequilibrium SNPs, we obtained a maximum nonparametric linkage score (NPL) of 3.39 (P=0.0005) at 17q12–21.32 and the Z-score of 4.20 (P=0.000007). To replicate our findings, we genotyped 29 independent U.S. families and obtained a maximum NPL score of 1.26 (P=0.008) and the Z-score of 1.47 (P=0.035). Accounting for the genetic heterogeneity using the ordered subset analysis approach, the combined analyses of 75 families resulted in a maximum NPL score of 3.81 (P=0.00001). The genomic regions we have implicated in this study may offer novel insights into glioma susceptibility, focusing future work to identify genes that cause familial glioma. PMID:22037877

  8. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Otani, Yoshihiro; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Date, Isao

    2016-07-15

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies.

  9. EFEMP2 is upregulated in gliomas and promotes glioma cell proliferation and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Long; Chen, Qianxue; Chen, Zhibiao; Tian, Daofeng; Xu, Haitao; Cai, Qiang; Liu, Baohui; Deng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor. Although EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 2 (EFEMP2), an extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein, is regarded as a candidate oncogene, little is known about the association of EFEMP2 and gliomas. Here, the expression of EFEMP2 was significantly increased in glioma tissues (n=60) compared to non-tumorous brain tissues (n=25). Silencing of EFEMP2 expression through RNA interference in two glioma cell lines (U87 and U373) remarkably inhibited cell proliferation and G1/S transition. More importantly, EFEMP2 silencing significantly induced cell apoptosis via increasing the ratio of Bax and Bcl-2. Additionally, knockdown of EFEMP2 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of both glioma cells, which was associated with the downregulated expression of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. In conclusion, expression of EFEMP2 was associated with the oncogenic potential of gliomas and silencing of its expression can suppress cancer cell growth and metastasis. Inhibition of EFEMP2 may be a therapeutic strategy for gliomas. PMID:26617746

  10. Resistance to DNA Damaging Agents Produced Invasive Phenotype of Rat Glioma Cells-Characterization of a New in Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Stojković, Sonja; Podolski-Renić, Ana; Dinić, Jelena; Pavković, Željko; Ayuso, Jose M; Fernández, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio; Pérez-García, Victor M; Pešić, Vesna; Pešić, Milica

    2016-06-27

    Chemoresistance and invasion properties are severe limitations to efficient glioma therapy. Therefore, development of glioma in vivo models that more accurately resemble the situation observed in patients emerges. Previously, we established RC6 rat glioma cell line resistant to DNA damaging agents including antiglioma approved therapies such as 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) and temozolomide (TMZ). Herein, we evaluated the invasiveness of RC6 cells in vitro and in a new orthotopic animal model. For comparison, we used C6 cells from which RC6 cells originated. Differences in cell growth properties were assessed by real-time cell analyzer. Cells' invasive potential in vitro was studied in fluorescently labeled gelatin and by formation of multicellular spheroids in hydrogel. For animal studies, fluorescently labeled cells were inoculated into adult male Wistar rat brains. Consecutive coronal and sagittal brain sections were analyzed 10 and 25 days post-inoculation, while rats' behavior was recorded during three days in the open field test starting from 25th day post-inoculation. We demonstrated that development of chemoresistance induced invasive phenotype of RC6 cells with significant behavioral impediments implying usefulness of orthotopic RC6 glioma allograft in preclinical studies for the examination of new approaches to counteract both chemoresistance and invasion of glioma cells.

  11. The human glia maturation factor-gamma gene: genomic structure and mutation analysis in gliomas with chromosome 19q loss.

    PubMed

    Peters, N; Smith, J S; Tachibana, I; Lee, H K; Pohl, U; Portier, B P; Louis, D N; Jenkins, R B

    1999-09-01

    Human glia maturation factor-gamma (hGMF-gamma) is a recently identified gene that may be involved in glial differentiation, neural regeneration, and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. The gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 19 at band q13.2, a region that is frequently deleted in human malignant gliomas and is thus suspected to harbor a glioma tumor suppressor gene. Given the putative role of hGMF-gamma in cell differentiation and proliferation and its localization to chromosome 19q13, this gene is an interesting candidate for the chromosome 19q glioma tumor suppressor gene. To evaluate this possibility, we determined the genomic structure of human hGMF-gamma and performed mutation screening in a series of 41 gliomas with and without allelic loss of chromosome 19q. Mutations were not detected, which suggests that hGMF-gamma is not the chromosome 19q glioma suppressor gene. However, the elucidation of the genomic structure of hGMF-gamma may prove useful in future investigations of hGMF-gamma in the normal adult and developing human nervous system.

  12. Differential Glioma-Associated Tumor Antigen Expression Profiles of Human Glioma Cells Grown in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N.; Hoa, Neil T.; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens. PMID:22957023

  13. Differential glioma-associated tumor antigen expression profiles of human glioma cells grown in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N; Hoa, Neil T; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O(2)) or normoxic (21% O(2)) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens.

  14. Neurocognitive Changes Associated With Surgical Resection of Left and Right Temporal Lobe Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Kyle R.; Weinberg, Jeffrey S.; Ziu, Mateo; Benveniste, Ronald J.; Suki, Dima; Wefel, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the neurocognitive impact of temporal lobe tumor resection. Objective To clarify subacute surgery-related changes in neurocognitive functioning (NCF) in patients with left (LTL) and right (RTL) temporal lobe glioma. Methods Patients with glioma in the LTL (n=45) or RTL (n=19) completed comprehensive pre- and postsurgical neuropsychological assessments. NCF was analyzed with two-way mixed design repeated measures analysis of variance, with hemisphere (LTL or RTL) as an independent between-subjects factor and pre- and postoperative NCF as a within-subjects factor. Results About 60% of patients with LTL glioma and 40% with RTL lesions exhibited significant worsening on at least one NCF test. Domains most commonly impacted included verbal memory and executive functioning. Patients with LTL tumor showed greater decline than patients with RTL tumor on verbal memory and confrontation naming tests. Nonetheless, over one-third of patients with RTL lesions also showed verbal memory decline. Conclusion In patients with temporal lobe glioma, NCF decline in the subacute postoperative period is common. As expected, patients with LTL tumor show more frequent and severe decline than patients with RTL tumor, particularly on verbally-mediated measures. However, a considerable proportion of patients with RTL tumor also exhibit decline across various domains, even those typically associated with left hemisphere structures, such as verbal memory. While patients with RTL lesions may show even greater decline in visuospatial memory, this domain was not assessed. Nonetheless, neuropsychological assessment can identify acquired deficits and help facilitate early intervention in patients with temporal lobe glioma. PMID:26317672

  15. Naming performance in two bilinguals with frontal vs. temporal glioma.

    PubMed

    Gatignol, Peggy; Duffau, Hugues; Capelle, Laurent; Plaza, Monique

    2009-12-01

    Two bilingual patients had World Health Organization Grade II Gliomas removed from a language area, one in the left mesiofronto-cingular region and one in the left postero-temporal region. They performed a picture naming task in their two languages before their surgery and afterwards. Both patients showed slowness in naming in their first language but different patterns of naming performance across their first and second language. Their patterns depended upon the site of their lesion and their language experience. These data, from brain-damaged, bilingual adult patients, contribute to the neuropsychological literature on brain organization and plasticity, and highlight the importance of assessing naming speed to obtain a better understanding of impairment and recovery mechanisms.

  16. Bionanotechnology and the Future of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chiarelli, Peter A.; Kievit, Forrest M.; Zhang, Miqin; Ellenbogen, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Designer nanoscaled materials have the potential to revolutionize diagnosis and treatment for glioma. This review summarizes current progress in nanoparticle-based therapies for glioma treatment including targeting, drug delivery, gene delivery, and direct tumor ablation. Preclinical and current human clinical trials are discussed. Although progress in the field has been significant over the past decade, many successful strategies demonstrated in the laboratory have yet to be implemented in human clinical trials. Looking forward, we provide examples of combined treatment strategies, which harness the potential for nanoparticles to interact with their biochemical environment, and simultaneously with externally applied photons or magnetic fields. We present our notion of the “ideal” nanoparticle for glioma, a concept that may soon be realized. PMID:25722933

  17. Endogenous GABAA receptor activity suppresses glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Blanchart, A; Fernando, R; Häring, M; Assaife-Lopes, N; Romanov, R A; Andäng, M; Harkany, T; Ernfors, P

    2017-02-09

    Although genome alterations driving glioma by fueling cell malignancy have largely been resolved, less is known of the impact of tumor environment on disease progression. Here, we demonstrate functional GABAA receptor-activated currents in human glioblastoma cells and show the existence of a continuous GABA signaling within the tumor cell mass that significantly affects tumor growth and survival expectancy in mouse models. Endogenous GABA released by tumor cells, attenuates proliferation of the glioma cells with enriched expression of stem/progenitor markers and with competence to seed growth of new tumors. Our results suggest that GABA levels rapidly increase in tumors impeding further growth. Thus, shunting chloride ions by a maintained local GABAA receptor activity within glioma cells has a significant impact on tumor development by attenuating proliferation, reducing tumor growth and prolonging survival, a mechanism that may have important impact on therapy resistance and recurrence following tumor resection.

  18. Multigene sets for clinical application in glioma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, John F; Sulman, Erik P; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2011-04-01

    Diffuse gliomas are a heterogeneous group of malignancies with highly variable outcomes, and diagnosis is largely based on histologic appearance. Tumor classification according to cell type and grade provides some prognostic information. However, significant clinical and biologic heterogeneity exists in glioma, even after accounting for known clinicopathologic variables. Significant advances in knowledge of the molecular genetics of brain tumors have occurred in the past decade, largely because of the availability of high-throughput profiling techniques, including new sequencing methodologies and multidimensional profiling by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. The large amount of data generated from these efforts has enabled the identification of prognostic and predictive factors and helped to identify pathways driving tumor growth. Implementing these signatures into the clinic to personalize therapy presents a new challenge. Identification of relevant biomarkers, especially when coupled with clinical trials of newer targeted therapies, will enable better patient stratification and individualization of treatment for patients with glioma.

  19. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132H mutation is not detected in angiocentric glioma.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Aditya; Olar, Adriana; Vogel, Hannes; Parker, John R; Coventry, Susan C; Debski, Robert; Albarracin, Constance T; Aldape, Kenneth D; Cahill, Daniel P; Powell, Suzanne Z; Fuller, Gregory N

    2012-08-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 gene (IDH1), most commonly resulting in replacement of arginine at position 132 by histidine (R132H), have been described in World Health Organization grade II and III diffuse gliomas and secondary glioblastoma. Immunohistochemistry using a mouse monoclonal antibody has a high specificity and sensitivity for detecting IDH1 R132H mutant protein in sections from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Angiocentric glioma (AG), a unique neoplasm with mixed phenotypic features of diffuse glioma and ependymoma, has recently been codified as a grade I neoplasm in the 2007 World Health Organization classification of central nervous system tumors. The present study was designed to evaluate IDH1 R132H protein in AG. Three cases of AG were collected, and the diagnoses were confirmed. Expression of mutant IDH1 R132H protein was determined by immunohistochemistry on representative formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections using the antihuman mouse monoclonal antibody IDH1 R132H (Dianova, Hamburg, Germany). Known IDH1 mutation-positive and IDH1 wild-type cases of grade II to IV glioma served as positive and negative controls. All 3 patients were male, aged 3, 5, and 15 years, with intra-axial tumors in the right posterior parietal-occipital lobe, right frontal lobe, and left frontal lobe, respectively. All 3 cases showed characteristic morphologic features of AG, including a monomorphous population of slender bipolar cells that diffusely infiltrated cortical parenchyma and ensheathed cortical blood vessels radially and longitudinally. All 3 cases were negative for the presence of IDH1 R132H mutant protein (0/3). All control cases showed appropriate reactivity. IDH1 R132H mutation has been described as a common molecular signature of grade II and III diffuse gliomas and secondary glioblastoma; however, AG, which exhibits some features of diffuse glioma, has not been evaluated. The absence of mutant IDH1 R132H protein expression in AG

  20. Products of cells cultured from gliomas. VI. Immunofluorescent, morphometric, and ultrastructural characterization of two different cell types growing from explants of human gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, P. E.; Smith, B. H.; Taren, J. A.; Wahl, R. L.; Kornblith, P. L.; Chronwall, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    Explants derived from human gliomas have been characterized with respect to their cellular outgrowth pattern after 1-22 weeks in culture. A mat of cells which were fibronectin (FN)-positive and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-negative (hereafter designated FN+ cells) with a polygonal, flat morphology covered the growth substrate in a swirling pattern for a mean diameter of 9.2 mm around FN+ explants. FN+ cells showed ruffled plasmalemma, dilated rough endoplasmic reticulin (RDR), and extracellular filamentous strands. Rare desmosomes were compatible with at most minor leptomeningeal components or differentiation. FN+ cells predominated in six of seven cultures at passage 2, and their features were the same from various high-grade gliomas and gliosarcoma. Around other explants, elongated or stellate cells which were GFAP+ and FN- grew in a netlike pattern with little cell-to-cell contact. These GFAP+ cells surrounded explants at a mean diameter of 2 mm, substantially less than FN+ cells (P less than 0.005), and they grew more slowly than FN+ cells around explants. GFAP+ cells had an area/perimeter ratio which was less than that of FN+ cells. GFAP+ cells contained abundant intracellular filaments, rare desmosomes, and narrow RER cisternae. In mixed explants, GFAP+ cells often grew on top of FN+ cells. Individual cells which stained for both GFAP and FN were evident only from one glioma (8% doubly positive). Cells negative for both proteins resembled FN+ cells morphologically. Frozen sections of original glioma tissue showed FN+ vessel walls and GFAP+ parenchyma. Results are evidence for very early overgrowth of a preexistent FN+ cell type distinct from the GFAP+ parenchymal cell. The features of this distinct cell type are mesenchymal and resemble the proliferating vascular elements of gliomas in situ. The tendency for GFAP+ cells to grow on top of these FN+ cells suggests a feeder layer interaction. More knowledge of the origins and interactions of these two

  1. Glial Progenitors as Targets for Transformation in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ilkanizadeh, Shirin; Lau, Jasmine; Huang, Miller; Foster, Daniel J.; Wong, Robyn; Frantz, Aaron; Wang, Susan; Weiss, William A.; Persson, Anders I.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor and arises throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent focus on stem-like glioma cells has implicated neural stem cells (NSCs), a minor precursor population restricted to germinal zones, as a potential source of gliomas. In this review, we will focus on the relationship between oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), the largest population of cycling glial progenitors in the postnatal brain, and gliomas. Recent studies suggest that OPCs can give rise to gliomas. Furthermore, signaling pathways often associated with NSCs also play key roles during OPC lineage development. Recent advances suggesting that gliomas can undergo a switch from progenitor- to stem-like phenotype after therapy, implicating that an OPC-origin is more likely than previously recognized. Future in-depth studies of OPC biology may shed light on the etiology of OPC-derived gliomas and reveal new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24889528

  2. Molecular alterations of KIT oncogene in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana L; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Lopes, José M; Martinho, Olga; Lambros, Maryou B K; Martins, Albino; Schmitt, Fernando; Pardal, Fernando; Reis, Rui M

    2007-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and devastating primary brain tumours. Despite therapeutic advances, the majority of gliomas do not respond either to chemo or radiotherapy. KIT, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is frequently involved in tumourigenic processes. Currently, KIT constitutes an attractive therapeutic target. In the present study we assessed the frequency of KIT overexpression in gliomas and investigated the genetic mechanisms underlying KIT overexpression. KIT (CD117) immunohistochemistry was performed in a series of 179 gliomas of various grades. KIT activating gene mutations (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17) and gene amplification analysis, as defined by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were performed in CD117 positive cases. Tumour cell immunopositivity was detected in 15.6% (28/179) of cases, namely in 25% (1/4) of pilocytic astrocytomas, 25% (5/20) of diffuse astrocytomas, 20% (1/5) of anaplastic astrocytomas, 19.5% (15/77) of glioblastomas and one third (3/9) of anaplastic oligoastrocytomas. Only 5.7% (2/35) of anaplastic oligodendrogliomas showed CD117 immunoreactivity. No association was found between tumour CD117 overexpression and patient survival. In addition, we also observed CD117 overexpression in endothelial cells, which varied from 0-22.2% of cases, being more frequent in high-grade lesions. No KIT activating mutations were identified. Interestingly, CISH and/or qRT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of KIT gene amplification in 6 glioblastomas and 2 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, corresponding to 33% (8/24) of CD117 positive cases. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that KIT gene amplification rather than gene mutation is a common genetic mechanism underlying KIT expression in subset of malignant gliomas. Further studies are warranted to determine whether glioma patients exhibiting KIT overexpression and KIT gene amplification may benefit from therapy with anti-KIT RTK inhibitors.

  3. Choroid plexus cyst and chordoid glioma. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hanbali, F; Fuller, G N; Leeds, N E; Sawaya, R

    2001-06-15

    confusion. Three weeks later he died of a massive myocardial infarction. These two patients represent the sixth case of an adult with a choroid plexus cyst in the anterior lateral ventricle and the 19th case of an adult with a chordoid glioma of the third ventricle, respectively.

  4. The Adult Student Learning Experience: A Mixed-Methods Investigation in a Marine Corps Program from a Knowledge Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Jennifer Gray

    2010-01-01

    On one Marine Corps base, a minimum of 5% of adult enlisted Marines per year lack certain competencies and seek admittance into a high school competency remediation program. The lack of these competencies impedes qualification for many military occupational specialties, the ability to convert from an enlisted Marine to a Warrant Officer, or…

  5. Relative Bioavailabilities of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate and d-Amphetamine in Healthy Adults in an Open-Label, Randomized, Crossover Study After Mixing Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate With Food or Drink

    PubMed Central

    Ermer, James; Corcoran, Mary; Lasseter, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Background: This open-label, crossover study examined lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) and d-amphetamine pharmacokinetics in healthy adults after administration of an intact LDX capsule or after the capsule was emptied into orange juice or yogurt and the contents consumed. Methods: Healthy adult volunteers (N = 30) were administered a 70-mg LDX capsule or the contents of a 70-mg capsule mixed with yogurt or orange juice using a 3-way crossover design. Blood samples were collected serially for up to 96 hours after dose. Pharmacokinetic endpoints included maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration versus time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) or to last assessment (AUClast). Relative LDX and d-amphetamine bioavailabilities from the contents of a 70-mg LDX capsule mixed with orange juice or yogurt were compared with those from the intact LDX capsule using bioequivalence-testing procedures. Results: Geometric least squares mean ratios (90% confidence intervals [CIs]) for d-amphetamine (active moiety) were within the prespecified bioequivalence range (0.80–1.25) when the contents of a 70-mg LDX capsule were mixed with orange juice [Cmax: 0.971 (0.945, 0.998); AUC0–∞: 0.986 (0.955, 1.019); AUClast: 0.970 (0.937, 1.004)] or yogurt [Cmax: 0.970 (0.944, 0.997); AUC0–∞: 0.945 (0.915, 0.976); AUClast: 0.944 (0.912, 0.977)]. Geometric least squares mean ratios (90% CIs) for LDX (inactive prodrug) were below the accepted range when the contents of a 70-mg LDX capsule were mixed with orange juice [Cmax: 0.641 (0.582, 0.707); AUC0–∞: 0.716 (0.647, 0.792); AUClast: 0.708 (0.655, 0.766)]; the lower 90% CI for Cmax [0.828 (0.752, 0.912)] was below the accepted range when the contents of a 70-mg LDX capsule were mixed with yogurt. Conclusions: Relative bioavailability of d-amphetamine (the active moiety) did not differ across administrations, which suggests that emptying an LDX capsule into orange juice or yogurt and consuming it

  6. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Presenting as Severe Gastrointestinal and Renal Involvement with Mixed Outcomes in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Raj; Vollmar, Alexis; Harrell, Amanda; Van Trump, Richard; Masoud, Amgad

    2017-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is typically seen as a self-limiting disease in children, but can present more severely in adults, especially when there is renal involvement. Management of HSP in adults also remains a controversial topic with very few studies evaluating available therapies. In this case, HSP presenting as a combination of severe gastrointestinal involvement and a rapid decline in renal function in an adult patient directed our therapy. The patient was a 48-year-old Caucasian male with no known past medical history, who presented with a combination of purpuric rash over the lower extremities, severe abdominal pain with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and a rapidly increasing serum creatinine, with hematuria. He initially underwent a skin biopsy, along with investigation for other possible causes, including autoimmune and infectious etiologies, which were negative. He was started on therapy for presumed HSP with intravenous methylprednisolone. The skin biopsy, however, was not conclusive, and the patient had no improvement in his clinical status. He then underwent a kidney biopsy that was consistent with HSP nephritis (immunoglobulin A (IgA) predominant glomerulonephritis with crescents), and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) that showed mucosal inflammation, ulcerations, and stigmata of bleeding—findings that were consistent with ischemia. Cyclophosphamide was added to the regimen at this time. However, he had worsening abdominal pain, continued gastrointestinal bleeding, now with hematochezia, and also worsening renal function that required dialysis. Plasmapheresis was then initiated on days alternating with dialysis. This resulted in the improvement of his gastrointestinal symptoms, but no recovery was seen of his renal function, and the patient required outpatient dialysis. This case report exhibits the unique presentation of severe gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations and rapid progression to renal failure in an adult patient with partial

  7. Brain stem glioma: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Ruth K

    2005-01-01

    The paths taken by each family in coming to terms with the dismal prognosis associated with brain stem glioma can be quite different. The case studies of 2 school-age girls diagnosed with a brain stem glioma within weeks of each other are presented. The multi-disciplinary team response to each family was individualized at each stage of diagnosis, treatment, and end-of-life care, as expected. The ultimate chronologic union of these 2 families as each child neared death was somewhat uncanny. The experience of each family, and their relationship with the team through this process, was an intense challenge and learning experience.

  8. [Guidelines for the radiotherapy of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Feuvret, L; Antoni, D; Biau, J; Truc, G; Noël, G; Mazeron, J-J

    2016-09-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumours. Treating these tumours is difficult because of the proximity of organs at risk, infiltrating nature, and radioresistance. Clinical prognostic factors such as age, Karnofsky performance status, tumour location, and treatments such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have long been recognized in the management of patients with gliomas. Molecular biomarkers are increasingly evolving as additional factors that facilitate diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making. These practice guidelines aim at helping in choosing the best treatment, in particular radiation therapy.

  9. Positron Emission Tomography Using Fluorine F 18 EF5 to Find Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Meningeal Melanocytoma

  10. FANCD2 re-expression is associated with glioma grade and chemical inhibition of the Fanconi Anaemia pathway sensitises gliomas to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Patil, Abhijit A; Sayal, Parag; Depondt, Marie-Lise; Beveridge, Ryan D; Roylance, Anthony; Kriplani, Deepti H; Myers, Katie N; Cox, Angela; Jellinek, David; Fernando, Malee; Carroll, Thomas A; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-08-15

    Brain tumours kill more children and adults under 40 than any other cancer. Around half of primary brain tumours are glioblastoma multiforme (GBMs) where treatment remains a significant challenge, where survival rates have improved little over the last 40 years, thus highlighting an unmet need for the identification/development of novel therapeutic targets and agents to improve GBM treatment. Using archived and fresh glioma tissue, we show that in contrast to normal brain or benign schwannomas GBMs exhibit re-expression of FANCD2, a key protein of the Fanconi Anaemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, and possess an active FA pathway. Importantly, FANCD2 expression levels are strongly associated with tumour grade, revealing a potential exploitable therapeutic window to allow inhibition of the FA pathway in tumour cells, whilst sparing normal brain tissue. Using several small molecule inhibitors of the FA pathway in combination with isogenic FA-proficient/deficient glioma cell lines as well as primary GBM cultures, we demonstrate that inhibition of the FA pathway sensitises gliomas to the chemotherapeutic agents Temozolomide and Carmustine. Our findings therefore provide a strong rationale for the development of novel and potent inhibitors of the FA pathway to improve the treatment of GBMs, which may ultimately impact on patient outcome.

  11. FANCD2 re-expression is associated with glioma grade and chemical inhibition of the Fanconi Anaemia pathway sensitises gliomas to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Abhijit A.; Sayal, Parag; Depondt, Marie-Lise; Beveridge, Ryan D.; Roylance, Anthony; Kriplani, Deepti H.; Myers, Katie N.; Cox, Angela; Jellinek, David; Fernando, Malee; Carroll, Thomas A.; Collis, Spencer J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumours kill more children and adults under 40 than any other cancer. Around half of primary brain tumours are glioblastoma multiforme (GBMs) where treatment remains a significant challenge. GBM survival rates have improved little over the last 40 years, thus highlighting an unmet need for the identification/development of novel therapeutic targets and agents to improve GBM treatment. Using archived and fresh glioma tissue, we show that in contrast to normal brain or benign schwannomas GBMs exhibit re-expression of FANCD2, a key protein of the Fanconi Anaemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, and possess an active FA pathway. Importantly, FANCD2 expression levels are strongly associated with tumour grade, revealing a potential exploitable therapeutic window to allow inhibition of the FA pathway in tumour cells, whilst sparing normal brain tissue. Using several small molecule inhibitors of the FA pathway in combination with isogenic FA-proficient/deficient glioma cell lines as well as primary GBM cultures, we demonstrate that inhibition of the FA pathway sensitises gliomas to the chemotherapeutic agents Temozolomide and Carmustine. Our findings therefore provide a strong rationale for the development of novel and potent inhibitors of the FA pathway to improve the treatment of GBMs, which may ultimately impact on patient outcome. PMID:25071006

  12. Interaction of brain fatty acid-binding protein with the polyunsaturated fatty acid environment as a potential determinant of poor prognosis in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Elsherbiny, Marwa E.; Emara, Marwan; Godbout, Roseline

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common adult brain cancers. In spite of aggressive treatment, recurrence occurs in the great majority of patients and is invariably fatal. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are abundant in brain, particularly ω-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and ω-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Although the levels of ω-6 and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are tightly regulated in brain, the ω-6:ω-3 ratio is dramatically increased in malignant glioma, suggesting deregulation of fundamental lipid homeostasis in brain tumor tissue. The migratory properties of malignant glioma cells can be modified by altering the ratio of AA:DHA in growth medium, with increased migration observed in AA-rich medium. This fatty acid-dependent effect on cell migration is dependent on expression of the brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) previously shown to bind DHA and AA. Increased levels of enzymes involved in eicosanoid production in FABP7-positive malignant glioma cells suggest that FABP7 is an important modulator of AA metabolism. We provide evidence that increased production of eicosanoids in FABP7-positive malignant glioma growing in an AA-rich environment contributes to tumor infiltration in the brain. We discuss pathways and molecules that may underlie FABP7/AA-mediated promotion of cell migration and FABP7/DHA-mediated inhibition of cell migration in malignant glioma. PMID:23981365

  13. Long Noncoding RNA MEG3 Suppresses Glioma Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion By Acting As Competing Endogenous RNA of MiR-19a.

    PubMed

    Tong, Gui-Feng; Qin, Nan; Sun, Li-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Lin

    2017-03-08

    Glioma, with varying malignancy grades and histological subtypes, is the commonest primary brain tumor in adults. Longnon-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein-coding transcripts and have been proven to play important roles in tumorigenesis. Our study aims to elucidate the combined effect of lncRNA MEG3 and microRNA-19a in human glioma U87 and U251 cell lines. Real time PCR revealed that MEG3 was down-regulated and miR-19a was up-regulated in malignant glioma tissues and cell lines. Bioinformatics analyses (TargetScan, miRanda and starBase V2.0) showed that PTEN is a target of miR-19a with complementary binding sites in the 3'-UTR. As expected, luciferase results verify the putative target site and also reveal the complementary binding between miR-19a and MEG3. MiR-19a represses the expression of PTEN and promotes glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion. However, MEG3 could directly bind to miR-19a and effectively act as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) for miR-19a to suppress tumorigenesis. Our data firstly demonstrates that lncRNA MEG3 suppresses glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion via acting as competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) of miR-19a, which provides a novel insight about the pathogenesis of glioma.

  14. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate < 0.0005). Furthermore, 16 known glioma related genes were abstracted from Genetic Association Database. After mapping 8,890 DEGs and 16 known glioma related genes to Human Protein Reference Database, a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network (GAPN) was constructed. In addition, 51 sub-networks in GAPN were screened out through Molecular Complex Detection (score ≥ 1), and sub-network 1 was found to have the closest interaction (score = 3). What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value < 0.05) was performed, and DEGs involved in sub-network 1 and 2, such as BRMS1L and CCNA1, were predicted to regulate cell growth, cell cycle, and DNA replication via interacting with known glioma related genes. Finally, the overlaps of DEGs and human essential, housekeeping, tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  15. Lymphoid Cell-Glioma Cell Interaction Enhances Cell Coat Production by Human Gliomas: Novel Suppressor Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.; Macchi, Beatrice; Papazoglou, Savvas; Oldfield, Edward H.; Kornblith, Paul L.; Smith, Barry H.; Gately, Maurice K.

    1983-05-01

    Certain human glioma lines produce mucopolysaccharide coats that impair the generation of cytolytic lymphocytes in response to these lines in vitro. Coat production is substantially enhanced by the interaction of glioma cells with a macromolecular factor released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. This interaction thus constitutes an unusual mechanism by which inflammatory cells may nonspecifically suppress the cellular immune response to at least one class of solid tumors in humans.

  16. Immunotherapy for high-grade glioma: how to go beyond Phase I/II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    van Gool, Stefaan

    2013-10-01

    Evaluation of: Lasky JL 3rd, Panosyan EH, Plant A et al. Autologous tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell immunotherapy for pediatric patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent high-grade gliomas. Anticancer Res. 33, 2047-2056 (2013). Immunotherapy for children and adults with high-grade glioma (HGG) is an emerging innovative treatment approach, which aims at stimulating the body's own immune system against HGG by using autologous dendritic cells pulsed with autologous tumor lysate as a therapeutic vaccine. This is the third report on immunotherapy for HGG in children, bringing additional knowledge and experience to the scientific community. However, at the same time, this and other manuscripts urge for the next step in treatment development.

  17. Assessment of quality of life in patients treated for low-grade glioma: a preliminary report.

    PubMed Central

    Taphoorn, M J; Heimans, J J; Snoek, F J; Lindeboom, J; Oosterink, B; Wolbers, J G; Karim, A B

    1992-01-01

    In this pilot study quality of life was assessed in fourteen adult patients who were treated for a low-grade glioma with surgery and radiotherapy at least one year previously. Apart from widely used parameters, such as the neurological and functional status, the patients' cognitive functioning and actual affective status were determined. In addition the patients were interviewed to evaluate various aspects of quality of life. Generally no serious focal neurological deficits were found, although psychological examination showed serious cognitive and affective disturbances in most cases. Self report measures concerning cognitive functioning were not in all cases in accordance with objective test results. When the results of treatment in glioma patients are evaluated assessment of quality of life, including neuropsychological functioning, should be performed, especially as new therapeutic strategies are being developed. PMID:1602310

  18. Acceptance of an assistive robot in older adults: a mixed-method study of human–robot interaction over a 1-month period in the Living Lab setting

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Wrobel, Jérémy; Cornuet, Mélanie; Kerhervé, Hélène; Damnée, Souad; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in investigating acceptance of robots, which are increasingly being proposed as one form of assistive technology to support older adults, maintain their independence, and enhance their well-being. In the present study, we aimed to observe robot-acceptance in older adults, particularly subsequent to a 1-month direct experience with a robot. Subjects and methods Six older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and five cognitively intact healthy (CIH) older adults were recruited. Participants interacted with an assistive robot in the Living Lab once a week for 4 weeks. After being shown how to use the robot, participants performed tasks to simulate robot use in everyday life. Mixed methods, comprising a robot-acceptance questionnaire, semistructured interviews, usability-performance measures, and a focus group, were used. Results Both CIH and MCI subjects were able to learn how to use the robot. However, MCI subjects needed more time to perform tasks after a 1-week period of not using the robot. Both groups rated similarly on the robot-acceptance questionnaire. They showed low intention to use the robot, as well as negative attitudes toward and negative images of this device. They did not perceive it as useful in their daily life. However, they found it easy to use, amusing, and not threatening. In addition, social influence was perceived as powerful on robot adoption. Direct experience with the robot did not change the way the participants rated robots in their acceptance questionnaire. We identified several barriers to robot-acceptance, including older adults’ uneasiness with technology, feeling of stigmatization, and ethical/societal issues associated with robot use. Conclusion It is important to destigmatize images of assistive robots to facilitate their acceptance. Universal design aiming to increase the market for and production of products that are usable by everyone (to the greatest extent possible) might help to

  19. Gliomas and exposure to wood preservatives.

    PubMed

    Cordier, S; Poisson, M; Gerin, M; Varin, J; Conso, F; Hemon, D

    1988-10-01

    A case-referent study was undertaken to look for occupational risk factors among patients with glioma treated in a neurological hospital in Paris between 1975 and 1984. In the study group were 125 men with gliomas (aged less than or equal to 65) and 238 patients (also less than or equal to 65) admitted for non-neoplastic, non-malformative vascular diseases in the same department during the same period constituting the reference group. All diagnoses were confirmed by tomodensitometry. Information on occupational history was obtained from a postal questionnaire and from medical records. Comparison of cases and referents showed a significant excess risk among teachers (OR = 4.1) and a raised risk among wood workers (OR = 1.6). Four of nine cases of glioma who had been employed as wood workers reported that a colleague had suffered from glioma (those reports were confirmed by hospital records). None were reported among 11 referent wood workers. Using a complementary questionnaire on wood work, exposure assessment to wood preservatives and solvents showed that frequent exposure to organochlorine wood preservatives and to organic solvents occurred more often among cases than referent wood workers (p less than 0.10).

  20. The Effects of Thermal Preconditioning on Oncogenic and Intraspinal Cord Growth Features of Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang; Han, Inbo; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; Aljuboori, Zaid; Anderson, Jamie E; Chi, John H; Zafonte, Ross D; Teng, Yang D

    2016-12-13

    The adult rodent spinal cord presents an inhibitory environment for donor cell survival, impeding efficiency for xenograft-based modeling of gliomas. We postulated that mild thermal preconditioning may influence the fate of the implanted tumor cells. To test this hypothesis, high-grade human astrocytoma G55 and U87 cells were cultured under 37C and 38.5C to mimic regular experimental or core body temperatures of rodents, respectively. In vitro, the 38.5C-conditioned cells, relative to 37C, grew slightly faster. Compared to U87 cells, G55 cells demonstrated a greater response to the temperature difference. Hyperthermal culture markedly increased production of Hsp27 in most G55 cells, but only promoted transient expression of cancer stem cell marker CD133 in a small cell subpopulation. We subsequently transplanted G55 cells following 37C or 38.5C culture into the C2 or T10 spinal cord of adult female immunodeficient rats (3 rats/each locus/per temperature; total: 12 rats). Systematic analyses revealed that 38.5C-preconditioned G55 cells grew more malignantly at either C2 or T10 as determined by tumor size, outgrowth profile, resistance to bolus intratumor administration of 5-fluorouracil (0.1 mol), and posttumor survival (p0.05; n=6/group). Therefore, thermal preconditioning of glioma cells may be an effective way to influence the in vitro and in vivo oncological contour of glioma cells. Future studies are needed for assessing the potential oncogenic modifying effect of hyperthermia regimens on glioma cells.

  1. Predictive and Prognostic Roles of Abnormal Expression of Tissue miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxing; Zheng, Jihui; Chen, Liangyu; Diao, Hongyu; Liu, Yunhui

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is the most prevalent primary brain tumors in adults. In addition to the high incidence and mortality rate, the 5-year survival rate of glioma is also extremely low. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), as a class of small non-coding RNAs, may play an important role in carcinogenesis. It was also proposed that miRNAs might also be associated with glioma diagnosis and prognosis. In this study, we aimed at investigating the predictive and prognostic values of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 in glioma and, hopefully, to provide some evidence for novel therapy of glioma. Tissue specimens were obtained from tumor tissue and adjacent non-tumor tissue. RNA was extracted and qRT-PCR was performed with U6 being the internal control. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed, and the area under the ROC curves (AUC) was calculated to evaluate the significance of candidate miRNAs in distinguishing glioma tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues. Survival curves of Kaplan-Meier method were constructed for both high expression group and low expression group, and the difference between curves was evaluated by log-rank test. All the statistical analyses were performed using Stata version 12.0 software, and graphs were generated by GraphPad Prism 5.0. The significance of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 expression level in distinguishing glioma tumor from adjacent non-tumor tissues was further validated. Combination of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-22 was significantly superior compared to the clinical standard of using these miRNAs alone. A clear demarcation was shown by survival analysis between patients with high miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 expression and patients with poor prognosis. Similarly, panel of these miRNAs could play a better prognostic role in glioma. In this study, we confirmed the significance of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 in distinguishing glioma tumor from adjacent non-tumor tissues. Higher expressions of miR-125b and miR-222 have also been proved

  2. Validity of COSMED's quark CPET mixing chamber system in evaluating energy metabolism during aerobic exercise in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C; Austin, Melanie D; Dew, Dustin; Utter, Alan C

    2013-01-01

    This study validated the accuracy of COSMED's Quark cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) metabolic mixing chamber system in measuring metabolic factors during maximal, graded exercise testing. Subjects included 32 physically active men between the ages of 18 and 34 years. During the first test session, subjects were measured for maximal oxygen consumption twice (15 min separation) with the CPET and Douglas bag systems (random order). During the second test session, subjects exercised through four stages of the Bruce treadmill protocol with measurement by the CPET and Douglas bag systems (random order) during steady state at the end of each 3-minute stage. Statistical analysis using a 2 (systems) x 5 (time) repeated measures ANOVA showed that the pattern of change in VO2, VCO2, VE, FeO2, FeCO2, and RER did not differ significantly between CPET and Douglas bag systems. This validation study indicates that the CPET mixing chamber system provides valid metabolic measurements that compare closely with the Douglas bag system during aerobic exercise.

  3. Economics of Malignant Gliomas: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Fitzner, Karen A.; Jacobs, Daniel I.; Bennett, Charles L.; Liebling, Dustin B.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Trifilio, Steven M.; Grimm, Sean A.; Fisher, Matthew J.; Haleem, Meraaj S.; Ray, Paul S.; McKoy, Judith M.; DeBoer, Rebecca; Tulas, Katrina-Marie E.; Deeb, Mohammed; McKoy, June M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 18,500 persons are diagnosed with malignant glioma in the United States annually. Few studies have investigated the comprehensive economic costs. We reviewed the literature to examine costs to patients with malignant glioma and their families, payers, and society. Methods: A total of 18 fully extracted studies were included. Data were collected on direct and indirect costs, and cost estimates were converted to US dollars using the conversion rate calculated from the study's publication date, and updated to 2011 values after adjustment for inflation. A standardized data abstraction form was used. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by another. Results: Before approval of effective chemotherapeutic agents for malignant gliomas, estimated total direct medical costs in the United States for surgery and radiation therapy per patient ranged from $50,600 to $92,700. The addition of temozolomide (TMZ) and bevacizumab to glioblastoma treatment regimens has resulted in increased overall costs for glioma care. Although health care costs are now less front-loaded, they have increased over the course of illness. Analysis using a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life-year suggests that the benefits of TMZ fall on the edge of acceptable therapies. Furthermore, indirect medical costs, such as productivity losses, are not trivial. Conclusion: With increased chemotherapy use for malignant glioma, the paradigm for treatment and associated out-of-pocket and total medical costs continue to evolve. Larger out-of-pocket costs may influence the choice of chemotherapeutic agents, the economic implications of which should be evaluated prospectively. PMID:25466707

  4. [Classification of gliomas. Current progress and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Capper, D; Reifenberger, G

    2015-06-01

    The diagnostic subdivision of gliomas is traditionally based on histological features as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. In recent years molecular studies have identified a number of genetic and epigenetic markers that could contribute to an improved tumor classification and better prediction of response to therapy and prognosis in the individual patient. The most important molecular tests with differential diagnostic relevance in patients with astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors include the detection of genetic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), IDH2, alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX), histone H3.3 (H3F3A) and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) genes as well as the demonstration of codeletions of chromosomal arms 1p and 19q. Important predictive markers that have been linked to the response to alkylating chemotherapy are O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation in glioblastoma patients and 1p/19q codel status in anaplastic glioma patients. Oncogenic c11orf95/RELA fusion gene formation is characteristic for a subgroup of patients with supratentorial ependymoma. In addition to diagnostic testing of individual genes, novel microarray and next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques show promising perspectives in glioma diagnostics. The assessment of DNA methylation profiles using DNA methylation arrays representing 450,000 CpG dinucleotides distributed throughout the human genome (450 k array test) now allows the robust molecular classification of gliomas into clinically relevant entities and variants. Moreover, glioma-associated gene panel NGS promises the timely parallel sequencing of relevant diagnostic and predictive marker genes in a single test. It will now be a major task to integrate these novel results and techniques into the conventional histological procedures in the up-coming revision of the

  5. Computer Simulation of Glioma Growth and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Frieboes, Hermann B.; Lowengrub, John S.; Wise, S.; Zheng, X.; Macklin, Paul; Bearer, Elaine; Cristini, Vittorio

    2007-01-01

    Despite major advances in the study of glioma, the quantitative links between intra-tumor molecular/cellular properties, clinically observable properties such as morphology, and critical tumor behaviors such as growth and invasiveness remain unclear, hampering more effective coupling of tumor physical characteristics with implications for prognosis and therapy. Although molecular biology, histopathology, and radiological imaging are employed in this endeavor, studies are severely challenged by the multitude of different physical scales involved in tumor growth, i.e., from molecular nanoscale to cell microscale and finally to tissue centimeter scale. Consequently, it is often difficult to determine the underlying dynamics across dimensions. New techniques are needed to tackle these issues. Here, we address this multi-scalar problem by employing a novel predictive three-dimensional mathematical and computational model based on first-principle equations (conservation laws of physics) that describe mathematically the diffusion of cell substrates and other processes determining tumor mass growth and invasion. The model uses conserved variables to represent known determinants of glioma behavior, e.g., cell density and oxygen concentration, as well as biological functional relationships and parameters linking phenomena at different scales whose specific forms and values are hypothesized and calculated based on in-vitro and in-vivo experiments and from histopathology of tissue specimens from human gliomas. This model enables correlation of glioma morphology to tumor growth by quantifying interdependence of tumor mass on the microenvironment (e.g., hypoxia, tissue disruption) and on the cellular phenotypes (e.g., mitosis and apoptosis rates, cell adhesion strength). Once functional relationships between variables and associated parameter values have been informed, e.g. from histopathology or intra-operative analysis, this model can be used for disease diagnosis

  6. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Bin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  7. Depression and experience of vision loss in group of adults in rehabilitation setting: mixed-methods pilot study.

    PubMed

    Senra, Hugo; Vieira, Cristina R; Nicholls, Elizabeth G; Leal, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature regarding the relationship between the experience of vision loss and depression. Therefore, the current pilot study aimed to explore whether significant differences existed in levels of depression between adults with different vision loss experiences. A group of adults aged between 20 and 65 yr old with irreversible vision loss in a rehabilitation setting was interviewed. Semistructured interviews were conducted in order to explore patients' experience of vision loss. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to assess depressive levels; 39.5% (n = 15) of patients met CES-D criteria for depression. In addition, higher levels of depression (p < 0.05) were identified in patients whose interviews revealed greater self-awareness of impairment, inadequate social support, and longer rehabilitation stay. Current findings draw attention to variables such as self-awareness of impairment and perceived social support and suggest that depression following vision loss may be related to patients' emotional experiences of impairment and adjustment processes.

  8. Intra-arterial bromodeoxyuridine radiosensitization of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hegarty, T.J.; Thornton, A.F.; Diaz, R.F.; Chandler, W.F.; Ensminger, W.D.; Junck, L.; Page, M.A.; Gebarski, S.S.; Hood, T.W.; Stetson, P.L. )

    1990-08-01

    In the 1950's it was first observed that mammalian cells exposed to the halogenated deoxyuridines were more sensitive to ultraviolet light and radiation than untreated cells. This prompted early clinical trials with bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) which showed mixed results. More recently, several Phase I studies, while establishing the feasibility of continuous intravenous (IV) infusion of BUdR, have reported significant dose limiting skin and bone marrow toxicities and have questioned the optimal method of BUdR delivery. To exploit the high mitotic activity of malignant gliomas relative to surrounding normal brain tissue, we have developed a permanently implantable infusion pump system for safe, continuous intraarterial (IA) internal carotid BUdR delivery. Since July 1985, 23 patients with malignant brain tumors (18 grade 4, 5 grade 3) have been treated in a Phase I clinical trial using IA BUdR (400-600 mg/m2/day X 8 1/2 weeks) and focal external beam radiotherapy (59.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/day in 6 1/2 weeks). Following initial biopsy/surgery the infusion pump system was implanted; BUdR infusion began 2 weeks prior to and continued throughout the 6 1/2 week course of radiotherapy. There have been no vascular complications. Side-effects in all patients have included varying degrees of anorexia, fatigue, ipsilateral forehead dermatitis, blepharitis, and conjunctivitis. Myelosuppression requiring dose reduction occurred in one patient. An overall Kaplan-Meier estimated median survival of 20 months has been achieved. As in larger controlled series, histologic grade and age are prognostically significant. We have shown in a Phase I study that IA BUdR radiosensitization is safe, tolerable, may lead to improved survival, and appears to be an efficacious primary treatment of malignant gliomas.

  9. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-10-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes.

  10. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Ying; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS). The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  11. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes. PMID:27782153

  12. Oncolytic adenoviruses: A thorny path to glioma cure

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, I.V.; Borovjagin, A.V.; Schroeder, B.A.; Baryshnikov, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressing brain tumor. Despite the relatively low percentage of cancer patients with glioma diagnoses, recent statistics indicate that the number of glioma patients may have increased over the past decade. Current therapeutic options for glioma patients include tumor resection, chemotherapy, and concomitant radiation therapy with an average survival of approximately 16 months. The rapid progression of gliomas has spurred the development of novel treatment options, such as cancer gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. Preclinical testing of oncolytic adenoviruses using glioma models revealed both positive and negative sides of the virotherapy approach. Here we present a detailed overview of the glioma virotherapy field and discuss auxiliary therapeutic strategies with the potential for augmenting clinical efficacy of GBM virotherapy treatment. PMID:25685829

  13. A mathematical model of pre-diagnostic glioma growth

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Marc; Hao, Wenrui; Schwartzbaum, Judith; Rempala, Grzegorz A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their location, the malignant gliomas of the brain in humans are very difficult to treat in advanced stages. Blood-based biomarkers for glioma are needed for more accurate evaluation of treatment response as well as early diagnosis. However, biomarker research in primary brain tumors is challenging given their relative rarity and genetic diversity. It is further complicated by variations in the permeability of the blood brain barrier that affects the amount of marker released into the bloodstream. Inspired by recent temporal data indicating a possible decrease in serum glucose levels in patients with gliomas yet to be diagnosed, we present an ordinary differential equation model to capture early stage glioma growth. The model contains glioma-glucose-immune interactions and poses a potential mechanism by which this glucose drop can be explained. We present numerical simulations, parameter sensitivity analysis, linear stability analysis and a numerical experiment whereby we show how a dormant glioma can become malignant. PMID:26073722

  14. Novel Oncogenic PDGFRA Mutations in Pediatric High-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Paugh, Barbara S.; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Qu, Chunxu; Endersby, Raelene; Diaz, Alexander K.; Zhang, Junyuan; Bax, Dorine A.; Carvalho, Diana; Reis, Rui M.; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Broniscer, Alberto; Wetmore, Cynthia; Zhang, Jinghui; Jones, Chris; Ellison, David W.; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2013-01-01

    The outcome for children with high-grade gliomas (HGG) remains dismal, with a two-year survival rate of only 10–30%. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) comprise a subset of HGG that arise in brainstem almost exclusively in children. Genome-wide analyses of copy number imbalances previously showed that platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) is the most frequent target of focal amplification in pediatric HGGs, including DIPGs. To determine whether PDGFRA is also targeted by more subtle mutations missed by copy number analysis, we sequenced all PDGFRA coding exons from a cohort of pediatric HGGs. Somatic activating mutations were identified in 14.4% (13/90) of non-brainstem pediatric HGGs and 4.7% (2/43) of DIPGs, including missense mutations and in-frame deletions and insertions not previously described. 40% of tumors with mutation showed concurrent amplification, while 60% carried heterozygous mutations. Six different mutations impacting different domains all resulted in ligand-independent receptor activation that was blocked by small molecule inhibitors of PDGFR. Expression of mutants in p53-null primary mouse astrocytes conferred a proliferative advantage in vitro, and generated HGGs in vivo with complete penetrance when implanted into brain. The gene expression signatures of these murine HGGs reflected the spectrum of human diffuse HGGs. PDGFRA intragenic deletion of exons 8 and 9 were previously shown in adult HGG, but were not detected in 83 non-brainstem pediatric HGG and 57 DIPGs. Thus, a distinct spectrum of mutations confers constitutive receptor activation and oncogenic activity to PDGFRα in childhood HGG. PMID:23970477

  15. Older Adults and Emerging Digital Service Delivery: A Mixed Methods Study on Information and Communications Technology Use, Skills, and Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Siren, Anu; Knudsen, Sine Grønborg

    2017-01-01

    Based on data from a survey (n = 3291) and 14 qualitative interviews among Danish older adults, this study investigated the use of, and attitudes toward, information communications technology (ICT) and the digital delivery of public services. While age, gender, and socioeconomic status were associated with use of ICT, these determinants lost their explanatory power when we controlled for attitudes and experiences. We identified three segments that differed in their use of ICT and attitudes toward digital service delivery. As nonuse of ICT often results from the lack of willingness to use it rather than from material or cognitive deficiencies, policy measures for bridging the digital divide should focus on skills and confidence rather than on access or ability.

  16. IGFBP2 expression predicts IDH-mutant glioma patient survival.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin Eric; Cohen, Adam L; Colman, Howard; Jensen, Randy L; Fults, Daniel W; Couldwell, William T

    2017-01-03

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 genes occur in ~80% of lower-grade (WHO grade II and grade III) gliomas. Mutant IDH produces (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate, which induces DNA hypermethylation and presumably drives tumorigenesis. Interestingly, IDH mutations are associated with improved survival in glioma patients, but the underlying mechanism for the difference in survival remains unclear. Through comparative analyses of 286 cases of IDH-wildtype and IDH-mutant lower-grade glioma from a TCGA data set, we report that IDH-mutant gliomas have increased expression of tumor-suppressor genes (NF1, PTEN, and PIK3R1) and decreased expression of oncogenes(AKT2, ARAF, ERBB2, FGFR3, and PDGFRB) and glioma progression genes (FOXM1, IGFBP2, and WWTR1) compared with IDH-wildtype gliomas. Furthermore, each of these genes is prognostic in overall gliomas; however, within the IDH-mutant group, none remains prognostic except IGFBP2 (encodinginsulin-like growth factor binding protein 2). Through validation in an independent cohort, we show that patients with low IGFBP2 expressiondisplay a clear advantage in overall and disease-free survival, whereas those with high IGFBP2 expressionhave worse median survival than IDH-wildtype patients. These observations hold true across different histological and molecular subtypes of lower-grade glioma. We propose therefore that an unexpected biological consequence of IDH mutations in glioma is to ameliorate patient survival by promoting tumor-suppressor signaling while inhibiting that of oncogenes, particularly IGFBP2.

  17. Malignant gliomas: old and new systemic treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mesti, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant (high-grade) gliomas are rapidly progressive brain tumours with very high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, treatment options for patients with malignant gliomas were limited and mainly the same for all subtypes of malignant gliomas. The treatment included surgery and radiotherapy. Chemotherapy used as an adjuvant treatment or at recurrence had a marginal role. Conclusions Nowadays, the treatment of malignant gliomas requires a multidisciplinary approach. The treatment includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The chosen approach is more complex and individually adjusted. By that, the effect on the survival and quality of life is notable higher. PMID:27247544

  18. Yoga Therapy in Treating Patients With Malignant Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  19. EGFR promoter exhibits dynamic histone modifications and binding of ASH2L and P300 in human germinal matrix and gliomas.

    PubMed

    Erfani, Parsa; Tome-Garcia, Jessica; Canoll, Peter; Doetsch, Fiona; Tsankova, Nadejda M

    2015-01-01

    Several signaling pathways important for the proliferation and growth of brain cells are pathologically dysregulated in gliomas, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Expression of EGFR is high in neural progenitors during development and in gliomas but decreases significantly in most adult brain regions. Here we show that EGFR expression is maintained in the astrocyte ribbon of the adult human subventricular zone. The transcriptional regulation of EGFR expression is poorly understood. To investigate the role of epigenetics on EGFR regulation in the contexts of neural development and gliomagenesis, we measured levels of DNA methylation and histone H3 modifications at the EGFR promoter in human brain tissues, glioma specimens, and EGFR-expressing neural cells, acutely isolated from their native niche. While DNA was constitutively hypomethylated in non-neoplastic and glioma samples, regardless of their EGFR-expression status, the activating histone modifications H3K27ac and H3K4me3 were enriched only when EGFR is highly expressed (developing germinal matrix and gliomas). Conversely, repressive H3K27me3 marks predominated in adult white matter where EGFR is repressed. Furthermore, the histone methyltransferase core enzyme ASH2L was bound at EGFR in the germinal matrix and in gliomas where levels of H3K4me3 are high, and the histone acetyltransferase P300 was bound in samples with H3K27ac enrichment. Our studies use human cells and tissues undisturbed by cell-culture artifact, and point to an important, locus-specific role for chromatin remodeling in EGFR expression in human neural development that may be dysregulated during gliomagenesis, unraveling potential novel targets for future drug therapy.

  20. EGFR promoter exhibits dynamic histone modifications and binding of ASH2L and P300 in human germinal matrix and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Erfani, Parsa; Tome-Garcia, Jessica; Canoll, Peter; Doetsch, Fiona; Tsankova, Nadejda M

    2015-01-01

    Several signaling pathways important for the proliferation and growth of brain cells are pathologically dysregulated in gliomas, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Expression of EGFR is high in neural progenitors during development and in gliomas but decreases significantly in most adult brain regions. Here we show that EGFR expression is maintained in the astrocyte ribbon of the adult human subventricular zone. The transcriptional regulation of EGFR expression is poorly understood. To investigate the role of epigenetics on EGFR regulation in the contexts of neural development and gliomagenesis, we measured levels of DNA methylation and histone H3 modifications at the EGFR promoter in human brain tissues, glioma specimens, and EGFR-expressing neural cells, acutely isolated from their native niche. While DNA was constitutively hypomethylated in non-neoplastic and glioma samples, regardless of their EGFR-expression status, the activating histone modifications H3K27ac and H3K4me3 were enriched only when EGFR is highly expressed (developing germinal matrix and gliomas). Conversely, repressive H3K27me3 marks predominated in adult white matter where EGFR is repressed. Furthermore, the histone methyltransferase core enzyme ASH2L was bound at EGFR in the germinal matrix and in gliomas where levels of H3K4me3 are high, and the histone acetyltransferase P300 was bound in samples with H3K27ac enrichment. Our studies use human cells and tissues undisturbed by cell-culture artifact, and point to an important, locus-specific role for chromatin remodeling in EGFR expression in human neural development that may be dysregulated during gliomagenesis, unraveling potential novel targets for future drug therapy. PMID:25996283

  1. Restoration of Sensitivity in Chemo — Resistant Glioma Cells by Cold Atmospheric Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Köritzer, Julia; Boxhammer, Veronika; Schäfer, Andrea; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klämpfl, Tobias G.; Li, Yang-Fang; Welz, Christian; Schwenk-Zieger, Sabina; Morfill, Gregor E.; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Schlegel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumor in adults. Despite multimodal treatments including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy the prognosis remains poor and relapse occurs regularly. The alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) has been shown to improve the overall survival in patients with malignant gliomas, especially in tumors with methylated promoter of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance towards TMZ makes it crucial to find new therapeutic strategies aimed at improving the prognosis of patients suffering from malignant gliomas. Cold atmospheric plasma is a new auspicious candidate in cancer treatment. In the present study we demonstrate the anti-cancer properties of different dosages of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) both in TMZ-sensitive and TMZ-resistant cells by proliferation assay, immunoblotting, cell cycle analysis, and clonogenicity assay. Importantly, CAP treatment restored the responsiveness of resistant glioma cells towards TMZ therapy. Concomitant treatment with CAP and TMZ led to inhibition of cell growth and cell cycle arrest, thus CAP might be a promising candidate for combination therapy especially for patients suffering from GBMs showing an unfavorable MGMT status and TMZ resistance. PMID:23704990

  2. Selective activity of phenylacetate against malignant gliomas: resemblance to fetal brain damage in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Samid, D; Ram, Z; Hudgins, W R; Shack, S; Liu, L; Walbridge, S; Oldfield, E H; Myers, C E

    1994-02-15

    Phenylacetate, a deaminated metabolite of phenylalanine, has been implicated in damage to immature brain in phenylketonuria. Because primary brain tumors are highly reminiscent of the immature central nervous system, these neoplasms should be equally vulnerable. We show here that sodium phenylacetate can induce cytostasis and reversal of malignant properties of cultured human glioblastoma cells, when used at pharmacological concentrations that are well tolerated by children and adults. Treated tumor cells exhibited biochemical alterations similar to those observed in phenylketonuria-like conditions, including selective decline in de novo cholesterol synthesis from mevalonate. Because gliomas, but not mature normal brain cells, are highly dependent on mevalonate for production of sterols and isoprenoids vital for cell growth, sodium phenylacetate would be expected to affect tumor growth in vivo while sparing normal tissues. Systemic treatment of rats bearing intracranial gliomas resulted in significant tumor suppression with no apparent toxicity to the host. The data indicate that phenylacetate, acting through inhibition of protein prenylation and other mechanisms, may offer a safe and effective novel approach to treatment of malignant gliomas and perhaps other neoplasms as well.

  3. Sulfasalazine unveils a contact-independent HSV-TK/ganciclovir gene therapy bystander effect in malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Robe, Pierre A; Nguyen-Khac, Minh-Tuan; Lambert, Frederic; Lechanteur, Chantal; Jolois, Olivier; Ernst-Gengoux, Patricia; Rogister, Bernard; Bours, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of HSV-TK/ganciclovir-based gene therapy on malignant gliomas largely relies on the amplitude of the bystander effect. In these experiments, the anti-inflammatory drug Sulfasalazine increased the HSV-TK/ganciclovir bystander effect in C6, 9L and LN18 cells but not in U87 glioma cells. Using bi-compartmental culture devices and conditioned medium transfer experiments, we showed that in C6, 9L and LN18 cells but not in U87 cells, Sulfasalazine also unveiled a new, contact-independent mechanism of HSV-TK/ganciclovir bystander effect. Upon treatment with ganciclovir, human LN18-TK but not U87-TK cells synthetized and released TNF-alpha in the culture medium. Sulfasalazine sensitized glioma cells to the toxic effect of TNF-alpha and enhanced its secretion in LN18-TK cells in response to GCV treatment. The caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-FMK and a blocking antibody to TNF-alpha both inhibited the contact-independent bystander effect in LN18 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that TNF-alpha mediates the contact-independent bystander effect in LN18 cells. The treatment with GCV and/or Sulfasalazine of tumor xenografts consisting of a mix of 98% C6 and 2% C6-TK cells shows that Sulfasalazine is also a potent adjunct to the in vivo treatment of gliomas.

  4. Bevacizumab and Irinotecan in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma, or Low Grade Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-07

    Childhood Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma

  5. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high-grade gliomas: Clinical and dosimetric results

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, Ashwatha . E-mail: narayana@mskcc.org; Yamada, Josh; Berry, Sean; Shah, Priti B.S.; Hunt, Margie; Gutin, Philip H.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To report preliminary clinical and dosimetric data from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight consecutive high-grade gliomas were treated between January 2001 and December 2003 with dynamic multileaf collimator IMRT, planned with the inverse approach. A dose of 59.4-60 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction was delivered. A total of three to five noncoplanar beams were used to cover at least 95% of the target volume with the prescription isodose line. Glioblastoma accounted for 70% of the cases, and anaplastic oligodendroglioma histology (pure or mixed) was seen in 15% of the cases. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 26% of the patients, and 80% received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 85% of the patients have relapsed. The median progression-free survival time for anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma histology was 5.6 and 2.5 months, respectively. The overall survival time for anaplastic glioma and glioblastoma was 36 and 9 months, respectively. Ninety-six percent of the recurrences were local. No Grade IV/V late neurologic toxicities were noted. A comparative dosimetric analysis revealed that regardless of tumor location, IMRT did not significantly improve target coverage compared with three-dimensional planning. However, IMRT resulted in a decreased maximum dose to the spinal cord, optic nerves, and eye by 16%, 7%, and 15%, respectively, owing to its improved dose conformality. The mean brainstem dose also decreased by 7%. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered with a limited number of beams did not result in an increased dose to the normal brain. Conclusions: It is unlikely that IMRT will improve local control in high-grade gliomas without further dose escalation compared with conventional radiotherapy. However, it might result in decreased late toxicities associated with radiotherapy.

  6. Nanotechnology Applications for Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    PubMed

    Bredlau, Amy Lee; Dixit, Suraj; Chen, Chao; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are invariably fatal tumors found in the pons of elementary school aged children. These tumors are grade II-IV gliomas, with a median survival of less than 1 year from diagnosis when treated with standard of care (SOC) therapy. Nanotechnology may offer therapeutic options for the treatment of DIPGs. Multiple nanoparticle formulations are currently being investigated for the treatment of DIPGs. Nanoparticles based upon stable elements, polymer nanoparticles, and organic nanoparticles are under development for the treatment of brain tumors, including DIPGs. Targeting of nanoparticles is now possible as delivery techniques that address the difficulty in crossing the blood brain barrier (BBB) are developed. Theranostic nanoparticles, a combination of therapeutics and diagnostic nanoparticles, improve imaging of the cancerous tissue while delivering therapy to the local region. However, additional time and attention should be directed to developing a nanoparticle delivery system for treatment of the uniformly fatal pediatric disease of DIPG.

  7. Anaplastic glioma: current treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic glioma (AG) is divided into three morphology-based groups (anaplastic astrocytoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma) as well as three molecular groups (glioma-CpG island methylation phenotype [G-CIMP] negative, G-CIMP positive non-1p19q codeleted tumors and G-CIMP positive codeleted tumors). The RTOG 9402 and EORTC 26951 trials established radiotherapy plus (procarbazine, lomustine, vincristine) chemotherapy as the standard of care in 1p/19q codeleted AG. Uni- or non-codeleted AG are currently best treated with radiotherapy only or alkylator-based chemotherapy only as determined by the NOA-04 trial. Maturation of NOA-04 and results of the currently accruing studies, CODEL (for codeleted AG) and CATNON (for uni or non-codeleted AG), will likely refine current up-front treatment recommendations for AG.

  8. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  9. Overview of current immunotherapeutic strategies for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Kamran, Neha; Baker, Gregory; Mineharu, Yohei; Lowenstein, Pedro Ricardo; Castro, Maria Graciela

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, numerous studies of immunotherapy for malignant glioma (glioblastoma multiforme) have brought new knowledge and new hope for improving the prognosis of this incurable disease. Some clinical trials have reached Phase III, following positive outcomes in Phase I and II, with respect to safety and immunological end points. Results are encouraging especially when considering the promise of sustained efficacy by inducing antitumor immunological memory. Progress in understanding the mechanisms of tumor-induced immune suppression led to the development of drugs targeting immunosuppressive checkpoints, which are used in active clinical trials for glioblastoma multiforme. Insights related to the heterogeneity of the disease bring new challenges for the management of glioma and underscore a likely cause of therapeutic failure. An emerging therapeutic strategy is represented by a combinatorial, personalized approach, including the standard of care: surgery, radiation, chemotherapy with added active immunotherapy and multiagent targeting of immunosuppressive checkpoints. PMID:26598957

  10. Genomic analysis of diffuse pediatric low-grade gliomas identifies recurrent oncogenic truncating rearrangements in the transcription factor MYBL1

    PubMed Central

    Ramkissoon, Lori A.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Craig, Justin M.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Rich, Benjamin E.; Schumacher, Steven E.; McKenna, Aaron; Lawrence, Michael S.; Bergthold, Guillaume; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Tabak, Barbara; Ducar, Matthew D.; Van Hummelen, Paul; MacConaill, Laura E.; Pouissant-Young, Tina; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Taha, Hala; Mahmoud, Madeha; Bowers, Daniel C.; Margraf, Linda; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia; Packer, Roger J.; Hill, D. Ashley; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Dunn, Ian F.; Goumnerova, Liliana; Getz, Gad; Chan, Jennifer A.; Santagata, Sandro; Hahn, William C.; Stiles, Charles D.; Ligon, Azra H.; Kieran, Mark W.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Ligon, Keith L.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) are among the most common solid tumors in children but, apart from BRAF kinase mutations or duplications in specific subclasses, few genetic driver events are known. Diffuse PLGGs comprise a set of uncommon subtypes that exhibit invasive growth and are therefore especially challenging clinically. We performed high-resolution copy-number analysis on 44 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded diffuse PLGGs to identify recurrent alterations. Diffuse PLGGs exhibited fewer such alterations than adult low-grade gliomas, but we identified several significantly recurrent events. The most significant event, 8q13.1 gain, was observed in 28% of diffuse astrocytoma grade IIs and resulted in partial duplication of the transcription factor MYBL1 with truncation of its C-terminal negative-regulatory domain. A similar recurrent deletion-truncation breakpoint was identified in two angiocentric gliomas in the related gene v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) on 6q23.3. Whole-genome sequencing of a MYBL1-rearranged diffuse astrocytoma grade II demonstrated MYBL1 tandem duplication and few other events. Truncated MYBL1 transcripts identified in this tumor induced anchorage-independent growth in 3T3 cells and tumor formation in nude mice. Truncated transcripts were also expressed in two additional tumors with MYBL1 partial duplication. Our results define clinically relevant molecular subclasses of diffuse PLGGs and highlight a potential role for the MYB family in the biology of low-grade gliomas. PMID:23633565

  11. Resection Probability Maps for Quality Assessment of Glioma Surgery without Brain Location Bias

    PubMed Central

    De Witt Hamer, Philip C.; Hendriks, Eef J.; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Barkhof, Frederik; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Duffau, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Background Intraoperative brain stimulation mapping reduces permanent postoperative deficits and extends tumor removal in resective surgery for glioma patients. Successful functional mapping is assumed to depend on the surgical team's expertise. In this study, glioma resection results are quantified and compared using a novel approach, so-called resection probability maps (RPM), exemplified by a surgical team comparison, here with long and short experience in mapping. Methods Adult patients with glioma were included by two centers with two and fifteen years of mapping experience. Resective surgery was targeted at non-enhanced MRI extension and was limited by functional boundaries. Neurological outcome was compared. To compare resection results, we applied RPMs to quantify and compare the resection probability throughout the brain at 1 mm resolution. Considerations for spatial dependence and multiple comparisons were taken into account. Results The senior surgical team contributed 56, and the junior team 52 patients. The patient cohorts were comparable in age, preoperative tumor volume, lateralization, and lobe localization. Neurological outcome was similar between teams. The resection probability on the RPMs was very similar, with none (0%) of 703,967 voxels in left-sided tumors being differentially resected, and 124 (0.02%) of 644,153 voxels in right-sided tumors. Conclusion RPMs provide a quantitative volumetric method to compare resection results, which we present as standard for quality assessment of resective glioma surgery because brain location bias is avoided. Stimulation mapping is a robust surgical technique, because the neurological outcome and functional-based resection results using stimulation mapping are independent of surgical experience, supporting wider implementation. PMID:24039922

  12. Photoradiation therapy causing selective tumor kill in a rat glioma model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, A.H.; Morstyn, G.

    1987-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of photoradiation therapy using the photosensitizer, hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), and the argon-pumped rhodamine dye laser tuned to 630 nm in the rat C6 glioma model. Animal models of cerebral glioma were established by implanting 10(6) C6 glioma cells in adult Wistar rats, and craniotomies were performed on normal and tumor-bearing animals. HpD in doses of up to 80 mg/kg followed by craniotomy resulted in no damage to the normal brain, and laser light at doses of up to 1200 joules/cm2 without the prior administration of HpD produced no significant damage if the craniotomy site was irrigated with normal saline to prevent a temperature rise. Photoradiation caused no brain necrosis in non-tumor bearing animals if less than 20 mg of HpD per kg and 200 joules of red light per cm2 were used. At higher doses of HpD and light, cerebral necrosis did occur. The depth of necrosis depended on the dose of both HpD and light. Treatment with 40 mg of HpD per kg and 400 joules of light per cm2 resulted in cerebral necrosis in 50% of the treated animals. The mean depth of brain necrosis was 1.3 mm. Selective kill of a cerebral glioma with sparing of the normal brain was achieved with photoradiation therapy at doses of HpD of less than 20 mg/kg and light doses of less than 200 joules/cm2. At these doses, the mean depth of tumor kill was 4.5 mm. In 2 of 10 animals, the depth of tumor destruction was more than 6 mm.

  13. Raman spectroscopy of gliomas: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Mahesh; Hole, Arti R.; Shridhar, E.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar V.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Gliomas are extremely infiltrative type of brain cancers, the borders of which are difficult to locate. Gliomas largely consist of tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage. Usually stereotactic surgery is performed to obtain tumor tissue sample. Complete excision of these tumors with preservation of uninvolved normal areas is important during brain tumor surgeries. The present study was undertaken to explore feasibility of classifying abnormal and normal glioma tissues with Raman spectroscopy (RS). RS is a nondestructive vibrational spectroscopic technique, which provides information about molecular composition, molecular structures and molecular interactions in tissue. Postoperated 33 (20-abnormal and 13-normal) gliomas tissue samples of different grades were collected under clinical supervision. Five micron section from tissue sample was used for confirmatory histopathological diagnosis while the remaining tissue was placed on CaF2 window and spectra were acquired using a fiberoptic-probe-coupled HE-785 Raman-spectrometer. Spectral acquisition parameters were laser power-80mW, integration-20s and averaged over 3 accumulations. Spectra were pre-processed and subjected to unsupervised Principal-Component Analysis (PCA) to identify trends of classification. Supervised PC-LDA (Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant Analysis) was used to develop standard-models using spectra of 12 normal and abnormal specimens each. Leave-one-out crossvalidation yielded classification-efficiency of 90% and 80% for normal and abnormal conditions, respectively. Evaluation with an independent-test data-set comprising of 135 spectra of 9 samples provided sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. Findings of this preliminary study may pave way for objective tumor margin assessment during brain surgery.

  14. Autophagy and Akt promote survival in glioma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qi-Wen; Weiss, William A

    2011-05-01

    Signaling through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K)-Akt-mTOR is frequently activated in cancers including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), where this kinase network regulates survival. It is thus surprising that inhibitors of these pathways induce minimal cell death in glioma. We showed that the dual PtdIns3K-mTOR inhibitor PI-103 induces autophagy in therapy-resistant, PTEN-mutant glioma, with blockade of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and complex 2 (mTORC2) contributing independently to autophagy. Inhibition of autophagosome maturation synergizes with PI-103 to induce apoptosis through the Bax-dependent intrinsic mitochondrial pathway, indicating that PI-103 induces autophagy as a survival pathway in this setting. Not all inhibitors of PtdIns3K-Akt-mTOR signaling synergize with inhibitors of autophagy. The allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin fails to induce apoptosis in conjunction with blockade of autophagy, due to feedback-activation of Akt. Apoptosis in the setting of rapamycin therapy requires concurrent inhibition of both autophagy and of PtdIns3K-Akt. Moreover, the clinical PtdIns3K-mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 cooperates with the clinical lysosomotropic autophagy inhibitor chloroquine to induce apoptosis in PTEN-mutant glioma xenografts in vivo, offering a therapeutic approach translatable to patients.

  15. Perspectives in Intraoperative Diagnostics of Human Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Tyurikova, O.; Dembitskaya, Y.; Yashin, K.; Mishchenko, M.; Vedunova, M.; Medyanik, I.; Kazantsev, V.

    2015-01-01

    Amongst large a variety of oncological diseases, malignant gliomas represent one of the most severe types of tumors. They are also the most common type of the brain tumors and account for over half of the astrocytic tumors. According to different sources, the average life expectancy of patients with various glioblastomas varies between 10 and 12 months and that of patients with anaplastic astrocytic tumors between 20 and 24 months. Therefore, studies of the physiology of transformed glial cells are critical for the development of treatment methods. Modern medical approaches offer complex procedures, including the microsurgical tumor removal, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, supplemented with photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy. The most radical of them is surgical resection, which allows removing the largest part of the tumor, reduces the intracranial hypertension, and minimizes the degree of neurological deficit. However, complete removal of the tumor remains impossible. The main limitations are insufficient visualization of glioma boundaries, due to its infiltrative growth, and the necessity to preserve healthy tissue. This review is devoted to the description of advantages and disadvantages of modern intraoperative diagnostics of human gliomas and highlights potential perspectives for development of their treatment. PMID:26543495

  16. Low-grade gliomas: introduction and overview.

    PubMed

    Piepmeier, J M; Christopher, S

    1997-08-01

    This issue of the Journal of Neuro-Oncology is devoted to recent investigations of low-grade gliomas. The purpose of this issue is not to debate the relative merits and liabilities of different management strategies for low-grade gliomas, but to present new data concerning novel and innovative approaches to evaluating these lesions. The common theme of many of these reports represents a departure from grading systems that primarily depend on a morphology-based analysis from light microscopy to classify these tumors. The purpose of this review is to present the reasoning behind the selection of authors for this issue of the Journal of Neuro-Oncology and to provide a format for presentation of new ideas concerning these interesting tumors. It is clear that standard classification systems that address only the morphological characteristics of tumor cells can not adequately represent the wide variation in biological activity that is found with these lesions. It is hoped that these articles will stimulate further interest and research into low-grade gliomas that will one day lead to more effective therapy.

  17. Retention in Care among HIV-Infected Adults in Ethiopia, 2005– 2011: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Tiruneh, Yordanos M.; Galárraga, Omar; Genberg, Becky; Wilson, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor retention in HIV care challenges the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study assessed how well patients stay in care and explored factors associated with retention in the context of an initial ART rollout in Sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We conducted a mixed-methods study at a teaching hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A cohort of 385 patients was followed for a median of 4.6 years from ART initiation to lost-to-follow-up (LTFU—missing appointments for more than three months after last scheduled visit or administrative censoring). We used Kaplan-Meier plots to describe LTFU over time and Cox-regression models to identify factors associated with being LTFU. We held six focus group discussions, each with 6–11 patients enrolled in care; we analyzed data inductively informed by grounded theory. Results Patients in the cohort were predominantly female (64%) and the median age was 34 years. Thirty percent were LTFU by study’s end; the median time to LTFU was 1,675 days. Higher risk of LTFU was associated with baseline CD4 counts <100 and >200 cells/μL (HR = 1.62; 95% CI:1.03–2.55; and HR = 2.06; 95% CI:1.15–3.70, respectively), compared with patients with baseline CD4 counts of 100–200 cells/μL. Bedridden participants at ART initiation (HR = 2.05; 95% CIs [1.11–3.80]) and those with no or only primary education (HR = 1.50; 95% CIs [1.00–2.24]) were more likely to be LTFU. Our qualitative data revealed that fear of stigma, care dissatisfaction, use of holy water, and economic constraints discouraged retention in care. Social support and restored health and functional ability motivated retention. Conclusion Complex socio-cultural, economic, and health-system factors inhibit optimum patient retention. Better tracking, enhanced social support, and regular adherence counseling addressing stigma and alternative healing options are needed. Intervention strategies aimed at changing clinic routines and improving patient

  18. One-month comparative efficacy of three topical ectoparasiticides against adult brown dog ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato) on mixed-bred dogs in controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Varloud, Marie; Fourie, Josephus J

    2015-05-01

    This study was designed to compare the therapeutic and residual efficacy for 1 month of three topical ectoparasiticides on mixed-bred dogs against the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Adult dogs (n = 32, 10.8-18.4 kg BW) were allocated to 4 groups (n = 8) and infested with 50 adult ticks on days -8, -2, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Within each group, dogs were treated topically on day 0 with a control solution (CS), Vectra 3D (DPP), Frontline Plus (FM), or K9 Advantix (IP). Ticks were enumerated on dogs 24 h after treatment and each subsequent tick infestation by in situ thumb count assessment without removal and at 48 h by combing and removal. Acaricidal efficacy was calculated using arithmetic means for all 24 and 48 h tick count assessments. From 42 to 56% of the total, infested ticks were found on dogs 48 h post-challenge in the CS group. Therapeutic efficacy for all treatments ranged from 45.5 to 64.6% after 48 h of infestation. Residual efficacy after FM treatment was consistently lower compared to DPP or IP treatments at the 24 h assessments on days 8, 22, 23, and 29. Residual efficacy measured at this last time point was 94.8% for DPP, 83.1% for IP, and 46.9% for FM. This study demonstrates that permethrin-based formulations (DPP and IP) provided a quicker onset of residual protection against brown dog ticks compared to FM. Although DPP and IP are both permethrin-based formulations, DPP exhibited consistently higher residual acaricidal efficacies and was the only treatment that provided >90% protection for 1 month at 24 h post challenge.

  19. Prevalence and associated factors of female genital cutting among young adult females in Jigjiga district, eastern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional mixed study

    PubMed Central

    Gebremariam, Kidanu; Assefa, Demeke; Weldegebreal, Fitsum

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of female genital cutting (FGC) among young adult (10–24 years of age) females in Jigjiga district, eastern Ethiopia. Methods A school-based cross-sectional mixed method combining both quantitative and qualitative research methods was employed among 679 randomly selected young adult female students from Jigjiga district, Somali regional state, eastern Ethiopia, from February to March 2014 to assess the prevalence and associated factors with FGC. A pretested structured questionnaire was used to collect data. The qualitative data were collected using focus group discussion. Results This study depicted that the prevalence of FGC among the respondents was found to be 82.6%. The dominant form of FGC in this study was type I FGC, 265 (49.3%). The majority of the respondents, 575 (88.3%), had good knowledge toward the bad effects of FGC. Four hundred and seven (62.7%) study participants had positive attitude toward FGC discontinuation. Religion, residence, respondents’ educational level, maternal education, attitude, and belief in religious requirement were the most significant predictors of FGC. The possible reasons for FGC practice were to keep virginity, improve social acceptance, have better marriage prospects, religious approval, and have hygiene. Conclusion Despite girls’ knowledge and attitude toward the bad effects of FGC, the prevalence of FGC was still high. There should be a concerted effort among women, men, religious leaders, and other concerned bodies in understanding and clarifying the wrong attachment between the practice and religion through behavioral change communication and advocacy at all levels. PMID:27563257

  20. Targeting brain cancer: advances in the molecular pathology of malignant glioma and medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Huse, Jason T; Holland, Eric C

    2010-05-01

    Malignant brain tumours continue to be the cause of a disproportionate level of morbidity and mortality across a wide range of individuals. The most common variants in the adult and paediatric populations - malignant glioma and medulloblastoma, respectively - have been the subject of increasingly intensive research over the past two decades that has led to considerable advances in the understanding of their basic biology and pathogenesis. This Review summarizes these developments in the context of the evolving notion of molecular pathology and discusses the implications that this work has on the design of new treatment regimens.

  1. A role for ion channels in perivascular glioma invasion

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Emily G.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are devastating tumors, frequently killing those diagnosed in little over a year. The profuse infiltration of glioma cells into healthy tissue surrounding the main tumor mass is one of the major obstacles limiting the improvement of patient survival. Migration along the abluminal side of blood vessels is one of the salient features of glioma cell invasion. Invading glioma cells are attracted to the vascular network, in part by the neuro-peptide bradykinin, where glioma cells actively modify the gliovascular interface and undergo volumetric alterations to navigate the confined space. Critical to these volume modifications is a proposed hydrodynamic model that involves the flux of ions in and out of the cell, followed by osmotically obligated water. Ion and water channels expressed by the glioma cell are essential in this model of invasion and make opportune therapeutic targets. Lastly, there is growing evidence that vascular-associated glioma cells are able to control the vascular tone, presumably to free up space for invasion and growth. The unique mechanisms that enable perivascular glioma invasion may offer critical targets for therapeutic intervention in this devastating disease. Indeed, a chloride channel-blocking peptide has already been successfully tested in human clinical trials. PMID:27424110

  2. Association Between Prediagnostic Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Glioma.

    PubMed

    Zigmont, Victoria; Garrett, Amy; Peng, Jin; Seweryn, Michal; Rempala, Grzegorz A; Harris, Randall; Holloman, Christopher; Gundersen, Thomas E; Ahlbom, Anders; Feychting, Maria; Johannesen, Tom Borge; Grimsrud, Tom Kristian; Schwartzbaum, Judith

    2015-01-01

    There are no previous studies of the association between prediagnostic serum vitamin D concentration and glioma. Vitamin D has immunosuppressive properties; as does glioma. It was, therefore, our hypothesis that elevated vitamin D concentration would increase glioma risk. We conducted a nested case-control study using specimens from the Janus Serum Bank cohort in Norway. Blood donors who were subsequently diagnosed with glioma (n = 592), between 1974 and 2007, were matched to donors without glioma (n = 1112) on date and age at blood collection and sex. We measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], an indicator of vitamin D availability, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Seasonally adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated for each control quintile of 25(OH)D using conditional logistic regression. Among men diagnosed with high grade glioma >56, we found a negative trend (P = .04). Men diagnosed ≤ 56 showed a borderline positive trend (P = .08). High levels (>66 nmol/L) of 25(OH)D in men >56 were inversely related to high grade glioma from ≥2 yr before diagnosis (OR = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.38, 0.91) to ≥15 yr before diagnosis (OR = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.38,0.96). Our findings are consistent long before glioma diagnosis and are therefore unlikely to reflect preclinical disease.

  3. Aberrant CpG Islands Hypermethylation Profiles in Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Ryeol; Kim, Ealmaan

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors analyzed whether the promoter hypermethylation of cancer-related genes was involved in the tumorigenesis of malignant gliomas. Methods A total of 29 patients received surgery and histologically confirmed to have malignant gliomas from January 2000 to December 2006. The promoter methylation status of several genes, which were reported to be frequently methylated in malignant gliomas, was investigated using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Results All cases of malignant gliomas represented the promoter hypermethylation in at least 2 or more genes tested. Of 29 tumors, 28 (96.55%) showed concurrent hypermethylation of 3 or more genes. Ras association domain family member 1, epithelial cadherin, O-6 methyl guanine DNA methyltransferase, thrombospondin 1, p14 and adenomatous polyposis coli were frequently methylated in high grade gliomas including glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Conclusion Aberrant hypermethylation profile was closely related with malignant gliomas suggesting that epigenetic change may play a role in the development of malignant gliomas. Two or three target genes may provide useful clues to the development of the useful prognostic as well as diagnostic assays for malignant gliomas. PMID:24926469

  4. Association between Prediagnostic Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zigmont, Victoria; Garrett, Amy; Peng, Jin; Seweryn, Michal; Rempala, Grzegorz A.; Harris, Randall; Holloman, Christopher; Gundersen, Thomas E.; Ahlbom, Anders; Feychting, Maria; Johannesen, Tom Borge; Grimsrud, Tom Kristian; Schwartzbaum, Judith

    2016-01-01

    There are no previous studies of the association between prediagnostic serum vitamin D concentration and glioma. Vitamin D has immunosuppressive properties; as does glioma. It was, therefore, our hypothesis that elevated vitamin D concentration would increase glioma risk. We conducted a nested case–control study using specimens from the Janus Serum Bank cohort in Norway. Blood donors who were subsequently diagnosed with glioma (n = 592), between 1974 and 2007, were matched to donors without glioma (n = 1112) on date and age at blood collection and sex. We measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), an indicator of vitamin D availability, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Seasonally adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were estimated for each control quintile of 25(OH)D using conditional logistic regression. Among men diagnosed with high grade glioma >56, we found a negative trend (P=.04). Men diagnosed ≤ 56 showed a borderline positive trend (P=.08). High levels (>66 nmol/L) of 25(OH)D in men > 56 were inversely related to high grade glioma from ≥ 2 years before diagnosis (OR=0.59; 95%CI=0.38,0.91) to ≥ 15 years before diagnosis (OR=0.61; 95%CI=0.38,0.96). Our findings are consistent long before glioma diagnosis and are therefore unlikely to reflect preclinical disease. PMID:26317248

  5. Cystoid angiocentric glioma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sainan; Lü, Yubo; Xu, Shangchen; Liu, Qiang; Lee, Pearlene

    2015-01-01

    Angiocentric glioma is a rare subtype of neuroepithelial tumor that is associated with a history of epilepsy. We report a case of cystoid angiocentric glioma associated with an area of calcification. This 25 year old male patient presented with tonic clonic spasm. He underwent craniotomy with complete resection of the lesion. Pathologic specimen showed monomorphous bipolar cells with angiocentric growth pattern. PMID:26629293

  6. A role for ion channels in perivascular glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Emily G; Sontheimer, Harald

    2016-10-01

    Malignant gliomas are devastating tumors, frequently killing those diagnosed in little over a year. The profuse infiltration of glioma cells into healthy tissue surrounding the main tumor mass is one of the major obstacles limiting the improvement of patient survival. Migration along the abluminal side of blood vessels is one of the salient features of glioma cell invasion. Invading glioma cells are attracted to the vascular network, in part by the neuropeptide bradykinin, where glioma cells actively modify the gliovascular interface and undergo volumetric alterations to navigate the confined space. Critical to these volume modifications is a proposed hydrodynamic model that involves the flux of ions in and out of the cell, followed by osmotically obligated water. Ion and water channels expressed by the glioma cell are essential in this model of invasion and make opportune therapeutic targets. Lastly, there is growing evidence that vascular-associated glioma cells are able to control the vascular tone, presumably to free up space for invasion and growth. The unique mechanisms that enable perivascular glioma invasion may offer critical targets for therapeutic intervention in this devastating disease. Indeed, a chloride channel-blocking peptide has already been successfully tested in human clinical trials.

  7. Enhanced radiation-induced cytotoxic effect by 2-ME in glioma cells is mediated by induction of cell cycle arrest and DNA damage via activation of ATM pathways.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huichao; Zhao, Shiguang; Zhang, Jianhua; Lv, Gongwei; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Huibo; Wang, Ligang

    2007-12-14

    Glioblastoma multiform is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults, but there remains no effective therapeutic approach. 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), which is a naturally occurring metabolite of 17beta-estradiol, was shown to enhance radiotherapeutic effect in certain tumors; however, whether 2-ME can also enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to radiotherapy remains unknown. The present study, therefore, was to address this issue using two human glioma cell lines (T98G and U251MG). These cells were irradiated with and without 2-ME and then clonogenic assay, apoptosis assay, DNA damage, and cell cycle change were examined. Results showed that 2-ME significantly enhances radiation-induced cell death in both glioma cells, shown by decreasing cell viability and increasing apoptotic cell death. No such radiosensitizing effect was observed if cells pre-treated with Estrodiol, suggesting the specifically radiosensitizing effect of 2-ME rather than a general effect of estrodials. The enhanced radio-cytotoxic effect in glioma cells by 2-ME was found to be associated with its enhancement of G(2)/M arrest and DNA damage, and phosphorylated ATM protein kinases as well as cell cycle checkpoint protein Chk2. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM by ATM inhibitor abolished 2-ME-activated Chk2 and enhanced radio-cytotoxic effects. These results suggest that 2-ME enhancement of the sensitivity of glioma cell lines to radiotherapy is mediated by induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased DNA damage via activation of ATM kinases.

  8. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  9. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Rishi R.; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  10. Glioma coexisting with angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Chunlei; He, Jianqing; Li, Peipei; Zhou, Jingxu; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yuhai

    2016-01-01

    Angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation (AOVM) is a type of complex cerebrovascular malformation that is not visible on digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Vascular malformation coexisting with glioma is clinically rare, and glioma coexisting with AOVM is even more rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report glioma coexisting with AOVM in the literature. The present study reports a rare case of glioma coexisting with AOVM in a 30-year-old male patient. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed calcification, hemorrhage and edema in the right frontal lobe. CT angiography revealed a vascular malformation in the right frontal lobe, which was not observed on DSA. Finally, glioma coexisting with AOVM was confirmed by 2.0T magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative pathological examination. The present patient had a positive outcome and no neurological dysfunctions during the 6-month follow-up subsequent to surgery. PMID:27698825

  11. Androglobin knockdown inhibits growth of glioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Lu, Yi-Sheng; Li, Xia; Zhu, Zhi-Chuan; Li, Kui; Liu, Ji-Wei; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Ze-Lan

    2014-01-01

    Globin family was famous for oxygen supply function of its members such as hemoglobin and myoglobin. With the progress of research, several members of this protein family have been proven to play roles in tumors including glioma. Androglobin (ADGB) is a recently identified member of globin family with very few studies about its function. In the present study, we show that ADGB plays an oncogene role in glioma. Lentiviral vector mediated ADGB knockdown inhibited the proliferation of glioma cell lines determined by MTT assay and colony formation assay. ADGB knockdown also increased the apoptosis of glioma cell line U251 assessed by flow cytometry. In addition, western blot showed that ADGB knockdown altered levels of several proteins related to proliferation, survival or apoptosis in U251 cells. These findings suggest ADGB is involved in the progression of glioma in vitro. PMID:24966926

  12. Expression of the galectin-9-Tim-3 pathway in glioma tissues is associated with the clinical manifestations of glioma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengjin; Han, Huamin; He, Xin; Li, Shouwei; Wu, Chenxing; Yu, Chunjiang; Wang, Shengdian

    2016-03-01

    Glioma is known to induce local and systemic immunosuppression, which inhibits antitumor T cell responses. The galectin-9-Tim-3-pathway negatively regulates T cell pathways in the tumor immunosuppressive environment. The present study assessed the expression of Tim-3 and galectin-9 in glioma patients, and evaluated the association between the expression of Tim-3 and galectin-9 with clinical characteristics. The present study identified that Tim-3 expression was significantly increased in peripheral blood T cells of glioma patients compared with those of healthy controls, and was additionally increased on tumor-infiltrating T cells. The expression of Tim-3 on tumor-infiltrating T cells was associated with the World Health Organization (WHO) grade of glioma, but negatively correlated with the Karnofsky Performance Status score of the glioma patients. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of galectin-9 in tumor tissues was associated with Tim-3 expression on tumor-infiltrating T cells and the WHO grade of glioma. These findings suggest that the galectin-9-Tim-3 pathway may be critical in the immunoevasion of glioma and may be a potent target for immunotherapy in glioma patients.

  13. Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-21

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Malignant Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Noninfiltrating Astrocytoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Meningioma; Brain Metastases; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Pineal Parenchymal Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Infiltrating Astrocytoma; Mixed Gliomas; Stage IV Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  14. Automated Grading of Gliomas using Deep Learning in Digital Pathology Images: A modular approach with ensemble of convolutional neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Ertosun, Mehmet Günhan; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Brain glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults with different pathologic subtypes: Lower Grade Glioma (LGG) Grade II, Lower Grade Glioma (LGG) Grade III, and Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) Grade IV. The survival and treatment options are highly dependent of this glioma grade. We propose a deep learning-based, modular classification pipeline for automated grading of gliomas using digital pathology images. Whole tissue digitized images of pathology slides obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to train our deep learning modules. Our modular pipeline provides diagnostic quality statistics, such as precision, sensitivity and specificity, of the individual deep learning modules, and (1) facilitates training given the limited data in this domain, (2) enables exploration of different deep learning structures for each module, (3) leads to developing less complex modules that are simpler to analyze, and (4) provides flexibility, permitting use of single modules within the framework or use of other modeling or machine learning applications, such as probabilistic graphical models or support vector machines. Our modular approach helps us meet the requirements of minimum accuracy levels that are demanded by the context of different decision points within a multi-class classification scheme. Convolutional Neural Networks are trained for each module for each sub-task with more than 90% classification accuracies on validation data set, and achieved classification accuracy of 96% for the task of GBM vs LGG classification, 71% for further identifying the grade of LGG into Grade II or Grade III on independent data set coming from new patients from the multi-institutional repository. PMID:26958289

  15. ET-05INTRANASAL DELIVERY OF NEURAL STEM CELLS LOADED WITH ONCOLYTIC ADENOVIRUS EXTENDS SURVIVAL OF MICE WITH INTRACRANIAL GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Balyasnikova, Irina; Dey, Mahua; Tobias, Alex; Kanojia, Deepak; Lee, Gina; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Ahmed, Atique; Aboody, Karen; Lesniak, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common adult primary brain tumor, is in need of better and effective therapeutic options. In this study, we hypothesized that neural stem cells (NSCs) loaded with CRAd-S-pK7 oncolytic adenovirus (OV) can be successfully delivered via nasal application (IN) and will impart therapeutic efficacy in a murine model of human glioma. Recently, we demonstrated that radiation therapy increases the expression of CXCL12 in glioma xenografts, thus contributing to the enhanced migration of stem cells to the tumor site. We now show that hypoxic preconditioning of NSCs for 24h (1% oxygen) results in the two-fold increase of the CXCR4 expression on the surface of NSCs and doubles the rate of their migration towards glioma cells (p < 0.001) compared to untreated group. Hypoxic preconditioning of NSCs did not alter the OV replication as measured by E1A copy number. For in vivo studies, a patient derived GBM43 glioma cells were intracranially inoculated in nude mice. One week later, mice were treated with fractioned dose of irradiation at 2Gy for 5 days. NSCs (5x105) cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions were loaded with OV at 50 viral particles per cell, and IN inoculated 24h following the completion of the radiation. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that irradiation resulted in 44% improvement (p < 0.001) in median survival versus non-treated group. Survival of irradiated mice was not affected by either NSC's or OV-loaded NSCs, but was extended (p < 0.05) another 25% in the group of animals treated with OV-loaded NSCs cultured under hypoxic conditions. Thus, our data further validate the IN delivery as a novel route for the stem cell-based anti-glioma therapy, and suggest that modification of NSCs by enhancing their ability to migrate might significantly increase their therapeutic potential for IN delivery to target GBM.

  16. Dexamethasone inhibits proliferation and stimulates ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 activity in C6 rat glioma cell line.

    PubMed

    Bavaresco, Luci; Bernardi, Andressa; Braganhol, Elizandra; Wink, Márcia R; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2007-08-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and devastating primary tumors of the adult central nervous system. Dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, is commonly co-administered to control edema in the management of brain tumors during chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In the present study, the effect of dexamethasone on proliferation and ectonucleotidase activities in rat C6 glioma cell line was investigated. Dexamethasone concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 10 microM induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of C6 rat glioma cell proliferation after 24, 48 and 72-h treatment. The tetrazolium reduction assay (MTT) indicated a reduction of in cell viability (44 +/- 7.6%) after 48-h treatment with 1 microM dexamethasone. Pretreatment with 10 microM of RU38486, an antagonist of glucocorticoid receptors, abolished the effect of 1 microM dexamethasone by 78 +/- 9.8% after 48 h of treatment, indicating that this action is mediated via the glucocorticoid receptor. Members of the E-NTPDase family and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 can modulate extracellular ATP degradation and adenosine formation, both of which have been described as proliferation factors. Treatment of C6 glioma cells for 48 h with 1 microM dexamethasone increased in 38 +/- 8.09% the AMP hydrolysis and in 3.7-fold the ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 expression, suggesting an increase in adenosine formation and, therefore, a possible modulatory role in the elicitation of cell death responses. In addition, pretreatment with 5 microM GF 109203X, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, abolished the effect of dexamethasone on cell proliferation and on ecto-5'-NT activity, suggesting that dexamethasone could exert this action via PKC. The alterations in the catabolism of extracellular purines induced by dexamethasone treatment in glioma C6 cells could be related to its pharmacological effects.

  17. Automated Grading of Gliomas using Deep Learning in Digital Pathology Images: A modular approach with ensemble of convolutional neural networks.

    PubMed

    Ertosun, Mehmet Günhan; Rubin, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Brain glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults with different pathologic subtypes: Lower Grade Glioma (LGG) Grade II, Lower Grade Glioma (LGG) Grade III, and Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) Grade IV. The survival and treatment options are highly dependent of this glioma grade. We propose a deep learning-based, modular classification pipeline for automated grading of gliomas using digital pathology images. Whole tissue digitized images of pathology slides obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to train our deep learning modules. Our modular pipeline provides diagnostic quality statistics, such as precision, sensitivity and specificity, of the individual deep learning modules, and (1) facilitates training given the limited data in this domain, (2) enables exploration of different deep learning structures for each module, (3) leads to developing less complex modules that are simpler to analyze, and (4) provides flexibility, permitting use of single modules within the framework or use of other modeling or machine learning applications, such as probabilistic graphical models or support vector machines. Our modular approach helps us meet the requirements of minimum accuracy levels that are demanded by the context of different decision points within a multi-class classification scheme. Convolutional Neural Networks are trained for each module for each sub-task with more than 90% classification accuracies on validation data set, and achieved classification accuracy of 96% for the task of GBM vs LGG classification, 71% for further identifying the grade of LGG into Grade II or Grade III on independent data set coming from new patients from the multi-institutional repository.

  18. The Glioma International Case-Control Study: A Report From the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Amirian, E. Susan; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Zhou, Renke; Lau, Ching C.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel; Olson, Sara H.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Merrell, Ryan T.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Davis, Faith G.; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Aldape, Kenneth; Alafuzoff, Irina; Brännström, Thomas; Broholm, Helle; Collins, Peter; Giannini, Caterina; Rosenblum, Marc; Tihan, Tarik; Melin, Beatrice S.; Bondy, Melissa L.

    2016-01-01

    Decades of research have established only a few etiological factors for glioma, which is a rare and highly fatal brain cancer. Common methodological challenges among glioma studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity of tumor subtypes, and retrospective exposure assessment. Here, we briefly describe the Glioma International Case-Control (GICC) Study (recruitment, 2010–2013), a study being conducted by the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium that integrates data from multiple data collection sites, uses a common protocol and questionnaire, and includes biospecimen collection. To our knowledge, the GICC Study is the largest glioma study to date that includes collection of blood samples, which will allow for genetic analysis and interrogation of gene-environment interactions. PMID:26656478

  19. Number of glioma polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) associated with vasculogenic mimicry formation and tumor grade in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) contribute to solid tumor heterogeneity. This study investigated the relationships among PGCCs numbers, vasculogenic mimicry (VM) formation, and tumor grades in glioma. Methods A total of 76 paraffin-embedded glioma tissue samples, including 28 cases of low grade and 48 cases of high grade gliomas, were performed with H&E and immunohistochemical staining for Ki-67 and hemoglobin. The size of PGCCs nuclei was measured by a micrometer using H&E section and defined as at least three times larger than the nuclei of regular diploid cancer cells. The number of PGCCs and different blood supply patterns were compared in different grade gliomas. Microcirculation patterns in tumors were assessed using CD31 immunohistochemical and PAS histochemical double staining. Human glioma cancer cell line C6 was injected into the chicken embryonating eggs to form xenografts, which was used to observe the PGCCs and microcirculation patterns. Results In human glioma, the number of PGCCs increased with the grade of tumors (χ2 = 4.781, P = 0.015). There were three kinds of microcirculation pattern in human glioma including VM, mosaic vessel (MV) and endothelium dependent vessel. PGCCs were able to generate erythrocytes via budding to form VM. The walls of VM were positive (or negative) for PAS staining and negative for CD31 staining. There were more VM and MVs in high grade gliomas than those in low grade gliomas. The differences have statistical significances for VM (t = 3.745, P = 0.000) and MVs (t = 4.789, P = 0.000). PGCCs, VM and MVs can also be observed in C6 chicken embryonating eggs xenografts. Conclusions The data demonstrated presence of PGCCs, VM and MVs in glioma and PGCCs generating erythrocytes contribute the formation of VM and MVs. PMID:24422894

  20. Primary intracranial solitary leptomeningeal glioma: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, K; Shimura, T; Mizutani, N; Koide, A; Yamagiwa, O; Mori, F; Nishiyama, K; Tanaka, R; Takahashi, H

    2002-01-01

    Primary intracranial solitary leptomeningeal gliomas are exceedingly rare. We, therefore, performed a detailed clinical, radiological and pathological analysis to better characterize these tumors in 3 patients (33- and 72-year-old men and a 72-year-old woman). Two of the tumors were located in the frontal region and 1 in the temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well circumscribed large lesion (maximal diameter 4 - 6 cm) with peritumoral edema, mixed low- and isosignal intensity on T1-weighted images, hypersignal intensity on T2-weighted images and non-homogeneous contrast enhancement. External carotid angiography demonstrated a vascular supply to these tumors via branches of the middle meningeal artery. Gross total resection was achieved in all patients. The pathological diagnosis was glioblastoma in 2 patients and oligodendroglioma in 1. The MIB-1 nuclear labeling index ranged from 11.8% - 23.6% (mean 18.2%). Local tumor recurrence was documented in 2 patients after 8 and 11 months, respectively. The other patient with glioblastoma developed a metastasis to the femur 39 months after craniotomy. A definitive diagnosis can be made by careful radiological assessment and histopathological examination.

  1. Adoptive cell transfer therapy for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Eiichi; Takano, Shingo; Ohno, Tadao; Tsuboi, Koji

    2012-01-01

    To date, various adoptive immunotherapies have been attempted for treatment of malignant gliomas using nonspecific and/or specific effector cells. Since the late 1980s, with the development of rIL-2, the efficacy of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell therapy with or without rIL-2 for malignant gliomas had been tested with some modifications in therapeutic protocols. With advancements in technology, ex vivo expanded tumor specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) or those lineages were used in clinical trials with higher tumor response rates. In addition, combinations of those adoptive cell transfer using LAK cells, CTLs or natural killer (NK) cells with autologous tumor vaccine (ATV) therapy were attempted. Also, a strategy of high-dose (or lymphodepleting) chemotherapy followed by adoptive cell transfer has been drawing attentions recently. The most important role of these clinical studies using cell therapy was to prove that these ex vivo expanded effector cells could kill tumor cells in vivo. Although recent clinical results could demonstrate radiologic tumor shrinkage in a number of cases, cell transfer therapy alone has been utilized less frequently, because of the high cost of ex vivo cell expansion, the short duration of antitumor activity in vivo, and the recent shift of interest to vaccine immunotherapy. Nevertheless, NK cell therapy using specific feeder cells or allergenic NK cell lines have potentials to be a good choice of treatment because of easy ex vivo expansion and their efficacy especially when combined with vaccine therapy as they are complementary to each other. Also, further studies are expected to clarify the efficacy of the high-dose chemotherapy followed by a large scale cell transfer therapy as a new therapeutic strategy for malignant gliomas.

  2. Gene therapy for high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of high-grade gliomas remains difficult despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. True advances may emerge from the increasing understanding in molecular biology and discovery of novel mechanisms for the delivery of tumoricidal agents. In an attempt to overcome this formidable neoplasm, molecular approaches using gene therapy have been investigated clinically since 1992. The clinical trials have mainly been classified into three approaches: suicide gene therapy, immune gene therapy and oncolytic viral therapy. In this article, we review these approaches, which have been studied in previous and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:19262115

  3. Tipifarnib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Brain Stem Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  4. The Moment Study: protocol for a mixed method observational cohort study of the Alternative Nicotine Delivery Systems (ANDS) initiation process among adult cigarette smokers

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jennifer L; Smiley, Sabrina L; Rubin, Leslie F; Anesetti-Rothermel, Andrew; Elmasry, Hoda; Davis, Megan; DeAtley, Teresa; Harvey, Emily; Kirchner, Thomas; Abrams, David B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Alternative Nicotine Delivery Systems (ANDS) such as e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that aerosolize nicotine and other substances to simulate smoking without using tobacco. Little is known about the ANDS initiation process among adult smokers. The aims of this research are threefold to: (1) examine how ANDS use affects cigarette use; (2) examine how the immediate environmental and psychosocial contexts of cigarette and ANDS use vary within—and between—participants in general and by menthol preference and race; and, (3) examine participants' ‘lived experience’ of the subjective perceptions, meaning, influences and utility of cigarette and ANDS use. Methods and analyses This study's mixed method, 6-week longitudinal design will produce a detailed description of the ANDS initiation process among adult smokers (N=100). Qualitative and quantitative data collection will include 3 weeks of: (1) ecological momentary assessment of patterns of cigarette/ANDS use, satisfaction, mood and craving; (2) geospatial assessment of participants' environment, including indoor and outdoor cigarette/ANDS norms and rules; (3) in-depth interviews about the meaning and utility of cigarette smoking and ANDS use; and, (4) saliva cotinine and exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) biomarkers. A diverse sample will be recruited with an equal number of menthol and non-menthol cigarette smokers. As the primary independent variable, we will investigate how ANDS use affects cigarette consumption. We will also examine how smoking-related and ANDS-related rules and norms surrounding product use influence cigarette and ANDS product use, and how the subjective effects of ANDS use affect ANDS perceptions, beliefs and use. Ethics and dissemination This study was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the US National Institutes of Health (1R21DA036472), registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02261363), and approved by the Chesapeake IRB (Pro00008526). Findings will be

  5. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group f polymorphisms influence risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong-Bin; Xie, Chen; Zhang, Ru-You; Hu, Shao-Shan; Wang, Zhi; Yue, Wu

    2013-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory investigation of whether variation in six common SNPs of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F (XPF) is associated with risk of glioma in a Chinese population. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 207 glioma cases and 236 cancer-free controls by a 384-well plate format on the Sequenom MassARRAY platform (Sequenom, San Diego, USA). The rs1800067 G and rs2276466 G allele frequencies were significantly higher in the glioma group than controls. Individuals with the rs1800067 GG genotype were at greater risk of glioma when compared with the A/A genotype in the codominant model, with an OR (95% CI) of 2.63 (1.04-7.25). The rs2276466 polymorphism was significantly associated with moderate increased risk of glioma in codominant and dominant models, with ORs (95% CI) of 1.90 (1.05-3.44) and 1.55 (1.07-2.47), respectively. The combination genotype of rs1800067 G and rs2276466 G alleles was associated with a reduced risk of glioma (OR=0.44, 95% CI=0.19-0.98). These findings indicate that genetic variants of the XPF gene have critical functions in the development of glioma.

  6. Hugl-1 inhibits glioma cell growth in intracranial model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejiao; Lu, Dong; Ma, Peng; Liu, Huaqiang; Cao, Yuewen; Sang, Ben; Zhu, Xianlong; Shi, Qiong; Hu, Jinxia; Yu, Rutong; Zhou, Xiuping

    2015-10-01

    Drosophila lethal (2) giant larvae (lgl) has been reported as a tumor suppressor and could regulate the Drosophila hippo signaling. Human giant larvae-1(Hugl-1), one human homologue of Drosophila lgl, also has been reported to be involved in the development of some human cancers. However, whether Hugl-1 is associated with the pathogenesis of malignant gliomas remains poorly understood. In the present work, we examined the effect of Hugl-1 on glioma cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Firstly, we found that Hugl-1 protein levels decreased in the human glioma tissues, suggesting that Hugl-1 is involved in glioma progression. Unfortunately, either stably or transiently over-expressing Hugl-1 did not affect glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In addition, Hugl-1 over-expression did not regulate hippo signaling pathway. Interestingly, over-expression of Hugl-1 not only inhibited gliomagenesis but also markedly inhibited cell proliferation and promoted the apoptosis of U251 cells in an orthotopic model of nude mice. Taken together, this study provides the evidence that Hugl-1 inhibits glioma cell growth in intracranial model of nude mice, suggesting that Hugl-1 might be a potential tumor target for glioma therapy.

  7. Evaluation of nano-magnetic fluid on malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongsheng; Zong, Hailiang; Ma, Chong; Ming, Xing; Shang, Ming; Li, Kai; He, Xiaoguang; Cao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The temperature variation rule of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field and the effect on the treatment of malignant glioma were examined. The temperature variation of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field was investigated by heating in vitro, and cell morphology was observed through optical microscopy and electron microscopy. MTT detection also was used to detect the effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) on the proliferation of human U251 glioma cell line. The Fe3O4 nano MFH experiment was used to detect the inhibition rate of the tumor volume in nude mice with tumors. The results of the experiment showed that the heating ability of magnetic fluid was positively correlated with its concentration at the same intensity of the magnetic field. The results also indicated the prominent inhibitory effect of nanometer MFH on the proliferation of glioma cells, which was a dose-dependent relationship with nanometer magnetic fluid concentration. The hyperthermia experiment of nude mice with tumors displayed a significant inhibiting effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid in glioma volume. These results explain that iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanometer MFH can inhibit the proliferation of U251 glioma cells, and has an obvious inhibitory effect on glioma volume, which plays a certain role in the treatment of brain glioma. PMID:28356945

  8. PRG3 induces Ras-dependent oncogenic cooperation in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Chen, Daishi; Broggini, Thomas; Sehm, Tina; Majernik, Gökce Hatipoglu; Hock, Stefan W.; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most devastating cancers in humans. One characteristic hallmark of malignant gliomas is their cellular heterogeneity with frequent genetic lesions and disturbed gene expression levels conferring selective growth advantage. Here, we report on the neuronal-associated growth promoting gene PRG3 executing oncogenic cooperation in gliomas. We have identified perturbed PRG3 levels in human malignant brain tumors displaying either elevated or down-regulated PRG3 levels compared to non-transformed specimens. Further, imbalanced PRG3 levels in gliomas foster Ras-driven oncogenic amplification with increased proliferation and cell migration although angiogenesis was unaffected. Hence, PRG3 interacts with RasGEF1 (RasGRF1/CDC25), undergoes Ras-induced challenges, whereas deletion of the C-terminal domain of PRG3 (PRG3ΔCT) inhibits Ras. Moreover PRG3 silencing makes gliomas resistant to Ras inhibition. In vivo disequilibrated PRG3 gliomas show aggravated proliferation, invasion, and deteriorate clinical outcome. Thus, our data show that the interference with PRG3 homeostasis amplifies oncogenic properties and foster the malignancy potential in gliomas. PMID:27058420

  9. Evaluation of nano-magnetic fluid on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongsheng; Zong, Hailiang; Ma, Chong; Ming, Xing; Shang, Ming; Li, Kai; He, Xiaoguang; Cao, Lei

    2017-02-01

    The temperature variation rule of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field and the effect on the treatment of malignant glioma were examined. The temperature variation of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field was investigated by heating in vitro, and cell morphology was observed through optical microscopy and electron microscopy. MTT detection also was used to detect the effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) on the proliferation of human U251 glioma cell line. The Fe3O4 nano MFH experiment was used to detect the inhibition rate of the tumor volume in nude mice with tumors. The results of the experiment showed that the heating ability of magnetic fluid was positively correlated with its concentration at the same intensity of the magnetic field. The results also indicated the prominent inhibitory effect of nanometer MFH on the proliferation of glioma cells, which was a dose-dependent relationship with nanometer magnetic fluid concentration. The hyperthermia experiment of nude mice with tumors displayed a significant inhibiting effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid in glioma volume. These results explain that iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanometer MFH can inhibit the proliferation of U251 glioma cells, and has an obvious inhibitory effect on glioma volume, which plays a certain role in the treatment of brain glioma.

  10. Use of cardiac glycosides and risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Corinna; Meier, Christoph R; Jick, Susan S; Uhl, Martin; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Hau, Peter; Leitzmann, M F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac glycosides induce apoptotic effects on glioma cells, but whether cardiac glycosides protect against risk for glioma is unknown. We therefore explored the relation between glycoside use and glioma risk using a large and validated database. We performed a case-control analysis using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink involving 2005 glioma cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 that were individually matched to 20,050 controls on age, gender, general practice, and number of years of active history in the database. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between cardiac glycosides and the risk of glioma adjusting for body mass index and smoking. We also examined use of common heart failure and arrhythmia medications to differentiate between a specific glycoside effect and a generic effect of treatment for congestive heart failure or arrhythmia. Cardiac glycoside use was inversely related to glioma incidence. After adjustment for congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, diabetes, and common medications used to treat those conditions, the OR of glioma was 0.47 (95% CI 0.27-0.81, Bonferroni-corrected p value = 0.024) for use versus non-use of cardiac glycosides, based on 17 exposed cases. In contrast, no associations were noted for other medications used to treat congestive heart failure or arrhythmias. The OR of glioma in people with congestive heart failure was 0.65 (95% CI 0.40-1.04), and for arrhythmia it was 1.01 (95% CI 0.78-1.31). These data indicate that cardiac glycoside use is independently associated with reduced glioma risk.

  11. IGFBP2 expression predicts IDH-mutant glioma patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin Eric; Cohen, Adam L.; Colman, Howard; Jensen, Randy L.; Fults, Daniel W.; Couldwell, William T.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 genes occur in ~80% of lower-grade (WHO grade II and grade III) gliomas. Mutant IDH produces (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate, which induces DNA hypermethylation and presumably drives tumorigenesis. Interestingly, IDH mutations are associated with improved survival in glioma patients, but the underlying mechanism for the difference in survival remains unclear. Through comparative analyses of 286 cases of IDH-wildtype and IDH-mutant lower-grade glioma from a TCGA data set, we report that IDH-mutant gliomas have increased expression of tumor-suppressor genes (NF1, PTEN, and PIK3R1) and decreased expression of oncogenes(AKT2, ARAF, ERBB2, FGFR3, and PDGFRB) and glioma progression genes (FOXM1, IGFBP2, and WWTR1) compared with IDH-wildtype gliomas. Furthermore, each of these genes is prognostic in overall gliomas; however, within the IDH-mutant group, none remains prognostic except IGFBP2 (encodinginsulin-like growth factor binding protein 2). Through validation in an independent cohort, we show that patients with low IGFBP2 expressiondisplay a clear advantage in overall and disease-free survival, whereas those with high IGFBP2 expressionhave worse median survival than IDH-wildtype patients. These observations hold true across different histological and molecular subtypes of lower-grade glioma. We propose therefore that an unexpected biological consequence of IDH mutations in glioma is to ameliorate patient survival by promoting tumor-suppressor signaling while inhibiting that of oncogenes, particularly IGFBP2. PMID:27852048

  12. Preclinical evaluation of convection-enhanced delivery of liposomal doxorubicin to treat pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma and thalamic high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Sewing, A Charlotte P; Lagerweij, Tonny; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Meel, Michaël H; Veringa, Susanna J E; Carcaboso, Angel M; Gaillard, Pieter J; Peter Vandertop, W; Wesseling, Pieter; Noske, David; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Hulleman, Esther

    2017-02-17

    OBJECTIVE Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGGs) including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are primary brain tumors with high mortality and morbidity. Because of their poor brain penetrance, systemic chemotherapy regimens have failed to deliver satisfactory results; however, convection-enhanced delivery (CED) may be an alternative mode of drug delivery. Anthracyclines are potent chemotherapeutics that have been successfully delivered via CED in preclinical supratentorial glioma models. This study aims to assess the potency of anthracyclines against DIPG and pHGG cell lines in vitro and to evaluate the efficacy of CED with anthracyclines in orthotopic pontine and thalamic tumor models. METHODS The sensitivity of primary pHGG cell lines to a range of anthracyclines was tested in vitro. Preclinical CED of free doxorubicin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) to the brainstem and thalamus of naïve nude mice was performed. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was determined based on the observation of clinical symptoms, and brains were analyzed after H & E staining. Efficacy of the MTD was tested in adult glioma E98-FM-DIPG and E98-FM-thalamus models and in the HSJD-DIPG-007-Fluc primary DIPG model. RESULTS Both pHGG and DIPG cells were sensitive to anthracyclines in vitro. Doxorubicin was selected for further preclinical evaluation. Convection-enhanced delivery of the MTD of free doxorubicin and PLD in the pons was 0.02 mg/ml, and the dose tolerated in the thalamus was 10 times higher (0.2 mg/ml). Free doxorubicin or PLD via CED was ineffective against E98-FM-DIPG or HSJD-DIPG-007-Fluc in the brainstem; however, when applied in the thalamus, 0.2 mg/ml of PLD slowed down tumor growth and increased survival in a subset of animals with small tumors. CONCLUSIONS Local delivery of doxorubicin to the brainstem causes severe toxicity, even at doxorubicin concentrations that are safe in the thalamus. As a consequence, the authors could not establish a therapeutic

  13. [Smoking as a form of self-medication for depression or anxiety in young adults: results of a mixed-methods study].

    PubMed

    Carceller-Maicas, Natàlia; Ariste, Santiago; Martínez-Hernáez, Angel; Martorell-Poveda, María-Antonia; Correa-Urquiza, Martín; DiGiacomo, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco use and mental health problems in the depression/anxiety spectrum often begin in adolescence as co-occurring phenomena. Epidemiologically, the relationship between them is bidirectional, but in the case of young people it appears to be explained best by the unidirectional self-medication hypothesis. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between tobacco use, symptoms of depression or anxiety, and the perception of adolescents and young adults concerning tobacco use as a form of self-medication. A sample of 105 young people between the ages of 17 and 21 years was selected from a longitudinal sociological study to create three groups of participants: 1) subjects with a previous diagnosis of depression or anxiety; 2) subjects with self-perceived but undiagnosed distress compatible with depression or anxiety; 3) and a group of control. A mixed quantitative/qualitative questionnaire on substance consumption was administered, as well as the BDI-II depression scale, the GHQ anxiety and depression scales, and the MISS (Mannheim Interview on Social Support) scale. The final results show that the subjects experiencing symptoms of depression or anxiety in adolescence start smoking later than subjects in the control group, and those who smoke give self-medication as the main reason for doing so. The association between habitual tobacco use and BDI scores for depression was not statistically significant for the sample as a whole, only for the male participants (OR: 6,22, IC 95%, 1,06-36,21, p=.042). Anti-smoking campaigns targeting young people should take into consideration their use of tobacco as a form of self-medication for emotional distress.

  14. A pilot study of bevacizumab-based therapy in patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Trent R; Salloum, Ralph; Drissi, Rachid; Kumar, Shiva; Sobo, Matthew; Goldman, Stewart; Pai, Ahna; Leach, James; Lane, Adam; Pruitt, David; Sutton, Mary; Chow, Lionel M; Grimme, Laurie; Doughman, Renee; Backus, Lori; Miles, Lili; Stevenson, Charles; Fouladi, Maryam; DeWire, Mariko

    2016-03-01

    Although bevacizumab has not proven effective in adults with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas (HGG), feasibility in newly diagnosed children with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) or HGG has not been reported in a prospective study. In a safety and feasibility study, children and young adults with newly diagnosed HGG received radiotherapy (RT) with bevacizumab (10 mg/kg: days 22, 36) and temozolomide (75-90 mg/m(2)/day for 42 days) followed by bevacizumab (10 mg/kg, days 1, 15), irinotecan (125 mg/m(2), days 1, 15) and temozolomide (150 mg/m(2)/day days 1-5). DIPG patients did not receive temozolomide. Telomerase activity, quality of life (QOL), and functional outcomes were assessed. Among 27 eligible patients (15 DIPG, 12 HGG), median age 10 years (range 3-29 years), 6 discontinued therapy for toxicity: 2 during RT (grade 4 thrombocytopenia, grade 3 hepatotoxicity) and 4 during maintenance therapy (grade 3: thrombosis, hypertension, skin ulceration, and wound dehiscence). Commonest ≥grade 3 toxicities included lymphopenia, neutropenia and leukopenia. Grade 3 hypertension occurred in 2 patients. No intracranial hemorrhages occurred. For DIPG patients, median overall survival (OS) was 10.4 months. For HGG patients, 3-year progression free survival and OS were 33 % (SE ± 14 %) and 50 % (SE ± 14 %), respectively. All 3 tested tumor samples, demonstrated histone H3.3K27M (n = 2 DIPG) or G34R (n = 1 HGG) mutations. QOL scores improved over the course of therapy. A bevacizumab-based regimen is feasible and tolerable in newly diagnosed children and young adults with HGG and DIPG.

  15. Localisation of malignant glioma by a radiolabelled human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J; Alderson, T; Sikora, K; Watson, J

    1983-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies were produced by fusing intratumoral lymphocytes from patients with malignant gliomas with a human myeloma line. One antibody was selected for further study after screening for binding activity to glioma cell lines. The patient from whom it was derived developed recurrent glioma. 1 mg of antibody was purified, radiolabelled with 131I, and administered intravenously. The distribution of antibody was determined in the blood, CSF and tumour cyst fluid and compared with that of a control human monoclonal immunoglobulin. Antibody localisation in the tumour was observed and confirmed by external scintiscanning. Images PMID:6101173

  16. Malignant glioma: lessons from genomics, mouse models, and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; McKay, Renée M; Parada, Luis F

    2012-03-30

    Eighty percent of malignant tumors that develop in the central nervous system are malignant gliomas, which are essentially incurable. Here, we discuss how recent sequencing studies are identifying unexpected drivers of gliomagenesis, including mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and the NF-κB pathway, and how genome-wide analyses are reshaping the classification schemes for tumors and enhancing prognostic value of molecular markers. We discuss the controversies surrounding glioma stem cells and explore how the integration of new molecular data allows for the generation of more informative animal models to advance our knowledge of glioma's origin, progression, and treatment.

  17. Noscapine inhibits tumor growth in TMZ-resistant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Niyati; Cho, Heeyeon; Torres, Shering; Wang, Weijun; Schönthal, Axel H; Petasis, Nicos A; Louie, Stan G; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C

    2011-12-22

    Noscapine, a common oral antitussive agent, has been shown to have potent antitumor activity in a variety of cancers. Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with temozolomide (TMZ), its current standard of care, is problematic because the tumor generally recurs and is then resistant to this drug. We therefore investigated the effects of noscapine on human TMZ-resistant GBM tumors. We found that noscapine significantly decreased TMZ-resistant glioma cell growth and invasion. Using the intracranial xenograft model, we showed that noscapine increased survival of animals with TMZ-resistant gliomas. Thus noscapine can provide an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of TMZ-resistant gliomas.

  18. Extracts from Glioma Tissues following Cryoablation Have Proapoptosis, Antiproliferation, and Anti-Invasion Effects on Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianzhu; Wang, Xin; Yin, Zhilin; Pan, Jun; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Shizhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study is to investigate the in vivo apoptotic processes in glioma tissues following cryoablation and the effects of glioma tissue extracts on GL261 glioma cells in vitro. Methods. TUNEL and flow cytometry analysis were performed to detect the apoptotic processes in the glioma tissues following cryoablation and in the GL261 cells treated with cryoablated tumor extracts. The scratch assay, the transwell assay, and Western blot analysis were carried out to evaluate the effects of cryoablated tumor extracts on the migration, invasion, and proliferation of tumor cells. Results. Our in vivo results indicated that the rapid-onset apoptosis was induced via the intrinsic pathway and the delayed apoptosis was triggered through the extrinsic pathway. The in vitro results showed that extracts from glioma tissues following cryoablation induced apoptosis via extrinsic pathways in GL261 glioma cells. Furthermore, cryoablated tumor extracts significantly inhibited the migration and proliferation of these cells, which would be related to the inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway and the activation of P38 pathway. Conclusion. Glioma cells surviving in cryoablation undergo intrinsic or extrinsic apoptosis. Augmenting the induction of apoptosis or enhancing the cryosensitization of tumor cells by coupling cryoablation with specific chemotherapy effectively increases the efficiency of this therapeutic treatment. PMID:24818132

  19. Advances in Oncolytic Virus Therapy for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Haseley, Amy; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher; Chaudhury, Abhik Ray; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization grossly classifies the various types of astrocytomas using a grade system with grade IV gliomas having the worst prognosis. Oncolytic virus therapy is a novel treatment option for GBM patients. Several patents describe various oncolytic viruses used in preclinical and clinical trials to evaluate safety and efficacy. These viruses are natural or genetically engineered from different viruses such as HSV-1, Adenovirus, Reovirus, and New Castle Disease Virus. While several anecdotal studies have indicated therapeutic advantage, recent clinical trials have revealed the safety of their usage, but demonstration of significant efficacy remains to be established. Oncolytic viruses are being redesigned with an interest in combating the tumor microenvironment in addition to defeating the cancerous cells. Several patents describe the inclusion of tumor microenvironment modulating genes within the viral backbone and in particular those which attack the tumor angiotome. The very innovative approaches being used to improve therapeutic efficacy include: design of viruses which can express cytokines to activate a systemic antitumor immune response, inclusion of angiostatic genes to combat tumor vasculature, and also enzymes capable of digesting tumor extra cellular matrix (ECM) to enhance viral spread through solid tumors. As increasingly more novel viruses are being tested and patented, the future battle against glioma looks promising. PMID:19149710

  20. Survival after stereotactic biopsy of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, R.J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Taylor, F.H.

    1988-03-01

    For many patients with malignant gliomas in inaccessible or functionally important locations, stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy (RT) may be a more appropriate initial treatment than craniotomy and tumor resection. We studied the long term survival in 91 consecutive patients with malignant gliomas diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy: 64 had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 27 had anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Sixty-four per cent of the GBMs and 33% of the AAs involved deep or midline cerebral structures. The treatment prescribed after biopsy, the tumor location, the histological findings, and the patient's age at presentation (for AAs) were statistically important factors determining patient survival. If adequate RT (tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy) was not prescribed, the median survival was less than or equal to 11 weeks regardless of tumor histology or location. The median survival for patients with deep or midline tumors who completed RT was similar in AA (19.4 weeks) and GBM (27 weeks) cases. Histology was an important predictor of survival only for patients with adequately treated lobar tumors. The median survival in lobar GBM patients who completed RT was 46.9 weeks, and that in lobar AA patients who completed RT was 129 weeks. Cytoreductive surgery had no statistically significant effect on survival. Among the clinical factors examined, age of less than 40 years at presentation was associated with prolonged survival only in AA patients. Constellations of clinical features, tumor location, histological diagnosis, and treatment prescribed were related to survival time.

  1. Photodynamic therapy of recurrent cerebral glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shu-Gan; Wu, Si-En; Chen, Zong-Qian; Sun, Wei

    1993-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed on 11 cases of recurrent cerebral glioma, including 3 cases of recurrent glioblastoma, 7 of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma, and 1 recurrent ependymoma. Hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) was administered intravenously at a dose of 4 - 7 mg/kg 5 - 24 hours before the operation. All patients underwent a craniotomy with a nearly radical excision of the tumor following which the tumor bed was irradiated with 630 nm laser light emitting either an argon pumped dye laser or frequency double YAG pumped dye laser for 30 to 80 minutes with a total dose of 50 J/cm2 (n equals 1), 100 J/cm2 (n equals 2), 200 J/cm2 (n equals 7), and 300 J/cm2 (n equals 1). The temperature was kept below 37 degree(s)C by irrigation. Two patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy. There was no evidence of increased cerebral edema, and no other toxicity by the therapy. All patients were discharged from the hospital within 15 days after surgery. We conclude that PDT using 4 - 7 mg/kg of HPD and 630 nm light with a dose of up to 300 J/cm2 can be used as an adjuvant therapy with no additional complications. Adjuvant PDT in the treatment of recurrent glioma is better than simple surgery.

  2. Prospective Longitudinal Analysis of 2-Hydroxyglutarate Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Identifies Broad Clinical Utility for the Management of Patients With IDH-Mutant Glioma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Changho; Raisanen, Jack M; Ganji, Sandeep K; Zhang, Song; McNeil, Sarah S; An, Zhongxu; Madan, Akshay; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Sheppard, Christie A; Oliver, Dwight; Hulsey, Keith M; Tiwari, Vivek; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Battiste, James; Barnett, Samuel; Madden, Christopher J; Patel, Toral R; Pan, Edward; Malloy, Craig R; Mickey, Bruce E; Bachoo, Robert M; Maher, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-20

    Purpose Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain can detect 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), the oncometabolite produced in neoplasms harboring a mutation in the gene coding for isocitrate dehydrogenase ( IDH). We conducted a prospective longitudinal imaging study to determine whether quantitative assessment of 2HG by MRS could serve as a noninvasive clinical imaging biomarker for IDH-mutated gliomas. Patients and Methods 2HG MRS was performed in 136 patients using point-resolved spectroscopy at 3 T in parallel with standard clinical magnetic resonance imaging and assessment. Data were analyzed in patient cohorts representing the major phases of the glioma clinical course and were further subgrouped by histology and treatment type to evaluate 2HG. Histologic correlations were performed. Results Quantitative 2HG MRS was technically and biologically reproducible. 2HG concentration > 1 mM could be reliably detected with high confidence. During the period of indolent disease, 2HG concentration varied by less than ± 1 mM, and it increased sharply with tumor progression. 2HG concentration was positively correlated with tumor cellularity and significantly differed between high- and lower-grade gliomas. In response to cytotoxic therapy, 2HG concentration decreased rapidly in 1p/19q codeleted oligodendrogliomas and with a slower time course in astrocytomas and mixed gliomas. The magnitude and time course of the decrease in 2HG concentration and magnitude of the decrease in tumor volume did not differ between oligodendrogliomas treated with temozolomide or carmustine. Criteria for 2HG MRS were established to make a presumptive molecular diagnosis of an IDH mutation in gliomas technically unable to undergo a surgical procedure. Conclusion 2HG concentration as measured by MRS was reproducible and reliably reflected the disease state. These data provide a basis for incorporating 2HG MRS into clinical management of IDH-mutated gliomas.

  3. Experimental therapy of human glioma by means of a genetically engineered virus mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Martuza, R.L.; Malick, A.; Markert, J.M.; Ruffner, K.L.; Coen, D.M. )

    1991-05-10

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant brain tumors and are almost always fatal. A thymidine kinase-negative mutant of herpes simplex virus-1 (dlsptk) that is attenuated for neurovirulence was tested as a possible treatment for gliomas. In cell culture, dlsptk killed two long-term human glioma lines and three short-term human glioma cell populations. In nude mice with implanted subcutaneous and subrenal U87 human gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk caused growth inhibition. In nude mice with intracranial U87 gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk prolonged survival. Genetically engineered viruses such as dlsptk merit further evaluation as novel antineoplastic agents.

  4. Alpinetin targets glioma stem cells by suppressing Notch pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianpeng; Yan, Zhiyong; Liu, Xia; Che, Shusheng; Wang, Chao; Yao, Weicheng

    2016-07-01

    Glioma is among the most common human malignancies with poor prognosis. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are the culprit of glioma, suggesting that GSCs are potential therapeutic targets. Notch signaling pathway plays a pivotal role for the function of GSCs, implying that suppression of Notch pathway may be an effective strategy for GSC-targeting therapy. In this study, we found that alpinetin, a natural compound, can suppress the proliferation and invasiveness of GSCs and induce apoptosis in GSCs. Immunoblot analysis and luciferase assay revealed that Notch signaling was suppressed by alpinetin. Furthermore, restoration of Notch signaling activity rescued the effect of alpinetin on GSC's function. The anti-tumor activity of alpinetin was further confirmed in an animal model. Collectively, targeting of GSC by alpinetin is an effective strategy for glioma therapy.

  5. MEF promotes stemness in the pathogenesis of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Bazzoli, Elena; Pulvirenti, Teodoro; Oberstadt, Moritz C.; Perna, Fabiana; Wee, Boyoung; Schultz, Nikolaus; Huse, Jason T.; Fomchenko, Elena I.; Voza, Francesca; Tabar, Viviane; Brennan, Cameron W.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Nimer, Stephen D.; Holland, Eric C.; Squatrito, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary High-grade gliomas are aggressive and uniformly fatal tumors, composed of a heterogeneous population of cells that include many with stem cell-like properties. The acquisition of stem-like traits might contribute to glioma initiation, growth and recurrence. Here we investigated the role of the transcription factor myeloid Elf-1 like factor (MEF, also known as ELF4) in glioma. We found that MEF is highly expressed in both human and mouse GBMs and its absence impairs gliomagenesis in a PDGF-driven glioma mouse model. We show that modulation of MEF levels in both mouse neural stem cells and human glioblastoma cells, has a significant impact on neurosphere formation. Moreover, we identify Sox2 as a direct downstream target of MEF. Taken together, our studies implicate MEF as a previously unrecognized gatekeeper gene in gliomagenesis by promoting stem cell characteristics through Sox2 activation. PMID:23217424

  6. Cognition and resective surgery for diffuse infiltrative glioma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Klein, Martin; Duffau, Hugues; De Witt Hamer, Philip C

    2012-06-01

    Compared to classical oncological outcome measures such as time to progression and survival, the importance of cognitive functioning in patients with diffuse infiltrative brain tumors has only recently been recognized. Apart from the relatively low incidence and the invariably fatal outcome of gliomas, the general assumption that cognitive assessment is time-consuming and burdensome contributes to this notion. Our understanding of the effects of brain surgery on cognition, for instance, is largely based on studies in surgical patients with refractory epilepsy, with only a limited number of studies in surgical patients with gliomas. The impact of other factors affecting cognition in glioma patients such as direct tumor effects, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and medical treatment, including anti-epileptic drugs and steroids, have been studied more extensively. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of cognition in patients with diffuse infiltrative gliomas and the impact of resective surgery as well as other tumor and treatment-related factors.

  7. MEF promotes stemness in the pathogenesis of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bazzoli, Elena; Pulvirenti, Teodoro; Oberstadt, Moritz C; Perna, Fabiana; Wee, Boyoung; Schultz, Nikolaus; Huse, Jason T; Fomchenko, Elena I; Voza, Francesca; Tabar, Viviane; Brennan, Cameron W; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Nimer, Stephen D; Holland, Eric C; Squatrito, Massimo

    2012-12-07

    High-grade gliomas are aggressive and uniformly fatal tumors, composed of a heterogeneous population of cells that include many with stem-cell-like properties. The acquisition of stem-like traits might contribute to glioma initiation, growth, and recurrence. Here we investigated the role of the transcription factor myeloid Elf-1 like factor (MEF, also known as ELF4) in gliomas. We found that MEF is highly expressed in both human and mouse glioblastomas and its absence impairs gliomagenesis in a PDGF-driven glioma mouse model. We show that modulation of MEF levels in both mouse neural stem cells and human glioblastoma cells has a significant impact on neurosphere formation. Moreover, we identify Sox2 as a direct downstream target of MEF. Taken together, our studies implicate MEF as a previously unrecognized gatekeeper gene in gliomagenesis that promotes stem cell characteristics through Sox2 activation.

  8. Salinomycin inhibits the tumor growth of glioma stem cells by selectively suppressing glioma-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tunan; Yi, Liang; Li, Fei; Hu, Rong; Hu, Shengli; Yin, Yi; Lan, Chuan; Li, Zhao; Fu, Chuhua; Cao, Liu; Chen, Zhi; Xian, Jishu; Feng, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Glioma‑initiating cells are a small population of cells that have the ability to undergo self‑renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. In the present study, the potential role of salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, on the suppression of glioma cell growth was investigated. GL261 glioma cells were maintained in a stem‑cell‑like status [GL261 neurospheres (GL261‑NS)] or induced for differentiation [GL261 adherent cells (GL261‑AC)]. It was demonstrated that salinomycin significantly reduced the cell viability of GL261‑NS and GL261‑AC cells in a dose‑dependent manner, with a more substantial inhibition of GL261‑NS proliferation (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of salinomycin on cell growth was more effective than that of 1‑(4‑amino‑2‑methyl‑5‑pyrimid l)‑methyl‑3‑(2‑chloroethyl)‑3‑nitrosourea hydrochloride and vincristine (P<0.05). Salinomycin depleted GL261‑NS from tumorspheres and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, salinomycin prolonged the median survival time of glioma‑bearing mice (P<0.05). Therefore, the present study indicated that salinomycin may preferentially inhibit glioma‑initiated cell growth by inducing apoptosis, suggesting that salinomycin may provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  9. Glioma Stemlike Cells Enhance the Killing of Glioma Differentiated Cells by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Riccadonna, Cristina; Walker, Paul R.; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive primary brain tumor, is maintained by a subpopulation of glioma cells with self-renewal properties that are able to recapitulate the entire tumor even after surgical resection or chemo-radiotherapy. This typifies the vast heterogeneity of this tumor with the two extremes represented on one end by the glioma stemlike cells (GSC) and on the other by the glioma differentiated cells (GDC). Interestingly, GSC are more sensitive to immune effector cells than the GDC counterpart. However, how GSC impact on the killing on the GDC and vice versa is not clear. Using a newly developed cytotoxicity assay allowing to simultaneously monitor cytotoxic lymphocytes-mediated killing of GSC and GDC, we found that although GSC were always better killed and that their presence enhanced the killing of GDC. In contrast, an excess of GDC had a mild protective effect on the killing of GSC, depending on the CTL type. Overall, our results suggest that during combination therapy, immunotherapy would be the most effective after prior treatment with conventional therapies. PMID:27073883

  10. Expression of TIP-1 Confers Radioresistance of Malignant Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant gliomas represent one group of tumors that poorly respond to ionizing radiation (IR) alone or combined with chemotherapeutic agents because of the intrinsic or acquired resistance. In this study, TIP-1 was identified as one novel protein that confers resistance of glioma cells to IR. Methodology/Principal Findings Meta-analysis indicated that high TIP-1 expression levels correlate with the poor prognosis of human malignant gliomas after radiotherapy. Studies with established human glioma cell lines demonstrated that TIP-1 depletion with specific shRNAs sensitized the cells to IR, whereas an ectopic expression of TIP-1 protected the glioma cells from the IR-induced DNA damage and cell death. Biochemical studies indicated that TIP-1 protein promoted p53 ubiquitination and resulted in a reduced p53 protein level. Furthermore, p53 and its ubiquitination are required for the TIP-1 regulated cellular response to IR. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified that TIP-1, through its single PDZ domain, binds to the carboxyl terminus of LZAP that has been studied as one tumor suppressor functioning through ARF binding and p53 activation. It was revealed that the presence of TIP-1 enhances the protein association between LZAP and ARF and modulates the functionality of ARF/HDM2 toward multi-ubiquitination of p53, while depleting TIP-1 rescued p53 from polyubiquitination and degradation in the irradiated glioma cells. Studies with a mouse xenograft model indicated that depleting TIP-1 within D54 cells improved the tumor growth control with IR. Conclusions/Significance This study provided the first evidence showing that TIP-1 modulates p53 protein stability and is involved in the radioresistance of malignant gliomas, suggesting that antagonizing TIP-1 might be one novel approach to sensitize malignant gliomas to radiotherapy. PMID:23028987

  11. Malignant glioma following radiotherapy for unrelated primary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Marus, G.; Levin, C.V.; Rutherfoord, G.S.

    1986-08-15

    Four cases are documented where a glioma was histologically verified in the irradiation field of a previously treated malignancy of a different cell line. Radiation-induced neoplasia in the central nervous system now has been established in the induction of meningioma and sarcoma. The association between therapeutic irradiation and glioma in the reported cases lends to the evidence that a causal relation does exist. This incidence is small and does not detract from the overall benefit of irradiation as a therapeutic modality.

  12. Targeting Pediatric Glioma with Apoptosis and Autophagy Manipulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Gliomas are the most common and most deadly solid tumors that affect children . Treatment options are limited and...Gliomas are the most common and most deadly solid tumors that affect children . Treatment options are limited and cure rates are dismal. My laboratory has...tyrosine kinase inhibition. Society for Neuro- Oncology International Meetings Poster Presentation. November 2013. -Pierce AM, Keating AK. TAM Receptor

  13. Primary Role for Kinin B1 and B2 Receptors in Glioma Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Natália Fontana; Sénécal, Jacques; da Silva, Vinicius Duval; Roxo, Marcelo R; Ferreira, Nelson Pires; de Morais, Rafael Leite T; Pesquero, João Bosco; Campos, Maria Martha; Couture, Réjean; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno

    2016-11-16

    This study investigated the role of kinins and their receptors in malignant brain tumors. As a first approach, GL-261 glioma cells were injected (2 × 10(5) cells in 2 μl/2 min) into the right striatum of adult C57/BL6 wild-type, kinin B1 and B2 receptor knockout (KOB1R and KOB2R) and B1 and B2 receptor double knockout mice (KOB1B2R). The animals received the selective B1R (SSR240612) and/or B2R (HOE-140) antagonists by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) route at 5, 10, and 15 days. The tumor size quantification, mitotic index, western blot analysis, quantitative autoradiography, immunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy were carried out in brain tumor samples, 20 days after tumor induction. Our results revealed an uncontrolled tumor growing in KOB1R or SSR240612-treated mice, which was blunted by B2R blockade with HOE-140, suggesting a crosstalk between B1R and B2R in tumor growing. Combined treatment with B1R and B2R antagonists normalized the upregulation of tumor B1R and decreased the tumor size and the mitotic index, as was seen in double KOB1B2R. The B1R was detected on astrocytes in the tumor, indicating a close relationship between this receptor and astroglial cells. Noteworthy, an immunohistochemistry analysis of tumor samples from 16 patients with glioma diagnosis revealed a marked B1R immunopositivity in low-grade gliomas or in older glioblastoma individuals. Furthermore, the clinical data revealed a significantly higher immunopositivity for B1R, when compared to a lower B2R immunolabeling. Taken together, our results show that blocking simultaneously both kinin receptors or alternatively stimulating B1R may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of brain glioblastoma growth and malignancy.

  14. SURVIVAL ADVANTAGE COMBINING A BRAF INHIBITOR AND RADIATION IN BRAF V600E-MUTANT GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Tina; Olow, Aleksandra K.; Yang, Xiaodong; Hashizume, Rintaro; Tom, Maxwell; Aoki, Yasuyuki; Berger, Mitchel S.; Weiss, William A.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Prados, Michael; James, C. David; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation (RT) is critical to the treatment of high-grade gliomas (HGGs) but cures remain elusive. The BRAF mutation V600E is critical to the pathogenesis of 10–20% of pediatric gliomas, and a small proportion of adult HGGs. Here we aim to determine whether PLX4720, a specific BRAF V600E inhibitor, enhances the activity of radiation (RT) in human HGGs in vitro and in vivo. Methods Patient-derived HGG lines harboring wild-type BRAF or BRAF V600E were assessed in vitro to determine IC50 values, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence and elucidate mechanisms of combinatorial activity. A BRAF V600E HGG intracranial xenograft mouse model was used to evaluate in vivo combinatorial efficacy of PLX4720+RT. Tumors were harvested for immunohistochemistry to quantify cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Results RT+PLX4720 exhibited greater anti-tumor effects than either monotherapy in BRAF V600E but not in BRAF WT lines. In vitro studies showed increased Annexin V and decreased S phase cells in BRAF V600E gliomas treated with PLX4720+RT, but no significant changes in β-galactosidase levels. In vivo, concurrent and sequential PLX4720+RT each significantly prolonged survival compared to monotherapies, in the BRAF V600E HGG model. Immunohistochemistry of in vivo tumors demonstrated that PLX4720+RT decreased Ki-67 and phospho-MAPK, and increased γH2AX and p21 compared to control mice. Conclusions BRAF V600E inhibition enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in BRAF V600E-mutated HGGs, in vitro and in vivo, effects likely mediated by apoptosis and cell cycle, but not senescence. These studies provide the pre-clinical rationale for clinical trials of concurrent radiotherapy and BRAF V600E inhibitors. PMID:26384810

  15. Survival advantage combining a BRAF inhibitor and radiation in BRAF V600E-mutant glioma.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Tina; Olow, Aleksandra K; Yang, Xiaodong; Hashizume, Rintaro; Nicolaides, Theodore P; Tom, Maxwell; Aoki, Yasuyuki; Berger, Mitchel S; Weiss, William A; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Prados, Michael; James, C David; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A

    2016-02-01

    Radiation (RT) is critical to the treatment of high-grade gliomas (HGGs) but cures remain elusive. The BRAF mutation V600E is critical to the pathogenesis of 10-20% of pediatric gliomas, and a small proportion of adult HGGs. Here we aim to determine whether PLX4720, a specific BRAF V600E inhibitor, enhances the activity of RT in human HGGs in vitro and in vivo. Patient-derived HGG lines harboring wild-type BRAF or BRAF V600E were assessed in vitro to determine IC50 values, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence and elucidate mechanisms of combinatorial activity. A BRAF V600E HGG intracranial xenograft mouse model was used to evaluate in vivo combinatorial efficacy of PLX4720+RT. Tumors were harvested for immunohistochemistry to quantify cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. RT+PLX4720 exhibited greater anti-tumor effects than either monotherapy in BRAF V600E but not in BRAF WT lines. In vitro studies showed increased Annexin V and decreased S phase cells in BRAF V600E gliomas treated with PLX4720+RT, but no significant changes in β-galactosidase levels. In vivo, concurrent and sequential PLX4720+RT each significantly prolonged survival compared to monotherapies, in the BRAF V600E HGG model. Immunohistochemistry of in vivo tumors demonstrated that PLX4720+RT decreased Ki-67 and phospho-MAPK, and increased γH2AX and p21 compared to control mice. BRAF V600E inhibition enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in BRAF V600E-mutated HGGs, in vitro and in vivo, effects likely mediated by apoptosis and cell cycle, but not senescence. These studies provide the pre-clinical rationale for clinical trials of concurrent radiotherapy and BRAF V600E inhibitors.

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas: Pharmacotherapeutic Potential of Natural Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Guntuku, Lalita; Naidu, G.M.; Yerra, Veera Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors either benign or malignant originating from the glial tissue. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most prevalent and aggressive form among all gliomas, associated with decimal prognosis due to it's high invasive nature. GBM is also characterized by high recurrence rate and apoptosis resistance features which make the therapeutic targeting very challenging. Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that are acting as focal points in diverse array of cellular functions such as cellular energy metabolism, regulation of ion homeostasis, redox signaling and cell death. Eventual findings of mitochondrial dysfunction include preference of glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation, enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and abnormal mitochondria mediated apoptotic machinery are frequently observed in various malignancies including gliomas. In particular, gliomas harbor mitochondrial structure abnormalities, genomic mutations in mtDNA, altered energy metabolism (Warburg effect) along with mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) enzyme. Numerous natural compounds have shown efficacy in the treatment of gliomas by targeting mitochondrial aberrant signaling cascades. Some of the natural compounds directly target the components of mitochondria whereas others act indirectly through modulating metabolic abnormalities that are consequence of the mitochondrial dysfunction. The present review offers a molecular insight into mitochondrial pathology in gliomas and therapeutic mechanisms of some of the promising natural compounds that target mitochondrial dysfunction. This review also sheds light on the challenges and possible ways to overcome the hurdles associated with these natural compounds to enter into the clinical market. PMID:26791479

  17. Risk of seizures in children with tectal gliomas.

    PubMed

    Dabscheck, Gabriel; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Manley, Peter E; Goumnerova, Liliana; Ullrich, Nicole J

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of seizures in children with tectal gliomas and to determine if there are common clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), or radiologic findings that predict risk of seizures in these patients. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with tectal gliomas over a 22-year period at a single institution. Data extraction included sex, age at presentation of tectal glioma and age of presentation with seizures, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, seizure frequency and semiology, and EEG findings. We identified 79 patients, 66 of whom had adequate imaging and clinical data for further analysis. Eight patients (12.1%) had a history of seizures. Three patients had a clear symptomatic cause of seizures. Three patients were diagnosed with a tectal glioma as an incidental finding after a first seizure. One patient had a history of febrile convulsions. One patient had a generalized seizure 5 years after presenting with macrocephaly. Although the risk of seizure in children with known tectal glioma was relatively high, we did not identify specific clinical, radiologic, EEG, or MRI features that are predictive of increased risk. Thus, in children with tectal gliomas who have seizures, alternative causes for the seizures must be sought.

  18. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-03-15

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes.

  19. Plexin-B2 promotes invasive growth of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Le, Audrey P; Huang, Yong; Pingle, Sandeep C; Kesari, Santosh; Wang, Huaien; Yong, Raymund L; Zou, Hongyan; Friedel, Roland H

    2015-03-30

    Invasive growth is a major determinant of the high lethality of malignant gliomas. Plexin-B2, an axon guidance receptor important for mediating neural progenitor cell migration during development, is upregulated in gliomas, but its function therein remains poorly understood. Combining bioinformatic analyses, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry of patient samples, we demonstrate that Plexin-B2 is consistently upregulated in all types of human gliomas and that its expression levels correlate with glioma grade and poor survival. Activation of Plexin-B2 by Sema4C ligand in glioblastoma cells induced actin-based cytoskeletal dynamics and invasive migration in vitro. This proinvasive effect was associated with activation of the cell motility mediators RhoA and Rac1. Furthermore, costimulation of Plexin-B2 and the receptor tyrosine kinase Met led to synergistic Met phosphorylation. In intracranial glioblastoma transplants, Plexin-B2 knockdown hindered invasive growth and perivascular spreading, and resulted in decreased tumor vascularity. Our results demonstrate that Plexin-B2 promotes glioma invasion and vascularization, and they identify Plexin-B2 as a potential novel prognostic marker for glioma malignancy. Targeting the Plexin-B2 pathway may represent a novel therapeutic approach to curtail invasive growth of glioblastoma.

  20. Nicotinic acid inhibits glioma invasion by facilitating Snail1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiejing; Qu, Jiagui; Shi, Yu; Perfetto, Mark; Ping, Zhuxian; Christian, Laura; Niu, Hua; Mei, Shuting; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Xiangcai; Wei, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a formidable disease that commonly leads to death, mainly due to the invasion of tumor cells into neighboring tissues. Therefore, inhibition of tumor cell invasion may provide an effective therapy for malignant glioma. Here we report that nicotinic acid (NA), an essential vitamin, inhibits glioma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of the U251 glioma cells with NA in vitro results in reduced invasion, which is accompanied by a loss of mesenchymal phenotype and an increase in cell-cell adhesion. At the molecular level, transcription of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin is upregulated, leading to accumulation of E-cadherin protein at the cell-cell boundary. This can be attributed to NA’s ability to facilitate the ubiquitination and degradation of Snail1, a transcription factor that represses E-cadherin expression. Similarly, NA transiently inhibits neural crest migration in Xenopus embryos in a Snail1-dependent manner, indicating that the mechanism of action for NA in cell migration is evolutionarily conserved. We further show that NA injection blocks the infiltration of tumor cells into the adjacent brain tissues and improves animal survival in a rat model of glioma. These results suggest that NA treatment may be developed into a potential therapy for malignant glioma. PMID:28256591

  1. Three-dimensional cultured glioma cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Marley, Garry M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional glioma spheroids were produced in vitro with size and histological differentiation previously unattained. The spheroids were grown in liquid media suspension in a Johnson Space Center (JSC) Rotating Wall Bioreactor without using support matrices such as microcarrier beads. Spheroid volumes of greater than 3.5 cu mm and diameters of 2.5 mm were achieved with a viable external layer or rim of proliferating cells, a transitional layer beneath the external layer with histological differentiation, and a degenerative central region with a hypoxic necrotic core. Cell debris was evident in the degenerative central region. The necrotics centers of some of the spheroids had hyaline droplets. Granular bodies were detected predominantly in the necrotic center.

  2. History of chickenpox in glioma risk: a report from the glioma international case-control study (GICC).

    PubMed

    Amirian, E Susan; Scheurer, Michael E; Zhou, Renke; Wrensch, Margaret R; Armstrong, Georgina N; Lachance, Daniel; Olson, Sara H; Lau, Ching C; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Jenkins, Robert B; Bernstein, Jonine L; Merrell, Ryan T; Davis, Faith G; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2016-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic α-herpesvirus that causes chickenpox and establishes life-long latency in the cranial nerve and dorsal root ganglia of the host. To date, VZV is the only virus consistently reported to have an inverse association with glioma. The Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC) is a large, multisite consortium with data on 4533 cases and 4171 controls collected across five countries. Here, we utilized the GICC data to confirm the previously reported associations between history of chickenpox and glioma risk in one of the largest studies to date on this topic. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling, we found that a positive history of chickenpox was associated with a 21% lower glioma risk, adjusting for age and sex (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.65-0.96). Furthermore, the protective effect of chickenpox was stronger for high-grade gliomas. Our study provides additional evidence that the observed protective effect of chickenpox against glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Future studies, including meta-analyses of the literature and investigations of the potential biological mechanism, are warranted.

  3. DNA content and chromosomal composition of malignant human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bigner, S H; Bjerkvig, R; Laerum, O D

    1985-11-01

    A short review is given on DNA aberrations and chromosomal composition of malignant human gliomas. By flow cytometric DNA analysis, a wide range of different ploidies has been reported in biopsied gliomas, from diploid to strongly aneuploid nuclear DNA. However, with the preparation and analysis methods used so far, no clear relationship between the type of ploidy and histology or prognosis has been established. A high proportion of glioblastomas is near-diploid, indicating a high degree of biologic malignancy is not necessarily connected to aberration of the nuclear DNA content. It is possible that improved methods giving a higher degree of resolution will allow separation of the near-diploid populations of malignant human gliomas from normal diploid cells and permit the detection of subpopulations with small differences from the dominant DNA mode. Chromosomal studies of malignant gliomas have confirmed that the majority of them have near-diploid stemlines. These populations are seldom normal diploid, however, as both numerical and structural abnormalities are usually present. In addition, chromosomal analyses have shown that when gliomas are bimodal, the polyploid populations are usually doubled versions of the near-diploid ones. In contrast to the near-diploid populations that characterize biopsied malignant gliomas, both FCM studies and karyotyping have demonstrated that permanent cultured cell lines derived from malignant gliomas are usually near-triploid or near-tetraploid. Sequential karyotypic studies of these tumors from biopsy through establishment in vitro have shown an evolutionary pattern consisting of doubling of the original stemline, followed by gains or losses of individual chromosomes with new marker formation in late culture. Evaluation of biopsied malignant gliomas by karyotyping has also demonstrated that subgroups of them are characterized by specific numerical and structural deviations. These groupings may prove useful in predicting prognosis

  4. "Unusual brain stone": heavily calcified primary neoplasm with some features suggestive of angiocentric glioma.

    PubMed

    Sajjad, Jahangir; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Bermingham, Niamh; Marks, Charles; Keohane, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    This 40-year-old man presented with a 5-month history of progressive right-sided headache associated with visual blurring. He also had a history of epilepsy but had been seizure free with medication for the past 10 years. An initial CT scan of his brain performed 16 years previously had revealed a small area of calcification in the right parietal region. In the current presentation, he had a left-sided homonymous hemianopia but no other neurological deficits. A CT scan of his brain showed a much larger calcified, partly cystic lesion in the right parietal region. Because he was symptomatic, the lesion was excised and the cyst was drained. Histological examination of the excised tissue showed an unusual primary tumor that was difficult to classify but had some features of angiocentric glioma. The heavy calcification, mixed-density cell population, and regions with features of angiocentric glioma were most unusual. The patient remained asymptomatic 5 years after surgery, and follow-up scans did not show recurrence.

  5. Sense p16 and Antisense uPAR Bicistronic Construct Inhibits Angiogenesis and Induces Glioma Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Nalabothula, Narasimharao; Lakka, Sajani S.; Dinh, Dzung H.; Gujrati, Meena; Olivero, William C.; Rao, Jasti S.

    2006-01-01

    High-grade gliomas comprise the most malignant type of primary brain tumor and are relatively frequent in adults. Recent studies have indicated that the loss of p16, an inhibitor of CDK4, promotes the acquisition of malignant characteristics in gliomas. A correlation between overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and glioblastoma invasion has also been established. Moreover, uPAR/integrin binding has been shown to initiate or potentiate integrin signaling through focal adhesion kinase and/or src kinases. Our previous studies demonstrated that downregulation of uPAR expression and restoration of p16 regress glioma growth in nude mice and downregulate αvβ3 integrin receptor expression. Here, we show the effect of a bicistronic construct on αvβ5 integrin receptor expression, angiogenesis and the biochemical pathway that causes glioma cell death. The U251 glioblastoma and a glioblastoma xenograft cell line transduced with a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vector containing the cDNA of wild-type p16 and antisense RNA of uPAR significantly inhibited human mammary epithelial cell capillary formation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Inactivation of anti-apoptotic molecules such as Akt, PARP, activation of caspases and accumulation of heteroduplex chromosomal DNA in pre-G1 phase of the cell cycle was demonstrated by western blotting, caspase activity assay and FACS analysis. Nuclear DNA fragmentation upon induction of apoptosis was scored using the TUNEL assay. Significant downregulation of αvβ5 integrin receptor expression was also confirmed by FACS analysis, immunoprecipitation and RT-PCR. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the sense p16 and anti-sense uPAR bicistronic construct significantly inhibits angiogenesis, induces apoptosis by deregulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and downregulates αvβ5 integrin receptor expression. PMID:17273768

  6. Impact of meriolins, a new class of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, on malignant glioma proliferation and neo-angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Marie; Lecointre, Céline; Malleval, Céline; Desrues, Laurence; Schouft, Marie-Thérèse; Lejoncour, Vadim; Liger, François; Lyvinec, Gildas; Joseph, Benoît; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Honnorat, Jérôme; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Castel, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas are the most frequent and most aggressive primary brain tumors in adults. The median overall survival is limited to a few months despite surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. It is now clearly established that hyperactivity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) is one of the processes underlying hyperproliferation and tumoral growth. The marine natural products meridianins and variolins, characterized as CDK inhibitors, display a kinase-inhibitory activity associated with cytotoxic effects. In order to improve selectivity and efficiency of these CDK inhibitors, a series of hybrid compounds called meriolins have been synthesized. Methods The potential antitumoral activity of meriolins was investigated in vitro on glioma cell lines (SW1088 and U87), native neural cells, and a human endothelial cell line (HUV-EC-C). The impact of intraperitoneal or intratumoral administrations of meriolin 15 was evaluated in vivo on 2 different nude mice-xenografted glioma models. Results Meriolins 3, 5, and 15 exhibited antiproliferative properties with nanomolar IC50 and induced cell-cycle arrest and CDK inhibition associated with apoptotic events in human glioma cell lines. These meriolins blocked the proliferation rate of HUV-EC-C through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In vivo, meriolin 15 provoked a robust reduction in tumor volume in spite of toxicity for highest doses, associated with inhibition of cell division, activation of caspase 3, reduction of CD133 cells, and modifications of the vascular architecture. Conclusion Meriolins, and meriolin 15 in particular, exhibit antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities on both glioma and intratumoral endothelial cells, constituting key promising therapeutic lead compounds for the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:24891448

  7. A novel, integrated PET-guided MRS technique resulting in more accurate initial diagnosis of high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ellen S; Satter, Martin; Reed, Marilyn; Fadell, Ronald; Kardan, Arash

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal malignant glioma in adults. Currently, the modality of choice for diagnosing brain tumor is high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast, which provides anatomic detail and localization. Studies have demonstrated, however, that MRI may have limited utility in delineating the full tumor extent precisely. Studies suggest that MR spectroscopy (MRS) can also be used to distinguish high-grade from low-grade gliomas. However, due to operator dependent variables and the heterogeneous nature of gliomas, the potential for error in diagnostic accuracy with MRS is a concern. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (11)C-methionine (MET) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been shown to add additional information with respect to tumor grade, extent, and prognosis based on the premise of biochemical changes preceding anatomic changes. Combined PET/MRS is a technique that integrates information from PET in guiding the location for the most accurate metabolic characterization of a lesion via MRS. We describe a case of glioblastoma multiforme in which MRS was initially non-diagnostic for malignancy, but when MRS was repeated with PET guidance, demonstrated elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratio in the right parietal mass consistent with a high-grade malignancy. Stereotactic biopsy, followed by PET image-guided resection, confirmed the diagnosis of grade IV GBM. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an integrated PET/MRS technique for the voxel placement of MRS. Our findings suggest that integrated PET/MRS may potentially improve diagnostic accuracy in high-grade gliomas.

  8. Rabbit Model of Human Gliomas: Implications for Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Huamin; Janowski, Miroslaw; Pearl, Monica S.; Malysz-Cymborska, Izabela; Li, Shen; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2017-01-01

    The prognosis for malignant brain tumors remains poor despite a combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This is partly due to the blood-brain barrier, a major obstacle that prevents therapeutic agents from effectively reaching the tumor. We have recently developed a method for precise and predictable opening of the blood-brain barrier via the intra-arterial administration of mannitol, a hyperosmolar agent, in a rabbit model, whose vascular anatomy facilitates the use of standard interventional neuroradiology techniques and devices. To date, however, no protocols are available that enable human glioma modeling in rabbits. In this article, we report on the xenotransplantation of a human glioblastoma (GBM-1) in adult New Zealand rabbits. We induced multi-drug immunosuppression (Mycophenolate Mofetil, Dexamethasone, Tacrolimus) and stereotactically implanted GBM-1 tumor cells into rabbit brains. The rabbits were followed for 42 days, monitored by MRI and body weight measurements, and underwent postmortem histopathological analysis. On MRI, brain tumors were identified on T2-weighted scans. On histopathology, tumors were detected with hematoxylin/eosin and their human origin was confirmed with immunohistochemistry against human-specific antigens. Our method for human glioma modeling in rabbits provides the foundation to test novel treatment strategies, including intra-arterial therapeutic agent delivery. PMID:28103265

  9. ROS and Brain Gliomas: An Overview of Potential and Innovative Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Caffo, Maria; Minutoli, Letteria; Marini, Herbert; Abbritti, Rosaria Viola; Squadrito, Francesco; Trichilo, Vincenzo; Valenti, Andrea; Barresi, Valeria; Altavilla, Domenica; Passalacqua, Marcello; Caruso, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) represent reactive products belonging to the partial reduction of oxygen. It has been reported that ROS are involved in different signaling pathways to control cellular stability. Under normal conditions, the correct function of redox systems leads to the prevention of cell oxidative damage. When ROS exceed the antioxidant defense system, cellular stress occurs. The cellular redox impairment is strictly related to tumorigenesis. Tumor cells, through the generation of hydrogen peroxide, tend to the alteration of cell cycle phases and, finally to cancer progression. In adults, the most common form of primary malignant brain tumors is represented by gliomas. The gliomagenesis is characterized by numerous molecular processes all characterized by an altered production of growth factor receptors. The difficulty to treat brain cancer depends on several biological mechanisms such as failure of drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier, tumor response to chemotherapy, and intrinsic resistance of tumor cells. Understanding the mechanisms of ROS action could allow the formulation of new therapeutic protocols to treat brain gliomas. PMID:27338365

  10. Surgical Outcomes of High-Grade Spinal Cord Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Syunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to obtain useful information for establishing the guidelines for treating high-grade spinal cord gliomas. Overview of Literature The optimal management of high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains controversial. We report the outcomes of the surgical management of 14 high-grade spinal glioma. Methods We analyzed the outcomes of 14 patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas who were surgically treated between 1989 and 2012. Survival was charted with the Kaplan-Meier plots and comparisons were made with the log-rank test. Results None of the patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas underwent total resection. Subtotal resection was performed in two patients, partial resection was performed in nine patients, and open biopsy was performed in three patients. All patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy and six patients further underwent radiation cordotomy. The median survival time for patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas was 15 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 22.2%. The median survival time for patients with World Health Organization grade III tumors was 25.5 months, whereas the median survival time for patients with glioblastoma multiforme was 12.5 months. Both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated a significant effect only in the group that did not include cervical cord lesion as a factor associated with survival (p=0.04 and 0.03). Conclusions The surgical outcome of patients diagnosed with high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains poor. Notably, only the model which excluded cervical cord lesions as a factor significantly predicted survival. PMID:26713128

  11. Corpus callosum involvement and postoperative outcomes of patients with gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ko-Ting; Wu, Tai-Wei Erich; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Hsin; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Chang, Chen-Nen; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Pai, Ping-Ching; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Corpus callosum involvement is associated with poorer survival in high grade glioma (HGG), but the prognostic value in low grade glioma (LGG) is unclear. To determine the prognostic impact of corpus callosum involvement on progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in HGG and LGG, the records of 233 glioma patients treated from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images were used to identify corpus callosum involvement. Age, sex, preoperative Karnofsky performance scale, postoperative Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score and extent of resection (EOR) were evaluated with respect to PFS and OS. The incidence of corpus callosum involvement was similar among HGG (14 %) and LGG (14.5 %). Univariate analysis revealed that PFS and OS were significantly shorter in both WHO grade II and grade IV glioma with corpus callosum involvement (both, p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that grade II glioma with corpus callosum involvement have shorter PFS (p = 0.03), while EOR, instead of corpus callosum involvement (p = 0.16), was an independent factor associated with PFS in grade IV glioma (p < 0.05). Corpus callosum involvement was no longer significantly associated with OS after adjusting age, gender, EOR, preoperative and postoperative performance status (p = 0.16, 0.17 and 0.56 in grade II, III and IV gliomas, respectively). Corpus callosum involvement happened in both LGG and HGG, and is associated with lower EOR and higher postoperative ECOG score both in LGG and HGG. Corpus callosum involvement tends to be an independent prognostic factor for PFS in LGG, but not for OS in LGG or in HGG.

  12. Overexpression of IL-7 enhances cisplatin resistance in glioma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Fu, Jun; Pang, Jesse Chung-Sean; Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Fu-Rong; Shi, Hong-Liu; Ng, Ho-Keung; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2012-05-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents for glioma patients. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was used to identify genes associated with cisplatin resistance in a human glioma cell line. The cisplatin-resistant U251/CP2 cell line was derived by stepwise selection using cisplatin. The genetic aberrations of the U251 parental cell line and the U251/CP2 cells were analyzed using aCGH. RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of the altered genes revealed by aCGH. The sensitivity of glioma cells to cisplatin was determined by using the MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using flow cytometry and western blot analysis. The IC 50 value of cisplatin in U251/CP2 cells was five times higher than its IC 50 in U251 cells. The U251 cells lost at least one copy each of the CFHR1 and CFHR3 genes, and both CFHR1 and CFHR3 were homozygously deleted in U251/CP2 cells. The U251/CP2 cells gained two to three copies of C8orf70 and IL-7 genes. IL-7 mRNA expression was studied in 12 glioma cell lines, and expression was positively correlated with the IC 50 of cisplatin. Furthermore, IL-7 mRNA expression was also positively correlated with the IC 50 of cisplatin in 91 clinical glioma specimens. Additionally, treatment with recombinant human IL-7 (rhIL-7) enhanced cisplatin resistance and increased the relative growth rate of the glioma cells. Moreover, the apoptosis induced by cisplatin could be inhibited by IL-7. In conclusion, our results suggest that IL-7 may play an important role in cisplatin resistance in glioma.

  13. Stem cell-mediated delivery of therapies in the treatment of glioma.

    PubMed

    Frosina, G

    2011-06-01

    High grade gliomas can be seldom controlled, due to the infiltrative nature of these tumors and the presence of cell populations resistant to radio- and chemotherapy. Current research aims to develop novel therapeutic approaches to track and eliminate the disseminated glioma-driving cells. Selected delivery of therapeutic agents taking advantage of the tropism of normal stem cells for glioma cells might be one.

  14. Mitochondrial Lon is over-expressed in high-grade gliomas, and mediates hypoxic adaptation: potential role of Lon as a therapeutic target in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Di, Kaijun; Lomeli, Naomi; Wood, Spencer D.; Vanderwal, Christopher D.; Bota, Daniela A.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of cancer biology. Tumor mitochondrial metabolism is characterized by an abnormal ability to function in scarce oxygen conditions through glycolysis (the Warburg effect), and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA defects are present in both hereditary neoplasia and sporadic cancers. Mitochondrial Lon is a major regulator of mitochondrial metabolism and the mitochondrial response to free radical damage, and plays an essential role in the maintenance and repair of mitochondrial DNA. Despite these critical cellular functions of Lon, very little has been reported regarding its role in glioma. Lon expression in gliomas and its relevance with patient survival was examined using published databases and human tissue sections. The effect of Lon in glioma biology was investigated through siRNA targeting Lon. We also tested the in vitro antitumor activity of Lon inhibitor, CC4, in the glioma cell lines D-54 and U-251. High Lon expression was associated with high glioma tumor grade and poor patient survival. While Lon expression was elevated in response to a variety of stimuli, Lon knockdown in glioma cell lines decreased cell viability under normal conditions, and dramatically impaired glioma cell survival under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the Lon inhibitor, CC4, efficiently prohibited glioma cell proliferation and synergistically enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agents, temozolomide (TMZ) and cisplatin. We demonstrate that Lon plays a key role in glioma cell hypoxic survival and mitochondrial respiration, and propose Lon as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:27764809

  15. A Mixed Flavonoid-Fish Oil Supplement Induces Immune-Enhancing and Anti-Inflammatory Transcriptomic Changes in Adult Obese and Overweight Women—A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cialdella-Kam, Lynn; Nieman, David C.; Knab, Amy M.; Shanely, R. Andrew; Meaney, Mary Pat; Jin, Fuxia; Sha, Wei; Ghosh, Sujoy

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids and fish oils have anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating influences. The purpose of this study was to determine if a mixed flavonoid-fish oil supplement (Q-Mix; 1000 mg quercetin, 400 mg isoquercetin, 120 mg epigallocatechin (EGCG) from green tea extract, 400 mg n3-PUFAs (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid) (220 mg eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 180 mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) from fish oil, 1000 mg vitamin C, 40 mg niacinamide, and 800 µg folic acid) would reduce complications associated with obesity; that is, reduce inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and alter genomic profiles in overweight women. Overweight and obese women (n = 48; age = 40–70 years) were assigned to Q-Mix or placebo groups using randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled procedures. Overnight fasted blood samples were collected at 0 and 10 weeks and analyzed for cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), F2-isoprostanes, and whole-blood-derived mRNA, which was assessed using Affymetrix HuGene-1_1 ST arrays. Statistical analysis included two-way ANOVA models for blood analytes and gene expression and pathway and network enrichment methods for gene expression. Plasma levels increased with Q-Mix supplementation by 388% for quercetin, 95% for EPA, 18% for DHA, and 20% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Q-Mix did not alter plasma levels for CRP (p = 0.268), F2-isoprostanes (p = 0.273), and cytokines (p > 0.05). Gene set enrichment analysis revealed upregulation of pathways in Q-Mix vs. placebo related to interferon-induced antiviral mechanism (false discovery rate, FDR < 0.001). Overrepresentation analysis further disclosed an inhibition of phagocytosis-related inflammatory pathways in Q-Mix vs. placebo. Thus, a 10-week Q-Mix supplementation elicited a significant rise in plasma quercetin, EPA, DHA, and DPA, as well as stimulated an antiviral and inflammation whole-blood transcriptomic response in overweight women. PMID:27187447

  16. A Mixed Flavonoid-Fish Oil Supplement Induces Immune-Enhancing and Anti-Inflammatory Transcriptomic Changes in Adult Obese and Overweight Women-A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Cialdella-Kam, Lynn; Nieman, David C; Knab, Amy M; Shanely, R Andrew; Meaney, Mary Pat; Jin, Fuxia; Sha, Wei; Ghosh, Sujoy

    2016-05-11

    Flavonoids and fish oils have anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating influences. The purpose of this study was to determine if a mixed flavonoid-fish oil supplement (Q-Mix; 1000 mg quercetin, 400 mg isoquercetin, 120 mg epigallocatechin (EGCG) from green tea extract, 400 mg n3-PUFAs (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid) (220 mg eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 180 mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) from fish oil, 1000 mg vitamin C, 40 mg niacinamide, and 800 µg folic acid) would reduce complications associated with obesity; that is, reduce inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and alter genomic profiles in overweight women. Overweight and obese women (n = 48; age = 40-70 years) were assigned to Q-Mix or placebo groups using randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled procedures. Overnight fasted blood samples were collected at 0 and 10 weeks and analyzed for cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), F₂-isoprostanes, and whole-blood-derived mRNA, which was assessed using Affymetrix HuGene-1_1 ST arrays. Statistical analysis included two-way ANOVA models for blood analytes and gene expression and pathway and network enrichment methods for gene expression. Plasma levels increased with Q-Mix supplementation by 388% for quercetin, 95% for EPA, 18% for DHA, and 20% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Q-Mix did not alter plasma levels for CRP (p = 0.268), F2-isoprostanes (p = 0.273), and cytokines (p > 0.05). Gene set enrichment analysis revealed upregulation of pathways in Q-Mix vs. placebo related to interferon-induced antiviral mechanism (false discovery rate, FDR < 0.001). Overrepresentation analysis further disclosed an inhibition of phagocytosis-related inflammatory pathways in Q-Mix vs. placebo. Thus, a 10-week Q-Mix supplementation elicited a significant rise in plasma quercetin, EPA, DHA, and DPA, as well as stimulated an antiviral and inflammation whole-blood transcriptomic response in overweight women.

  17. Novel cancer-testis antigen expression on glioma cell lines derived from high-grade glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Komiyama, Masaru; Miyata, Haruo; Yagoto, Mika; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Iizuka, Akira; Oshita, Chie; Kume, Akiko; Nogami, Masahiro; Ito, Ichiro; Watanabe, Reiko; Sugino, Takashi; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant and aggressive tumors, and has a very poor prognosis with a mean survival time of <2 years, despite intensive treatment using chemo-radiation. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches including immunotherapy have been developed against GBM. For the purpose of identifying novel target antigens contributing to GBM treatment, we developed 17 primary glioma cell lines derived from high-grade glioma patients, and analyzed the expression of various tumor antigens and glioma-associated markers using a quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC). A quantitative PCR using 54 cancer-testis (CT) antigen-specific primers showed that 36 CT antigens were positive in at least 1 of 17 serum-derived cell lines, and 17 antigens were positive in >50% cell lines. Impressively, 6 genes (BAGE, MAGE-A12, CASC5, CTAGE1, DDX43 and IL-13RA2) were detected in all cell lines. The expression of other 13 glioma-associated antigens than CT genes were also investigated, and 10 genes were detected in >70% cell lines. The expression of CT antigen and glioma-associated antigen genes with a high frequency were also verified in IHC analysis. Moreover, a relationship of antigen gene expressions with a high frequency to overall survival was investigated using the Repository of Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) database of the National Cancer Institute, and expression of 6 genes including IL-13RA2 was inversely correlated to overall survival time. Furthermore, 4 genes including DDX43, TDRD1, HER2 and gp100 were identified as MGMT-relevant factors. In the present study, several CT antigen including novel genes were detected in high-grade glioma primary cell lines, which might contribute to developing novel immunotherapy and glioma-specific biomarkers in future.

  18. Molecular genetics of pediatric brain stem gliomas. Application of PCR techniques to small and archival brain tumor specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N.; Rubio, M.P.; Correa, K.M.; Gusella, J.F.; Deimling, A. von )

    1993-09-01

    Brain stem gliomas are pediatric astrocytomas that histologically resemble adult supratentorial astrocytomas such as gliobastomas multiforme (GBM). The molecular genetic studies have suggested that adult GBM can be divided into two genetic subsets: Tumors with p53 tumor suppressor gene mutations and chromosome 17p loss that occur more commonly in younger patients; and tumors with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification that occur more commonly in older patients. Brain stem gliomas have not been studied since biopsies of these tumors are rare and extremely small. The authors investigated the molecular genetic composition of seven brain stem glioblastomas (two small biopsies, five autopsies) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for chromosomal loss, gene mutation and gene amplification. Four cases lost portions of chromosome 17p that included the 53p gene. These four cases and one additional case had mutations in the p53 gene. None of the cases showed amplification of the EGFR gene. Allelic losses of the long arm of chromosome 10 were noted in four cases. These results suggest similarities between pediatric brain stem glioblastomas and those GBM that occur in younger adult patients, and confirm the utility of PCR-based means of studying small and archival brain tumor specimens. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Deciphering the 8q24.21 association for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Enciso-Mora, Victor; Hosking, Fay J.; Kinnersley, Ben; Wang, Yufei; Shete, Sanjay; Zelenika, Diana; Broderick, Peter; Idbaih, Ahmed; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Marie, Yannick; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Labussière, Marianne; Dobbins, Sara; Boisselier, Blandine; Ciccarino, Pietro; Rossetto, Marta; Armstrong, Georgina; Liu, Yanhong; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Lau, Ching; Hepworth, Sarah J.; Strauch, Konstantin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Moebus, Susanne; Eisele, Lewin; Forsti, Asta; Hemminki, Kari; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Lathrop, Mark; Simon, Matthias; Bondy, Melissa; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified tagSNPs at 8q24.21 influencing glioma risk. We have sought to fine-map the location of the functional basis of this association using data from four genome-wide association studies, comprising a total of 4147 glioma cases and 7435 controls. To improve marker density across the 700 kb region, we imputed genotypes using 1000 Genomes Project data and high-coverage sequencing data generated on 253 individuals. Analysis revealed an imputed low-frequency SNP rs55705857 (P = 2.24 × 10−38) which was sufficient to fully capture the 8q24.21 association. Analysis by glioma subtype showed the association with rs55705857 confined to non-glioblastoma multiforme (non-GBM) tumours (P = 1.07 × 10−67). Validation of the non-GBM association was shown in three additional datasets (625 non-GBM cases, 2412 controls; P = 1.41 × 10−28). In the pooled analysis, the odds ratio for low-grade glioma associated with rs55705857 was 4.3 (P = 2.31 × 10−94). rs55705857 maps to a highly evolutionarily conserved sequence within the long non-coding RNA CCDC26 raising the possibility of direct functionality. These data provide additional insights into the aetiological basis of glioma development. PMID:23399484

  20. A graphic method for identification of novel glioma related genes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Shu, Yang; Yang, Lei; He, Yi-Chun; Li, Li-Peng; Huang, GuaHua; Li, Hai-Peng; Jiang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Glioma, as the most common and lethal intracranial tumor, is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. Good comprehension of the mechanism underlying this disease is very helpful to design effective treatments. However, up to now, the knowledge of this disease is still limited. It is an important step to understand the mechanism underlying this disease by uncovering its related genes. In this study, a graphic method was proposed to identify novel glioma related genes based on known glioma related genes. A weighted graph was constructed according to the protein-protein interaction information retrieved from STRING and the well-known shortest path algorithm was employed to discover novel genes. The following analysis suggests that some of them are related to the biological process of glioma, proving that our method was effective in identifying novel glioma related genes. We hope that the proposed method would be applied to study other diseases and provide useful information to medical workers, thereby designing effective treatments of different diseases.

  1. 2-methoxyestradiol as a potential cytostatic drug in gliomas?

    PubMed

    Kirches, E; Warich-Kirches, M

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas of astrocytic origin show only a limited chemotherapy response. Chemoresistance is most pronounced in glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and most malignant glioma, with median survival times not much longer than one year. Failure of chemotherapy partly relies on protective mechanisms against the commonly used DNA alkylating agents, but also on the constitutive activation of the pro-survival PI3K-Akt pathway in glioma cells, which inhibits apoptosis. Therefore, new drugs with an alternative mechanism, independent of DNA alkylation, are required. The microtubule targeting drug 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) efficiently induces mitotic arrest, apoptosis, but also autophagic cell death in glioma cells in vitro. Moreover, it may be able to inhibit vascularization of the highly vascular gliobastomas, because the drug influences blood vessel sprouting via a HIF-1-dependent mechanism. Although high doses of i.p. injected 2-ME were recently shown to be effective in an orthothopic rat glioma model, clinical phase I/II trials revealed low oral bioavailability. One of the most exciting future perspectives will be the currently ongoing development of improved 2-ME analogs. Compounds, sulphamoylated at positions 3 and 17, combine sufficient toxicity against tumor cells with resistance against metabolic degradation and sufficient plasma levels in experimental animals. They were found to be superior in some animal models of tumor growth and vascularization, following oral application.

  2. Epo is involved in angiogenesis in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Nico, Beatrice; Annese, Tiziana; Guidolin, Diego; Finato, Nicoletta; Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the extent of angiogenesis, evaluated as microvascular density, and the immunoreactivity of tumor cells to erythropoietin (Epo) and of endothelial cells to Epo receptor (EpoR) have been correlated in human glioma specimens, and the effect of anti-Epo antibody on glioma-induced angiogenesis in vivo in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) has been investigated. Results show that: (1) Epo/EpoR expression correlates with angiogenesis, (2) in the CAM assay, tumor bioptic specimens induce a strong angiogenic response, comparable to that induced by VEGF, and (3) an anti-Epo antibody co-administered with tumor bioptic specimens significantly inhibits the angiogenic response. These findings suggest the presence of a loop in the Epo/EpoR system, i.e. Epo is secreted by glioma tumor cells and it affects glioma vascular endothelial cells via its receptor and promotes angiogenesis in a paracrine manner. Moreover, as demonstrated by in vivo experiments, Epo is responsible for the strong angiogenic response induced by human glioma bioptic specimens, because an anti-Epo antibody is able to significantly inhibit this response.

  3. Concurrent thermochemoradiotherapy for brain high-grade glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, A. I.; Novikov, V. A.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Bober, E. E.; Frolova, I. G.; Baranova, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the achievements in the current strategies for treatment, the prognosis in malignant glioma patients remains unsatisfactory. Hyperthermia is currently considered to be the most effective and universal modifier of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preliminary treatment outcomes for 28 patients with newly diagnosed (23) and recurrent (5) high-grade gliomas were presented. All the patients received multimodality treatment including surgery, thermoche-moradiotherapy followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients endured thermochemoradiotherapy well. A complication, limited skin burn (II stage), was diagnosed in two cases and treated conservatively without treatment interruption. A month after thermochemoradiotherapy the results were as follows: complete regression was achieved in 4 cases, partial regression in 4 cases, stable disease in 14 cases and disease progression in 6 cases (one of them is pseudo-progression). After completing the adjuvant chemotherapy 2 more patients demonstrated complete response and 1 patient had disease progression. Introduction of local hyperthermia in multimodal therapy of malignant glioma does not impair the combined modality treatment tolerability of patients with malignant gliomas. A small number of studied patients and short follow-up time do not allow making reliable conclusions about the impact of local hyperthermia on the treatment outcomes; however, there is a tendency towards the increase in disease-free survival in the patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

  4. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  5. An immuno-wall microdevice exhibits rapid and sensitive detection of IDH1-R132H mutation specific to grade II and III gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yamamichi, Akane; Kasama, Toshihiro; Ohka, Fumiharu; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kato, Akira; Motomura, Kazuya; Hirano, Masaki; Ranjit, Melissa; Chalise, Lushun; Kurimoto, Michihiro; Kondo, Goro; Aoki, Kosuke; Kaji, Noritada; Tokeshi, Manabu; Matsubara, Toshio; Senga, Takeshi; Kaneko, Mika K.; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hara, Masahito; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Baba, Yoshinobu; Kato, Yukinari; Natsume, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract World Health Organization grade II and III gliomas most frequently occur in the central nervous system (CNS) in adults. Gliomas are not circumscribed; tumor edges are irregular and consist of tumor cells, normal brain tissue, and hyperplastic reactive glial cells. Therefore, the tumors are not fully resectable, resulting in recurrence, malignant progression, and eventual death. Approximately 69–80% of grade II and III gliomas harbor mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene (IDH1), of which 83–90% are found to be the IDH1-R132H mutation. Detection of the IDH1-R132H mutation should help in the differential diagnosis of grade II and III gliomas from other types of CNS tumors and help determine the boundary between the tumor and normal brain tissue. In this study, we established a highly sensitive antibody-based device, referred to as the immuno-wall, to detect the IDH1-R132H mutation in gliomas. The immuno-wall causes an immunoreaction in microchannels fabricated using a photo-polymerizing polymer. This microdevice enables the analysis of the IDH1 status with a small sample within 15 min with substantially high sensitivity. Our results suggested that 10% content of the IDH1-R132H mutation in a sample of 0.33 μl volume, with 500 ng protein, or from 500 cells is theoretically sufficient for the analysis. The immuno-wall device will enable the rapid and highly sensitive detection of the IDH1-R132H mutation in routine clinical practice. PMID:27877908

  6. Phase II Trial of Radiotherapy After Hyperbaric Oxygenation With Multiagent Chemotherapy (Procarbazine, Nimustine, and Vincristine) for High-Grade Gliomas: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Inoue, Osamu; Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Saito, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Iraha, Shiro; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Ariga, Takuro; Kasuya, Goro; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term results of a Phase II trial of radiotherapy given immediately after hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) with multiagent chemotherapy in adults with high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed high-grade gliomas were administered radiotherapy in daily 2 Gy fractions for 5 consecutive days per week up to a total dose of 60 Gy. Each fraction was administered immediately after HBO, with the time interval from completion of decompression to start of irradiation being less than 15 minutes. Chemotherapy consisting of procarbazine, nimustine, and vincristine and was administered during and after radiotherapy. Results: A total of 57 patients (39 patients with glioblastoma and 18 patients with Grade 3 gliomas) were enrolled from 2000 to 2006, and the median follow-up of 12 surviving patients was 62.0 months (range, 43.2-119.1 months). All 57 patients were able to complete a total radiotherapy dose of 60 Gy immediately after HBO with one course of concurrent chemotherapy. The median overall survival times in all 57 patients, 39 patients with glioblastoma and 18 patients with Grade 3 gliomas, were 20.2 months, 17.2 months, and 113.4 months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, histologic grade alone was a significant prognostic factor for overall survival (p < 0.001). During treatments, no patients had neutropenic fever or intracranial hemorrhage, and no serious nonhematologic or late toxicities were seen in any of the 57 patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy delivered immediately after HBO with multiagent chemotherapy was safe, with virtually no late toxicities, and seemed to be effective in patients with high-grade gliomas.

  7. Identification of Histological Correlates of Overall Survival in Lower Grade Gliomas Using a Bag-of-words Paradigm: A Preliminary Analysis Based on Hematoxylin & Eosin Stained Slides from the Lower Grade Glioma Cohort of The Cancer Genome Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Reid Trenton; Olar, Adriana; Narang, Shivali; Rao, Ganesh; Sulman, Erik; Fuller, Gregory N.; Rao, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Background: Glioma, the most common primary brain neoplasm, describes a heterogeneous tumor of multiple histologic subtypes and cellular origins. At clinical presentation, gliomas are graded according to the World Health Organization guidelines (WHO), which reflect the malignant characteristics of the tumor based on histopathological and molecular features. Lower grade diffuse gliomas (LGGs) (WHO Grade II–III) have fewer malignant characteristics than high-grade gliomas (WHO Grade IV), and a better clinical prognosis, however, accurate discrimination of overall survival (OS) remains a challenge. In this study, we aimed to identify tissue-derived image features using a machine learning approach to predict OS in a mixed histology and grade cohort of lower grade glioma patients. To achieve this aim, we used H and E stained slides from the public LGG cohort of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to create a machine learned dictionary of “image-derived visual words” associated with OS. We then evaluated the combined efficacy of using these visual words in predicting short versus long OS by training a generalized machine learning model. Finally, we mapped these predictive visual words back to molecular signaling cascades to infer potential drivers of the machine learned survival-associated phenotypes. Methods: We analyzed digitized histological sections downloaded from the LGG cohort of TCGA using a bag-of-words approach. This method identified a diverse set of histological patterns that were further correlated with OS, histology, and molecular signaling activity using Cox regression, analysis of variance, and Spearman correlation, respectively. A support vector machine (SVM) model was constructed to discriminate patients into short and long OS groups dichotomized at 24-month. Results: This method identified disease-relevant phenotypes associated with OS, some of which are correlated with disease-associated molecular pathways. From these image-derived phenotypes, a

  8. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hematoma in Low-Grade Glioma After 14 Years of Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Joković, Miloš; Bogosavljević, Vojislav; Nikolić, Igor; Jovanović, Nemanja

    We are reporting the case of a 53-year old woman presenting to our hospital with a hemorrhagic low-grade glioma (LGG). She was admitted to a nearby general hospital where she had presented with aphasia, right hemiplegia and change of mental status. Computer tomography (CT) images showed a left temporo-parietal hemorrhage with mass effect. She was transferred to our hospital neuro-intensive care unit where emergency craniotomy was performed. A tumor with hematoma was removed and further histopathology analysis revealed tumor progression. We reviewed the literature reporting cases of central nervous system tumors hemorrhage and found that these types of events are exquisitely rare in adults with LGG. However these events are possible, suggesting that it should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient presenting with intracranial hemorrhage. This case raises questions regarding the benefit of early versus late intervention for patients known to have LGG.

  9. Clinical implications of molecular neuropathology and biomarkers for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Hegi, Monika; Stupp, Roger; Weller, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are currently diagnosed based on morphological criteria and graded according to the World Health Organization classification of primary brain tumors. This algorithm of diagnosis and classification provides clinicians with an estimated prognosis of the natural course of the disease. It does not reflect the expected response to specific treatments beyond surgery (eg, radiotherapy or alkylating chemotherapy). Clinical experience has revealed that gliomas sharing similar histomorphological criteria might indeed have different clinical courses and exhibit highly heterogenous responses to treatments. This was very impressively demonstrated first for oligodendrogliomas. The presence or lack of combined deletions of the chromosomal segments 1p/19q was associated with different benefit from radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We review current molecular markers for malignant gliomas and discuss their current and future impact on clinical neuro-oncology.

  10. Silver nanoparticles: a novel radiation sensitizer for glioma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peidang; Huang, Zhihai; Chen, Zhongwen; Xu, Ruizhi; Wu, Hao; Zang, Fengchao; Wang, Cailian; Gu, Ning

    2013-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors with a dismal prognosis. Previous investigations by our group demonstrated the radiosensitizing effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma cells in vitro. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of intratumoral administration of AgNPs in combination with a single dose of ionizing radiation at clinically relevant MV energies for the treatment of C6 glioma-bearing rats. AgNPs (10 or 20 μg/10 μl) were stereotactically administered on day 8 after tumor implantation. One day after AgNP injection, rats bearing glioma received 10 Gy radiation. The mean survival times were 100.5 and 98 days, the corresponding percent increase in life spans was 513.2% and 497.7%, and the cure rates were 41.7 and 38.5% at 200 days for the 10 and 20 μg AgNPs and radiation combination groups, respectively. In contrast, the mean survival times for irradiated controls, 10 and 20 μg AgNPs alone, and untreated controls were 24.5, 16.1, 19.4, and 16.4 days, respectively. Furthermore, a cooperative antiproliferative and proapoptotic effect was obtained when gliomas were treated with AgNPs followed by radiotherapy. Our results showed the therapeutic efficacy of AgNPs in combination with radiotherapy without apparent systemic toxicity, suggesting the clinical potential of AgNPs in improving the outcome of malignant glioma radiotherapy.Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors with a dismal prognosis. Previous investigations by our group demonstrated the radiosensitizing effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma cells in vitro. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of intratumoral administration of AgNPs in combination with a single dose of ionizing radiation at clinically relevant MV energies for the treatment of C6 glioma-bearing rats. AgNPs (10 or 20 μg/10 μl) were stereotactically administered on day 8 after tumor implantation. One day after Ag

  11. Boldine: a potential new antiproliferative drug against glioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Daniéli; Horn, Ana Paula; Gaelzer, Mariana Maier; Frozza, Rudimar Luiz; Delgado-Cañedo, Andrés; Pelegrini, Alessandra Luiza; Henriques, Amélia T; Lenz, Guido; Salbego, Christianne

    2009-12-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and devastating primary tumors of the central nervous system. Currently no efficient treatment is available. This study evaluated the effect and underlying mechanisms of boldine, an aporphine alkaloid of Peumus boldus, on glioma proliferation and cell death. Boldine decreased the cell number of U138-MG, U87-MG and C6 glioma lines at concentrations of 80, 250 and 500 muM. We observed that cell death caused by boldine was cell-type specific and dose-dependent. Exposure to boldine for 24 h did not activate key mediators of apoptosis. However, it induced alterations in the cell cycle suggesting a G(2)/M arrest in U138-MG cells. Boldine had no toxic effect on non-tumor cells when used at the same concentrations as those used on tumor cells. Based on these results, we speculate that boldine may be a promising compound for evaluation as an anti-cancer agent.

  12. [Gliomas – What I Have to Know in ten Questions].

    PubMed

    Gulden-Sala, Wiebke; Roth, Patrick; Brown, Michelle; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Weller, Michael; Stupp, Roger

    2016-03-16

    Gliomas are the most common primary tumors involving the central nervous system. They can manifest with diverse and non-specific general and neurological symptoms. The diagnostic gold standard is cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent histological confirmation of the diagnosis. Steroids, especially dexamethasone, are used in case of focal symptoms and of symptoms caused by increased intracranial pressure, and antiepileptic drugs are used to manage epileptic seizures. Non-enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs are preferable. Glioma patients have an inherently elevated thromboembolic risk, and therapeutic anticoagulation is indicated following a thromboembolic event. Surgery, radiotherapy and systemic therapy are used as tumor-specific therapy modalities in gliomas. Molecular markers play an increasing role in the prognosis and selection of therapy in daily oncological routine.

  13. Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 10p in human gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmelman, A.C.; Liang, B.C.; Ross, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    Molecular loss of heterozygosity studies on human gliomas have shown several regions on chromosome 10 frequently deleted in higher grade tumors, suggesting that chromosome 10 may contain several tumor suppressor genes. We assessed loss of heterozygosity with microsatellite markers in 20 gliomas, consisting of various grades and containing two chromosome 10 copies. The locus that exhibited the most loss (69%) was the region bordered by D10S249 and D10S558 and inclusive of D10S594, with a linkage distance of 3 cM. This region was noted to be deleted in various grades of tumor, including low- and high-grade tumors. These results suggest that chromosome region 10p15 is involved in human gliomas of diverse grades and that this region may harbor genes important in the development of and progression to the malignant phenotype. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Genomic Insights into Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lapin, Danielle H.; Tsoli, Maria; Ziegler, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a highly aggressive pediatric brainstem tumor with a peak incidence in middle childhood and a median survival of less than 1 year. The dismal prognosis associated with DIPG has been exacerbated by the failure of over 250 clinical trials to meaningfully improve survival compared with radiotherapy, the current standard of care. The traditional practice to not biopsy DIPG led to a scarcity in available tissue samples for laboratory analysis that till recently hindered therapeutic advances. Over the past few years, the acquisition of patient derived tumor samples through biopsy and autopsy protocols has led to distinct breakthroughs in the identification of key oncogenic drivers implicated in DIPG development. Aberrations have been discovered in critical genetic drivers including histone H3, ACVR1, TP53, PDGFRA, and Myc. Mutations, previously not identified in other malignancies, highlight DIPG as a distinct biological entity. Identification of novel markers has already greatly influenced the direction of preclinical investigations and offers the exciting possibility of establishing biologically targeted therapies. This review will outline the current knowledge of the genomic landscape related to DIPG, overview preclinical investigations, and reflect how biological advances have influenced the focus of clinical trials toward targeted therapies.

  15. Antibody-based immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Gedeon, Patrick C.; Riccione, Katherine A.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapy for malignant glioma (MG) fails to specifically eliminate tumor cells, resulting in toxicity that limits therapeutic efficacy. In contrast, antibody-based immunotherapy utilizes the immune system to eliminate tumor cells with exquisite specificity. Increased understanding of the pathobiology of MG and the profound immunosuppression present among patients with MG has revealed several biologic targets amenable to antibody-based immunotherapy. Novel antibody engineering techniques allow for the production of fully human antibodies or antibody fragments with vastly reduced antigen-binding dissociation constants, increasing safety when used clinically as therapeutics. In this report, we summarize the use of antibody-based immunotherapy for MG. Approaches currently under investigation include the use of antibodies or antibody fragments to: 1) redirect immune effector cells to target tumor mutations, 2) inhibit immunosuppressive signals and thereby stimulate an immunological response against tumor cells, and 3) provide co-stimulatory signals to evoke immunologic targeting of tumor cells. These approaches demonstrate highly compelling safety and efficacy for the treatment of MG, providing a viable adjunct to current standard-of-care therapy for MG. PMID:25173142

  16. Chemosensitivity of IDH1 mutant gliomas due to an impairment in PARP1-mediated DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanxin; Kwintkiewicz, Jakub; Liu, Yang; Tech, Katherine; Frady, Lauren N; Su, Yu-Ting; Bautista, Wendy; Moon, Seog In; MacDonald, Jeffrey; Edwend, Matthew G; Gilbert, Mark R; Yang, Chunzhang; Wu, Jing

    2017-02-15

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) are the most prevalent genetic abnormalities in lower grade gliomas. The presence of these mutations in glioma is prognostic for better clinical outcomes with longer patient survival. In the present study, we found that defects in oxidative metabolism and 2-HG production confer chemosensitization in IDH1-mutated glioma cells. In addition, temozolomide (TMZ) treatment induced greater DNA damage and apoptotic changes in mutant glioma cells. The PARP1-associated DNA repair pathway was extensively compromised in mutant cells due to decreased NAD+ availability. Targeting the PARP DNA repair pathway extensively sensitized IDH1-mutated glioma cells to TMZ. Our findings demonstrate a novel molecular mechanism that defines chemosensitivity in IDH mutant gliomas. Targeting PARP-associated DNA repair may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for gliomas.

  17. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  18. The transglutaminase 2 gene is aberrantly hypermethylated in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Lisa M.; Schooler, Kevin P.; Ai, Lingbao; Klop, Corinne; Qiu, Jingxin; Robertson, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that catalyzes protein/protein crosslinking. Because extracellular TG2 crosslinks components of the extracellular matrix, TG2 is thought to function as a suppressor of cellular invasion. We have recently uncovered that the TG2 gene (TGM2) is a target for epigenetic silencing in breast cancer, highlighting a molecular mechanism that drives reduced TG2 expression, and this aberrant molecular event may contribute to invasiveness in this tumor type. Because tumor invasiveness is a primary determinant of brain tumor aggressiveness, we sought to determine if TGM2 is targeted for epigenetic silencing in glioma. Analysis of TGM2 gene methylation in a panel of cultured human glioma cells indicated that the 5′ flanking region of the TGM2 gene is hypermethylated and that this feature is associated with reduced TG2 expression as judged by immunoblotting. Further, culturing glioma cells in the presence of the global DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A resulted in re-expression of TG2 in these lines. In primary brain tumors we observed that the TGM2 promoter is commonly hypermethylated and that this feature is a cancer-associated phenomenon. Using publically available databases, TG2 expression in gliomas was found to vary widely, with many tumors showing overexpression or underexpression of this gene. Since overexpression of TG2 leads to resistance to doxorubicin through the ectopic activation of NFκB, we sought to examine the effects of recombinant TG2 expression in glioma cells treated with commonly used brain tumor therapeutics. We observed that in addition to doxorubicin, TG2 expression drove resistance to CCNU; however, TG2 expression did not alter sensitivity to other drugs tested. Finally, a catalytically null mutant of TG2 was also able to support doxorubicin resistance in glioma cells indicating that transglutaminase activity is not necessary

  19. Primary brain tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Damien; Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Lahutte, Marion; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-05-26

    Important advances have been made in the understanding and management of adult gliomas and primary CNS lymphomas--the two most common primary brain tumours. Progress in imaging has led to a better analysis of the nature and grade of these tumours. Findings from large phase 3 studies have yielded some standard treatments for gliomas, and have confirmed the prognostic value of specific molecular alterations. High-throughput methods that enable genome-wide analysis of tumours have improved the knowledge of tumour biology, which should lead to a better classification of gliomas and pave the way for so-called targeted therapy trials. Primary CNS lymphomas are a group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas. High-dose methotrexate-based regimens increase survival, but the standards of care and the place of whole-brain radiotherapy remain unclear, and are likely to depend on the age of the patient. The focus now is on the development of new polychemotherapy regimens to reduce or defer whole-brain radiotherapy and its delayed complications.

  20. [Arteriovenous malformation-glioma association: study of four cases].

    PubMed

    Borges, Lia Raquel R; Malheiros, Suzana M F; Pelaez, Maria Paula; Stávale, João Norberto; Santos, Adrialdo J; Carrete, Henrique; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Ferraz, Fernando A P; Gabbai, Alberto A

    2003-06-01

    We reviewed the clinical presentation, imaging and histopathologic findings in 4 patients with the diagnosis of arteriovenous malformation associated with glioma that were operated on from 1991 to 2000 in our institution. Four patients (2 males; age between 15 and 52 years) presented with progressive headache with clinical evidence of intracranial hypertension (in 3) and partial seizures (in 1). CT scan showed a brain tumor without any detectable pathologic vessels. Histologic examination revealed astrocytic tumors associated with arteriovenous malformation. No patient presented the vascular component intermixed with the tumor. The arteriovenous-glioma association is rare and must be identified by a clear demarcation between the malformation and the tumor.

  1. Glioma Stem Cells but Not Bulk Glioma Cells Upregulate IL-6 Secretion in Microglia/Brain Macrophages via Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Hu, Feng; Derkow, Katja; Haage, Verena; Euskirchen, Philipp; Harms, Christoph; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral macrophages and resident microglia constitute the dominant glioma-infiltrating cells. The tumor induces an immunosuppressive and tumor-supportive phenotype in these glioma-associated microglia/brain macrophages (GAMs). A subpopulation of glioma cells acts as glioma stem cells (GSCs). We explored the interaction between GSCs and GAMs. Using CD133 as a marker of stemness, we enriched for or deprived the mouse glioma cell line GL261 of GSCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Over the same period of time, 100 CD133(+ )GSCs had the capacity to form a tumor of comparable size to the ones formed by 10,000 CD133(-) GL261 cells. In IL-6(-/-) mice, only tumors formed by CD133(+ )cells were smaller compared with wild type. After stimulation of primary cultured microglia with medium from CD133-enriched GL261 glioma cells, we observed an selective upregulation in microglial IL-6 secretion dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Our results show that GSCs, but not the bulk glioma cells, initiate microglial IL-6 secretion via TLR4 signaling and that IL-6 regulates glioma growth by supporting GSCs. Using human glioma tissue, we could confirm the finding that GAMs are the major source of IL-6 in the tumor context.

  2. Striving and Thriving in a Foreign Culture: A Mixed Method Approach on Adult International Students' Experience in U.S.A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Dianbing; Yang, Xinxiao

    2014-01-01

    In this mixed method study, we examined the experience of a sample of international students in four American universities to identify the factors that might enhance their ability in surviving and thriving in a foreign country within the context of university internationalization. The research explored the concepts of cultural values, behaviors,…

  3. Immunotherapeutic targeting of shared melanoma-associated antigens in a murine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Prins, Robert M; Odesa, Sylvia K; Liau, Linda M

    2003-12-01

    Immune-based treatments for central nervous system gliomas have traditionally lagged behind those of more immunogenic tumors such as melanoma. The relative paucity of defined glioma-associated antigens that can be targeted by the immune system may partially account for this situation. Antigens present on melanomas have been extensively characterized, both in humans and in murine preclinical models. Melanocytes and astrocytes are both derived embryologically from the neural ectoderm. Their neoplastic counterparts, malignant melanomas and gliomas, have been shown in humans to share common antigens at the RNA level. However, little is known concerning whether gliomas can be targeted by immune-based strategies that prime T cells to epitopes from melanoma-associated antigens (MAAs). In this study, we provide evidence that two common murine glioma cell lines (GL26 and GL261) express the melanoma antigens gp100 and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2). To understand the immunogenicity of murine gliomas to CD8(+) T cells, we examined the ability of a MAA-specific CTL cell line to lyse the glioma cells, as well as the in vivo expansion of MAA-specific CD8(+) T cells in animals harboring gliomas. Both glioma cell lines were lysed by a human gp100-specific CTL cell line in vitro. Mice harboring s.c. GL26 gliomas possessed TRP-2-specific CD8(+) T cells, providing further evidence that these gliomas express the protein products in the context of MHC class I. Furthermore, MAA peptide-pulsed dendritic cells could prime T cells that specifically recognize GL26 glioma cells in vitro. Lastly, mice that were prevaccinated with human gp100 and TRP-2 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells had significantly extended survival when challenged with tumor cells in the brain, resulting in >50% long-term survival. These results suggest that shared MAAs on gliomas can be targeted immunotherapeutically, pointing the way to a new potential treatment option for patients with malignant gliomas.

  4. Are schools and alcohol a good mix? A qualitative study of school principals' experiences of adults' alcohol use in Australian secondary schools

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bernadette M; Buykx, Penny; Munro, Geoffrey; Wiggers, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective Parents, schools and the broader community influence children's socialisation to alcohol. In Australia, the UK and the USA, there have been media reports of adults consuming alcohol at family-focused school events such as fairs and graduations. The aim of this qualitative study was to describe school principals' experiences of adults' use of alcohol at school events, when children are present. Design/setting/participants A qualitative study was undertaken. Publicly available lists were used to invite 60 principals from government and Catholic secondary schools in Victoria, Australia. In-depth interviews were conducted and analysed thematically and reported using the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research guidelines. Results 14 principals (5 female, 9 male) participated. Most (10) of the participating principals reported adults' use of alcohol at events when students were present. Regarding these events, most principals reported concerns regarding potential harms and responsibility for decision-making about alcohol availability in schools. Some (4) principals believed alcohol should not be present at such events and this was their practice. Half of the participating schools had recently made changes to reduce the availability or management of alcohol at school functions. Conclusions The findings confirm the common use of alcohol by adults at school events, the challenges this poses for school principals and suggests consideration needs to be given to identifying strategies for supporting schools and school principals in decision-making regarding the conduct of such events. PMID:27481620

  5. Differential utilization of ketone bodies by neurons and glioma cell lines: a rationale for ketogenic diet as experimental glioma therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Even in the presence of oxygen, malignant cells often highly depend on glycolysis for energy generation, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. One strategy targeting this metabolic phenotype is glucose restriction by administration of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet. Under these conditions, ketone bodies are generated serving as an important energy source at least for non-transformed cells. Methods To investigate whether a ketogenic diet might selectively impair energy metabolism in tumor cells, we characterized in vitro effects of the principle ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate in rat hippocampal neurons and five glioma cell lines. In vivo, a non-calorie-restricted ketogenic diet was examined in an orthotopic xenograft glioma mouse model. Results The ketone body metabolizing enzymes 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (BDH1 and 2), 3-oxoacid-CoA transferase 1 (OXCT1) and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) were expressed at the mRNA and protein level in all glioma cell lines. However, no activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway was observed in glioma cells, consistent with the absence of substantial 3-hydroxybutyrate metabolism and subsequent accumulation of succinate. Further, 3-hydroxybutyrate rescued hippocampal neurons from glucose withdrawal-induced cell death but did not protect glioma cell lines. In hypoxia, mRNA expression of OXCT1, ACAT1, BDH1 and 2 was downregulated. In vivo, the ketogenic diet led to a robust increase of blood 3-hydroxybutyrate, but did not alter blood glucose levels or improve survival. Conclusion In summary, glioma cells are incapable of compensating for glucose restriction by metabolizing ketone bodies in vitro, suggesting a potential disadvantage of tumor cells compared to normal cells under a carbohydrate-restricted ketogenic diet. Further investigations are necessary to identify co-treatment modalities, e.g. glycolysis inhibitors or antiangiogenic agents that efficiently

  6. Microscopic DTI accurately identifies early glioma cell migration: correlation with multimodal imaging in a new glioma stem cell model.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Perles-Barbacaru, Adriana-T; Millet, Arnaud; Appaix, Florence; El-Atifi, Michele; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring glioma cell infiltration in the brain is critical for diagnosis and therapy. Using a new glioma Glio6 mouse model derived from human stem cells we show how diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may predict glioma cell migration/invasion. In vivo multiparametric MRI was performed at one, two and three months of Glio6 glioma growth (Glio6 (n = 6), sham (n = 3)). This longitudinal study reveals the existence of a time window to study glioma cell/migration/invasion selectively. Indeed, at two months only Glio6 cell invasion was detected, while tumor mass formation, edema, blood-brain barrier leakage and tumor angiogenesis were detected later, at three months. To robustly confirm the potential of DTI for detecting glioma cell migration/invasion, a microscopic 3D-DTI (80 μm isotropic spatial resolution) technique was developed and applied to fixed mouse brains (Glio6 (n = 6), sham (n = 3)). DTI changes were predominant in the corpus callosum (CC), a known path of cell migration. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and perpendicular diffusivity (D⊥ ) changes derived from ex vivo microscopic 3D-DTI were significant at two months of tumor growth. In the caudate putamen an FA increase of +38% (p < 0.001) was observed, while in the CC a - 28% decrease in FA (p < 0.005) and a + 95% increase in D⊥ (p < 0.005) were observed. In the CC, DTI changes and fluorescent Glio6 cell density obtained by two-photon microscopy in the same brains were correlated (p < 0.001, r = 0.69), validating FA and D⊥ as early quantitative biomarkers to detect glioma cell migration/invasion. The origin of DTI changes was assessed by electron microscopy of the same tract, showing axon bundle disorganization. During the first two months, Glio6 cells display a migratory phenotype without being associated with the constitution of a brain tumor mass. This offers a unique opportunity to apply microscopic 3D-DTI and to validate DTI parameters FA and D⊥ as biomarkers for glioma cell

  7. A driver role for GABA metabolism in controlling stem and proliferative cell state through GHB production in glioma.

    PubMed

    El-Habr, Elias A; Dubois, Luiz G; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Bogeas, Alexandra; Lipecka, Joanna; Turchi, Laurent; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Coehlo, Paulo Lucas Cerqueira; Yamaki, Tomohiro; Wittmann, Bryan M; Fareh, Mohamed; Mahfoudhi, Emna; Janin, Maxime; Narayanan, Ashwin; Morvan-Dubois, Ghislaine; Schmitt, Charlotte; Verreault, Maité; Oliver, Lisa; Sharif, Ariane; Pallud, Johan; Devaux, Bertrand; Puget, Stéphanie; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Varlet, Pascale; Ottolenghi, Chris; Plo, Isabelle; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Virolle, Thierry; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Junier, Marie-Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Cell populations with differing proliferative, stem-like and tumorigenic states co-exist in most tumors and especially malignant gliomas. Whether metabolic variations can drive this heterogeneity by controlling dynamic changes in cell states is unknown. Metabolite profiling of human adult glioblastoma stem-like cells upon loss of their tumorigenicity revealed a switch in the catabolism of the GABA neurotransmitter toward enhanced production and secretion of its by-product GHB (4-hydroxybutyrate). This switch was driven by succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) downregulation. Enhancing GHB levels via SSADH downregulation or GHB supplementation triggered cell conversion into a less aggressive phenotypic state. GHB affected adult glioblastoma cells with varying molecular profiles, along with cells from pediatric pontine gliomas. In all cell types, GHB acted by inhibiting α-ketoglutarate-dependent Ten-eleven Translocations (TET) activity, resulting in decreased levels of the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine epigenetic mark. In patients, low SSADH expression was correlated with high GHB/α-ketoglutarate ratios, and distinguished weakly proliferative/differentiated glioblastoma territories from proliferative/non-differentiated territories. Our findings support an active participation of metabolic variations in the genesis of tumor heterogeneity.

  8. Approaching a Scientific Consensus on the Association between Allergies and Glioma Risk: A Report from the Glioma International Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Amirian, E. Susan; Zhou, Renke; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Olson, Sara H.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Il’yasova, Dora; Lachance, Daniel; Armstrong, Georgina N.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Lau, Ching C.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Merrell, Ryan T.; Davis, Faith G.; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Bondy, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several previous studies have found inverse associations between glioma susceptibility and a history of allergies or other atopic conditions. Some evidence indicates that respiratory allergies are likely to be particularly relevant with regard to glioma risk. Using data from the Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC), we examined the effects of respiratory allergies and other atopic conditions on glioma risk. Methods The GICC contains detailed information on history of atopic conditions for 4533 cases and 4171 controls, recruited from 14 study sites across five countries. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling to calculate meta-analysis odds ratios, we examined the associations between glioma and allergy status, respiratory allergy status, asthma, and eczema. Results Having a history of respiratory allergies was associated with an approximately 30% lower glioma risk, compared to not having respiratory allergies (mOR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58–0.90). This association was similar when restricting to high-grade glioma cases. Asthma and eczema were also significantly protective against glioma. Conclusions A substantial amount of data on the inverse association between atopic conditions and glioma has accumulated, and findings from the GICC study further strengthen the existing evidence that the relationship between atopy and glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Impact As the literature approaches a consensus on the impact of allergies in glioma risk, future research can begin to shift focus to what the underlying biological mechanism behind this association may be, which could, in turn, yield new opportunities for immunotherapy or cancer prevention. PMID:26908595

  9. An analysis of 170 glioma patients and systematic review to investigate the association between IDH-1 mutations and preoperative glioma-related epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Mao, Qing; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Yanhui; Mao, Yunhe; Zhou, Qiao; Luo, Jiewen

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is a common presenting symptom of glioma, and many biomarkers have been suggested to be associated with preoperative seizure; however, the relationships between IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase) mutations and glioma-related epilepsy only recently been studied. The authors aimed to examine the correlations between IDH mutations in glioma patients with preoperative seizures and tumor location. A series of 170 glioma samples were analyzed for IDH1 R132H mutations (amino acid change from arginine to histidine at codon 132) with immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining and for IDH mutations with direct DNA sequencing when the IHC results were negative. If either the IHC or direct DNA sequencing result was positive, the IDH status was defined as mutated. The results of the IDH mutation examinations were used to analyze the relationship between mutations and glioma-related epilepsy. The study population consisted of 64 (37.6%) World Health Organization (WHO) grade II gliomas, 58 (34.1%) grade III, and 48 (28.3%) grade IV gliomas. A total of 84 samples with IDH1 mutations were observed in our study, and 54 of these presented with seizures as the initial symptoms, whereas 28 of the patients with wild-type IDH status presented with seizures (p=0.043 for the WHO grade II gliomas, p=0.002 for the grade III gliomas and p=0.942 for the grade IV gliomas, chi-squared tests). Among the WHO grade II and III gliomas, IDH1 mutations were significantly associated with preoperative seizures, but no significant relationship between IDH mutations and preoperative seizures was found with glioblastoma multiforme.

  10. Mixed effects of elevated pCO2 on fertilisation, larval and juvenile development and adult responses in the mobile subtidal scallop Mimachlamys asperrima (Lamarck, 1819).

    PubMed

    Scanes, Elliot; Parker, Laura M; O'Connor, Wayne A; Ross, Pauline M

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to have severe consequences for calcifying marine organisms especially molluscs. Recent studies, however, have found that molluscs in marine environments with naturally elevated or fluctuating CO2 or with an active, high metabolic rate lifestyle may have a capacity to acclimate and be resilient to exposures of elevated environmental pCO2. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of near future concentrations of elevated pCO2 on the larval and adult stages of the mobile doughboy scallop, Mimachlamys asperrima from a subtidal and stable physio-chemical environment. It was found that fertilisation and the shell length of early larval stages of M. asperrima decreased as pCO2 increased, however, there were less pronounced effects of elevated pCO2 on the shell length of later larval stages, with high pCO2 enhancing growth in some instances. Byssal attachment and condition index of adult M. asperrima decreased with elevated pCO2, while in contrast there was no effect on standard metabolic rate or pHe. The responses of larval and adult M. asperrima to elevated pCO2 measured in this study were more moderate than responses previously reported for intertidal oysters and mussels. Even this more moderate set of responses are still likely to reduce the abundance of M. asperrima and potentially other scallop species in the world's oceans at predicted future pCO2 levels.

  11. Mixed Effects of Elevated pCO2 on Fertilisation, Larval and Juvenile Development and Adult Responses in the Mobile Subtidal Scallop Mimachlamys asperrima (Lamarck, 1819)

    PubMed Central

    Scanes, Elliot; Parker, Laura M.; O’Connor, Wayne A.; Ross, Pauline M.

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to have severe consequences for calcifying marine organisms especially molluscs. Recent studies, however, have found that molluscs in marine environments with naturally elevated or fluctuating CO2 or with an active, high metabolic rate lifestyle may have a capacity to acclimate and be resilient to exposures of elevated environmental pCO2. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of near future concentrations of elevated pCO2 on the larval and adult stages of the mobile doughboy scallop, Mimachlamys asperrima from a subtidal and stable physio-chemical environment. It was found that fertilisation and the shell length of early larval stages of M. asperrima decreased as pCO2 increased, however, there were less pronounced effects of elevated pCO2 on the shell length of later larval stages, with high pCO2 enhancing growth in some instances. Byssal attachment and condition index of adult M. asperrima decreased with elevated pCO2, while in contrast there was no effect on standard metabolic rate or pHe. The responses of larval and adult M. asperrima to elevated pCO2 measured in this study were more moderate than responses previously reported for intertidal oysters and mussels. Even this more moderate set of responses are still likely to reduce the abundance of M. asperrima and potentially other scallop species in the world’s oceans at predicted future pCO2 levels. PMID:24733125

  12. An integrated transcriptomic and computational analysis for biomarker identification in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wenli; Zeng, Chun

    2016-06-01

    Malignant glioma is one of the most common primary brain tumors and is among the deadliest of human cancers. The molecular mechanism for human glioma is poorly understood. Early prognosis of this disease and early treatment are vital. Thus, it is crucial to target the key genes controlling pathogenesis in the early stage of glioma. In this study, differentially expressed genes in human glioma and paired peritumoral tissues were detected by transcriptome microarray analysis. Following gene microarray analysis, the gene expression profile in the differential grade glioma was further validated by bioinformatic analyses, co-expression network construction. Microarray analysis revealed that 1725 genes were differentially expressed and classified into different glioma stage. The analysis revealed 14 genes that were significantly associated with survival with a false discovery rate. Among these genes, macrophage capping protein (CAPG), a member of the actin-regulatory protein, was the key gene in a 20-gene network that modulates cell motility by interacting with the cytoskeleton. Furthermore, the prognostic impact of CAPG was validated by use of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry on human glioma tissue. CAPG protein was significantly upregulated in clinical high-grade glioblastoma as compared with normal brain tissues. Overexpression of CAPG levels also predict shorter overall survival of glioma patients. These data demonstrated CAPG protein expression in human glioma was associated with tumorigenesis and may be a biomarker for identification of the pathological grade of glioma.

  13. Circulating tumor cell is a common property of brain glioma and promotes the monitoring system

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Faliang; Cui, Yong; Jiang, Haihui; Sui, Dali; Wang, Yonggang; Jiang, Zhongli; Zhao, Jizong; Lin, Song

    2016-01-01

    Brain glioma is the most common primary intracranial tumor characterized by dismal prognosis and frequent recurrence, yet a real-time and reliable biological approach to monitor tumor response and progression is still lacking. Recently, few studies have reported that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be detected in glioblastoma multiform (GBM), providing the possibility of its application in brain glioma monitoring system. But its application limits still exist, because the detection rate of CTCs is still low and was exclusively limited to high- grade gliomas. Here, we adopted an advanced integrated cellular and molecular approach of SE-iFISH to detect CTCs in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with 7 different subtypes of brain glioma, uncovering the direct evidences of glioma migration. We identified CTCs in the PB from 24 of 31 (77%) patients with glioma in all 7 subtypes. No statistical difference of CTC incidence and count was observed in different pathological subtypes or WHO grades of glioma. Clinical data revealed that CTCs, to some extent, was superior to MRI in monitoring the treatment response and differentiating radionecrosis from recurrence of glioma. Conclusively, CTCs is a common property of brain gliomas of various pathological subtypes, which has provided an ultimate paradox for the hypothesis “soil and seed”. It can be used to monitor the microenvironment of gliomas dynamically, which will be a meaningful complement to radiographic imaging. PMID:27517490

  14. Alphaxalone inhibits growth, migration and invasion of rat C6 malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huawei; Zheng, Xiaoke; Zhou, Yuehan; Zhu, Wenbo; Ou, Yanqiu; Shu, Minfeng; Gao, Xiuren; Leng, Tiandong; Qiu, Pengxin; Yan, Guangmei

    2013-10-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most devastating and aggressive brain tumors affecting the central nervous system. The insidious growth and infiltration are the most prominent characteristics of malignant gliomas, which render the current therapies for malignant gliomas including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy unsuccessful. Inhibition of infiltration as well as proliferation in combination with surgery might be more effective in the treatment of malignant gliomas. In the current study, we demonstrate the alphaxalone (3-hydroxypregnane-11,20-dione) could effectively inhibit the proliferation of C6 glioma cells in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, this compound could also suppress the migration and invasion of C6 glioma cells at a concentration without causing significant cytotoxicity. Except the in vitro anti-glioma activity, alphaxalone effectively delayed the growth of rat C6 malignant glioma xenografts in vivo. Together, these findings suggest alphaxalone might be a promising candidate for the treatment of malignant gliomas and may also provide helpful clues for anti-glioma drugs development in future.

  15. Overexpressed homeobox B9 regulates oncogenic activities by transforming growth factor-β1 in gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Yinghui; Zou, Lijuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in gliomas. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression in gliomas. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation, migration and sphere formation of glioma cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. - Abstract: Glioma is the leading cause of deaths related to tumors in the central nervous system. The mechanisms of gliomagenesis remain elusive to date. Homeobox B9 (HOXB9) has a crucial function in the regulation of gene expression and cell survival, but its functions in glioma formation and development have yet to be elucidated. This study showed that HOXB9 expression in glioma tissues was significantly higher than that in nontumor tissues. Higher HOXB9 expression was also significantly associated with advanced clinical stage in glioma patients. HOXB9 overexpression stimulated the proliferation, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas HOXB9 knockdown elicited an opposite effect. HOXB9 overexpression also increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, the activation of transforming growth factor-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. HOXB9 could be used as a predictable biomarker to be detected in different pathological and histological subtypes in glioma for diagnosis or prognosis.

  16. Diffusion kurtosis imaging can efficiently assess the glioma grade and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rifeng; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhao, Lingyun; Zhang, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Shun; Yao, Yihao; Yang, Shiqi; Shi, Jingjing; Shen, Nanxi; Su, Changliang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Wenzhen

    2015-12-08

    Conventional diffusion imaging techniques are not sufficiently accurate for evaluating glioma grade and cellular proliferation, which are critical for guiding glioma treatment. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), an advanced non-Gaussian diffusion imaging technique, has shown potential in grading glioma; however, its applications in this tumor have not been fully elucidated. In this study, DKI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) were performed on 74 consecutive patients with histopathologically confirmed glioma. The kurtosis and conventional diffusion metric values of the tumor were semi-automatically obtained. The relationships of these metrics with the glioma grade and Ki-67 expression were evaluated. The diagnostic efficiency of these metrics in grading was further compared. It was demonstrated that compared with the conventional diffusion metrics, the kurtosis metrics were more promising imaging markers in distinguishing high-grade from low-grade gliomas and distinguishing among grade II, III and IV gliomas; the kurtosis metrics also showed great potential in the prediction of Ki-67 expression. To our best knowledge, we are the first to reveal the ability of DKI to assess the cellular proliferation of gliomas, and to employ the semi-automatic method for the accurate measurement of gliomas. These results could have a significant impact on the diagnosis and subsequent therapy of glioma.

  17. HOXB1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Regulated by miR-3175 in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liang; Liu, Dehua; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Nan; Han, Ziwu; Wang, Guang; Fu, Yao; Guo, Zhigang; Zhu, Zifeng

    2015-01-01

    The HOXB1 gene plays a critical role as an oncogene in diverse tumors. However, the functional role of HOXB1 and the mechanism regulating HOXB1 expression in glioma are not fully understood. A preliminary bioinformatics analysis showed that HOXB1 is ectopically expressed in glioma, and that HOXB1 is a possible target of miR-3175. In this study, we investigated the function of HOXB1 and the relationship between HOXB1 and miR-3175 in glioma. We show that HOXB1 expression is significantly downregulated in glioma tissues and cell lines, and that its expression may be closely associated with the degree of malignancy. Reduced HOXB1 expression promoted the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells, and inhibited their apoptosis in vitro, and the downregulation of HOXB1 was also associated with worse survival in glioma patients. More importantly, HOXB1 was shown experimentally to be a direct target of miR-3175 in this study. The downregulated expression of miR-3175 inhibited cell proliferation and invasion, and promoted apoptosis in glioma. The oncogenicity induced by low HOXB1 expression was prevented by an miR-3175 inhibitor in glioma cells. Our results suggest that HOXB1 functions as a tumor suppressor, regulated by miR-3175 in glioma. These results clarify the pathogenesis of glioma and offer a potential target for its treatment. PMID:26565624

  18. Convection-enhanced Delivery of Therapeutics for Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Ryuta; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2017-01-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) circumvents the blood–brain barrier by delivering agents directly into the tumor and surrounding parenchyma. CED can achieve large volumes of distribution by continuous positive-pressure infusion. Although promising as an effective drug delivery method in concept, the administration of therapeutic agents via CED is not without challenges. Limitations of distribution remain a problem in large brains, such as those of humans. Accurate and consistent delivery of an agent is another challenge associated with CED. Similar to the difficulties caused by immunosuppressive environments associated with gliomas, there are several mechanisms that make effective local drug distribution difficult in malignant gliomas. In this review, methods for local drug application targeting gliomas are discussed with special emphasis on CED. Although early clinical trials have failed to demonstrate the efficacy of CED against gliomas, CED potentially can be a platform for translating the molecular understanding of glioblastomas achieved in the laboratory into effective clinical treatments. Several clinical studies using CED of chemotherapeutic agents are ongoing. Successful delivery of effective agents should prove the efficacy of CED in the near future. PMID:27980285

  19. [Gliomas and BRCA genes mutations: fortuitous association or imputability?].

    PubMed

    Girardstein-Boccara, Laura; Mari, Véronique; Met-Domestici, Marie; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Berthet, Pascaline; Paquis, Philippe; Frenay, Marc Paul; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine

    2014-09-01

    BRCA is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the major mechanisms of cellular stability in every type of cell. Its mutations are described in numerous cancers, mainly breast and ovarian in women. It was also found an increase of lifetime risk of pancreas, colon, prostate cancer or lymphoma in men carriers. We report the cases of two female patients aged 40 and 58-years-old female patients and one 35-years-old male patient, with brain or medullar gliomas, carriers of a germline mutation of BRCA gene. Those gliomas were particularly aggressive and were not responding to the standard treatment, with chemo and radiotherapy. The very unusual characteristics in location and evolutive profile of these central nervous system tumors raise the question of a genetical underlying mechanism, maybe linked to the BRCA gene mutation that carry these patients. In addition, a non-fortuitous association between germline mutation of BRCA and occurrence of a glioma can be evoked according to the embryological, epidemiological and biomolecular findings noted in the literature. Other clinical and experimental studies are necessary to precise the physiopathological link existing between BRCA mutations and the occurrence of a glioma; this could have therapeutical and clinical implications in the future.

  20. [Dendritic cells and gliomas: a hope in immunotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, E; Poujol, D; Caux, C; Belin, M-F; Blay, J-Y; Puisieux, I

    2006-12-01

    Immunotherapy has been explored for several decades to try to improve the prognosis of gliomas, but until recently no therapeutic benefit has been achieved. The discovery of dendritic cells, the most potent professional antigen presenting cells to initiate specific immune response, and the possibility of producing them ex vivo gave rise to new protocols of active immunotherapy. In oncology, promising experimental and clinical therapeutic results were obtained using these dendritic cells loaded with tumor antigen. Patients bearing gliomas have deficit antigen presentation making this approach rational. In several experimental glioma models, independent research teams have showed specific antitumor responses using these dendritic cells. Phase I/II clinical trials have demonstrated the feasibility and the tolerance of this immunotherapeutic approach. In neuro-oncology, the efficiency of such an approach remains to be established, similarly in oncology where positive phase III studies are missing. Nevertheless, dendritic cells comprise a complex network which is only partially understood and capable of generating either immunotolerance or immune response. Numerous parameters remain to be explored before any definitive conclusion about their utility as an anticancer weapon can be drawn. It seems however logical that immunotherapy with dendritic cells could prevent or delay tumor recurrence in patients with minor active disease. A review on glioma and dendritic cells is presented.

  1. Critical Neural Networks in Awake Surgery for Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    KINOSHITA, Masashi; MIYASHITA, Katsuyoshi; TSUTSUI, Taishi; FURUTA, Takuya; NAKADA, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    From the embarrassing character commonly infiltrating eloquent brain regions, the surgical resection of glioma remains challenging. Owing to the recent development of in vivo visualization techniques for the human brain, white matter regions can be delineated using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as a routine clinical practice in neurosurgery. In confirmation of the results of DTI tractography, a direct electrical stimulation (DES) substantially influences the investigation of cortico-subcortical networks, which can be identified via specific symptoms elicited in the concerned white matter tracts (eg., the arcuate fascicle, superior longitudinal fascicles, inferior fronto-occipital fascicle, inferior longitudinal fascicle, frontal aslant tract, sensori-motor tracts, optic radiation, and so forth). During awake surgery for glioma using DES, it is important to identify the anatomo-functional structure of white matter tracts to identify the surgical boundaries of brain regions not only to achieve maximal resection of the glioma but also to maximally preserve quality of life. However, the risk exists that neurosurgeons may be misled by the inability of DTI to visualize the actual anatomy of the white matter fibers, resulting in inappropriate decisions regarding surgical boundaries. This review article provides information of the critical neuronal network that is necessary to identify and understand in awake surgery for glioma, with special references to white matter tracts and the author’s experiences. PMID:27250817

  2. A combined preclinical therapy of cannabinoids and temozolomide against glioma.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sofía; Lorente, Mar; Rodríguez-Fornés, Fátima; Hernández-Tiedra, Sonia; Salazar, María; García-Taboada, Elena; Barcia, Juan; Guzmán, Manuel; Velasco, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is highly resistant to current anticancer treatments, which makes it crucial to find new therapeutic strategies aimed at improving the poor prognosis of patients suffering from this disease. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active ingredient of marijuana, and other cannabinoid receptor agonists inhibit tumor growth in animal models of cancer, including glioma, an effect that relies, at least in part, on the stimulation of autophagy-mediated apoptosis in tumor cells. Here, we show that the combined administration of THC and temozolomide (TMZ; the benchmark agent for the management of GBM) exerts a strong antitumoral action in glioma xenografts, an effect that is also observed in tumors that are resistant to TMZ treatment. Combined administration of THC and TMZ enhanced autophagy, whereas pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of this process prevented TMZ + THC-induced cell death, supporting that activation of autophagy plays a crucial role on the mechanism of action of this drug combination. Administration of submaximal doses of THC and cannabidiol (CBD; another plant-derived cannabinoid that also induces glioma cell death through a mechanism of action different from that of THC) remarkably reduces the growth of glioma xenografts. Moreover, treatment with TMZ and submaximal doses of THC and CBD produced a strong antitumoral action in both TMZ-sensitive and TMZ-resistant tumors. Altogether, our findings support that the combined administration of TMZ and cannabinoids could be therapeutically exploited for the management of GBM.

  3. Extracellular matrix protein CCN1 limits oncolytic efficacy in glioma.

    PubMed

    Haseley, Amy; Boone, Sean; Wojton, Jeffrey; Yu, Lianbo; Yoo, Ji Young; Yu, Jianhua; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Glorioso, Joseph C; Caligiuri, Michael A; Kaur, Balveen

    2012-03-15

    Oncolytic viral therapy has been explored widely as an option for glioma treatment but its effectiveness has remained limited. Cysteine rich 61 (CCN1) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein elevated in cancer cells that modulates their adhesion and migration by binding cell surface receptors. In this study, we examined a hypothesized role for CCN1 in limiting the efficacy of oncolytic viral therapy for glioma, based on evidence of CCN1 induction that occurs in this setting. Strikingly, we found that exogenous CCN1 in glioma ECM orchestrated a cellular antiviral response that reduced viral replication and limited cytolytic efficacy. Gene expression profiling and real-time PCR analysis revealed a significant induction of type-I interferon responsive genes in response to CCN1 exposure. This induction was accompanied by activation of the Jak/Stat signaling pathway, consistent with induction of an innate antiviral cellular response. Both effects were mediated by the binding of CCN1 to the cell surface integrin α6β1, activating its signaling and leading to rapid secretion of interferon-α, which was essential for the innate antiviral effect. Together, our findings reveal how an integrin signaling pathway mediates activation of a type-I antiviral interferon response that can limit the efficacy of oncolytic viral therapy. Furthermore, they suggest therapeutic interventions to inhibit CCN1-integrin α6 interactions to sensitize gliomas to viral oncolysis.

  4. Mutant tristetraprolin: a potent inhibitor of malignant glioma cell growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant gliomas rely on the production of certain critical growth factors including VEGF, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, to fuel rapid tumor growth, angiogenesis, and treatment resistance. Post-transcriptional regulation through adenine and uridine-rich elements of the 3' untranslated region is one ...

  5. Myosin VI contributes to malignant proliferation of human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rong; Fang, Xu-hao

    2016-01-01

    Previously characterized as a backward motor, myosin VI (MYO6), which belongs to myosin family, moves toward the minus end of the actin track, a direction opposite to all other known myosin members. Recent researches have illuminated the role of MYO6 in human cancers, particularly in prostate cancer. However, the role of MYO6 in glioma has not yet been determined. In this study, to explore the role of MYO6 in human glioma, lentivirus-delivered short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting MYO6 was designed to stably down-regulate its endogenous expression in glioblastoma cells U251. Knockdown of MYO6 signifi cantly inhibited viability and proliferation of U251 cells in vitro. Moreover, the cell cycle of U251 cells was arrested at G0/G1 phase with the absence of MYO6, which could contribute to the suppression of cell proliferation. In conclusion, we firstly identified the crucial involvement of MYO6 in human glioma. The inhibition of MYO6 by shRNA might be a potential therapeutic method in human glioma. PMID:26937209

  6. Intraoperative radiation therapy in malignant glioma: early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Ortiz de Urbina, D; Santos, M; Garcia-Berrocal, I; Bustos, J C; Samblas, J; Gutierrez-Diaz, J A; Delgado, J M; Donckaster, G; Calvo, F A

    1995-08-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) with high energy electron beams is a treatment modality that has been included in multimodal programs in oncology to improve local tumor control. From August 1991 to December 1993, 17 patients with primary (8) or recurrent (9) high grade malignant gliomas, anaplastic astrocytoma (4), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (6) and glioblastoma multiforme (7), underwent surgical resection and a single dose of 10-20 Gy intraoperative radiation therapy was delivered in tumor bed. Fourteen patients received either pre-operative (8) or post-operative (6) external beam radiation therapy. Primary gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate has been 56% (range: 1-21+ months) and the median survival time has not yet been achieved. Four patients developed tumor progression (median time to tumor progression: 9 months). Recurrent gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate and median survival time has been 47% and 13 months (range: 6-32+ months) respectively. The median time to tumor progression was 11 months. No IORT related mortality has been observed. IORT is an attractive, tolerable and feasible treatment modality as antitumoral intensification procedure in high grade malignant gliomas.

  7. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Children with Low-Grade Gliomas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ris, M. Douglas; Beebe, Dean W.

    2008-01-01

    As a group, children with low-grade gliomas (LGGs) enjoy a high rate of long-term survival and do not require the intensity of neurotoxic treatments used with higher risk pediatric brain tumors. Because they are generally considered to have favorable neurobehavioral outcomes, they have not been studied as thoroughly as higher-grade brain tumors by…

  8. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Flavahan, William A; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B; Gillespie, Shawn M; Venteicher, Andrew S; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Suvà, Mario L; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-01-07

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas. Mutant IDH protein produces a new onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate, which interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5'-methylcytosine hydroxylases. TET enzymes catalyse a key step in the removal of DNA methylation. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), although the functional importance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that human IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hypermethylation at cohesin and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to interact aberrantly with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with a demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and downregulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wild-type gliomaspheres upregulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression.

  9. Growth hormone and cancer: GH production and action in glioma?

    PubMed

    Lea, Robert W; Dawson, Timothy; Martinez-Moreno, Carlos G; El-Abry, Nasra; Harvey, Steve

    2015-09-01

    The hypersecretion of pituitary growth hormone (GH) is associated with an increased risk of cancer, while reducing pituitary GH signaling reduces this risk. Roles for pituitary GH in cancer are therefore well established. The expression of the GH gene is, however, not confined to the pituitary gland and it is now known to occur in many extrapituitary tissues, in which it has local autocrine or paracrine actions, rather than endocrine function. It is, for instance, expressed in cancers of the prostate, lung, skin, endometrium and colon. The oncogenicity of autocrine GH may also be greater than that induced by endocrine or exogenous GH, as higher concentrations of GHR antagonists are required to inhibit its actions. This may reflect the fact that autocrine GH is thought to act at intracellular receptors directly after synthesis, in compartments not readily accessible to endocrine (or exogenous) GH. The roles and actions of extrapituitary GH in cancer may therefore differ from those of pituitary GH. The possibility that GH may be expressed and act in glioma tumors was therefore examined by immunohistochemistry. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of abundant GH- and GH receptor (GHR-) immunoreactivity in glioma, in which they were co-localized in cytoplasmic but not nuclear compartments. These results demonstrate that glioma differs from most cancers in lacking nuclear GHRs, but GH is nevertheless likely to have autocrine or paracrine actions in the induction and progression of glioma.

  10. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Campanati, Loraine; Righy, Cassia; D’Andrea-Meira, Isabella; Spohr, Tania Cristina Leite de Sampaio e; Porto-Carreiro, Isabel; Pereira, Claudia Maria; Balça-Silva, Joana; Kahn, Suzana Assad; DosSantos, Marcos F.; Oliveira, Marcela de Almeida Rabello; Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Faveret, Eduardo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM), characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells), extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the BBB and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected. PMID:25565956

  11. EXPLORING THE ANTITUMOR EFFECT OF VIRUS IN MALIGNANT GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Dipongkor; Ahmed, Seemin S.; Rabkin, Samuel D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Malignant gliomas are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor with no effective treatments. Current conventional therapies (surgical resection, radiation therapy, temozolomide (TMZ), and bevacizumab administration) typically fail to eradicate the tumors resulting in the recurrence of treatment-resistant tumors. Therefore, novel approaches are needed to improve therapeutic outcomes. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are excellent candidates as a more effective therapeutic strategy for aggressive cancers like malignant gliomas since OVs have a natural preference or have been genetically engineered to selectively replicate in and kill cancer cells. OVs have been used in numerous preclinical studies in malignant glioma, and a large number of clinical trials using OVs have been completed or are underway that have demonstrated safety, as well as provided indications of effective antiglioma activity. In this review, we will focus on those OVs that have been used in clinical trials for the treatment of malignant gliomas (herpes simplex virus, adenovirus, parvovirus, reovirus, poliovirus, Newcastle disease virus, measles virus, and retrovirus) and OVs examined preclinically (vesicular stomatitis virus and myxoma virus), and describe how these agents are being used. PMID:26855472

  12. The transcriptional coactivator TAZ regulates mesenchymal differentiation in malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Krishna P L; Salazar, Katrina L; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Wani, Khalida; Heathcock, Lindsey; Hollingsworth, Faith; James, Johanna D; Gumin, Joy; Diefes, Kristin L; Kim, Se Hoon; Turski, Alice; Azodi, Yasaman; Yang, Yuhui; Doucette, Tiffany; Colman, Howard; Sulman, Erik P; Lang, Frederick F; Rao, Ganesh; Copray, Sjef; Vaillant, Brian D; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2011-12-15

    Recent molecular classification of glioblastoma (GBM) has shown that patients with a mesenchymal (MES) gene expression signature exhibit poor overall survival and treatment resistance. Using regulatory network analysis of available expression microarray data sets of GBM, including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identified the transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), to be highly associated with the MES network. TAZ expression was lower in proneural (PN) GBMs and lower-grade gliomas, which correlated with CpG island hypermethylation of the TAZ promoter compared with MES GBMs. Silencing of TAZ in MES glioma stem cells (GSCs) decreased expression of MES markers, invasion, self-renewal, and tumor formation. Conversely, overexpression of TAZ in PN GSCs as well as murine neural stem cells (NSCs) induced MES marker expression and aberrant osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation in a TEAD-dependent fashion. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we show that TAZ is directly recruited to a majority of MES gene promoters in a complex with TEAD2. The coexpression of TAZ, but not a mutated form of TAZ that lacks TEAD binding, with platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) resulted in high-grade tumors with MES features in a murine model of glioma. Our studies uncover a direct role for TAZ and TEAD in driving the MES differentiation of malignant glioma.

  13. Comparative permeability of different glioma models to horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Groothuis, D R; Fischer, J M; Vick, N A; Bigner, D D

    1981-01-01

    Seven different experimental glioma models were studied to determine their capillary permeability to horseradish peroxidase. The models were the autochthonous ASV-viral model, intracerebral (ic) and (sc) injections of rat 9L and RG-2 tumor cell lines, the sc rat S-69C15 tumor cell line, and human glioblastoma cell lines in nude mice. The ASV-viral model showed an average HRP permeability of 63% of tumor volume, the ic RG-2 tumors were 100% permeable, and the ic 9L tumors were 41% permeable. The permeability of the marginal zone (brain-tumor interface) showed similar variation from group to group. In contrast, all of the sc tumors were 100% permeable regardless of the cell line used to create the tumors. Our results show the variability between these glioma models, and suggest that RG-2 ic gliomas and all sc gliomas should be optimal to assess the tumoricidal effect of drugs, because access to the tumor compartment from the vascular compartment is complete.

  14. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) inhibitors decrease glioma progression

    PubMed Central

    Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Kota, Rajesh; Chen, Kevin; Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Jhaveri, Niyati; Groshen, Susan L.; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M.; Shih, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor which is currently treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Tumors usually become resistant to TMZ and recur; no effective therapy is then available. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO A) oxidizes monoamine neurotransmitters resulting in reactive oxygen species which cause cancer. This study shows that MAO A expression is increased in human glioma tissues and cell lines. MAO A inhibitors, clorgyline or the near-infrared-dye MHI-148 conjugated to clorgyline (NMI), were cytotoxic for glioma and decreased invasion in vitro. Using the intracranial TMZ-resistant glioma model, clorgyline or NMI alone or in combination with low-dose TMZ reduced tumor growth and increased animal survival. NMI was localized specifically to the tumor. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that the MAO A inhibitor reduced proliferation, microvessel density and invasion, and increased macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, we have identified MAO A inhibitors as potential novel stand-alone drugs or as combination therapy with low dose TMZ for drug-resistant gliomas. NMI can also be used as a non-invasive imaging tool. Thus has a dual function for both therapy and diagnosis. PMID:26871599

  15. Exploiting macrophages as targeted carrier to guide nanoparticles into glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Liang; Qin, Jing; Han, Limei; Zhao, Wenjie; Liang, Jianming; Xie, Zhongyi; Yang, Pei; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    The restriction of anti-cancer drugs entry to tumor sites in the brain is a major impediment to the development of new strategies for the treatment of glioma. Based on the finding that macrophages possess an intrinsic homing property enabling them to migrate to tumor sites across the endothelial barriers in response to the excretion of cytokines/chemokines in the diseased tissues, we exploited macrophages as ‘Trojan horses’ to carry drug-loading nanoparticles (NPs), pass through barriers, and offload them into brain tumor sites. Anticancer drugs were encapsulated in nanoparticles to avoid their damage to the cells. Drug loading NPs was then incubated with RAW264.7 cells in vitro to prepare macrophage-NPs (M-NPs). The release of NPs from M-NPs was very slow in medium of DMEM and 10% FBS and significantly accelerated when LPS and IFN-γ were added to mimic tumor inflammation microenvironment. The viability of macrophages was not affected when the concentration of doxorubicin lower than 25 μg/ml. The improvement of cellular uptake and penetration into the core of glioma spheroids of M-NPs compared with NPs was verified in in vitro studies. The tumor-targeting efficiency of NPs was also significantly enhanced after loading into macrophages in nude mice bearing intracranial U87 glioma. Our results provided great potential of macrophages as an active biocarrier to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor sites in the brain and improve therapeutic effects of glioma. PMID:27213597

  16. Effect of pterostilbene on glioma cells and related mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liang; Zhong, Zhendong; Sun, Hongbin; Yan, Linxia; He, Baomin; Li, Supin; Ma, Shuai; Yang, Lili; Huang, Yulan

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglioma is the most common primary malignant tumor in neurosurgery. Due to unfavorable life quality of patients, the treatment of glioma is a major challenge in clinics. The search for effect treatment drugs thus benefits patient prognosis. As one derivative of resveratrol, pterostilbene has a wide spectrum of pharmaceutical functions, especially with the anti-tumor effects. This study thus investigated the effect of pterostilbene on neuroglioma and related mechanisms. U87 glioma cell line was divided into control, normal culture and different dosages of pterostilbene groups, which received 5 mM or 10 mM pterostilbene for 48 h. MTT assay was used to detect U87 cell proliferation, while invasion assay was employed to test the effect of pterostilbene on cell invasion, followed by flow cytometry assay for analyzing U87 cell apoptosis. Real-time PCR was used to test mRNA expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in glioma cells under the effect of pterostilbene, while Western blotting was used to detect alternation of Bcl-2 and Bax protein levels. Pterostilbene significantly inhibited proliferation and invasion abilities of glioma cells compared to those in control group (P<0.05). It can also enhance cell apoptosis, decrease mRNA and protein of Bcl-2 expression, and increase mRNA and protein expressions of Bax (P<0.05 compared to control group) in a dose-dependent manner. Pterostilbene can facilitate apoptosis of glioma cells, and inhibit their proliferation and invasion via mediating apoptotic/anti-apoptotic homeostasis. PMID:28077996

  17. Targeting of human glioma xenografts in vivo utilizing radiolabeled antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.A.; Wessels, B.W.; Wharam, M.D.; Order, S.E.; Wanek, P.M.; Poggenburg, J.K.; Klein, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies provide a potential basis for selective radiotherapy of human gliomas. We have measured tumor targeting by radiolabeled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against neuroectodermal and tumor-associated antigens in nude mice bearing human glioma xenografts. Monoclonal P96.5, a mouse IgG2a immunoglobulin, defines an epitope of a human melanoma cell surface protein, and specifically binds the U-251 human glioma as measured by immunoperoxidase histochemistry. 111In-radiolabeled P96.5 specifically targets the U-251 human glioma xenograft and yields 87.0 microCuries (microCi) of tumor activity per gram per 100 microCi injected activity compared to 4.5 microCi following administration of radiolabeled irrelevant monoclonal antibody. Calculations of targeting ratios demonstrate deposited dose to be 11.6 times greater with radiolabeled P96.5 administration compared to irrelevant monoclonal antibody. The proportion of tumor dose found in normal organs is less than 10%, further supporting specific targeting of the human glioma xenograft by this antibody. Monoclonal antibody ZME018, which defines a second melanoma-associated antigen, and polyclonal rabbit antiferritin, which defines a tumor-associated antigen, demonstrate positive immunoperoxidase staining of the tumor, but comparatively decreased targeting. When compared to the 111In-radiolabeled antibody, 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5 demonstrates comparable tumor targeting and percentages of tumor dose found in normal organs. To test the therapeutic potential of 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, tumors and normal sites were implanted with miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Seven days following administration of 100 microCi 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, average absorbed doses of 3770, 980, 353, and 274 cGy were observed in tumor, liver, contralateral control site, and total body, respectively.

  18. Association between Prediagnostic Allergy-Related Serum Cytokines and Glioma.

    PubMed

    Schwartzbaum, Judith; Seweryn, Michal; Holloman, Christopher; Harris, Randall; Handelman, Samuel K; Rempala, Grzegorz A; Huang, Ruo-Pan; Burkholder, Brett; Brandemihl, Adam; Kallberg, Henrik; Johannesen, Tom Borge; Ahlbom, Anders; Feychting, Maria; Grimsrud, Tom K

    2015-01-01

    Allergy is inversely related to glioma risk. To determine whether prediagnostic allergy-related serum proteins are associated with glioma, we conducted a nested case-control study of seven cytokines (IL4, IL13, IL5, IL6, IL10, IFNG, TGFB2), two soluble cytokine receptors (sIL4RA, sIL13RA2) and three allergy-related transcription factors (FOXP3, STAT3, STAT6) using serum specimens from the Janus Serum Bank Cohort in Oslo, Norway. Blood donors subsequently diagnosed with glioma (n = 487) were matched to controls (n = 487) on age and date of blood draw and sex. We first estimated individual effects of the 12 serum proteins and then interactions between IL4 and IL13 and their receptors using conditional logistic regression. We next tested equality of case-control inter-correlations among the 12 serum proteins. We found that TGFB2 is inversely related to glioblastoma (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.87, 95% Confidence Interval (CI)) = 0.76, 0.98). In addition, ≤ 5 years before diagnosis, we observed associations between IL4 (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.66, 1.01), sIL4RA (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.65, 1.00), their interaction (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.12) and glioblastoma. This interaction was apparent > 20 years before diagnosis (IL4-sIL4RA OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.37). Findings for glioma were similar. Case correlations were different from control correlations stratified on time before diagnosis. Five years or less before diagnosis, correlations among case serum proteins were weaker than were those among controls. Our findings suggest that IL4 and sIL4RA reduce glioma risk long before diagnosis and early gliomagenesis affects circulating immune function proteins.

  19. Lactate dehydrogenase A silencing in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Chesnelong, Charles; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Blough, Michael D.; Al-Najjar, Mohammad; Stechishin, Owen D.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Pieper, Russell O.; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Weiss, Samuel; Luchman, H. Artee; Cairncross, J. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 gene (IDH1/2) were initially thought to enhance cancer cell survival and proliferation by promoting the Warburg effect. However, recent experimental data have shown that production of 2-hydroxyglutarate by IDH mutant cells promotes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α degradation and, by doing so, may have unexpected metabolic effects. Methods We used human glioma tissues and derived brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) to study the expression of HIF1α target genes in IDH mutant (mt) and IDH wild-type (wt) tumors. Focusing thereafter on the major glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), we used standard molecular methods and pyrosequencing-based DNA methylation analysis to identify mechanisms by which LDHA expression was regulated in human gliomas. Results We found that HIF1α-responsive genes, including many essential for glycolysis (SLC2A1, PDK1, LDHA, SLC16A3), were underexpressed in IDHmt gliomas and/or derived BTSCs. We then demonstrated that LDHA was silenced in IDHmt derived BTSCs, including those that did not retain the mutant IDH1 allele (mIDHwt), matched BTSC xenografts, and parental glioma tissues. Silencing of LDHA was associated with increased methylation of the LDHA promoter, as was ectopic expression of mutant IDH1 in immortalized human astrocytes. Furthermore, in a search of The Cancer Genome Atlas, we found low expression and high methylation of LDHA in IDHmt glioblastomas. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of downregulation of LDHA in cancer. Although unexpected findings, silencing of LDHA and downregulation of several other glycolysis essential genes raise the intriguing possibility that IDHmt gliomas have limited glycolytic capacity, which may contribute to their slow growth and better prognosis. PMID:24366912

  20. Thyroid hormone transport in a human glioma cell line.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, E; Lakshmanan, M; Pontecorvi, A; Robbins, J

    1990-03-05

    The uptake of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) was studied in human glioma cells (Hs 683) and compared with that in several other neural cell lines. At 25 degrees C or 37 degrees C, total cell uptake rose rapidly and reached equilibrium within 60 min. The glioma cells had the highest uptake: 47.6 fmol of L-T3 and 43.4 fmol of L-T4 per 10(6) cells at 37 degrees C. These were inhibited 77% and 72%, respectively, by excess unlabeled hormone. Uptake in the nuclei reached equilibrium between 90 and 120 min and was also highest in glioma cells: 1.46 fmol of L-T3 and 0.49 fmol of L-T4 per 10(6) cells. When expressed as percent of total cell uptake, however, glioma cells had the lowest values (3.1% for L-T3 and 1.1% for L-T4). Also in contrast to other cell lines, glioma cells transported L-T4 almost as effectively as L-T3. D-T3 and D-T4 total cell uptake was 86% and 96% lower than that of the respective L-isomers, and the nuclear uptake as a fraction of the cell uptake was similar. Kinetic analysis of the initial rate of cell uptake gave Vmax values for D-T3 and D-T4 that were 97% and 98% lower than for the L-isomers. Antimycin and monodansylcadaverine decreased the Vmax as well as the equilibrium cell and nuclear uptake of the L-isomers. The apparent nuclear affinity constant for L-T4 in intact cells was inhibited 90% in the presence of antimycin, whereas no effect was observed in isolated nuclei.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Ectopic expression of AP-2α transcription factor suppresses glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Su, Wenjing; Xia, Juan; Chen, Xueqin; Xu, Miao; Nie, Ling; Chen, Ni; Gong, Jing; Li, Xinglan; Zhou, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional factor AP-2α is a tumor suppressor gene and is downregulated in various neoplasms including glioma. Although the level of AP-2α is negatively associated with the grade of human glioma, the specific functions of AP-2α in glioma are still unknown. In this study, we experimentally showed that artificial overexpression of AP-2α in glioma T98G and U251 cells significantly downregulated the mRNA levels of Bcl-xl, Bcl-2, c-IAP2 and survivin, together with upregulation of the Hrk mRNA levels. Reintroduction of AP-2α also induced downregulation of the protein levels of survivin and VEGF in glioma cells. In biological assays with T98G and U251 cells, AP-2α reduced tumor cell growth, increased cell death, attenuated cell migration and endothelial tube formation. The AP-2α transcription factor may play an important role in suppressing glioma progression.

  2. GPR56 is a GPCR that is overexpressed in gliomas and functions in tumor cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, Sumana; Lorente, Gustavo; Nagavarapu, Usha; Nelson, April; Kuo, Jane; Cummins, Jeramiah; Nikolich, Karoly; Urfer, Roman; Foehr, Erik D

    2005-03-03

    GPR56 (also known as TM7XN1) is a newly discovered orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) of the secretin family that has a role in the development of neural progenitor cells and has been linked to developmental malformations of the human brain. GPR56 diverges from other secretin-like family members in that it has an extremely large N-terminal extracellular region (381 amino acids) and contains a novel feature among this new subclass, consisting of four cysteine residues that define a GPCR proteolytic site (GPS motif) located just before the first transmembrane spanning domain. The rest of the amino-terminal domain contains a large number of possible N- and O-linked glycosylation sites similar to mucin-like proteins. These features suggest a role in cell-cell, or cell-matrix interactions. Here, we demonstrate upregulation of GPR56 in glioblastoma multiforme tumors using functional genomics. Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the expression of GPR56 protein in a majority of glioblastoma/astrocytoma tumor samples with undetectable levels of expression in normal adult brain tissue. Immunofluorescence analysis of human glioma cells using anti-GPR56 antibodies demonstrate that GPR56 is expressed on the leading edge of membrane filopodia and colocalizes with alpha-actinin. Purified recombinant GPR56 extracellular domain protein inhibits glioma cell adhesion and causes abnormal cytoskeletal morphology and cell rounding. These results indicate that the extracellular domain may compete for unidentified ligand(s), and block the normal function of GPR56 in cell attachment. In reporter assays, overexpression of GPR56 activates the NF-kappaB, PAI-1 and TCF transcriptional response elements. These pathways have been implicated in cytoskeletal signaling, adhesion and tumor biology. The above results indicate that GPR56 serves as an adhesion GPCR and is involved in adhesion signaling.

  3. HLF/miR-132/TTK axis regulates cell proliferation, metastasis and radiosensitivity of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu; Wang, Yang; Ni, Chunxia; Meng, Ge; Sheng, Xiaofang

    2016-10-01

    Glioma is a malignant cancer with high mortality. A key prognostic factor of glioma is radiosensitivity. It has also been known that microRNAs (miR) significantly contribute to the development of glioma. miR-132 has been previously reported to inhibit tumor growth in some cancers, but not well studied in glioma. It is necessary to understand the association between miR-132 and glioma, including miR-132 expression in glioma, effects of miR-132 on cancer metastasis and radiosensitivity, and the involved molecular mechanism. We first explored the expression levels of miR-132 in human normal and glioma tissues, then correlated the expression levels with different stages of glioma. Utilizing human glioma U87 cells, lentiviral transduction technique, luciferase reporter assay, wound healing assay, transwell invasion assay and clonogenic assay, we investigated the effects of hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), miR-132 and TTK protein kinase (TTK) on cancer cell viability, proliferation, migration, invasion and radiosensitivity. The expression of miR-132 was low in human glioma tissues, and the downregulated expression was associated with advanced glioma grades. HLF directly bound to the BS1 site of miR-132 promoter to enhance the expression of miR-132. HLF-mediated miR-132 was able to directly target and inhibit a downstream factor TTK, which had an oncogenic role. Overexpression of TTK could reverse the inhibitory effects of either miR-132 or HLF on cancer cell proliferation, metastasis and radioresistance. TTK acts as an oncogene in glioma. HLF-mediated miR-132 directly suppresses TTK expression, thus exerting inhibitory effects on cancer cell proliferation, metastasis and radioresistance.

  4. Characterization and response of newly developed high-grade glioma cultures to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, Paula; Howley, Rachel; Doolan, Padraig; Clarke, Colin; Madden, Stephen F.; Clynes, Martin; Farrell, Michael; Amberger-Murphy, Verena

    2012-03-10

    High-grade gliomas (HGG), are the most common aggressive brain tumours in adults. Inhibitors targeting growth factor signalling pathways in glioma have shown a low clinical response rate. To accurately evaluate response to targeted therapies further in vitro studies are necessary. Growth factor pathway expression using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant EGFR (EGFRvIII), platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), C-Kit and C-Abl together with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression and downstream activation of AKT and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P70S6K) was analysed in 26 primary glioma cultures treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib. Response to TKIs was assessed using 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}). Response for each culture was compared with the EGFR/PDGFR immunocytochemical pathway profile using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Erlotinib response was not strongly associated with high expression of the growth factor pathway components. PTEN expression did not correlate with response to any of the three TKIs. Increased EGFR expression was associated with gefitinib response; increased PDGFR-{alpha} expression was associated with imatinib response. The results of this in vitro study suggest gefitinib and imatinib may have therapeutic potential in HGG tumours with a corresponding growth factor receptor expression profile. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-responders had low EGFR expression, high PDGFR-{beta}, and a low proliferation rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN is not indicative of response to a TKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Erlotinib response was not associated with expression of the proteins examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imatinib-response correlated with expression of PDGFR-{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gefitinib response correlated with increased expression of EGFR.

  5. A variable age of onset segregation model for linkage analysis, with correction for ascertainment, applied to glioma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangqing; Vengoechea, Jaime; Elston, Robert; Chen, Yanwen; Amos, Christopher I.; Armstrong, Georgina; Bernstein, Jonine L; Claus, Elizabeth; Davis, Faith; Houlston, Richard S; Il'yasova, Dora; Jenkins, Robert B; Johansen, Christoffer; Lai, Rose; Lau, Ching C; Liu, Yanhong; McCarthy, Bridget J; Olson, Sara H; Sadetzki, Siegal; Schildkraut, Joellen; Shete, Sanjay; Yu, Robert; Vick, Nicholas A; Merrell, Ryan; Wrensch, Margaret; Yang, Ping; Melin, Beatrice; Bondy, Melissa L.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2012-01-01

    Background We propose a two-step model-based approach, with correction for ascertainment, to linkage analysis of a binary trait with variable age of onset and apply it to a set of multiplex pedigrees segregating for adult glioma. Methods First, we fit segregation models by formulating the likelihood for a person to have a bivariate phenotype, affection status and age of onset, along with other covariates, and from these we estimate population trait allele frequencies and penetrance parameters as a function of age (N=281 multiplex glioma pedigrees). Second, the best fitting models are used as trait models in multipoint linkage analysis (N=74 informative multiplex glioma pedigrees). To correct for ascertainment, a prevalence constraint is used in the likelihood of the segregation models for all 281 pedigrees. Then the trait allele frequencies are re-estimated for the pedigree founders of the subset of 74 pedigrees chosen for linkage analysis. Results Using the best fitting segregation models in model-based multipoint linkage analysis, we identified two separate peaks on chromosome 17; the first agreed with a region identified by Shete et al. who used model-free affected-only linkage analysis, but with a narrowed peak: and the second agreed with a second region they found but had a larger maximum log of the odds (LOD). Conclusions/Impact Our approach has the advantage of not requiring markers to be in linkage equilibrium unless the minor allele frequency is small (markers which tend to be uninformative for linkage), and of using more of the available information for LOD-based linkage analysis. PMID:22962404

  6. The Impact of an Internet-Based Self-Management Intervention (HeLP-Diabetes) on the Psychological Well-Being of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Mixed-Method Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Megan; Dack, Charlotte; Barker, Chris; Murray, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-method study assessed the impact of an internet-based, self-management intervention (“HeLP-Diabetes”) on the psychological well-being of adults with type 2 diabetes. Nineteen participants were recruited from 3 general practices. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 weeks follow-up. Access to HeLP-Diabetes was associated with a significant decrease in participants' diabetes-related distress (Z = 2.04, p = 0.04, and d = 0.28). No significant differences were found in emotional distress or self-efficacy. The qualitative data found that participants reported improvements including increased self-efficacy and support, better management of low mood, greater diabetes awareness, and taking the condition more seriously. Participants also reported making improvements to their eating habits, exercise routine, and medical management. Some negative experiences associated with using the intervention were mentioned including feelings of guilt for not using the intervention as suggested or not making any behavioral changes, as well as technical and navigational frustrations with the intervention. Internet-based self-management interventions may have the potential to decrease diabetes-related distress in people with type 2 diabetes. The qualitative data also suggests internet interventions can positively impact both psychological and behavioural outcomes of adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26682226

  7. Determining adult type 2 diabetes-related health care needs in an indigenous population from rural Guatemala: a mixed-methods preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Guatemala, diabetes is an emerging public health concern. Guatemala has one of the largest indigenous populations in Latin America, and this population frequently does not access the formal health care system. Therefore, knowledge about the emergence of diabetes in this population is limited. Methods Interview participants (n=23) were recruited from a convenience sample of indigenous adults with type 2 diabetes at one rural diabetes clinic in Guatemala. A structured interview was used to assess knowledge about diabetes and its complications; access to diabetes-related health care and treatment; dietary and lifestyle changes; and family and social supports for individuals living with diabetes. Interviews were supplemented with two group interviews with community leaders and health care providers. Thematic analysis was used to produce insights into diabetes knowledge, attitudes, and practices. In addition, a chart review of the clinic’s electronic medical record identified all adult patients (n=80) presenting in one calendar year for a first-time diabetic consultation. Sociodemographic and clinical variables were extracted and summarized from these records. Results Salient demographic factors in both the structured interview and chart review samples included low educational levels and high indigenous language preference. In the interview sample, major gaps in biomedical knowledge about diabetes included understanding the causes, chronicity, and long-term end-organ complications of diabetes. Medication costs, medical pluralism, and limited social supports for dietary and lifestyles changes were major practical barriers to disease management. Quantitative data from medical records review revealed high rates of poor glycemic control, overweight and obesity, and medication prescription. Conclusions This study provides a preliminary sketch of type 2 diabetes in an indigenous Guatemalan population. Combined qualitative and quantitative data point towards

  8. MYB-QKI rearrangements in Angiocentric Glioma drive tumorigenicity through a tripartite mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Ramkissoon, Lori A.; Jain, Payal; Bergthold, Guillaume; Wala, Jeremiah; Zeid, Rhamy; Schumacher, Steven E.; Urbanski, Laura; O’Rourke, Ryan; Gibson, William J.; Pelton, Kristine; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Han, Harry J.; Zhu, Yuankun; Choudhari, Namrata; Silva, Amanda; Boucher, Katie; Henn, Rosemary E.; Kang, Yun Jee; Knoff, David; Paolella, Brenton R.; Gladden-Young, Adrianne; Varlet, Pascale; Pages, Melanie; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Federation, Alexander; Malkin, Hayley; Tracy, Adam; Seepo, Sara; Ducar, Matthew; Hummelen, Paul Van; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Scagnet, Mirko; Bowers, Daniel C.; Giannini, Caterina; Puget, Stephanie; Hawkins, Cynthia; Tabori, Uri; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Burger, Peter C.; Eberhart, Charles; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Hill, D. Ashley; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Santagata, Sandro; Stiles, Charles D.; Bradner, James E.; Jabado, Nada; Goren, Alon; Grill, Jacques; Ligon, Azra H.; Goumnerova, Liliana; Waanders, Angela J.; Storm, Phillip B.; Kieran, Mark W.; Ligon, Keith L.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Resnick, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Angiocentric gliomas are pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) without known recurrent genetic drivers. We performed genomic analysis of new and published data from 249 PLGGs including 19 Angiocentric Gliomas. We identified MYB-QKI fusions as a specific and single candidate driver event in Angiocentric Gliomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies show MYB-QKI rearrangements promote tumorigenesis through three mechanisms: MYB activation by truncation, enhancer translocation driving aberrant MYB-QKI expression, and hemizygous loss of the tumor suppressor QKI. This represents the first example of a single driver rearrangement simultaneously transforming cells via three genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in a tumor. PMID:26829751

  9. Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Kundu, Soumi; Feenstra, Tjerk; Li, Xiujuan; Jin, Chuan; Laaniste, Liisi; El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu; Ohlin, K Elisabet; Yu, Di; Olofsson, Tommie; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Magnusson, Peetra U; Nilsson, Karin Forsberg; Essand, Magnus; Smits, Anja; Dieterich, Lothar C; Dimberg, Anna

    2015-12-08

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization.

  10. In vitro enhancement of dendritic cell-mediated anti-glioma immune response by graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhongjun; Duan, Jinhong; Wang, Chen; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xian-Da

    2014-06-01

    Malignant glioma has extremely poor prognosis despite combination treatments with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy may potentially serve as an adjuvant treatment of glioma, but its efficacy generally needs further improvement. Here we explored whether graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could modulate the DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response in vitro, using the T98G human glioma cell line as the study model. Pulsing DCs with a glioma peptide antigen (Ag) generated a limited anti-glioma response compared to un-pulsed DCs. Pulsing DCs with GO alone failed to produce obvious immune modulation effects. However, stimulating DCs with a mixture of GO and Ag (GO-Ag) significantly enhanced the anti-glioma immune reaction ( p < 0.05). The secretion of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the lymphocytes was also markedly boosted by GO-Ag. Additionally, the anti-glioma immune response induced by GO-Ag appeared to be target-specific. Furthermore, at the concentration used in this study, GO exhibited a negligible effect on the viability of the DCs. These results suggested that GO might have potential utility for boosting a DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response.

  11. Adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix as drug targets for glioma.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshihiko; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Ishida, Joji; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Date, Isao

    2016-04-01

    The formation of tumor vasculature and cell invasion along white matter tracts have pivotal roles in the development and progression of glioma. A better understanding of the mechanisms of angiogenesis and invasion in glioma will aid the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The processes of angiogenesis and invasion cause the production of an array of adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. This review focuses on the role of adhesion molecules and the ECM in malignant glioma. The results of clinical trials using drugs targeted against adhesion molecules and the ECM for glioma are also discussed.

  12. The effects of CD147 on the cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis in glioma.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haoyuan; Shao, Ying; Chen, Xuan

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the effects of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (CD147) on glioma proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis. Tissue samples were obtained from 101 glioma cases while normal brain tissues were obtained from 30 brain injury cases. Immunohistochemical assay was performed to detect the expressions of CD147, CD34, and VEGF in tissue samples. QRT-PCR was performed to detect the relative expression of CD147 mRNA in human glioma cell lines. CD147 siRNA was transfected into glioma cell line U251. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis were tested by MTT, flow cytometry, Transwell assay, and vasculogenic mimicry assay, respectively. Expressions of relative proteins were analyzed with western blot. CD147 was positively expressed with the percentage of 0, 37.5, 44.8, 67.9, and 85.7 % in normal tissues and glioma tissues with WHO grades I-IV, respectively, and the scores of MVDand VEGF were associated with the expression of CD147. CD147 was significantly upregulated in the human glioma cell lines (P < 0.05). Downregulated the expression of CD147 suppressed cell proliferation, blocked cell cycle, induced apoptosis, inhibited cell invasion and angiogenesis in glioma cells in vitro. The expression of CD147 was significantly associated with WHO tumor grade and angiogenesis; silencing of CD147 contributed to inhibition of glioma proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Our study provided firm evidence that CD 147 is a potential glioma target for anti-angiogenic therapies.

  13. Influence of glioma cells on a new co-culture in vitro blood-brain barrier model for characterization and validation of permeability.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Bárbara; Marques, Cláudia; Carvalho, Isabel; Costa, Paulo; Martins, Susana; Ferreira, Domingos; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-07-25

    The blood-brain barrier plays an important role in protecting the brain from injury and diseases, but also restrains the delivery of potential therapeutic drugs for the treatment of brain illnesses, such as tumors. Glioma is most common cancer type of central nervous system in adults and the most lethal in children. The treatment is normally poor and ineffective. To better understand the ability of drug delivery systems to permeate this barrier, a blood-brain barrier model using human brain endothelial cells and a glioma cell line is herein proposed. The consistent trans-endothelial electrical values, immunofluorescence and scanning electronic microscopy showed a confluent endothelial cell monolayer with high restrictiveness. Upon inclusion of glioma cell line, the trans-endothelial electrical resistance decreased, with consequent increase of apparent permeability of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran used as model drug, revealing a reduction of the barrier robustness. In addition, it was demonstrated a cell shape modification in the co-culture, with loss of tight junctions. The microenvironment of co-cultured model presented significant increase of of CCL2/MCP-1 and IL-6 production, correlating with the modulation of permeation. The results encourage the use of the proposed in vitro model as a screening tool when performing drugs permeability for the treatment of disorders among the central nervous system.

  14. Armodafinil in Reducing Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients With High Grade Glioma | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies armodafinil to see how well it works in reducing cancer-related fatigue in patients with high grade glioma. Armodafinil may help relieve fatigue in patients with high grade glioma. |

  15. Acceptance of Commercially Available Wearable Activity Trackers Among Adults Aged Over 50 and With Chronic Illness: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Kathryn; Giangregorio, Lora; Schneider, Eric; Chilana, Parmit; Li, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity and sedentary behavior increase the risk of chronic illness and death. The newest generation of “wearable” activity trackers offers potential as a multifaceted intervention to help people become more active. Objective To examine the usability and usefulness of wearable activity trackers for older adults living with chronic illness. Methods We recruited a purposive sample of 32 participants over the age of 50, who had been previously diagnosed with a chronic illness, including vascular disease, diabetes, arthritis, and osteoporosis. Participants were between 52 and 84 years of age (mean 64); among the study participants, 23 (72%) were women and the mean body mass index was 31 kg/m2. Participants tested 5 trackers, including a simple pedometer (Sportline or Mio) followed by 4 wearable activity trackers (Fitbit Zip, Misfit Shine, Jawbone Up 24, and Withings Pulse) in random order. Selected devices represented the range of wearable products and features available on the Canadian market in 2014. Participants wore each device for at least 3 days and evaluated it using a questionnaire developed from the Technology Acceptance Model. We used focus groups to explore participant experiences and a thematic analysis approach to data collection and analysis. Results Our study resulted in 4 themes: (1) adoption within a comfort zone; (2) self-awareness and goal setting; (3) purposes of data tracking; and (4) future of wearable activity trackers as health care devices. Prior to enrolling, few participants were aware of wearable activity trackers. Most also had been asked by a physician to exercise more and cited this as a motivation for testing the devices. None of the participants planned to purchase the simple pedometer after the study, citing poor accuracy and data loss, whereas 73% (N=32) planned to purchase a wearable activity tracker. Preferences varied but 50% felt they would buy a Fitbit and 42% felt they would buy a Misfit, Jawbone, or

  16. The Metabolomic Signature of Malignant Glioma Reflects Accelerated Anabolic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Kensicki, Elizabeth; Bloom, Gregory; Prabhu, Antony; Sarcar, Bhaswati; Kahali, Soumen; Eschrich, Steven; Qu, Xiaotao; Forsyth, Peter; Gillies, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made toward understanding glioblastoma biology through large-scale genetic and protein expression analyses, little is known about the underlying metabolic alterations promoting their aggressive phenotype. We conducted global metabolomic profiling on patient-derived glioma specimens and identified specific metabolic programs differentiating low- and high-grade tumors, with the metabolic signature of glioblastoma reflecting accelerated anabolic metabolism. When coupled with transcriptional profiles, we identified the metabolic phenotype of the mesenchymal subtype to consist of accumulation of the glycolytic intermediate phosphoenolpyruvate and decreased pyruvate kinase activity. Unbiased hierarchical clustering of metabolomic profiles identified three subclasses, which we term energetic, anabolic, and phospholipid catabolism with prognostic relevance. These studies represent the first global metabolomic profiling of glioma, offering a previously undescribed window into their metabolic heterogeneity, and provide the requisite framework for strategies designed to target metabolism in this rapidly fatal malignancy. PMID:23026133

  17. Targeted Therapy for MAPK Alterations in Pediatric Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Truong, AY; Nicolaides, TP

    2015-01-01

    Although the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway helps promote normal cell development, the pathway is known to contribute to the initiation and growth of many types of cancers. Tumorigenesis can result from mutations in a number of the pathway’s key proteins, including but not limited to RAS, any one of the three RAF kinases, or MEK1/2. Moreover, by discovering and understanding the biology of oncogenic mutations, scientists can develop novel targeted therapies. This review describes the general history of such targeted therapies in the context of pediatric gliomas. We first describe the biology of gliomas and oncogenic mutations in the MAPK pathway and then summarize notable pre-clinical data and clinical trials for these targeted therapies. PMID:26525348

  18. Trends in Fluorescence Image-guided Surgery for Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jonathan T.C.; Meza, Daphne; Sanai, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that a more extensive surgical resection is associated with an improved life expectancy for both low-grade and high-grade glioma patients. However, radiographically complete resections are not often achieved in many cases due to the lack of sensitivity and specificity of current neurosurgical guidance techniques at the margins of diffuse infiltrative gliomas. Intraoperative fluorescence imaging offers the potential to improve the extent of re