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Sample records for adult mourning doves

  1. Primary feather molt of adult mourning doves in North and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, G.H.; Amend, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    Examination of 8,141 adult mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) in North and South Carolina revealed that substantial numbers complete primary feather molt in September. Adult mourning doves shed primaries at the rate of 1 per 14 days. No difference was found in this rate between sexes or among years, 1969-74. The initiation of molt differed from year to year, and female molt always preceded male molt. Available data show that southern doves complete primary molt a month earlier than northern doves. Therefore, age based on primary molt can be biased upward if all molt-complete wings from southern hunting samples are considered immature.

  2. Aging mourning doves by outer primary wear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wight, H.M.; Blankenship, L.H.; Tomlinson, R.E.

    1967-01-01

    Many immature mourning doves (Zenaidura macroura) cannot be aged by the conventional white-tipped primary covert method if molt has proceeded beyond the 7th primary. A new method of aging doves in this group is based on the presence (immature) or absence (adult) of a buff-colored fringe on the tips of the 9th and 10th primaries. Experienced biologists were nearly 100 percent accurate in aging wings of 100 known-age doves from eastern and midwestern states. The technique is not as reliable for doves from southwestern United States because of added feather wear, apparently from harsh vegetative and soil conditions.

  3. An observation of a partially albinistic zenaida macroura (Mourning Dove)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berdeen, James; Otis, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Three of the 4 forms of albinism that occur in avifauna have been detected in Zenaida macroura (Mourning Dove). Albinism is rare in this species, and the incidence rate of each age and sex cohort is not well known. Consequently, we examined the pigmentation of Mourning Doves encountered in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina, and classified the age and sex of all individuals. One adult male Mourning Dove had unusually light coloration of some feathers and the upper mandible. This pigmentation is consistent with partial albinism. This was the only individual out of 10,749 examined that appeared to be albinistic. This low incidence rate of albinism supports the conclusion that this condition is relatively rare in Mourning Doves (Mirarchi 1993).

  4. Progress of primary feather molt of adult mourning doves in Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadler, K.C.; Tomlinson, R.E.; Wight, H.M.

    1970-01-01

    The examination of 7,892 adult doves in Missouri between 1953 and 1965 showed that less than 2.5% of adult doves completed their molt before October 1. Adult doves of both sexes began molting their primary feathers during early June in Missouri and lost the last (tenth) primary during the latter half of October. Approximately 140-150 days were required to complete the molt. Thus, early-hatched immatures, which begin their primary molt 25-30 days after hatching, contributed the bulk of the wings with completed molts in September. By correctly classifying September samples of dove wings with a completed molt as young-of-the-year a more accurate young:adult ratio is obtained.

  5. Eggshell thickness in mourning dove populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreitzer, J.F.

    1971-01-01

    Eggs (n = 452) of the mourning dove (Zenaidura macroura) were collected from 9 states in 1969 and 11 states in 1970, and shell thickness was compared with that of eggs (n = 97) collected from 24 states during the years 1861 to 1935. Mean shell thickness did not differ significantly in the test groups.

  6. Immunologic status of mourning doves following an epizootic of trichomoniasis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.; Amend, S.R.

    1972-01-01

    An epizootic of trichomoniasis in mourning doves at the Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge began in 1969 and continued into 1970. The disease was seen in 16% of the adults and 2% of the immatures in 1970, but only one immature bird out of 37 surveyed (3%) carried Trichomonas gallinae. Challenge infection of 33 doves from the epizootic area showed 85 percent to be resistant to trichomoniasis, compared to 69 percent resistance in doves from Maryland, where no epizootic has occurred for at least 3 years. Plasma protein changes which occurred following challenge infection were identical in CSNWR and Maryland doves which showed evidence of disease. Of the doves which showed no signs of disease, those from the CSNWR exhibited no change in beta globulins, identical to the response in pigeons which survive an infection by T. gallinae, but they had some tissue invasion by the parasite.

  7. Reappraising factors affecting mourning dove perch coos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayre, M.W.; Atkinson, R.D.; Baskett, T.S.; Haas, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    Results confirmed pairing as the primary factor influencing perch-cooing rates of wild mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). Marked unmated males cooed at substantially higher rates (6.2x) than mated males, had greater probability of cooing (2.3x) during 3-minute periods, and continued cooing longer each morning than mated males. Population density was not a major factor affecting cooing. Unmated males cooed more frequently in the presence of other cooing doves (P < 0.05) than when alone, but the number of additional doves above 1 was unimportant. Cooing rates of both mated and unmated males on areas with dissimilar dove densities were not significantly different. Within limits of standard call-count procedure, weather exerted no detectable influence on cooing.

  8. Breeding behavior of immature mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irby, H.D.; Blankenship, L.H.

    1966-01-01

    Some immature mourning doves (Zenaidura mncroura) are capable of breeding in their first (calendar) year of life. The breeding activities of immatures observed in this study included calling, copulating, and nesting. Development of sexual structures such as cloacal papillae, oviduct openings, and gonads was also regarded as evidence of breeding potential. Immatures were identified principally by white-tipped wing coverts. Sexes were distinguished by behavioral characteristics. Males coo, perform flights, carry nest material, and attend nests during the day and females attend nests at night. Immatures were involved in at least ten nestings on two areas near Tucson, Arizona, in 1963. Five young fledged from these nests.

  9. Population demographics of two local South Carolina mourning dove populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, D.P., Jr.; Otis, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) call-count index had a significant (P 2,300 doves and examined >6,000 individuals during harvest bag checks. An age-specific band recovery model with time- and area-specific recovery rates, and constant survival rates, was chosen for estimation via Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), likelihood ratio, and goodness-of-fit criteria. After-hatching-year (AHY) annual survival rate was 0.359 (SE = 0.056), and hatching-year (HY) annual survival rate was 0.118 (SE = 0.042). Average estimated recruitment per adult female into the prehunting season population was 3.40 (SE = 1.25) and 2.32 (SE = 0.46) for the 2 study areas. Our movement data support earlier hypotheses of nonmigratory breeding and harvested populations in South Carolina. Low survival rates and estimated population growth rate in the study areas may be representative only of small-scale areas that are heavily managed for dove hunting. Source-sink theory was used to develop a model of region-wide populations that is composed of source areas with positive growth rates and sink areas of declining growth. We suggest management of mourning doves in the Southeast might benefit from improved understanding of local population dynamics, as opposed to regional-scale population demographics.

  10. Band loss by nestling mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaczynski, C.F.; Kiel, W.H.

    1963-01-01

    Nestling mourning doves (Zenaidura macroura) were banded and checked for band loss prior to fledging at Parchman, Mississippi, during the months of June-August, 1960. Three hundred seventy-seven nestlings 4-6 days of age were banded, 117 with size 3 bands, 120 with size 3A bands, and 140 with size 3A bands secured by Dalzoflex tape. Two hundred twenty nestlings 7-9 days of age were banded, 114 with size 3 bands and 106 with size 3A bands. In the 4- to 6-day age group, 66.3 percent of the size 3A bands were lost. This was a statistically significant departure from the 7.7 percent loss of size 3 bands. No taped bands were lost. However, predators ate 13.8 percent of the nestlings with taped bands and significantly fewer of the nestlings banded without tape. In the 4- to 6-day age group, percentages of nestlings known to be available for band recovery at 9 days or older were: size 3, 69.2 percent; size 3A with tape, 59.0 percent; size 3A, 25.8 percent. In the 7-to 9-day age group, there was a 3.3 percent loss of size 3A bands and no loss of size 3 bands. The minimum age at which nestlings were banded without subsequent loss of bands was 6 days for size 3 and 8 days for size 3A.

  11. Lead poisoning in a sample of Maryland mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Bagley, G.E.

    1967-01-01

    A sick mourning dove (Zenuidura macroura) collected in Maryland with 2 lead shot in the gizzard showed acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies in the kidney tubular cells. The liver and the tibia contained 72 ppm and 187 ppm lead (wet weight) respectively. Four gizzards from 62 doves killed by hunters contained lead shot. The lead content of 43 dove livers ranged from 0.4-14.0 ppm (wet weight); 40 of these doves were collected by hunters, and the other 3 were dying of trichomoniasis.

  12. 76 FR 38202 - Proposed Information Collection; Mourning Dove Call Count Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Information Collection; Mourning Dove Call Count Survey AGENCY: Fish... migratory bird populations. The Mourning Dove Call Count Survey is an essential part of the migratory bird... survey to provide the necessary data to determine the population status of the mourning dove. If...

  13. Rapid change in the defense of flightless young by a mourning dove parent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berdeen, James; Otis, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    We report that an adult-sized Zenaida macroura (Mourning Dove), presumably a parent, rapidly decreased risk taken in defense of a juvenile as the likelihood of predation to the juvenile increased. We attribute this decrease in risk taken to (1) the parent's perception that the risk of predation had increased to the extent that a continuation of defensive behaviors would not prevent the death of the juvenile, and (2) its attempt to minimize its own risk of death. It may be that there is a threshold beyond which Mourning Dove parents will forgo the risk of additional defense of offspring in favor of making another reproductive attempt.

  14. Using fecal glucocorticoids for stress assessment in Mourning Doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, B.E.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Schulz, J.H.; Jones, S.B.; Mong, T.

    2003-01-01

    Fecal glucocorticoid assays provide a potentially useful, noninvasive means to study physiological responses of wildlife to various stressors. The objective of our study was to validate a method for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) feces. We validated the assay using standard procedures (e.g., parallelism, recovery of exogenous corticosterone) to demonstrate that the assay accurately and precisely measured glucocorticoid metabolites in Mourning Dove fecal extracts. We conducted adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) challenge experiments to validate the assay's ability to determine biologically important changes in fecal glucocorticoids. Fecal glucocorticoid levels increased significantly approximately 2-3 hr after administration of ACTH at 50 IU per kg body mass to wild Mourning Doves held in captivity. In contrast, fecal glucocorticoid metabolites did not increase in control birds, birds that received saline injections, or a lower dose of ACTH (1 IU per kg body mass). Variation in overall fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels may have been influenced by season and the length of time birds were held in captivity. Non-invasive fecal glucocorticoid metabolite analyses, in combination with demographic information, may have considerable utility for monitoring the effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on Mourning Dove populations.

  15. Mourning Dove nesting habitat and nest success in Central Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drobney, R.D.; Schulz, J.H.; Sheriff, S.L.; Fuemmeler, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Previous Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) nesting studies conducted in areas containing a mixture of edge and continuous habitats have focused on edge habitats. Consequently, little is known about the potential contribution of continuous habitats to dove production. In this study we evaluated the relative importance of these two extensive habitat types by monitoring the habitat use and nest success of 59 radio-marked doves during 1990-1991 in central Missouri. Of 83 nests initiated by our marked sample, most (81.9%) were located in edge habitats. Although continuous habitats were selected less as nest sites, the proportion of successful nests did not differ significantly from that in edge habitats. Our data indicate that continuous habitats should not be considered marginal nesting habitat. If the intensity of use and nest success that we observed are representative regionally or nationally, continuous habitats could contribute substantially to annual Mourning Dove production because of the high availability of these habitats throughout much of the Mourning Dove breeding range.

  16. Racial determination of origin of mourning doves in hunters' bags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldrich, J.W.; Duvall, A.J.; Geis, A.D.

    1958-01-01

    A method is described for determining the general area of production of mourning doves that are shot during the hunting season. This procedure is based on the identification of racial characteristics that can be ascertained from samples of wings. The application and utility of this method were demonstrated with data gathered from doves shot in two important dove-hunting areas, Georgia and Texas. The Georgia data indicated that the early-season kill consisted largely of the race carolinensis, while later in the season marginella and the intermediate form made up most of the bag. The wing samples from Texas indicated that birds produced outside of southern Texas made up the largest part of the bag in southern Texas during the entire season. Doves produced west of the Appalachians contributed to both the Georgia and Texas kill.

  17. A new stratification of mourning dove call-count routes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blankenship, L.H.; Humphrey, A.B.; MacDonald, D.

    1971-01-01

    The mourning dove (Zenaidura macroura) call-count survey is a nationwide audio-census of breeding mourning doves. Recent analyses of the call-count routes have utilized a stratification based upon physiographic regions of the United States. An analysis of 5 years of call-count data, based upon stratification using potential natural vegetation, has demonstrated that this uew stratification results in strata with greater homogeneity than the physiographic strata, provides lower error variance, and hence generates greatet precision in the analysis without an increase in call-count routes. Error variance was reduced approximately 30 percent for the contiguous United States. This indicates that future analysis based upon the new stratification will result in an increased ability to detect significant year-to-year changes.

  18. Calibrating recruitment estimates for mourning doves from harvest age ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Otis, David L.

    2010-01-01

    We examined results from the first national-scale effort to estimate mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) age ratios and developed a simple, efficient, and generalizable methodology for calibrating estimates. Our method predicted age classes of unknown-age wings based on backward projection of molt distributions from fall harvest collections to preseason banding. We estimated 1) the proportion of late-molt individuals in each age class, and 2) the molt rates of juvenile and adult birds. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated our estimator was minimally biased. We estimated model parameters using 96,811 wings collected from hunters and 42,189 birds banded during preseason from 68 collection blocks in 22 states during the 2005–2007 hunting seasons. We also used estimates to derive a correction factor, based on latitude and longitude of samples, which can be applied to future surveys. We estimated differential vulnerability of age classes to harvest using data from banded birds and applied that to harvest age ratios to estimate population age ratios. Average, uncorrected age ratio of known-age wings for states that allow hunting was 2.25 (SD 0.85) juveniles:adult, and average, corrected ratio was 1.91 (SD 0.68), as determined from harvest age ratios from an independent sample of 41,084 wings collected from random hunters in 2007 and 2008. We used an independent estimate of differential vulnerability to adjust corrected harvest age ratios and estimated the average population age ratio as 1.45 (SD 0.52), a direct measure of recruitment rates. Average annual recruitment rates were highest east of the Mississippi River and in the northwestern United States, with lower rates between. Our results demonstrate a robust methodology for calibrating recruitment estimates for mourning doves and represent the first large-scale estimates of recruitment for the species. Our methods can be used by managers to correct future harvest survey data to generate recruitment estimates for use in

  19. Case report -- pox in the mourning dove in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Herman, C.M.; King, E.S., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    1) An outbreak of avian pox in a captive flock of mourning doves involving 12 of 23 birds is described. Typical nodular growths on the eyelids and head as well as yellowish lesions at the base of the tongue and at the back of the pharynx were seen. Typical intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were demonstrated. Methods are described for differentiating this infection from trichomoniasis. An attempt to transmit the disease to pigeons, with material from a natural case, failed.

  20. Effects of lead shot ingestion on free-ranging mourning doves

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, M.E.; Mirarchi, R.E. )

    1989-08-01

    Mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) may develop Pb toxicosis from ingesting spent Pb shot from hunted fields in which they feed. One to 6.5 percent of the dove population may ingest Pb shot based on analysis of gizzard contents. No Pb shot toxicity studies have been conducted on free-ranging mourning doves. Mortality data for Pb-dosed, free-ranging doves would help determine the actual effects of Pb shot ingestion on the mourning dove population. Causes of death of Pb-treated doves also could help to estimate exposure of predators and scavengers to secondary Pb toxicosis. The objectives of this study were to compare mortality and causes of death of free-ranging Pb-treated and untreated mourning doves.

  1. Upper digestive tract trichomoniasis in mourning doves and other birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stabler, R.M.; Herman, C.M.

    1951-01-01

    This paper, while partially a review of previously published reports from North America, presents many new records on the occurrence of Trichomonas gallinae in North American columbiform birds. Evidence is presented that the .infection is present throughout most of the United States and on occasion has reached epizootic proportions in mourning doves and band-tiled pigeons in isolated areas. An extensive epizootic is reported involving several thousand eastern mourning doves in the Southeastern States during the summer of 1950. Although probably the chief means of transmission is from. parent to offspring in columbiform birds (and the occurrence of infection in nestling mourning doves demonstrates that this mode of inoculation occurs) in severe epizootics there also is undoubtedly a transmission by contamination of water or food besides, or as well as, the parent to offspring transfers. When T. gallinae is implanted in clean pigeons it becomes evident that there is a variety of strains of the organisms and that they differ considerably in virulence. Some strains may kill almost every recipient, while others, though they readily infect, never produce the slightest discomfort or pathology. Nonlethal infections produce an immunity to all strains tested. In some cases, however, when these double-strain infections are further inoculated into. clean birds, the effects of either the nonlethal or the killing strain may predominate. The mechanism by which this virulence acts in the blrds is undoubtedly an important factor in determining the morbidity or mortality that may occur in a population. The prevalence of trichomoniasis in native pigeons and doves presents many practical as well as academic problems. Ultimate application of control measures, evenon an experimental basis, must await further knowledge of many more basic facts.

  2. Pathophysiological responses to a schistosome infection in a wild population of mourning doves (Zenaida macroura).

    PubMed

    Sweazea, Karen L; Simperova, Anna; Juan, Tiffany; Gadau, Alice; Brant, Sara V; Deviche, Pierre; Jarrett, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    The blood trematode Gigantobilharzia huronensis typically infects passerine birds and has not been reported in other orders of wild birds. However, in the summer of 2011 in Tempe, Arizona, USA, mourning doves (Zenaida macroura; order: Columbiformes) were collected with infections of G. huronensis. This is the first report of a natural schistosome infection found in wild populations of doves. We sought to determine if G. huronensis infections alter the general body condition and physiology of doves, a seemingly unlikely host for this parasite. Specifically, we hypothesized that birds infected with schistosomes would exhibit reduced weight as well as increased markers of stress and immune system activation. Adult male mourning doves (n=14) were captured using walk-in style funnel traps. After weighing the birds, blood and mesenteric tissue samples were collected. We measured biomarkers of stress including circulating heat shock proteins (HSPs) 60 and 70, as well as oxidized lipoproteins in schistosome-infected and non-infected birds. Indices of immune system reactivity were assessed using agglutination and lysis assays in addition to determining the leukocyte to erythrocyte ratios and prevalence of hemoparasite infections from blood smears. Schistosome-infected mourning doves had significantly increased oxidative stress and evidence of HSP70 mobilization. There was no evidence for weight loss in schistosome-infected birds nor evidence of significant immune system activation associated with schistosome infection. This may be a reflection of the small sample size available for the study. These findings suggest that schistosome infections have pathological effects in doves, but the lack of mature worms suggests that infected birds in this sampling may not have been suitable hosts for parasite maturation. PMID:26265584

  3. A risk assessment for consumers of mourning doves

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.; Kennamer, R.A.; Brisbin, I.L. Jr.; Gochfeld, M.

    1998-10-01

    Recreational and subsistence hunters and anglers consume a wide range of species, including birds, mammals, fish and shellfish, some of which represent significant exposure pathways for environmental toxic agents. This study focuses on the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Savannah River Site (SRS), a former nuclear weapons production facility in South Carolina. The potential risk of contaminant intake from consuming mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), the most popular United States game bird, was examined under various risk scenarios. For all of these scenarios the authors used the mean tissue concentration of six metals (lead, mercury, cadmium, selenium, chromium, manganese) and radiocesium, in doves collected on and near SRS. They also estimated risk to a child consuming doves that had the maximum contaminant level. The authors used the cancer slope factor for radiocesium, the Environmental Protection Agencies Uptake/Biokinetic model for lead, and published reference doses for the other metals. As a result of their risk assessments they recommend management of water levels in contaminated reservoirs so that lake bed sediments are not exposed to use by gamebirds and other terrestrial wildlife. Particularly, measures should be taken to insure that the hunting public does not h ave access to such a site. Their data also indicate that doves on popular hunting areas are exposed to excess lead, suggesting that banning lead shot for doves, as has been done for waterfowl, is desirable.

  4. A risk assessment for consumers of mourning doves.

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Kennamer, R A; Brisbin, I L; Gochfeld, M

    1998-10-01

    Recreational and subsistence hunters and anglers consume a wide range of species, including birds, mammals, fish and shellfish, some of which represent significant exposure pathways for environmental toxic agents. This study focuses on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Savannah River Site (SRS), a former nuclear weapons production facility in South Carolina. The potential risk of contaminant intake from consuming mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), the most popular United States game bird, was examined under various risk scenarios. For all of these scenarios we used the mean tissue concentration of six metals (lead, mercury, cadmium, selenium, chromium, manganese) and radiocesium, in doves collected on and near SRS. We also estimated risk to a child consuming doves that had the maximum contaminant level. We used the cancer slope factor for radiocesium, the Environmental Protection Agencies Uptake/Biokinetic model for lead, and published reference doses for the other metals. As a result of our risk assessments we recommend management of water levels in contaminated reservoirs so that lake bed sediments are not exposed to use by gamebirds and other terrestrial wildlife. Particularly, measures should be taken to insure that the hunting public does not have access to such a site. Our data also indicate that doves on popular hunting areas are exposed to excess lead, suggesting that banning lead shot for doves, as has been done for waterfowl, is desirable. PMID:9853392

  5. Haemoproteus, a blood parasite, in domestic pigeons and mourning doves in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knisley, J.O., Jr.; Herman, C.M.

    1967-01-01

    The occurrence of Haemoproteus in pigeons throughout the world and in mourning doves in the United States is reviewed. Haemoproteus has previously been reported only once from pigeons in Maryland. During this study it was found in all of 18 pigeons from one area but in none of 12 from an adjacent area. No infections were found in 90 Maryland mourning doves. All of the 10 mourning doves from Florida were infected whereas 60 nestlings from Texas and Mississippi had no parasites. None was found in 358 nestling white-winged doves from Texas.

  6. Effects of PCBs on mourning dove courtship behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Tori, G.M.; Peterle, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of PCBs on the Mourning sove courtship behavior and subsequent reproductive effects were studied. The behavior has been divided into the courtship phase (pair bond formation and courting) and the nesting phase (nestbuilding, egglaying, and incubation). Twenty four pairs of doves were fed 0, 10, or 40 ppm Aroclor 1254 for 42 days. The courtship phases were significantly prolonged at the higher dose. Both doses had effects on the nesting phase; at 10 ppm the initial nest building was about 7 days longer than that of controls. Clutch size and eggshell thickness did not significantly differ from controls. (JMT)

  7. Effects of PCBs on mourning dove courtship behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Tori, G.M.; Peterle, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of PCBs on the Mourning sove courtship behavior and subsequent reproductive effects were studied. The behavior has been divided into the courtship phase (pair bond formation and courting) and the nesting phase (nestbuilding, egglaying, and incubation). Twenty four pairs of doves were fed 0, 10, or 40 ppm Aroclor 1254 for 42 days. The courtship phases were significantly prolonged at the higher dose. Both doses had effects on the nesting phase; at 10 ppm the initial nest building was about 7 days longer than that of controls. Clutch size and eggshell thickness did not significantly differ form controls. (JMT)

  8. Mourning dove use of man-made ponds in a cold-desert ecosystem in Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, F.P.; Flake, L.D. )

    1989-10-31

    Mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) in a cold-desert ecosystem used man-made ponds for watering, feeding, gritting, loafing, and courting. Diurnal pond use by doves peaked in the morning and evening. Monthly dove use of ponds fluctuated slightly during the summers of 1984 and 1985. Pond size, pH, and shoreline characteristics had little association with the intensity of pond use by doves; but geographic isolation of ponds was weakly associated had pond-use intensity. The number of doves present at the beginning of the one-hour period was a poor indicator of the number of arrivals during that period. We conclude that man-made water sources are important in areas where water availability may limit mourning dove productivity and abundance. It is suggested that mourning dove arrival rates could be used as a population index in cold-desert areas.

  9. Landscape correlates along mourning dove call-count routes in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elmore, R.D.; Vilella, F.J.; Gerard, P.D.

    2007-01-01

    Mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) call-count surveys in Mississippi, USA, suggest declining populations. We used available mourning dove call-count data to evaluate long-term mourning dove habitat relationships. Dove routes were located in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, Deep Loess Province, Mid Coastal Plain, and Hilly Coastal Plain physiographic provinces of Mississippi. We also included routes in the Blackbelt Prairie region of Mississippi and Alabama, USA. We characterized landscape structure and composition within 1.64-km buffers around 10 selected mourning dove call-count routes during 3 time periods. Habitat classes included agriculture, forest, urban, regeneration stands, wetland, and woodlot. We used Akaike's Information Criterion to select the best candidate model. We selected a model containing percent agriculture and edge density that contained approximately 40% of the total variability in the data set. Percent agriculture was positively correlated with relative dove abundance. Interestingly, we found a negative relationship between edge density and dove abundance. Researchers should conduct future research on dove nesting patterns in Mississippi and threshold levels of edge necessary to maximize dove density. During the last 20 years, Mississippi lost more than 800,000 ha of cropland while forest cover represented largely by pine (Pinus taeda) plantations increased by more than 364,000 ha. Our results suggest observed localized declines in mourning dove abundance in Mississippi may be related to the documented conversion of agricultural lands to pine plantations.

  10. Mourning dove nesting: seasonal patterns and effects of September hunting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, Paul H.; Dolton, David D.; Field, Rebecca; Coon, Richard A.; Percival, H. Franklin; Hayne, Don W.; Soileau, Lawrence D.; George, Ronnie R.; Dunks, James H.; Bunnell, S. Dwight

    1987-01-01

    A nationwide State-Federal cooperative study was initiated in 1978 to examine effects of September hunting on nesting mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). This study was designed to (1) determine the proportion of the annual total of dove nesting activity and production that occurs in September and October, and (2) determine if survival rates of mourning dove eggs and nestlings are lower in zones where early September dove hunting is permitted than in zones where it is prohibited. During 1979 and 1980, 6,950 active nests were monitored to obtain data on nesting patterns. Nest initiation was estimated using two measurements, backdating from hatch dates and counting numbers of nests found for the first time. The nationwide percentage of the annual total of nests that were initiated in September and October was 1.0% based on backdating from hatch dates and 2.7% based on nests found for the first time. Nesting activity was measured by numbers of eggs and nestlings present in weekly counts. Nationally, 4.5% of the annual nesting activity occurred in September and October. The activity of 80% of the observed nests was within the period of 22 April to 4 September. The measure of production used in this study was numbers of young fledged. Nationally, 10.3% of all observed fledging occurred in September and October. Because a decline in nests found in the latter half of the nesting season preceded the 1 September start of hunting, we concluded that the reduction in nesting activity at the end of the season is a natural phenomenon and is not caused by hunting disturbance. In a separate part of this study, we estimated survival rates in adjacent hunted and nonhunted zones from data on 668 nests. The estimated daily survival rates for individual eggs and nestlings were 95.8% in the nonhunted and 95.0% in the hunted zones; the corresponding fledging rates were 33 and 26%, respectively. The fledging rates are lower because they are the daily survival rates operating over a 26-day

  11. Mourning Dove Nesting: Seasonal Patterns and Effects of September Hunting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.; Dolton, D.D.; Coon, R.A.; Percival, H.F.; Field, R.; Hayne, D.W.; Soileau, L.D.; George, R.R.; Dunks, J.H.; Bunnell, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    A nationwide State/Federal cooperative study was initiated in 1978 to examine effects of September hunting on mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) nesting. This study was designed to (1) determine the proportion of the annual total of dove nesting activity and production that occurs in September and October, and (2) determine if survival rates of mourning dove eggs and nestlings are lower in areas where early September dove hunting is permitted compared to areas where it is prohibited. During 1979 and 1980, 6,950 active nests were followed to obtain data on nesting patterns. Nest initiation was estimated both by backdating from hatch dates and by the numbers of nests found for the first time. The nationwide percent of the annual total of nests that were initiated in September and October was 1.0% based on backdating hatch dates and 2.7% based on nests found for the first time. Nesting activity was measured by numbers of eggs and nestlings present in weekly counts. Nationally, 4.5% of the annual total of nesting activity occurred in September and October. The observed period when 80% of the nests were active, based on hatch dates, lasted from April 22 to September 4. The measure of production used in this study was numbers of young fledged. Nationally, 10.3% of all observed fledging occurred in September and October. A decline in nests found in the latter half of the nesting season preceded the September 1 start of hunting. From this we concluded that the reduction in nesting activity at the end of the season is a natural phenomenon and not caused by hunting disturbance. In a separate part of this study, we estimated survival rates in hunted and nonhunted sections from data on 668 nests. The estimated daily survival rates for individual eggs and nestlings were 95.8% in the nonhunted and 95.0% in the hunted sections; the corresponding fledging rates were 33% and 26%, respectively. The fledging rates are lower because they are the daily survival rates operating over a 26

  12. Unretrieved shooting loss of mourning doves in north-central South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Unretrieved loss for mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) in north-central South Carolina was between 27 and 41 percent of the retrieved kill for the 1973 through 1975 hunting seasons based on 1,396 doves shot by 281 hunters. Dove hunters hunted in groups, fired 8.6 shots per retrieved dove, and engaged in a substantial number of illegal activities. Increased dove populations and hunter bag resulted in increased unretrieved loss, numbers of shots per bagged bird, and illegal activities. Retriever dogs increased the efficiency of dove hunters.

  13. Distribution and migration of races of the mourning dove

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldrich, J.W.; Duvall, A.J.

    1958-01-01

    The Mourning Dove is a widespread species breeding in the non-boreal regions of North and Middle America and from the West Indies south to Panama. It is hunted extensively in many sections of the United States and in some sections of Canada, the West Indies, and Mexico....The trends in geographic variation of Mourning Doves are from dark coloration in the east to pale coloration in the west and from shorter wing length in tropical areas to longer in the temperate region. More rusty underparts are associated with birds of the West Indies, and extremely saturated coloration and relatively large bills and feet have been developed by the population on Clarion Island off the western coast of Mexico. The combinations of geographic variation result in the recognition of five geographic races, two of which breed on the mainland of North America. The race carolinensis of eastern United States can be distinguished from the western race, marginella, by the color of the wings alone, which makes possible the recognition of these racial components from the wings of doves taken from hunters? bags.....Taking Ridgway?s account in ?Birds of North and Middle America? as a basis, discrepancies in the descriptions of sex and racial characters are pointed out. Two races recognized by Ridgway and one suggested as possibly distinct were not substantiated. The occurrence of dark and pale types among the West Indian populations are considered of possible racial significance, but sufficient breeding material is lacking to study the problem satisfactorily.....The allocation of type specimens and names to the various recognizable races which appears in the most recent literature is considered satisfactory. The ecological boundaries between tropical and temperate life zones and between the western grasslands and eastern deciduous forest zones, generally speaking, separate distinct races from each other.....There is an extensive postbreeding wandering of birds in all directions, particularly

  14. Resistance of Benghal Dayflower (Commelina benghalensis) Seeds to Harsh Environments and the Implications for Dispersal by Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura) in Georgia, U.S.A.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential dispersal of Benghal dayflower seeds by mourning doves was studied in southern Georgia, U.S.A. The gut contents (both crop and gizzard) of mourning doves harvested in the autumn months were investigated to determine if mourning doves fed on Benghal dayflower and whether seeds can surv...

  15. 50 CFR 20.103 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for mourning and white-winged doves and wild pigeons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Register citations affecting annual regulatory schedules for this section, see the List of CFR Sections... mourning and white-winged doves and wild pigeons. 20.103 Section 20.103 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED... shooting hours for mourning and white-winged doves and wild pigeons. This section provides for the...

  16. 50 CFR 20.103 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for mourning and white-winged doves and wild pigeons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Register citations affecting annual regulatory schedules for this section, see the List of CFR Sections... mourning and white-winged doves and wild pigeons. 20.103 Section 20.103 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED... shooting hours for mourning and white-winged doves and wild pigeons. This section provides for the...

  17. Changes in land use as a possible factor in Mourning Dove population decline in Central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostrand, W.D.; Meyers, P.M.; Bissonette, J.A.; Conover, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) population indices for the western United States have declined significantly since 1966. Based on data collected in 1951-1952, in Fillmore, Utah, we examined whether there had been a local decline in the dove population index since the original data were collected. We then determined whether habitat had been altered, identified which foraging habitats doves preferred, and assessed whether changes in land use could be responsible, in part, for a decline in the local population index. We found that dove population indices declined 72% and 82% from 1952-1992 and 1952-1993, respectively. The most dramatic change in habitat was an 82% decline in land devoted to dry land winter wheat production and a decline in livestock feed pens. Doves foraged primarily in harvested wheat fields, feed pens, and weedy patches. We hypothesize that a decrease in wheat availability during the spring and the consolidation of the livestock industry have contributed to a population decline of Mourning Doves in central Utah.

  18. Evaluating call-count procedures for measuring local mourning dove populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armbruster, M.J.; Baskett, T.S.; Goforth, W.R.; Sadler, K.C.

    1978-01-01

    Seventy-nine mourning dove call-count runs were made on a 32-km route in Osage County, Missouri, May 1-August 31, 1971 and 1972. Circular study areas, each 61 ha, surrounding stop numbers 4 and 5, were delineated for intensive nest searches and population estimates. Tallies of cooing male doves along the entire call-count route were quite variable in repeated runs, fluctuating as much as 50 percent on consecutive days. There were no consistent relationships between numbers of cooing males tallied at stops 4 and 5 and the numbers of current nests or doves estimated to be present in the surrounding study areas. We doubt the suitability of call-count procedures to estimate precisely the densities of breeding pairs, nests or production of doves on small areas. Our findings do not dispute the usefulness of the national call-count survey as an index to relative densities of mourning doves during the breeding season over large portions of the United States, or as an index to annual population trends.

  19. Functional morphology and seed anatomy of the invasive weed, benghal dayflower (Commelina benghalensis): Implications for dispersal by mourning doves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Benghal dayflower (BD) is an exotic weed that reduces yields in many agricultural crops. Potential dispersal of this weed by migratory Mourning doves was investigated in this study. Evidence shows that doves feed on BD seeds, with some birds containing hundreds of seeds. Seeds extracted from harvest...

  20. Mourning dove hunting regulation strategy based on annual harvest statistics and banding data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otis, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Although managers should strive to base game bird harvest management strategies on mechanistic population models, monitoring programs required to build and continuously update these models may not be in place. Alternatively, If estimates of total harvest and harvest rates are available, then population estimates derived from these harvest data can serve as the basis for making hunting regulation decisions based on population growth rates derived from these estimates. I present a statistically rigorous approach for regulation decision-making using a hypothesis-testing framework and an assumed framework of 3 hunting regulation alternatives. I illustrate and evaluate the technique with historical data on the mid-continent mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) population. I evaluate the statistical properties of the hypothesis-testing framework using the best available data on mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). I use these results to discuss practical implementation of the technique as an interim harvest strategy for mourning doves until reliable mechanistic population models and associated monitoring programs are developed.

  1. A comparison of the nesting success of mourning doves and American robins in conventionally managed and organic orchards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fluetsch, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study was undertaken to document more closely the effects of operational pesticide use on non-target avian species. Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) and American Robin (Turdus migratorius) nesting activity was monitored in three organic and three conventional orchards during two breeding seasons. Surveys were conducted to characterize the avian community within orchards under both management practices. Organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate pesticides, known to be extremely toxic to birds, were repeatedly sprayed during the peaks in dove and robin breeding activity. Spray card tests revealed that OP pesticides were deposited on 85.5% of the nests tested during routine spray operations. The threat of direct pesticide exposure to eggs, nestlings, and adult birds was considerable. Nest daily survival rates (DSRs) for both doves and robins, were significantly higher in the organic orchards than in the conventional orchards in 1991 and years combined (P < 0.05). Species diversity was significantly greater in the organic orchards (H = 2.43) than in the conventional orchards (H = 1.79). Results suggest that repeated applications of pesticides, within the conventional orchards, directly or indirectly, affected the reproductive success of doves and robins, as well as influenced species diversity within the treated orchards. Organic orchards appear to provide more favorable nesting and foraging habitat for birds than conventional orchards.

  2. Spent shot availability and ingestion on areas managed for mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, J.H.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Washburn, B.E.; Wester, G.R.; Lanigan, J. T., III; Franson, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) hunting is becoming increasingly popular, especially in managed shooting fields. Given the possible increase in the availability of lead (Pb) shot on these areas, our objective was to estimate availability and ingestion of spent shot at the Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area (EBCA, hunted with nontoxic shot) and the James A. Reed Memorial Wildlife Area (JARWA, hunted with Pb shot) in Missouri. During 1998, we collected soil samples one or 2 weeks prior to the hunting season (prehunt) and after 4 days of dove hunting (posthunt). We also collected information on number of doves harvested, number of shots fired, shotgun gauge, and shotshell size used. Dove carcasses were collected on both areas during 1998-99. At EBCA, 60 hunters deposited an estimated 64,775 pellets/ha of nontoxic shot on or around the managed field. At JARWA, approximately 1,086,275 pellets/ha of Pb shot were deposited by 728 hunters. Our posthunt estimates of spent-shot availability from soil sampling were 0 pellets/ha for EBCA and 6,342 pellets/ha for JARWA. Our findings suggest that existing soil sampling protocols may not provide accurate estimates of spent-shot availability in managed dove shooting fields. During 1998-99, 15 of 310 (4.8%) mourning doves collected from EBCA had ingested nontoxic shot. Of those doves, 6 (40.0%) contained a?Y7 shot pellets. In comparison, only 2 of 574 (0.3%) doves collected from JARWA had ingested Pb shot. Because a greater proportion of doves ingested multiple steel pellets compared to Pb pellets, we suggest that doves feeding in fields hunted with Pb shot may succumb to acute Pb toxicosis and thus become unavailable to harvest, resulting in an underestimate of ingestion rates. Although further research is needed to test this hypothesis, our findings may partially explain why previous studies have shown few doves with ingested Pb shot despite their feeding on areas with high Pb shot availability.

  3. Mourning dove population trend estimates from Call-Count and North American Breeding Bird Surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, J.R.; Dolton, D.D.; Droege, S.

    1994-01-01

    The mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) Callcount Survey and the North American Breeding Bird Survey provide information on population trends of mourning doves throughout the continental United States. Because surveys are an integral part of the development of hunting regulations, a need exists to determine which survey provides precise information. We estimated population trends from 1966 to 1988 by state and dove management unit, and assessed the relative efficiency of each survey. Estimates of population trend differ (P lt 0.05) between surveys in 11 of 48 states; 9 of 11 states with divergent results occur in the Eastern Management Unit. Differences were probably a consequence of smaller sample sizes in the Callcount Survey. The Breeding Bird Survey generally provided trend estimates with smaller variances than did the Callcount Survey. Although the Callcount Survey probably provides more withinroute accuracy because of survey methods and timing, the Breeding Bird Survey has a larger sample size of survey routes and greater consistency of coverage in the Eastern Unit.

  4. Individual variation in baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels predicts parental effort by nesting mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Vleck, Carol M.; Otis, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine systems have an important mechanistic role in structuring life-history trade-offs. During breeding, individual variation in prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone (CORT) levels affects behavioral and physiological processes that drive trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance. We examined patterns in baseline (BL) and stress induced (SI; level following a standard capture-restraint protocol) levels of PRL and CORT for breeding mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). We determined whether the relationship of adult condition and parental effort to hormone levels in wild birds was consistent with life-history predictions. Both BL PRL and BL CORT level in adults were positively related to nestling weight at early nestling ages, consistent with the prediction of a positive relationship of hormone levels to current parental effort of adults and associated increased energy demand. Results are consistent with the two hormones acting together at baseline levels to limit negative effects of CORT on reproduction while maintaining beneficial effects such as increased foraging for nestling feeding. Our data did not support predictions that SI responses would vary in response to nestling or adult condition. The magnitude of CORT response in the parents to our capture-restraint protocol was negatively correlated with subsequent parental effort. Average nestling weights for adults with the highest SI CORT response were on average 10–15% lighter than expected for their age in follow-up visits after the stress event. Our results demonstrated a relationship between individual hormone levels and within population variation in parental effort and suggested that hormonal control plays an important role in structuring reproductive decisions for mourning doves.

  5. Individual variation in baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels predicts parental effort by nesting mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Vleck, Carol M.; Otis, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine systems have an important mechanistic role in structuring life-history trade-offs. During breeding, individual variation in prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone (CORT) levels affects behavioral and physiological processes that drive trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance. We examined patterns in baseline (BL) and stress induced (SI; level following a standard capture-restraint protocol) levels of PRL and CORT for breeding mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). We determined whether the relationship of adult condition and parental effort to hormone levels in wild birds was consistent with life-history predictions. Both BL PRL and BL CORT level in adults were positively related to nestling weight at early nestling ages, consistent with the prediction of a positive relationship of hormone levels to current parental effort of adults and associated increased energy demand. Results are consistent with the two hormones acting together at baseline levels to limit negative effects of CORT on reproduction while maintaining beneficial effects such as increased foraging for nestling feeding. Our data did not support predictions that SI responses would vary in response to nestling or adult condition. The magnitude of CORT response in the parents to our capture-restraint protocol was negatively correlated with subsequent parental effort. Average nestling weights for adults with the highest SI CORT response were on average 10–15% lighter than expected for their age in follow-up visits after the stress event. Our results demonstrated a relationship between individual hormone levels and within population variation in parental effort and suggested that hormonal control plays an important role in structuring reproductive decisions for mourning doves.

  6. Individual variation in baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels predicts parental effort by nesting mourning doves.

    PubMed

    Miller, David A; Vleck, Carol M; Otis, David L

    2009-10-01

    Endocrine systems have an important mechanistic role in structuring life-history trade-offs. During breeding, individual variation in prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone (CORT) levels affects behavioral and physiological processes that drive trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance. We examined patterns in baseline (BL) and stress induced (SI; level following a standard capture-restraint protocol) levels of PRL and CORT for breeding mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). We determined whether the relationship of adult condition and parental effort to hormone levels in wild birds was consistent with life-history predictions. Both BL PRL and BL CORT level in adults were positively related to nestling weight at early nestling ages, consistent with the prediction of a positive relationship of hormone levels to current parental effort of adults and associated increased energy demand. Results are consistent with the two hormones acting together at baseline levels to limit negative effects of CORT on reproduction while maintaining beneficial effects such as increased foraging for nestling feeding. Our data did not support predictions that SI responses would vary in response to nestling or adult condition. The magnitude of CORT response in the parents to our capture-restraint protocol was negatively correlated with subsequent parental effort. Average nestling weights for adults with the highest SI CORT response were on average 10-15% lighter than expected for their age in follow-up visits after the stress event. Our results demonstrated a relationship between individual hormone levels and within population variation in parental effort and suggested that hormonal control plays an important role in structuring reproductive decisions for mourning doves. PMID:19682449

  7. Investigations of methods of determining abundance of breeding mourning doves in certain eastern states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duvall, A.J.; Robbins, C.S.

    1952-01-01

    A call count over a 20 mile route (beginning 1/2 hour before local official sunrise and with 20 stops of 3 minutes duration 1 mile apart) gives a more practical index to the abundance of mourning doves in the breeding season than roadside counts and area population studies tried in 1950. Calling activities showed relatively high peaks and low depressions during April and May of 1951, with a plateau in June; a decline in calling was noted after July 3, and continued until September 11, when activity apparently ceased. Although there seems to be a direct correlation between the total number of doves heard and the total number of calls recorded, available evidence indicates that the breeding index should still be based on the number of doves heard. In general, more doves were heard calling than were seen up to about mid-July, 1951, after which time doves became conspicuous and relatively few were heard; and there was an increase in doves seen from July through September with a noticeable decline in October in cental Maryland. Very little difference was noted between morning and evening roadside counts from the end of July through October, although one route indicated that morning was more favorable. Our data probably are too meager to determine if any significant difference exists. A statistical analysis of calling counts covering the period from May 15-June 26, 1951 indicates that with 3 routes, 12 trips per route must be made in order to reflect a 15 percent change. Calling counts should begin in this area (central Maryland and northeastern Virginia) no later than May 15, and the counts must be completed by the end of the third week in June to conform to the present schedule of formulating hunting regulations.

  8. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyls on mourning dove reproduction and circulating progesterone levels

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, P.J.; Peterle, T.J.; Harder, J.D.

    1987-10-01

    PCBs acquired in sublethal doses increase activation of the liver's microsomal action and hepatic mixed function oxidase (MFO) enzymes. Physiological effects of increase in the MFO system may delay, if not eliminate, avian reproductive behavior and nesting success. No evidence is yet available to clearly link PCBs to lowered levels of circulating steroids in birds. However, data concerning the effects of PCBs on avian reproduction are abundant. Increased degradation of circulating steroids might alter essential hormone dynamics associated with nesting behavior and ovulation. Alternatively, normal feedback regulation by the pituitary-gonadal axis might lead to a full compensatory response to increased MFO such that hormone profiles remain unaltered, suggesting alternative modes of action for PCBs in reproductive disorders. Therefore, the authors investigated the effect of dietary PCBs on circulating progesterone levels prior to and during egg laying in wild-trapped mourning doves (Zenaida macroura).

  9. Mourning dove ( Zenaida macroura) wing-whistles may contain threat-related information for con- and hetero-specifics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Seth W.

    2008-10-01

    Distinct acoustic whistles are associated with the wing-beats of many doves, and are especially noticeable when doves ascend from the ground when startled. I thus hypothesized that these sounds may be used by flock-mates as cues of potential danger. To test this hypothesis, I compared the responses of mourning doves ( Zenaida macroura), northern cardinals ( Cardinalis cardinalis), and house sparrows ( Passer domesticus) to audio playbacks of dove ‘startle wing-whistles’, cardinal alarm calls, dove ‘nonstartle wing-whistles’, and sparrow ‘social chatter’. Following playbacks of startle wing-whistles and alarm calls, conspecifics and heterospecifics startled and increased vigilance more than after playbacks of other sounds. Also, the latency to return to feeding was greater following playbacks of startle wing-whistles and alarm calls than following playbacks of other sounds. These results suggest that both conspecifics and heterospecifics may attend to dove wing-whistles in decisions related to antipredator behaviors. Whether the sounds of dove wing-whistles are intentionally produced signals warrants further testing.

  10. Mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) wing-whistles may contain threat-related information for con- and hetero-specifics.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Seth W

    2008-10-01

    Distinct acoustic whistles are associated with the wing-beats of many doves, and are especially noticeable when doves ascend from the ground when startled. I thus hypothesized that these sounds may be used by flock-mates as cues of potential danger. To test this hypothesis, I compared the responses of mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) to audio playbacks of dove 'startle wing-whistles', cardinal alarm calls, dove 'nonstartle wing-whistles', and sparrow 'social chatter'. Following playbacks of startle wing-whistles and alarm calls, conspecifics and heterospecifics startled and increased vigilance more than after playbacks of other sounds. Also, the latency to return to feeding was greater following playbacks of startle wing-whistles and alarm calls than following playbacks of other sounds. These results suggest that both conspecifics and heterospecifics may attend to dove wing-whistles in decisions related to antipredator behaviors. Whether the sounds of dove wing-whistles are intentionally produced signals warrants further testing. PMID:18551267

  11. Organochlorine insecticide residues and PCBs in tissues of woodcock, mourning doves, and robins from east-central, Illinois, 1978-79

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.R.; Duzan, R.E.; Siemers, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    Reported here are levels in ppm of heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, dieldrin, p,p'-DDE (DDE), and PCB residues assayed in muscle, heart, liver, brain, and fatty tissues of woodcock (Philohelo minor), mourning doves (Zenaidura macroura), and robins (Turdus migratorium) from east-central Illinois in 1978 and 1979.

  12. Intestinal Helminths in Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura) from Arizona, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Tennessee, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, K.A.; Franson, J.C.; Kinsella, J.M.; Hollmen, T.; Hansen, S.P.; Hollmen, A.

    2004-01-01

    We examined 115 hunter-killed mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) from 4 states (Arizona, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Tennessee, U.S.A.) in 1998 and 1999 to investigate geographical variation in the prevalence and intensity of intestinal helminth infections. Four intestinal helminth species were identified: Killigrewia delafondi, Ornithostrongylus crami, Ascaridia columbae, and Capillaria obsignata. The number of worms (all helminth species combined) per infected bird ranged from 1 to 166 (mean ± SE = 12.7 ± 7.45, median = 2.0). Filarids. Aproctella stoddardi, were found in 2 birds but were probably adhering to the outside of the intestine. Overall, 18% of the doves were infected with 1 or more species of helminths. The percentage of doves infected with at least 1 helminth species varied from 4% in Arizona to 27% in South Carolina. Mixed infections occurred in only 3 individuals (14% of infected birds). We found no significant differences in prevalence of infection among any of the 4 helminths by host age or sex, and prevalences were too low to test for differences among states. The intensity of O. crami was higher in males than in females but did not differ significantly among states. Intensities of the other 3 helminths did not differ by sex or state, and we found no differences in helminth intensity by age. Intestinal length was significantly greater in infected than in uninfected birds.

  13. Loving your child to death: Considerations of the care of chronically ill children and euthanasia in Emil Sher’s Mourning Dove

    PubMed Central

    Mukhida, Karim

    2007-01-01

    How do parents cope when their child is ill or dying, and when he or she is experiencing constant pain or suffering? What do parents think of the contributions that medical professionals make to the care of their chronically or terminally ill child? Is it possible for a parent to love a child so much that they wish their child to be dead? The purpose of the present paper is to explore these questions and aspects of the care of chronically or terminally ill children using Mourning Dove’s portrayal of one family’s attempt to care for their ill daughter. Mourning Dove, a play written by Canadian playwright Emil Sher, was inspired by the case of Saskatchewan wheat farmer Robert Latimer who killed his 12-year-old daughter, Tracy, who suffered with cerebral palsy and had begun to experience tremendous pain. Rather than focusing on the medical or legal aspects of the care of a chronically ill child, the play offers a glimpse into how a family copes with the care of such a child and the effect the child’s illness has on the family. The reading and examination of nonmedical literature, such as Mourning Dove, serves as a useful means for medical professionals to better understand how illness affects and is responded to by patients and their families. This understanding is a prerequisite for them to be able to provide complete care of children with chronic or terminal illnesses and their families. PMID:19043501

  14. Naturally high plasma glucose levels in mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) do not lead to high levels of reactive oxygen species in the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christina L; Toomey, Matthew; Walker, Benjimen R; Braun, Eldon J; Wolf, Blair O; McGraw, Kevin; Sweazea, Karen L

    2011-06-01

    Plasma glucose (P(Glu)) concentrations in birds are 1.5-2 times higher than those of mammals of similar body mass. In mammals, sustained elevations of P(Glu) lead to oxidative stress and free radical-mediated scavenging of endogenous vasodilators (e.g., nitric oxide), contributing to elevated blood pressure. Despite the relatively high P(Glu) levels in birds, they appear resistant to the development of oxidative stress in tissues such as the heart, brain and kidneys. To our knowledge no information exists on oxidative stress susceptibility in the resistance vasculature of birds. Therefore, we compared endogenous antioxidant mechanisms in the resistance vasculature of mourning doves (MODO; Zenaida macroura) and rats (Rattus norvegicus). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed with the fluorescent indicator 7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester in mesenteric arteries from rats and wild-caught MODO. Despite having significantly higher P(Glu) than rats, there were no significant differences in ROS levels between mesenteric arteries from rats or doves. Although superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were lower in the plasma, total antioxidant capacity, uric acid, vitamin E (α-tocopherol), and carotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin) were significantly higher in MODO than in rats. Thus, compared to rats, MODO have multiple circulating antioxidants that may prevent the development of oxidative stress in the vasculature. PMID:21600747

  15. The characteristics and experiences of anticipatory mourning in caregivers of teenagers and young adults.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Rachel; Davies, Kerry; Lavender, Verna

    2015-11-01

    This article reports a systematic review of literature undertaken to identify characteristics and experiences of anticipatory mourning in caregivers of teenagers and young adults with life-limiting or life-threatening conditions. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using the key words 'anticipatory', 'mourning', 'grief', and synonyms. This review focused on six studies that met inclusion criteria and reported characteristics of anticipatory mourning in caregivers of teenagers and young adults. Characteristics and experiences were sorted into four main themes: symptoms; a sense of loss; caregiver behaviour; and the unique experience of caring for, or losing, a teenager or young adult. The review suggests that there are characteristics and experiences of anticipatory mourning that are unique to caregivers of this age group. The review also suggests that consideration of anticipatory mourning is important in offering holistic care to young adults and their caregivers, and points to the need for further research in this area. PMID:26619236

  16. BLOOD GAS, LACTATE, AND HEMATOLOGY EFFECTS OF VENIPUNCTURE TIMING AND LOCATION AFTER MIST-NET CAPTURE OF MOURNING DOVES (ZENAIDA MACROURA), BOAT-TAILED GRACKLES (QUISCALUS MAJOR), AND HOUSE SPARROWS (PASSER DOMESTICUS).

    PubMed

    Harms, Craig A; Jinks, Maggie R; Harms, Ronald V

    2016-04-01

    Venous blood gas partial pressures, pH, bicarbonate and lactate concentrations, packed cell volume, white blood cell differential counts, and heterophil/lymphocyte ratios were measured from Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura), Boat-tailed Grackles (Quiscalus major), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus). Birds were bled promptly after mist-net capture and banding or following a targeted delay of 45-60 min, in order to assess the impacts of a brief holding period commonly practiced in large-scale bird banding operations. Additionally, effects of venipuncture location (basilic [=ulnar] vein versus jugular vein) were evaluated in male Boat-tailed Grackles sampled promptly after capture and banding. All comparisons were with unpaired samples; no birds were subjected to more than one venipuncture. All three species exhibited moderate improvements in blood gas and acid-base status after the delay, with reductions in lactate concentrations with or without concurrent increases in pH and bicarbonate. Boat-tailed Grackles exhibited an increased proportion of heterophils in the differential white blood cell count following a delay in sampling, suggestive of a stress leukogram. There were no significant differences between basilic and jugular venipuncture results from male Boat-tailed Grackles. Most metabolic, respiratory, and acid-base alterations were minor, but a small number of birds exhibited values (e.g., temperature-corrected pH <7.3, lactate >10 mmol/L) that could be of concern if combined with other adverse conditions. For such birds, a short delay between capture and processing could benefit their blood gas and acid-base status, although loss of time foraging or feeding young and greater activation of the hypophyseal-pituitary-adrenal axis are additional considerations. PMID:26845300

  17. Newborn GnRH neurons in the adult forebrain of the ring dove.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mei-Fang; Alexander, Katherine; Zhou, Shiliang; Bonder, Edward; Chuang, Ling-Shiang

    2011-06-01

    The preoptic area of the hypothalamus is a key area that produces gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In birds, the chicken GnRH-I-form neurons are responsible for the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal system, which controls reproduction. In the ring dove, electrolytic lesion in the adult hypothalamus induces neurogenesis. In this study, we determined whether adult neurogenesis is involved in repairing GnRH neurons, specifically by generating newborn cells exhibiting GnRH-I immunoreactive properties. We selectively applied electrolytic lesions to three different regions of the diencephalon, including the preoptic area, which contains GnRH-I neurons, and identified new cells (BrdU-positive cells) that co-labeled with GnRH-I-immunoreactive cells. The BrdU(+)/GnRH(+) double labeled cells were then confirmed with confocal laser analysis. In brains of both male and female ring doves we found new neurons at the lesion site of the preoptic region that were GnRH-I immunoreactive. However, the total number of GnRH neurons in the lesioned brains was less than that of sham-lesioned brains. When two other regions of the diencephalon that contain GnRH-I neurons were damaged, no recruitment of new GnRH-I neurons was detected. The rate of neurogenesis depends on the bird's reproductive phase when the lesion was applied. We found BrdU(+)/GnRH(+) double-labeled cells almost exclusively during the pre-laying phase when birds are engaged in active courtship that leads to egg laying. Our observations suggest that recruitment of GnRH immunoreactive new neurons is restricted to the hypothalamic region and is sensitive to the reproductive stage of the birds. PMID:21443878

  18. Mourning into Dancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Mary C.

    1990-01-01

    Asserts that unacknowledged grief has created a pernicious, low-grade depression in many North Americans, and that mourning has become a metaphor for the educational work that needs to be done. States that race relations, educational hierarchies, neighborhoods, and subway rides are all made by humans, and that mourning allows a more hopeful…

  19. DO MOURNING DOVES DISPERSE SEED OF TROPICAL SPDIERWORT?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Federal Noxious Weed tropical spiderwort (Commelina benghalensis L.) (TSW) was virtually unknown as an agricultural pest in the southeastern United States five years ago. Recently, TSW has rapidly dispersed throughout much of southern Georgia where it now adversely affects peanuts, cotton and o...

  20. Diversity and phylogenetic relationships of hemosporidian parasites in birds of Socorro Island, México, and their role in the re-introduction of the Socorro dove (Zenaida graysoni).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jenny S; Martínez-Gómez, Juan E; Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Loiseau, Claire; Bell, Douglas A; Sehgal, Ravinder N M

    2013-04-01

    The Socorro dove Zenaida graysoni , endemic to Socorro Island, was last reported in the wild in 1972. Fortunately, the species has been propagated in zoos in Europe and the United States, and plans are under way to re-introduce it to its native habitat. This will be the first known attempt to return a bird species extinct in the wild to its ancestral island. In order to assess the disease threats the Socorro dove may face, the avifauna of Socorro Island, with a specific focus on Socorro ground doves Columbina passerina socorroensis and mourning doves Zenaida macroura , as well as Socorro doves in captivity, were screened for blood parasites of the genera Plasmodium , Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, and Trypanosoma spp. We found Haemoproteus spp. in 17 (74%) of 23 Socorro ground doves, 23 (92%) of 25 mourning doves, and 3 (14%) of 21 northern mockingbirds; none of the other bird species showed infections. Here, we report the phylogenetic analysis of 19 distinct lineages of Haemoproteus spp. detected in birds of Socorro Island and compare their evolutionary relationships to parasites detected in the avifauna of the Galápagos Islands, continental Latin America, and Europe. Microscopic examination revealed 1 mourning dove infected with Plasmodium ( Haemamoeba ), thus underscoring the importance of using both PCR and microscopy when analyzing avian blood samples for hemosporidian parasites. The study confirms that the Socorro dove will most likely be exposed to Haemoproteus spp. that currently infect mourning doves and Socorro ground doves of Socorro Island. A monitoring program for both birds and vectors should be implemented to establish the prevalence of Plasmodium sp. and as a necessary conservation measure for critically endangered birds on the island. PMID:23043349

  1. [New perspectives of mourning].

    PubMed

    Csikós, Ágnes; Menyhért, Mónika; Radványi, Ildikó; Busa, Csilla

    2015-09-27

    Grief is a natural part of life and it is always individual. Researchers have tried and still try to develop different theories to interpret, explain, and approach this particular phenomenon. The aim of the authors was to review the theoretical literature of mourning and to present new bereavement theories for domestic professionals. From the first half of the 20th century until presently mourning theories have undergone significant changes. Today the determinant models includes the flexible, coping-oriented dual process model, meaning reconstruction model which focuses on the meaning making, and the model which focuses on the development after the loss. The authors conclude that experts, who work in the clinical area should know the prevailing theories of grief, because they encounter often with loss at work. The presented models may contribute to more efficient work, to better understanding of the mourning process and to a better support of families. PMID:26550914

  2. Miss Dove Rediviva.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that a way out of the current malaise of American education may be to locate educational excellence in accessible American fiction. Discusses Frances Gray Patton's "Good Morning, Miss Dove," in which the central character is an elementary school geography teacher. (RS)

  3. Unresolved mourning, supernatural beliefs and dissociation: a mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Paula; Jaque, S Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Unresolved mourning is marked by disorganized behavior and states of mind. In this study, we speculated that pathological dissociation would mediate the effects of unresolved mourning on supernatural beliefs. This hypothesis was determined based on findings that indicate an association between higher levels of dissociation, stronger beliefs in the supernatural and unresolved mourning. We examined two groups of participants, one classified as non-unresolved (non-U) (n = 56) and the other as unresolved (n = 26) (U) with respect to past loss/trauma as measured by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI). Two self-report instruments were administered to measure supernatural beliefs and dissociation. As hypothesized, the multivariate analysis of variance indicated mean differences between the two groups. The unresolved group had greater belief in the supernatural and more pathological dissociative processes. The mediation analysis demonstrated that pathological dissociation fully mediated the effects of unresolved mourning on supernatural beliefs. PMID:24913392

  4. Dove prism heterodyne refractometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Lee, Chia-Yun; Chu, Kuan-Ho; Wu, Tsai-Chen

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we proposed an alternative method, integrating a Dove prism and precision circular heterodyne interferometry, for measuring the refractive index and concentration of sodium chloride and hydrogen peroxide solutions with low phase error. Due to the optical properties of the Dove prism, the test light undergoes total internal reflection (TIR) at the interface between the test sample and the prism. The light beam travels in and out of the Dove prism while maintaining the same direction. Therefore, only slight alignment is required, leading to only small errors in the phase and refractive index. In this study, the phase error, refractive index error, and resolution of the concentration are approximated to be 0.003°, 2×10-5, and 1×10-3 M, respectively. The proposed method has the advantages of a simple optical configuration, ease of operation, little alignment required, and high stability, and it allows for high-precision measurement of the refractive index and concentration of the liquid sample.

  5. Facilitation of Mourning During Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert; And Others

    This paper discusses case studies of children psychologically disturbed by the death of parents or siblings. Illustrations of mourning facilitation were mainly gathered from 16 orphaned children, ages 3-14. Some techniques used in helping children mourn include: discussing physical details of the illness, discussing previous deaths of animals and…

  6. Ecology and behavior of the zenaida dove

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Data are summarized from a 10 year study of the Zenaida Dove (Zenaida aurita) in Puerto Rico and its offshore islands. The dove displays sexual size dimorphism, with males generally larger than females: Most activities (feeding, courtship, fighting) occurred in mornings and afternoons, whereas loafing and maintenance activities were more prevalent at mid-day. I recorded 77 plant species used as food by Zenaida Doves in Puerto Rico. Major food species uncluded Scleria lithosperma, Argemone mexicana, Croton rigidus, Phyllanthus amarus, Cordia angustifolia, Zanthoxylum martinicense, Euphorbia heterophylla, and several species of legumes. Zenaida Doves have two major vocalizations: the 'Coo', or Advertisement Call, given in assertive and sexual contexts, and the Nest Call, primarily used at or near the nest. Doves nested in a wide variety of habitats, including forest edge, mangrove forest, dry scrub, and mixed agriculture-urban areas. Nests were generally placed in trees, but doves nested on the ground where certain terrestrial predators were absent. Nests were found in all months of the year, although a breeding peak occurred from March through Mayor July. Doves replaced clutches when nests were destroyed, and recycled up to four times in a season. Males selected nest sites and initiated building. Eggs (2) were laid on alternate days, beginning about two days after the nest was completed. Incubation and nestling stages averaged 13.9 :t 0.5 [SE] and 14.3 :t 0.6 days. The male attended the nest from mid-morning (X = 08:59 hr) through mid-afternoon (x = 16:53), then the female took over incubation and brooding duties for the night. Nests were continuously covered from the laying of the first egg through day seven of the nestling stage. Thereafter, adult attendance dropped steadily until day 14, when they carne to the nest only for chick feedings. Chicks (days 0-15) showed a mean daily weight gain of 18.3% and attained a fledging weight of about 120g (81% of adult weight

  7. Avian thermoregulation in the heat: resting metabolism, evaporative cooling and heat tolerance in Sonoran Desert doves and quail.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric Krabbe; O'Neill, Jacqueline; Gerson, Alexander R; Wolf, Blair O

    2015-11-01

    Birds in subtropical deserts face significant thermoregulatory challenges because environmental temperatures regularly exceed avian body temperature. To understand the differing susceptibility of desert birds to increasing temperatures, we examined thermoregulatory performance and estimated heat tolerance limits (HTLs) for three Sonoran Desert nesting bird species - Gambel's quail, mourning doves and white-winged doves. Using flow-through respirometry we measured daytime resting metabolism, evaporative water loss and real-time body temperature at air temperatures (T(air)) from 30°C to 66°C. We found marked increases in resting metabolism at the upper critical temperature (T(uc)), which was significantly lower in the quail (T(air)=41.1°C) than in both dove species (T(air)=45.9-46.5°C). Gambel's quail maintained low resting metabolic rates and low rates of evaporative water loss at their T(uc) (0.71 W and 1.20 g H2O h(-1), respectively), but were more sensitive to increasing air temperature, reaching their HTL at T(air) of 52°C. Mourning doves and white-winged doves maintained low resting metabolic rates (0.66 and 0.94 W), but higher rates of evaporative water loss (1.91 and 2.99 g H2O h(-1)) at their T(uc) and reached their HTL at T(air) of 58-60°C. Mass-specific evaporative water loss in white-winged doves (147 g) and mourning doves (104 g) was 45% and 30% greater, respectively, than the rate observed in Gambel's quail (161 g) at Tair of 48°C. Higher rates of evaporation and higher T(uc) made the doves exceptionally heat tolerant, allowing them to maintain body temperatures at least 14°C below air temperatures as high as 60°C (140°F). PMID:26582934

  8. Anticholinesterase exposure of white-winged doves breeding in lower Rio Grande valley, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tacha, T.C.; Schacht, S.J.; George, R.R.; Hill, E.F.

    1994-01-01

    We studied exposure of breeding white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica) to anticholinesterase compounds (organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides) in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV), Texas. Widespread use of organophosphorus pesticides and dove population declines prompted the study. We collected breeding adult doves in May and July 1991 (n = 28) and July 1992 (n = 33) at 6 locations. We used depression of whole-brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity (2 SD below control mean) to detect exposure; values from 4 hand-reared doves fed commercial pigeon chow served as the control. Mean brain ChE activity was lower (P lt 0.027) than the control sample at all 6 locations in 1991; 79% of the birds were diagnostic of exposure ( gt 16.1% ChE depression). Pooled 1992 field samples also were lower (P lt 0.036) than were control samples; doves from 4 of the 6 locations had brain ChE activity below (P lt 0.088) controls. Overall, 39% of 1992 doves were diagnostic of exposure to anticholinesterase compounds. Higher exposure rates in 1991 were probably due to increased use of organophosphorus pesticides. Research is needed documenting effects of sublethal exposure on white-winged dove productivity.

  9. Mourning in the psychoanalytic situation and in Shakespeare's The Tempest.

    PubMed

    Houlding, Sybil

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing that mourning builds psychic structure, the author highlights the ubiquitous and essential nature of mourning in the psychoanalytic situation. Reality testing is intimately connected to mourning and is the warp on which psychic structure is woven in the analytic situation. Reality testing necessarily involves opportunities for mourning and thus will be present in every analytic hour. The confrontation with reality is the basis for all processes of mourning, or for creating defenses against this painful experience. The author views mourning as fundamentally a transformational process, and Shakespeare's The Tempest is used to illustrate this aspect of mourning. PMID:25619364

  10. Communicating about Loss and Mourning: Death Education for Persons with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanok, James; Beifus, Joan Addis

    This paper describes a death education curriculum designed for and field-tested on verbally expressive adults with mental retardation. The Communicating About Loss and Mourning (CALM) curriculum was presented to an experimental group in 8 sessions each lasting 50 minutes. Lectures and group discussions were used to convey information about death…

  11. Mourning the dead, mourning the disappeared: the enigma of the absent-presence.

    PubMed

    Taiana, Cecilia

    2014-12-01

    Freud's interest in the impact of death on the living goes back further than Mourning and Melancholia (1917e, [1915]). In Totem and Taboo (1912-13) Freud noted the ambivalence of the emotions we experience in relation to the dead. In this paper, I focus on Mourning and Melancholia as a landmark in the understanding of both the normal and psychopathological aspects of mourning and depressive processes in human beings. Mourning and Melancholia bridges Freud's first and second topographic theories of the psychic apparatus and constitutes for many authors the foundation of his theory of internal object relations. With this psychoanalytic understanding of mourning as a framework, I discuss 'special mourning processes,' such as the those confronted by psychoanalysts in Argentina when treating the relatives of thousands of people who were 'disappeared' by the military dictatorship in the 1970s; they are 'special' in the sense that the external reality [which] constitutes the starting point of the psychic mourning process, as described by Freud, is absent. I argue that the 'absent-presence' of the body as an enigmatic message initiates a special mourning process that bears certain characteristics of, and is isomorphic to, Laplanche's seduction theory. PMID:25363451

  12. "Women ... Mourn and Men Carry on": African Women Storying Mourning Practices--A South African Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotze, Elmarie; Els, Lishje; Rajuili-Masilo, Ntsiki

    2012-01-01

    African mourning of loss of lives in South Africa has been shaped by discursive practices of both traditional African cultures and the sociopolitical developments under apartheid and in post-apartheid South Africa. This article reports on changes in mourning practices on the basis of a literature review and uses a collection of examples to…

  13. 78 FR 37474 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, Colorado AGENCY: Federal Communications..., allots FM Channel 229C3 as a first local transmission service at Dove Creek, Colorado. Channel 229C3 can be allotted at Dove Creek, consistent with the minimum distance separation requirements of...

  14. 77 FR 75946 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 . Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, CO AGENCY: Federal Communications... 229C3 as a first local service at Dove Creek, Colorado. Channel 229C3 can be allotted at Dove Creek... Sec. 73.202 2. Section 73.202(b), the Table of FM Allotments under Colorado, is amended by adding...

  15. When LVAD Patients Die: The Caregiver's Mourning.

    PubMed

    Rossi Ferrario, Silvia; Omarini, Pierangela; Cerutti, Paola; Balestroni, Giangluigi; Omarini, Giovanna; Pistono, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have progressively evolved, particularly in the last 10 years, to serve patients affected by severe heart failure as a bridge to transplant or destination therapy. The survival rate and quality of life of pre- and postimplant patients, as well as caregivers' perceptions and distress, are under investigation by the scientific community. But what caregivers think and feel after the loss of their loved one has not so far been examined. We contacted 16 principal caregivers of deceased LVAD patients by telephone. They were asked to evaluate their experience with LVADs and were administered a specific questionnaire about their mourning, the Caregiver Mourning Questionnaire (CMQ), to evaluate their perceptions of the physical, emotional, and social support-related problems that they had experienced during the previous 3 months. Positive aspects reported by the caregivers were the patient's overall subjective well-being and increased survival. Negative aspects were the difficulty to manage infections and the driveline, and the incomplete autonomy of the patient. Half of the caregivers reported not being preadvised about many of the problems they would face. The CMQ revealed that numerous caregivers had health problems, difficulty in sleeping, eating disorders, lack of energy, and loneliness. Use of psychotropic drugs and regrets about how they assisted their loved one also emerged. In conclusion, caregivers of LVAD patients may experience complicated mourning. Our data support in particular the need for an early intervention of palliative care which could prevent or reduce complicated mourning. PMID:26527229

  16. Bereavement and Mourning in Pediatric Rehabilitation Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donders, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    Reviews developmental changes in children's acquisition of death concepts and in their emotional reactions. Discusses moderating variables that may affect nature of grieving processes after parental or sibling death. Reviews pragmatic issues regarding bereavement and mourning in children with acquired brain injuries and illustrates issues by means…

  17. After Columbine: How People Mourn Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fast, Jonathan D.

    2003-01-01

    Responses to the rampage killings at Columbine High School were analyzed at the national level, the level of the community, and that of the family. In many cases people responded by undertaking "grief projects." It is suggested that these projects are best understood within the context of Worden's task model of mourning. (Contains 31 references.)…

  18. The Voice of the Turtle Dove.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terkel, Amelia S.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using ring doves in the classroom for observing behavior patterns and the entire reproductive cycle. Requirements for space, food, and care are minimal and easily obtained. Students can observe: male participation in nest-building; care of young; and (using candlelight) embryos and heartbeats because of the thin egg shells these birds…

  19. Anorexia and attachment: dysregulated defense and pathological mourning

    PubMed Central

    Delvecchio, Elisa; Di Riso, Daniela; Salcuni, Silvia; Lis, Adriana; George, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The role of defensive exclusion (Deactivation and Segregated Systems) in the development of early relationships and related to subsequent manifestations of symptoms of eating disorders was assessed using the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP). Fifty-one DSM-IV diagnosed women with anorexia participated in the study. Anorexic patients were primarily classified as dismissing or unresolved. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of defensive exclusion were carried out. Results showed potential benefits of using the AAP defense exclusion coding system, in addition to the main attachment classifications, in order to better understand the developmental issues involved in anorexia. Discussion concerned the processes, such as pathological mourning, that may underlie the associations between dismissing and unresolved attachment and anorexia. Implications for developmental research and clinical nosology are discussed. PMID:25389412

  20. DDE effects on reproduction of ring doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haegele, M.A.; Hudson, R.H.

    1973-01-01

    Reproductive performance was measured for 126 days in twelve pairs of ring doves (Streptopelia risoria) fed a diet containing 40 ppm of p,p'-DDE and in twelve other pairs given untreated food. The DDE-treated doves took an average of 2 1/2 times longer to renest than controls, produced 13.5% fewer eggs/clutch, had 10% thinner eggs, and experienced twice as great mortality of young; all these differences were statistically significant. Hatchability was also lower but not significantly so. Control birds nested forty-nine times during the study, laying two eggs in each clutch. DDE-treated birds nested only thirty-three times, laying an average of 1?7 eggs/clutch. The combined effects of DDE on reproduction resulted in only ten young being successfully raised by DDE-treated pairs versus thirty-five being raised by controls.

  1. Toxic lead exposure in the urban rock dove

    SciTech Connect

    DeMent, S.H.; Chisolm, J.J. Jr.; Eckhaus, M.A.; Strandberg, J.D.

    1987-04-01

    Thirteen adult urban rock doves (Columba livia), 12 captured alive and one found dead, were studied from the Baltimore zoo. The mean concentration of lead in the blood for the 12 live birds was 184.5 +/- 531.2 (range 10.5-1,870 micrograms/dl). Three of the 13 birds with high measured blood and tissue lead concentrations were found at necropsy with lead shot pellets in their gizzards. Correlations were not found between concentrations of lead in the blood and body weight or hematocrit. Conversely, high correlations were noted between concentrations of lead in the blood and measured liver and kidney concentrations (r = 0.946, P less than 0.01; r = 0.993, P less than 0.01, respectively). Numbers of intranuclear acid-fast inclusions per 10 consecutive fields (100x oil immersion lens) correlated well with measured kidney lead concentrations (r = 0.990, P less than 0.001).

  2. Rotationally shearing interferometer employing modified Dove prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paez, Gonzalo; Strojnik, Marija; Moreno, Ivan

    2003-12-01

    We describe the rotationally shearing interferometer (RSI) employing modified Dove prisms, designed with a widened aperture to increase throughput and with larger base angles to minimize the wave-front tilt introduced due to manufacturing errors. Experimental results obtained with the RSI ascertain the feasibility of the design. This work demonstrates that the rotationally shearing interferometry may be used to perform some functions of the traditional astronomical instruments.

  3. Grief in Two Guises: "Mourning and Melancholia" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Viviane

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a re-reading of Freud's classic paper. The themes of mourning and melancholia are viewed in relation to children and adolescents with illustrations from case histories. Mourning is interpreted in a broader sense: not only as grief (both expectable and traumatic) but as a response to the developmental process itself as phases of…

  4. Dying to Live: Mourning, Melancholia and the Adolescent Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polmear, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    The author reviews the main points in Freud's 1917 paper "Mourning and Melancholia" and relates them to the process of both normal and troubled adolescent development. Using clinical examples she illustrates the ways in which the processes Freud describes in melancholia operate in some disturbed adolescents such that instead of mourning the lost…

  5. "Women...mourn and men carry on": African women storying mourning practices: a South African example.

    PubMed

    Kotzé, Elmarie; Els, Lishje; Rajuili-Masilo, Ntsiki

    2012-09-01

    African mourning of loss of lives in South Africa has been shaped by discursive practices of both traditional African cultures and the sociopolitical developments under apartheid and in post-apartheid South Africa. This article reports on changes in mourning practices on the basis of a literature review and uses a collection of examples to highlight the navigation of some cultural and gendered issues relating to mourning, against the backdrop of the everyday experiences of loss of life in South Africa due to violence and HIV/AIDS. The article draws on African womanist and feminist scholarship and focuses on the intersections between cultural and gender practices of bereavement in the lives of professional urban African women. The authors argue for the use of positioning theory and witnessing practices to honor and story the ongoing struggle of African women as these women take different agentic positions by accepting, questioning, resisting, and/or changing cultural mourning practices while they compassionately witness the self and others in the narratives they live. PMID:24563939

  6. The Meaning Structures of Muslim Bereavements in Israel: Religious Traditions, Mourning Practices, and Human Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasien-Esmael, Hend; Rubin, Simon Shimshon

    2005-01-01

    The grief and mourning of Muslim citizens in Israel are considered. First, a series of mourning customs spanning the period from notification of death until post-mourning are presented from 3 perspectives: (a) the requirements of the Islamic Sunni tradition; (b) the manner in which Islamic mourning rituals are practiced; and (c) the authors'…

  7. The Role of DOVE in Policy Decisionmaking. Invited Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Marsha

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the role of the Data on Vocational Education (DOVE) system in planning for policy formation in vocational education. DOVE's strengths lie in providing information on national trends in enrollment and course taking and in drawing on longitudinal data that allow rigorous analysis of impacts of vocational education. (SLD)

  8. Loss and mourning in the Jewish tradition.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Simon Shimshon

    Robert Kastenbaum was a man who helped reintroduce issues related to death, dying, and bereavement to academic, clinical, and general discourse. This article, devoted to an encounter with the observance of mourning custom and ritual in the Jewish tradition, continues the dialogue in this journal that Bob founded. The article utilizes the Two-Track Model of Bereavement to address the Jewish tradition's structuring of the loss experience. After a brief introduction, I present a schematic presentation of some of the issues operant in grief and mourning for the believer. This is followed by two responses to loss that portray the pain of loss in the tradition. The article goes on to consider the Jewish time cycle of response to loss-from preburial Aninut, to Shiva, the first week, to Shloshim, the first month, to Shanah, the first year, to the expectations for encounters across the life cycle. The Yizkor and Kaddish are also considered. In the Jewish tradition, alongside attention to what level of functioning to require of the bereaved, there are lifelong opportunities to re-work and maintain connection to the memories, associations, narratives, and experiences that comprise the psychological organization of the continuing bond and relationship to the deceased. PMID:25351592

  9. Dying, mourning, and spirituality: a psychological perspective.

    PubMed

    Marrone, R

    1999-09-01

    Based in an unfortunate tradition that stretches back in time to Watson's behaviorism and Freud's psychoanalysis, psychology has tended to reject and to pathologize matters of the spirit. In the past 30 years, however, with the advent of what has been termed the cognitive revolution, psychology has greatly expanded the scope of its subject matter. Psychologists and thanatologists have begun to unravel the cognitive underpinnings of our assumptive world and the transformation of those underpinnings in times of crisis and stress. This article examines the cognitive basis of the spiritual experience and the use of cognitive assimilation, accommodation strategies during the process of mourning the death of a loved one, as well as during the process of living our own dying. Of special importance to mental health professionals and clergy, new research on dying, mourning, and spirituality suggests that the specific ways in which people rediscover meaning--such as belief in traditional religious doctrine, the afterlife, reincarnation, philanthropy, or a spiritual order to the universe--may be less important than the process itself. In other words, in the midst of dealing with profound loss in our lives, the ability to reascribe meaning to a changed world through spiritual transformation, religious conversion, or existential change may be more significant than the specific content by which that need is filled. PMID:10558611

  10. Beating phantasies: Mourned and unmourned.

    PubMed

    Antinucci, Giuseppina

    2016-06-01

    This paper intends to explore the organizing function and fate of sado-masochistic phantasies in their fixed form, in the psychic life of patients who have suffered early traumas, due to environmental vicissitudes and maternal psychopathology. The theoretical starting point is provided by the Novicks' research into transitory and permanent beating phantasies in adult and child patients, their onset and their psychic function, based on an examination of Freud's paper 'A child is being beaten'. In this text Freud achieves an unprecedented syncretism, locating the phantasy at the intersection between the oedipal complex, which is a vertical structure organizing sexual and generational differences, and the fraternal dimension, which is horizontal and organizes the lateral relationship with that similar but different other who is the sibling. Reporting in some detail material from the analyses of two young women, whose clinical presentation and early traumas show some similarities, the author puts in the context of the analytic work the emerging of the sado-masochistic phantasies, emphasizing their use and function in the transference-countertransference interplay. The beating phantasies shore up a precarious sense of self, threatened with psychic depletion and death, in identification with the absent mother of early infancy. An overly close relationship with a sibling, experienced as a narcissistic double, compounds the clinical picture, to establish the triangle formed by the parent(s) and two children which features in the beating phantasy. Finally, the author explores the contribution of ameliorating factors, such as alternative identificatory figures, constitutional endowment and capacity for sublimation, to account for the different fate of the fixed beating phantasies. PMID:26602362

  11. 50 CFR 20.103 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for mourning and white-winged doves and wild pigeons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Register citations affecting annual regulatory schedules for this section, see the List of CFR Sections... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for... BIRD HUNTING Annual Seasons, Limits, and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.103 Seasons, limits,...

  12. 50 CFR 20.103 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for mourning and white-winged doves and wild pigeons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Register citations affecting annual regulatory schedules for this section, see the List of CFR Sections... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for... BIRD HUNTING Annual Seasons, Limits, and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.103 Seasons, limits,...

  13. 50 CFR 20.103 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for mourning and white-winged doves and wild pigeons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Register citations affecting annual regulatory schedules for this section, see the List of CFR Sections... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for... BIRD HUNTING Annual Seasons, Limits, and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.103 Seasons, limits,...

  14. Anna Freud and the Holocaust: mourning and survival guilt.

    PubMed

    Hartman, John J

    2014-12-01

    This article explores the period of Anna Freud's life after she was informed of the deaths of her aunts in Nazi concentration camps during World War II. Understanding of this period may be enhanced by consideration of the role of the Holocaust in her complicated mourning process. A series of her dreams is re-examined from the point of view of survivor guilt and the complicated mourning of her father in the context of the Holocaust. It is argued that unconscious reproaches against her father led to an identification with him that included his 'decision' to leave his sisters in Vienna. Survivor guilt in relation to her aunts' murders is seen as one of the complicating factors in the mourning process. In addition the article discusses the possible role of this period, particularly her work with child concentration camp survivors, in her post-war writing. The noted duality in her work between innovation and conservatism is explored in terms of an outcome of the mourning process of this period. It is argued that her views on mourning, trauma, attachment, and the widening scope of indications for psychoanalysis were influenced by the outcome of her mourning process. Finally, an irony is noted in the fact that her attitude about altruism never changed despite the role of the altruism of others in her rescue from the Nazis. PMID:25363600

  15. Gender identification of white-winged doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Braun, Clait E.

    2007-01-01

    White-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica) are migratory game birds with an expanding distribution. Reasons for the range expansion are largely unknown as are characteristics of populations in newly occupied areas. This species is avidly sought in states having large white-wing populations and where it is hunted with specific hunting seasons designed to prevent local over-harvest. Increasing distribution and apparent population size in other states may result in legalizing or liberalization of hunting regulations in those states. Prior to any liberalization, more knowledge is needed on population characteristics including population demography in both the Central Flyway and Pacific Flyway portions of the species' range. These needs should be specific by age and gender as hunting may over exploit one gender (or age class). Harvest rates may be measured through banding programs; these rates should be gender specific to examine possible rates of hunting loss on population composition, which could affect breeding population size. Harvest by gender can also be measured through use of hunter bag checks and collections use of parts collection surveys.

  16. Mourning, dreaming, and the discovery of the oedipus complex.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Eugene J

    2013-10-01

    The author argues that the structure of mourning and the structure of the Oedipus complex are triadic, the latter being obvious and easy to conceptualize, while the former is quite subtle. When it is the father who is mourned, the son must repeatedly invoke the dead object so that libidinal cathexis can be reinvested in living objects. Such was the situation in which Freud found himself in 1896 when his father died--the triadic nature of the Oedipus complex ironically not yet discovered by him. In the author's belief, Freud's mourning and his attendant rich dream life occurring between 1896 and 1897 gave him access to the unconscious raw material that would eventually help him conceptualize the triadic structure at the instinctual core of the Oedipus complex. PMID:24194485

  17. Parental Death in Childhood and Loneliness in Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Patricia Ann

    1987-01-01

    Examined relationship between self-esteem and reported mourning behavior as it pertains to loneliness in young adults who, as children, had experienced parental death. Subjects (N=184) aged 18 to 25 completed four questionnaires. Revealed that self-esteem was the single best predictor of loneliness; reported mourning behaviors significantly added…

  18. Twin death and mourning worldwide: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pector, Elizabeth A

    2002-06-01

    Cultural beliefs about the nature of multiples appear in the mourning practices of many civilizations. Ethnographic literature suggests common themes that echo modern concepts. Many societies viewed twins as fragile, likely to die without preferential or meticulously equal treatment. A shared soul between twins is a common tenet, and the death of one is often felt to herald the other's prompt demise. The close relationship between multiples influences funerary rites. Honor, fear and mysticism are often evident in rituals. Twin infanticide was widely practiced, yet mourning customs were still observed. Many peoples recognize the special status of multiples and their families after one, two or more die. PMID:12184887

  19. Interspecific comparison of traffic noise effects on dove coo transmission in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Bao-Sen; Liang, Shih-Hsiung; Chiu, Yuh-Wen; Lin, Szu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Most previous studies concerning avian adaptation to anthropogenic noise have focused on songbirds, but few have focused on non-songbirds commonly found in urban environments such as doves. We conducted field playback-recording experiments on the perch-coos of five dove species, including four native Taiwan species (the spotted dove, Spilopelia chinensis, the oriental turtle-dove, Streptopelia orientalis, the red collared-dove, Streptopelia tranquebarica, and the emerald dove, Chalcophaps indica) and one species not native to Taiwan (the zebra dove, Geopelia striata) to evaluate the detection and recognition of dove coos in habitats with differing levels of traffic noise. Our results suggest that traffic noise has selected dominant urban species such as the spotted dove to temporally and spatially adjust cooing to reduce the masking effects of traffic noise and rare urban species such as the emerald dove to avoid areas of high traffic noise. Additionally, although the zebra dove had the highest coo frequency among the study species, its coos showed the highest detection value but not the highest recognition value. We conclude that traffic noise is an important factor in shaping the distribution of rare and dominant dove species in urban environments through its significant effects on coo transmission. PMID:27578359

  20. Interspecific comparison of traffic noise effects on dove coo transmission in urban environments

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Bao-Sen; Liang, Shih-Hsiung; Chiu, Yuh-Wen; Lin, Szu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Most previous studies concerning avian adaptation to anthropogenic noise have focused on songbirds, but few have focused on non-songbirds commonly found in urban environments such as doves. We conducted field playback-recording experiments on the perch-coos of five dove species, including four native Taiwan species (the spotted dove, Spilopelia chinensis, the oriental turtle-dove, Streptopelia orientalis, the red collared-dove, Streptopelia tranquebarica, and the emerald dove, Chalcophaps indica) and one species not native to Taiwan (the zebra dove, Geopelia striata) to evaluate the detection and recognition of dove coos in habitats with differing levels of traffic noise. Our results suggest that traffic noise has selected dominant urban species such as the spotted dove to temporally and spatially adjust cooing to reduce the masking effects of traffic noise and rare urban species such as the emerald dove to avoid areas of high traffic noise. Additionally, although the zebra dove had the highest coo frequency among the study species, its coos showed the highest detection value but not the highest recognition value. We conclude that traffic noise is an important factor in shaping the distribution of rare and dominant dove species in urban environments through its significant effects on coo transmission. PMID:27578359

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Spotted dove (Streptopelia chinensis).

    PubMed

    Yan, Shou-Qing; Guo, Peng-Cheng; Li, Yu-Mei; Qi, Shun-Min; Bai, Chun-Yan; Zhao, Zhi-Hui; Sun, Jin-Hai

    2016-09-01

    The Spotted dove (Streptopelia chinensis) is a member of the bird family Columbidae. In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial genome of this species. The mitochondrial genome of Spotted dove is a circular molecule of 16,966 bp in size and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and one control region. The total base composition is 30.1% for A, 32.1% for C, 13.9% for G, and 23.9% for T. These data will be useful for the phylogenetic and population diversity analyses of birds, especially Columbidae species. PMID:25600734

  2. Mourning and Guilt among Greek Women Having Repeated Abortions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naziri, D.; Tzavaras, A.

    1993-01-01

    Conducted clinical study concerning bereavement process of Greek women after abortion. Found strong identificatory tendencies on both mother and father images. Argues that, in cases of repeated abortion, mourning and guilt do not only refer to murdered and lost "person-fetus" but principally to death and loss of object of ambiguous desire.…

  3. Interpretation and Judgment: A Reading of "Lonesome Dove."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorburn, David

    1993-01-01

    Defends the importance for media study of a descriptive and evaluative scholarship grounded in old-humanist perspectives. Uses the television miniseries "Lonesome Dove" as a case study to argue that media texts, like literary works, can and should be evaluated according to the criteria of "formal mastery" and "intellectual coherence." (SR)

  4. Hypodectes propus (Acarina: Hypoderatidae) in a rufous turtle dove, Streptopelia orientalis (Aves: Columbiformes), in Japan

    PubMed Central

    El-Dakhly, Khaled Mohamed; El-Nahass, El-Shaymaa; Inui, Kosei; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2013-01-01

    An adult male rufous turtle dove, Streptopelia (S.) orientalis (Aves: Columbiformes), was found dead in Yorii-machi Town, Osato District 369-1217, Saitama Prefecture, Japan, and subjected to necropsy. A large number of immobile hypopi (deutonymphs) of the hypoderatid mite, Hypodectes (H.) propus (Acarina: Hypoderatidae), were found individually encapsulated subcutaneously primarily in the adipose tissue. The mites were 1.43 mm in length and 0.44 mm in width on average, and had provoked mild inflammatory reactions that predominantly manifested as foamy macrophages and lymphoplasmocytes. PCR analysis using ribosomal DNA extracted from paraffin-blocked tissues produced a 240 bp band specific for hypoderatids. Based on the morphological features (distinct coxal apodemes, especially in the anterior portion) and PCR-based findings, the hypopi were identified as H. propus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case describing the subcutaneous mite H. propus in a rufous turtle dove, S. orientalis, in Japan. This study also highlights the use of paraffin blocks as a source of tissue DNA for molecular evaluation. PMID:23820220

  5. Parent-offspring behavior of Jambu fruit doves (Ptilinopus jambu).

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Corinne P; Vickerman, Elizabeth; Sahrmann, John; Garrett, Tammy; Leonard, Denise; Bauman, Karen L; Asa, Cheryl S

    2016-03-01

    Fruit doves (Ptilinopus) constitute a genus of small to medium-sized, brightly colored arboreal birds, whose diets consist entirely of fruit. Little is known about the behavior of fruit doves because most species inhabit dense forests and are difficult to observe in the wild. This study describes the parental behavior of Jambu fruit dove pairs (Ptilinopus jambu) in a captive breeding program at the Saint Louis Zoo. Continuous video recordings were made of three pairs which raised a total of eight squabs over 2 years; daily rates of parental and squab behaviors were quantified. Overall, females were present at the nest, brooded their squabs, pecked, and attempted feedings more often than males. Parents also cared for their squabs at different times throughout the day. Males fed and brooded squabs during the middle of the day, while females fed throughout the day and brooded in the morning, evening, and overnight. Feeding rates were lower than those described for seed-eating doves (Columbinae), with hours between consecutive feedings, and squabs rarely begged before feeding events. Most squab behaviors involved initiating or terminating brooding and self-preening. These behaviors increased as squabs approached fledging, and coincided with a shift from full to partial brooding, and a decrease in parental allopreening. Older squabs also initiated feeding less frequently. Together, these data provide the first description of parental behavior in a Ptilinopus fruit dove. The results of this study may help improve captive breeding efforts, which are likely to become increasingly important for future conservation and reintroduction programs. Zoo Biol. 35:120-127, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26866825

  6. New mourners, old mourners: online memorial culture as a chapter in the history of mourning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Tony

    2015-04-01

    How does online mourning differ from offline mourning? Throughout history, demographic, social and technological changes have altered mourners' social relationships with both the living and the dead, and hence their experiences of grief. Online technologies comprise the latest chapter in this story; earlier chapters include family/community mourning (pre-industrial), private mourning (twentieth century) and public mourning (turn of the millennium). Pervasive social media in which users generate their own content have significantly shifted mourners' social interactions and the norms that govern them, partly in new directions (such as enfranchising previously stigmatised griefs; more potential for conflict between mourners and others) but partly returning to something more like the relationships of the pre-industrial village (such as everyday awareness of mortality, greater use of religious imagery, more potential for conflict among mourners). Online, mourners can experience both greater freedom to be themselves and increased social pressure to conform to group norms as to who should be mourned and how.

  7. Parenting a damaged child: mourning, regression, and disappointment.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, B

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an examination of the long-term parenting experiences of parents who have given birth to CNS damaged infants. In particular, the focus is on the mourning, regression, rage, and depression that frequently attend these parents throughout their lives and can become pathological and pathogenic interferences with the provision of good-enough parenting. Several clinical vignettes were presented, each of which illustrated the usefulness of different psychoanalytic clinical theories about normality and pathology of parenting and parent-child interaction. The now-classical contribution of Solnit and Stark (Mourning and the Birth of a Defective Child, 1962) is reviewed along with Benedek's and others' psychoanalytic theories about normal parenting. The thinking of these writers is within the framework of structural/libidinal theory and seems to be useful in describing certain parenting problems that concern the mourning and regressive aspects of parenting. However, it was proposed that some of the adaptive coping and pathology encompassed by Solnit and Stark's explanations is not comfortably illuminated by the structural clinical theory of conflict and drives. Freud's discussion (1917) compares mourning and melancholia, which he differentiated as related but dynamically distinct clinical phenomena. This work is briefly recalled as an earlier point in theory building where structural theory was not sufficient to explain clinical depression and rage that exceeds normal mourning (as in Freud's melancholia). It is felt that an additional theoretical perspective on parenting provided by self psychology can fill in some of the gaps left by structural theory explanations. The self psychology perspective is particularly helpful with understanding the rage, ambivalence, and chronic depression often experienced by parents of damaged children. According to this perspective, the damaged child is a disappointing selfobject for the parent, and the parent's self organization

  8. Do I Dare to Be Human? The Perverse Failure to Mourn, to Think, and to Love.

    PubMed

    Shoshani, Michael; Shoshani, Batya

    2016-06-01

    The authors discuss the relation between perverse psychic formations and the ability to develop a mind of one's own. The authors characterize the formation of perversity in terms of failure to develop the key capacities of thinking, mourning, and loving. These failures result in the abolishment of thinking and the repudiation of separateness and lead to the creation of different kinds of twisted coalitions, which shape the transference-counter-transference matrix. Persons with perverse psychic organizations have difficulties developing their own minds due to their refusal to acknowledge human limitations and their inability to accept the fundamental differences of human existence: self-other, child-adult, male-female. These characterizations are illustrated by clinical material, including a detailed analytic session, demonstrating the perverse aggresivization and sexualization of the analytic relationship. The role of the analyst is to detoxify the violence and destruction and to translate the language of perversion into the language of love. PMID:27248040

  9. Nietzsche, autobiography, history: mourning and Martin and John.

    PubMed

    Champagne, J

    1998-01-01

    How might gay and lesbian literature be read not as a mimetic representation of homosexuality, but as an activity linked to problems of subjectivity and historiography? Reading Dale Peck's novel Martin and John alongside passages from Friedrich Nietzsche's "On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life" and Sigmund Freud's "Mourning and Melancholia," this essay argues for an understanding of Peck's text as an attempt to link two apparently different processes of import to contemporary gay male subjects in particular: the writing of what Nietzsche terms "critical history," and the mourning of those lost to HIV disease. It concludes by linking Martin and John to feminist critiques of identity and traditional historiography, as well as noting the connection between these two critiques. PMID:9505231

  10. Socially shared mourning: construction and consumption of collective memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harju, Anu

    2015-04-01

    Social media, such as YouTube, is increasingly a site of collective remembering where personal tributes to celebrity figures become sites of public mourning. YouTube, especially, is rife with celebrity commemorations. Examining fans' online mourning practices on YouTube, this paper examines video tributes dedicated to the late Steve Jobs, with a focus on collective remembering and collective construction of memory. Combining netnography with critical discourse analysis, the analysis focuses on the user comments where the past unfolds in interaction and meanings are negotiated and contested. The paper argues that celebrity death may, for avid fans, be a source of disenfranchised grief, a type of grief characterised by inadequate social support, usually arising from lack of empathy for the loss. The paper sheds light on the functions digital memorials have for mourning fans (and fandom) and argues that social media sites have come to function as spaces of negotiation, legitimisation and alleviation of disenfranchised grief. It is also suggested that when it comes to disenfranchised grief, and grief work generally, the concept of community be widened to include communities of weak ties, a typical form of communal belonging on social media.

  11. COI barcodes and phylogeny of doves (Columbidae family).

    PubMed

    Khan, Haseeb Ahmad; Arif, Ibrahim Abdulwahid

    2013-12-01

    Cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene has been recognized as an authentic tool for species identification. Besides its potential barcoding capacity, COI sequences have also been used for inferring the phylogeny. Phylogenetic relationships among genera of Columbidae (pigeons and doves family) have not been fully resolved because of scarce sampling of taxa and limited availability of sequence data. In this study, we have evaluated the efficiency of COI barcodes for species identification and phylogenetic analysis of various doves. We sequenced the 693 bp region of COI gene of three species of doves including Oena capensis, Streptopelia decaocto, and Streptopelia senegalensis. After retrieving the relevant sequences from the GenBank, the entire data-set of 85 sequences represented 25 dove species from 11 different genera of the family Columbidae. The COI sequences of four species including Chalcophaps indica (two specimens), Columbina inca (five specimens), Geopelia striata (three specimens), and Macropygia phasianella (three specimens) were identical. The mean intraspecific base differences ranged from 0 to 37 while the P-distances ranged between 0 and 0.058. For most of the species, the P-distances were ≤ 0.008. Phylogenetic analysis differentiated the taxa into three major clusters. One of the clusters grouped five genera including Claravis, Columbina, Gallicolumba, Geopelia, and Geotrygon. The remaining two clusters grouped three genera each including Chalcophaps, Oena, and Turtur in one cluster and Macropygia, Streptopelia, and Zenaida in another cluster. Further sub-clustering clearly separated all the genera into individual clusters except two discrepancies for the genera Streptopelia and Turtur. Species-level cladistics clearly separated all the species into distinctive clades. In conclusion, COI barcoding is a powerful tool for species identification with added information on phylogenetic inference. The finding of this study will help to understand the

  12. Hawks and Doves on small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, Marco; Luthi, Leslie; Giacobini, Mario

    2006-01-01

    We explore the Hawk-Dove game on networks with topologies ranging from regular lattices to random graphs with small-world networks in between. This is done by means of computer simulations using several update rules for the population evolutionary dynamics. We find the overall result that cooperation is sometimes inhibited and sometimes enhanced in those network structures, with respect to the mixing population case. The differences are due to different update rules and depend on the gain-to-cost ratio. We analyze and qualitatively explain this behavior by using local topological arguments.

  13. Systematics and biogeography of Indo-Pacific ground-doves.

    PubMed

    Jønsson, Knud A; Irestedt, Martin; Bowie, Rauri C K; Christidis, Les; Fjeldså, Jon

    2011-05-01

    Ground-doves represent an insular bird radiation distributed across the Indo-Pacific. The radiation comprises sixteen extant species, two species believed to be extinct and six species known to be extinct. In the present study, we present a molecular phylogeny for all sixteen extant species, based on two mitochondrial markers. We demonstrate that the Gallicolumba as currently circumscribed is not monophyletic and recommend reinstalling the name Alopecoenas for a monophyletic radiation comprising ten extant species, distributed in New Guinea, the Lesser Sundas and Oceania. Gallicolumba remains the name for six species confined to New Guinea the Philippines and Sulawesi. Although our phylogenetic analyses fail to support a single origin for the remaining Gallicolumba species, we suspect that the addition of nuclear sequence data may alter this result. Because a number of ground-dove taxa have gone extinct, it is difficult to assess biogeographical patterns. However, the Alopecoenas clade has clearly colonized many remote oceanic islands rather recently, with several significant water crossings. The Gallicolumba radiation(s), on the other hand, is significantly older and it is possible that diversification within that group may in part have been shaped by plate tectonics and corresponding re-arrangements of land masses within the Philippine and Sulawesi region. PMID:21256968

  14. Vocal tract filtering and the ``coo'' of doves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Neville H.; Riede, Tobias; Beckers, Gabriël J. L.; Suthers, Roderick A.

    2004-12-01

    Ring doves (Streptopelia risoria) produce a ``coo'' vocalization that is essentially a pure-tone sound at a frequency of about 600 Hz and with a duration of about 1.5 s. While making this vocalization, the dove inflates the upper part of its esophagus to form a thin-walled sac structure that radiates sound to the surroundings. It is a reasonable assumption that the combined influence of the trachea, glottis and inflated upper esophagus acts as an effective band-pass filter to eliminate higher harmonics generated by the vibrating syringeal valve. Calculations reported here indicate that this is indeed the case. The tracheal tube, terminated by a glottal constriction, is the initial resonant structure, and subsequent resonant filtering takes place through the action of the inflated esophageal sac. The inflated esophagus proves to be a more efficient sound radiating mechanism than an open beak. The action of this sac is only moderately affected by the degree of inflation, although an uninflated esophagus is inactive as a sound radiator. These conclusions are supported by measurements and observations that have been reported in a companion paper. .

  15. Spatial Evolutionary Game Theory: Hawks and Doves Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killingback, Timothy; Doebeli, Michael

    1996-09-01

    We consider a spatial generalization of evolutionary game theory in which strategies are distributed over a spatial array of sites. We assume that the strategy corresponding to a given site has local interactions with the strategies sitting on neighbouring sites, and that the strategies change if neighbouring strategies are doing better. After briefly setting the stage with a formal definition of spatial evolutionary game theory, we consider the spatial extension of the Hawk-Dove game, and we show that the results are qualitatively different from those obtained from classical evolutionary game theory. For example, the proportion of Hawks in the population is in general lower in the spatial game than in the classical one. We also consider spatial generalizations of the extensions of the Hawk-Dove game obtained by including strategies such as Retaliator and Bully. Here, too, the results from the spatial game are very different from the classical results. In particular, with space Retaliator is a much more successful strategy than one would expect from classical considerations. This suggests that, in general, spatial structure may facilitate the evolution of strategies such as Retaliator, which do not necessarily prosper classically, and which are reminiscent of the `nice', `provokable' and `forgiving' strategies which seem to play a central role in the evolution of cooperation. The results indicate that including spatial structure in evolutionary game theory is a fruitful extension.

  16. Histopathologic and Molecular Characterization of Sarcocystis calchasi Encephalitis in White-winged Doves (Zenaida asiatica) and Eurasian Collared Doves (Streptopelia decaocto), East-central Texas, USA, 2010–13

    PubMed Central

    Hodo, Carolyn L.; Whitley, Derick B.; Hamer, Sarah A.; Corapi, Wayne V.; Snowden, Karen; Heatley, J. Jill; Hoffmann, Aline Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Sarcocystis calchasi is a recently described apicomplexan parasite that causes encephalitis in avian hosts. We diagnosed one White-winged Dove (Zenaida asiatica) and two Eurasian Collared Doves (Streptopelia decaocto) in Texas, US, with a history of neurologic signs with protozoal encephalitis. On histologic examination, all three doves had moderate to severe meningoencephalitis characterized by large numbers of plasma cells, lymphocytes, and macrophages with gliosis and astrocytosis. Brain sections from two doves also contained numerous Mott cells. Protozoal schizonts with rosettes or clusters of individual merozoites consistent with Sarcocystis spp. were seen within areas of inflammation. Sarcocysts were also identified in the skeletal muscle of one dove. The PCR and sequencing of brain and skeletal muscle from two doves revealed 99% identity with S. calchasi. The presence of S. calchasi in fatal cases of encephalitis in doves in Texas suggests that the geographic and host ranges of S. calchasi are broader than previously reported. PMID:27124332

  17. Histopathologic and Molecular Characterization of Sarcocystis calchasi Encephalitis in White-winged Doves ( Zenaida asiatica ) and Eurasian Collared Doves ( Streptopelia decaocto ), East-central Texas, USA, 2010-13.

    PubMed

    Hodo, Carolyn L; Whitley, Derick B; Hamer, Sarah A; Corapi, Wayne V; Snowden, Karen; Heatley, J Jill; Hoffmann, Aline Rodrigues

    2016-04-28

    Sarcocystis calchasi is a recently described apicomplexan parasite that causes encephalitis in avian hosts. We diagnosed one White-winged Dove ( Zenaida asiatica ) and two Eurasian Collared Doves ( Streptopelia decaocto ) in Texas, US, with a history of neurologic signs with protozoal encephalitis. On histologic examination, all three doves had moderate to severe meningoencephalitis characterized by large numbers of plasma cells, lymphocytes, and macrophages with gliosis and astrocytosis. Brain sections from two doves also contained numerous Mott cells. Protozoal schizonts with rosettes or clusters of individual merozoites consistent with Sarcocystis spp. were seen within areas of inflammation. Sarcocysts were also identified in the skeletal muscle of one dove. The PCR and sequencing of brain and skeletal muscle from two doves revealed 99% identity with S. calchasi. The presence of S. calchasi in fatal cases of encephalitis in doves in Texas suggests that the geographic and host ranges of S. calchasi are broader than previously reported. PMID:27124332

  18. Ray-optical negative refraction and pseudoscopic imaging with Dove-prism arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtial, Johannes; Nelson, John

    2008-02-01

    A sheet consisting of an array of small, aligned Dove prisms can locally (on the scale of the width of the prisms) invert one component of the ray direction. A sandwich of two such Dove-prism sheets that inverts both transverse components of the ray direction is a ray-optical approximation to the interface between two media with refractive indices +n and n. We demonstrate the simulated imaging properties of such a Dove-prism-sheet sandwich, including a demonstration of pseudoscopic imaging.

  19. Two new Meitingsunes species (Acari: Syringophilidae) from Indonesian doves (Columbiformes: Columbidae).

    PubMed

    Kaszewska, Katarzyna; Skoracki, Maciej; Kavetska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    We describe two new quill mite species of the genus Meitingsunes Glowska and Skoracki, 2010 (Acari: Prostigmata: Syringophilidae) parasitizing columbiform birds (Columbiformes: Columbidae): M. chalcophaps sp. nov. collected from the Emerald Dove, Chalcophaps indica (Linnaeus) and M. turacoenas sp. nov. from the White-faced Cuckoo Dove, Turacoena manadensis (Quoy and Gaimard) (type host) and the Black Cuckoo-Dove, Turacoena modesta (Temminck). All host species were collected in Indonesia. These represent two new genus-level host records for Meitingsunes. In addition, we summarize the diversity of Meitingsunes and present a key to species in this genus. PMID:27394880

  20. Explaining It to Ourselves: The Phases of National Mourning in Space Tragedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldzwig, Steve; Dionisopoulos, George N.

    1986-01-01

    Relies on grief literature to develop a heuristic model of patterned stages of national mourning. Applies the model to lend insight into print mediated accounts of the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. (NKA)

  1. Dove prism based rotating dual beam bidirectional Doppler OCT.

    PubMed

    Blatter, Cedric; Coquoz, Séverine; Grajciar, Branislav; Singh, Amardeep S G; Bonesi, Marco; Werkmeister, René M; Schmetterer, Leopold; Leitgeb, Rainer A

    2013-07-01

    Traditional Doppler OCT is highly sensitive to motion artifacts due to the dependence on the Doppler angle. This limits its accuracy in clinical practice. To overcome this limitation, we use a bidirectional dual beam technique equipped with a novel rotating scanning scheme employing a Dove prism. The volume is probed from two distinct illumination directions with variable controlled incidence plane, allowing for reconstruction of the true flow velocity at arbitrary vessel orientations. The principle is implemented with Swept Source OCT at 1060nm with 100,000 A-Scans/s. We apply the system to resolve pulsatile retinal absolute blood velocity by performing segment scans around the optic nerve head and circumpapillary scan time series. PMID:23847742

  2. Dove prism based rotating dual beam bidirectional Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Cedric; Coquoz, Séverine; Grajciar, Branislav; Singh, Amardeep S. G.; Bonesi, Marco; Werkmeister, René M.; Schmetterer, Leopold; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Doppler OCT is highly sensitive to motion artifacts due to the dependence on the Doppler angle. This limits its accuracy in clinical practice. To overcome this limitation, we use a bidirectional dual beam technique equipped with a novel rotating scanning scheme employing a Dove prism. The volume is probed from two distinct illumination directions with variable controlled incidence plane, allowing for reconstruction of the true flow velocity at arbitrary vessel orientations. The principle is implemented with Swept Source OCT at 1060nm with 100,000 A-Scans/s. We apply the system to resolve pulsatile retinal absolute blood velocity by performing segment scans around the optic nerve head and circumpapillary scan time series. PMID:23847742

  3. The Printing Types of the Doves Press: Their History and Destruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable, Carole

    1974-01-01

    The Doves Press, founded in 1900 in Hammersmith, England, produced some of the most notable examples of fine typography of the twentieth century. A dispute over ownership of the types developed, and the types were destroyed. (Author/LS)

  4. Discovery and characterization of the first genuine avian leptin gene in the rock dove (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Friedman-Einat, Miriam; Cogburn, Larry A; Yosefi, Sara; Hen, Gideon; Shinder, Dmitry; Shirak, Andrey; Seroussi, Eyal

    2014-09-01

    Leptin, the key regulator of mammalian energy balance, has been at the center of a great controversy in avian biology for the last 15 years since initial reports of a putative leptin gene (LEP) in chickens. Here, we characterize a novel LEP in rock dove (Columba livia) with low similarity of the predicted protein sequence (30% identity, 47% similarity) to the human ortholog. Searching the Sequence-Read-Archive database revealed leptin transcripts, in the dove's liver, with 2 noncoding exons preceding 2 coding exons. This unusual 4-exon structure was validated by sequencing of a GC-rich product (76% GC, 721 bp) amplified from liver RNA by RT-PCR. Sequence alignment of the dove leptin with orthologous leptins indicated that it consists of a leader peptide (21 amino acids; aa) followed by the mature protein (160 aa), which has a putative structure typical of 4-helical-bundle cytokines except that it is 12 aa longer than human leptin. Extra residues (10 aa) were located within the loop between 2 5'-helices, interrupting the amino acid motif that is conserved in tetrapods and considered essential for activation of leptin receptor (LEPR) but not for receptor binding per se. Quantitative RT-PCR of 11 tissues showed highest (P < .05) expression of LEP in the dove's liver, whereas the dove LEPR peaked (P < .01) in the pituitary. Both genes were prominently expressed in the gonads and at lower levels in tissues involved in mammalian leptin signaling (adipose; hypothalamus). A bioassay based on activation of the chicken LEPR in vitro showed leptin activity in the dove's circulation, suggesting that dove LEP encodes an active protein, despite the interrupted loop motif. Providing tools to study energy-balance control at an evolutionary perspective, our original demonstration of leptin signaling in dove predicts a more ancient role of leptin in growth and reproduction in birds, rather than appetite control. PMID:24758303

  5. Neuro-immune interactions in the dove brain.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Marta

    2011-05-15

    Mast cells (MC) are of hematopoetic origin. Connective tissue type MCs are able to function in IgE dependent and independent fashion, change their phenotype according to the tissue environment. They are able to enter the brain under normal physiological conditions, and move into this compact tissue made of neurons. In doves MCs are found only in the medial habenula (MH) and their number is changing according to the amount of sex steroids in the body. MCs are able to synthesize and store a great variety of biologically active compounds, like transmitters, neuromodulators and hormones. They are able to secrete GnRH. With the aid of electron microscopy we were able to describe MC-neuron interactions between GnRH-positive MCs and neurons. Piecemeal degranulation (secretory vesicles budding off swollen and active granules) seems to be a very efficient type of communication between MCs and surrounding neurons. Different types of granular and vesicular transports are seen between GnRH-immunoreactive MCs and neurons in the MH of doves. Sometimes whole granules are visible in the neuronal cytoplasm, in other cases exocytotic vesicles empty materials of MC origin. Thus MCs might modulate neuronal functions. Double staining experiments with IP3-receptor (IP3R), Ryanodine-receptor (RyR) and serotonin antibodies showed active MC population in the habenula. Light IP3R-labeling was present in 64-97% of the cells, few granules were labeled in 7-10% of MCs, while strong immunoreactivity was visible in 1-2% of TB stained cells. No immunoreactivity was visible in 28-73% of MCs. According to cell counts, light RyR-positivity appeared in 27-52%, few granules were immunoreactive in 4-19%, while strong immunopositivity was found only in one animal. In this case 22% of MCs were strongly RyR-positive. No staining was registered in 44-73% of MCs. Double staining with 5HT and these receptor markers proved that indeed only a part of MCs is actively secreting. Resting cells with only 5HT

  6. The Inevitability of Sleep: Using Manet's Last Paintings to Envision a Pedagogy of Loss and Mourning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author offers Manet's last paintings as metaphors for a bygone, psychically healthy conception of loss and mourning, what is called the pre-Freudian, Victorian notion of loss (Otto 2008), which contrasts with the post-Freudian, Modern notion of loss and mourning (Otto 2008). Otto argues this liminal, transitional moment…

  7. Magmatism, structure and age of Dove Basin (Antarctica): A key to understanding South Scotia Arc development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Puga, Encarnación; Bohoyo, Fernando; González, Francisco Javier; Maldonado, Andrés; Martos, Yasmina M.; Pérez, Lara F.; Ruano, Patricia; Schreider, Anatoly A.; Somoza, Luis; Suriñach, Emma; Antonio, Díaz de Federico

    2014-11-01

    Dove Basin is situated in the south-central Scotia Sea, between Pirie and Bruce banks, and was formed during the development of the Scotia Arc. The basin has a roughly sigmoidal shape, with a prominent NNE-SSW elongated ridge located in its central part, the Dove Ridge, which is considered as an extinct spreading axis. A NE-SW elongated tectonic high, the Dove Seamount, is located in the north-eastern region of the basin, bounded by a normal fault dipping to the southeast. Dredged rocks and geophysical data were collected during the SCAN2004 and SCAN2008 cruises. Dredged samples were recovered from three positive features in the center of the basin, two from Dove Ridge, and one from Dove Seamount. Igneous rocks along the Dove Ridge are mainly tholeiitic basalts, derived from asthenospheric upper mantle within an extensional supra-subduction back-arc tectonic setting, which evolved over time from back-arc basin basalts (BABB) toward Mid Oceanic Ridge Basalts (MORBs). Altered olivine-bearing fine- and medium-grained basaltic rocks were also dredged from Dove Ridge and the seamount, together with minor oceanic island arc basalts and basaltic andesites. The mantle source was affected, up to early Miocene times, by a subducted oceanic slab related to an arc to the east, with Dove Basin forming in a back-arc position. Minor alkaline oceanic island basalts dredged at the seamount might represent a final extensional stage, genetically related with the dying Dove Ridge volcanism or, less probably, to a later, late Miocene-Pliocene extensional stage, producing incipient volcanism deriving from a deeper mantle source. 40Ar/39Ar dating of MORB samples dredged from the Dove Ridge provided ages of 20.4 ± 2.6 to 22.8 ± 3.1 Ma. These outcrops were later coated by Fe-Mn crusts with Co-Chronometer ages ranging from at least 12.6 Ma and probably up to 18 Ma. Analysis of magnetic anomaly profiles shows the best fit in the central profile, corresponding to chrons C6B (21.7 Ma) to C7

  8. An outbreak of Mycobacterium genavense infection in a flock of captive diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata).

    PubMed

    Haridy, Mohie; Fukuta, Mayumi; Mori, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hideyuki; Kubo, Masahito; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2014-09-01

    Two diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata) in a flock of 23 birds housed in an aviary in a zoo in central Japan were found dead as a result of mycobacteriosis. Fecal samples of the remaining doves were positive for mycobacterial infection, and thus they were euthanatized. Clinical signs and gross pathology, including weight loss and sudden death and slight enlargement of the liver and intestine, were observed in a small number of birds (3/23). Disseminated histiocytic infiltration of either aggregates or sheets of epithelioid cells containing acid-fast bacilli, in the absence of caseous necrosis, were observed in different organs of the infected doves, especially lungs (23/23), intestines (9/23), livers (7/23), and hearts (6/23). Mycobacterium sp. was isolated from the livers of three birds (3/23). DNA extracted from frozen liver and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues (5/23) were used for amplification of the gene encoding mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein (hsp65). The causative Mycobacterium species was identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Mycobacterium genavense infection was confirmed in three of the diamond doves. Moreover, partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing revealed 100% identity across the three samples tested, and 99.77% nucleotide homology of the isolate sequence to M. genavense. The main route of M. genavense infection in the diamond doves was most likely airborne, suggesting a potential zoonotic risk of airborne transmission between humans and birds. PMID:25518432

  9. Low frequency dove coos vary across noise gradients in an urbanized environment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fengyi; Bonebrake, Timothy C; Dingle, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Urbanization poses a challenge to bird communication due to signal masking by ambient noise and reflective surfaces that lead to signal degradation. Bird species (especially oscines) have been shown to alter their singing behaviour to increase signal efficiency in highly urbanized environments. However, few studies on the effects of noise on song structure have included birds with low frequency vocal signals which may be especially vulnerable to noise pollution due to significant frequency overlap of their signals with traffic noise. We compared the perch coos of spotted doves (Streptopelia chinensis), a species with very low frequency vocalizations, in different background noise levels across urban and peri-urban areas in Hong Kong. We documented a 10% upward shift in the minimum frequency of coos of spotted doves across the noise gradient (a relatively small but significant shift), and a reduced maximum frequency in urban habitats with a higher density of built up area. Hong Kong doves had significantly higher minimum and maximum frequencies than doves from throughout their range (from mostly rural sites). Our results indicate that urban species with extremely low sound frequencies such as doves can alter their vocalizations in response to variable urban acoustic environments. PMID:27268468

  10. A field test of behavioural flexibility in Zenaida doves (Zenaida aurita).

    PubMed

    Boogert, Neeltje Janna; Monceau, Karine; Lefebvre, Louis

    2010-10-01

    Animals' ability to adjust their behaviour when environmental conditions change can increase their likelihood of survival. Although such behavioural flexibility is regularly observed in the field, it has proven difficult to systematically quantify and predict inter-individual differences in free-living animals. We presented 24 Zenaida doves (Zenaida aurita) on 12 territories with two learning tests in their natural habitat in Barbados. The dove pairs showed high site fidelity and territoriality, allowing us to test individuals repeatedly while accounting for the effects of territorial chases and pair bonds on our learning measures. We used a foraging apparatus that enabled Zenaida doves to access seed, yet excluded other species, and measured doves' performance on colour discrimination and reversal learning tests. We found that (1) doves on all 12 territories passed the two tests; (2) mates within a pair were consistently solvers or scroungers; (3) sex, body condition and territorial chases did not consistently affect learning rates; (4) tameness was a significant negative predictor of learning to feed from the foraging apparatus and (5) scrounging within pairs seemed to facilitate learning. Our study presents a method to quantify intraspecific differences in behavioural flexibility in the field and relate these to individuals' physical and social traits. PMID:20615457

  11. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Eurasian Collared Doves (Streptopelia decaocto) and Retrospective Study of Avian Yersiniosis at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (1990-2015).

    PubMed

    Stoute, Simone T; Cooper, George L; Bickford, Arthur A; Carnaccini, Silvia; Shivaprasad, H L; Sentíes-Cué, C Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    In February 2015, two Eurasian collared doves (Streptopelia decaocto) were submitted dead to the California Animal Health and Food Safety (CAHFS) Laboratory, Turlock branch, from a private aviary experiencing sudden, high mortality (4/9) in adult doves. In both doves, the gross and histologic lesions were indicative of acute, fatal septicemia. Grossly, there were numerous pale yellow foci, 1 to 2 mm in diameter, in the liver and spleen. Microscopically, these foci were composed of acute severe multifocal coagulative necrosis of hepatocytes and splenic pulp with infiltration of heterophils mixed with fibrin and dense colonies of gram-negative bacteria. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis was isolated from the lung, liver, spleen, heart, ovary, kidney, and trachea. The organism was susceptible to most antibiotics it was tested against, except erythromycin. Based on a retrospective study of necropsy submissions to CAHFS between 1990 and 2015, there were 77 avian case submissions of Y. pseudotuberculosis. There were 75/77 cases identified from a wide range of captive avian species from both zoo and private facilities and 2/77 cases from two backyard turkeys submitted from one premise. The largest number of cases originated from psittacine species (31/77). The lesions most commonly described were hepatitis (63/77), splenitis (49/77), pneumonia (30/77), nephritis (16/77), and enteritis (12/77). From 1990 to 2015, there was an average of three cases of avian pseudotuberculosis per year at CAHFS. Although there were no cases diagnosed in 1993 and 1994, in all other years, there were between one and eight cases of Y. pseudotuberculosis detected from avian diagnostic submissions. PMID:26953950

  12. From backwater to mainstream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Pox infection has occurrcd in mourning doves in at least 8 states on 12 separate occasions. Unsuccessful attempts were made to transmit both fowl pox (chicken isolate) and passerine pox (cowbird isolate) to mourning doves.

  13. Making Sense of Traumatic Events: Toward a Politics of Aporetic Mourning in Educational Theory and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Michalinos Zembylas examines how the work of mourning can evoke public and school pedagogies that provide an alternative way of relating to otherness and trauma--not through remaining fixated on simply representing the other's or one's own trauma, but in the insistence on remaining inconsolable before suffering. A major concern is…

  14. Mourning Child Grief Support Group Curriculum: Preschool Edition. Denny the Duck Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Linda; Jimerson, Shane R.; Gaasch, Ann

    The Mourning Child Preschool grief support curriculum is intended for use with preschool children who have experienced the death of someone special to them. It is designed for use by professionals who work in schools, hospitals, hospices, mental health agencies, or any setting that serves bereaved children. The curriculum contains lesson plans for…

  15. Grief and Coping in Early Childhood: The Role of Communication in the Mourning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostler, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    This article draws on interviews with women who experienced the death of their mothers during early childhood to explore the grieving process of a child for a lost parent. The author describes the women's recollections of how the loss was talked about, or not, in their families and how this impacted the women's mourning and coping. Most women who…

  16. Virtual Mourning and Memory Construction on Facebook: Here Are the Terms of Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Rhonda N.; Scheaffer, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the online information practices of persons grieving and mourning via Facebook. It examines how, or whether, these practices and Facebook's terms of use policies have implications for the bereaved and/or the memory of the deceased. To explore these questions, we compared traditional publicly recorded asynchronous…

  17. [The influence of mourning on feeding habits and its implications for nutritional behavior].

    PubMed

    Campos, Maria Teresa Fialho de Sousa

    2013-09-01

    The lack of preparation for dealing with death and the absence of the loved one may lead to organic and psychological reactions that, due to the adaptive capacity of the individual to the period of mourning, may result in interference in feeding habits and consequently on the person's nutritional status. This article addresses the effects of recent mourning on feeding behavior, followed by the analysis of the dietary interview from various standpoints. This includes the postmortem nutrition and feeding habits of the bereaved and the implications of this process on hunger, on thirst and on family cooking, with a focus on nutritional behavior and on the decisions that surround it. This is a review of the literature on the theme of death and mourning, which seeks to contextualize this theme around reflections based on this experience. It emphasizes the interaction of nutrition with the science of thanatology, which is an area still not properly examined and lacking study. The identification of this influence and its implications enables better planning of food strategies, contributing greatly to actions for coping and support during mourning. PMID:23989584

  18. COMPLETE GENOMIC SEQUENCE OF VIRULENT PIGEON PARAMYXOVIRUS IN LAUGHING DOVES (STREPTOPELIA SENEGALENSIS) IN KENYA.

    PubMed

    Obanda, Vincent; Michuki, George; Jowers, Michael J; Rumberia, Cecilia; Mutinda, Mathew; Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Wangoru, Kihara; Kasiiti-Orengo, Jacquiline; Yongo, Moses; Angelone-Alasaad, Samer

    2016-07-01

    Following mass deaths of Laughing Doves (Streptopelia senegalensis) in different localities throughout Kenya, internal organs obtained during necropsy of two moribund birds were sampled and analyzed by next generation sequencing. We isolated the virulent strain of pigeon paramyxovirus type-1 (PPMV-1), PPMV1/Laughing Dove/Kenya/Isiolo/B2/2012, which had a characteristic fusion gene motif (110)GGRRQKRF(117). We obtained a partial full genome of 15,114 nucleotides. The phylogenetic relationship based on the fusion gene and genomic sequence grouped our isolate as class II genotype VI, a group of viruses commonly isolated from wild birds but potentially lethal to Chickens ( Gallus gallus domesticus ). The fusion gene isolate clustered with PPMV-I strains from pigeons (Columbidae) in Nigeria. The complete genome showed a basal and highly divergent lineage to American, European, and Asian strains, indicating a divergent evolutionary pathway. The isolated strain is highly virulent and apparently species-specific to Laughing Doves in Kenya. Risk of transmission of such a strain to poultry is potentially high whereas the cyclic epizootic in doves is a threat to conservation of wild Columbidae in Kenya. PMID:27224210

  19. Pollination of Saguaro Cactus by Doves, Nectar-Feeding Bats, and Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Alcorn, S M; McGregor, S E; Olin, G

    1961-05-19

    In a large cage, free-flying western white-winged doves, nectar-feeding Leptonycteris bats, and honey bees were each effective as cross-pollinators of self-sterile saguaro flowers. Seed production and seed viability were not significantly different in fruit from flowers pollinated by these agents. Pollination is not a limiting factor in saguaro repopulation. PMID:17781127

  20. The dynamic interplay of mourning and forgiveness in the early development of the self and psychic structure.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Eric D

    2014-04-01

    Mourning has received considerable attention in the psychoanalytic literature. Beginning with Freud's 1917 investigation, the central role of mourning in psychical development via identification has been articulated and subsequently elaborated upon by various authors (e.g., Klein, 1940; Schafer, 2005). Forgiveness, on the other hand, has until recently received considerably less attention, perhaps because of the strong religious and moral connotations often associated with it (Lansky, 2009a). Contemporary writers exploring the psychoanalytic implications of mourning and forgiveness, however, have suggested the importance of both in normal psychical development. The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrated model of mourning and forgiveness and explore its potential role in nascent infant development. PMID:24731046

  1. Toxoplasmosis in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) from the Zoo of Clères, France

    PubMed Central

    Rigoulet, Jacques; Hennache, Alain; Lagourette, Pierre; George, Catherine; Longeart, Loïc; Le Net, Jean-Loïc; Dubey, Jitender P.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis causes mortality in several avian species, especially passerine birds. Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) found dead at the zoo of Clères (France). The bird had necrotizing pneumonia and nephritis with intralesional tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunostaining with polyclonal rabbit T. gondii antibodies and by transmission electron microscopy. To our knowledge, the bar-shouldered dove is a new host record for T. gondii. PMID:25407506

  2. Entextualising mourning on Facebook: stories of grief as acts of sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaxoglou, Korina

    2015-04-01

    Web 2.0 mourning is said to afford increased opportunities for the deceased's and mourners' visibility as well as create in the bereaved an increased sense of social support through the participatory entextualisation of mourning. So far, however, there has been little systematic attention to the uses of narrative in social network sites. The present article addresses this gap by providing an analysis of entextualised moments of mourning as stories shared by a single author over a six-month period on a Facebook Rest in Peace memorial group. The article foregrounds heterogeneity in narrative activity across posts, linking diversity in ways of telling to different types of the online mourner's positioning at three interrelated levels of discourse construction: (1) the representation of the event of death, (2) the alignment (or disalignment) with the dead and the networked mourners and (3) the poster's self. It is argued that telling stories on Facebook memorial sites constitutes an act of sharing affording networked individuals resources for making meaning out of the meaninglessness of a loved one's death in ways that can help render the painful experience of loss tellable and also create a sense of ambient affiliation or affinity with networked mourners.

  3. Parental Divorce in Childhood and Loneliness in Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Patricia

    1991-01-01

    Studied effects of childhood parental separation and divorce on adult loneliness among 87 college students who, when they were between the ages of 3 and 16, had experienced the divorce of their parents. Data analysis revealed that there were significant relationships between reported mourning behaviors, as well as respondents, ages at time of…

  4. Fungal Diversity in a Dark Oligotrophic Volcanic Ecosystem (DOVE) on Mount Erebus, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Connell, Laurie; Staudigel, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Fumarolic Ice caves on Antarctica's Mt. Erebus contain a dark oligotrophic volcanic ecosystem (DOVE) and represent a deep biosphere habitat that can provide insight into microbial communities that utilize energy sources other than photosynthesis. The community assembly and role of fungi in these environments remains largely unknown. However, these habitats could be relatively easily contaminated during human visits. Sixty-one species of fungi were identified from soil clone libraries originating from Warren Cave, a DOVE on Mt. Erebus. The species diversity was greater than has been found in the nearby McMurdo Dry Valleys oligotrophic soil. A relatively large proportion of the clones represented Malassezia species (37% of Basidomycota identified). These fungi are associated with skin surfaces of animals and require high lipid content for growth, indicating that contamination may have occurred through the few and episodic human visits in this particular cave. These findings highlight the importance of fungi to DOVE environments as well as their potential use for identifying contamination by humans. The latter offers compelling evidence suggesting more strict management of these valuable research areas. PMID:24832809

  5. Fungal Diversity in a Dark Oligotrophic Volcanic Ecosystem (DOVE) on Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Laurie; Staudigel, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Fumarolic Ice caves on Antarctica’s Mt. Erebus contain a dark oligotrophic volcanic ecosystem (DOVE) and represent a deep biosphere habitat that can provide insight into microbial communities that utilize energy sources other than photosynthesis. The community assembly and role of fungi in these environments remains largely unknown. However, these habitats could be relatively easily contaminated during human visits. Sixty-one species of fungi were identified from soil clone libraries originating from Warren Cave, a DOVE on Mt. Erebus. The species diversity was greater than has been found in the nearby McMurdo Dry Valleys oligotrophic soil. A relatively large proportion of the clones represented Malassezia species (37% of Basidomycota identified). These fungi are associated with skin surfaces of animals and require high lipid content for growth, indicating that contamination may have occurred through the few and episodic human visits in this particular cave. These findings highlight the importance of fungi to DOVE environments as well as their potential use for identifying contamination by humans. The latter offers compelling evidence suggesting more strict management of these valuable research areas. PMID:24832809

  6. Reprint of "Magmatism, structure and age of Dove Basin (Antarctica): A key to understanding South Scotia Arc development"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Puga, Encarnación; Bohoyo, Fernando; González, Francisco Javier; Maldonado, Andrés; Martos, Yasmina M.; Pérez, Lara F.; Ruano, Patricia; Schreider, Anatoly A.; Somoza, Luis; Suriñach, Emma; Antonio, Díaz de Federico

    2014-12-01

    Dove Basin is situated in the south-central Scotia Sea, between Pirie and Bruce banks, and was formed during the development of the Scotia Arc. The basin has a roughly sigmoidal shape, with a prominent NNE-SSW elongated ridge located in its central part, the Dove Ridge, which is considered as an extinct spreading axis. A NE-SW elongated tectonic high, the Dove Seamount, is located in the north-eastern region of the basin, bounded by a normal fault dipping to the southeast. Dredged rocks and geophysical data were collected during the SCAN2004 and SCAN2008 cruises. Dredged samples were recovered from three positive features in the center of the basin, two from Dove Ridge, and one from Dove Seamount. Igneous rocks along the Dove Ridge are mainly tholeiitic basalts, derived from asthenospheric upper mantle within an extensional supra-subduction back-arc tectonic setting, which evolved over time from back-arc basin basalts (BABB) toward Mid Oceanic Ridge Basalts (MORBs). Altered olivine-bearing fine- and medium-grained basaltic rocks were also dredged from Dove Ridge and the seamount, together with minor oceanic island arc basalts and basaltic andesites. The mantle source was affected, up to early Miocene times, by a subducted oceanic slab related to an arc to the east, with Dove Basin forming in a back-arc position. Minor alkaline oceanic island basalts dredged at the seamount might represent a final extensional stage, genetically related with the dying Dove Ridge volcanism or, less probably, to a later, late Miocene-Pliocene extensional stage, producing incipient volcanism deriving from a deeper mantle source. 40Ar/39Ar dating of MORB samples dredged from the Dove Ridge provided ages of 20.4 ± 2.6 to 22.8 ± 3.1 Ma. These outcrops were later coated by Fe-Mn crusts with Co-Chronometer ages ranging from at least 12.6 Ma and probably up to 18 Ma. Analysis of magnetic anomaly profiles shows the best fit in the central profile, corresponding to chrons C6B (21.7 Ma) to C7

  7. Differences in straggling rates between two genera of dove lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) reinforce population genetic and cophylogenetic patterns.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, Noah Kerness; Santiago-Alarcon, Diego; Johnson, Kevin P; Parker, Patricia G

    2004-09-01

    Differences in dispersal abilities have been implicated for causing disparate evolutionary patterns between Columbicola and Physconelloides lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera). However, no study has documented straggling (when lice are found on atypical hosts) rates within these lineages. We used the fact that the Galapagos Hawk, Buteo galapagoensis (Gould) (Falconiformes) feeds on the Galapagos Dove Zenaida galapagoensis Gould (Columbiformes) within an ecologically simplified setting. The Galapagos Dove is the only typical host of Columbicola macrourae (Wilson) and Physconelloides galapagensis (Kellogg and Huwana) in Galapagos. We quantitatively sampled and found these lice on both bird species. A DNA barcoding approach confirmed that stragglers were derived from Galapagos doves. We also collected a Bovicola sp. louse, likely originating from a goat (Capra hircus). On hawks, C. macrourae was significantly more prevalent than P. galapagensis. On doves, the two lice were equally prevalent and abundant. Differences in prevalence on hawks was a function of differences in straggling rate between lice, and not a reflection of their relative representation within the dove population. This provides further evidence that differences in dispersal abilities may drive differences in the degree of cospeciation in Columbicola and Phyconelloides lice, which have become model systems in evolutionary biology. PMID:15380682

  8. Fantasy and mourning: heterogeneity, alterity, and discontinuity in the pastoral encounter.

    PubMed

    Beers, William

    2006-01-01

    In exploring why the topic of fantasy has been absent from current pastoral care articles, the author draws from the work of Peter Homans and Eric Santner to inscribe the social dimensions of fantasy in the pastoral encounter, arguing that fantasy closes us off from radical change, difference, strangeness, and loss (discontinuity, heterogeneity, alterity, and mourning) while, paradoxically, opening us up to these excesses of life. Understanding the unconscious interpsychic role of fantasy makes these ever-widening dilemmas more psychologically transparent and even theologically transformational. Without this perspective, what often remains is a disappointing, unreflective, rationalized fiction of a stranger. PMID:17059110

  9. The inability to mourn and the inability to love in Shakespeare's Hamlet.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Martin S

    2009-04-01

    The author discusses the special role played by Shakespeare's masterpiece Hamlet in the history of psychoanalysis. Freud and many of his followers have treated Hamlet as if he were a real person inhibited by the Oedipus complex. In this presentation, Hamlet is understood as the embodiment of a brilliant artistic endeavor aimed at both revealing and concealing the power of this complex. The author proposes that, if Hamlet is autobiographical, it expresses Shakespeare's inability to mourn and love until a childhood homosexual memory has emerged. Hidden in Hamlet is a cure through the recall of a childhood memory. PMID:19507446

  10. Range Expansion and Population Dynamics of an Invasive Species: The Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto)

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Spencer N.; Hurlbert, Allen H.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species offer ecologists the opportunity to study the factors governing species distributions and population growth. The Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) serves as a model organism for invasive spread because of the wealth of abundance records and the recent development of the invasion. We tested whether a set of environmental variables were related to the carrying capacities and growth rates of individual populations by modeling the growth trajectories of individual populations of the Collared-Dove using Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) and Christmas Bird Count (CBC) data. Depending on the fit of our growth models, carrying capacity and growth rate parameters were extracted and modeled using historical, geographical, land cover and climatic predictors. Model averaging and individual variable importance weights were used to assess the strength of these predictors. The specific variables with the greatest support in our models differed between data sets, which may be the result of temporal and spatial differences between the BBS and CBC. However, our results indicate that both carrying capacity and population growth rates are related to developed land cover and temperature, while growth rates may also be influenced by dispersal patterns along the invasion front. Model averaged multivariate models explained 35–48% and 41–46% of the variation in carrying capacities and population growth rates, respectively. Our results suggest that widespread species invasions can be evaluated within a predictable population ecology framework. Land cover and climate both have important effects on population growth rates and carrying capacities of Collared-Dove populations. Efforts to model aspects of population growth of this invasive species were more successful than attempts to model static abundance patterns, pointing to a potentially fruitful avenue for the development of improved invasive distribution models. PMID:25354270

  11. Feather isotope analysis reveals differential patterns of habitat and resource use in populations of white-winged doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carleton, Scott A.; Martinez Del Rio, Carlos; Robinson, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The white-winged dove (Zenaida asiatica) serves an important ecological role as a diurnal pollinator of the saguaro cactus in the Sonoran desert and an economic role as a highly sought after game bird in North America. White-winged doves are intimately linked to anthropogenic changes on the landscape and because of this, have experienced dramatic population fluctuations over the last 75 years in response, both positively and negatively, to anthropogenic changes on the landscape. To understand the factors driving population growth and decline of migratory species like the white-winged dove, it is imperative we study resource use on both their breeding and wintering grounds. To understand how populations are distributed on the wintering grounds, we tested an alternative to band recovery approaches by using stable isotope analysis. Before we could use isotope analysis to link breeding and wintering locations for this species, we first needed to determine if hydrogen (δ2H) and carbon (δ13C) stable isotopes in feather tissue (δ2Hf and δ13Cf, respectively) could differentiate among populations of white-winged doves across their breeding range in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. δ2Hf and δ13Cf not only differentiated between populations of white-winged doves that breed in the United States, but δ2Hf also provided further differentiation in white-winged doves that breed in native Sonoran Desert and agricultural habitats in the western portion of their range. Ecological processes associated with desert resources and anthropogenic influences, specifically saguaro cacti and irrigated crops, largely determined δ2Hf in some white-winged doves in Arizona whereas δ2H of precipitation (δ2Hp) largely determined δ2Hfof doves in New Mexico and Texas. This study highlights the usefulness of stable isotope analysis to differentiate populations of animals across the landscape and the insight isotopes can provide into habitat and resource use. Published 2015. This article

  12. Symbolic loss in American adolescents: mourning in teenage cinema.

    PubMed

    Kramp, Joseph M

    2014-04-01

    I argue that the changing economic conditions in the contemporary world have caused a shift in religious and cultural values among American youth. This shift in cultural and religious values and practices is interpreted in this essay as an experience of symbolic loss, or a loss of socially shared historic ideals and symbols (Homans in Childhood and selfhood: essays on tradition, religion, and modernity in the psychology of Erik H. Erikson. Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg, pp 189-228, 2008). I argue that the symbolic loss among American youth can most clearly be seen in the contemporary horror film genre in America. I assess the popularity of this genre, its value structure and the psychosocial consequences of the symbolic losses experienced by American youth as witnessed in this film genre. I suggest two ways in which adolescents and adults can work to re-create cultural and religious meanings that both foster courage and serenity in the face of the profound despair that accompanies the rage and paranoia in the contemporary horror film genre. PMID:22843337

  13. Some observations on the creative process and its relation to mourning and various forms of understanding.

    PubMed

    Székely, L

    1983-01-01

    Highly abstract thinking is the manifestation of the inner working of mental life, which in the present instance is the creative activity of a theoretical physicist. Events in the 'creative workshop' are traditionally not the focus of psychoanalytic inquiry. The study here begins with a description of the intrapsychic consequences of object loss and mourning and their specific outcome during a period of creative work. Three distinctive events can be considered as direct consequences of mourning: (1) The conceptualization of the 'little wave'. (2) The belief, that the 'little wave' is solely his invention. (3) The assumption made in the preconscious, that the 'little wave' is a stable one. (2) and (3) had turned out to be erroneous and had been corrected by Alpha subsequently. Thereafter the scope of the psychoanalytic inquiry widens to include the cognitive strategies employed by the physicist and their genetic link to the collective alternates in Greenacre's sense. One such cognitive strategy is dealt with, to which the term 'tangled hierarchy' is applied. This considers how thought or knowledge acquired at one level is transferred to another, or vice versa, with the aim of achieving some degree of isomorphy between them. Interactions between events within the realm of object relations and those which take place in the preconscious creative sphere are pointed out. The transitional stages of a creative product bear the mark of the specific features of object relations, conflicts and defences. The final product, however, does not exhibit these same marks. PMID:6874232

  14. Intentions of burial: mourning, politics, and memorials following the massacre at Srebrenica.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Craig Evan

    2003-01-01

    In the aftermath of tragedy, memorials and grave sites are frequently constructed. Research needs to pay attention to the goals of mourners for such places. The 1995 massacre at Srebrenica in Bosnia-Herzegovina left over 7,000 Muslim men missing and presumed dead. Five years later, families fought to bury the remains that had been collected. Qualitative interviews with 67 people, including survivors and key informants were completed over the summer of 2000. This article examines the intentions of the burial from the perspective of two groups of family members who lost loved ones: survivors who remain politically isolated and those involved in advocacy or political organizations. For the politically isolated, burial was important in reshaping individual mourning after mass death and in the face of unidentified remains. For those involved in advocacy groups, burial was a means of recognizing the past massacre, understanding the massacre's impact on current political divisions, and shaping future directions. Both mourning and political functions are elaborated on in the setting of Bosnian culture and society. PMID:12678057

  15. Aggression and guilt during mourning by parents who lost an infant.

    PubMed

    Hasui, Chieko; Kitamura, Toshinori

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted in-depth interviews with 38 mothers and fathers who had lost an infant. The focus of the interview was aggression and guilt during mourning work. The participants felt strong shame after separation. Phenomena such as strong irrational guilt, aggression, and hesitation toward others were similar to feelings typical of the paranoid-schizoid position. However, mourners did not lose their sense of reality, continued to do daily chores, and kept taking care of others. In this period, mourners were in disintegration, similar to individuals in the paranoid-schizoid position. Shame may be the feeling in the residue of the paranoid-schizoid position, through which they felt persecuted by others, their partner, relatives, and God. Their aggression was strong, but generally their aggression and impulses came to be used constructively and they progressed to integration. At the moment their children died, mourners fluctuated between disintegration and integration. After a certain interval, fluctuation subsided or integration predominated. In times of fluctuation, containers were very important for mourners to move toward integration. Participants reported changes in their lifestyle after the loss of a child. Mental health professionals should view aggressive impulses among such people during mourning not as an obstacle, but rather as a means to move toward integration. The authors speculate that a psychotherapist can serve as a container for mourners. PMID:15342331

  16. Efficacy of rock doves at the Hanford site, Washington, as radiological indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Houser, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    Site faithfulness and general movement patterns of five rock dove (Columba livia) flocks were estimated in order to evaluate their efficacy as radiological indicators on the Hanford Site. Of 367 individually marked birds, 311 were resighted or recaptured at least once during onsite and offsite monitoring. Average site faithfulness for all flocks from resightings was 87.1% and was not significantly different than a hypothesized 90% site faithful distribution. Average site faithfulness from pooled resightings and recaptures was 91.3%, which was also not significantly different than a 90% distribution. Since Hanford rock doves exhibit site faithfulness and can be easily monitored, I conclude that they can be used as radiological indicators. I found 107 birds at 21 different locations during offsite surveys in agricultural areas adjacent to the Hanford Site. Mean movement distances from capture areas to offsite locations for each of the five flocks were significantly different. Mean movement distances from capture areas to offsite locations for each flock were highly correlated with closest possible distances for each flock. Mean movement directions from capture areas to offsite locations for each flock were significantly different than random movement patterns for each flock.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from a Rock Dove (Columba livia) in the Russian Federation.

    PubMed

    Yurchenko, Kseniya S; Sivay, Mariya V; Glushchenko, Alexandra V; Alkhovsky, Sergey V; Shchetinin, Alexey M; Shchelkanov, Michail Y; Shestopalov, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolate, NDV/Altai/pigeon/770/2011, isolated from a rock dove in the Russian Federation. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, this strain was clustered into genotype VIb class II. PMID:25635008

  18. Toxoplasmosis in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) from the zoo of Clères, France

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis causes mortality in several avian species, especially passerine birds. Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) found dead at the zoo of Clères (France). The bird had necrotizing pneumonia and nephritis with intralesional tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondi...

  19. {delta}-ALAD activity variations in red blood cells in response to lead accumulation in rock doves (Columba livia)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.; Tejedor, M.C.

    1992-10-01

    The enzyme {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase ({delta}-ALAD, E.C. 4.2.1.24), catalyses the second step of the haeme biosynthetic pathway and is required to maintain the haemoglobin and cytochrome content in red cells. {delta}-ALAD is not only found in bone marrow cells, the major site of haeme synthesis, but also in circulating erythrocytes and other tissues. An inverse correlation was found between {delta}-ALAD activity in red blood cells and lead concentration in the blood. The degree of {delta}-ALAD inhibition in erythrocytes has been widely accepted as a standard bioassay to detect acute and chronic lead exposure in humans and in avians. The value of this parameter as an indicator for environmental lead has been often reported in doves and Scanlon. In lead-treated rats, an increase in {delta}-ALAD activity in bone marrow cells and in blood samples was shown by radioimmunoassay at 5 and 9 days after the treatment. Similarly, the amount of {delta}-ALAD seems to be more sensitive to lead in avian species than in mammals, the usefulness of blood {delta}-ALAD activity as an index of lead exposure has already been questioned by Hutton in the pigeon and by Jaffe et al. in humans. The present investigation studied the toxic effects of lead on rock dove red blood cell {delta}-ALAD activity in two situations: in doves treated with lead acetate in the laboratory and in doves exposed to the environment of Alcala de Henares. The final lead blood concentrations were lower in the environmental than in the laboratory doves. {delta}-ALAD activity in bone marrow cells and the relationships between lead accumulation and enzyme activity in red cells, are examined. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Mourning and melancholia revisited: correspondences between principles of Freudian metapsychology and empirical findings in neuropsychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Mayberg, Helen S; Malizia, Andrea L; Nutt, David

    2008-01-01

    Freud began his career as a neurologist studying the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, but it was his later work in psychology that would secure his place in history. This paper draws attention to consistencies between physiological processes identified by modern clinical research and psychological processes described by Freud, with a special emphasis on his famous paper on depression entitled 'Mourning and melancholia'. Inspired by neuroimaging findings in depression and deep brain stimulation for treatment resistant depression, some preliminary physiological correlates are proposed for a number of key psychoanalytic processes. Specifically, activation of the subgenual cingulate is discussed in relation to repression and the default mode network is discussed in relation to the ego. If these correlates are found to be reliable, this may have implications for the manner in which psychoanalysis is viewed by the wider psychological and psychiatric communities. PMID:18652673

  1. Younger Dryas glaciation and climate in the Mourne Mountains, Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Iestyn; Devaney, Maia; Flood, Rory; Roberson, Sam

    2016-04-01

    Here we investigate glaciation and climate in the Mourne Mountains, Northern Ireland, during the Younger Dryas (YD; c. 12.9-11.7 ka BP), using a combination of field-mapping, remote sensing and glacier mass balance modelling. Results indicate that small, independent (likely snow-field fed) glaciers occupied the mountains during this period, with Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs) ranging from ~ 450 to 708 m above sea level. Based on these estimates, mass balance modelling suggest a ~ 8°C reduction in mean annual temperature at the YD (assuming precipitation values comparable to present). Despite this, though the chronology and style of glacial retreat from the Last Glacial Maximum would suggest that the reconstructed glaciers relate to the YD, new radiocarbon dating of basal contact organics (conducted as part of this investigation) has been unable to conclusively verify a YD age.

  2. Grief and mourning gone awry: pathway and course of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Shear, M. Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief is a recently recognized condition that occurs in about 7% of bereaved people. People with this condition are caught up in rumination about the circumstances of the death, worry about its consequences, or excessive avoidance of reminders of the loss. Unable to comprehend the finality and consequences of the loss, they resort to excessive avoidance of reminders of the loss as they are tossed helplessly on waves of intense emotion. People with complicated grief need help, and clinicians need to know how to recognize the symptoms and how to provide help. This paper provides a framework to help clinicans understand bereavement, grief, and mourning. Evidence-based diagnostic criteria are provided to help clinicians recognize complicated grief, and differentiate it from depression as well as anxiety disorder. We provide an overview of risk factors and basic assumptions and principles that can guide treatment. PMID:22754284

  3. When the third is dead: memory, mourning, and witnessing in the aftermath of the holocaust.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Samuel

    2009-12-01

    The origins of psychoanalysis, as well as the concerns of our daily endeavors, center on engagement with the fate of the unbearable - be it wish, affect, or experience. In this paper, I explore psychological states and dynamics faced by survivors of genocide and their children in their struggle to sustain life in the midst of unremitting deadliness. Toward this continuous effort, I re-examine Freud's theoretical formulations concerning memory and mourning, elaborate André Green's concept of the 'Dead Mother', and introduce more recent work on the concepts of the 'third' and 'thirdness'. Throughout, my thoughts are informed by our clinical experience with the essential role of witnessing in sustaining life after massive trauma. I bring aspects of all these forms of knowing to reflections about a poem by Primo Levi entitled Unfinished business and to our own never finished business of avoiding denial while living in an age of genocide and under the aura of uncontained destructiveness. PMID:20002819

  4. 50 CFR 32.35 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Migratory Game Bird Hunting. We allow hunting of goose, duck, coot, dove, rail, woodcock, crow, and common... allow hunting of goose, duck, merganser, coot, mourning dove, and snipe on designated areas of the.... We allow hunting of goose, duck, coot, rail, snipe, woodcock, and mourning dove on designated...

  5. [A Clinical Case of Grief Hallucination through the Mourning Work Normal Grief and Spiritual Care].

    PubMed

    Kurotori, Isaku; Kato, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Auditory or visual hallucinations of a deceased person are well known in the normal course of the bereavement process. According to DSM-5, this symptom is included in the associated features supporting diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder. In Japan, however, little is known about these hallucinatory experiences during grieving, and few reports on their prevalence are available. Here, we have reported a clinical case of such experiences following the loss of a spouse. A 66-year-old patient presented to the outpatient department with insomnia after her husband's death. She was preoccupied with a sense of loss and absolute loneliness. One day, she confessed to regularly encountering her husband's ghost at night; the ghost was distinguishable from a dream and provided the bereaved wife with some degree of comfort. The appearances lasted for 15 months and occurred several times a week without disturbing her social functioning. She gradually became aware that her husband was returning from the spirit world to give her solace. Her treatment was focused on resolving her conflicting feelings concerning her grief at his death and her relief at his no longer suffering from disease. While accepting her experiences, she started to review the days they spent together and appreciated his attachment. Therefore she completed the work of mourning and the ghost no longer appeared. One year after the departure of the ghost, she still attends the hospital regularly and there has been no recurrence. A reconstruction of her internal world leads us to conclude that the support of normal grief with such hallucinations prevents the intense experience of loss from generating pathological grief. Furthermore, we suggest reconsidering the importance of the mourning work and the inclusion of both the bereaved and deceased person in the medical context. PMID:26642726

  6. Susceptibility of rock doves to low-pathogenic avian influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Shriner, Susan A; Root, J Jeffrey; Mooers, Nicole L; Ellis, Jeremy W; Stopak, Scott R; Sullivan, Heather J; VanDalen, Kaci K; Franklin, Alan B

    2016-03-01

    Following a 2008 outbreak of North American low-pathogenic H5N8 influenza A virus at an upland gamebird farm, we sero-sampled rock doves (pigeons, Columba livia) at the outbreak site and conducted experimental inoculations of wild-caught pigeons using the H5N8 virus and another low-pathogenic virus (H4N6). While 13% of pigeons at the outbreak site were seropositive, none were positive for exposure to H5, and one was positive for N8. Challenged pigeons exhibited low susceptibility and limited viral RNA excretion for both viruses tested, but at least one individual had RNA loads indicative of the potential for viral transmission to other birds. PMID:26687583

  7. Mutation-selection equilibrium in finite populations playing a Hawk-Dove game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Pablo; Seoane, Jesús M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2015-08-01

    We study the evolution of a finite population playing a Hawk-Dove game with mixed strategies. Players have a fixed strategy and their offspring inherit the parental strategy, with a probability u of mutating to another strategy. Payoff in the game is the only variation in fitness among individuals, and a selection coefficient δ measures the importance of the game in the overall fitness. Population evolution is carried out through a Moran process. We compare our numerical simulations with theoretical predictions in earlier work by Tarnita et al. (2009). Our results show that the effect of selection on the abundances of favored strategies is nonlinear, being less intense as δ increases. The mutation rate u has an opposite and stronger effect to that of selection. Heuristic theoretical arguments are given in order to explain this nonlinear relationship.

  8. Dark Oligotrophic Volcanic Ecosystems (DOVEs) in Fumarolic Ice Caves of Mt. Erebus Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, H.; Anitori, R.; Davis, R.; Connell, L.; Tebo, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    Dark Oligotrophic Volcanic Ecosystems (DOVEs) in the earth's crust may host substantial biomass sustained by chemolithoautotrophic metabolic reactions. It may serve as the base of the foodweb at the surface via hydrothermal circulation, venting pore fluids, cold seeps or gases, and offer a means for primary carbon fixation. When compared to other crustal oligotrophic environments, DOVEs are particularly relevant due to their considerable reductive potential, high permeability and the substantial chemical exchange facilitated by their hydrothermal systems. We studied terrestrial DOVEs in fumarolic ice caves on the summit plateau of Mt Erebus, an active volcano on Ross Island, Antarctica (http://erebuscaves.nmt.edu/). Most of the ice caves on Mt Erebus are relatively shallow and illuminated by natural light, but some are deep enough to afford complete darkness. Fumarole gases forming these caves are mostly atmospheric, enriched with water vapor and CO2. The fumaroles were studied in three caves, Warren, Warren West and Harry's Dream; these displayed, respectively, temperatures of 18°C, 2°C and 11°C at our sampling sites. Both Warren caves were completely dark, while Harry's Dream received continuous indirect light during the Austral summer, and offered a control to the two dark caves. The composition of the resident microbial communities was assessed using 16S rRNA and ITS libraries, while metabolic and functional characteristics were analyzed by culturing. The latter results are presented by Anitori et al. (this session). The three cave soils displayed very low (Warren, Warren West) or moderate division-level diversity, with distinct communities in each environment. Acidobacteria was the only phylum detected in all three caves, and was a major component of each library. The phototroph-containing phyla Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Chlorophyta (latter eukaryotic) were only seen in Harry's Dream. A number of phyla whose members are known to oxidize Mn(II) or Fe

  9. Doves and hawks in economics revisited: An evolutionary quantum game theory based analysis of financial crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Kunz, Jennifer; Bernius, Steffen; König, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    The last financial and economic crisis demonstrated the dysfunctional long-term effects of aggressive behaviour in financial markets. Yet, evolutionary game theory predicts that under the condition of strategic dependence a certain degree of aggressive behaviour remains within a given population of agents. However, as a consequence of the financial crisis, it would be desirable to change the “rules of the game” in a way that prevents the occurrence of any aggressive behaviour and thereby also the danger of market crashes. The paper picks up this aspect. Through the extension of the well-known hawk-dove game by a quantum approach, we can show that dependent on entanglement, evolutionary stable strategies also can emerge, which are not predicted by the classical evolutionary game theory and where the total economic population uses a non-aggressive quantum strategy.

  10. Phenology changes in the mayfly Ephemera danica in response to water temperature variations in the River Dove, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew; Everall, Nicholas; Wilby, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Water temperature in rivers is critical to aquatic life. Climate and environmental change can elevate river temperatures to levels that stress fish, but impacts on other aquatic organisms are not well understood. In particular, rising temperatures are expected to alter the phenology of aquatic insects at levels substantially below those required to stress fish species. The phenology of the mayfly Ephemera danica, a large burrowing species that is widespread throughout Europe, is known to be sensitive to temperature change. To assess the temporal and spatial variability in mayfly emergence, E. danica were monitored at two reaches in the River Dove, English Peak District over the period 2007 to 2013. Variations in Growing Degree Days (GDDs) were modelled for an upstream site with an annual temperature range in excess of 15 ° C (Beresford Dale) and a downstream site, dominated by near constant discharges of cool groundwater with an annual range less than 8 ° C (Dovedale). The emergence of E. danica was strongly related to GDDs at each site. E. danica usually remains in an aquatic larval stage for two years before emerging in its adult, terrestrial form. However, after particularly warm summers in Beresford Dale, E. danica was recorded to emerge after only one year in its aquatic form. Following the particularly wet/cold year of 2012, E. danica began to revert back to a bi-annual cycle. In Dovedale, an average of 374 fewer GDDs were accumulated in comparison to Beresford Dale. As a result, E. danica maintained a two-year growth cycle throughout the monitoring period despite the phenology changes observed 8 km upstream at Beresford. Changes to insect phenology are significant because populations with a one-year cycle are potentially more vulnerable to adverse weather when the majority of the population is in terrestrial form. Also, altering the growth, development and size of insects affects reproductive success with implications for population dynamics. Data from the

  11. The Chewing Lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Ischnocera: Amblycera) of Japanese Pigeons and Doves (Columbiformes), with Descriptions of Three New Species.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Daniel R; Tsurumi, Miyako; Bush, Sarah E

    2015-06-01

    The chewing louse fauna of pigeons and doves in Japan is reviewed based on published records and new collections. An updated checklist of the chewing lice of Japanese pigeons and doves is provided, and 3 new species are described: Columbicola asukae n. sp. and Coloceras nakamurai n. sp., both from Columba janthina Temminck, 1830 (Japanese wood pigeon), and Columbicola lemoinei n. sp. from Treron formosae permagnus Stejneger, 1887, and Treron formosae medioximus (Bangs, 1901) (whistling green-pigeons). This checklist includes data on the first records of Coloceras chinense (Kellogg and Chapman, 1902), Coloceras piriformis ( Tendeiro, 1969 ), and Columbicola guimaraesi Tendeiro, 1965, in Japan. New host records of Hohorstiella sp. from Columba janthina and Treron formosae permagnus, and Coloceras sp. from Treron sieboldii sieboldii (Temminck, 1835) (white-bellied green-pigeon) are provided. PMID:25738214

  12. Migration Routes and Staging Areas of Trans-Saharan Turtle Doves Appraised from Light-Level Geolocators

    PubMed Central

    Eraud, Cyril; Rivière, Marcel; Lormée, Hervé; Fox, James W.; Ducamp, Jean-Jacques; Boutin, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The identification of migration routes, wintering grounds and stopover sites are crucial issues for the understanding of the Palearctic-African bird migration system as well as for the development of relevant conservation strategies for trans-Saharan migrants. Using miniaturized light-level geolocators we report a comprehensive and detailed year round track of a granivorous trans-Saharan migrant, the European Turtle Dove (Streptopelia turtur). From five recovered loggers, our data provide new insights on migratory journeys and winter destinations of Turtle Doves originating from a breeding population in Western France. Data confirm that Turtle Doves wintered in West Africa. The main wintering area encompassed Western Mali, the Inner Delta Niger and the Malian/Mauritanian border. Some individuals also extended their wintering ranges over North Guinea, North-West of Burkina Faso and the Ivory-Coast. Our results reveal that all individuals did not spend the winter period at a single location; some of them experienced a clear eastward shift of several hundred kilometres. We also found evidence for a loop migration pattern, with a post-breeding migration flyway lying west of the spring route. Finally, we found that on their way back to breeding grounds Turtle Doves needed to refuel after crossing the Sahara desert. Contrary to previous suggestions, our data reveal that birds used stopover sites for several weeks, presumably in Morocco and North Algeria. This later finding is a crucial issue for future conservation strategies because environmental conditions on these staging areas might play a pivotal role in population dynamics of this declining species. PMID:23544064

  13. Courtship interactions stimulate rapid changes in GnRH synthesis in male ring doves

    PubMed Central

    Mantei, Kristen E.; Ramakrishnan, Selvakumar; Sharp, Peter J.; Buntin, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Many birds and mammals show changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in response to social or sexual interactions between breeding partners. While alterations in GnRH neuronal activity play an important role in stimulating these changes, it remains unclear if acute behaviorally-induced alterations in GnRH release are accompanied by parallel changes in GnRH synthesis. To investigate this relationship, we examined changes in the activity of GnRH neurons in the brains of male ring doves following brief periods of courtship interactions with females. Such interactions have been previously shown to increase plasma LH in courting male doves at 24 h, but not at 1 h, after pairing with females. In the first study, males allowed to court females for 2 h had 60% more cells that showed immunocytochemical labeling for GnRH-I in the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus than did control males that remained isolated from females. To determine whether an increase in GnRH gene expression preceded this increase in GnRH immunoreactivity in the POA, changes in the number of cells with detectable GnRH-I mRNA in the POA were measured by in situ hybridization following a 1 h period of courtship interactions with females. In this second study, courting males exhibited 40% more cells with GnRH-I in this region than did isolated control males. GnRH-immunoreactive neurons in two other diencephalic regions failed to show these courtship-induced changes. Plasma LH was not elevated after 1 or 2 h of courtship. These results demonstrate that the release of GnRH-I in the POA that is presumably responsible for courtship-induced pituitary and gonadal activation is accompanied by a rapid increase in GnRH synthesis that occurs before plasma LH levels increase. We suggest that this increase in GnRH synthesis is necessary to support the extended period of HPG axis activation that is seen in this species during the 5–10 day period of courtship and nest building activity. PMID

  14. Macroscopic and molecular-scale assessment of soil lead contamination impacted by seasonal dove hunting activities

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Y.; Tappero, R.; Rick, A.R.; Saylor, T.; Faas, E. & Lanzirotti, A.

    2011-05-24

    Environmental contamination of lead (Pb) in soils and sediments poses serious threats to human and ecological health. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of seasonal dove sports hunting activities on Pb contamination in acid forest soils. A grid sampling method was used to investigate the spatial distribution of Pb contamination in surface soils. Soils were analyzed for total metal(loid) concentration and characterized for physicochemical properties and mineralogy. Adsorption isotherm experiments were also conducted to understand the reactivity and retention capacity of Pb(II) in soils. Finally, synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical speciation of Pb that controls the retention/release mechanisms of Pb in soils. There was no excessive accumulation of Pb at the site. However, the concentration of Pb in surface soils was greater than the background level (<16 mg kg{sup -1}). The contamination level of Pb was as high as 67 mg kg{sup -1} near a patch of corn field where lime was frequently applied. A microfocused X-ray microprobe analysis showed the presence of Pb pellet fragments that predominantly contain oxidized Pb(II), suggesting that oxidative dissolution was occurring in soils. Dissolved Pb(II) can be readily retained in soils up to {approx}3,600 mg kg{sup -1} via inner-sphere and outer-sphere surface complexation on carbon and aluminol functional groups of soil components, suggesting that partitioning reactions control the concentration of Pb in soil solution. The fate of Pb is likely to be controlled by (1) oxidative dissolution process of Pb(0) pellets and (2) the release of outer-sphere and/or inner-sphere Pb surface complexes in humic substances and aluminosilicate/Al oxyhydroxides. Although no remedial actions are immediately required, the long-term accumulation of Pb in soils should be carefully monitored in protecting ecosystem and water quality at the dove hunting

  15. Preliminary Surficial Geology of the Dove Spring Off-Highway Vehicle Open Area, Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David M.; Amoroso, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Introduction As part of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) monitoring plan to evaluate the environmental impact of off-highway vehicle (OHV) use on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land in California, this report presents results of geologic studies in the Dove Spring OHV Open Area. This study produced baseline data, which when combined with historic and current patterns of land use, forms the basis for vegetation and wildlife monitoring designed to address the following questions: 1. Is the density and length of OHV routes increasing? 2. Are there cumulative effects of past and current OHV use associated with changes in the environmental integrity of soils, plants, and wildlife? 3. Is the spread of invasive species associated with levels of OHV use? 4. Is there a threshold of OHV impact that might be translated to management action by the BLM? The monitoring studies will be used to collect baseline environmental information to determine levels of environmental impact of OHV use. This approach will use a low-impact area as a proxy for pre-impact conditions (substituting space for time) to determine thresholds of OHV impacts beyond which environmental integrity is affected. Indicators of environmental integrity will emphasize factors that are fundamental to ecosystem structure and function and likely to be sensitive to OHV impacts. Surficial geology is studied because material properties such as texture and chemistry strongly control soil moisture and nutrient availability and therefore affect plant growth and distribution. An understanding of surficial geology can be used to predict and extrapolate soil properties and improve understanding of vegetation assemblages and their distribution. In the present study, vegetation associations may be examined as a function of surficial geology as well as other environmental variables such as slope, aspect, NRCS (National Resources Conservation Service) soil classification, elevation, and land-use history. Ground measurements of

  16. UN genocide commemoration, transnational scenes of mourning and the global project of learning from atrocity.

    PubMed

    Skillington, Tracey

    2013-09-01

    This paper offers a critical analytic reconstruction of some of the main symbolic properties of annual UN Holocaust and Rwandan genocide commemorations since 2005. Applying a discourse-historical approach (Wodak and Meyer 2010), it retraces how themes of guilt, responsibility, evil and redemption are woven together across annual commemorative performances in the hope of stabilizing shared patterns of cultural translation of the significance of these atrocities to globally dispersed communities. UN commemorative discourse characteristically links memories of Holocaust and Rwandan trauma in a 'chain of communication' with those of other episodes of brutality (e.g., Cambodia, Bosnia and Darfur) chiefly to convey the continuity of human barbarity across time and endorse certain presuppositions regarding the fate of a fallen humanity in this more 'post-secular' age. As scenes of mourning, UN commemorations unite participating international delegations in their expressions of grief for the victims of 'preventable tragedies' in the past but also, it must be said, their uncertainty regarding new horrors likely to occur in the future. The duty to remember is reiterated continuously as both a mark of respect to those who have already perished and as a warning of atrocities yet to unfold. This paper explores how the historical constancy of violence is interpreted by the UN through a detailed critical analysis of its recently inaugurated 'remembrance through education' programme aimed at a transnational collective learning from atrocity. PMID:23998322

  17. Dopamine and norepinephrine depletion in ring doves fed DDE, dieldrin, and Aroclor 1254

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hill, E.F.; Contrera, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The levels of dopamine and norepinephrine were measured in one-half of the brain of ring doves fed a control diet or a diet containing 2, 20, or 200 ppm DDE; 1, 4, or 16 ppm dieldrin; or 1, 10, or 100 ppm Aroclor 1254. Levels of DDE, dieldrin, or Aroclor 1254 were determined in the other half of each brain. The intermediate and high levels of each chemical caused depletions in both neurotransmitters, and brain residues of each chemical were negatively correlated with levels of neurotransmitters. The highest concentrations of DDE, dieldrin, and Aroclor 1254 depressed averages of dopamine to 42.4, 41.4, and 45.2% of the control level and norepinephrine to 61.6, 62.0, and 56.9% of controls, respectively. Depletions of dopamine and norepinephrine could result in abnormal behavior of contaminated birds in the wild, and the detection of such depletions could become an important tool in assessing contaminant-induced behavioral aberrations in birds.

  18. Deuterium stable isotope ratios as tracers of water resource use: an experimental test with rock doves.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O; Martínez del Rio, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Naturally-occurring deuterium stable isotope ratios can potentially be used to trace water resource use by animals, but estimating the contribution of isotopically distinct water sources requires the accurate prediction of isotopic discrimination factors between water inputs and an animal's body water pool. We examined the feasibility of using estimates of water fluxes between a bird and its environment with a mass-balance model for the deuterium stable isotope ratio of avian body water (deltaDbody) to predict isotopic discrimination factors. Apparent fractionation and thus discrimination factors were predicted to vary with the proportion of an animal's total water losses than could be attributed to evaporative processes. To test our ability to predict isotopic discrimination, we manipulated water intake and evaporative water loss in rock doves (Columba livia) by providing them with fresh water or 0.15 M NaCl solution in thermoneutral or hot environments. After we switched the birds from drinking water with deltaD=-95 per thousand VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water) to enriched drinking water with deltaD=+52 per thousand VSMOW, steady-state deltaDbody was approached asymptotically. The equilibrium deltaDbody was enriched by 10-50 per thousand relative to water inputs. After isotopic equilibrium was reached, the degree of enrichment was positively related (r2=0.34) to the fraction of total water loss that occurred by evaporation (revap/rH2O)supporting the major prediction of the model. The variation we observed in discrimination factors suggests that the apparent fractionation of deuterium will be difficult to predict accurately under natural conditions. Our results show that accurate estimates of the contribution of different water sources to a bird's body water pool require large deuterium isotopic differences between the sources. PMID:15185137

  19. Personal Narratives of Loss and the Exhumation of Missing Persons in the Aftermath of War: In Search of Public and School Pedagogies of Mourning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2011-01-01

    This paper is grounded in a phenomenological-interpretive exploration of how mourning is experienced and understood by the victim's nuclear family--the victims are Greek-Cypriot missing persons whose remains have been recovered, identified and properly buried, after exhumations of mass graves in the aftermath of war. Particularly, the focus is on…

  20. A Spectrophotometric Study of Plumage Color in the Eared Dove (Zenaida auriculata), the Most Abundant South American Columbiforme.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Diego Javier; Benitez-Vieyra, Santiago Miguel

    2016-01-01

    For birds, plumage color perception is critical in social interactions such as courtship, in both monochromatic and dichromatic species. In the Eared Dove (Zenaida auriculata), perhaps the most abundant South American Columbiforme, the plumage of males and females looks alike and both sexes share the same melanistic coloration with gray and pink tones. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether evident sexual dichromatism exists in the plumage of the Eared Dove using a spectrophotometry technique in the avian-visible range (300-700 nm). The results of the classic colorimetric variables analysis (hue, chroma and brightness) show that males are in general brighter and have higher UV chroma values than females. The avian visual model points to differences in achromatic and chromatic levels between males and females in body regions possibly involved in sexual selection (e.g. the crown). The model also indicates chromatic or achromatic differences in body regions not subject to sexual selection such as the black spots on the wing coverts and white tail bands, both of which may be involved in intra- or inter-gender-specific communication. PMID:27213273

  1. Colonisation and Diversification of the Zenaida Dove (Zenaida aurita) in the Antilles: Phylogeography, Contemporary Gene Flow and Morphological Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Monceau, Karine; Cézilly, Frank; Moreau, Jérôme; Motreuil, Sébastien; Wattier, Rémi

    2013-01-01

    Caribbean avifaunal biogeography has been mainly studied based on mitochondrial DNA. Here, we investigated both past and recent island differentiation and micro-evolutionary changes in the Zenaida Dove (Zenaida aurita) based on combined information from one mitochondrial (Cytochrome c Oxydase subunit I, COI) and 13 microsatellite markers and four morphological characters. This Caribbean endemic and abundant species has a large distribution, and two subspecies are supposed to occur: Z. a. zenaida in the Greater Antilles (GA) and Z. a. aurita in the Lesser Antilles (LA). Doves were sampled on two GA islands (Puerto Rico and the British Virgin Islands) and six LA islands (Saint Barthélemy, Guadeloupe, Les Saintes, Martinique, Saint Lucia and Barbados). Eleven COI haplotypes were observed that could be assembled in two distinct lineages, with six specific to GA, four to LA, the remaining one occurring in all islands. However, the level of divergence between those two lineages was too moderate to fully corroborate the existence of two subspecies. Colonisation of the studied islands appeared to be a recent process. However, both phenotypic and microsatellite data suggest that differentiation is already under way between all of them, partly associated with the existence of limited gene flow. No isolation by distance was observed. Differentiation for morphological traits was more pronounced than for neutral markers. These results suggest that despite recent colonisation, genetic drift and/or restricted gene flow are promoting differentiation for neutral markers. Variation in selective pressures between islands may explain the observed phenotypic differentiation. PMID:24349217

  2. Expansion of an exotic species and concomitant disease outbreaks: pigeon paramyxovirus in free-ranging Eurasian collared doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuler, Krysten L.; Green, David E.; Justice-Allen, Anne E.; Jaffe, Rosemary; Cunningham, Mark; Thomas, Nancy J.; Spalding, Marilyn G.; Ip, Hon S.

    2012-01-01

    Eurasian collared doves (Streptopelia decaocto) have expanded their range across the United States since their introduction several decades ago. Recent mortality events in Eurasian collared doves in Arizona and Montana, USA, during the winter of 2009-2010 were the result of pigeon paramyxovirus (PPMV), a novel disease agent. The first instance of mortality by this emerging infectious disease in this species occurred in Florida in 2001 with subsequent disease events in 2006 and 2008. Full diagnostic necropsies were performed on carcasses from the three states. PPMV was identified by RT-PCR and virus isolation and was sequenced to the VIb genotype of avian paramyxovirus-1 (APMV). Other APMVs are common in a variety of free-ranging birds, but concern is warranted because of the potential for commingling of this species with native birds, virus evolution, and threats to domestic poultry. Improved surveillance for wildlife mortality events and efforts to prevent introduction of non-native animals could reduce the threat of introducing new pathogens.

  3. A Spectrophotometric Study of Plumage Color in the Eared Dove (Zenaida auriculata), the Most Abundant South American Columbiforme

    PubMed Central

    Benitez-Vieyra, Santiago Miguel

    2016-01-01

    For birds, plumage color perception is critical in social interactions such as courtship, in both monochromatic and dichromatic species. In the Eared Dove (Zenaida auriculata), perhaps the most abundant South American Columbiforme, the plumage of males and females looks alike and both sexes share the same melanistic coloration with gray and pink tones. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether evident sexual dichromatism exists in the plumage of the Eared Dove using a spectrophotometry technique in the avian-visible range (300–700 nm). The results of the classic colorimetric variables analysis (hue, chroma and brightness) show that males are in general brighter and have higher UV chroma values than females. The avian visual model points to differences in achromatic and chromatic levels between males and females in body regions possibly involved in sexual selection (e.g. the crown). The model also indicates chromatic or achromatic differences in body regions not subject to sexual selection such as the black spots on the wing coverts and white tail bands, both of which may be involved in intra- or inter-gender-specific communication. PMID:27213273

  4. The hawk-dove game in a sexually reproducing species explains a colourful polymorphism of an endangered bird.

    PubMed

    Kokko, Hanna; Griffith, Simon C; Pryke, Sarah R

    2014-10-22

    The hawk-dove game famously introduced strategic game theory thinking into biology and forms the basis of arguments for limited aggression in animal populations. However, aggressive 'hawks' and peaceful 'doves', with strategies inherited in a discrete manner, have never been documented in a real animal population. Thus, the applicability of game-theoretic arguments to real populations might be contested. Here, we show that the head-colour polymorphism of red and black Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae) provides a real-life example. The aggressive red morph is behaviourally dominant and successfully invades black populations, but when red 'hawks' become too common, their fitness is severely compromised (via decreased parental ability). We also investigate the effects of real-life deviations, particularly sexual reproduction, from the simple original game, which assumed asexual reproduction. A protected polymorphism requires mate choice to be sufficiently assortative. Assortative mating is adaptive for individuals because of genetic incompatibilities affecting hybrid offspring fitness, but by allowing red 'hawks' to persist, it also leads to significantly reduced population sizes. Because reductions in male contributions to parental care are generally known to lead to lower population productivity in birds, we expect zero-sum competition to often have wide ranging population consequences. PMID:25209943

  5. Mental states as part of countertransference responses in psychotherapists facing reports of traumatic events of mourning and sexual violence.

    PubMed

    Goldfeld, Patricia; Terra, Luciana; Abuchaim, Claudio; Sordi, Anne; Wiethaeuper, Daniela; Bouchard, Marc-Andrè; Mardini, Victor; Baumgardt, Rosana; Lauerman, Marta; Ceitlin, Lúcia Helena

    2008-09-01

    The study aims to compare the mental states and countertransference responses of 92 psychodynamically oriented psychotherapists, male and female, experienced and inexperienced, facing written reports of real patients who experienced traumatic events. Two vignettes were presented: one of a sexual violence, the other the sudden death of a significant person. The Mental States Rating System (MSRS; Bouchard, Picard, Audet, Brisson, & Carrier, 1998), the MSRS Self-Report (Goldfeld & Bouchard, 2004), and the Inventory of Countertransference Behavior (ICB; Friedman & Gelso, 2000) were used. Results showed that the mourning vignette led to more reflective responses (MSRS) and the rape case was associated with more negative countertransference reactions (ICB). Female participants were more reflective (MSRS); male therapists used less mentalized states (MSRS Self-Report) and expressed more negative reactions (ICB) for both scenarios. Experienced therapists showed more positive reactions on the ICB. The construct validity of the instruments is discussed in relation to the findings. PMID:18816003

  6. 77 FR 3490 - Information Collection Request Sent to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for Approval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... FR 3802) a notice of our intent to request that OMB renew approval for this information collection... (OMB) for Approval; Mourning Dove Call Count Survey AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION.... Title: Mourning Dove Call Count Survey. Service Form Number(s): 3-159. Type of Request: Extension...

  7. 50 CFR 32.50 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. We allow hunting of goose, duck, coot, mourning dove, and sandhill....S. Highway 70 and U.S. Highway 380), we restrict hunting to goose, duck, sandhill crane, and... allow hunting of mourning and white-winged dove and light goose on designated areas of the refuge...

  8. Effects of stimuli emanating from the nest on the reproductive cycle in the ring dove. I: pre-laying behaviour.

    PubMed

    White, S J

    1975-11-01

    The course of several behavioural patterns could be influenced by controlling the state of the nest available to a pair of ring doves (Streptopelia risoria). These patterns were: wing-flipping, handling of nesting material, nest bowl occupancy, and nervous activities. In groups having to build nests, the onset of wing-flipping by the female occurred at a predictable time before egg-laying. It is argued that during nest-building a female influences the male to carry material to her by sitting in the nest bowl and wing-flipping. In pairs provided with a completed nest, the course of the pre-laying cycle was changed and the 'typical' sex roles did not emerge. The relationships between the male and female are discussed. PMID:1106261

  9. Cophylogenetic analysis of New World ground-doves (Aves: Columbidae) and their parasitic wing lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Columbicola).

    PubMed

    Sweet, Andrew D; Johnson, Kevin P

    2016-10-01

    Hosts-parasite interactions are plentiful and diverse, and understanding the patterns of these interactions can provide great insight into the evolutionary history of the organisms involved. Estimating the phylogenetic relationships of a group of parasites and comparing them to that of their hosts can indicate how factors such as host or parasite life history, biogeography, or climate affect evolutionary patterns. In this study we compare the phylogeny generated for a clade of parasitic chewing lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) within the genus Columbicola to that of their hosts, the small New World ground-doves (Aves: Columbidae). We sampled lice from the majority of host species, including samples from multiple geographic locations. From these samples we sequenced mitochondrial and nuclear loci for the lice, and used these data to estimate phylogenetic trees and population networks. After estimating the appropriate number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) for the lice, we used cophylogenetic analyses to compare the louse phylogeny to an existing host phylogeny. Our phylogenetic analysis recovered significant structure within the louse clade, including evidence for potentially cryptic species. All cophylogenetic analyses indicated an overall congruence between the host and parasite trees. However, we only recovered a single cospeciation event. This finding suggests that certain branches in the trees are driving the signal of congruence. In particular, lice with the highest levels of congruence are associated with high Andean species of ground-doves that are well separated altitudinally from other related taxa. Other host-parasite associations are not as congruent, and these often involved widespread louse taxa. These widespread lice did, however, have significant phylogeographic structure, and their phylogenetic relationships are perhaps best explained by biogeographic patterns. Overall these results indicate that both host phylogeny and biogeography can be

  10. [Significances of the life experience for the long-lived elderly person in the process of death/dying and mourning].

    PubMed

    Menezes, Tânia Maria de Oliva; Lopes, Regina Lúcia Mendonça

    2014-08-01

    This is a study using the Heideggerian theoretical-phenomenological approach, which sought to understand the significances of the life experience for the long-lived elderly person in the process of death/dying and mourning. It was conducted in 2009 with 16 long-lived senior citizens of both genders who were aged between 80 and 90, members of a community center for the elderly located in a suburban neighborhood of the city of Salvador in the state of Bahia, Brazil. The results showed that the long-lived elderly person experiences the mourning status process when relatives and friends become ill and die. Furthermore, they gave ambiguous reports with respect to the fear of death. With the attributed significances, it was possible to arrive at the unit of significance, namely the authenticity and lack of authenticity of the individual regarding imminent death. The conclusion reached is that long-lived elderly individuals faced with the process of death/dying and mourning is apparent or concealed in accordance with the moment they are experiencing and the opportunities that present themselves, in other words, it is greatly influenced by their past. PMID:25119070

  11. Hierarchical modeling of an invasive spread: The eurasian collared-dove streptopelia decaocto in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bled, F.; Royle, J. Andrew; Cam, E.

    2011-01-01

    Invasive species are regularly claimed as the second threat to biodiversity. To apply a relevant response to the potential consequences associated with invasions (e.g., emphasize management efforts to prevent new colonization or to eradicate the species in places where it has already settled), it is essential to understand invasion mechanisms and dynamics. Quantifying and understanding what influences rates of spatial spread is a key research area for invasion theory. In this paper, we develop a model to account for occupancy dynamics of an invasive species. Our model extends existing models to accommodate several elements of invasive processes; we chose the framework of hierarchical modeling to assess site occupancy status during an invasion. First, we explicitly accounted for spatial structure and how distance among sites and position relative to one another affect the invasion spread. In particular, we accounted for the possibility of directional propagation and provided a way of estimating the direction of this possible spread. Second, we considered the influence of local density on site occupancy. Third, we decided to split the colonization process into two subprocesses, initial colonization and recolonization, which may be ground-breaking because these subprocesses may exhibit different relationships with environmental variations (such as density variation) or colonization history (e.g., initial colonization might facilitate further colonization events). Finally, our model incorporates imperfection in detection, which might be a source of substantial bias in estimating population parameters. We focused on the case of the Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) and its invasion of the United States since its introduction in the early 1980s, using data from the North American BBS (Breeding Bird Survey). The Eurasian Collared-Dove is one of the most successful invasive species, at least among terrestrial vertebrates. Our model provided estimation of the

  12. The Salience of Family Worldview in Mourning an Elderly Husband and Father

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Helen K.; Santanello, Holly R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore family reaction to the death of the elderly husband and father in the family. Methods: We qualitatively interviewed 34 families (a family included a widow and 2 adult biological children) approximately 6-15 months after the death. In private, one-on-one in-depth interviews, we…

  13. The hawk–dove game in a sexually reproducing species explains a colourful polymorphism of an endangered bird

    PubMed Central

    Kokko, Hanna; Griffith, Simon C.; Pryke, Sarah R.

    2014-01-01

    The hawk–dove game famously introduced strategic game theory thinking into biology and forms the basis of arguments for limited aggression in animal populations. However, aggressive ‘hawks’ and peaceful ‘doves’, with strategies inherited in a discrete manner, have never been documented in a real animal population. Thus, the applicability of game-theoretic arguments to real populations might be contested. Here, we show that the head-colour polymorphism of red and black Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae) provides a real-life example. The aggressive red morph is behaviourally dominant and successfully invades black populations, but when red ‘hawks’ become too common, their fitness is severely compromised (via decreased parental ability). We also investigate the effects of real-life deviations, particularly sexual reproduction, from the simple original game, which assumed asexual reproduction. A protected polymorphism requires mate choice to be sufficiently assortative. Assortative mating is adaptive for individuals because of genetic incompatibilities affecting hybrid offspring fitness, but by allowing red ‘hawks’ to persist, it also leads to significantly reduced population sizes. Because reductions in male contributions to parental care are generally known to lead to lower population productivity in birds, we expect zero-sum competition to often have wide ranging population consequences. PMID:25209943

  14. Inaccessible Masturbation, Impossible Mourning: Collective Melancholia, the Prohibition on Female Sexual Subjects in India, and Masturbation Fantasy as a Zone of the Strange.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, A

    2015-12-01

    This paper explores a subjective experience-and identification-that a cohort of Indian women identifies as "home." This experience of "home" provides an attachment to a collective melancholia that keeps in place a prohibited female sexual subjectivity. The paper provides a brief historical overview of the prohibition of female sexual subjectivity and erotic agency in India. Following this, it discusses women's masturbation fantasies that illustrate the toggle between women's permitted and prohibited identifications. A clinical case example is presented to illustrate the hopelessness and mourning inherent in the psychoanalytic journey into subjectivity, a journey involving a departure from a shared cultural history. PMID:26653059

  15. The Salience of Family Worldview in Mourning an Elderly Husband and Father

    PubMed Central

    Black, Helen K.; Santanello, Holly R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore family reaction to the death of the elderly husband and father in the family. Methods: We qualitatively interviewed 34 families (a family included a widow and 2 adult biological children) approximately 6–15 months after the death. In private, one-on-one in-depth interviews, we discussed how the death affected each family member as an individual and how each member perceived that the death altered the family as a unit. Results: An individual's worldview, embedded in the smaller culture of the family and the larger culture of society, offers a template for appropriate grief reactions. Discussion: Our article builds on the constructs of worldview, grief for the husband and father, and narrative at the juncture of self-evaluation, as family members reflected on where they stood in their own journey through life. PMID:22241808

  16. Mourning the loss of "self as father": a longitudinal study of fatherhood among the Druze.

    PubMed

    Florsheim, P; Gutmann, D

    1992-05-01

    It is within the context of the parent-child relationship--through the processes of attachment, loss, separation and individuation--that we grow and develop interpersonally and intrapsychically (Bowlby 1969, 1980; Mahler et al. 1975; Pollock, 1989). Most developmentalists agree that changes in the parent-child relationship continue to influence both parents and children throughout the life cycle (Cohen et al. 1984; Colarusso and Nemiroff 1982). While there is a vast body of literature devoted to discussing changes that occur in the parent-child relationship during the "formative years," little has been written about what happens to that relationship after the children leave home to start families of their own. Moreover, most researchers investigate the processes of attachment, loss, separation and individuation in terms of the child's development. Little is known about how the child's quest for independence affects the psychological development of his/her parents. Those writers who have addressed the issue of individuation in later life tend to focus on the adult child's continuing struggle to separate and individuate from his/her real or imagined parents (Levinson, 1978). PMID:1603872

  17. Fly Again, Mourning Cloak.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Yvonne Baron

    1989-01-01

    The author travels 400 years into a future boasting honored teachers and cherished children, but lacking butterflies (extinct because of 20th century pesticide residues). The big advance, besides miniaturized solar collectors, is people's inability to tell lies. Perceptions are trusted, and emotions are accurately read. Also, children are taught…

  18. Comparison between lead levels in blood and bone tissue of rock doves (Columba livia) treated with lead acetate or exposed to the environment of Alcala de Henares

    SciTech Connect

    Tejedor, M.C.; Gonzalez, M.

    1992-06-01

    The increase in the amount of lead released into the environment in developed countries during the last two to three decades has resulted in a significant increase in lead levels in organisms from completely different environments. Several surveys have been made in urban areas with high traffic densities in an attempt to identify plant and animal species that might reflect environmental metal concentrations so that those species could be used as sensitive biological indicators of heavy metal contamination. Studies of lead accumulation in U.K. rock doves imply that use of this species as a pollution indicator would facilitate periodic monitoring of chronic lead exposure conditions in the urban environment. Laboratory investigations cannot readily reflect environmental conditions since the validity of extrapolating laboratory results, where high doses are administered over short-time periods, to the natural environment has been seriously questioned. The present study was made on four rock dove (Columbia livia) populations: two groups (males and females) were dosed with lead acetate in the laboratory and two groups of males were housed in different parts of the city of Alcala de Henares. Data on lead bioaccumulation were collected in two situations: the first was in a laboratory with controlled amounts of lead, while in the second situation the amounts reflected the actual environmental levels in Alcala de Henares. Lead levels were determined in two tissues: blood, which is the target of first impact in possible acute situations; and bone, which is the main tissue where lead accumulates and, therefore, very important during chronic exposure. The study focused on the following three items: (1) lead tissue distribution; (2) variation with habitat; and (3) an evaluation of the levels of lead contamination in the city of Alcala de Henares. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Documenting trans-Himalayan migration through satellite telemetry: a report on capture, deployment, and tracking of bar-headed goose (Anser indicus) from India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Javed, S.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Douglas, D.C.; Rahmani, A.R.; Choudhury, B.C.; Landfried, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    2000-01-01

    Trichomonas gallinae-free pigeons and mourning doves were infected with the Jones' Barn strain of T. gallinae to determine the rate of disease resistant T. gallinae-free birds in each population. Although all birds became infected 88% of the pigeons were resistant to trichomoniasis while 82% of the mourning doves were resistant. It was concluded that these birds had been previously infected and spontaneously lost their trichomonad fauna while retaining their resistance to fatal infection.

  20. Challenge infection as a means of determining the rate of disease resistant Trichomonas gallinae-free birds in a population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.; Knisley, J.O.

    1970-01-01

    Trichomonas gallinae-free pigeons and mourning doves were infected with the Jones' Barn strain of T. gallinae to determine the rate of disease resistant T. gallinae-free birds in each population. Although all birds became infected 88% of the pigeons were resistant to trichomoniasis while 82% of the mourning doves were resistant. It was concluded that these birds had been previously infected and spontaneously lost their trichomonad fauna while retaining their resistance to fatal infection.

  1. 50 CFR 32.50 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. We allow hunting of goose, duck, coot, mourning dove, and sandhill....S. Highway 70 and U.S. Highway 380), we restrict hunting to goose, duck, sandhill crane, and... and white-winged dove and light goose on designated areas of the refuge in accordance with...

  2. Vegetational analysis of a canyon ecosystem at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Foxx, T.S.; Tierney, G.D.

    1982-11-01

    The floristic composition of the area immediately below a peregrine falcon nesting site was determined. The objective was to determine if any plants found within the disturbed area were key food species for either doves or rodents. Mourning doves are frequent prey of the peregrine and rodents attract owls that are occasional predators on the falcons. (ACR)

  3. Immunohistochemistry and molecular epidemiology of avian paramyxovirus 1 from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections of Japanese doves (Columba livia) affected with neurological signs

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, Kikuyasu; FUJIMORI, Hideo; KOYAMA, Akiko; DAI, Trinh Quang; IMAI, Kunitoshi; IKEZAWA, Mitsutaka; YAMAMOTO, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Four doves (Nos. 1–4 birds) affected with neurological signs (ataxia, circling and torticollis) were investigated pathologically and microbiologically. Viral isolation was tried from the tracheal and cloacal swabs of all 4 birds and from liver, spleen, kidney, heart, lung and brain of Nos. 1 and 2 birds. No viruses were isolated from 4 birds, but they had high serum antibody titers against avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1). Histologically, they had the characteristic histological changes of pigeon APMV-1 infection; nonpurulent encephalitis and interstitial nephritis. Immununohistochemically, APMV-1 antigens were detected in the necrotic renal tubular epithelial cells of 1 bird of them (No. 3 bird). Detection of APMV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections was attempted by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Sequencing the RT-PCR product showed the virus RNA belonged to the same APMV-1 genotype (VI) as the strains isolated from the world previous cases of pigeon APMV-1 infection. The RT-PCR of FFPE sections and sequencing of RT-PCR products are useful for molecular epidemiology of the virus when viral isolation from fresh samples is unsuccessful. PMID:25816803

  4. Immunohistochemistry and molecular epidemiology of avian paramyxovirus 1 from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections of Japanese doves (Columba livia) affected with neurological signs.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kikuyasu; Fujimori, Hideo; Koyama, Akiko; Dai, Trinh Quang; Imai, Kunitoshi; Ikezawa, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Yu

    2015-07-01

    Four doves (Nos. 1-4 birds) affected with neurological signs (ataxia, circling and torticollis) were investigated pathologically and microbiologically. Viral isolation was tried from the tracheal and cloacal swabs of all 4 birds and from liver, spleen, kidney, heart, lung and brain of Nos. 1 and 2 birds. No viruses were isolated from 4 birds, but they had high serum antibody titers against avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1). Histologically, they had the characteristic histological changes of pigeon APMV-1 infection; nonpurulent encephalitis and interstitial nephritis. Immununohistochemically, APMV-1 antigens were detected in the necrotic renal tubular epithelial cells of 1 bird of them (No. 3 bird). Detection of APMV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections was attempted by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Sequencing the RT-PCR product showed the virus RNA belonged to the same APMV-1 genotype (VI) as the strains isolated from the world previous cases of pigeon APMV-1 infection. The RT-PCR of FFPE sections and sequencing of RT-PCR products are useful for molecular epidemiology of the virus when viral isolation from fresh samples is unsuccessful. PMID:25816803

  5. Assessment of examiner leniency and stringency ('hawk-dove effect') in the MRCP(UK) clinical examination (PACES) using multi-facet Rasch modelling

    PubMed Central

    McManus, IC; Thompson, M; Mollon, J

    2006-01-01

    Background A potential problem of clinical examinations is known as the hawk-dove problem, some examiners being more stringent and requiring a higher performance than other examiners who are more lenient. Although the problem has been known qualitatively for at least a century, we know of no previous statistical estimation of the size of the effect in a large-scale, high-stakes examination. Here we use FACETS to carry out a multi-facet Rasch modelling of the paired judgements made by examiners in the clinical examination (PACES) of MRCP(UK), where identical candidates were assessed in identical situations, allowing calculation of examiner stringency. Methods Data were analysed from the first nine diets of PACES, which were taken between June 2001 and March 2004 by 10,145 candidates. Each candidate was assessed by two examiners on each of seven separate tasks. with the candidates assessed by a total of 1,259 examiners, resulting in a total of 142,030 marks. Examiner demographics were described in terms of age, sex, ethnicity, and total number of candidates examined. Results FACETS suggested that about 87% of main effect variance was due to candidate differences, 1% due to station differences, and 12% due to differences between examiners in leniency-stringency. Multiple regression suggested that greater examiner stringency was associated with greater examiner experience and being from an ethnic minority. Male and female examiners showed no overall difference in stringency. Examination scores were adjusted for examiner stringency and it was shown that for the present pass mark, the outcome for 95.9% of candidates would be unchanged using adjusted marks, whereas 2.6% of candidates would have passed, even though they had failed on the basis of raw marks, and 1.5% of candidates would have failed, despite passing on the basis of raw marks. Conclusion Examiners do differ in their leniency or stringency, and the effect can be estimated using Rasch modelling. The reasons for

  6. Comparative analysis of mineralocorticoid receptor expression among vocal learners (Bengalese finch and budgerigar) and non-vocal learners (quail and ring dove) has implications for the evolution of avian vocal learning.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Suzuki, Kenta; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor is the receptor for corticosteroids such as corticosterone or aldosterone. Previously, we found that mineralocorticoid receptor was highly expressed in song nuclei of a songbird, Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata var. domestica). Here, to examine the relationship between mineralocorticoid receptor expression and avian vocal learning, we analyzed mineralocorticoid receptor expression in the developing brain of another vocal learner, budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) and non-vocal learners, quail (Coturnix japonica) and ring dove (Streptopelia capicola). Mineralocorticoid receptor showed vocal control area-related expressions in budgerigars as Bengalese finches, whereas no such mineralocorticoid receptor expressions were seen in the telencephalon of non-vocal learners. Thus, these results suggest the possibility that mineralocorticoid receptor plays a role in vocal development of parrots as songbirds and that the acquisition of mineralocorticoid receptor expression is involved in the evolution of avian vocal learning. PMID:22010640

  7. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…

  8. Urinary tract infection - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder infection - adults; UTI - adults; Cystitis - bacterial - adults; Pyelonephritis - adults; Kidney infection - adults ... to the hospital if you: Are an older adult Have kidney stones or changes in the anatomy ...

  9. Adult Strabismus

    MedlinePlus

    ... will likely improve the double vision and depth perception. Also, strabismus affects adults in emotional, social, and ... muscle surgery is usually not severe. Headache, pulling sensation with eye movement and foreign body sensation in ...

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... the upper airway for obstructive sleep apnea in adults. Sleep . 2010;33:1408-1413. PMID: 21061864 www. ...

  11. Least squares estimation of avian molt rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    A straightforward least squares method of estimating the rate at which birds molt feathers is presented, suitable for birds captured more than once during the period of molt. The date of molt onset can also be estimated. The method is applied to male and female mourning doves.

  12. AN ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF LEAD SHOT EXPOSURE IN NON-WATERFOWL AVIAN SPECIES: UPLAND GAME BIRDS AND RAPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing concern that birds in terrestrial ecosystems may be exposed to spent lead shot. Evidence exists that upland birds, particularly mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), ingest spent lead shot and that raptors ingest lead shot by consuming wounded game. Mortality, ne...

  13. 50 CFR 32.25 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Game Bird Hunting. Hunting of geese, ducks, coots, snipe and mourning doves is permitted on designated... the waterfowl hunting season. B. Upland Game Hunting. Hunting of pheasant, cottontail rabbit, black... waterfowl hunting season. C. Big Game Hunting. D. Sport Fishing. Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge...

  14. 50 CFR 32.50 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. We allow hunting of goose, duck, coot, mourning dove, and sandhill... closed areas for retrieval of game. 8. We do not require refuge or other special hunt permits other than... Game Hunting. We allow hunting of pheasant, quail, cottontail, and jack rabbit on designated areas...

  15. 50 CFR 32.25 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Game Bird Hunting. Hunting of geese, ducks, coots, snipe and mourning doves is permitted on designated... the waterfowl hunting season. B. Upland Game Hunting. Hunting of pheasant, cottontail rabbit, black... waterfowl hunting season. C. Big Game Hunting. D. Sport Fishing. Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge...

  16. 50 CFR 32.25 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Game Bird Hunting. Hunting of geese, ducks, coots, snipe and mourning doves is permitted on designated... the waterfowl hunting season. B. Upland Game Hunting. Hunting of pheasant, cottontail rabbit, black... waterfowl hunting season. C. Big Game Hunting. D. Sport Fishing. Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge...

  17. 50 CFR 32.57 - Pennsylvania.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Migratory Game Bird Hunting. We allow hunting of mourning dove, rail, common snipe, goose, duck, coot, and... prohibit field possession of migratory game birds in areas of the refuge closed to migratory game bird hunting. B. Upland Game Hunting. We allow hunting of grouse, squirrel, rabbit, woodchuck, pheasant,...

  18. 50 CFR 32.25 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Game Bird Hunting. Hunting of geese, ducks, coots, snipe and mourning doves is permitted on designated... the waterfowl hunting season. B. Upland Game Hunting. Hunting of pheasant, cottontail rabbit, black... waterfowl hunting season. C. Big Game Hunting. D. Sport Fishing. Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge...

  19. West Nile virus infection rates and avian serology in east-central Illinois.

    PubMed

    Lampman, Richard L; Krasavin, Nina M; Ward, Mike P; Beveroth, Tara A; Lankau, Emily W; Alto, Barry W; Muturi, Ephantus; Novak, Robert J

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the geographic role of different species of mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts in West Nile virus (WNV) transmission cycles can facilitate the development and implementation of targeted surveillance and control measures. This study examined the relationship between WNV-antibody rates in birds and mosquito infection rates and bloodfeeding patterns in east-central Illinois. The earliest detection of WNV-RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction TaqMan was from Culex restuans; however, amplification typically coincided with an increase in abundance of Cx. pipiens. Trap type influenced annual estimates of infection rates in Culex species, as well as estimation of blood meal source. Bird species with the highest WNV-antibody rates (i.e., Mourning Doves [Zenaida macroura], Northern Cardinals [Cardinalis cardinalis], American Robins [Turdus migratorius], and House Sparrows [Passer domesticus]) were also the common species found in Culex blood meals. Although antibody rates were not directly proportional to estimated avian abundance, the apparent availability of mammal species did influence proportion of mammal to bird blood meals. Antibody prevalence in the American Robin was lower than expected based on the strong attraction of Culex to American Robins for blood meals. Age-related differences in serology were evident, antibody rates increased in older groups of robins and sparrows, whereas 1st-year hatch and older adults of Mourning Doves and Northern Cardinals had equally high rates of antibody-positive serum samples. The vector and host interactions observed in east-central Illinois (Champaign County), an urban area surrounded by agriculture, are compared to studies in the densely population areas of southern Cook County. PMID:23923325

  20. Adult Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John M.

    In its broadest context, play can be interpreted as any pleasurable use of discretionary time. Playfulness is an intrinsic feature of being human, and should be viewed in the light of a total lifestyle, not as an occurrence in an isolated time of life. Adult play appears to be an indefinable and controversial concept. A holistic approach should be…

  1. CPR: Adult

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  2. Exposure to insecticides of brushland wildlife within the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Mitchell, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Brushland wildlife within the Lower Rio Grande Valley of south Texas were studied following applications of eleven insecticides to nearby sugarcane or cotton fields. During the study no wildlife were found dead. Mean brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus) and mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) was significantly lower than controls following application of some organophosphorous insecticides. Brain AChE activity varied significantly among chemicals, days after exposure and application rates. Mean brain AChE activity of white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica) and three small mammal species was not significantly different than their respective controls following application of insecticides. Mean brain AChE activity of grackles was inhibited significantly more than white-winged doves after application of Bolstar, EPN-methyl parathion, and Azodrin and significantly more than that of mourning doves after applications of Bolstar and EPN-methyl parathion. Our data indicate that there were no adverse effects on most brushland wildlife. Exposure was probably dependent upon use of the agricultural fields as feeding or resting sites and only grackles and mourning doves were regularly present in the fields.

  3. Exposure to insecticides of brushland wildlife within the lower Rio Grande valley Texas USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Mitchell, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Brushland wildlife within the Lower Rio Grande Valley of south Texas were studied following applications of eleven insecticides to nearby sugarcane or cotton fields. During the study no wildlife were found dead. Mean brain acetycholinesterase (AChE) activity of great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus) and mourning doves (Zenaida microura) was significantly lower than controls following application of some organophosphorus insecticides. Brain AChE activity varied significantly among chemicals, days after exposure and lactin rates. Mean brain AChE activity of white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica) and three small mammals species was not significantly different than their respective control following application of the insecticides. Mean brain AChE activity of grackles was inhibited significantly more than white-winged doves after application of Bolstar, EPN-methyl parathion, and Azodrin and significantly more than that of mourning doves after applications of Bolstar and EPN-methyl parathion. Our data indicate that there were no adverse effects on most brushland wildlife. Exposure was probably dependent upon use of the agricultural fields as feeding or resting site and only grackles and mourning doves were regularly present in the fields.

  4. ADULT EDUCATION OF MIGRANT ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEAL, CATHERINE; AND OTHERS

    UNITS ON MIGRANT ADULT EDUCATION, AND A UNIT ON ORGANIZING INFORMAL GROUPS OF MIGRANT WOMEN TO DISCUSS MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING THEIR TEMPORARY HOMES, ARE PRESENTED. THE GOALS OF THE UNIT ON EDUCATION FOR MIGRANT MEN ARE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE, BETTER HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND BETTER HANDLING OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THE MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE…

  5. [Adult twins].

    PubMed

    Charlemaine, Christiane

    2006-12-31

    This paper explores the deep roots of closeness that twins share in their youngest age and their effect on their destiny at the adult age. Psychologists believe the bond between twins begins in utero and develops throughout the twins' lives. The four patterns of twinship described show that the twin bond is determined by the quality of parenting that twins receive in their infancy and early childhood. Common problems of adult twins bring about difficulties to adapt in a non-twin world. The nature versus nurture controversy has taken on new life focusing on inter-twin differences and the importance of parent-child interaction as fundamental to the growth and development of personality. PMID:17352324

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  7. The experience of Japanese adolescents and young adults after losing siblings to childhood cancer: three types of narratives.

    PubMed

    Kamibeppu, Kiyoko; Sato, Iori; Hoshi, Yasutaka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe Japanese adolescents' and young adults' experiences after losing siblings to childhood cancer. A conceptual framework of the transition and analysis based on narrative method were adopted from qualitative data from 6 Japanese adolescents and young adults who had lost their siblings to childhood cancer. It was revealed that the participants' psychological experience after the sibling's death was directed by their perceptions of their mothers' responses to bereavement. We also found that the psychological distance between participants and their mothers could be an important factor in enabling transition into mourning and in orienting the lost sibling in their mind. The stories obtained from these 6 participants were categorized into the following 3 types of narratives: "Mother in another world and the sibling who became a god," "Return of the loving mother and the sibling as savior," and "The poor mother and the sibling who needs my help to carry on her legacy." This typology will serve as a framework for grief care and future research. PMID:25413258

  8. Adult Development and Learning of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This summary of adult development covers a wide range of authors. Adult development is one way of understanding how the internal and external changes in our lives have an impact on learning. Of particular importance in this work are the developmental issues of older adults. I present various theories of adult development such as linear and…

  9. The Academic Dean: Dove, Dragon, and Diplomat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Allan; Bryan, Robert A.

    Written for deans in colleges and universities of all sizes and types, this book examines a number of management issues and provides advice on recognizing and solving problems that face academic administrators who have several departments or divisions under their jurisdiction. The book is divided into ten chapters: (1) The Perfect Dean; (2)…

  10. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  11. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  12. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  13. Mourning the Death of a Spouse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... one person who has to do it all. Learning to manage new tasks, from chores to household ...

  14. Geophysicists celebrate two satellites, mourn a third.

    PubMed

    Kerr, R A

    1994-06-17

    Searching for a common theme in a gathering as diverse as the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in Baltimore last month might seem futile. But satellites, both natural and artificial, provided some of the meeting's high points. Researchers reported on the first science results from the Clementine spacecraft's 2-month sojourn orbiting the moon, the revealing color of the small moon that accompanies the asteroid lda, and the planned termination of the Magellan spacecraft orbiting Venus. PMID:17839901

  15. Mourning a Lost Childhood: A Therapeutic Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulish, Nancy Mann

    J. M. Barrie's popular story of Peter Pan depicts the never-neverland of an endless happy childhood. Analysis of the story and of J. M. Barrie's personal background, however, reveals that the tale is a conflicted solution to and separation from early childhood losses and disappointments. Themes of separation and reunion, redesertion and revenge…

  16. Panic Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  17. Bipolar Disorder Among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  18. Major Depression Among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  19. Arizona Adult Education Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Adult education standards are the cornerstone for quality teaching, quality learning, and quality lives. The Arizona Adult Education Standards Initiative (Standards Initiative) represents a proactive effort by Arizona's adult education community to ensure rigor and consistency in program content and student outcomes for adult learners throughout…

  20. Adult Cancers in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Valérie; Marples, Maria; Stark, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of cancer seen in young people changes with increasing age, transitioning from childhood- to adult-type cancer in adolescence and the third decade. The risk factors, presentation and biology of cancer in young adults differ from those in the older adult population. Factors of particular significance in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) include genetic predisposition to adult-type cancer, diagnostic uncertainty, long-term morbidity and considerations of fertility. New systemic therapies are being introduced that can prolong life and even increase the chance of cure, but the impact on AYAs is uncertain, as these patients are often under-represented in clinical trials. Here, we discuss the management of AYAs with 3 of the most common cancers affecting adults, when they emerge in the AYA populations, and therefore are currently met by medical oncologists - breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma. PMID:27595357

  1. Patient Eye Examinations - Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Examinations, Adults Patient Eye Examinations, Children Refractive Errors Scientists in the Laboratory Visual Acuity Testing Patient Eye Examinations, Adults × Warning message Automatic fallback to the cURL connection method kicked in to handle the request. Result code ...

  2. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  3. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  4. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... to ACHA Search The futures of adults with congenital heart disease made brighter by their pasts Get Involved 2016 ... conference theme is "The Changing Landscape of Adult Congenital Heart Disease." Join Us Help us improve the quality of ...

  5. Depression in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred; Onedera, Jill D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address selected aspects of depression in older adults. Specifically, symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, and interventions for depression in older adults are reviewed.

  6. Adult Learning: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Peter, Ed.

    This book on adult learning is divided into six sections. Section 1, Cognitive Processes, includes the following chapters: "Cognitive Processes: Contemporary Paradigms of Learning" (Jack Mezirow); "Information Processing, Memory, Age and Adult Learning" (Gillian Boulton-Lewis); "Adult Learners' Metacognitive Behaviour in Higher Education" (Barry…

  7. Aspects of Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekhar, Rajkumari

    This book presents an overview of and prescription for adult education in India. Following an introduction to the problem of illiteracy in India, the book's 14 chapters cover a broad spectrum of adult education issues. Topics discussed include adult education and national development; roles of voluntary organizations, universities, colleges, and…

  8. Dimensions of Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This broad introduction to adult and postcompulsory education offers an overview of the field for students, adult educators and workplace trainers. The book establishes an analytical framework to emphasize the nature of learning and agency of learners; examines the core knowledge and skills that adult educators need; discusses policy, research and…

  9. Kids Who Outwit Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.; Brendtro, Larry K.

    Kids who distrust adults are highly skilled at hiding their real nature and resisting change. Most adults shun such youths or get mired in conflict with them. Punitive get tough practices as well as traditional flaw-fixing treatment are reactive strategies that often drive these youths further from adult bonds and reinforce oppositional and…

  10. Adult Learners in Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Janette, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Theories on adult development and learning and some of the Ontario universities' programs and services for the adult learner are examined, and Athabasca University, Alberta's answer to the British Open University, is described. Peter O'Donnell discusses adult learners' needs and explains how Athabasca University serves this specific type of…

  11. Adult Competency Education Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of brief descriptions of 20 current resources for Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) programs, this guide was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are already involved with APL/ACE programs. Each citation contains information…

  12. Adult Competency Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of abstracts of 120 current Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) federally supported projects being conducted in 34 States and the District of Columbia, this project profile was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are currently…

  13. Adult Education in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miser, Rifat; Ural, Ozana; Ünlühisarýklý, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the situation and practices of adult education in Turkey in terms of (a) participants, (b) providers, and (c) program areas. The data were derived from published statistical data and one-to-one interaction with adult education providers when such data are unavailable. Turkey has a long tradition of adult education with…

  14. Navajo Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Community Coll., Tsaile, AZ.

    The objectives of this Special Experimental Demonstration Project in Adult Basic Education for the Navajo were: (1) to raise the educational and social level of Navajo adult students who are unable to read, write, and speak English; (2) to assist the Navajo adult students to take advantage of occupational and vocational training programs; (3) to…

  15. The Adult Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Janet

    The 14 chapters of this textbook chronicle adult development from youth through old age, emphasizing both research and interviews with adults at various stages in their lives. Topics covered include the following: (1) the academic field of adult development; (2) theories and research methods; (3) aging and disease prevention; (4) sexuality and…

  16. Adult Numeracy Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeds, Andrew, Ed.

    Designed primarily for adult literacy teachers and tutors, this curriculum describes the content of what should be taught in numeracy programs in order to meet the individual needs of adults through the selection and teaching of skills appropriate to those adults' needs. An introduction describes national standards and qualifications, learners,…

  17. Adults and GNVQs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Aidan

    1996-01-01

    This document is intended for further education colleges in the United Kingdom wishing to extend their General National Vocational Qualification (GNVQ) provision to adults, extend their adult students' options for accreditation, or review the suitability of different qualification routes for adults. It presents information about the development of…

  18. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional materials,…

  19. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  20. Adults Role in Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Charles E.; Padgett, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Do adults play a role in bullying? Do parents, teachers, school staff, and community adult leaders influence bullying behavior in children and teenagers? This article will focus on research regarding all adults who have almost daily contact with children and teens and their part in how bullying is identified, addressed, and prevented. This article…

  1. Adult Learning Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine Knowles' theory of andragogy and his six assumptions of how adults learn while providing evidence to support two of his assumptions based on the theory of andragogy. As no single theory explains how adults learn, it can best be assumed that adults learn through the accumulation of formal and informal…

  2. Adult Education in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkos, Alexios

    2008-01-01

    The central aim of this article is to analyse the current situation of adult education in Greece. The article focuses on the following points: (a) the degree of participation in programmes of continuing professional training and general adult education courses, (b) the quality and the outcomes of the adult education provision in Greece, and (c)…

  3. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  4. Avian Hosts of West Nile Virus in Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Komar, Nicholas; Panella, Nicholas A.; Young, Ginger R.; Brault, Aaron C.; Levy, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes sporadic outbreaks of human encephalitis in Phoenix, Arizona. To identify amplifying hosts of WNV in the Phoenix area, we blood-sampled resident birds and measured antibody prevalence following an outbreak in the East Valley of metropolitan Phoenix during summer, 2010. House sparrow (Passer domesticus), house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus), great-tailed grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) accounted for most WNV infections among locally resident birds. These species roost communally after early summer breeding. In September 2010, Culex vector-avian host contact was 3-fold greater at communal bird roosts compared with control sites, as determined by densities of resting mosquitoes with previous vertebrate contact (i.e., blood-engorged or gravid mosquitoes). Because of the low competence of mourning doves, these were considered weak amplifiers but potentially effective free-ranging sentinels. Highly competent sparrows, finches, and grackles were predicted to be key amplifying hosts for WNV in suburban Phoenix. PMID:23857022

  5. No consistent effect of plant diversity on productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huston, M.A.; Aarssen, L.W.; Austin, M.P.; Cade, B.S.; Fridley, J.D.; Garnier, E.; Grime, J.P.; Hodgson, J.; Lauenroth, W.K.; Thompson, K.; Vandermeer, J.H.; Wardle, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    1) An outbreak of avian pox in a captive flock of mourning doves involving 12 of 23 birds is described. Typical nodular growths on the eyelids and head as well as yellowish lesions at the base of the tongue and at the back of the pharynx were seen. Typical intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were demonstrated. Methods are described for differentiating this infection from trichomoniasis. An attempt to transmit the disease to pigeons, with material from a natural case, failed.

  6. Safeguarding vulnerable adults.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    Nurses have a professional duty to safeguard vulnerable adults from abuse under the provisions of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's (NMC) revised Code (2015). With adult abuse continuing to increase, all members of the nursing team are well placed to identify and take action to safeguard the vulnerable. This article sets out how the Care Act 2014 seeks to improve the safeguarding of vulnerable adults and the role of nurses in that process. PMID:26153813

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of avian poxviruses among free-ranging birds of Virginia.

    PubMed

    Adams, Cary J; Feldman, Sanford H; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2005-12-01

    Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify a portion of the avian poxvirus core 4b gene of infected free-ranging birds that presented at the Wildlife Center of Virginia during the 2003 and early 2004 years. The species of bird infected were a great blue heron (Ardea herodias), two American crows (Corvus brachyrhyncos), two American robins (Turdus migratorius), two mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), a blue-gray gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea), a northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), a house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus), and a northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis). Phylogenetic analysis was performed using the consensus sequences determined for each avian case in Virginia in combination with avian poxvirus core 4b gene sequence from isolates previously described in Europe and that of vaccinia virus. Alignment of DNA sequences identified areas of point mutations and, in the case of a single mourning dove, the incorporation of a triplet of nucleotides. Maximum-likelihood analysis grouped the 2003-2004 Virginia avian poxviruses into a clade distinct from those reported in European free-ranging birds, with the exception of a single case in a mourning dove that clustered within one European clade. The cladogram that resulted from our analysis of the European isolates is in agreement with those previously published. This study identified a distinct clade of avian poxvirus unique from four clades previously described and associated with epornitics in free-ranging birds, where the core 4b gene DNA sequence has been the basis of comparison. PMID:16405007

  8. Concentration of contaminants in breeding bird eggs from the Colorado River Delta, Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, Jaqueline; Sapozhnikova, Yelena V; Schlenk, Daniel; Mason, Andrew Z; Hinojosa-Huerta, Osvel; Rivera-Díaz, Juan José; Ramos-Delgado, Norma Alicia; Sánchez-Bon, Gerardo

    2006-06-01

    Organic contaminants (organochlorine [OC], organophosphorus [OP] pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]), and metals (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se) are a concern to avian health in the Colorado River delta, Mexico. We determined concentrations of contaminants in eggs of three breeding species of birds from the delta (mourning doves [Zenaida macroura], burrowing owls [Athene cunicularia], and marsh wrens [Cistothorus palustris]). We collected 27 eggs of mourning doves, eight eggs of burrowing owls, and 18 eggs of marsh wrens for analyses. Polychlorinated biphenyls, OC, and OP pesticides were analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with an electron capture detector, and metals were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The non-ortho PCB congeners (PCB 77 and 126) were found in mourning dove and burrowing owl eggs at concentrations in which hatchability can be affected. Mean selenium concentration found in marsh wren eggs (5.6 microg/g dry wt) exceeded the level of concern. Arsenic and Cd were found at higher than normal concentrations, Hg concentrations did not exceed the level of concern in any of the species, and Pb concentrations were higher in eggs of species subject to hunting. With the exception of lead, marsh wren eggs contained the highest metal concentrations. PMID:16764484

  9. Alternative Programming for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Thomas A.; Frey, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning is currently cataloguing alternative programming features that are most effective with adult students in a best practices inventory organized around a framework of high-level descriptive principles of effectiveness. This chapter identifies a few interesting features from a quick survey of this…

  10. Adult Education in Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, John

    This study is limited essentially to adult education in West Germany, although the historical sections include references to earlier experiences and experiments in areas now Russian-occupied. The terms "adult edcuation" and "workers' education" are clarified. Both are presented as separate movements. Brief reference is made to political, social,…

  11. Adult Learning Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Adult Learners' Week--which is supported by the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills and the European Social Fund, amongst a raft of other organisations--is all about raising demand for learning. At its core, the campaign is about encouraging under-represented groups--including low-skilled, unemployed and low-paid adults and those…

  12. Teachers of Adults Will...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankowski, Mary L.

    1975-01-01

    The article lists the 12 competencies of adult education teachers that are considered essential to assist adults in achieving instructional goals and objectives. Following the listing a brief justification and examples of ways to evaluate teacher competencies are discussed. (Author/BP)

  13. Recruiting Adult Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Resources Network, Manhattan, KS.

    This document is the first nationwide compilation of successful recruiting techniques for students in adult basic education, literacy, General Educational Development classes, and adult high school degree programs. Information for the publication was gathered from a literature search and other sources, especially "Reaching the Least Educated," a…

  14. Counseling Adult Adoptees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This review presents various resources about working with adult adoptees in order to inform counselors in their practice. Topics covered include basics of adoption, including types of adoption and adoption statistics; possible issues adult adoptees may face; and suggestions and implications for counselors. The article addresses some of the serious…

  15. Adult Education and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinzen, Heribert, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document contains 19 papers on adult education and development worldwide. The following papers are included: "Editorial" (Heribert Hinzen); "Lifelong Learning in Europe: Moving towards EFA (Dakar Framework for Action on Education for All) Goals and the CONFINTEA V Agenda" (Sofia Conference on Adult Education); "Poverty and Schooling in the…

  16. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  17. Today's Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Who are the adult students in career and technical education (CTE) today? There is not one simple answer to that question. Some are young with little life experience, while others are returning to the workforce and learning new skills to reinvent themselves. Whatever the case, educating adult students is an integral part of ACTE's mission, and the…

  18. Adult Learning and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenson, Kjell, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As individuals and societies try to respond to fundamental economic and social transformation, the field of adult learning and education is rapidly getting increased attention and new topics for research on adult learning have emerged. This collection of articles from the International Encyclopedia of Education 3e offers practitioners and…

  19. Dialogue and Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarule, Jill Mattuck

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of the role of language and dialogue in adult learning looks at dialogue as epistemology and at talk as learning. It is proposed that the challenge in teaching and retaining adult learners is to create dialogue-rich classrooms, including many external speech opportunities, small-group discussion, and group projects. (MSE)

  20. Libraries and Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josey, E. J., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Of the 13 essays presented in this special issue on libraries and adult education, 8 focus on programs and services from the public library for adult learners. These essays provide information on: (1) an Education Information Centers Program (EIC) designed to complement employment skills training provided under the Comprehensive Employment and…

  1. Adult Education in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, Radu

    2006-01-01

    Ever since the first ideas of national independence appeared in Finland, adult education has played an essential role in shaping the destiny of the Finns. With a history of almost 130 years, during which it has continuously increased in quality and quantity, the Finnish adult education system has ensured that Finland stays among the most…

  2. Adult Education Regional Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For more than one hundred and fifty years, until 2008, California was an undisputed national leader in its commitment to adult education. The state's investment in adult learners topped $750 million, a sum greater than the combined total of every other state in the nation. However, for the past several years recession and fiscal crisis have left…

  3. Adult Education in Cohesion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenson, Kjell

    2003-01-01

    International Adult Literacy Survey data show the average adult education participation in Nordic countries is 14% higher than in other industrialized nations. Public support for participation of the disadvantaged, an active labor market policy, and popular education are key characteristics. (Contains 37 references.) (Author/JOW)

  4. Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Ernestine P., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The major articles in this journal issue deal with various aspects of young adult literature. Specific topics covered in the articles are (1) questions worth asking students about young adult novels, (2) the five major functions of adolescent literature in high school literature programs, (3) Southwestern literature for adolescents, (4) teaching…

  5. Adult Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Labour, Copenhagen (Denmark).

    Danish adult vocational training activities take the form of specifically targeted initial and continued training for employed and unemployed adults. Planning, development, and adaptation of vocational training programs (AMU programs) are characterized by tripartite cooperation among public authorities and organizations of employers and employees.…

  6. Adult Counseling Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Phil; Davis, Sandy A.

    In order to determine the specific counseling needs of the adult learner, staff of the Adult Counseling Project began by conducting a literature search pertaining to the problems of returning students and those considering a return to school. The review revealed that little is known about the educational and vocational needs of the returning…

  7. Toward Transpersonal Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2016-01-01

    As a foundation for discussing transpersonal adult development, the author traces her trajectory, involvement in, and contribution to the modern transpersonal movement and her introduction of it to the adult learning literature, beginning during the early 1980s. Highlighted are the transpersonal domain and a differentiation between transpersonal…

  8. Adult Vocational Teacher Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hole, F. Marvin

    As part of a larger study to investigate the backgrounds and professional inservice needs of part-time adult vocational teachers in Pennsylvania, research was conducted to identify and assess adult vocational teacher competencies. Following a literature review, a survey instrument was devised which listed thirty-four competencies (basically…

  9. Adult Tech Prep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaad, Donna

    For over 2 years, Blak Hawk College (Illinois) has provided high school equivalency (GED) candidates and recipients, older returning students, and underprepared high school graduates with a Tech Prep curriculum to give them the skills to make the transition from adult basic education to college or work. The Adult Tech Prep (ATP) core curriculum…

  10. Financing of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, David

    2007-01-01

    The 2008 EFA Global Monitoring Report recognises adult literacy as the most neglected of the EFA goals. It is neglected most obviously in respect of the financial allocations made by governments and donors. This shortage of financing creates a dangerous situation in which adult educators seek to convince politicians to invest, based on false…

  11. Authenticity in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the relationship between authenticity and adult learning and prompted by some studies in which adult "authentic learning" is a central concept. The implication revealed by them is that real-worldness of learning contexts, learning content and learning tasks is perceived as conferring authenticity on learning. Here,…

  12. Gender Dysphoria in Adults.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J; Lawrence, Anne A; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-03-28

    Gender dysphoria (GD), a term that denotes persistent discomfort with one's biologic sex or assigned gender, replaced the diagnosis of gender identity disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 2013. Subtypes of GD in adults, defined by sexual orientation and age of onset, have been described; these display different developmental trajectories and prognoses. Prevalence studies conclude that fewer than 1 in 10,000 adult natal males and 1 in 30,000 adult natal females experience GD, but such estimates vary widely. GD in adults is associated with an elevated prevalence of comorbid psychopathology, especially mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and suicidality. Causal mechanisms in GD are incompletely understood, but genetic, neurodevelopmental, and psychosocial factors probably all contribute. Treatment of GD in adults, although largely standardized, is likely to evolve in response to the increasing diversity of persons seeking treatment, demands for greater client autonomy, and improved understanding of the benefits and limitations of current treatment modalities. PMID:26788901

  13. Adult Education in the Seventies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Adult Education Association, New Delhi.

    The proceedings of the 24th All India Adult Education Conference highlight two symposia, "Adult Education and Urban Development" and "Adult Education and Green Revolution." Commission Reports on the two symposia are given. (DB)

  14. Normal yeast flora of the upper digestive tract of some wild columbids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.; Hasenclever, H.F.

    1972-01-01

    Seven species of pigeons and doves were cultured for yeasts in the upper digestive tract. The following list gives the isolation rate for each columbid species and the yeasts cultured from them: feral pigeon Columba Livia (Gmelin) 95% -Candida albicans (Robin) Berkhout, C. tropicalis (Castellani) Berkhout, C. krusei (Cast.) Berkhout, C. guilliermondii (Cast.) Langeron et Guerra, Torulopsis glabrata (Anderson) Lodder et De Vries, Saccharomyces telluris Van der Walt, and Geotrichum sp.; white-crowned pigeon (C. leucocephala Linnaeus) 56% -- S. telluris; mourning dove (Zenaidura rnacroura Linnaeus) 24% -- C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, and Geotrichurn sp.; passerine ground dove (Collumbigallina passerina Linnaeus) 20% -- C. parapsilosis (Ashford) Langeron et Talice, Kloeckera apiculata (Reess Emend. Klocker) Janke; zenaida dove (Zenaida aurita Temminck) 16% -- C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and T. glabrata; one moustasche dove (Geotrygon mystacea Gosse) -- C. guillierrnondii; ringed turtle dove (Streptopelia rizoria Linnaeus) 14% -- C. albicans and Geotrichurn sp. No signs of disease could be seen in the 139 birds that were examined, and it was concluded that these yeasts comprise a part of the columbid's normal microbial flora.

  15. An ecological risk assessment of lead shot exposure in upland game birds and raptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, R.I.; Lacher, T.E. Jr.; Bunck, C.

    1995-12-31

    There is concern about exposure of birds in terrestrial ecosystems to spent lead shot. Upland birds, particularly mourning doves, ingest spent lead shot; raptors ingest lead shot by consuming wounded game. Mortality, neurological dysfunction, immune suppression and reproductive impairment are effects of exposure to lead. The authors conducted an ecological risk assessment (using the new USEPA Ecological Risk Assessment Paradigm) on the impact of lead shot exposure in upland birds. Large amounts of lead shot are released into the environment each year from shooting and hunting. Doves collected from fields cultivated to attract mourning doves for hunting contain ingested spent lead shot. This might underestimate risk because doves ingesting shot may experience lead toxicosis and not be collected by hunters. Because lead can cause both acute and chronic toxicity if ingested and there is evidence of widespread liberation of lead shot in terrestrial ecosystems, concern for impacts on upland game birds and raptors is warranted. Although this ecological risk assessment does not clearly define a significant risk of upland game birds to lead shot, there is little evidence to rebut the presumption of risk. This issue merits continued scrutiny to protect upland game bird and raptor resources.

  16. Young Adult Smoking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Pamela M.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Young adults have the highest smoking rate of any age group in the U.S., and new strategies to decrease young adult smoking are needed. The objective of the current study was to identify psychographic and demographic factors associated with current smoking and quitting behaviors among young adults. Methods Attitudes, social groups, and self-descriptors, including supporting action against the tobacco industry, advertising receptivity, depression, alcohol use, and other factors associated with smoking were tested for associations with smoking behaviors in a 2005 cross-sectional survey of 1528 young adults (aged 18–25 years) from a web-enabled panel. Analyses were conducted in 2007. Results Being older was associated with current smoking, whereas having some higher education and being African American or Hispanic were negatively associated with smoking. Supporting action against the tobacco industry was negatively associated with smoking (AOR=0.34 [95% CI=0.22, 0.52]). Perceived usefulness of smoking, exposure to smokers, increased perceived smoking prevalence, receptivity to tobacco advertising, binge drinking, and exposure to tobacco advertising in bars and clubs were associated with smoking. Supporting action against the tobacco industry was associated with intentions to quit smoking (AOR= 4.43 [95% CI=2.18, 8.60]). Conclusions Young adults are vulnerable to tobacco-industry advertising. Media campaigns that denormalize the tobacco industry and appeal to young adults appear to be a powerful intervention to decrease young adult smoking. PMID:19269128

  17. Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults but can have serious consequences. Over half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support. PMID:19327033

  18. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  19. Brainstem Glioma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jethro; Western, Stephen; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas are not nearly as common in adults as they are in children. They are likely the final common consequence not of a single disease process but of several. They can be difficult to diagnose, and are challenging to treat. Clinical studies of this diagnosis are few and generally small. Because of these factors, our understanding of the biology of adult brainstem glioma is incomplete. However, the knowledge base is growing and progress is being made. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge for brainstem glioma in adults and identify key areas for which additional information is required. PMID:27556016

  20. Older Adults and Drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Older Adults and Drinking Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Generally, ... liver problems, osteoporosis, memory problems, and mood disorders. Drinking and Medications Many medications, such as the ones ...

  1. The Colonial Adult Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.

    1975-01-01

    The adult evening schools of colonial America served a mixed clientele and provided instruction in a variety of subjects. Although most historians have described evening schoolmasters as incompetent frauds, research indicates that such descriptions are generally unjust and unfounded. (NHM)

  2. Motivation and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, J. Rodney

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews theories of human motivation: Lewin's force field analysis, Skinner's operant reinforcement theory, and Maslow's hierarchy of needs. He then extracts the implications of these theories for adult learning. SK)

  3. CPR - adult - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100219.htm CPR - adult - series To use the sharing features on ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics CPR A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  4. Mosquito, adult (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This illustration shows an adult southern house mosquito. This mosquito feeds on blood and is the carrier of many diseases, such as encephalitis, West Nile, dengue fever, yellow fever, and others. ( ...

  5. About BMI for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs About Adult BMI Language: ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Language: English Español (Spanish) ...

  6. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000017.htm Pneumonia in adults - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In ...

  7. Adult Neurogenesis in Fish.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Julia; Brand, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Teleost fish have a remarkable neurogenic and regenerative capacity in the adult throughout the rostrocaudal axis of the brain. The distribution of proliferation zones shows a remarkable conservation, even in distantly related teleost species, suggesting a common teleost ground plan of proliferation zones. There are different progenitor populations in the neurogenic niches-progenitors positive for radial glial markers (dorsal telencephalon, hypothalamus) and progenitors with neuroepithelial-like characteristics (ventral telencephalon, optic tectum, cerebellum). Definition of these progenitors has allowed studying their role in normal growth of the adult brain, but also when challenged following a lesion. From these studies, important roles have emerged for intrinsic mechanisms and extrinsic signals controlling the activation of adult neurogenesis that enable regeneration of the adult brain to occur, opening up new perspectives on rekindling regeneration also in the context of the mammalian brain. PMID:26747664

  8. Motivation and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, J.

    1974-01-01

    The paper examines the role of adult education and the contribution it can make to the solution of current problems in developing countries, particularly the problems of economic under-development and over-population. (Author/AG)

  9. Yoga and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Yoga and Older Adults Yoga is a mind and body practice that typically ... breathing exercises, and relaxation. Researchers are studying how yoga may help improve health and to learn more ...

  10. Pancreatoblastoma in an adult.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Tang, Na; Liu, Yang; Wang, En-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatoblastoma is a malignant pancreatic tumor that rarely occurs in adults. We report a case of an adult female with pancreatoblastoma. A mass was detected in the pancreatic head using computed tomography and ultrasonography. The clinical diagnosis was a solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas. However, after the operation, the final diagnosis was pancreatoblastoma, which showed two lines of differentiation: Acinar differentiation and squamoid corpuscles. The patient is currently in good condition. PMID:25673604

  11. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  12. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-05-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  13. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  14. Adult Education in Israel V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmayer, Paul, Ed.; Michaelson, Serena T., Ed.

    This fifth journal edition focuses on the didactics of adult education in Israel. Following a "Preface" (Meir Peretz) discussing the didactics of adult education, three major fields are examined: Learning for Adults; Hebrew Language and Culture for Immigrants; and Special Populations (adults with learning disabilities, senior citizens, and…

  15. The Adult Learner: Four Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Topics concerning the adult learner that are relevant to institutional researchers are addressed in four articles: marketing, predicting success for adult students, enrollment projection, and follow-up studies of adult learners. In "Institutional Research in Support of Marketing the Adult Student," Lydia Jurand notes the importance of identifying…

  16. The ABC's of Adult Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roehrig, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy, it is estimated that 93 million adults in the United States have basic or below basic literacy skills. Those individuals found most lacking in literacy skills were adults living in poverty, adults lacking a high school diploma, seniors and the elderly aged 65 and older, the more than one…

  17. Rich Environments for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentham, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Unaware of the messages a bare adult learning environment sends and its effect on adult learners, a trainer attends an intensive Reggio Emilia course and learns that the physical environment is the "third teacher"--for adults as well as for children. Using principles of Reggio, she offers suggestions for enhancing adult learning spaces and…

  18. Adult Brainstem Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, German; Mokhtari, Karima; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas are uncommon in adults and account for only 1%–2% of intracranial gliomas. They represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that differ from those found in their pediatric counterparts. In adults, a low-grade phenotype predominates, which is a feature that likely explains their better prognosis compared to that in children. Because biopsies are rarely performed, classifications based on the radiological aspect of magnetic resonance imaging results have been proposed to establish treatment strategies and to determine outcomes: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade, (b) enhancing malignant glioma, (c) focal tectal gliomas, and (d) exophytic gliomas. Despite significant advances in neuroradiology techniques, a purely radiological classification remains imperfect in the absence of a histological diagnosis. Whereas a biopsy may often be reasonably avoided in the diffuse nonenhancing forms, obtaining histological proof seems necessary in many contrast-enhanced brainstem lesions because of the wide variety of differential diagnoses in adults. Conventional radiotherapy is the standard treatment for diffuse intrinsic low-grade brainstem gliomas in adults (the median survival is 5 years). In malignant brainstem gliomas, radiotherapy is the standard treatment. However, the possible benefit of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide or other agents) has not been thoroughly evaluated in adults. The role of anti-angiogenic therapies in brainstem gliomas remains to be defined. A better understanding of the biology of these tumors is of primary importance for identifying homogeneous subgroups and for improving therapy options and outcomes. PMID:22382458

  19. Adult onset retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-07-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  20. Adult Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic-recurrent inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects adults; however, a more transient infantile form also occurs. The definitive cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown. However, proliferation of Malassezia species has been described as a contributing factor. The adult form of seborrheic dermatitis affects up to approximately five percent of the general population. The disorder commonly affects the scalp, face, and periauricular region, with the central chest, axillae, and genital region also involved in some cases. Pruritus is not always present and is relatively common, especially with scalp disease. A variety of treatments are available including topical corticosteroids, topical antifungal agents, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and more recently, a nonsteroidal “device ”cream. This article reviews the practical topical management of seborrheic dermatitis in the United States, focusing on the adult population. PMID:21607192

  1. Pharmacotherapy for adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lenard A

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved 3 medications, atomoxetine and the extended-release formulations of amphetamine salts and dexmethylphenidate, for the treatment of adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Different formulations of the same drugs, as well as other agents and cognitive-behavioral therapy, have been tested to determine efficacy in ADHD alone and in ADHD with comorbid substance use disorders, mood disorders, and anxiety disorders. A deficit in research exists in regard to these comorbidities in adults with ADHD. PMID:19552859

  2. Tuberculosis in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Shobita

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the world's most lethal infectious diseases. Preventive and control strategies among other high-risk groups, such as the elderly population, continues to be a challenge. Clinical features of TB in older adults may be atypical and confused with age-related diseases. Diagnosis and management of TB in the elderly person can be difficult; treatment can be associated with adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current global epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, management, and prevention of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in community-dwelling and institutionalized aging adults. PMID:27394018

  3. Back pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stumbo, Jessica R

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a summary of the many causes of back pain in adults. There is an overview of the history and physical examination with attention paid to red flags that alert the clinician to more worrisome causes of low back pain. An extensive differential diagnosis for back pain in adults is provided along with key historical and physical examination findings. The various therapeutic options are summarized with an emphasis on evidence-based findings. These reviewed treatments include medication, physical therapy, topical treatments, injections, and complementary and alternative medicine. The indications for surgery and specialty referral are also discussed. PMID:23668645

  4. The Adult Student Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Fred A.; Blocker, Clyde E.

    This study is concerned with the following topics on adult student attendance at Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC) during the 1969-70 academic year: student background, reason for attendance, enrollment in programs or courses, academic success, evidence of personal and occupational development. The report is based on the useable…

  5. Police and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Vic

    The literature on adult education for police is reviewed and criticized. Among the publications that have been influential in debating the need for police education are Charles B. Saunder's "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society" (1976), which endorses the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement's recommendations regarding the vital…

  6. Helping Adults to Spell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorhouse, Catherine

    This book presents a range of strategies for adult literacy tutors and offers a wealth of practical advice on teaching spelling within the context of writing. Chapters 1-3 offer basic information on talking with the student about spelling, finding out how the student spells and helping the student to see himself/herself as a "good" speller, and…

  7. Adult Basic Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet, aimed at adult basic education students, pinpoints and summarizes a few common spelling rules to help make spelling easier, and includes a component on using the dictionary. In the text, each rule is presented with many examples. Exercises follow each spelling rule, allowing students the opportunity to apply the rule to specific…

  8. Helping Adults Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmundson, Phyllis J.

    2007-01-01

    Increased attention to preparing addictions counselors and related professionals to use evidence-based practices has brought new attention to the preparation programs for addictions counselors. Research and theory about adult learning emphasizes the importance of students as active participants in problem and experience based learning. This paper…

  9. For Adult Audiences Only.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallien, Kathryn J.

    1986-01-01

    Empire State College, a branch of the State University of New York, is a public institution designed for adults with 5,500 students at 40 locations. ESC's most successful student recruitment method is word of mouth. Suggestions on how to attract students are provided. (MLW)

  10. Bereavement in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, James P.

    1994-01-01

    Factors that place older adults at risk for problems associated with the bereavement process are identified and discussed. Provides guidelines for distinguishing between normal bereavement depression and clinical depression, discusses the impact of different types of loss, describes three types of intervention, and explores countertransference.…

  11. Adult Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, John L.

    2012-01-01

    Most religious organizations exert their greatest effort in the religious education of children. This makes sense in terms of handing on the faith to the next generation. Historically, however, religious education of adults is the first endeavor of religious groups. Conducting education of children requires the previous religious education of…

  12. Adult Learning Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adults Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Campaigning Alliance for Lifelong Learning is to lobby parliament for the restoration of the 1.5 million adult learning places lost over the past two years. The campaign has attracted supporters from an astonishingly wide range of backgrounds. In this article, Gordon Marsden, Caroline Biggins, Beth Walker, Mike Chaney, Peter Davies, Sian…

  13. Individualized Adult Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, C. G.

    As the proceedings of a national seminar on individualized adult science education, a total of 13 articles is compiled in this volume concerning the theory and techniques of curriculum development and the individualization process in upgrading Canadian science courses. The topics include: The Characteristics and Formulation of Behavioral…

  14. Intelligence and Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellenz, Robert A., Ed.; Conti, Gary J., Ed.

    "Understanding Adult Intelligence" (Robert Sternberg) focuses on the nature of intelligence. It explains Sternberg's triarchic theory, in which he posits three main aspects of intelligence: its relation to the internal or mental world of the learner, its relation to experience, and its relation to the surrounding world. "Strategies and Learning"…

  15. Adult Literacy Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C., Ed.; Draper, James A., Ed.

    This book, intended to serve as a professional reference work, proposes to define the field of Adult Basic Education in its evolution, its contribution to professional education, and the principal problems and issues. The volume contains the following treatises: "Definitions and Evolution of the Concepts" (Thomas); "Selected Chronology of Literacy…

  16. Facilitation of Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  17. Immigration and Adult Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumbaut, Ruben G.; Komaie, Golnaz

    2010-01-01

    Almost 30 percent of the more than 68 million young adults aged eighteen to thirty-four in the United States today are either foreign born or of foreign parentage. As these newcomers make their transitions to adulthood, say Ruben Rumbaut and Golnaz Komaie, they differ significantly not only from one another but also from their native-parentage…

  18. Encyclopedia of Adult Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert, Ed.

    This encyclopedia contains 106 articles on adult development that were written by more than 75 specialists in such diverse fields as anthropology, communication, education, health sciences, history, and psychology. In a guide to related topics that is presented at the beginning of the encyclopedia, the 106 articles are grouped under the following…

  19. Dealing with Adult Illiteracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Today, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of a recent study, "Adult Illiteracy in the United States: A Report to the Ford Foundation." Incidence of reading difficulties, effectiveness of literacy programs, and the relationship of reading ability to poverty are some of the topics discussed. New community-based literacy initiatives are recommended. (SJL)

  20. Adult Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Ronald W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents analysis of adult children of alcoholics, their experience and adjustment in relation to the severity and type of alcoholism, age considerations and perceptions as a child, and existence and nature of significant others. Discusses alcoholics' and others' family issues, focusing on roles taken, and personality characteristics. Emphasizes…

  1. Profiles of Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Library, Springfield.

    Since January 1986, when the Illinois Secretary of State Literacy Grant Program began funding a wide variety of adult literacy programs, more than 30,000 students have sought help with reading. They have been matched with 25,000 tutors who have provided more than 2 million hours of volunteer instruction. The profiles in this booklet are stories of…

  2. Dance for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Diane Milhan, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Dance programs for older adults that encourage exercise and socializing are described in six articles. Program guidelines of the American Alliance Committee on Aging are explained, and other articles emphasize a movement education approach that may involve intergenerational contact. A dance program held in a worship setting is also discussed. (PP)

  3. Adult Education in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education and Cultural Affairs, Stockholm (Sweden).

    The forms of adult education in Sweden discussed in this review include the courses provided by the Labour Market Board, the folk high schools, the national and local educational schemes, the Commission for TV and Radio in Education (TRU), and the training courses arranged by the employee organizations. Brief mention is also made of the courses…

  4. Individualized Mathematics for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanosko, Barbara J.

    Adults who have chosen to interrupt their educational careers often face the problem of rusty academic skills. The Veterans Upward Bound Program at Humboldt State University developed a ten-week college preparatory program designed to help these people make the transition to college life with appropriate academic skills. Two different mathematics…

  5. Hearing Loss in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses hearing loss in adults. It begins with an explanation of the anatomy of the ear and then explains the three types of hearing loss: conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss. Tinnitus, hearing aids, and cochlear implants are also addressed. (CR)

  6. Migration and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gois, William

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to highlight the role of adult education as a tool in addressing labour migration issues, specifically those concerning the protection of migrant workers' rights and the transformation of the impact of migration into positive holistic developmental gains. The view of labour migration as a means to forge the economic…

  7. Adult Education. Annual Report, National Advisory Council on Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Adult Education, Washington, DC.

    Recommendations of the President's National Advisory Council on Adult Education are the subject of this first annual report. The activities of the Council during its first year are listed. Recommendations for Action are: (1) a higher budget priority for adult education in Fiscal Year 1973, and the development of a Comprehensive Adult Education…

  8. Adult Development. What do Teachers of Adults Need To Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Susan; And Others

    The first part of this two-part paper provides a general review of adult development and is premised on an understanding of andragogy. Andragogy is the art and science of helping adults learn. It is based on the following four assumptions about adults: (1) as people mature they become less dependent and more self-directed; (2) experiences serve as…

  9. Teaching Nontraditional Adult Students: Adult Learning Theories in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    As the USA experiences rapid growth of nontraditional adult students in higher education, educators and institutions will increasingly need to look beyond the traditional youth-centric educational models to better address adult learning needs. To date, no research has been conducted examining the learning experiences of adult students enrolled in…

  10. Utah Adult Education Services. Adult Education Report 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Major purposes for the preparation of this report on public school adult education in Utah were: to provide the public with a description of achievements, trends, and needs, and with meaningful cost accounting information; to make comparisons and analyses of adult education by program, school district, and year; and to provide the adult education…

  11. Adult Development and Adult Beginning Reading Behaviors: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Sally

    An ethnographic study investigated four adult beginning reading (ABR) classes in several adult learning centers in order to determine the effect of an adult's age and developmental phase on his or her behavior and attitudes in the learning-to-read process. For 9 months, a four-member research team conducted on-site observations, compiled extensive…

  12. Hearing Loss and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Hearing Loss and Older Adults On this page: What is ... about hearing loss and older adults? What is hearing loss? Hearing loss is a sudden or gradual decrease ...

  13. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  14. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr ... topic from the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: ...

  15. Facts about Measles for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... as part of a combination vaccine, called the MMR vaccine that protects against measles, mumps, and rubella. Which adults should get vaccinated against measles with MMR vaccine? Adults born in 1957 or later who do ...

  16. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  17. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  18. Finding Your Adult Vaccination Record

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Is Your Adult Vaccination Record Up-To-Date? Language: English Español (Spanish) ... next medical appointment. Staying Up-to-date on Vaccination is Important Every year thousands of adults in ...

  19. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  20. Strategies in Aboriginal Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Alan T.

    1973-01-01

    Traditional Aboriginal practices render traditional adult education programs futile. Aboriginal adult education must be concerned with the growth and development of the total personality. Adopted strategies must motivate Aborigines as individuals and as members of the community. (AG)

  1. AIDS and the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allers, Christopher T.

    1990-01-01

    Older adults are finding themselves the neighbors of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients as well as the primary caregivers of infected adult children. Focuses on roles, issues, and conflicts older adults face in dealing with relatives or neighbors with AIDS. Case management and educational intervention strategies are also offered.…

  2. Rural Education for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, Vivian W.

    2008-01-01

    Meeting the learning needs of older adults in rural areas is a critical and growing concern for adult and continuing education. This chapter addresses learning in a rural context for older adults by examining several constructs. These include the definitions of "rural," the issues of the learners' ages, and the various structures and purposes…

  3. Act To Promote Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1970

    An act of the German Lower Saxony Parliament to promote adult education is presented. It has 24 general provisions relating to the following: purpose of adult education, principle for promotion, conditions for promotions of establishments, independence of adult education, prerequisites and form of acknowledgement of entitlement to promotion,…

  4. Adult Development and the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, James M.

    Little attention has been given to how adults develop through their lifetimes and what roles their workplace environments play in that development. Research and theory regarding adult psychosocial development have confirmed the developmental life-cycle phases of adulthood. These are: leaving the family (ages 16-22), getting into the adult world…

  5. Philosophies of Adult Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a typology of philosophical traditions in environmental education for adults, based on five philosophical perspectives of adult education described by Elias and Merriam. These five traditions are liberal, progressive, behaviorist, humanist, and radical adult environmental education, respectively. A summary of each philosophy's…

  6. Adult Education and Development, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Education and Development, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The publication is a half-yearly journal for adult education in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Issue 42 includes the following: "Adult Education for Self-Reliance in Community Health Education Programmes" (Kweka); "Promoting Good Nutrition" (Mangvwat); "Incorporating Health-Improvement Activities in Adult Education Programmes in Nigeria"…

  7. The Future of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    It is an interesting assignment to think about the future of adult education. In fact, it is an assignment the author has the graduate students in his "Introduction to Adult Education" class at East Carolina University consider during one of their course units. As a member of the Board of Directors for the American Association for Adult and…

  8. Achieving Adult Literacy. Fastback 330.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Pamela J.

    Leaders in business and industry are demanding workers who not only can read and write but can think creatively and critically and solve problems. Federal- and state-funded programs and volunteer organizations are involved with adult literacy. Increasingly, corporations are funding adult literacy projects. Adults read for different reasons than…

  9. Policy Issues in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Leonard P.

    1983-01-01

    States that adult educators in the United States, unlike their counterparts abroad, have not been key actors in influencing policy with adult education overtones at the national, state, or local levels. Discusses how adult educators can become more influential by applying concepts used by Warren Bennis to describe organizational health: sense of…

  10. Transformative Dimensions of Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mezirow, Jack

    This book presents a theory of how adults learn by making meaning of their experiences. Chapter 1 gives an overview of an emerging transformation theory of adult learning, compares it with other theories of adult learning, and describes the dynamics of the process through which one makes meaning of one's experience. Chapter 2 examines the way…

  11. Visual Persistence and Adult Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Roberta L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Visual persistence was investigated in adults with and without dyslexia in order to determine whether dyslexic adults demonstrate problems similar to those found in childhood dyslexia. Results showed that sensitivity of dyslexic adults was impaired when parts of a test stimulus were presented to adjacent retinal areas, suggesting that under…

  12. Adult Multiple Intelligences and Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, Meg Ryback

    In the Adult Multiple Intelligences (AMI) study, 10 teachers of adults from the northeastern region of the United States explored for 18 months the ways that multiple intelligences (MI) theory could support instruction and assessment in various adult learning contexts. The results of this research were published in a book by Julie Viens called MI…

  13. Adult Education in Western Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Joachim H.; And Others

    Here are abstracts of three books on adult education in Western Germany, where the institutions and methods of continuing education have been nearly unknown. The first, ERWACHSENENBILDUNG IN DER BUNDESREPUBLIK (ADULT EDUCATION IN THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC), 167 pages, justifies regarding adult education today as a complete changeover from its forms in…

  14. Assessment Matters in Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donley, Jan; Napper, Rosemary

    This handbook was developed to give tutors of adult education information and ideas about assessing adult learning. It can be used as a reference for information about assessment and as a practical tool for tutors. Section 1, Introduction to Assessment in Adult Learning, includes information on these topics: what assessment is, how to assess, why…

  15. Literacy Proficiency of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Kamp, Max; Boudard, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    As a supplement to the International Adult Literacy Survey, the Netherlands devoted special attention to the literacy proficiency of older adults. A close look at the literacy skills of older adults and their use in daily life is relevant because demographic developments, individualisation, the position of older employees in the labour market and…

  16. Assessment Tools for Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shefrin, Carol; Shafer, Dehra; Forlizzi, Lori

    The Assessment Tools for Adult Education project was designed to provide training and support to staff of the Pennsylvania Bureau of Adult Basic and Literacy Education (ABLE) funded programs to help them use assessment tools and procedures to document the learning gains of the adult students they serve. The following candidate assessment…

  17. Rural Adult Education: Current Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchey, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    "Context". The word pervades the literature on adult and continuing education. For adult education practitioners and researchers alike, understanding the beliefs and actions of their educational place continues to be of significant concern, and rightfully so. That adults wish to have their histories, experiences, and abilities appreciated and…

  18. Teachers as Adult Learners: A New Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Patricia A.

    2003-01-01

    Presents the Adult Learning Model for Faculty Development of adult educators, which incorporates principles of adult learning and program planning concepts used in adult education. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  19. Nocturnal hypothermia impairs flight ability in birds: a cost of being cool.

    PubMed

    Carr, Jennie M; Lima, Steven L

    2013-12-01

    Many birds use regulated drops in night-time body temperature (Tb) to conserve energy critical to winter survival. However, a significant degree of hypothermia may limit a bird's ability to respond to predatory attack. Despite this likely energy-predation trade-off, the behavioural costs of avian hypothermia have yet to be examined. We thus monitored the nocturnal hypothermia of mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) in a laboratory setting in response to food deprivation. Nocturnal flight tests were used to quantify the flight ability of hypothermic doves. Many hypothermic doves (39% of tests) could not fly while carrying a small weight, but could do so after quickly warming up to typical daytime Tb. Doves that were unable to fly during their first test were more hypothermic than those that could fly, with average Tb reductions of 5.3°C and 3.3°C, respectively, but there was no overall indication of a threshold Tb reduction beyond which doves were consistently incapable of flight. These results suggest that energy-saving hypothermia interferes with avian antipredator behaviour via a reduction in flight ability, likely leading to a trade-off between energy-saving hypothermia and the risk of predation. PMID:24107528

  20. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4000 million cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 1996, resulting in 2.5 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries traveling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, and oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution). PMID:19450323

  1. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4.6 billion cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 2004, resulting in 2.2 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 72 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution), vitamin A supplementation, and zinc supplementation. PMID:21718555

  2. Rhinitis in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nyenhuis, Sharmilee; Mathur, Sameer K.

    2013-01-01

    Rhinitis symptoms of rhinorrhea, congestion, sneezing, nasal/ocular pruritis, and postnasal drainage can significantly affect the quality of life for older adults. As the US population ages, it will be increasingly important for healthcare providers to effectively diagnose and manage rhinitis. Rhinitis is categorized broadly into allergic rhinitis and non-allergic rhinitis. Environmental changes and avoidance measures are a primary means of intervention. In addition, there are several topical therapies (nasal sprays) that can be effective for symptom control. PMID:23389558

  3. An Undergraduate Course in Adult Development: When the Virtual Adult Is an Adult

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    An aspect of an undergraduate psychology course on adult development was the preparation of case records on adults who consented to be studied. Participants (1) developed their abilities to observe and accurately record adult behavior across a variety of ages and contexts; (2) withheld judgments about behavior when evidence was lacking; (3)…

  4. The Academic Dean: Dove, Dragon, and Diplomat. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Allan; Bryan, Robert A.

    This book is a guide to the many roles of an academic dean who has jurisdiction over academic departments and programs that include faculty members, budget, and curricula in colleges and universities. The work advises on ways to recognize and solve the problems that confront academic deans. The topics treated include the following: the allocation…

  5. Milk-Jug Mosaic: Creating a Mathematical Dove of Peace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Kathleen K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a teaching experience with 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students who participated in a project designed to give students opportunities to use a variety of mathematical skills while creating a peaceful community of friends. Concludes with ideas for adapting the project for other occasions and involving other mathematics skills. (KHR)

  6. Peace Poems and Picasso Doves: Literature, Art, Technology, and Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreillon, Judi

    Students and teachers employ think-aloud strategies as they read literature, compose poems, and create artwork related to the theme of peace. This unit is designed for collaborative teaching among classroom, art, and technology teachers, and school librarians. A single educator can also teach this unit. During nine and a half hours, plus…

  7. Hawks, doves, and owls: An agenda for avoiding nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, G.T.; Carnesale, A.; Nye, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book explores five paths toward nuclear conflict, concentrating on how changes in forces, technology, and political life affect the way events might travel down each path. The authors suggest ways to move the world back from danger. Their agenda is an extensive list of detailed policy recommendations to reduce the risk of nuclear war.

  8. An ecological risk assessment of lead shot exposure in non-waterfowl avian species: Upland game birds and raptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, R.J.; Lacher, T.E. Jr.; Bunck, C.

    1996-01-01

    There is increasing concern that birds in terrestrial ecosystems may be exposed to spent lead shot. Evidence exists that upland birds, particularly mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), ingest spent lead shot and that raptors ingest lead shot by consuming wounded game. Mortality, neurological dysfunction, immune suppression, and reproductive impairment are documented effects of exposure to lead in birds. An ecological risk assessment on the impact of lead shot exposure in upland birds was conducted and is presented in the context of the new United States Environmental Protection Agency`s Ecological Risk Assessment Paradigm. A considerable amount of spent lead shot is released into the environment each year from shooting and hunting. Doves collected from fields that are cultivated to attract mourning doves for hunting activities show evidence of ingestion of spent lead shot. Because lead can cause both acute and chronic toxicity if ingested by birds, and because there is evidence of widespread deposition of lead shot in terrestrial ecosystems, concern for impacts on upland game birds and raptors seems warranted. Although this ecological risk assessment does not clearly define a significant risk of lead shot exposure to upland game birds, this issue merits continued scrutiny to protect upland game bird and raptor resources.

  9. [Intraosseous infusion for adults].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kirchhoff, C

    2008-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion methods have been common for emergency treatment in infants and children for years. The role of IO access in adults is however much less clear, but its importance in this patient group is increasing, and different devices are available today. Each device has strengths and weaknesses, but all achieve rapid vascular access even in challenging situations. The potential of IO access regarding both therapeutic and diagnostic options has been shown in several operational studies in and out of hospital. Insertion times require between 1 and 2 min in most cases, while insertion and handling of the IO access devices seem to be easy and reliable. The flow rates of IO access devices for adults are lower than those of large-bore peripheral intravenous catheters, but fluid resuscitation is possible in most cases at least with pressure bag infusion systems. Most drugs administered intravenously can be given intraosseously in equivalent dosages and with the same effects. Nevertheless the limitations and risks of IO access routes need to be considered for each application. Rapid IO access is now possible in all age groups, and the 2005 AHA Guidelines favor it over drug administration via the endotracheal tube. PMID:18250995

  10. Human metapneumovirus in adults.

    PubMed

    Haas, Lenneke E M; Thijsen, Steven F T; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  11. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  12. Shrapnel: Latency, Mourning and the Suicide of a Parent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisagni, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe some acute responses to the suicide of a parent, through the account of the analytic psychotherapy of a latency child who found the body of his dead father. The acute traumatic responses of the child show that the perceptual apparatus, time and space are subverted, while the functioning of the contact barrier…

  13. The Face of Mourning: Deploying Grief To Construct a Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiederhold, Eve

    2002-01-01

    Argues the predilection for sharing speech that informs the study of rhetoric does not fully address the haunted sense of psychic and embodied displacement that can accompany connections made to imagined social constructs to satisfy desires for affiliation. Focuses on media representations of the shootings at Columbine High School and two cases of…

  14. Grief and Mourning Reactions Following Abortion and Miscarriage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widener, Anmarie J.

    1996-01-01

    Explores current research on psychological reactions following induced and spontaneous abortions. Provides examples of studies wherein researchers have used a loss model to understand this experience. Explores possible reasons for the apparent inattention to grief reactions following this type of loss and offers an alternative approach to the loss…

  15. Near Vision Test for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eyes Education Series Online Training and Certification Patient Education Materials Star Pupils ... Test for Adults Testing Near Vision and Distance Vision Prevent Blindness does NOT recommend that you ...

  16. Facts about Rubella for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  17. Facts about Mumps for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  18. Adult Literacy and Numeracy: Assessing Change. Adult Literacy Research Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, J. Joy, Ed.; van Kraayenoord, Christina E., Ed.

    This document contains eight papers from an action research program to foster good practice in adult literacy provision and policy. "Introduction" (J. Joy Cumming, Christina E. van Kraayenoord) presents an overview of the action research project and individual reports. "Assessment: Making a Difference in Adult Literacy and Numeracy Learning" (J.…

  19. Evaluation of Adult Education Programs. California Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    To assist adult educators in finding meaningful ways to measure the effectiveness of instruction, this monograph provides selected illustrations of specific methods used by adult education instructors to verify student learning. Obtained from teachers in the field, the examples are from programs in (1) dental assisting, (2) instrument pilot ground…

  20. Working with Young Adults. NIACE Lifelines in Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carol

    This document explains how adult educators and others in the United Kingdom can increase levels of participation and achievement in learning for young adults by providing informal learning opportunities for those young people who are least inclined to participate in formal education and training programs. The guide outlines a step-by-step approach…

  1. Literacy of Older Adults in America. Adult Literacy Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent State Univ., OH. Ohio Literacy Resource Center.

    As part of the National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS) of 1992, the National Center for Education Statistics published a separate study that focuses on the literacy skills of older adults (aged 60 years and older) from a variety of perspectives, such as age, sex, amount of education, race or ethnic background, income, and geographic region. Some of…

  2. An Adult Education Program for Mentally Retarded Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starnes, Jean; Damron, Imogene

    This curriculum guide is intended for use with mentally retarded adults who are enrolled in adult basic education classes. The curriculum provides guidelines to improve students' competencies in three main areas: general functioning skills and independence (transportation, interpersonal relationships, health and safety, goal setting, planning and…

  3. The Varieties of Adult Civic Engagement in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Linda; Wrigley, Heide Spruck

    2012-01-01

    Civic engagement, or the practice of democratic deliberation in adult education and learning, asks that adults use their experiences to cooperatively build solutions to the difficult social, economic, and political problems that affect their lives and communities now and into the future. The articles presented in this issue look at the…

  4. Atomoxetine Treatment for ADHD: Younger Adults Compared with Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durell, Todd; Adler, Lenard; Wilens, Timothy; Paczkowski, Martin; Schuh, Kory

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Atomoxetine is a nonstimulant medication for treating child, adolescent, and adult ADHD. This meta-analysis compared the effects in younger and older adults. Method: A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Data from patients aged 18-25 years were compared with data from…

  5. Adult Education in Australia: The Council of Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Shirley

    Liberal adult education in Victoria, Australia, takes its ideals, if not its form, from the pre-war university and Workers Education Association (WEA) partnerships: the university providing tutors and content, the WEA providing contact with unions and workers. Unique to Victoria is the level to which community-based adult education has been…

  6. Adults' conceptions of intelligence across the adult life span.

    PubMed

    Berg, C A; Sternberg, R J

    1992-06-01

    To examine whether young, middle-aged, and older adults view the concept of intelligent person as similar or different during adulthood, 140 adults of various ages rated how likely it would be for individuals of average and exceptional intelligence at 30, 50, and 70 years of age to be engaged in behaviors previously identified by adults as characterizing adult intelligence. Adults perceived more similarity between exceptionally intelligent prototypes of closer ages (i.e., 30 and 50 and 50 and 70). Intelligence was perceived to consist of interest and ability to deal with novelty, everyday competence, and verbal competence--dimensions that were perceived to be differentially important for different-aged prototypes and by individuals of different ages. Participants' conceptions also included the idea that intelligence is malleable and that abilities differentially increase or decrease across the life span. PMID:1610512

  7. [Adult celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Cellier, C; Grosdidier, E

    2001-05-15

    Celiac disease is much common than previously thought with a prevalence of 1/300, but most of cases are poorly symptomatic or silent. Fewer of half of patients report diarrhoea as a presenting symptom. In adults, the diagnosis should be considered, in case of isolated iron deficiency anaemia, neurological symptoms (ataxia, epilepsy), osteoporosis and arthralgia, infertility, dermatitis herpetiformis and abnormalities in liver tests. Characteristic histological features are total or subtotal villous atrophy associated with an increased number of intraepithelial lymphocytes. The most sensitive and specific circulating antibodies for the diagnosis are endomysial and transglutaminase IgA antibodies. The treatment of celiac disease requires a strict gluten free diet, but the observance to this diet is often difficult. In patients refractory to a strict gluten free diet, serious complications such as intestinal lymphoma or refractory sprue should be considered. PMID:11458609

  8. Secondary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Puar, Troy Hai Kiat; Mok, Yingjuan; Debajyoti, Roy; Khoo, Joan; How, Choon How; Ng, Alvin Kok Heong

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hypertension occurs in a significant proportion of adult patients (~10%). In young patients, renal causes (glomerulonephritis) and coarctation of the aorta should be considered. In older patients, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnoea and renal artery stenosis are more prevalent than previously thought. Primary aldosteronism can be screened by taking morning aldosterone and renin levels, and should be considered in patients with severe, resistant or hypokalaemia-associated hypertension. Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea should be sought. Worsening of renal function after starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor suggests the possibility of renal artery stenosis. Recognition, diagnosis and treatment of secondary causes of hypertension lead to good clinical outcomes and the possible reversal of end-organ damage, in addition to blood pressure control. As most patients with hypertension are managed at the primary care level, it is important for primary care physicians to recognise these conditions and refer patients appropriately. PMID:27211205

  9. Extravasation Injuries in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Al-Benna, S.; O'Boyle, C.; Holley, J.

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of an intravascular catheter is one of the most common invasive procedures in hospitals worldwide. These intravascular lines are crucial in resuscitation, allow vital medication to be administered, and can be used to monitor the patients' real-time vital parameters. There is, however, growing recognition of potential risks to life and limb associated with their use. Medical literature is now replete with isolated case reports of complications succinctly described by Garden and Laussen (2004) as “An unending supply of “unusual” complications from central venous catheters.” This paper reviews complications of venous and arterial catheters and discusses treatment approaches and methods to prevent complications, based on current evidence and endeavours to provide information and guidance that will enable practitioners to prevent, recognise, and successfully treat extravasation injuries in adults. PMID:23738141

  10. Adult Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Valley, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Most organisms use their olfactory system to detect and analyze chemical cues from the external world to guide essential behaviors. From worms to vertebrates, chemicals are detected by odorant receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons, which in vertebrates send an axon to the primary processing center called the olfactory bulb (OB). Within the OB, sensory neurons form excitatory synapses with projection neurons and with inhibitory interneurons. Thus, because of complex synaptic interactions, the output of a given projection neuron is determined not only by the sensory input, but also by the activity of local inhibitory interneurons that are regenerated throughout life in the process of adult neurogenesis. Herein, we discuss how it is optimized and why. PMID:27235474

  11. The older adult driver.

    PubMed

    Carr, D B

    2000-01-01

    More adults aged 65 and older will be driving in the next few decades. Many older drivers are safe behind the wheel and do not need intensive testing for license renewal. Others, however, have physiologic or cognitive impairments that can affect their mobility and driving safety. When an older patient's driving competency is questioned, a comprehensive, step-by-step assessment is recommended. Many diseases that impair driving ability can be detected and treated effectively by family physicians. Physicians should take an active role in assessing and reducing the risk for injury in a motor vehicle and, when possible, prevent or delay driving cessation in their patients. Referral to other health care professionals, such as an occupational or physical therapist, may be helpful for evaluation and treatment. When an older patient is no longer permitted or able to drive, the physician should counsel the patient about using alternative methods of transportation. PMID:10643955

  12. Adult coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Marmouz, F

    2007-01-01

    Coeliac disease is an auto-immune inflammatory reaction characterized by a partial or total villi's atrophy of the proximal small intestine occuring after ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed patients. The classic form is much more frequent in children. Thereby there has been a misevaluation and improper treatment of coeliac disease in adults who suffer more from asymptomatica and atypical forms. Currently the only effective treatment is a strict gluten free diet for life. However recent researches brought a new light on the matter. Now oats as a causative factor is controvertial. The introduction of some moderate intestinal lesions (pre-atrophic with intra-epithelial hyperlymphocytosis qualified as "weak enteropathies") in the definition of coeliac disease might be possible. Moreover the way to diagnose has evolved as serological tests and markers are more used due to their efficiency. PMID:17375738

  13. Operation Bootstrap: Adult Education Program Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Ella M.

    Adult educators need to ask themselves two basic questions: What are the problems which adults face today? What are the services which adult education can deliver to help adults individually, and collectively, resolve their problems? For many low-income adults, the problems of high death and unemployment rates, low life expectancy rates, limited…

  14. Segmenting the Adult Education Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aurand, Tim

    1994-01-01

    Describes market segmentation and how the principles of segmentation can be applied to the adult education market. Indicates that applying segmentation techniques to adult education programs results in programs that are educationally and financially satisfying and serve an appropriate population. (JOW)

  15. Adult Transition Program without Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberg, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Best practices in adult transition special education for moderate to severe students suggest student-centered planning that maximizes independence in adult life. Based on the above sources, school districts and governing boards would best serve moderate to severe transition special education students with increasing integration into the community…

  16. Recall in Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walen, Susan R.

    1970-01-01

    The learning and retention performances of children and adults were compared on free and serialized reproductions of meaningful words. Although the children took longer than the adults to reach the learning criterion, and short-term retention was equivalent for both groups, the children displayed a superior serial recall at 7-day retention.…

  17. Participation Training for Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergevin, Paul; McKinley, John

    Participation Training for Adult Education serves as a manual, guide, and resource for leaders and participants interested in establishing a program of adult learning called group-participation training. Goals emphasize participants learning about themselves as learners, how they relate to and can help others, and exploring the dynamics of a…

  18. Gangsta Rap and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guy, Talmadge C.

    2004-01-01

    Adult education instructors and administrators, who typically are not members of the hip-hop generation, have little or no background, sensitivity, or understanding of the influence and significance of black popular culture and music for young African American and white adult learners. (Contains 1 note.)

  19. Focus on Young Adult Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Union, Bunni; Williams, Sheila

    1996-01-01

    Presents three library youth service programs which focus on "Pizza and Politicians," a public library pizza party which gave high school students and college-aged young adults a chance to meet and question politicians; a young adult "Reading to Seniors" program; "Making Books," a public library journal-making project for middle school students.…

  20. Native American Adult Reader I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lovern Root, Ed.

    Aspects of Native American history and culture as well as issues and concerns of American Indians are presented in the twelve short articles in this reader for adults. Intended for use in an adult basic education/GED program, the reader features simply written stories (for grades 0-3), illustrations, vocabulary lists and student study questions.…

  1. Sibling Status Effects: Adult Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, Linda Musun

    1985-01-01

    This study attempted to determine what expectations or beliefs adults might hold about a child based on his or her sibling status alone. Ratings on 50 adjective pairs for each of three sibling status types, only, oldest, and youngest child, were assessed in relation to adult expectations, birth order, and parental status of rater. (Author/DST)

  2. Understanding Adult Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    This book introduces readers to issues, debates and literatures related to a number of central areas of practice in adult education and training, especially in Australia. It is intended as a first attempt to define the field of adult education in Australia in an analytical and theoretical, as opposed to a theoretical and practical sense. Written…

  3. Predictive Modeling in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    The current economic crisis, a growing workforce, the increasing lifespan of workers, and demanding, complex jobs have made organizations highly selective in employee recruitment and retention. It is therefore important, to the adult educator, to develop models of learning that better prepare adult learners for the workplace. The purpose of…

  4. Adult Academy Tutor Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isserlis, Janet; And Others

    This handbook is for volunteer tutors, student interns, and VISTA volunteers working with adult basic education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) learners. The community-based handbook contains information about adult literacy and tutoring--what tutors do, who the learners are, and how the literacy learning process works. Introductory…

  5. Mass Media and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, John A., Ed.

    Some important developments affecting the use of the mass media in adult education are described in this collection of papers. A paper by Dr. George Gordon accuses educators of lacking imagination in their whole approach to adult education, especially in their use of the media. Dr. Robert Carlson's paper delineates the history of educational…

  6. Examining Controversies in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreitlow, Burton W.; And Others

    Controversies over adult education purposes, methods, audiences, and procedures are examined. After outlining a procedure for reviewing competing positions on controversial topics, the book pairs the contrasting views of two authors on each of 10 key issues facing adult education. Chapters cover: philosophies at issue (David L. Boggs); identifying…

  7. Adult Education in India & Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nikhil Ranjan

    A survey is made of various aspects of adult education in India since 1947, together with comparative accounts of the origin, development, and notable features of adult education in Denmark, Great Britain, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Needs and objectives in India, largely in the eradication of illiteracy, are set forth, and pertinent…

  8. Journey to International Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Qi

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes her journey to international adult education and shares some lessons learned from her journey. The author developed her interest in international adult education through the Scientific Research Institute of International and Comparative Education (SRIICE) at Beijing Normal University and discovered its…

  9. Travel and Adult Transformative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological research study examines the lived experience of individual adult transformation in the context of travel. Adults throughout history have experienced profound personal and perception changes as a result of significant travel events. Transformative learning occurs through experience, crisis, and reflection, all of which are…

  10. Economic Essays on Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shetty, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Adult students are an important component of the current U.S education landscape. They account for over 40% of the degree-seeking fresh enrollees in the U.S. colleges and according to the U.S. Department of Education, their growth will soon outpace that of traditional students. Adult students have also received considerable attention in higher…

  11. Notes & Quotes on Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, John R. A.

    This document is a review of literature on adult learning, assembled in a computer-printout format. It brings together brief statements made by authors on the various major aspects of individual and social (associational) learning, as well as information on planning and evaluation. The document also contains a glossary of adult education terms and…

  12. The Politics of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Art

    2016-01-01

    Art Ellison is longtime advocate for adult education, having managed numerous advocacy campaigns over the past forty years on the state and national levels. Prior to his employment in 1980 as the NH State Director of Adult Education he worked for many years as a high school teacher and as a community organizer. In this article, Ellison offers some…

  13. Perceived Stress among Deaf Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elaine G.; Ouellette, Sue E.; Kang, Youngmi

    2006-01-01

    The Present Article describes the effectiveness of stress management classes in decreasing perceived stress among Deaf adults. Deaf adults may experience unique stressors, in addition to circumstances associated with increased stress in the general population. The Perceived Stress Scale (S. Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) was used as a…

  14. Recruiting and Retaining Adult Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadfield, Janice

    2003-01-01

    Adult learners, long the stepchildren of colleges and universities, have nearly become the norm, and they spend billions of dollars each year on education. This chapter takes a customer-oriented approach to recruiting and retaining adult students in higher education. (GCP)

  15. Testing in Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehringhaus, Carolyn

    1991-01-01

    Responses from 427 adult basic education teachers (51 percent response) indicated that (1) 84.8 percent use tests for placement; (2) the Tests of Adult Basic Education are overwhelmingly the most frequently used; and (3) 77.7 percent find their testing practices effective, although informal observation and assessment received the highest ranking.…

  16. Adult Education; State Demographic Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Adult Education, Washington, DC.

    In order to clearly identify the target population of Federal activities in adult education, the Research Committee gathered State-by-State demographic information from the 1970 U.S. Census. This compilation of over 3,700 separate figures provides a profile of adults relating to an eligible population for a Federal-State-Local partnership program.…

  17. Senior Adult Consumer Advisory Manual,

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ater, E. Carolyn, Ed.

    This manual is intended for use by senior adult peer advisors (age 60 and over) engaged in helping relationships in providing consumer education to other senior adults. The advisory procedures are based on a problem solving approach which incorporates the development of a self-help concept. Chapter 1 provides information on consumer advising. It…

  18. Adult Educator in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutta, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    The role of adult education in developing countries is preparation of the people for accepting and inculcating change and helping to establish a pattern of social values enabling progress. Recommendations from the Asian Regional Seminar were a high degree of professionalism for adult educators and the establishing of a regional institute. (EA)

  19. Structuring an Adult Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Alan D.; Lindsey, William L.

    Mercy College in New York has devised a program that seeks to meet the special needs of returning adult students. To ease the restraints on the adult student's time and travel needs, the college holds classes in branches and extension centers throughout the urban area. It also offers eight-week courses that carry the same contact time requirements…

  20. Adult Learning Disorders: Contemporary Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Lorraine E., Ed.; Schreiber, Hope E., Ed.; Wasserstein, Jeanette, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics technologies have enhanced our understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders in adults. The authors in this volume not only discuss such advances as they apply to adults with learning disorders, but also address their translation into clinical practice. One cluster of chapters addresses developmental…

  1. Adult Functional Competency: A Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Div. of Extension.

    The Adult Performance Level (APL) project summary specifies the competencies which are functional to economic and educational success in society and describes devices developed for assessing those competencies. The APL theory of functional competency identifies adult needs in general knowledge areas (consumer economics, occupational knowledge,…

  2. Adult Education Research in Finland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, John A.; Johnson, Arthur A.

    Finnish research in adult education falls into three categories: philosophical, historical, and empirical. (Philosophical research involves the analysis of the concept of adult education and its relationship to other levels of education. Empirical research embraces the psychological and sociological study of students, teachers, institutions, and…

  3. Neuropsychological Assessment of Adult Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marceau, Roger; Meghani, Rehana; Reddon, John R.

    2008-01-01

    This report is primarily concerned with reporting on the normative results obtained on a large sample of serious adult offenders. An expanded Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery was administered to 584 adult offenders (OF), 132 normal controls (NC), and 494 acute psychiatric patients (PP). Subjects were between 18 and 44 years of age.…

  4. Obesity Prevention in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Stella Lucia; Sukumar, Deeptha; Milliron, Brandy-Joe

    2016-06-01

    The number of older adults living in the USA, 65 years of age and older, has been steadily increasing. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007-2010, indicate that more than one-third of older adults, 65 years of age and older, were obese. With the increased rate of obesity in older adults, the purpose of this paper is to present research on different methods to prevent or manage obesity in older adults, namely dietary interventions, physical activity interventions, and a combination of dietary and physical activity interventions. In addition, research on community assistance programs in the prevention of obesity with aging will be discussed. Finally, data on federal programs for older adults will also be presented. PMID:27107762

  5. Adult attachment and declining birthrates.

    PubMed

    Draper, Thomas W; Holman, Thomas B; White, Whitney; Grandy, Shannon

    2007-02-01

    Attachment scores for 658 young adults living in the U.S.A. were obtained using the Experiences in Close Relationships scale. The participants came from a subsample of the RELATE data set, who had also filled out the adult attachment measure. Those young adults living in Utah County, Utah, an area of the country with a higher than normal birthrate (88% members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints), also had higher than average adult attachment scores. While the methodology was not sufficient to assess causal direction nor eliminate the possibility of unidentified influences, an undiscussed psychological factor, adult attachment, may play a role in the numerical declines observed among nonimmigrant communities in the USA and Europe. PMID:17450996

  6. Older adults challenged financially when adult children move home.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Steven P; Padilla-Frausto, D Imelda

    2014-02-01

    This policy brief looks at the financial burdens imposed on older Californians when adult children return home, often due to a crisis not of their own making, to live with their parents. The findings show that on average in California, the amount of money that older adults need in order to maintain a minimally decent standard of living while supporting one adult child in their home increases their expenses by a minimum of 50 percent. Low-income older adults are usually on fixed incomes, so helping an adult child can provide the child with a critical safety net but at the cost of the parents' own financial well-being. Policy approaches to assisting this vulnerable population of older adults include implementing reforms to increase Supplemental Security Income (SSI), improving the availability of affordable housing, assuring that all eligible nonelderly adults obtain health insurance through health care reform's expansion of Medi-Cal and subsidies, and increasing food assistance through SNAP and senior meal programs. PMID:24804354

  7. Coaching as a Strategy for Helping Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wax, Dorothy M.; Wertheim, Judith

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of coaching for adult learners, the specific characteristics adults bring to the learning environment, and strategies for dealing with the obstacles adult learners may face.

  8. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What are adult brain ...

  9. General Information about Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  13. Just How Adult Is This Young Adult Book: Young Adult Books for the Junior High Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Charlotte

    1999-01-01

    Discusses young adult novels and presents a bibliography to acquaint librarians with titles and authors that are suitable for emerging young adult readers in grades five through nine. Subject categories include realistic fiction, in the news, historical fiction, short stories, legendary characters, mysteries, science fiction/fantasy/horror, and…

  14. Aspects of Adult Development. The Rossman Adult Learning Inventory: Creating Awareness of Adult Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Frederick; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Romero's overview of adult developmental theory stresses the work of Erikson, Havighurst, Loevinger, Perry, Kohlberg, and Cross. Rossman and Rossman discuss the development of their Adult Learning Inventory with an extensive source summary for its 4 factors and a 62-item bibliography. (SK)

  15. Vitalistic thinking in adults.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stuart

    2013-11-01

    Vitalistic thinking has traditionally been associated with reasoning about biological phenomena. The current research aimed to investigate a broader range of vitalistic thinking than previously studied. Esoteric notions of 'energy' are frequently used by individuals when making causal attributions for strange occurrences, and previous literature has linked such thinking with paranormal, magical, and superstitious beliefs. Two experiments are described that aim to investigate whether adults are vitalistic when asked to make causal judgments, and whether this can be predicted by thinking styles and prior paranormal belief. Experiment 1 asked participants to rate three causal options (one of which was vitalistic) for six vignettes. Scores on one dimension of paranormal belief (New Age Philosophy) and analytical thinking significantly predicted vitalism, but scores on intuitive thinking and Traditional Paranormal Beliefs did not. Experiment 2 extended the findings by asking participants to generate their own causal responses. Again, paranormal belief was found to be the best predictor of vitalism, but this time Traditional Paranormal Beliefs were associated with vitalistic responses whilst both intuitive and analytical thinking were unable to significantly predict classification. Results challenge previous findings, suggesting that vitalistic thinking may operate differently when applied to everyday causal reasoning. PMID:24094281

  16. [Prehospitale analgesia in adults].

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, Björn; Holsträter, Susanne; Bernhard, Michael; Lampl, Lorenz; Helm, Matthias; Kulla, Martin

    2016-02-01

    After securing vital function, treatment of pain is an important aspect in emergency medical care. Irrespective of the underlying disease or injury, pain is an important warning symptom of the body and the most common reason for an emergency alert notification. A patient assesses quality of care and success of prehospital care using the criteria of the extent of pain relief he experiences. Since mild pain does not usually lead to an emergency alert, the criteria apply mainly to treatment of severe and very severe pain. Pain perception varies from individual to individual. Accordingly, assessment of pain intensity is the very first step in pain therapy. The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) ranging from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable) is suitable for pain assessment in adult emergency patients. Above a grade of 4, therapeutic intervention should be initiated with the goal of reducing pain to reach a value of <4, or at least to achieve a reduction by 3 points. The choice of analgesics that can be meaningfully used in pre-hospital emergency medicine is limited. The emergency physician should be aware of available drugs and administration routes. PMID:26949902

  17. Adult health checkup

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, Jane; Ischayek, Amanda; Dubey, Vinita; Iglar, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe updates to the Preventive Care Checklist Form© to help family physicians stay up to date with current preventive health care recommendations. Quality of evidence The Ovid MEDLINE database was searched using specified key words and other terms relevant to the periodic health examination. Secondary sources, such as the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the Trip database, and the Canadian Medical Association Infobase, were also searched. Recommendations for preventive health care for average-risk adults were reviewed. Strong and weak recommendations are presented on the form in bold and italic text, respectively. Main message Updates were made to the form based on the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommendations on screening for obesity (2015), cervical cancer (2013), depression (2013), osteoporosis (2013), hypertension (2012), diabetes (2012, 2013), and breast cancer (2011). Updates were made based on recommendations from other Canadian organizations on screening for HIV (2013), screening for sexually transmitted infections (2013), immunizations (2012 to 2014), screening for dyslipidemia (2012), fertility counseling for women (2011, 2012), and screening for colorectal cancer (2010). Some previous recommendations were removed and others lacking evidence were not included. Conclusion The Preventive Care Checklist Form has been updated with current recommendations to enable family physicians to provide comprehensive, evidence-based care to patients during periodic health examinations. PMID:27076540

  18. Clueless: Adult Mysteries with Young Adult Appeal 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John; Morrison, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    This annotated bibliography includes adult mysteries that appeal to teen readers under the categories of Sherlock Holmes; reference sources; private investigators; amateur sleuths; historical sleuths; suspense and thrillers; police procedurals; mystery blends; and anthologies. (LRW)

  19. La lecture et les adultes (Reading and Adults).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caceres, Benigno

    1980-01-01

    Discusses methods used to help adults improve their reading skills and read with more enjoyment. Particular attention is paid to the Reading Club method. An illustration is given of a particular exercise used at a center in Paris. (AMH)

  20. Computational models of adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2005-10-01

    Experimental results in recent years have shown that adult neurogenesis is a significant phenomenon in the mammalian brain. Little is known, however, about the functional role played by the generation and destruction of neurons in the context of an adult brain. Here, we propose two models where new projection neurons are incorporated. We show that in both models, using incorporation and removal of neurons as a computational tool, it is possible to achieve a higher computational efficiency that in purely static, synapse-learning-driven networks. We also discuss the implication for understanding the role of adult neurogenesis in specific brain areas like the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus.

  1. Adult Hirschprung disease: radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Mindelzun, R E; Hicks, S M

    1986-09-01

    Hirschprung disease is usually diagnosed in infancy. Occasionally patients reach adulthood without diagnosis or treatment. Four cases of adult Hirschprung disease are described. The principal radiographic findings are a markedly dilated, feces-filled colon above the zone of transition; a narrowed rectum; a cone- or funnel-shaped zone of transition; and a mosaic colonic pattern caused by collapsed redundant mucosa after colonic cleansing. In an adult, identification on a barium enema examination of an abrupt, smooth transition zone in the rectum with proximal colonic dilatation, in conjunction with an appropriate clinical history, should suggest the diagnosis of adult Hirschprung disease. PMID:3737900

  2. Thematic relations in adults' concepts.

    PubMed

    Lin, E L; Murphy, G L

    2001-03-01

    Concepts can be organized by their members' similarities, forming a kind (e.g., animal), or by their external relations within scenes or events (e.g., cake and candles). This latter type of relation, known as the thematic relation, is frequently found to be the basis of children's but not adults' classification. However, 10 experiments found that when thematic relations are meaningful and salient, they have significant influence on adults' category construction (sorting), inductive reasoning, and verification of category membership. The authors conclude that concepts function closely with knowledge of scenes and events and that this knowledge has a role in adults' conceptual representations. PMID:11293459

  3. Inservice Instructors: Adult Educator Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Mary Beth Harper

    1983-01-01

    Describes how fourteen principles of adult education provide the conceptual framework for performance competencies to guide the daily practice of instructors in the centralized inservice department of a large acute-care hospital. (JOW)

  4. Computer acceptance of older adults.

    PubMed

    Nägle, Sibylle; Schmidt, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    Even though computers play a massive role in everyday life of modern societies, older adults, and especially older women, are less likely to use a computer, and they perform fewer activities on it than younger adults. To get a better understanding of the factors affecting older adults' intention towards and usage of computers, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Usage of Technology (UTAUT) was applied as part of a more extensive study with 52 users and non-users of computers, ranging in age from 50 to 90 years. The model covers various aspects of computer usage in old age via four key constructs, namely performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influences, and facilitating conditions, as well as the variables gender, age, experience, and voluntariness it. Interestingly, next to performance expectancy, facilitating conditions showed the strongest correlation with use as well as with intention. Effort expectancy showed no significant correlation with the intention of older adults to use a computer. PMID:22317258

  5. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung disease Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Patient Instructions Eating extra calories when sick - adults ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Interstitial Lung Diseases Sarcoidosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  6. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  7. Recommended Immunizations for Adults 50+

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Health Screenings and Immunizations Recommended Immunizations For Adults 50+ The content in this section ... out more, visit How Vaccines Prevent Disease . Vaccines, Vaccinations, and Immunizations Understanding the difference between vaccines, vaccinations, ...

  8. Older Adults and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a widely underrecognized and undertreated medical illness. Depression often co-occurs with other serious illnesses, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson's disease. Because many older adults face these illnesses as well as various social and ...

  9. Osteoporosis: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures if needed annual flu shots. Protein-Calorie Malnutrition Many older adults living at home eat poorly. ... serious that a condition known as protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM) develops. Sometimes, PCM occurs after a long ...

  10. Youths Transitioning as Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, C. Amelia

    2014-01-01

    This chapter considers how transitions to adulthood have been historically represented and presents alternative ways of thinking about transitions to adulthood through the context of adult basic education programs.

  11. Adult-Onset Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Khera, Mohit; Broderick, Gregory A; Carson, Culley C; Dobs, Adrian S; Faraday, Martha M; Goldstein, Irwin; Hakim, Lawrence S; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Kacker, Ravi; Köhler, Tobias S; Mills, Jesse N; Miner, Martin; Sadeghi-Nejad, Hossein; Seftel, Allen D; Sharlip, Ira D; Winters, Stephen J; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-07-01

    In August 2015, an expert colloquium commissioned by the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (SMSNA) convened in Washington, DC, to discuss the common clinical scenario of men who present with low testosterone (T) and associated signs and symptoms accompanied by low or normal gonadotropin levels. This syndrome is not classical primary (testicular failure) or secondary (pituitary or hypothalamic failure) hypogonadism because it may have elements of both presentations. The panel designated this syndrome adult-onset hypogonadism (AOH) because it occurs commonly in middle-age and older men. The SMSNA is a not-for-profit society established in 1994 to promote, encourage, and support the highest standards of practice, research, education, and ethics in the study of human sexual function and dysfunction. The panel consisted of 17 experts in men's health, sexual medicine, urology, endocrinology, and methodology. Participants declared potential conflicts of interest and were SMSNA members and nonmembers. The panel deliberated regarding a diagnostic process to document signs and symptoms of AOH, the rationale for T therapy, and a monitoring protocol for T-treated patients. The evaluation and management of hypogonadal syndromes have been addressed in recent publications (ie, the Endocrine Society, the American Urological Association, and the International Society for Sexual Medicine). The primary purpose of this document was to support health care professionals in the development of a deeper understanding of AOH, particularly in how it differs from classical primary and secondary hypogonadism, and to provide a conceptual framework to guide its diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. PMID:27343020

  12. Asthma in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 10% of adults have suffered an attack of asthma, and up to 5% of these have severe disease that responds poorly to treatment. Patients with severe disease have an increased risk of death, but patients with mild to moderate disease are also at risk of exacerbations. Most guidelines about the management of asthma follow stepwise protocols. This review does not endorse or follow any particular protocol, but presents the evidence about specific interventions. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute asthma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 100 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: beta2 agonists (plus ipratropium bromide, pressured metered-dose inhalers, short-acting continuous nebulised, short-acting intermittent nebulised, short-acting iv, and inhaled formoterol); corticosteroids (inhaled); corticosteroids (single oral, combined inhaled, and short courses); education about acute asthma; generalist care; helium–oxygen mixture (heliox); magnesium sulphate (iv and adding isotonic nebulised magnesium to inhaled beta2 agonists); mechanical ventilation; oxygen supplementation (controlled 28% oxygen and controlled 100% oxygen); and specialist care. PMID:21463536

  13. What Does It Take to Be an Adult in Austria? Views of Adulthood in Austrian Adolescents, Emerging Adults, and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirsch, Ulrike; Dreher, Eva; Mayr, Eva; Willinger, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the defining features of emerging adulthood, subjects' conceptions of the transition to adulthood, and the perceived adult status in Austria. The sample consisted of 775 subjects (226 adolescents, 317 emerging adults, 232 adults). Results showed that most Austrian emerging adults feel themselves to be between adolescence…

  14. [Epithelial hepatoblastomas in the adult].

    PubMed

    Mondragón Sánchez, R; Bernal Maldonado, R; Sada Navarro, L A; Hernández, A I; Hurtado Andrade, H; Cortés Espinoza, T; Sánchez Cisneros, R

    1994-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma is the most frequent primary malignant liver neoplasm in childhood; in adults it is extremely rare and only 27 cases have been published. The prognosis of this neoplasm is poor because it is usually discovered late. Surgery, chemotherapy and liver transplantation have been tried with poor results. We present two adult patients who were diagnosed with an epithelial hepatoblastoma. The pathogenesis, histologic features and current management is reviewed. PMID:7716366

  15. Root Caries in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Dick; Hyde, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Older adults are retaining an increasing number of natural teeth, and nearly half of all individuals aged 75 and older have experienced root caries. Root caries is a major cause of tooth loss in older adults, and tooth loss is the most significant negative impact on oral health-related quality of life for the elderly. The need for improved preventive efforts and treatment strategies for this population is acute. PMID:26357814

  16. Bias of animal population trend estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.; Link, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    A computer simulation study of the population trend estimator used for the Mourning Dove Call-Count Survey, Woodcock Singing Ground Survey, Breeding Bird Survey and other surveys concluded that the estimator had negligible bias in most situations but that observer covariables should not be used with less than five years of data. With rare species (e.g. two birds per route), at least five years should be used. The estimator is seriously biased towards not detecting population changes with very rare species (e.g. 0.3 birds per route). Other technical recommendations are made.

  17. Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraerts, Martine; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    The discovery of adult stem cells in most adult tissues is the basis of a number of clinical studies that are carried out, with therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells as a prime example. Intense scientific debate is still ongoing as to whether adult stem cells may have a greater plasticity than previously thought. Although cells with some features of embryonic stem cells that, among others, express Oct4, Nanog and SSEA1 are isolated from fresh tissue, it is not clear if the greater differentiation potential is acquired during cell culture. Moreover, adult more pluripotent cells do not have all pluripotent characteristics typical for embryonic stem cells. Recently, some elegant studies were published in which adult cells could be completely reprogrammed to embryonic stem cell-like cells by overexpression of some key transcription factors for pluripotency (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). It will be interesting for the future to investigate the exact mechanisms underlying this reprogramming and whether similar transcription factor pathways are present and/or can be activated in adult more pluripotent stem cells.

  18. Study Circle Guide: Adult Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This study circle was created by the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL). The study circle is part of NCSALL's efforts to help connect research and practice in the field of adult basic education and adult literacy. The Adult Student Persistence Study Circle is one of a series of study circles that NCSALL has…

  19. Dealing with Disruptive Behavior of Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobmeier, Robert; Moran, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The adult education literature on disruptive behavior of adult learners was reviewed and a survey on disruptive behavior of adult learners was conducted with adult educators. The findings are synthesized in a conceptual framework for understanding the types and causes of disruptive behavior, which fall into the categories of inattention,…

  20. Adult Education in Israel, II-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmayer, Paul, Ed.; Pinnes, Noy, Ed.

    This is the second booklet in English that deals with adult education in Israel. The following papers are included: "Editors' Notes" (Paul Kirmayer, Noy Pinnes); "Introduction" (Meir Peretz); "Defining 'Adult Education'" (Yehezkel Cohen); "Planning Study Programs for Adults" (Rachel Tokatli); "The Role of Adult Education: Changing the Individual…

  1. Adults' Event Recall: Is Context Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratner, Hilary Horn; Padgett, Robert J.

    In studies of retention of verbal material adults have repeatedly remembered less than younger adults have. A study was conducted which asked older adults to remember an experienced event, retention of experiences being considered a better indicator of functioning ability than retention of word lists. In an initial study, older adults' recall was…

  2. Adult Education and Development, No. 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Education and Development, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This serial issue contains a total of 26 articles grouped under five headings: "Adult Learning: A Key for the Twenty-First Century (Fifth International Conference on Adult Education (Confintea V))"; "Trends in Adult Education Policy" (Belanger); "Adult Education in Modern Times" (Geissler); "From Criticism to Constructiveness" (Torres); "An…

  3. Competency-Based Adult Education Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    This resource guide for adult education personnel describes programs and publications on APL (Adult Performance Level) and Competency-Based Adult Education (CBAE). Includes: (1) Descriptions of APL examination programs developed by the American College Testing Program, (2) brief description of Missouri project on the identification of adult basic…

  4. 38 CFR 18.438 - Adult education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adult education. 18.438 Section 18.438 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED... Adult Education § 18.438 Adult education. A recipient that provides adult education may not, on...

  5. 38 CFR 18.438 - Adult education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adult education. 18.438 Section 18.438 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED... Adult Education § 18.438 Adult education. A recipient that provides adult education may not, on...

  6. 38 CFR 18.438 - Adult education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adult education. 18.438 Section 18.438 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED... Adult Education § 18.438 Adult education. A recipient that provides adult education may not, on...

  7. 38 CFR 18.438 - Adult education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adult education. 18.438 Section 18.438 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED... Adult Education § 18.438 Adult education. A recipient that provides adult education may not, on...

  8. Life Skills Curriculum for Senior Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon County Schools, Tallahassee, FL.

    This life skills curriculum helps adult basic educators meet the needs of senior adult learners. An introduction contains the following sections: purpose statement; description of the senior adult learner; tips to remember on teaching senior adults; physiology of aging; teaching the hearing impaired; and teaching the visually impaired. The life…

  9. Engaging the Adult Learner Generational Mix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyoke, Laura; Larson, Erick

    2009-01-01

    Educators and Trainers both focus on adult learning theory when teaching. In the workforce, as well as in higher education, current literature pertaining to adult learners tends to lump all adults into the same category. Scant research exists that reviews the adult learner through a generational lens. This paper examines the elements that engage…

  10. 38 CFR 18.438 - Adult education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adult education. 18.438 Section 18.438 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED... Adult Education § 18.438 Adult education. A recipient that provides adult education may not, on...

  11. Adult Learners: Pathways to Progression. FEDA Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisenberger, Anna; Sanders, John

    1997-01-01

    A study focused on facilitating progression for adults from nonvocational adult education to qualification-bearing courses in further education (FE) and studied their patterns of progression and which factors helped or hindered such progress. Information was collected from adult learners in 10 adult and FE organizations in Britain through a…

  12. Methods in Adult Education, Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Barton; And Others

    The adult education textbook is intended for persons preparing to teach adults as well as those already on the job. Following an introductory chapter, Chapter 2 is directed to the learning characteristics of adults. Chapter 3 focuses on steps of involving the potential participant in adult education programs, while Chapter 4 outlines various…

  13. Adults with ADHD. An overview.

    PubMed

    Wender, P H; Wolf, L E; Wasserstein, J

    2001-06-01

    Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common, genetically transmitted neurological disorder, with onset in childhood, probably mediated by decreased brain dopaminergic functioning. The first author was one of the earliest to describe the persistence of symptoms into adulthood. Prevalence and natural history data suggest that of the 3 to 10% of children diagnosed with ADHD, one- to two-thirds (somewhere between 1 and 6% of the general population) continue to manifest appreciable ADHD symptoms into adult life. This paper describes how ADHD in adults can be readily diagnosed and treated, despite resembling or coexisting with other psychiatric disorders. The Wender Utah diagnostic criteria address adult characteristics of the disorder. Informant and patient interviews and rating scales are used to determine the psychiatric status of the patient as a child, make a retroactive diagnosis of childhood ADHD, and establish the current diagnosis of the adult. Stringent diagnosis is key to determining effective treatment. Dopamine agonist stimulant medications appear to be the most effective in treating ADHD. About 60% of patients receiving stimulant medication showed moderate-to-marked improvement, as compared with 10% of those receiving placebo. The core symptoms of hyperactivity, inattention, mood lability, temper, disorganization, stress sensitivity, and impulsivity have been shown to respond to treatment with stimulant medications. Non-dopaminergic medications, such as the tricyclic antidepressants and SSRIs have generally not been useful in adults with ADHD in the absence of depression or dysthymia. Pemoline is no longer approved for use in these patients, despite early favorable reports. Appropriate management of adult patients with ADHD is multimodal. Psychoeducation, counseling, supportive problem-directed therapy, behavioral intervention, coaching, cognitive remediation, and couples and family therapy are useful adjuncts to medication management

  14. Acute Psychiatric Hospital Admissions of Adults and Elderly Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Examination of the records of 240 inpatients with mental retardation and 7 with autism discharged from a university hospital indicated that elderly adults had more medical problems than did adults, more elderly adults were transferred to a state hospital, and the most common diagnosis in both adults and elderly adults was chronic schizophrenia,…

  15. Policy Review on Adult Learning: The Adult Non-Formal Education Policy of Mali, West Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadio, Moussa

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the issue of policy development for adult learning in Mali, West Africa. On January 2007, the Malian government adopted the "Adult Non-formal Education Policy Document," which was intended to regulate the adult learning sector and federate the actions of policy makers, adult education providers, and adult learners. The…

  16. Psychological distress among homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, L; Linn, L S

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of mental illness among the homeless. As part of a community-based survey of 529 homeless adults, we developed and tested a model to increase our understanding of the factors related to their psychological distress. Using a previously validated and reliable scale of perceived psychological distress, we found that homeless adults were more likely to report psychological distress than the general population (80% vs. 49%). Distress levels were not associated with most demographic or homeless characteristics or general appearance. However, distress was related to unemployment, greater cigarette and alcohol use, worse physical health, fewer social supports, and perceived barriers to obtaining needed medical care. Since mental, physical, and social health are strongly related among homeless adults, alleviating distress among them may be most effectively done by implementing a broad-based health services package coupled with employment programs provided in an accessible service delivery setting. PMID:2785158

  17. Adult Neurogenesis and Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Cameron, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that adult neurogenesis, the production of new neurons in adulthood, may play a role in psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Medications and other treatments for mental disorders often promote the proliferation of new neurons; the time course for maturation and integration of new neurons in circuitry parallels the delayed efficacy of psychiatric therapies; adverse and beneficial experiences similarly affect development of mental illness and neurogenesis; and ablation of new neurons in adulthood alters the behavioral impact of drugs in animal models. At present, the links between adult neurogenesis and depression seem stronger than those suggesting a relationship between new neurons and anxiety or schizophrenia. Yet, even in the case of depression there is currently no direct evidence for a causative role. This article reviews the data relating adult neurogenesis to mental illness and discusses where research needs to head in the future. PMID:25178407

  18. [Adult hepatoblastoma. A case report].

    PubMed

    Goikoetxea Urdiain, A; Sánchez Acedo, P; Mateo Retuerta, J; Tarifa Castilla, A; Zazpe Ripa, C; Herrera Cabezón, J

    Adult hepatoblastoma is a rare pathology. Its pathogeny is not well understood and prognosis is very bad. We pre-sent a case of adult hepatoblastoma treated in our centre. A 65 year-old male, without previous hepatopathy, who consulted due to right hypochondrial pain with a subacute evolution. The pathological diagnosis was adult epithelial hepatoblastoma, with free surgical margins. The patient recei-ved a second surgical intervention 5 months later due to early recurrence and died 10 months after the diagnosis due to a new massive recurrence. His definitive diagnosis is histological. Radical surgery is the only treatment that increases survival, but recurrence is frequent. There are no well-defined patterns of adjuvant chemotherapy nor is there any trans-plant experience. PMID:27599957

  19. Prenatal Famine and Adult Health

    PubMed Central

    Lumey, L.H.; Stein, Aryeh D.; Susser, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    We review human studies on the relation between acute exposures to prenatal famine and adult physical and mental health. These studies are observational and include exposures to a famine environment by natural or man-made causes or, more commonly, from the interplay between natural and human factors. These natural experiments provide an opportunity to examine long-term outcomes after famine exposures by comparing exposed and nonexposed individuals. The studies show consistent associations between prenatal famine and adult body size, diabetes, and schizophrenia. For other measures of adult health, findings are less robust. A relation between prenatal famine and some reported epigenetic changes may provide a potential mechanism to explain specific associations. Much progress can be made if current separate studies are further analyzed with comparable definitions of exposures and outcomes and using common analytic strategies. PMID:21219171

  20. Vaccinations for the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, Gowrishankar; Biedenbender, Rex; Davidson, Harley Edward; Gravenstein, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Vaccine response declines with age, but currently recommended vaccines are safe and effective in reducing, if not preventing, disease altogether. Over the last decade, advancements in vaccine immunogenicity, either by increasing dose or conjugating vaccines to protein, have resulted in more immunogenic vaccines that also seem more effective in reducing clinical disease both for influenza and pneumococcus. Meanwhile, there is a resurgence in incident pertussis, exceeding prevalence from five decades ago, adding older adults to a recommended target vaccination group. This article discusses currently available vaccines, in the context of current epidemiology and recommendations, for older adults. PMID:27394026