Science.gov

Sample records for adult mouse intestinal

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine. PMID:25721301

  2. Oral Immunization with Cholera Toxin Provides Protection against Campylobacter jejuni in an Adult Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model

    PubMed Central

    Albert, M. John; Mustafa, Abu Salim; Islam, Anjum; Haridas, Shilpa

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunity to Campylobacter jejuni, a major diarrheal pathogen, is largely Penner serotype specific. For broad protection, a vaccine should be based on a common antigen(s) present in all strains. In our previous study (M. J. Albert, S. Haridas, D. Steer, G. S. Dhaunsi, A. I. Smith, and B. Adler, Infect. Immun. 75:3070–3073, 2007), we demonstrated that antibody to cholera toxin (CT) cross-reacted with the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs) of all Campylobacter jejuni strains tested. In the current study, we investigated whether immunization with CT protects against intestinal colonization by C. jejuni in an adult mouse model and whether the nontoxic subunit of CT (CT-B) is the portion mediating cross-reaction. Mice were orally immunized with CT and later challenged with C. jejuni strains (48, 75, and 111) of different serotypes. Control animals were immunized with phosphate-buffered saline. Fecal shedding of challenge organisms was studied daily for 9 days. Serum and fecal antibody responses were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting. The cross-reactivity of rabbit CT-B antibody to MOMP was studied by immunoblotting. The reactivity of 21 overlapping 30-mer oligopeptides (based on MOMP’s sequence) against rabbit CT antibody was tested by ELISA. Test animals produced antibodies to CT and MMP in serum and feces and showed resistance to colonization, the vaccine efficacies being 49% (for strain 48), 37% (for strain 75), and 34% (for strain 111) (P, ≤0.05 to ≤0.001). One peptide corresponding to a variable region of MOMP showed significant reactivity. CT-B antibody cross-reacted with MOMP. Since CT-B is a component of oral cholera vaccines, it might be possible to control C. jejuni diarrhea with these vaccines. PMID:23653448

  3. Loss of Sigma Factor RpoN Increases Intestinal Colonization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in an Adult Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, W. Brian; Richards, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagellar synthesis, as well as a wide range of nonflagellar genes. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in rpoN (VP2670) in V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633, a clinical serogroup O3:K6 isolate, and examined the effects in vivo using a streptomycin-treated mouse model of colonization. We confirmed that deletion of rpoN rendered V. parahaemolyticus nonmotile, and it caused reduced biofilm formation and an apparent defect in glutamine synthetase production. In in vivo competition assays between the rpoN mutant and a wild-type RIMD2210633 strain marked with the β-galactosidase gene lacZ (WBWlacZ), the mutant colonized significantly more proficiently. Intestinal persistence competition assays also demonstrated that the rpoN mutant had enhanced fitness and outcompeted WBWlacZ. Mutants defective in the polar flagellum biosynthesis FliAP sigma factor also outcompeted WBWlacZ but not to the same level as the rpoN mutant, which suggested that lack of motility is not the sole cause of the fitness effect. In an in vitro growth competition assay in mouse intestinal mucus, the rpoN mutant also outcompeted the wild type and exhibited faster doubling times when grown in mucus and on individual components of mucus. Genes in the pathways for the catabolism of mucus sugars also had significantly higher expression levels in a ΔrpoN mutant than in the wild type. These data suggest that in V. parahaemolyticus, RpoN plays an important role in carbon utilization regulation, which may significantly affect host colonization. PMID:24478070

  4. Suppression of c-Kit signaling induces adult neurogenesis in the mouse intestine after myenteric plexus ablation with benzalkonium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Tamada, Hiromi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis rarely occurs in the enteric nervous system (ENS). In this study, we demonstrated that, after intestinal myenteric plexus (MP) ablation with benzalkonium chloride (BAC), adult neurogenesis in the ENS was significantly induced in c-kit loss-of-function mutant mice (W/Wv). Almost all neurons and fibers in the MP disappeared after BAC treatment. However, 1 week after ablation, substantial penetration of nerve fibers from the non-damaged area was observed in the MP, longitudinal muscle and subserosal layers in both wildtype and W/Wv mice. Two weeks after BAC treatment, in addition to the penetrating fibers, a substantial number of ectopic neurons appeared in the subserosal and longitudinal muscle layers of W/Wv mice, whereas only a few ectopic neurons appeared in wildtype mice. Such ectopic neurons expressed either excitatory or inhibitory intrinsic motor neuron markers and formed ganglion-like structures, including glial cells, synaptic vesicles and basal lamina. Furthermore, oral administration of imatinib, an inhibitor of c-Kit and an anticancer agent for gastrointestinal stromal tumors, markedly induced appearance of ectopic neurons after BAC treatment, even in wildtype mice. These results suggest that adult neurogenesis in the ENS is negatively regulated by c-Kit signaling in vivo. PMID:27572504

  5. Suppression of c-Kit signaling induces adult neurogenesis in the mouse intestine after myenteric plexus ablation with benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Hiromi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis rarely occurs in the enteric nervous system (ENS). In this study, we demonstrated that, after intestinal myenteric plexus (MP) ablation with benzalkonium chloride (BAC), adult neurogenesis in the ENS was significantly induced in c-kit loss-of-function mutant mice (W/W(v)). Almost all neurons and fibers in the MP disappeared after BAC treatment. However, 1 week after ablation, substantial penetration of nerve fibers from the non-damaged area was observed in the MP, longitudinal muscle and subserosal layers in both wildtype and W/W(v) mice. Two weeks after BAC treatment, in addition to the penetrating fibers, a substantial number of ectopic neurons appeared in the subserosal and longitudinal muscle layers of W/W(v) mice, whereas only a few ectopic neurons appeared in wildtype mice. Such ectopic neurons expressed either excitatory or inhibitory intrinsic motor neuron markers and formed ganglion-like structures, including glial cells, synaptic vesicles and basal lamina. Furthermore, oral administration of imatinib, an inhibitor of c-Kit and an anticancer agent for gastrointestinal stromal tumors, markedly induced appearance of ectopic neurons after BAC treatment, even in wildtype mice. These results suggest that adult neurogenesis in the ENS is negatively regulated by c-Kit signaling in vivo. PMID:27572504

  6. Loss of sigma factor RpoN increases intestinal colonization of vibrio parahaemolyticus in an adult mouse model"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagella synthesis as well as a wide range of ...

  7. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  8. Intestinal histoplasmosis in immunocompetent adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin-Lin; Wang, Jin; Wang, Zi-Jing; Wang, Yi-Ping; Yang, Jin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To present a retrospective analysis of clinical and endoscopic features of 4 cases of immunocompetent hosts with intestinal histoplasmosis (IH). METHODS: Four immunocompetent adults were diagnosed with IH between October 2005 and March 2015 at West China Hospital of Sichuan University. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics were summarized and analyzed retrospectively. GMS (Gomori methenamine silver), PAS (periodic acid-Schiff) and Giemsa staining technique were used to confirm Histoplasma capsulatum(H. capsulatum). The symptoms, signs, endoscopic presentations, radiographic imaging, pathological stain results and follow-up are presented as tables and illustrations. RESULTS: The cases were male patients, ranging from 33 to 61 years old, and primarily presented with non-specific symptoms such as irregular fever, weight loss, abdominal pain and distention. Hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy were the most common signs. Endoscopic manifestations were localized or diffuse congestion, edema, ulcers, and polypoid nodules with central erosion involving the terminal ileum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon and rectum, similar to intestinal tuberculosis, tumor, and inflammatory bowel disease. Numerous yeast-like pathogens testing positive for PAS and GMS stains but negative for Giemsa were detected in the cytoplasm of the histiocytes, which were highly suggestive of H. capsulatum. CONCLUSION: Immunocompetent individuals suffering from histoplasmosis are rarely reported. It is necessary that gastroenterologists and endoscopists consider histoplasmosis as a differential diagnosis, even in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27099446

  9. Macrophage Isolation from the Mouse Small and Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Harusato, Akihito; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate responses to the normal microbiota as well as pathogens. One of the most important steps in beginning to understand the functions of these cells is the ability to effectively isolate them from the complex intestinal environment. Here, we detail methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages from the mouse small and large intestine. PMID:27246032

  10. Isolation, Culture, and Maintenance of Mouse Intestinal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Kevin P.; Ackerman, Sarah; Dow, Lukas E; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-01-01

    In this protocol we describe our modifications to a method to isolate, culture and maintain mouse intestinal stem cells as crypt-villus forming organoids. These cells, isolated either from the small or large intestine, maintain self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential over time. This provides investigators a tool to culture wild type or transformed intestinal epithelium, and a robust assay for stem cell tissue homeostasis in vitro.

  11. Small intestinal permeability in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luzia; Ramminger, Sara; Haas, Verena; Postrach, Elisa; Werich, Martina; Fischer, André; Koller, Michael; Swidsinski, Alexander; Bereswill, Stefan; Lochs, Herbert; Schulzke, Jörg‐Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It is not yet clear whether intestinal mucosal permeability changes with advancing age in humans. This question is of high importance for drug and nutrition approaches for older adults. Our main objective was to answer the question if small intestinal barrier integrity deteriorates with healthy aging. We conducted a cross‐sectional study including the pooled data of 215 nonsmoking healthy adults (93 female/122 male), 84 of whom were aged between 60 and 82 years. After a 12‐h fast, all participants ingested 10 g of lactulose and 5 g of mannitol. Urine was collected for 5 h afterwards and analyzed for test sugars. The permeability index (PI = lactulose/mannitol) was used to assess small intestinal permeability. Low‐grade inflammation defined by high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein ≥1 mL/L and kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate) were determined in the older age group. The PI was similar in older compared to younger adults (P =0.887). However, the urinary recovery of lactulose and mannitol was lower in the older adults and this change was neither associated with urinary volume nor glomerular filtration rate. The PI was not significantly correlated with low‐grade inflammation or presence of noninsulin‐dependent type 2 diabetes. However, it significantly deteriorated in the copresence of both conditions compared to low‐grade inflammation alone (P =0.043) or type 2 diabetes alone (P =0.015). Small intestinal mucosal barrier does not deteriorate with age per se. But low‐grade inflammation coupled with minor disease challenges, such as type 2 diabetes, can compromise the small intestinal barrier. PMID:24771689

  12. Immunofluorescent Staining of Mouse Intestinal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Kevin P.; Dow, Lukas E; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-01-01

    Immunofluorescent staining of organoids can be performed to visualize molecular markers of cell behavior. For example, cell proliferation marked by incorporation of nucleotide (EdU), or to observe markers of intestinal differentiation including paneth cells, goblet cells, or enterocytes (see Figure 1). In this protocol we detail a method to fix, permeabilize, stain and mount intestinal organoids for analysis by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy.

  13. Phenotypic and functional profiling of mouse intestinal antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Harusato, Akihito; Flannigan, Kyle L; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L

    2015-06-01

    The microbiota that populates the mammalian intestine consists of hundreds of trillions of bacteria that are separated from underlying immune cells by a single layer of epithelial cells. The intestinal immune system effectively tolerates components of the microbiota that provide benefit to the host while remaining poised to eliminate those that are harmful. Antigen presenting cells, especially macrophages and dendritic cells, play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate appropriate responses to the microbiota. Paramount to elucidating intestinal macrophage- and dendritic cell-mediated functions is the ability to effectively isolate and identify these cells from a complex cellular environment. In this review, we summarize methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages and DCs from the mouse intestine and discuss how this may be useful for gaining insight into the mechanisms by which mucosal immune tolerance is maintained. PMID:25891794

  14. SIRT1 regulates the mouse gastric emptying and intestinal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study addressed physiological significance of SIRT1 gene on mouse gastrointestinal growth and function (gastric emptying and intestinal growth). SIRT1 (a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase) is a key cellular energy sensor, and involved in a wide variety of cellular functions including energy me...

  15. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is involved in a wide array of cellular processes, including glucose homeostasis, energy metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis, and immune response. However, it is un...

  16. Anaerobic respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Gibson, Terri; Maltby, Rosalie C; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Stewart, Valley; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2011-10-01

    The intestine is inhabited by a large microbial community consisting primarily of anaerobes and, to a lesser extent, facultative anaerobes, such as Escherichia coli, which we have shown requires aerobic respiration to compete successfully in the mouse intestine (S. A. Jones et al., Infect. Immun. 75:4891-4899, 2007). If facultative anaerobes efficiently lower oxygen availability in the intestine, then their sustained growth must also depend on anaerobic metabolism. In support of this idea, mutants lacking nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase have extreme colonization defects. Here, we further explore the role of anaerobic respiration in colonization using the streptomycin-treated mouse model. We found that respiratory electron flow is primarily via the naphthoquinones, which pass electrons to cytochrome bd oxidase and the anaerobic terminal reductases. We found that E. coli uses nitrate and fumarate in the intestine, but not nitrite, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide. Competitive colonizations revealed that cytochrome bd oxidase is more advantageous than nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase. Strains lacking nitrate reductase outcompeted fumarate reductase mutants once the nitrate concentration in cecal mucus reached submillimolar levels, indicating that fumarate is the more important anaerobic electron acceptor in the intestine because nitrate is limiting. Since nitrate is highest in the absence of E. coli, we conclude that E. coli is the only bacterium in the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine that respires nitrate. Lastly, we demonstrated that a mutant lacking the NarXL regulator (activator of the NarG system), but not a mutant lacking the NarP-NarQ regulator, has a colonization defect, consistent with the advantage provided by NarG. The emerging picture is one in which gene regulation is tuned to balance expression of the terminal reductases that E. coli uses to maximize its competitiveness and achieve the highest possible population in

  17. Metabolomic markers for intestinal ischemia in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, René; Beyoğlu, Diren; Beldi, Guido; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of intestinal ischemia remains a clinical challenge. The aim of the present study was to use a metabolomic protocol to identify upregulated and downregulated small molecules (Mr < 500) in the serum of mice with intestinal ischemia. Such molecules could have clinical utility when evaluated as biomarkers in human studies. Methods A mouse model for intestinal ischemia was established and validated using histology and serum tumor necrosis factor α concentrations. A second mouse model of peritoneal sepsis was used as a positive control. Serial serum samples were collected from these and from sham-operated animals. Sera were analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry for 40 small molecules as their trimethylsilyl and O-methyloxime derivatives. Peak areas were normalized against an internal standard and resultant peak area ratios subjected to multivariate data analysis using unsupervised principal components analysis and supervised orthogonal projection to latent structures–discriminant analysis. Upregulated and downregulated serum molecules were identified from their correlation to the orthogonal projection to latent structures–discriminant analysis model. Results Three highly significantly upregulated (fold-change) serum molecules in intestinal ischemia were inorganic phosphate (2.4), urea (4.3), and threonic acid (2.9). Five highly significantly downregulated (fold-change) serum molecules were stearic acid (1.7), arabinose (2.7), xylose (1.6), glucose (1.4), and ribose (2.2). Lactic acid remained unchanged in intestinal ischemia. Conclusions Distinct molecular changes are reported here for the first time in intestinal ischemia. They reveal impairments of gut microbiota metabolism, intestinal absorption, and renal function, together with increased oxidative stress. In contrast to other reports, lactic acid was not significantly changed. These molecular signatures may now be evaluated in clinical studies. PMID:22947700

  18. Single-pass intestinal perfusion to establish the intestinal permeability of model drugs in mouse.

    PubMed

    Escribano, Elvira; Sala, Xavier García; Salamanca, Jorge; Navarro, Claudia Roig; Regué, Josep Queralt

    2012-10-15

    The aim of the present work was to study the intestinal permeabilities (P(eff)) of five model drugs: furosemide, piroxicam, naproxen, ranitidine and amoxicillin in the in situ intestinal perfusion technique in mice and compare them with corresponding rat and human in vivo P(eff) values. The main experimental conditions were: mice CD1 30-35 g, test drug concentrations in perfusion experiments (the highest dose strength dissolved in 250 mL of PBS pH 6.2) and flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The test compounds were assayed following a validated HPLC method. The effective permeability coefficients at steady-state were calculated after correcting the outlet concentration following the gravimetric correction method proposed by Sutton et al. (2001). The permeability coefficient values ranged from 0.1751±0.0756×10(-4) cm/s for ranitidine to 17.19±4.16×10(-4) cm/s for naproxen. The mouse method correctly assigned the BCS permeability classification of a given drug and a correlation between mouse permeability data and the fraction of an oral dose absorbed in humans was achieved (FA=1-exp(-34,745·P(eff(mouse))); R=0.9631). Based on the results obtained, we conclude that mouse can be considered a valuable tool in the evaluation of intestinal permeability in order to predict the extent of human gastrointestinal absorption following oral administration of a drug. PMID:22814225

  19. Intrauterine Growth Restriction Alters Mouse Intestinal Architecture during Development.

    PubMed

    Fung, Camille M; White, Jessica R; Brown, Ashley S; Gong, Huiyu; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Frey, Mark R; McElroy, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are at increased risk for neonatal and lifelong morbidities affecting multiple organ systems including the intestinal tract. The underlying mechanisms for the risk to the intestine remain poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IUGR affects the development of goblet and Paneth cell lineages, thus compromising the innate immunity and barrier functions of the epithelium. Using a mouse model of maternal thromboxane A2-analog infusion to elicit maternal hypertension and resultant IUGR, we tested whether IUGR alters ileal maturation and specifically disrupts mucus-producing goblet and antimicrobial-secreting Paneth cell development. We measured body weights, ileal weights and ileal lengths from birth to postnatal day (P) 56. We also determined the abundance of goblet and Paneth cells and their mRNA products, localization of cellular tight junctions, cell proliferation, and apoptosis to interrogate cellular homeostasis. Comparison of the murine findings with human IUGR ileum allowed us to verify observed changes in the mouse were relevant to clinical IUGR. At P14 IUGR mice had decreased ileal lengths, fewer goblet and Paneth cells, reductions in Paneth cell specific mRNAs, and decreased cell proliferation. These findings positively correlated with severity of IUGR. Furthermore, the decrease in murine Paneth cells was also seen in human IUGR ileum. IUGR disrupts the normal trajectory of ileal development, particularly affecting the composition and secretory products of the epithelial surface of the intestine. We speculate that this abnormal intestinal development may constitute an inherent "first hit", rendering IUGR intestine susceptible to further injury, infection, or inflammation. PMID:26745886

  20. Intrauterine Growth Restriction Alters Mouse Intestinal Architecture during Development

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley S.; Gong, Huiyu; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Frey, Mark R.; McElroy, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are at increased risk for neonatal and lifelong morbidities affecting multiple organ systems including the intestinal tract. The underlying mechanisms for the risk to the intestine remain poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IUGR affects the development of goblet and Paneth cell lineages, thus compromising the innate immunity and barrier functions of the epithelium. Using a mouse model of maternal thromboxane A2-analog infusion to elicit maternal hypertension and resultant IUGR, we tested whether IUGR alters ileal maturation and specifically disrupts mucus-producing goblet and antimicrobial-secreting Paneth cell development. We measured body weights, ileal weights and ileal lengths from birth to postnatal day (P) 56. We also determined the abundance of goblet and Paneth cells and their mRNA products, localization of cellular tight junctions, cell proliferation, and apoptosis to interrogate cellular homeostasis. Comparison of the murine findings with human IUGR ileum allowed us to verify observed changes in the mouse were relevant to clinical IUGR. At P14 IUGR mice had decreased ileal lengths, fewer goblet and Paneth cells, reductions in Paneth cell specific mRNAs, and decreased cell proliferation. These findings positively correlated with severity of IUGR. Furthermore, the decrease in murine Paneth cells was also seen in human IUGR ileum. IUGR disrupts the normal trajectory of ileal development, particularly affecting the composition and secretory products of the epithelial surface of the intestine. We speculate that this abnormal intestinal development may constitute an inherent “first hit”, rendering IUGR intestine susceptible to further injury, infection, or inflammation. PMID:26745886

  1. A guide to Ussing chamber studies of mouse intestine

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Lane L.

    2009-01-01

    The Ussing chamber provides a physiological system to measure the transport of ions, nutrients, and drugs across various epithelial tissues. One of the most studied epithelia is the intestine, which has provided several landmark discoveries regarding the mechanisms of ion transport processes. Adaptation of this method to mouse intestine adds the dimension of investigating genetic loss or gain of function as a means to identify proteins or processes affecting transepithelial transport. In this review, the principles underlying the use of Ussing chambers are outlined including limitations and advantages of the technique. With an emphasis on mouse intestinal preparations, the review covers chamber design, commercial equipment sources, tissue preparation, step-by-step instruction for operation, troubleshooting, and examples of interpretation difficulties. Specialized uses of the Ussing chamber such as the pH stat technique to measure transepithelial bicarbonate secretion and isotopic flux methods to measure net secretion or absorption of substrates are discussed in detail, and examples are given for the adaptation of Ussing chamber principles to other measurement systems. The purpose of the review is to provide a practical guide for investigators who are new to the Ussing chamber method. PMID:19342508

  2. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. PMID:26755265

  3. The presentation of malrotation of the intestine in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, H. W.; Armstrong, C. P.; Thompson, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    Three cases of intestinal malrotation presenting in adults are reported. Each illustrates various aspects of symptomatology, investigation and treatment which are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2382946

  4. Lubiprostone ameliorates the cystic fibrosis mouse intestinal phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene that impair the function of CFTR, a cAMP-regulated anion channel. In the small intestine loss of CFTR function creates a dehydrated, acidic luminal environment which is believed to cause an accumulation of mucus, a phenotype characteristic of CF. CF mice have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, an altered innate immune response, and impaired intestinal transit. We investigated whether lubiprostone, which can activate the CLC2 Cl- channel, would improve the intestinal phenotype in CF mice. Methods Cftrtm1UNC (CF) and wildtype (WT) littermate mice on the C57BL/6J background were used. Lubiprostone (10 μg/kg-day) was administered by gavage for two weeks. Mucus accumulation was estimated from crypt lumen widths in periodic acid-Schiff base, Alcian blue stained sections. Luminal bacterial load was measured by qPCR for the bacterial 16S gene. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in fasted mice were assessed using gavaged rhodamine dextran. Gene expression was evaluated by Affymetrix Mouse430 2.0 microarray and qRT-PCR. Results Crypt width in control CF mice was 700% that of WT mice (P < 0.001). Lubiprostone did not affect WT crypt width but, unexpectedly, increased CF crypt width 22% (P = 0.001). Lubiprostone increased bacterial load in WT mice to 490% of WT control levels (P = 0.008). Conversely, lubiprostone decreased bacterial overgrowth in CF mice by 60% (P = 0.005). Lubiprostone increased gastric emptying at 20 min postgavage in both WT (P < 0.001) and CF mice (P < 0.001). Lubiprostone enhanced small intestinal transit in WT mice (P = 0.024) but not in CF mice (P = 0.377). Among other innate immune markers, expression of mast cell genes was elevated 4-to 40-fold in the CF intestine as compared to WT, and lubiprostone treatment of CF mice decreased expression to WT control levels. Conclusions These results indicate that lubiprostone has some benefits for the CF intestinal phenotype

  5. Host genetic and environmental effects on mouse intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, James H; Foster, Carmen M; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Campbell, Alisha G; Yang, Zamin K; Wymore, Ann; Palumbo, Anthony V; Chesler, Elissa J; Podar, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian gut harbors complex and variable microbial communities, across both host phylogenetic space and conspecific individuals. A synergy of host genetic and environmental factors shape these communities and account for their variability, but their individual contributions and the selective pressures involved are still not well understood. We employed barcoded pyrosequencing of V1-2 and V4 regions of bacterial small subunit ribosomal RNA genes to characterize the effects of host genetics and environment on cecum assemblages in 10 genetically distinct, inbred mouse strains. Eight of these strains are the foundation of the Collaborative Cross (CC), a panel of mice derived from a genetically diverse set of inbred founder strains, designed specifically for complex trait analysis. Diversity of gut microbiota was characterized by complementing phylogenetic and distance-based, sequence-clustering approaches. Significant correlations were found between the mouse strains and their gut microbiota, reflected by distinct bacterial communities. Cohabitation and litter had a reduced, although detectable effect, and the microbiota response to these factors varied by strain. We identified bacterial phylotypes that appear to be discriminative and strain-specific to each mouse line used. Cohabitation of different strains of mice revealed an interaction of host genetic and environmental factors in shaping gut bacterial consortia, in which bacterial communities became more similar but retained strain specificity. This study provides a baseline analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in the eight CC progenitor strains and will be linked to integrated host genotype, phenotype and microbiota research on the resulting CC panel. PMID:22695862

  6. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells. PMID:25573173

  7. Bacterial Overgrowth in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Null Mouse Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Norkina, Oxana; Burnett, Tim G.; De Lisle, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    We recently reported the inflammation of the cystic fibrosis (CF) mouse small intestine, and we hypothesized bacterial overgrowth as a possible cause. Quantitative PCR of bacterial 16S genomic DNA in the CF mouse small intestine revealed an increase of greater than 40-fold compared to controls. Sequencing of 16S PCR products and Gram staining showed that the majority of bacteria in the CF mouse intestine were gram negative. Bacteria were observed to colonize the mucus that accumulates in the intestinal lumen of mice with CF. Impaired Paneth cell defenses were suggested by observation of partially dispersed Paneth granules in the mucus plugs of CF mouse intestinal crypts, and this mucus was strongly immunoreactive for Paneth cell bactericidal products. The role of bacterial overgrowth in intestinal inflammation in CF was tested by treating mice with oral antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and metronidazole) for 3 weeks, which reduced bacterial load in the CF mouse small intestine over 400-fold. Antibiotic treatment decreased the expression of the inflammation-related genes mast cell protease 2, leucine-rich α2 glycoprotein/leucine-rich high endothelial venule glycoprotein, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3, hematopoietic cell transcript 1, and resistin-like molecule β/found in inflammatory zone 2, all of which were no longer expressed at levels significantly different from control levels. The reduction of intestinal bacteria also significantly improved the growth of CF mice but had no effect on the growth of wild-type mice. These data suggest that bacterial overgrowth in the CF mouse small intestine has a role in inflammation and contributes to the failure to thrive in this mouse model of CF. PMID:15385508

  8. Transgenic Expression of Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor LPA2 in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells Induces Intestinal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Michihiro; He, Peijian; Yun, C. Chris

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) acts on LPA2 receptor to mediate multiple pathological effects that are associated with tumorigenesis. The absence of LPA2 attenuates tumor progression in rodent models of colorectal cancer, but whether overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to malignant transformation in the intestinal tract has not been studied. In this study, we expressed human LPA2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) under control of the villin promoter. Less than 4% of F1-generation mice had germline transmission of transgenic (TG) human LPA2; as such only 3 F1 mice out of 72 genotyped had TG expression. These TG mice appeared anemic with hematochezia and died shortly after birth. TG mice were smaller in size compared with the wild type mouse of the same age and sex. Morphological analysis showed that TG LPA2 colon had hyper-proliferation of IECs resulting in increased colonic crypt depth. Surprisingly, TG small intestine had villus blunting and decreased IEC proliferation and dysplasia. In both intestine and colon, TG expression of LPA2 compromised the terminal epithelial differentiation, consistent with epithelial dysplasia. Furthermore, we showed that epithelial dysplasia was observed in founder mouse intestine, correlating LPA2 overexpression with epithelial dysplasia. The current study demonstrates that overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to intestinal dysplasia. PMID:27124742

  9. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  10. Immunization with a Double-Mutant (R192G/L211A) of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxin of Escherichia coli Offers Partial Protection against Campylobacter jejuni in an Adult Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model.

    PubMed

    Albert, M John; Haridas, Shilpa; Ebenezer, Mathew; Raghupathy, Raj; Khan, Islam

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that antibodies to cholera toxin (CT) reacted with the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs) from Campylobacter jejuni strains on Western blot. Further, oral immunization with CT significantly protected against challenge with C. jejuni in an adult mouse colonization model of infection. CT and the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are structurally and functionally related. LT and its mutants including the double-mutant LT (R192G/L211A) (dmLT), are powerful mucosal adjuvants. Unlike LT which is reactogenic, dmLT has been shown to be safe for human use. In the current study, we determined whether rabbit anti-dmLT antibodies reacted with MOMPs from C. jejuni strains and whether immunization with dmLT would afford protection against C. jejuni. On Western blot, the MOMPs from C. jejuni 48 (Penner serotype O:19), C. jejuni 75 (O:3) and C. jejuni 111 (O:1,44) were probed with rabbit antibodies to dmLT or LT-E112K (a non-toxic LT mutant), which showed a lack of reaction. Adult BALB/c mice were orally immunized with dmLT and orally challenged with C. jejuni 48 or 111. Protection from colonization with the challenge bacteria was studied by enumerating Campylobacter colonies in feces daily for 9 days. Vaccination produced robust serum and stool antibody responses to dmLT and no antibody responses to C. jejuni MOMP. Vaccinated mice showed reduced colonization and excretion of both challenge strains compared to control mice. However, the differences were not statistically significant. The protective efficacy of the dmLT vaccine varied from 9.1% to 54.5%. The lack of cross-reaction between the MOMP and dmLT suggests that protection is not mediated by cross-reacting antibodies, but may be due to activation of innate immunity. As dmLT is safe for humans, it could be incorporated into a C. jejuni vaccine to enhance its efficacy. PMID:26540197

  11. Immunization with a Double-Mutant (R192G/L211A) of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxin of Escherichia coli Offers Partial Protection against Campylobacter jejuni in an Adult Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model

    PubMed Central

    Albert, M. John; Haridas, Shilpa; Ebenezer, Mathew; Raghupathy, Raj; Khan, Islam

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that antibodies to cholera toxin (CT) reacted with the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs) from Campylobacter jejuni strains on Western blot. Further, oral immunization with CT significantly protected against challenge with C. jejuni in an adult mouse colonization model of infection. CT and the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are structurally and functionally related. LT and its mutants including the double-mutant LT (R192G/L211A) (dmLT), are powerful mucosal adjuvants. Unlike LT which is reactogenic, dmLT has been shown to be safe for human use. In the current study, we determined whether rabbit anti-dmLT antibodies reacted with MOMPs from C. jejuni strains and whether immunization with dmLT would afford protection against C. jejuni. On Western blot, the MOMPs from C. jejuni 48 (Penner serotype O:19), C. jejuni 75 (O:3) and C. jejuni 111 (O:1,44) were probed with rabbit antibodies to dmLT or LT-E112K (a non-toxic LT mutant), which showed a lack of reaction. Adult BALB/c mice were orally immunized with dmLT and orally challenged with C. jejuni 48 or 111. Protection from colonization with the challenge bacteria was studied by enumerating Campylobacter colonies in feces daily for 9 days. Vaccination produced robust serum and stool antibody responses to dmLT and no antibody responses to C. jejuni MOMP. Vaccinated mice showed reduced colonization and excretion of both challenge strains compared to control mice. However, the differences were not statistically significant. The protective efficacy of the dmLT vaccine varied from 9.1% to 54.5%. The lack of cross-reaction between the MOMP and dmLT suggests that protection is not mediated by cross-reacting antibodies, but may be due to activation of innate immunity. As dmLT is safe for humans, it could be incorporated into a C. jejuni vaccine to enhance its efficacy. PMID:26540197

  12. Characterization of the cell adhesion molecules L1, N-CAM and J1 in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Thor, G; Probstmeier, R; Schachner, M

    1987-01-01

    To gain insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial cell surface interactions in the adult mouse intestine, we have characterized the cell adhesion molecules L1, N-CAM and J1 by immunocytological, biochemical and cell biological methods. Whereas N-CAM and J1 expression was found to be confined to the mesenchymal and neuroectodermally-derived parts of the intestine, L1 was localized in the proliferating epithelial progenitor cells of crypts, but not in the more differentiated epithelial cells of villi. L1 was detected in crypt cells by Western blot analysis in the molecular forms characteristic of peripheral neural cells, with apparent mol. wts of 230, 180 and 150 kd. Aggregation of single, enriched crypt, but not villus cells, was strongly inhibited in the presence of Fab fragments of polyclonal L1 antibodies. These observations show that L1 is not confined to the nervous system and that it may play a functional role in the histogenesis of the intestine in the adult animal. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3315649

  13. A guide to histomorphological evaluation of intestinal inflammation in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Erben, Ulrike; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Doerfel, Katja; Spieckermann, Simone; Haller, Dirk; Heimesaat, Markus M; Zeitz, Martin; Siegmund, Britta; Kühl, Anja A

    2014-01-01

    Histomorphology remains a powerful routine evaluating intestinal inflammation in animal models. Emphasizing the focus of a given animal study, histopathology can overstate differences between established models. We aimed to systematize histopathological evaluation of intestinal inflammation in mouse models facilitating inter-study comparisons. Samples of all parts of the intestinal tract from well-established mouse models of intestinal inflammation were evaluated from hematoxylin/eosin-stained sections and specific observations confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemistry. Three main categories sufficiently reflected the severity of histopathology independent of the localization and the overall extent of an inflammation: (i) quality and dimension of inflammatory cell infiltrates, (ii) epithelial changes and (iii) overall mucosal architecture. Scoring schemata were defined along specified criteria for each of the three categories. The direction of the initial hit proved crucial for the comparability of histological changes. Chemical noxes, infection with intestinal parasites or other models where the barrier was disturbed from outside, the luminal side, showed high levels of similarity and distinct differences to changes in the intestinal balance resulting from inside events like altered cytokine responses or disruption of the immune cell homeostasis. With a high degree of generalisation and maximum scores from 4-8 suitable scoring schemata accounted specific histopathological hallmarks. Truly integrating demands and experiences of gastroenterologists, mouse researchers, microbiologists and pathologists we provide an easy-to-use guideline evaluating histomorphology in mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Standard criteria and definitions facilitate classification and rating of new relevant models, allow comparison in animal studies and transfer of functional findings to comparable histopathologies in human disease. PMID:25197329

  14. Overlapping DNA Methylation Dynamics in Mouse Intestinal Cell Differentiation and Early Stages of Malignant Progression

    PubMed Central

    Forn, Marta; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Merlos-Suárez, Anna; Muñoz, Mar; Lois, Sergi; Carriò, Elvira; Jordà, Mireia; Bigas, Anna; Batlle, Eduard; Peinado, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of intestinal crypt cell differentiation and tumorigenesis have been used to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying both processes. DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mark and plays an important role in cell identity and differentiation programs and cancer. To get insights into the dynamics of cell differentiation and malignant transformation we have compared the DNA methylation profiles along the mouse small intestine crypt and early stages of tumorigenesis. Genome-scale analysis of DNA methylation together with microarray gene expression have been applied to compare intestinal crypt stem cells (EphB2high), differentiated cells (EphB2negative), ApcMin/+ adenomas and the corresponding non-tumor adjacent tissue, together with small and large intestine samples and the colon cancer cell line CT26. Compared with late stages, small intestine crypt differentiation and early stages of tumorigenesis display few and relatively small changes in DNA methylation. Hypermethylated loci are largely shared by the two processes and affect the proximities of promoter and enhancer regions, with enrichment in genes associated with the intestinal stem cell signature and the PRC2 complex. The hypermethylation is progressive, with minute levels in differentiated cells, as compared with intestinal stem cells, and reaching full methylation in advanced stages. Hypomethylation shows different signatures in differentiation and cancer and is already present in the non-tumor tissue adjacent to the adenomas in ApcMin/+ mice, but at lower levels than advanced cancers. This study provides a reference framework to decipher the mechanisms driving mouse intestinal tumorigenesis and also the human counterpart. PMID:25933092

  15. Intestinal Preparation Techniques for Histological Analysis in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan M; Duckworth, Carrie A; Vowell, Kate; Burkitt, Michael D; Pritchard, D Mark

    2016-01-01

    The murine intestinal tract represents a difficult organ system to study due to its long convoluted tubular structure, narrow diameter, and delicate mucosa which undergoes rapid changes after sampling prior to fixation. These features do not make for easy histological analysis as rapid fixation in situ, or after simple removal without careful dissection, results in poor postfixation tissue handling and limited options for high quality histological sections. Collecting meaningful quantitative data by analysis of this tissue is further complicated by the anatomical changes in structure along its length. This article describes two methods of intestinal sampling at necropsy that allow systematic histological analysis of the entire intestinal tract, either through examination of cross sections (circumferences) by the gut bundling technique or longitudinal sections by the adapted Swiss roll technique, together with basic methods for data collection. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27248432

  16. Intestinal lactase status of adults in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    1979-01-01

    Fifty hospital patients in Port Moresby (mean age 30 yr) without evidence of malnutrition or gastro-intestinal disease, who came from many parts of Papua New Guinea (P.N.G.), were given 50 g lactose orally after an overnight fast. In 49 blood glucose rise was less than 1.1 mmol 1(-1), indicating hypolactasia. Thirty-three gave a clear history of symptoms, usually diarrhoea, after lactose. Adult hypolactasia approaches 100% in P.N.G. There is no indication that the genetic structure of any part of the population of P,N.G. with regard to lactase has been influenced by genetic drift from peoples with persistence of lactase into adult life (PL). PMID:434766

  17. High intestinal lactase concentrations in adult Arbs in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Cook, G C; al-Torki, M T

    1975-07-19

    The maximum rise in blood glucose after 50 g lactose by mouth was determined in 40 adult Arabs. Out of 30 Bedouin, urban Saudi, and Yemeni and 9 of mixed ancestry (usually partly African), 25 (83%) and 2 (22%) respectively showed an increase of over 1-1 mmol/1 (20 mg/100 ml). In common with most northern Europeans and Hamitic people of northern Africa, Arabs in Saudi Arabia usually have high intestinal lactase concentrations in adult life. This persistence of high levels probably originated in the Arabian peninsula. Its selective advantage may have been associated with the fluid and calorie content of camels' milk, which is important for survival in desert nomads. PMID:1170003

  18. [Surgical significance of intestinal non-rotation in adults].

    PubMed

    von Flüe, M; Herzog, U; Vogt, B; Tondelli, P; Harder, F

    1991-06-15

    Intestinal non-rotation has been recognized as a cause of obstruction in neonates and children. It is very rarely seen in the adult and assumes surgical significance owing to the potential risk of midgut or ileocecal volvulus. However, it can also cause significant intermittent abdominal pain in the adult. We describe six personally observed patients with this malformation and analyze 38 case reports published in the English and German literature since 1923. We establish that in the acute symptomatic form only emergency laparotomy can provide the correct diagnosis and decrease the risk of bowel disturbance. In the chronic forms, barium studies of the whole intestinal tract reveal varying degrees of midgut malrotation and the non-rotation is confirmed in each case. Also in these forms, exploratory laparotomy with a consequent staging of the abdominal situs is to be recommended. In the operation described by Ladd the ascending colon is sutured at the colon descendens and sigmoideum. After this procedure the mesenterial pedicle is fixed and the risk of midgut torsion remains minimal. All reported cases after surgery are symptom-free. PMID:1857952

  19. Endocrine remodelling of the adult intestine sustains reproduction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Reiff, Tobias; Jacobson, Jake; Cognigni, Paola; Antonello, Zeus; Ballesta, Esther; Tan, Kah Junn; Yew, Joanne Y; Dominguez, Maria; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The production of offspring is energetically costly and relies on incompletely understood mechanisms that generate a positive energy balance. In mothers of many species, changes in key energy-associated internal organs are common yet poorly characterised functionally and mechanistically. In this study, we show that, in adult Drosophila females, the midgut is dramatically remodelled to enhance reproductive output. In contrast to extant models, organ remodelling does not occur in response to increased nutrient intake and/or offspring demands, but rather precedes them. With spatially and temporally directed manipulations, we identify juvenile hormone (JH) as an anticipatory endocrine signal released after mating. Acting through intestinal bHLH-PAS domain proteins Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and Germ cell-expressed (Gce), JH signals directly to intestinal progenitors to yield a larger organ, and adjusts gene expression and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activity in enterocytes to support increased lipid metabolism. Our findings identify a metabolically significant paradigm of adult somatic organ remodelling linking hormonal signals, epithelial plasticity, and reproductive output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06930.001 PMID:26216039

  20. A novel culture system for adult porcine intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hassan A; Lei, Nan Ye; Brinkley, Garrett; Scott, Andrew; Wang, Jiafang; Kar, Upendra K; Jabaji, Ziyad B; Lewis, Michael; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y; Stelzner, Matthias G

    2016-07-01

    Porcine models are useful for investigating therapeutic approaches to short bowel syndrome and potentially to intestinal stem cell (ISC) transplantation. Whereas techniques for the culture and genetic manipulation of ISCs from mice and humans are well established, similar methods for porcine stem cells have not been reported. Jejunal crypts were isolated from murine, human, and juvenile and adult porcine small intestine, suspended in Matrigel, and co-cultured with syngeneic intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs) or cultured without feeder cells in various culture media. Media containing epidermal growth factor, noggin, and R-spondin 1 (ENR medium) were supplemented with various combinations of Wnt3a- or ISEMF-conditioned medium (CM) and with glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitor (GSK3i), and their effects were studied on cultured crypts. Cell lineage differentiation was assessed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cultured porcine cells were serially passaged and transduced with a lentiviral vector. Whereas ENR medium supported murine enteroid growth, it did not sustain porcine crypts beyond 5 days. Supplementation of Wnt3a-CM and GSK3i resulted in the formation of complex porcine enteroids with budding extensions. These enteroids contained a mixture of stem and differentiated cells and were successfully passaged in the presence of GSK3i. Crypts grown in media supplemented with porcine ISEMF-CM formed spheroids that were less well differentiated than enteroids. Enteroids and spheroids were transfected with a lentivirus with high efficiency. Thus, our method maintains juvenile and adult porcine crypt cells long-term in culture. Porcine enteroids and spheroids can be successfully passaged and transduced by using lentiviral vectors. PMID:26928041

  1. Virtual unfolding of light sheet fluorescence microscopy dataset for quantitative analysis of the mouse intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeo, Alessia; Sana, Ilenia; Ferrari, Eleonora; Maiuri, Luigi; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Valentini, Gianluca; Bassi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has proven to be a powerful tool to image fixed and chemically cleared samples, providing in depth and high resolution reconstructions of intact mouse organs. We applied light sheet microscopy to image the mouse intestine. We found that large portions of the sample can be readily visualized, assessing the organ status and highlighting the presence of regions with impaired morphology. Yet, three-dimensional (3-D) sectioning of the intestine leads to a large dataset that produces unnecessary storage and processing overload. We developed a routine that extracts the relevant information from a large image stack and provides quantitative analysis of the intestine morphology. This result was achieved by a three step procedure consisting of: (1) virtually unfold the 3-D reconstruction of the intestine; (2) observe it layer-by-layer; and (3) identify distinct villi and statistically analyze multiple samples belonging to different intestinal regions. Even if the procedure has been developed for the murine intestine, most of the underlying concepts have a general applicability.

  2. Laminin α5 influences the architecture of the mouse small intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Zhen X.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The mammalian intestine displays two distinct patterns of mucosal organization. The small intestine contains mucosal epithelial invaginations called crypts of Lieberkühn that are continuous with evaginations into the lumen called villi. The colon also contains crypts, but its epithelial surface is lined by flat surface cuffs. The epithelial cells of both organs communicate with the underlying mesenchyme through a basement membrane that is composed of a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, including members of the laminin family. The basement membranes of the small intestine and colon contain distinct laminin subtypes; notably, the villus basement membrane is rich in laminin α5. Here we show that diminution of laminin α5 in a mouse model led to a compensatory deposition of colonic laminins that resulted in a transformation from a small intestinal to a colonic mucosal architecture. The alteration in mucosal architecture was associated with reduced levels of nuclear p27Kip1, a cell cycle regulator, and altered intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Our results suggest that laminin α5 plays a crucial role in establishing and maintaining the specific mucosal pattern of the mouse small intestine. PMID:18628307

  3. Antimicrobial peptide Cathelicidin-BF prevents intestinal barrier dysfunction in a mouse model of endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Deguang; Zong, Xin; Zhang, Haiwen; Wang, Tenghao; Yi, Hongbo; Luan, Chao; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal barrier functions are altered during the development of sepsis. Cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, such as LL-37 and mCRAMP, can protect animals against intestinal barrier dysfunction. Cathelicidin-BF (C-BF), a new cathelicidin peptide purified from the venom of the snake Bungarus fasciatus, has been shown to have both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. This study investigated whether C-BF pretreatment could protect the intestinal barrier against dysfunction in a mouse model of endotoxemia, induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (10mg/kg). Mice were treated with low or high dose C-BF before treatment with LPS, and samples were collected 5h after LPS treatment. C-BF reduced LPS induced intestinal histological damage and gut permeability to 4 KD Fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated dextran. Pretreatment with C-BF prevented LPS induced intestinal tight junction disruption and epithelial cell apoptosis. Moreover, C-BF down regulated the expression and secretion of TNF-α, a process involving the NF-κB signaling pathway. C-BF also reduced LPS induced TNF-α expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. These findings indicate that C-BF can prevent gut barrier dysfunction induced by LPS, suggesting that C-BF may be used to develop a prophylactic agent for intestinal injury in endotoxemia. PMID:25639228

  4. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.J.; Pitman, K.; Starr, G.; Wood, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were investigated in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease. These mice exhibited aganglionosis of the terminal segment of the large intestine. This condition was accompanied by fecal stasis and megacolon. Gastric emptying of saline or milk meals was slower in the mice with aganglionic or induced megacolon than in the normal mice, but the rate of emptying was faster than after administration of morphine (10 mg/kg). In the small intestine, the distribution of the radiolabeled marker and the advancing edge of the marker profile were abnormal in the mice with megacolon. There were small differences between the megacolonic and normal mice in the distance traversed by the advancing edge of the intraluminal profile of the marker. These results are evidence for disturbances of gastric and small intestinal motor function that occur in mice secondary to development of megacolon.

  5. Conditional knockout of the Slc5a6 gene in mouse intestine impairs biotin absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Lambrecht, Nils; Subramanya, Sandeep B.; Kapadia, Rubina

    2013-01-01

    The Slc5a6 gene expresses a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of the water-soluble vitamin biotin; the transporter is commonly referred to as the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) because it also transports pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. The relative contribution of the SMVT system toward carrier-mediated biotin uptake in the native intestine in vivo has not been established. We used a Cre/lox technology to generate an intestine-specific (conditional) SMVT knockout (KO) mouse model to address this issue. The KO mice exhibited absence of expression of SMVT in the intestine compared with sex-matched littermates as well as the expected normal SMVT expression in other tissues. About two-thirds of the KO mice died prematurely between the age of 6 and 10 wk. Growth retardation, decreased bone density, decreased bone length, and decreased biotin status were observed in the KO mice. Microscopic analysis showed histological abnormalities in the small bowel (shortened villi, dysplasia) and cecum (chronic active inflammation, dysplasia) of the KO mice. In vivo (and in vitro) transport studies showed complete inhibition in carrier-mediated biotin uptake in the intestine of the KO mice compared with their control littermates. These studies provide the first in vivo confirmation in native intestine that SMVT is solely responsible for intestinal biotin uptake. These studies also provide evidence for a casual association between SMVT function and normal intestinal health. PMID:23104561

  6. Malrotation of the Intestine in Adult and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ray, Dipankar; Morimoto, Mitsuaki

    2015-12-01

    Malrotation of the gut is a congenital anomaly and usually presents in childhood. Rarely, it may present in adults. Patients may be asymptomatic, and malrotation is detected during investigations, operation or autopsy. It can cause longstanding abdominal symptoms like pain, dyspepsia or acute abdomen due to volvulus. In adults, malrotation is found with different gastrointestinal malignancies like gastric, hepatobiliary, pancreatic and, in particular, colorectal neoplasms. We are reporting a case of 60-year-old female presented with carcinoma caecum along with malrotation of the gut. It is the first case report from India. We also reviewed documented cases of malrotation associated with colorectal malignancies. A large number of cases have been reported in Japan as compared to rest of the world. Malrotation in adults is probably associated with gastrointestinal malignancies. Possible causes of this association can be genetic factors or gut changes like chronic inflammation. These associations need further study to consider intestinal malrotation as premalignant lesion which may be very important in follow-up of children with malrotation. PMID:26884662

  7. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  8. Laparoscopic versus Open Ladd's Procedure for Intestinal Malrotation in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Frasier, Lane L.; Leverson, Glen; Gosain, Ankush; Greenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Background Intestinal malrotation results from errors in fetal intestinal rotation and fixation. While most patients are diagnosed in childhood, some present as adults. Laparoscopic Ladd's procedure is an accepted alternative to laparotomy in children but has not been well-studied in adults. This study was designed to investigate outcomes for adults undergoing laparoscopic Ladd's repair for malrotation. Methods We performed a single-institution retrospective chart review over eleven years. Data collected included: patient age, details of pre-operative work-up and diagnosis, surgical management, complications, rates of re-operation, and symptom resolution. Patients were evaluated on an intent-to-treat basis based on their planned operative approach. Categorical data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Continuous data were analyzed using Student's T-test. Results Twenty-two patients were identified (age range 18-63). Fifteen were diagnosed pre-operatively; of the remaining seven patients, four received an intra-operative malrotation diagnosis during elective surgery for another problem. Most had some type of pre-operative imaging, with Computed Tomography being the most common (77.3%). Comparing patients on an intent-to-treat basis, the two groups were similar with respect to age, operative time, and estimated blood loss. Six patients underwent successful laparoscopic repair; three began laparoscopically but were converted to laparotomy. There was a statistically significant difference in length of stay (LOS) (5.0±2.5d vs 11.6±8.1d, p=0.0148) favoring the laparoscopic approach. Three patients required re-operation: 2 underwent side-to-side duodeno-duodenostomy and 1 underwent a re-do Ladd's procedure. Ultimately, 3 (2 laparoscopic, 1 open) had persistent symptoms of bloating (n=2), constipation (n=2), and/or pain (n=1). Conclusion Laparoscopic repair appears to be safe and effective in adults. While a small sample size limits the power of this study, we found

  9. In vitro culture of embryonic mouse intestinal epithelium: cell differentiation and introduction of reporter genes

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Jonathan M; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Hornsey, Mark A; Tosh, David; Slack, Jonathan MW

    2006-01-01

    Background Study of the normal development of the intestinal epithelium has been hampered by a lack of suitable model systems, in particular ones that enable the introduction of exogenous genes. Production of such a system would advance our understanding of normal epithelial development and help to shed light on the pathogenesis of intestinal neoplasia. The criteria for a reliable culture system include the ability to perform real time observations and manipulations in vitro, the preparation of wholemounts for immunostaining and the potential for introducing genes. Results The new culture system involves growing mouse embryo intestinal explants on fibronectin-coated coverslips in basal Eagle's medium+20% fetal bovine serum. Initially the cultures maintain expression of the intestinal transcription factor Cdx2 together with columnar epithelial (cytokeratin 8) and mesenchymal (smooth muscle actin) markers. Over a few days of culture, differentiation markers appear characteristic of absorptive epithelium (sucrase-isomaltase), goblet cells (Periodic Acid Schiff positive), enteroendocrine cells (chromogranin A) and Paneth cells (lysozyme). Three different approaches were tested to express genes in the developing cultures: transfection, electroporation and adenoviral infection. All could introduce genes into the mesenchyme, but only to a small extent into the epithelium. However the efficiency of adenovirus infection can be greatly improved by a limited enzyme digestion, which makes accessible the lateral faces of cells bearing the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor. This enables reliable delivery of genes into epithelial cells. Conclusion We describe a new in vitro culture system for the small intestine of the mouse embryo that recapitulates its normal development. The system both provides a model for studying normal development of the intestinal epithelium and also allows for the manipulation of gene expression. The explants can be cultured for up to two weeks, they

  10. Mechanisms of intestinal inflammation and development of associated cancers: Lessons learned from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, Aya M.; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately 1/5th of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With regards

  11. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Marc; Hensel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes occurring during infection. An animal model for Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation relies on the pretreatment of mice with streptomycin. This model is of great importance but still shows limitations to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in the small intestine in vivo. Here, we review the use of mouse models for Salmonella infections and focus on a new small animal model using 1-day-old neonate mice. The neonate model enables researchers to observe infection of both the small and large intestine, thereby offering perspectives for new experimental approaches, as well as to analyze the Salmonella-enterocyte interaction in the small intestine in vivo. PMID:27408697

  12. Translocation and dissemination to target neurons of botulinum neurotoxin type B in the mouse intestinal wall.

    PubMed

    Connan, Chloé; Varela-Chavez, Carolina; Mazuet, Christelle; Molgó, Jordi; Haustant, Georges Michel; Disson, Olivier; Lecuit, Marc; Vandewalle, Alain; Popoff, Michel R

    2016-02-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are responsible for severe flaccid paralysis (botulism), which in most cases enter the organism via the digestive tract and then disseminate into the blood or lymph circulation to target autonomic and motor nerve endings. The passage way of BoNTs alone or in complex forms with associated nontoxic proteins through the epithelial barrier of the digestive tract still remains unclear. Here, we show using an in vivo model of mouse ligated intestinal loop that BoNT/B alone or the BoNT/B C-terminal domain of the heavy chain (HCcB), which interacts with cell surface receptors, translocates across the intestinal barrier. The BoNT/B or HCcB translocation through the intestinal barrier occurred via an endocytosis-dependent mechanism within 10-20 min, because Dynasore, a potent endocytosis inhibitor, significantly prevented BoNT/B as well as HCcB translocation. We also show that HCcB or BoNT/B specifically targets neuronal cells and neuronal extensions in the intestinal submucosa and musculosa expressing synaptotagmin, preferentially cholinergic neurons and to a lower extent other neuronal cell types, notably serotonergic neurons. Interestingly, rare intestinal epithelial cells accumulated HCcB suggesting that distinct cell types of the intestinal epithelium, still undefined, might mediate efficient translocation of BoNT/B. PMID:26294282

  13. Lubiprostone Decreases Mouse Colonic Inner Mucus Layer Thickness and Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Musch, Mark W.; Wang, Yunwei; Claud, Erika C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Lubiprostone has been used to treat constipation through its effects to stimulate Cl− secretion, resulting in water and electrolyte secretion. Aim Potential associated changes in intestinal mucus and the colonizing bacteria (microbiome) have not been studied. As mucus obstructions may play a role in cystic fibrosis, the hypothesis that lubiprostone alters intestinal mucus and the microbiome was investigated. Methods Ion transport studies were performed ex vivo. For mucus and microbiome studies, mice were gavaged daily with lubiprostone or vehicle. Mucin from intestinal sections was analyzed in Carnoy’s fixed tissues stained with Alcian blue. Microbiome composition was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-based sequencing. Results Lubiprostone stimulated short circuit current in all mouse intestinal segments after both serosal and mucosal additions, albeit at lower concentrations in the latter. Current was Cl-dependent and blocked by mucosal diphenylcarboxylic acid, serosal bumetanide, and serosal Ba++. The CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172 had a marginal effect. Mucus near epithelial cells (inner layer mucus) was not present in the small intestine of any mice. Proximal colon inner mucus layer was thicker in ΔF/ΔF compared with +/ΔF and +/+ mice. Lubiprostone decreased inner mucus layer thickness in both proximal and distal colon of all mice. Furthermore, lubiprostone altered the intestinal microbiome by increasing abundance of Lactobacillus and Alistipes. Conclusions Lubiprostone activates non-CFTR Cl− secretion and alters the colonic inner mucus layer, which is associated with changes in the composition of the enteric microbiome. PMID:23329012

  14. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Marc; Hensel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes occurring during infection. An animal model for Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation relies on the pretreatment of mice with streptomycin. This model is of great importance but still shows limitations to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in the small intestine in vivo. Here, we review the use of mouse models for Salmonella infections and focus on a new small animal model using 1-day-old neonate mice. The neonate model enables researchers to observe infection of both the small and large intestine, thereby offering perspectives for new experimental approaches, as well as to analyze the Salmonella-enterocyte interaction in the small intestine in vivo. PMID:27408697

  15. A Multicellular Approach Forms a Significant Amount of Tissue-Engineered Small Intestine in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Frédéric G.; Matthews, Jamil A.; Speer, Allison L.; Torashima, Yasuhiro; Barthel, Erik R.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) has successfully been used to rescue Lewis rats after massive small bowel resection. In this study, we transitioned the technique to a mouse model, allowing investigation of the processes involved during TESI formation through the transgenic tools available in this species. This is a necessary step toward applying the technique to human therapy. Multicellular organoid units were derived from small intestines of transgenic mice and transplanted within the abdomen on biodegradable polymers. Immunofluorescence staining was used to characterize the cellular processes during TESI formation. We demonstrate the preservation of Lgr5- and DcamKl1-positive cells, two putative intestinal stem cell populations, in proximity to their niche mesenchymal cells, the intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs), at the time of implantation. Maintenance of the relationship between ISEMF and crypt epithelium is observed during the growth of TESI. The engineered small intestine has an epithelium containing a differentiated epithelium next to an innervated muscularis. Lineage tracing demonstrates that all the essential components, including epithelium, muscularis, nerves, and some of the blood vessels, are of donor origin. This multicellular approach provides the necessary cell population to regenerate large amounts of intestinal tissue that could be used to treat short bowel syndrome. PMID:21395443

  16. The food processing contaminant glyoxal promotes tumour growth in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Camilla; Høie, Anja Hortemo; Alexander, Jan; Murkovic, Michael; Husøy, Trine

    2016-08-01

    Glyoxal is formed endogenously and at a higher rate in the case of hyperglycemia. Glyoxal is also a food processing contaminant and has been shown to be mutagenic and genotoxic in vitro. The tumourigenic potential of glyoxal was investigated using the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model, which spontaneously develops intestinal tumours and is susceptible to intestinal carcinogens. C57BL/6J females were mated with Min males. Four days after mating and throughout gestation and lactation, the pregnant dams were exposed to glyoxal through drinking water (0.0125%, 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%) or regular tap water. Female and male offspring were housed separately from PND21 and continued with the same treatment. One group were only exposed to 0.1% glyoxal from postnatal day (PND) 21. There was no difference in the number of intestinal tumours between control and treatment groups. However, exposure to 0.1% glyoxal starting in utero and at PND21 caused a significant increase in tumour size in the small intestine for male and female mice in comparison with respective control groups. This study suggests that glyoxal has tumour growth promoting properties in the small intestine in Min mice. PMID:27288931

  17. Gamma/delta intraepithelial lymphocytes in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masaki; Itoh, Tsunetoshi

    2016-09-01

    Although many studies of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) have been reported, most of them have focused on αβ-IELs; little attention has been paid to γδ-IELs. The function of γδ-IELs remains largely unclear. In this article, we briefly review a number of reports on γδ-IELs, especially those in the small intestine, along with our recent studies. We found that γδ-IELs are the most abundant (comprising >70 % of the) IELs in the duodenum and the jejunum, implying that it is absolutely necessary to investigate the function(s) of γδ-IELs when attempting to delineate the in vivo defense system of the small intestine. Intraperitoneal injection of anti-CD3 mAb stimulated the γδ-IELs and caused rapid degranulation of them. Granzyme B released from their granules induced DNA fragmentation of duodenal and jejunal epithelial cells (paracrine) and of the IELs themselves (autocrine). However, perforin (Pfn) was not detected, and DNA fragmentation was induced even in Pfn-knockout mice; our system was therefore found to present a novel type of in vivo Pfn-independent DNA fragmentation. We can therefore consider γδ-IELs to be a novel type of large granular lymphocyte without Pfn. Fragmented DNA was repaired in the cells, indicating that DNA fragmentation alone cannot be regarded as an unambiguous marker of cell death or apoptosis. Finally, since the response was so rapid and achieved without the need for accessory cells, it seems that γδ-IELs respond readily to various stimuli, are activated only once, and die 2-3 days after activation in situ without leaving their site. Taken together, these results suggest that γδ-IELs are not involved in the recognition of specific antigen(s) and are not involved in the resulting specific killing or exclusion of the relevant antigen(s). PMID:27056578

  18. Generation of L-cells in mouse and human small intestine organoids

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Natalia; Reimann, Frank; Bartfeld, Sina; Farin, Henner F.; Ringnalda, Femke C.; Vries, Robert G. J.; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; Gribble, Fiona M.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Upon a nutrient challenge, L-cells produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a powerful stimulant of insulin release. Strategies to augment endogenous GLP-1 production include promoting L-cell differentiation and increasing L-cell number. Here we present a novel in vitro platform to generate functional L-cells from 3D cultures of mouse and human intestinal crypts. We show that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) selectively increase the number of L-cells resulting in an elevation of GLP-1 release. This is accompanied by up-regulation of transcription factors, associated with the endocrine lineage of intestinal stem cell development. Thus, our platform allows us to study and modulate the development of L-cells in mouse and human crypts as a potential basis for novel therapeutic strategies in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24130334

  19. Hydroxyethyl Starch (HES 130/0.4) Impairs Intestinal Barrier Integrity and Metabolic Function: Findings from a Mouse Model of the Isolated Perfused Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowsky, Heike; Zitta, Karina; Bein, Berthold; Krause, Thorsten; Goldmann, Torsten; Frerichs, Inez; Steinfath, Markus; Weiler, Norbert; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background The application of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) for volume resuscitation is controversially discussed and clinical studies have suggested adverse effects of HES substitution, leading to increased patient mortality. Although, the intestine is of high clinical relevance and plays a crucial role in sepsis and inflammation, information about the effects of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity is very scarce. We therefore evaluated the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity employing an isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine. Methods An isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine was established and intestines were vascularly perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 3% Albumin (N=7) or 3% HES (130/0.4; N=7). Intestinal metabolic function (galactose uptake, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio), edema formation (wet-to-dry weight ratio), morphology (histological and electron microscopical analysis), fluid shifts within the vascular, lymphatic and luminal compartments, as well as endothelial and epithelial barrier permeability (FITC-dextran translocation) were evaluated in both groups. Results Compared to the Albumin group, HES perfusion did not significantly change the wet-to-dry weight ratio and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. However, perfusing the small intestine with 3% HES resulted in a significant loss of vascular fluid (p<0.01), an increased fluid accumulation in the intestinal lumen (p<0.001), an enhanced translocation of FITC-dextran from the vascular to the luminal compartment (p<0.001) and a significantly impaired intestinal galactose uptake (p<0.001). Morphologically, these findings were associated with an aggregation of intracellular vacuoles within the intestinal epithelial cells and enlarged intercellular spaces. Conclusion A vascular perfusion with 3% HES impairs the endothelial and epithelial barrier integrity as well as metabolic function of the small

  20. E-cadherin is required for intestinal morphogenesis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bondow, Benjamin J.; Faber, Mary L.; Wojta, Kevin J.; Walker, Emily; Battle, Michele A.

    2012-01-01

    E-cadherin, the primary epithelial adherens junction protein, has been implicated as playing a critical role in nucleating formation of adherens junctions, tight junctions, and desmosomes. In addition to its role in maintaining structural tissue integrity, E-cadherin has also been suggested as an important modulator of cell signaling via interactions with its cytoplasmic binding partners, catenins, as well as with growth factor receptors. Therefore, we proposed that loss of E-cadherin from the developing mouse intestinal epithelium would disrupt intestinal epithelial morphogenesis and function. To test this hypothesis, we used a conditional knockout approach to eliminate E-cadherin specifically in the intestinal epithelium during embryonic development. We found that E-cadherin conditional knockout mice failed to survive, dying within the first 24 hours of birth. Examination of intestinal architecture at E18.5 demonstrated severe disruption to intestinal morphogenesis in animals lacking E-cadherin in the epithelium of the small intestine. We observed changes in epithelial cell shape as well as in the morphology of villi. Although junctional complexes were evident, junctions were abnormal, and barrier function was compromised in E-cadherin mutant intestine. We also identified changes in the epithelial cell populations present in E-cadherin conditional knockout animals. The number of proliferating cells was increased, whereas the number of enterocytes was decreased. Although Wnt/β-catenin target mRNAs were more abundant in mutants compared with controls, the amount of nuclear activated β-catenin protein was dramatically lower in mutants compared with controls. In summary, our data demonstrate that E-cadherin is essential for intestinal epithelial morphogenesis and homeostasis during embryonic development. PMID:22766025

  1. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing of Mouse Small Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Schwank, Gerald; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is an RNA-guided genome-editing tool that has been recently developed based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas immune defense system. Due to its versatility and simplicity, it rapidly became the method of choice for genome editing in various biological systems, including mammalian cells. Here we describe a protocol for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in murine small intestinal organoids, a culture system in which somatic stem cells are maintained by self-renewal, while giving rise to all major cell types of the intestinal epithelium. This protocol allows the study of gene function in intestinal epithelial homeostasis and pathophysiology and can be extended to epithelial organoids derived from other internal mouse and human organs. PMID:27246017

  2. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schall, K. A.; Holoyda, K. A.; Grant, C. N.; Levin, D. E.; Torres, E. R.; Maxwell, A.; Pollack, H. A.; Moats, R. A.; Frey, M. R.; Darehzereshki, A.; Al Alam, D.; Lien, C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. PMID:26089336

  3. Correlation between lead retention and intestinal pinocytosis in the suckling mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, C.A.; Doherty, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Young animals absorb and retain a greater fraction of an oral dose of lead than do adult animals. It has been proposed that pinocytotic activity in young animals is partially responsible for the increased lead retention and absorption. Radiolabeled lead (5 mg/kg) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, 50 mg/kg) were administered orally to 12-day-old suckling mice and to adult mice, and the uptake of lead and PVP was determined periodically during a 6-day interval. Intestinal tissue from the distal jejunum and ileum were found to contain the greatest quantities of both lead and PVP. Pretreatment of suckling mice with cortisone acetate resulted in decreased content of lead and PVP within tissue of the intestine, and decreased whole-body lead retention. Cortisone pretreatment produced lower lead concentrations in blood, brain, kidney, and liver. Lead and PVP uptake into intestinal tissue of adult mice was much less than uptake in suckling pups. Cortisone pretreatment of adult mice had no effect on whole-body lead retention or intestinal tissue content of lead or PVP.

  4. Effects of Hemin and Nitrite on Intestinal Tumorigenesis in the A/J Min/+ Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Sødring, Marianne; Oostindjer, Marije; Egelandsdal, Bjørg; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2015-01-01

    Red and processed meats are considered risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. One cause for the potential link between CRC and meat is the heme iron in red meat. Two pathways by which heme and CRC promotion may be linked have been suggested: fat peroxidation and N-nitrosation. In the present work we have used the novel A/J Min/+ mouse model to test the effects of dietary hemin (a model of red meat), and hemin in combination with nitrite (a model of processed meat) on intestinal tumorigenesis. Mice were fed a low Ca2+ and vitamin D semi-synthetic diet with added hemin and/or nitrite for 8 weeks post weaning, before termination followed by excision and examination of the intestinal tract. Our results indicate that dietary hemin decreased the number of colonic lesions in the A/J Min/+ mouse. However, our results also showed that the opposite occurred in the small intestine, where dietary hemin appeared to stimulate tumor growth. Furthermore, we find that nitrite, which did not have an effect in the colon, appeared to have a suppressive effect on tumor growth in the small intestine. PMID:25836260

  5. Specific immunotherapy in combination with Clostridium butyricum inhibits allergic inflammation in the mouse intestine

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanhong; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Peng, Kangsheng; Wu, Wei; Wu, Ruijin; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Gui; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Liu, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Zhanju; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The current therapy on allergic inflammation is unsatisfactory. Probiotics improve the immunity in the body. This study aims to test a hypothesis that administration with Clostridium butyricum (C. butyricum) enforces the effect of specific immunotherapy (SIT) on intestinal allergic inflammation. In this study, an ovalbumin (OVA) specific allergic inflammation mouse model was created. The mice were treated with SIT or/and C. butyricum. The results showed that the intestinal allergic inflammation was only moderately alleviated by SIT, which was significantly enforced by a combination with C. butyricum; treating with C. butyricum alone did not show much inhibitory efficacy. The increase in the frequency of the interleukin (IL)-10-producing OVA-specific B cell (OVAsBC) was observed in mice in parallel to the inhibitory effect on the intestinal allergic inflammation. The in vitro treatment of the OVAsBCs with OVA increased the histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1) phosphorylation, modulated the transcription of the Bcl6 gene, and triggered the OVAsBCs to differentiate to the IgE-producing plasma cells. Exposure to both OVA and butyrate sodium in the culture increased the expression of IL-10 in OVAsBCs. In conclusion, administration with C. butyricum enforces the inhibitory effect of SIT on allergic inflammation in the mouse intestine. PMID:26627845

  6. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  7. Secreted adhesion molecules of Strongyloides venezuelensis are produced by oesophageal glands and are components of the wall of tunnels constructed by adult worms in the host intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, H; El-Malky, M; Kumagai, T; Ohta, N

    2003-02-01

    The parasitic female of Strongyloides venezuelensis keeps invading the epithelial layer of the host intestinal mucosa. Upon invasion, it adheres to the surface of the intestinal epithelial cells with adhesion molecules secreted from the mouth. It has been demonstrated that S. venezuelensis are expelled from the intestine because mucosal mast cells inhibit the attachment of adult worms to the mucosal surface. In the present study, we generated specific antibodies against secreted adhesion molecules to investigate their function in vivo, because these molecules have been demonstrated only in vitro in spite of the importance in the infection processes. A mouse monoclonal antibody specific to S. venezuelensis adhesion molecules inhibited the attachment of adult worms to plastic dishes and the binding of adhesion molecules to rat intestinal epithelial cells. Immunohistochemical study revealed that adhesion molecules were produced by oesophageal glands and were continuously secreted in vivo to line the wall of the tunnels formed by adult worms in the intestinal mucosa. Our findings indicate that adhesion molecules play essential roles in the infection processes of S. venezuelensis in the host intestine. PMID:12636354

  8. Composition and function of the undernourished neonatal mouse intestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Preidis, Geoffrey A; Ajami, Nadim J; Wong, Matthew C; Bessard, Brooke C; Conner, Margaret E; Petrosino, Joseph F

    2015-10-01

    Undernutrition remains one of the key global health challenges facing children today. Distinct microbial profiles have been associated with obesity and undernutrition, although mechanisms behind these associations are unknown. We sought to understand how protein-energy undernutrition alters the microbiome and to propose mechanisms by which these alterations influence the malnourished phenotype. Outbred CD1 neonatal mice were undernourished by timed separation from lactating dams, while control animals nursed ad libitum. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and compositional analysis identified microbes from luminal contents of ileum, cecum and colon, while whole metagenome shotgun sequencing identified microbial gene content. Our results suggest that the most important determinant of microbiome composition is body compartment; communities derived from ileum are distinct from those from cecum and colon as observed by phylogenetic clustering analysis. However, within each compartment, microbiota from undernourished and control mice cluster separately. At the phylum level, undernourished mice harbor more Verrucomicrobia and less Bacteroidetes in the distal intestine; these changes are driven by an increase in Akkermansia muciniphila and decreases in Bacteroides and Alistipes. Undernourished mice have an overall loss of microbial community richness and diversity and are deficient in multiple microbial genetic pathways including N-glycan, inositol phosphate and one-carbon metabolism. Losses in these microbial genes may confer less efficient extraction of energy from nondigestible dietary components including glycans and phytates, whereas epigenetic alterations provide a means of persistently altering metabolism even after adequate nutrition is restored. Thus, the microbiome of an undernourished host may perpetuate states of poor nutrition via multiple mechanisms. PMID:26070414

  9. Transcriptional Modulation of Intestinal Innate Defense/Inflammation Genes by Preterm Infant Microbiota in a Humanized Gnotobiotic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lei; Yu, Yueyue; Guo, Yuee; Wang, Yunwei; Chang, Eugene B.; Claud, Erika C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims It is known that postnatal functional maturation of the small intestine is facilitated by microbial colonization of the gut. Preterm infants exhibit defects in gut maturation, weak innate immunity against intestinal infection and increased susceptibility to inflammatory disorders, all of which may be related to the inappropriate microbial colonization of their immature intestines. The earliest microbes to colonize the preterm infant gut encounter a naïve, immature intestine. Thus this earliest microbiota potentially has the greatest opportunity to fundamentally influence intestinal development and immune function. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of early microbial colonization on global gene expression in the distal small intestine during postnatal gut development. Methods Gnotobiotic mouse models with experimental colonization by early (prior to two weeks of life) intestinal microbiota from preterm human infants were utilized. Microarray analysis was used to assess global gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Results and Conclusion Multiple intestinal genes involved in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix communication, and immune function are developmental- and intestinal microbiota- regulated. Using a humanized gnotobiotic mouse model, we demonstrate that certain early preterm infant microbiota from prior to 2 weeks of life specifically induce increased NF-κB activation and a phenotype of increased inflammation whereas other preterm microbiota specifically induce decreased NF-κB activation. These fundamental differences correlate with altered clinical outcomes and suggest the existence of optimal early microbial communities to improve health outcomes. PMID:25928420

  10. ATM localization and gene expression in the adult mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Leemput, Julia; Masson, Christel; Bigot, Karine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Dansault, Anouk; Provost, Alexandra; Gadin, Stéphanie; Aoufouchi, Said; Menasche, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Purpose High levels of metabolism and oxygen consumption in most adult murine ocular compartments, combined with exposure to light and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, are major sources of oxidative stress, causing DNA damage in ocular cells. Of all mammalian body cells, photoreceptor cells consume the largest amount of oxygen and generate the highest levels of oxidative damage. The accumulation of such damage throughout life is a major factor of aging tissues. Several multiprotein complexes have recently been identified as the major sensors and mediators involved in the maintenance of DNA integrity. The activity of these complexes initially seemed to be restricted to dividing cells, given their ultimate role in major cell cycle checkpoints. However, it was later established that they are also active in post-mitotic cells. Recent findings demonstrate that the DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for the development, maintenance, and normal functioning of the adult central nervous system. One major molecular factor in the DDR is the protein, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). It is required for the rapid induction of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks. These cytotoxic DNA lesions may be caused by oxidative damage. To understand how ATM prevents oxidative stress and participates in the maintenance of genomic integrity and cell viability of the adult retina, we determined the ATM expression patterns and studied its localization in the adult mouse eye. Methods Atm gene expression was analyzed by RT–PCR experiments and its localization by in situ hybridization on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. ATM protein expression was determined by western blot analysis of proteins homogenates extracted from several mouse tissues and its localization by immunohistochemistry experiments performed on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. In addition, subcellular localization was realized by confocal microscopy imaging of ocular tissue

  11. Virus-Specific Immunity in Neonatal and Adult Mouse Rotavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, J. F.; Eydelloth, R. S.; Vonderfecht, S. L.; Aurelian, L.

    1983-01-01

    Mouse rotavirus (epizootic diarrhea of infant mice) was used as a model to study the role of virus-specific immunity in infection and diarrheal disease. The distribution of viral antigen in intestinal tissues was determined by immunofluorescent staining with anti-simian rotavirus (SA-11) serum. The location and proportion of antigen-positive cells appeared to vary as a function of time postinfection and age of the animal at the time of infection. In animals infected at 1 and 7 days of age, antigen-positive cells (5 to 25%) were first detected (1 day postinfection) in the proximal segment of the small intestine, and infection progressed to the middle and distal segments. At 10 days postinfection, virus-infected cells were no longer observed in the proximal segment. In animals infected at 21 days of age (disease-free), a significantly lower proportion of cells were antigen positive (2 to 5%), and they were restricted to the middle and distal segments of the small intestine. Infection, defined according to the presence of virus and viral antigens in intestinal tissues and by seroconversion in the immunoglobulin M (IgM) isotype as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with SA-11 antigen, was observed for all age groups (neonatal to adult), even in the presence of virus-specific serum or intestinal immunoglobulins. On the other hand, diarrheal disease was not detected in neonatal mice (1 to 3 days old) positive for passively acquired virus-specific intestinal IgG. The presence of virus-specific IgA in the intestinal tract at the time of infection did not protect from subsequent diarrheal disease. Virus-specific, cell-mediated immunity, determined by a delayed-type hypersensitivity response, did not develop in neonatal mice infected at 5 and 12 days of age. Reinfection of adult mice was associated with suppression of virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity and a significant decrease in the titers of the virus-specific serum IgG and IgA. Images PMID:6299952

  12. A Comprehensive Atlas of the Adult Mouse Penis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tiffany R.; Wright, David K.; Gradie, Paul E.; Johnston, Leigh A.; Pask, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Mice are routinely used to study the development of the external genitalia and, in particular, the process of male urethral closure. This is because misplacement of the male penile urethra, or hypospadias, is amongst the most common birth defects reported in humans. While mice present a tractable model to study penile development, several structures differ between mice and humans, and there is a lack of consensus in the literature on their annotation and developmental origins. Defining the ontology of the mouse prepuce is especially important for the relevance and interpretation of mouse models of hypospadias to human conditions. We have developed a detailed annotation of the adult mouse penis that addresses these differences and enables an accurate comparison of murine and human hypospadias phenotypes. Through MRI data, gross morphology and section histology, we define the origin of the mouse external and internal prepuces, their relationship to the single human foreskin as well as provide a comprehensive view of the various structures of the mouse penis and their associated muscle attachments within the body. These data are combined to annotate structures in a novel 3D adult penis atlas that can be downloaded, viewed at any angle, and manipulated to examine the relationship of various structures. PMID:26112156

  13. Role of RIP1 in physiological enterocyte turnover in mouse small intestine via nonapoptotic death.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yosuke; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Enterocyte shedding in the small intestine is often referred as an example of programmed cell death. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms, although both apoptotic and nonapoptotic cell death have been suggested to play an important role. Here, we show by electron microscope that the majority of cells dying in the mouse small intestine do not display apoptotic characteristics. Chemical biological approach in vivo and in an organ culture showed that necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), an inhibitor of receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1, also called RIPK1), inhibited the shedding/nonapoptotic death of enterocyte, resulting in suppression of physiological enterocyte turnover. Moreover, RIP1 knockdown in vivo and RIP1 haploinsufficiency significantly suppressed physiological enterocyte turnover. Unlike Nec-1-sensitive (RIP1-dependent) cell death, so called necroptosis, which is also dependent on RIP3, physiological enterocyte turnover in RIP3-deficient mice was executed normally and still inhibited by Nec-1. As inhibition of the shedding/nonapoptotic death of enterocyte by Nec-1 resulted in suppression of crypt cell proliferation, the shedding process plays a dominant role over cell proliferation in maintaining homeostasis of enterocyte turnover. These results indicate that RIP1 plays a major role in physiological enterocyte turnover through a RIP3-independent nonapoptotic death mechanism in the mouse small intestine. PMID:25348793

  14. Comprehensive proteome analysis of an Apc mouse model uncovers proteins associated with intestinal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kenneth E; Faca, Vitor; Song, Kenneth; Sarracino, David A; Richard, Larissa Georgeon; Krastins, Bryan; Forrester, Sara; Porter, Andrew; Kunin, Alexandra; Mahmood, Umar; Haab, Brian B; Hanash, Samir M; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2009-03-01

    Tumor-derived proteins may occur in the circulation as a result of secretion, shedding from the cell surface, or cell turnover. We have applied an in-depth comprehensive proteomic strategy to plasma from intestinal tumor-bearing Apc mutant mice to identify proteins associated with tumor development. We used quantitative tandem mass spectrometry of fractionated mouse plasma to identify differentially expressed proteins in plasma from intestinal tumor-bearing Apc mutant mice relative to matched controls. Up-regulated proteins were assessed for the expression of corresponding genes in tumor tissue. A subset of proteins implicated in colorectal cancer were selected for further analysis at the tissue level using antibody microarrays, Western blotting, tumor immunohistochemistry, and novel fluorescent imaging. We identified 51 proteins that were elevated in plasma with concordant up-regulation at the RNA level in tumor tissue. The list included multiple proteins involved in colon cancer pathogenesis: cathepsin B and cathepsin D, cullin 1, Parkinson disease 7, muscle pyruvate kinase, and Ran. Of these, Parkinson disease 7, muscle pyruvate kinase, and Ran were also found to be up-regulated in human colon adenoma samples. We have identified proteins with direct relevance to colorectal carcinogenesis that are present both in plasma and in tumor tissue in intestinal tumor-bearing mice. Our results show that integrated analysis of the plasma proteome and tumor transcriptome of genetically engineered mouse models is a powerful approach for the identification of tumor-related plasma proteins. PMID:19240248

  15. Chemoprevention of mouse intestinal tumorigenesis by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor SNS-032.

    PubMed

    Boquoi, Amelie; Chen, Tina; Enders, Greg H

    2009-09-01

    Despite advances in screening and treatment, colorectal cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk) are deregulated in colorectal cancer by silencing of the Cdk inhibitor p16(Ink4a) and other mechanisms. We tested whether the small molecule Cdk inhibitor SNS-032 (formerly BMS-387032), which targets Cdk2, Cdk7, and Cdk9, can prevent intestinal tumorigenesis in mouse models. We generated mice with high intestinal tumor loads by combining the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mutation with Ink4a/Arf mutations and inducing colitis with dextran sulfate sodium. p16-null Min mice (n = 17) began dextran sulfate sodium treatment at week 5 and i.p. injection of carrier or SNS-032 at week 6. Mice were sacrificed at week 12. SNS-032 was well tolerated and reduced colon tumor burden to 36% of that in carrier-treated mice (P < 0.001). We then extended the study to Ink4/Arf-null Min mice (n = 14) and increased the drug dose frequency. SNS-032 treatment reduced the intestinal tumor number to 25% and intestinal tumor burden to 16% of carrier-treated mice (P < 0.0001). DNA synthesis in non-neoplastic and tumor epithelial cells, detected by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, was modestly reduced by acute SNS-032 treatment. The mitotic index, detected by histone H3 phosphorylation, was distinctly decreased (P < 0.03), and apoptosis, detected by caspase 3 activation, was increased (P < 0.005). These results show the chemoprevention of intestinal tumorigenesis by SNS-032. Our findings support further study of Cdk inhibitors for chemoprevention and therapy of colon cancer. PMID:19723896

  16. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Weidong; Feng, Yongjia; Holst, Jens J.; Hartmann, Bolette; Yang, Hua; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Small intestine luminal nutrient sensing may be crucial for modulating physiological functions. However, its mechanism of action is incompletely understood. We used a model of enteral nutrient deprivation, or total parenteral nutrition (TPN), resulting in intestinal mucosal atrophy and decreased epithelial barrier function (EBF). We examined how a single amino acid, glutamate (GLM), modulates intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) growth and EBF. Controls were chow-fed mice, T1 receptor-3 (T1R3)-knockout (KO) mice, and treatment with the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-5 antagonist MTEP. TPN significantly changed the amount of T1Rs, GLM receptors, and transporters, and GLM prevented these changes. GLM significantly prevented TPN-associated intestinal atrophy (2.5-fold increase in IEC proliferation) and was dependent on up-regulation of the protein kinase pAkt, but independent of T1R3 and mGluR5 signaling. GLM led to a loss of EBF with TPN (60% increase in FITC-dextran permeability, 40% decline in transepithelial resistance); via T1R3, it protected EBF, whereas mGluR5 was associated with EBF loss. GLM led to a decline in circulating glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) during TPN. The decline was regulated by T1R3 and mGluR5, suggesting a novel negative regulator pathway for IEC proliferation not previously described. Loss of luminal nutrients with TPN administration may widely affect intestinal taste sensing. GLM has previously unrecognized actions on IEC growth and EBF. Restoring luminal sensing via GLM could be a strategy for patients on TPN.—Xiao, W., Feng, Y., Holst, J. J., Hartmann, B., Yang, H., Teitelbaum, D. H. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition. PMID:24497581

  17. DES2 protein is responsible for phytoceramide biosynthesis in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Omae, Fumio; Miyazaki, Masao; Enomoto, Ayako; Suzuki, Minoru; Suzuki, Yusuke; Suzuki, Akemi

    2004-01-01

    The C-4 hydroxylation of sphinganine and dihydroceramide is a rate-limiting reaction in the biosynthesis of phytosphingolipids. Mouse DES1 (MDES1) cDNA homologous to the Drosophila melanogaster degenerative spermatocyte gene-1 (des-1) cDNA leads to sphingosine Delta4-desaturase activity, and another mouse homologue, MDES2, has bifunctional activity, producing C-4 hydroxysphinganine and Delta4-sphingenine in yeast [Ternes, Franke, Zahringer, Sperling and Heinz (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 25512-25518]. Here, we report the characterization of mouse DES2 (MDES2) using an in vitro assay with a homogenate of COS-7 cells transfected with MDES2 cDNA and N -octanoyl-sphinganine and sphinganine as substrates. MDES2 protein prefers dihydroceramide as a substrate to sphinganine, and exhibits dihydroceramide Delta4-desaturase and C-4 hydroxylase activities. MDES2 mRNA content was high in the small intestine and abundant in the kidney. In situ hybridization detected signals of MDES2 mRNA in the crypt cells. Immunohistochemistry using an anti-MDES2 peptide antibody stained the crypt cells and the adjacent epithelial cells. These results suggest that MDES2 is the dihydroceramide C-4 hydroxylase responsible for the biosynthesis of enriched phytosphingoglycolipids in the microvillous membranes of intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:14731113

  18. Smooth muscle NOS, colocalized with caveolin-1, modulates contraction in mouse small intestine

    PubMed Central

    El-Yazbi, Ahmed F; Cho, Woo Jung; Cena, Jonathan; Schulz, Richard; Daniel, Edwin E

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in myenteric neurons is activated during peristalsis to produce nitric oxide which relaxes intestinal smooth muscle. A putative nNOS is also found in the membrane of intestinal smooth muscle cells in mouse and dog. In this study we studied the possible functions of this nNOS expressed in mouse small intestinal smooth muscle colocalized with caveolin-1(Cav-1). Cav-1 knockout mice lacked nNOS in smooth muscle and provided control tissues. 60 mM KCl was used to increase intracellular [Ca2+] through L-type Ca2+ channel opening and stimulate smooth muscle NOS activity in intestinal tissue segments. An additional contractile response to LNNA (100 μM, NOS inhibitor) was observed in KCl-contracted tissues from control mice and was almost absent in tissues from Cav-1 knockout mice. Disruption of caveolae with 40 mM methyl-β cyclodextrin in tissues from control mice led to the loss of Cav-1 and nNOS immunoreactivity from smooth muscle as shown by immunohistochemistry and a reduction in the response of these tissues to N-ω-nitro-L-arginine (LNNA). Reconstitution of membrane cholesterol using water soluble cholesterol in the depleted segments restored the immunoreactivity and the response to LNNA added after KCl. Nicardipine (1 μM) blocked the responses to KCl and LNNA confirming the role of L-type Ca2+ channels. ODQ (1 μM, soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor) had the same effect as inhibition of NOS following KCl. We conclude that the activation of nNOS, localized in smooth muscle caveolae, by calcium entering through L-type calcium channels triggers nitric oxide production which modulates muscle contraction by a cGMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:18400048

  19. Preferential entry of botulinum neurotoxin A Hc domain through intestinal crypt cells and targeting to cholinergic neurons of the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Couesnon, Aurélie; Molgó, Jordi; Connan, Chloé; Popoff, Michel R

    2012-01-01

    Botulism, characterized by flaccid paralysis, commonly results from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) absorption across the epithelial barrier from the digestive tract and then dissemination through the blood circulation to target autonomic and motor nerve terminals. The trafficking pathway of BoNT/A passage through the intestinal barrier is not yet fully understood. We report that intralumenal administration of purified BoNT/A into mouse ileum segment impaired spontaneous muscle contractions and abolished the smooth muscle contractions evoked by electric field stimulation. Entry of BoNT/A into the mouse upper small intestine was monitored with fluorescent HcA (half C-terminal domain of heavy chain) which interacts with cell surface receptor(s). We show that HcA preferentially recognizes a subset of neuroendocrine intestinal crypt cells, which probably represent the entry site of the toxin through the intestinal barrier, then targets specific neurons in the submucosa and later (90-120 min) in the musculosa. HcA mainly binds to certain cholinergic neurons of both submucosal and myenteric plexuses, but also recognizes, although to a lower extent, other neuronal cells including glutamatergic and serotoninergic neurons in the submucosa. Intestinal cholinergic neuron targeting by HcA could account for the inhibition of intestinal peristaltism and secretion observed in botulism, but the consequences of the targeting to non-cholinergic neurons remains to be determined. PMID:22438808

  20. Caveolin-1 gene knockout impairs nitrergic function in mouse small intestine

    PubMed Central

    El-Yazbi, Ahmed F; Cho, Woo-Jung; Boddy, Geoffrey; Daniel, Edwin E

    2005-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is a plasma membrane-associated protein that is responsible for caveolae formation. It plays an important role in the regulation of the function of different signaling molecules, among which are the different isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Nitric oxide (NO) is known to be an important inhibitory mediator in the mouse gut. Caveolin-1 knockout mice (Cav1−/−) were used to examine the effect of caveolin-1 absence on the NO function in the mouse small intestine (ileum and jejunum) compared to their genetic controls and BALB/c controls. Immunohistochemical staining showed loss of caveolin-1 and NOS in the jejunal smooth muscles and myenteric plexus interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) of Cav1−/− mice; however, nNOS immunoreactive nerves were still present in myenteric ganglia. Under nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) conditions, small intestinal tissues from Cav1−/− mice relaxed to electrical field stimulation (EFS), as did tissues from control mice. Relaxation of tissues from control mice was markedly reduced by N-omega-nitro-L-arginine (10−4 M), but relaxation of Cav1−/− animals was affected much less. Also, Cav1−/− mice tissues showed reduced relaxation responses to sodium nitroprusside (100 μM) compared to controls; yet there were no significant differences in the relaxation responses to 8-bromoguanosine-3′ : 5′-cyclic monophosphate (100 μM). Apamin (10−6 M) significantly reduced relaxations to EFS in NANC conditions in Cav1−/− mice, but not in controls. The data from this study suggest that caveolin-1 gene knockout causes alterations in the smooth muscles and the ICC, leading to an impaired NO function in the mouse small intestine that could possibly be compensated by apamin-sensitive inhibitory mediators. PMID:15937515

  1. Streptomycin treatment alters the intestinal microbiome, pulmonary T cell profile and airway hyperresponsiveness in a cystic fibrosis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bazett, Mark; Bergeron, Marie-Eve; Haston, Christina K.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator deficient mouse models develop phenotypes of relevance to clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) including airway hyperresponsiveness, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and an altered intestinal microbiome. As dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota has been recognized as an important contributor to many systemic diseases, herein we investigated whether altering the intestinal microbiome of BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice and wild-type littermates, through treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin, affects the CF lung, intestinal and bone disease. We demonstrate that streptomycin treatment reduced the intestinal bacterial overgrowth in Cftrtm1UNC mice and altered the intestinal microbiome similarly in Cftrtm1UNC and wild-type mice, principally by affecting Lactobacillus levels. Airway hyperresponsiveness of Cftrtm1UNC mice was ameliorated with streptomycin, and correlated with Lactobacillus abundance in the intestine. Additionally, streptomycin treated Cftrtm1UNC and wild-type mice displayed an increased percentage of pulmonary and mesenteric lymph node Th17, CD8 + IL-17+ and CD8 + IFNγ+ lymphocytes, while the CF-specific increase in respiratory IL-17 producing γδ T cells was decreased in streptomycin treated Cftrtm1UNC mice. Bone disease and intestinal phenotypes were not affected by streptomycin treatment. The airway hyperresponsiveness and lymphocyte profile of BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice were affected by streptomycin treatment, revealing a potential intestinal microbiome influence on lung response in BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice. PMID:26754178

  2. Non-O1 Vibrio cholerae intestinal pathology and invasion in the removable intestinal tie adult rabbit diarrhea model.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R G; Tall, B D; Morris, J G

    1992-01-01

    A modified removable intestinal tie adult rabbit diarrhea (RITARD) model was used to investigate the intestinal pathology, intestinal bacterial colonization, intestinal fluid volume, and onset of diarrhea caused by non-O1 Vibrio cholerae. Three strains of non-O1 V. cholerae were studied. RITARD rabbits challenged with 10(3) CFU of strain NRT36S (a strain previously shown to cause diarrhea in volunteers) developed grade 3 diarrhea at 48 to 72 h. The mean counts of non-O1 V. cholerae isolated were 9.3 +/- 0.07 and 8.7 +/- 0.7 CFU/g from the small and large intestines, respectively. Histologic examination showed necrosis of the luminal epithelium in the colon and mild inflammatory cell infiltration in the adjacent lamina propria. The severity and extent of intestinal damage by strain NRT36S was dose dependent. Higher doses of strain NRT36S caused severe necrotizing colitis and enteritis, with bacteremia and mortality at less than 24 h in RITARD rabbits challenged with 10(9) CFU and at less than 48 h in RITARD rabbits challenged with 10(4) CFU. Electron and light microscopy demonstrated invasion of NRT36S into the luminal epithelial cells of the intestine. Challenge of RITARD rabbits with non-O1 V. cholerae A-5 and 2076-79 (strains which did not cause diarrhea in volunteers) did not cause diarrhea or intestinal pathology. Intestinal colonization was transient: at 72 h postchallenge, animals inoculated with strain A-5 were culture negative, while only low numbers of strain 2076-79 were detectable (approximately 0.4 to 0.8 CFU/g). Our data highlight the utility of the RITARD model, when combined with appropriate pathologic and bacteriologic studies, for obtaining insights into pathophysiologic mechanisms of enteric disease by non-O1 V. cholerae. In agreement with volunteer studies, non-O1 V. cholerae NRT36S is clearly pathogenic in this model; direct cell invasion may play a role in its ability to cause illness. Images PMID:1730473

  3. GATAe regulates intestinal stem cell maintenance and differentiation in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Takashi; Takeda, Koji; Kuchiki, Megumi; Akaishi, Marie; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Adachi-Yamada, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Adult intestinal tissues, exposed to the external environment, play important roles including barrier and nutrient-absorption functions. These functions are ensured by adequately controlled rapid-cell metabolism. GATA transcription factors play essential roles in the development and maintenance of adult intestinal tissues both in vertebrates and invertebrates. We investigated the roles of GATAe, the Drosophila intestinal GATA factor, in adult midgut homeostasis with its first-generated knock-out mutant as well as cell type-specific RNAi and overexpression experiments. Our results indicate that GATAe is essential for proliferation and maintenance of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Also, GATAe is involved in the differentiation of enterocyte (EC) and enteroendocrine (ee) cells in both Notch (N)-dependent and -independent manner. The results also indicate that GATAe has pivotal roles in maintaining normal epithelial homeostasis of the Drosophila adult midgut through interaction of N signaling. Since recent reports showed that mammalian GATA-6 regulates normal and cancer stem cells in the adult intestinal tract, our data also provide information on the evolutionally conserved roles of GATA factors in stem-cell regulation. PMID:26719127

  4. Prolactin Stimulates Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Tara L.; Vukovic, Jana; Koudijs, Margaretha M.; Blackmore, Daniel G.; Mackay, Eirinn W.; Sykes, Alex M.; Overall, Rupert W.; Hamlin, Adam S.; Bartlett, Perry F.

    2012-01-01

    In the search for ways to combat degenerative neurological disorders, neurogenesis-stimulating factors are proving to be a promising area of research. In this study, we show that the hormonal factor prolactin (PRL) can activate a pool of latent precursor cells in the adult mouse hippocampus. Using an in vitro neurosphere assay, we found that the addition of exogenous PRL to primary adult hippocampal cells resulted in an approximate 50% increase in neurosphere number. In addition, direct infusion of PRL into the adult dentate gyrus also resulted in a significant increase in neurosphere number. Together these data indicate that exogenous PRL can increase hippocampal precursor numbers both in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, PRL null mice showed a significant reduction (approximately 80%) in the number of hippocampal-derived neurospheres. Interestingly, no deficit in precursor proliferation was observed in vivo, indicating that in this situation other niche factors can compensate for a loss in PRL. The PRL loss resulted in learning and memory deficits in the PRL null mice, as indicated by significant deficits in the standard behavioral tests requiring input from the hippocampus. This behavioral deficit was rescued by direct infusion of recombinant PRL into the hippocampus, indicating that a lack of PRL in the adult mouse hippocampus can be correlated with impaired learning and memory. PMID:22973440

  5. Cytokine and Antioxidant Regulation in the Intestine of the Gray Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus) During Torpor

    PubMed Central

    Tessier, Shannon N.; Katzenback, Barbara A.; Pifferi, Fabien; Perret, Martine; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2015-01-01

    During food shortages, the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) of Madagascar experiences daily torpor thereby reducing energy expenditures. The present study aimed to understand the impacts of torpor on the immune system and antioxidant response in the gut of these animals. This interaction may be of critical importance given the trade-off between the energetically costly immune response and the need to defend against pathogen entry during hypometabolism. The protein levels of cytokines and antioxidants were measured in the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) and large intestine of aroused and torpid lemurs. While there was a significant decrease of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) in the duodenum and jejunum during torpor as compared to aroused animals, there was no change in anti-inflammatory cytokines. We observed decreased levels of cytokines (IL-12p70 and M-CSF), and several chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) but an increase in MIP-1α in the jejunum of the torpid animals. In addition, we evaluated antioxidant response by examining the protein levels of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant capacity provided by metabolites such as glutathione (and others). Our results indicated that levels of antioxidant enzymes did not change between torpor and aroused states, although antioxidant capacity was significantly higher in the ileum during torpor. These data suggest a suppression of the immune response, likely as an energy conservation measure, and a limited role of antioxidant defenses in supporting torpor in lemur intestine. PMID:26092185

  6. Cytokine and Antioxidant Regulation in the Intestine of the Gray Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus) During Torpor.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Shannon N; Katzenback, Barbara A; Pifferi, Fabien; Perret, Martine; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-04-01

    During food shortages, the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) of Madagascar experiences daily torpor thereby reducing energy expenditures. The present study aimed to understand the impacts of torpor on the immune system and antioxidant response in the gut of these animals. This interaction may be of critical importance given the trade-off between the energetically costly immune response and the need to defend against pathogen entry during hypometabolism. The protein levels of cytokines and antioxidants were measured in the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) and large intestine of aroused and torpid lemurs. While there was a significant decrease of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) in the duodenum and jejunum during torpor as compared to aroused animals, there was no change in anti-inflammatory cytokines. We observed decreased levels of cytokines (IL-12p70 and M-CSF), and several chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) but an increase in MIP-1α in the jejunum of the torpid animals. In addition, we evaluated antioxidant response by examining the protein levels of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant capacity provided by metabolites such as glutathione (and others). Our results indicated that levels of antioxidant enzymes did not change between torpor and aroused states, although antioxidant capacity was significantly higher in the ileum during torpor. These data suggest a suppression of the immune response, likely as an energy conservation measure, and a limited role of antioxidant defenses in supporting torpor in lemur intestine. PMID:26092185

  7. Azathioprine does not reduce adenoma formation in a mouse model of sporadic intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wielenga, Mattheus CB; van Lidth de Jeude, Jooske F; Rosekrans, Sanne L; Levin, Alon D; Schukking, Monique; D’Haens, Geert RAM; Heijmans, Jarom; Jansen, Marnix; Muncan, Vanesa; van den Brink, Gijs R

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if azathioprine could reduce adenoma formation in ApcMin/+, a mouse model of sporadic intestinal tumorigenesis. METHODS: Azathioprine was administered via drinking water (estimated 6-20 mg/kg body weight per day) to ApcMin/+ and wildtype mice. Control animals received vehicle only (DMSO) dissolved in drinking water. At 15 wk of age all mice were sacrificed and intestines of ApcMin/+ were harvested for evaluation of polyp number. Azathioprine induced toxicity was investigated by immunohistochemical analysis on spleens. RESULTS: All azathioprine treated mice showed signs of drug-associated toxicity such as weight loss and development of splenic T-cell lymphomas. Although this suggests that the thiopurine concentration was clearly in the therapeutic range, it did not reduce tumor formation (48 ± 3.1 adenomas vs 59 ± 5.7 adenomas, P = 0.148). CONCLUSION: We conclude that in the absence of inflammation, azathioprine does not affect intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:25469037

  8. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (P<0.001). Those mice in 5-FU groups had significantly higher proinflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α: 234.80 vs. 29.10, P<0.001, IL-6: 25.13 vs. 7.43, P<0.001, IFN-γ: 22.07 vs. 17.06, P = 0.137). A repairing of damage in jejunal villi was observed following probiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (P<0.05). No bacterial translocation was found in this study. Conclusions In conclusion, our results show that oral administration of probiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in

  9. A left-sided periappendiceal abscess in an adult with intestinal malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Ro; Kim, Jong Hun; Hwang, Yong; Kim, Young Kon

    2006-01-01

    Left-sided periappendiceal abscesses occur in association with two types of congenital anomaly: intestinal malrotation and situs inversus. It is difficult to obtain an accurate preoperative diagnosis of these abscesses due to the abnormal position of the appendix. We present an unusual case of a left-sided periappendiceal abscess in an adult with intestinal malrotation, the diagnosis of which was a challenge. PMID:16981277

  10. Micronutrient deficiencies in pediatric and young adult intestinal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Ubesie, Agozie C; Cole, Conrad R; Nathan, Jaimie D; Tiao, Greg M; Alonso, Maria H; Mezoff, Adam G; Henderson, Carol J; Kocoshis, Samuel A

    2013-01-01

    Background Intestinal transplant recipients are at risk for micronutrient deficiency due to the slow process of post-transplant adaptation. Another contributing factor is calcineurin inhibitor-induced renal tubular dysfunction. Patients are typically supplemented with micronutrients during parenteral nutrition; however the risk of deficiency may persist even after a successful transition to full enteral nutrition. Objective To determine the prevalence of, and associated risk factors for, iron, zinc, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, copper, folate, vitamins A, D, E and B12 deficiency in pediatric intestinal transplant recipients after successful transition to full enteral nutrition. Method A retrospective review of prospectively collected data from children who underwent intestinal transplantation at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Deficiencies of various micronutrients were defined using the hospital reference values. Results Twenty-one intestinal transplant recipients, aged one to 23 years that were successfully transitioned to full enteral nutrition were included in the study. The prevalence of micronutrient deficiency was 95.2%. The common deficient micronutrients were iron (94.7%) and magnesium (90.5%). Age ≤10 years (P=0.002) and tube feeding (P= 0.02) were significant risk factors for micronutrient deficiencies. Conclusion Pediatric intestinal transplant recipients have a high risk of micronutrient and mineral deficiencies. These deficiencies were more common among younger patients and those who received jejunal feeding. PMID:23919810

  11. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint

    PubMed Central

    Zapala, Matthew A.; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A.; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A.; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S.; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S.; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J.; Reilly, John F.; Young, Warren G.; Bloom, Floyd E.; Lockhart, David J.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-01-01

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional “imprint” consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior–posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org). PMID:16002470

  12. Isolated intestinal transplants vs. liver-intestinal transplants in adult patients in the United States: 22 yr of OPTN data.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag S; Gruessner, Angelika C; Khan, Khalid M; Fishbein, Thomas M; Jie, Tun; Rodriguez Rilo, Horacio L; Gruessner, Rainer W G

    2012-01-01

    We examined the outcomes of adult intestinal transplants (ITx); isolated ITx vs. liver-intestinal transplants (L-ITx) were compared using the UNOS database (1987-2009). Of 759 ITx transplants in 687 patients, 463 (61%) were isolated and 296 (39%) were L-ITx. Patient survival for primary isolated ITx at one, three, and five yr was 84%, 66.7%, and 54.2%; and primary L-ITx was, 67%, 53.3%, and 46% (p = 0.0005). Primary isolated ITx graft survival at one, three, and five yr was 80.7%, 57.6%, 42.8%; primary L-ITx was 64.1%, 51%, 44.1% (p = 0.0003 at one, three yr, Wilcoxon test). For retransplants (n = 72), patient and graft survival for isolated ITx (n = 41) at five yr was 40% in era 1 (1987-2000) and 16% in era 2 (p = 0.47); for retransplanted L-ITx (n = 31), it improved from 14% to 64% in era 2 (p = 0.01). Cox regression: creatinine >1.3 mg/dL and pre-transplant hospitalization were negative predictors for outcome of both; bilirubin >1.3 mg/dL was a negative predictor for isolated ITx and donor age >40 yr for L-ITx. Isolated ITx should be considered prior to liver disease for adults with intestinal failure; L-ITx is preferable for retransplantation. PMID:22192061

  13. Colitis Promotes Adaptation of an Intestinal Nematode: A Heligmosomoides Polygyrus Mouse Model System

    PubMed Central

    Donskow-Łysoniewska, Katarzyna; Bien, Justyna; Brodaczewska, Klaudia; Krawczak, Katarzyna; Doligalska, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The precise mechanism of the very effective therapeutic effect of gastrointestinal nematodes on some autoimmune diseases is not clearly understood and is currently being intensively investigated. Treatment with living helminths has been initiated to reverse intestinal immune-mediated diseases in humans. However, little attention has been paid to the phenotype of nematodes in the IBD-affected gut and the consequences of nematode adaptation. In the present study, exposure of Heligmosomoides polygyrus larvae to the changed cytokine milieu of the intestine during colitis reduced inflammation in an experimental model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)- induced colitis, but increased nematode establishment in the moderate-responder BALB/c mouse strain. We used mass spectrometry in combination with two-dimensional Western blotting to determine changes in protein expression and changes in nematode antigens recognized by IgG1 in mice with colitis. We show that nematode larvae immunogenicity is changed by colitis as soon as 6 days post-infection; IgG1 did not recognize highly conserved proteins Lev-11 (isoform 1 of tropomyosin α1 chain), actin-4 isoform or FTT-2 isoform a (14-3-3 family) protein. These results indicate that changes in the small intestine provoked by colitis directly influence the nematode proteome. The unrecognized proteins seem to be key antigenic epitopes able to induce protective immune responses. The proteome changes were associated with weak immune recognition and increased larval adaptation and worm growth, altered localization in the intestine and increased survival of males but reduced worm fecundity. In this report, the mechanisms influencing nematode survival and the consequences of changed immunogenicity that reflect the immune response at the site colonized by the parasite in mice with colitis are described. The results are relevant to the use of live parasites to ameliorate IBD. PMID:24167594

  14. Modulatory activity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus OLL2838 in a mouse model of intestinal immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Tasuku; Bergamo, Paolo; Maurano, Francesco; D'Arienzo, Rossana; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Bozzella, Giuseppina; Luongo, Diomira; Sashihara, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Takuya; Tanabe, Soichi; Rossi, Mauro

    2015-06-01

    Gut microbiota and probiotic strains play an important role in oral tolerance by modulating regulatory and effector cell components of the immune system. We have previously described the ability of Lactobacilli to influence both the innate and adaptive immunity to wheat gluten, a food antigen, in mouse. In this study, we further explored the immunomodulatory mechanisms elicited in this model by testing three specific probiotic strains, namely L. rhamnosus OLL2838, B. infantis ATCC15697 and S. thermophilus Sfi39. In vitro analysis showed the all tested strains induced maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs). However, only L. rhamnosus induced appreciable levels of IL-10 and nitric oxide productions, whereas S. thermophilus essentially elicited IL-12 and TNF-α. The anti-inflammatory ability of OLL2838 was then tested in vivo by adopting mice that develop a gluten-specific enteropathy. This model is characterized by villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, high levels of intestinal IFN-γ, increased cell apoptosis in lamina propria, and reduced intestinal total glutathione (GSHtot) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. We found that, following administration of OLL2838, GSHtot and GST activity were enhanced, whereas caspase-3 activity was reduced. On the contrary, this probiotic strain failed in recovering the normal histology and further increased intestinal IFN-γ. Confocal microscopy revealed the inability of the probiotic strain to appropriately interact with enterocytes of the small intestine and with Peyer's patches in treated mice. In conclusion, these data highlighted the potential of L. rhamnosus OLL2838 to recover specific toxicity parameters induced by gluten in enteropathic mice through mechanisms that involve induction of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:25623030

  15. Zinc sulfide in intestinal cell granules of Ancylostoma caninum adults

    SciTech Connect

    Gianotti, A.J.; Clark, D.T.; Dash, J. )

    1991-04-01

    A source of confusion has existed since the turn of the century about the reddish brown, weakly birefringent 'sphaerocrystals' located in the intestines of strongyle nematodes, Strongylus and Ancylostoma. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometric analyses were used for accurate determination of the crystalline order and elemental composition of the granules in the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The composition of the intestinal pigmented granules was identified unequivocally as zinc sulfide. It seems most probable that the granules serve to detoxify high levels of metallic ions (specifically zinc) present due to the large intake of host blood.

  16. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration. PMID:26487778

  17. Immunohistochemical study of the membrane skeletal protein, membrane protein palmitoylated 6 (MPP6), in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Akio; Saitoh, Yurika; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Ohno, Shinichi; Terada, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    The membrane protein palmitoylated (MPP) family belongs to the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family. MPP1 interacts with the protein 4.1 family member, 4.1R, as a membrane skeletal protein complex in erythrocytes. We previously described the interaction of another MPP family, MPP6, with 4.1G in the mouse peripheral nervous system. In the present study, the immunolocalization of MPP6 in the mouse small intestine was examined and compared with that of E-cadherin, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, and 4.1B, which we previously investigated in intestinal epithelial cells. The immunolocalization of MPP6 was also assessed in the small intestines of 4.1B-deficient (-/-) mice. In the small intestine, Western blotting revealed that the molecular weight of MPP6 was approximately 55-kDa, and MPP6 was immunostained under the cell membranes in the basolateral portions of almost all epithelial cells from the crypts to the villi. The immunostaining pattern of MPP6 in epithelial cells was similar to that of E-cadherin, but differed from that of ZO-1. In intestinal epithelial cells, the immunostained area of MPP6 was slightly different from that of 4.1B, which was restricted to the intestinal villi. The immunolocalization of MPP6 in small intestinal epithelial cells was similar between 4.1B(-/-) mice and 4.1B(+/+) mice. In the immunoprecipitation study, another MAGUK family protein, calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK), was shown to molecularly interact with MPP6. Thus, we herein showed the immunolocalization and interaction proteins of MPP6 in the mouse small intestine, and also that 4.1B in epithelial cells was not essential for the sorting of MPP6. PMID:26496923

  18. Isolation, Culture, and Functional Characterization of Adult Mouse Cardiomyoctyes

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Evan Lee; Balla, Cristina; Franchino, Hannabeth; Melman, Yonathan

    2013-01-01

    The use of primary cardiomyocytes (CMs) in culture has provided a powerful complement to murine models of heart disease in advancing our understanding of heart disease. In particular, the ability to study ion homeostasis, ion channel function, cellular excitability and excitation-contraction coupling and their alterations in diseased conditions and by disease-causing mutations have led to significant insights into cardiac diseases. Furthermore, the lack of an adequate immortalized cell line to mimic adult CMs, and the limitations of neonatal CMs (which lack many of the structural and functional biomechanics characteristic of adult CMs) in culture have hampered our understanding of the complex interplay between signaling pathways, ion channels and contractile properties in the adult heart strengthening the importance of studying adult isolated cardiomyocytes. Here, we present methods for the isolation, culture, manipulation of gene expression by adenoviral-expressed proteins, and subsequent functional analysis of cardiomyocytes from the adult mouse. The use of these techniques will help to develop mechanistic insight into signaling pathways that regulate cellular excitability, Ca2+ dynamics and contractility and provide a much more physiologically relevant characterization of cardiovascular disease. PMID:24084584

  19. Anti-Siglec-F antibody inhibits oral egg allergen induced intestinal eosinophilic inflammation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dae Jin; Cho, Jae Youn; Miller, Marina; Strangman, Wendy; Zhang, Mai; Varki, Ajit; Broide, David H

    2009-01-01

    Siglec-F is a sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-superfamily receptor that is highly expressed on eosinophils. We have used a mouse model of oral egg ovalbumin (OVA)-induced eosinophilic inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa associated with diarrhea and weight loss to determine whether administering an anti-Siglec-F antibody would reduce levels of intestinal mucosal eosinophilic inflammation. Mice administered the anti-Siglec-F antibody had significantly lower levels of intestinal eosinophilic inflammation, and this was associated with reduced intestinal permeability changes, normalization of intestinal villous crypt height, and restoration of weight gain. The reduced numbers of intestinal eosinophils in anti-Siglec-F antibody treated mice was associated with significantly reduced numbers of bone marrow and peripheral blood eosinophils, but was not associated with significant changes in the numbers of proliferating or apoptotic jejunal eosinophils. In addition, the anti-Siglec-F Ab reduced Th2 cytokines and IgE levels. Overall, these studies demonstrate that administration of an anti-Siglec-F antibody significantly reduces levels of eosinophilic inflammation in the intestinal mucosa and that this was associated with reduced intestinal permeability changes, normalization of intestinal villous crypt height, and restoration of weight gain. PMID:19135419

  20. Dedicated immunosensing of the mouse intestinal epithelium facilitated by a pair of genetically coupled lectin-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Leibelt, S; Friede, M E; Rohe, C; Gütle, D; Rutkowski, E; Weigert, A; Kveberg, L; Vaage, J T; Hornef, M W; Steinle, A

    2015-03-01

    The integrity of the intestinal epithelium is constantly surveyed by a peculiar subset of innate-like T lymphocytes embedded in the epithelial cell layer, hence called intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). IELs are thought to act as "first-line" sentinels sensing the state of adjacent epithelial cells via both T-cell receptors and auxiliary receptors. Auxiliary receptors modulating IEL activity include C-type lectin-like receptors encoded in the natural killer gene complex such as NKG2D. Here, we report that the CTLR Nkrp1g is expressed by a subpopulation of mouse CD103(+) IELs allowing immunosensing of the intestinal epithelium through ligation of the genetically coupled CTLR Clr-f that is almost exclusively expressed on differentiated intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Most of these Nkrp1g-expressing IELs exhibit a γδTCR(bright)Nkg2a(-) phenotype and are intimately associated with the intestinal epithelium. As Clr-f expression strongly inhibits effector functions of Nkrp1g-expressing cells and is upregulated upon poly(I:C) challenge, Clr-f molecules may quench reactivity of these IELs towards the epithelial barrier that is constantly provoked by microbial and antigenic stimuli. Altogether, we here newly characterize a genetically linked C-type lectin-like receptor/ligand pair with a highly restricted tissue expression that apparently evolved to allow for a dedicated immunosurveillance of the mouse intestinal epithelium. PMID:24985083

  1. Mechanical Testing of Mouse Carotid Arteries: from Newborn to Adult

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Mazyar; Le, Victoria P.; Wagenseil, Jessica E.

    2012-01-01

    The large conducting arteries in vertebrates are composed of a specialized extracellular matrix designed to provide pulse dampening and reduce the work performed by the heart. The mix of matrix proteins determines the passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall1. When the matrix proteins are altered in development, aging, disease or injury, the arterial wall remodels, changing the mechanical properties and leading to subsequent cardiac adaptation2. In normal development, the remodeling leads to a functional cardiac and cardiovascular system optimized for the needs of the adult organism. In disease, the remodeling often leads to a negative feedback cycle that can cause cardiac failure and death. By quantifying passive arterial mechanical properties in development and disease, we can begin to understand the normal remodeling process to recreate it in tissue engineering and the pathological remodeling process to test disease treatments. Mice are useful models for studying passive arterial mechanics in development and disease. They have a relatively short lifespan (mature adults by 3 months and aged adults by 2 years), so developmental3 and aging studies4 can be carried out over a limited time course. The advances in mouse genetics provide numerous genotypes and phenotypes to study changes in arterial mechanics with disease progression5 and disease treatment6. Mice can also be manipulated experimentally to study the effects of changes in hemodynamic parameters on the arterial remodeling process7. One drawback of the mouse model, especially for examining young ages, is the size of the arteries. We describe a method for passive mechanical testing of carotid arteries from mice aged 3 days to adult (approximately 90 days). We adapt a commercial myograph system to mount the arteries and perform multiple pressure or axial stretch protocols on each specimen. We discuss suitable protocols for each age, the necessary measurements and provide example data. We also include

  2. Mouse intestinal innate immune responses altered by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Zhu, Xiaoping; Chen, Shuai; Li, Tiejun; Wang, Shengping; Tang, Yulong; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2014-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of human and porcine morbidity and mortality. The current study was conducted to identify intestinal immunity that is altered in a mouse model of ETEC infection. Innate immune responses and inflammation were analyzed. The activation of signal transduction pathways, including toll like receptor 4 (TLR-4)-nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), was analyzed using immunoblotting and PCR array analyses. We found that ETEC infection promoted the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines through the activation of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Meanwhile, ETEC infection affected sIgA transportation and Paneth cell function. These data improve our understanding of how ETEC causes disease in animals. PMID:25267358

  3. Effect of Lactobacillus salivarius Bacteriocin Abp118 on the Mouse and Pig Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Riboulet-Bisson, Eliette; Sturme, Mark H. J.; Jeffery, Ian B.; O'Donnell, Michelle M.; Neville, B. Anne; Forde, Brian M.; Claesson, Marcus J.; Harris, Hugh; Gardiner, Gillian E.; Casey, Patrick G.; Lawlor, Peadar G.; O'Toole, Paul W.; Ross, R. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacilli are Gram-positive bacteria that are a subdominant element in the human gastrointestinal microbiota, and which are commonly used in the food industry. Some lactobacilli are considered probiotic, and have been associated with health benefits. However, there is very little culture-independent information on how consumed probiotic microorganisms might affect the entire intestinal microbiota. We therefore studied the impact of the administration of Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118, a microorganism well characterized for its probiotic properties, on the composition of the intestinal microbiota in two model animals. UCC118 has anti-infective activity due to production of the bacteriocin Abp118, a broad-spectrum class IIb bacteriocin, which we hypothesized could impact the microbiota. Mice and pigs were administered wild-type (WT) L. salivarius UCC118 cells, or a mutant lacking bacteriocin production. The microbiota composition was determined by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from faeces. The data show that L. salivarius UCC118 administration had no significant effect on proportions of major phyla comprising the mouse microbiota, whether the strain was producing bacteriocin or not. However, L. salivarius UCC118 WT administration led to a significant decrease in Spirochaetes levels, the third major phylum in the untreated pig microbiota. In both pigs and mice, L. salivarius UCC118 administration had an effect on Firmicutes genus members. This effect was not observed when the mutant strain was administered, and was thus associated with bacteriocin production. Surprisingly, in both models, L. salivarius UCC118 administration and production of Abp118 had an effect on Gram-negative microorganisms, even though Abp118 is normally not active in vitro against this group of microorganisms. Thus L. salivarius UCC118 administration has a significant but subtle impact on mouse and pig microbiota, by a mechanism that seems at least partially bacteriocin

  4. Exploration and visualization of connectivity in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Feng, David; Lau, Chris; Ng, Lydia; Li, Yang; Kuan, Leonard; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a mesoscale whole brain axonal projection atlas of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. All data were aligned to a common template in 3D space to generate a comprehensive and quantitative database of inter-areal and cell-type-specific projections. A suite of computational tools were developed to search and visualize the projection labeling experiments, available at http://connectivity.brain-map.org. We present three use cases illustrating how these publicly-available tools can be used to perform analyses of long range brain region connectivity. The use cases make extensive use of advanced visualization tools integrated with the atlas including projection density histograms, 3D computed anterograde and retrograde projection paths, and multi-specimen projection composites. These tools offer convenient access to detailed axonal projection information in the adult mouse brain and the ability to perform data analysis and visualization of projection fields and neuroanatomy in an integrated manner. PMID:25637033

  5. Intestinal toxemia botulism in 3 adults, Ontario, Canada, 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Yolanda D; Middleton, Dean; Whitfield, Yvonne; Tyndel, Felix; Haider, Shariq; Spiegelman, Jamie; Swartz, Richard H; Nelder, Mark P; Baker, Stacey L; Landry, Lisa; Maceachern, Ross; Deamond, Sherri; Ross, Lorrie; Peters, Garth; Baird, Michelle; Rose, David; Sanders, Greg; Austin, John W

    2012-01-01

    Five cases of intestinal toxemia botulism in adults were identified within an 18-month period in or near Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We describe findings for 3 of the 5 case-patients. Clinical samples contained Clostridium botulinum spores and botulinum neurotoxins (types A and B) for extended periods (range 41-61 days), indicative of intestinal toxemia botulism. Patients' clinical signs improved with supportive care and administration of botulinum antitoxin. Peanut butter from the residence of 1 case-patient yielded C. botulinum type A, which corresponded with type A spores found in the patient's feces. The food and clinical isolates from this case-patient could not be distinguished by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Two of the case-patients had Crohn disease and had undergone previous bowel surgery, which may have contributed to infection with C. botulinum. These cases reinforce the view that an underlying gastrointestinal condition is a risk factor for adult intestinal toxemia botulism. PMID:22257757

  6. Wandering spleen with gastric volvulus and intestinal non-rotation in an adult male patient.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Minako; Kohda, Eiichi; Iizuka, Yuo; Nagamoto, Masashi; Ishii, Tomotaka; Saida, Yoshihisa; Shimizu, Norikazu; Gomi, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    We report an extremely rare case of wandering spleen (WS) complicated with gastric volvulus and intestinal non-rotation in a male adult. A 22-year-old man who had been previously treated for Wilson disease was admitted with severe abdominal pain. Radiological findings showed WS in the midline of the pelvic area. The stomach was mesenteroaxially twisted and intestinal non-rotation was observed. Radiology results did not show any evidence of splenic or gastrointestinal (GI) infarction. Elective emergency laparoscopy confirmed WS and intestinal non-rotation; however, gastric volvulus was not observed. It was suspected that the stomach had untwisted when gastric and laparoscopic tubes were inserted. Surgery is strongly recommended for WS because of the high risk of serious complications; however, some asymptomatic adult patients are still treated conservatively, such as the patient in this study. The present case is reported with reference to the literature. PMID:24349711

  7. Wandering spleen with gastric volvulus and intestinal non-rotation in an adult male patient

    PubMed Central

    Kohda, Eiichi; Iizuka, Yuo; Nagamoto, Masashi; Ishii, Tomotaka; Saida, Yoshihisa; Shimizu, Norikazu; Gomi, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    We report an extremely rare case of wandering spleen (WS) complicated with gastric volvulus and intestinal non-rotation in a male adult. A 22-year-old man who had been previously treated for Wilson disease was admitted with severe abdominal pain. Radiological findings showed WS in the midline of the pelvic area. The stomach was mesenteroaxially twisted and intestinal non-rotation was observed. Radiology results did not show any evidence of splenic or gastrointestinal (GI) infarction. Elective emergency laparoscopy confirmed WS and intestinal non-rotation; however, gastric volvulus was not observed. It was suspected that the stomach had untwisted when gastric and laparoscopic tubes were inserted. Surgery is strongly recommended for WS because of the high risk of serious complications; however, some asymptomatic adult patients are still treated conservatively, such as the patient in this study. The present case is reported with reference to the literature. PMID:24349711

  8. Differential Apoptosis Radiosensitivity of Neural Progenitors in Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Qing; Cheng, Zoey; Wong, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian tissue-specific stem cells and progenitors demonstrate differential DNA damage response. Neural progenitors in dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are known to undergo apoptosis after irradiation. Using a mouse model of hippocampal neuronal development, we characterized the apoptosis sensitivity of the different neural progenitor subpopulations in adult mouse dentate gyrus after irradiation. Two different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms were used for cell fate mapping. We identified two apoptosis sensitive neural progenitor subpopulations after irradiation. The first represented non-proliferative and non-newborn neuroblasts and immature neurons that expressed doublecortin, calretinin or both. The second consisted of proliferative intermediate neural progenitors. The putative radial glia-like neural stem cells or type-1 cells, regardless of proliferation status, were apoptosis resistant after irradiation. There was no evidence of radiation-induced apoptosis in the absence of the Trp53 (p53) gene but absence of Cdkn1a (p21) did not alter the apoptotic response. Upregulation of nuclear p53 was observed in neuroblasts after irradiation. We conclude that adult hippocampal neural progenitors may demonstrate differential p53-dependent apoptosis sensitivity after irradiation. PMID:27331809

  9. Differential Apoptosis Radiosensitivity of Neural Progenitors in Adult Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Qing; Cheng, Zoey; Wong, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian tissue-specific stem cells and progenitors demonstrate differential DNA damage response. Neural progenitors in dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are known to undergo apoptosis after irradiation. Using a mouse model of hippocampal neuronal development, we characterized the apoptosis sensitivity of the different neural progenitor subpopulations in adult mouse dentate gyrus after irradiation. Two different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms were used for cell fate mapping. We identified two apoptosis sensitive neural progenitor subpopulations after irradiation. The first represented non-proliferative and non-newborn neuroblasts and immature neurons that expressed doublecortin, calretinin or both. The second consisted of proliferative intermediate neural progenitors. The putative radial glia-like neural stem cells or type-1 cells, regardless of proliferation status, were apoptosis resistant after irradiation. There was no evidence of radiation-induced apoptosis in the absence of the Trp53 (p53) gene but absence of Cdkn1a (p21) did not alter the apoptotic response. Upregulation of nuclear p53 was observed in neuroblasts after irradiation. We conclude that adult hippocampal neural progenitors may demonstrate differential p53-dependent apoptosis sensitivity after irradiation. PMID:27331809

  10. The sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells controls organ size and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Bruno; Khadayate, Sanjay; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Sex differences in physiology and disease susceptibility are commonly attributed to developmental and/or hormonal factors, but there is increasing realisation that cell-intrinsic mechanisms play important and persistent roles1,2. Here we use the Drosophila melanogaster intestine to investigate the nature and significance of cellular sex in an adult somatic organ in vivo. We find that the adult intestinal epithelium is a cellular mosaic of different sex differentiation pathways, and displays extensive sex differences in expression of genes with roles in growth and metabolism. Cell-specific reversals of the sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells uncover its key roles in controlling organ size, its reproductive plasticity and its response to genetically induced tumours. Unlike previous examples of sexually dimorphic somatic stem cell activity, the sex differences in intestinal stem cell behaviour arise from intrinsic mechanisms, which control cell cycle duration and involve a new doublesex- and fruitless-independent branch of the sex differentiation pathway downstream of transformer. Together, our findings indicate that the plasticity of an adult somatic organ is reversibly controlled by its sexual identity, imparted by a new mechanism that may be active in more tissues than previously recognised. PMID:26887495

  11. The sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells controls organ size and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hudry, Bruno; Khadayate, Sanjay; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2016-02-18

    Sex differences in physiology and disease susceptibility are commonly attributed to developmental and/or hormonal factors, but there is increasing realization that cell-intrinsic mechanisms play important and persistent roles. Here we use the Drosophila melanogaster intestine to investigate the nature and importance of cellular sex in an adult somatic organ in vivo. We find that the adult intestinal epithelium is a cellular mosaic of different sex differentiation pathways, and displays extensive sex differences in expression of genes with roles in growth and metabolism. Cell-specific reversals of the sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells uncovers the key role this identity has in controlling organ size, reproductive plasticity and response to genetically induced tumours. Unlike previous examples of sexually dimorphic somatic stem cell activity, the sex differences in intestinal stem cell behaviour arise from intrinsic mechanisms that control cell cycle duration and involve a new doublesex- and fruitless-independent branch of the sex differentiation pathway downstream of transformer. Together, our findings indicate that the plasticity of an adult somatic organ is reversibly controlled by its sexual identity, imparted by a new mechanism that may be active in more tissues than previously recognized. PMID:26887495

  12. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Carol F.; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. PMID:26111446

  13. Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue After Proton Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, A.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation in space, including types from solar particle events (SPE's), poses serious health risks to astronauts and is especially dangerous for long duration missions. Protons are the most abundant particles in deep space and to date there is little known about the details of the negative consequences crew members will face upon exposure to them. This ongoing project involves a mouse model subjected to several minutes of proton radiation at an energy of 250 MeV and doses of 0 Gy, 0.1 Gy, 1 Gy, and 2 Gy. The gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the small intestine was isolated and flash-frozen. Three specimens per dose were studied. Tissue was homogenized and RNA was isolated in order for cDNA synthesis and real-time PCR to be performed. Gene expression changes are currently being analyzed specific to mouse apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry will be used to confirm any significant changes found in the analyses. Immunohistochemistry is also being used to observe gamma H2AX staining to learn of any DNA damage that occurred as a result of proton exposure. We expect to see increased DNA damage due to proton exposure. Finally, histopathologic observation of the tissue will be completed using standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes. Increased apoptosis is expected to be seen in the tissues which is typical of radiation damage. Observations will be confirmed by a pathologist.

  14. Ricin crosses polarized human intestinal cells and intestines of ricin-gavaged mice without evident damage and then disseminates to mouse kidneys.

    PubMed

    Flora, Alyssa D; Teel, Louise D; Smith, Mark A; Sinclair, James F; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; O'Brien, Alison D

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potent toxin found in the beans of Ricinus communis and is often lethal for animals and humans when aerosolized or injected and causes significant morbidity and occasional death when ingested. Ricin has been proposed as a bioweapon because of its lethal properties, environmental stability, and accessibility. In oral intoxication, the process by which the toxin transits across intestinal mucosa is not completely understood. To address this question, we assessed the impact of ricin on the gastrointestinal tract and organs of mice after dissemination of toxin from the gut. We first showed that ricin adhered in a specific pattern to human small bowel intestinal sections, the site within the mouse gut in which a variable degree of damage has been reported by others. We then monitored the movement of ricin across polarized human HCT-8 intestinal monolayers grown in transwell inserts and in HCT-8 cell organoids. We observed that, in both systems, ricin trafficked through the cells without apparent damage until 24 hours post intoxication. We delivered a lethal dose of purified fluorescently-labeled ricin to mice by oral gavage and followed transit of the toxin from the gastrointestinal tracts to the internal organs by in vivo imaging of whole animals over time and ex vivo imaging of organs at various time points. In addition, we harvested organs from unlabeled ricin-gavaged mice and assessed them for the presence of ricin and for histological damage. Finally, we compared serum chemistry values from buffer-treated versus ricin-intoxicated animals. We conclude that ricin transverses human intestinal cells and mouse intestinal cells in situ prior to any indication of enterocyte damage and that ricin rapidly reaches the kidneys of intoxicated mice. We also propose that mice intoxicated orally with ricin likely die from distributive shock. PMID:23874986

  15. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  16. Effects of Rice Bran Oil on the Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolism of Isoflavones in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Motoi; Hori, Sachiko; Hoshi, Chigusa; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of rice bran oil (RBO) on mouse intestinal microbiota and urinary isoflavonoids. Dietary RBO affects intestinal cholesterol absorption. Intestinal microbiota seem to play an important role in isoflavone metabolism. We hypothesized that dietary RBO changes the metabolism of isoflavonoids and intestinal microbiota in mice. Male mice were randomly divided into two groups: those fed a 0.05% daidzein with 10% RBO diet (RO group) and those fed a 0.05% daidzein with 10% lard control diet (LO group) for 30 days. Urinary amounts of daidzein and dihydrodaidzein were significantly lower in the RO group than in the LO group. The ratio of equol/daidzein was significantly higher in the RO group (p < 0.01) than in the LO group. The amount of fecal bile acids was significantly greater in the RO group than in the LO group. The composition of cecal microbiota differed between the RO and LO groups. The occupation ratios of Lactobacillales were significantly higher in the RO group (p < 0.05). Significant positive correlation (r = 0.591) was observed between the occupation ratios of Lactobacillales and fecal bile acid content of two dietary groups. This study suggests that dietary rice bran oil has the potential to affect the metabolism of daidzein by altering the metabolic activity of intestinal microbiota. PMID:22949864

  17. [Hirschsprung's disease associated with intestinal malrotation in an adult and a review of literature].

    PubMed

    Ko, S; Fujii, H; Yamamoto, K; Sado, S; Yamamoto, M; Nakano, H

    1991-04-01

    A 19-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic because of abdominal distention and severe constipation from infancy. Barium enema revealed a grossly dilated descending colon in the right of the abdomen. At laparotomy, with diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease associated with non-obstructing intestinal malrotation (non-rotation type), division of the adhesion between caecum and duodenum, and modified Duhamel's procedure were performed. The association of Hirschsprung's disease and intestinal malrotation is rare, and to date only 20 infantile case have been reported. The present case would be the first adult case. PMID:1870577

  18. An anatomic gene expression atlas of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Overly, Caroline C; Dong, Hong-Wei; Kuan, Chihchau; Pathak, Sayan; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Bohland, Jason W; Bokil, Hemant; Mitra, Partha P; Puelles, Luis; Hohmann, John; Anderson, David J; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Studying gene expression provides a powerful means of understanding structure-function relationships in the nervous system. The availability of genome-scale in situ hybridization datasets enables new possibilities for understanding brain organization based on gene expression patterns. The Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA) is a new relational atlas revealing the genetic architecture of the adult C57Bl/6J mouse brain based on spatial correlations across expression data for thousands of genes in the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). The AGEA includes three discovery tools for examining neuroanatomical relationships and boundaries: (1) three-dimensional expression-based correlation maps, (2) a hierarchical transcriptome-based parcellation of the brain and (3) a facility to retrieve from the ABA specific genes showing enriched expression in local correlated domains. The utility of this atlas is illustrated by analysis of genetic organization in the thalamus, striatum and cerebral cortex. The AGEA is a publicly accessible online computational tool integrated with the ABA (http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea). PMID:19219037

  19. Quantitative Targeted Absolute Proteomics of Transporters and Pharmacoproteomics-Based Reconstruction of P-Glycoprotein Function in Mouse Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Takanori; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a pharmacokinetic model integrating in vitro mdr1a efflux activity (which we previously reported) with in vitro/in vivo differences in protein expression level can reconstruct intestinal mdr1a function. In situ intestinal permeability-surface area product ratio between wild-type and mdr1a/1b (-/-) mice is one of the parameters used to describe intestinal mdr1a function. The reconstructed ratios of six mdr1a substrates (dexamethasone, digoxin, loperamide, quinidine, verapamil, vinblastine) and one nonsubstrate (diazepam) were consistent with the observed values reported by Adachi et al. within 2.1-fold difference. Thus, intestinal mdr1a function can be reconstructed by our pharmacoproteomic modeling approach. Furthermore, we evaluated regional differences in protein expression levels of mouse intestinal transporters. Sixteen (mdr1a, mrp4, bcrp, abcg5, abcg8, glut1, 4f2hc, sglt1, lat2, pept1, mct1, slc22a18, ostβ, villin1, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, γ-gtp) out of 46 target molecules were detected by employing our established quantitative targeted absolute proteomics technique. The protein expression amounts of mdr1a and bcrp increased progressively from duodenum to ileum. Sglt1, lat2, and 4f2hc were highly expressed in jejunum and ileum. Mct1 and ostβ were highly expressed in ileum. The quantitative expression profiles established here should be helpful to understand and predict intestinal transporter functions. PMID:27276518

  20. Feeding natural hydrophilic bile acids inhibits intestinal cholesterol absorption: studies in the gallstone-susceptible mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, David Q-H; Tazuma, Susumu; Cohen, David E; Carey, Martin C

    2003-09-01

    We explored the influence of the hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of a series of natural bile acids on cholesterol absorption in the mouse. Male C57L/J mice were fed standard chow or chow supplemented with 0.5% cholic; chenodeoxycholic; deoxycholic; dehydrocholic; hyocholic; hyodeoxycholic; alpha-, beta-, or omega-muricholic; ursocholic; or ursodeoxycholic acids for 7 days. Biliary bile salts were measured by reverse-phase HPLC, and hydrophobicity indices were estimated by Heuman's method. Cholesterol absorption efficiency was determined by a plasma dual-isotope ratio method. In mice fed chow, natural proportions of tauro-beta-muricholate (42 +/- 6%) and taurocholate (50 +/- 7%) with a hydrophobicity index of -0.35 +/- 0.04 produced cholesterol absorption of 37 +/- 5%. Because bacterial and especially hepatic biotransformations of specific bile acids occurred, hydrophobicity indices of the resultant bile salt pools differed from fed bile acids. We observed a significant positive correlation between hydrophobicity indices of the bile salt pool and percent cholesterol absorption. The principal mechanism whereby hydrophilic bile acids inhibit cholesterol absorption appears to be diminution of intraluminal micellar cholesterol solubilization. Gene expression of intestinal sterol efflux transporters Abcg5 and Abcg8 was upregulated by feeding cholic acid but not by hydrophilic beta-muricholic acid nor by hydrophobic deoxycholic acid. We conclude that the hydrophobicity of the bile salt pool predicts the effects of individual fed bile acids on intestinal cholesterol absorption. Natural alpha- and beta-muricholic acids are the most powerful inhibitors of cholesterol absorption in mice and might act as potent cholesterol-lowering agents for prevention of cholesterol deposition diseases in humans. PMID:12748061

  1. Exposure to Heavy Ion Radiation Induces Persistent Oxidative Stress in Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to radiolysis of water molecules and is short lived. Persistent oxidative stress has also been observed after radiation exposure and is implicated in the late effects of radiation. The goal of this study was to determine if long-term oxidative stress in freshly isolated mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is dependent on radiation quality at a dose relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Mice (C57BL/6J; 6 to 8 weeks; female) were irradiated with 2 Gy of γ-rays, a low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, and intestinal tissues and IEC were collected 1 year after radiation exposure. Intracellular ROS, mitochondrial function, and antioxidant activity in IEC were studied by flow cytometry and biochemical assays. Oxidative DNA damage, cell death, and mitogenic activity in IEC were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Effects of γ radiation were compared to 56Fe radiation (iso-toxic dose: 1.6 Gy; energy: 1000 MeV/nucleon; LET: 148 keV/µm), we used as representative of high-LET radiation, since it's one of the important sources of high Z and high energy (HZE) radiation in cosmic rays. Radiation quality affected the level of persistent oxidative stress with higher elevation of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial superoxide in high-LET 56Fe radiation compared to unirradiated controls and γ radiation. NADPH oxidase activity, mitochondrial membrane damage, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were greater in 56Fe-irradiated mice. Compared to γ radiation oxidative DNA damage was higher, cell death ratio was unchanged, and mitotic activity was increased after 56Fe radiation. Taken together our results indicate that long-term functional dysregulation of mitochondria and increased NADPH oxidase activity are major contributing factors towards heavy ion radiation-induced persistent oxidative stress in IEC with potential for neoplastic transformation. PMID

  2. Strategies for Profiling Single Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Targeted Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, W.; Box, A.; Staehling, K.; Wang, F.; Li, L.; Zueckert-Gaudenz, K.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted gene expression profiling of single cells permits the study of heterogeneity in cell populations. Here, a pool of mouse intestinal crypt-base CD44+/GRP78- cells was collected by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Aliquots were either loaded onto Fluidigm's C1 System for microfluidic cell capture and cDNA synthesis in nanoliter volumes, or flow-sorted directly into individual PCR plate wells for cDNA synthesis in microliter volumes. The pre-amplified cDNAs were transferred to the BioMark System for EvaGreen real-time PCR. The two sample preparation methods were compared by expression analysis of 86 genes, using Fluidigm's SINGuLAR R-scripts. After outlier identification, gene expression values from 42% of the “C1” and 92% of the “flow” wells were retained. For 55 of the genes, expression was measured in both the “C1” and “flow” cells. Genes with a high variance in expression likely stemming from the sample preparation method and/or unspecific amplification were removed. Hierarchical clustering on the remaining data revealed gene clusters that contributed to the expected Lgr5hi and Lgr5lo intestinal stem cell (ISC) populations as well as a small population of differentiated cells. The subpopulations could be defined by either method. However, as ISCs quickly undergo apoptosis at room temperature, the use of the C1 System provided no clear advantage over the direct sorting of the fragile cells into lysis/RT reaction buffer. Specifically, the C1 quality control step to verify the number of captured cells and cell viability was omitted to accelerate processing.

  3. The Developmental Intestinal Regulator ELT-2 Controls p38-Dependent Immune Responses in Adult C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Block, Dena H. S.; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Kang, Hae Sung; Carlisle, Jolie A.; Hanganu, Alexandru; Lai, Ty Yu-Jen; Shapira, Michael

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors play critical roles in cellular differentiation and development. However, their roles in mature tissues are less understood. In C. elegans larvae, the transcription factor ELT-2 regulates terminal differentiation of the intestine. It is also expressed in the adult intestine, where it was suggested to maintain intestinal structure and function, and where it was additionally shown to contribute to infection resistance. To study the function of elt-2 in adults we characterized elt-2-dependent gene expression following its knock-down specifically in adults. Microarray analysis identified two ELT-2-regulated gene subsets: one, enriched for hydrolytic enzymes, pointed at regulation of constitutive digestive functions as a dominant role of adult elt-2; the second was enriched for immune genes that are induced in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Focusing on the latter, we used genetic analyses coupled to survival assays and quantitative RT-PCR to interrogate the mechanism(s) through which elt-2 contributes to immunity. We show that elt-2 controls p38-dependent gene induction, cooperating with two p38-activated transcription factors, ATF-7 and SKN-1. This demonstrates a mechanism through which the constitutively nuclear elt-2 can impact induced responses, and play a dominant role in C. elegans immunity. PMID:26016853

  4. Function of GATA Factors in the Adult Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rena; Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Zong, Yiwei; Wang, Liqing; Russo, Pierre; Hancock, Wayne; Stanger, Ben Z.; Hardison, Ross C.; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2013-01-01

    GATA transcription factors and their Friend of Gata (FOG) cofactors control the development of diverse tissues. GATA4 and GATA6 are essential for the expansion of the embryonic liver bud, but their expression patterns and functions in the adult liver are unclear. We characterized the expression of GATA and FOG factors in whole mouse liver and purified hepatocytes. GATA4, GATA6, and FOG1 are the most prominently expressed family members in whole liver and hepatocytes. GATA4 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 4409 occupied sites, associated with genes enriched in ontologies related to liver function, including lipid and glucose metabolism. However, hepatocyte-specific excision of Gata4 had little impact on gross liver architecture and function, even under conditions of regenerative stress, and, despite the large number of GATA4 occupied genes, resulted in relatively few changes in gene expression. To address possible redundancy between GATA4 and GATA6, both factors were conditionally excised. Surprisingly, combined Gata4,6 loss did not exacerbate the phenotype resulting from Gata4 loss alone. This points to the presence of an unusually robust transcriptional network in adult hepatocytes that ensures the maintenance of liver function. PMID:24367609

  5. A Case of Advanced Descending Colon Cancer in an Adult Patient with Intestinal Malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Masaki; Sawatsubashi, Yusuke; Minagawa, Noritaka; Torigoe, Takayuki; Hirata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    This report presents an operative case of advanced descending colon cancer in an adult patient with intestinal malrotation. A 63-year-old Japanese male was suffering from left side abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and constipation. An endoscopic examination revealed an advanced tumor in the descending colon. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed the thickening of the descending colon wall and superior mesenteric vein rotation. An opaque enema detected severe stenosis of the descending colon. An abdominal X-ray examination revealed the dilation of the colon and small intestine with niveau. At the insertion of an ileus tube, the C-loop of the duodenum was observed to be absent and the small intestine was located on the right side of the abdomen. After the decompression of the bowel contents, laparotomy was performed. Descending colon cancer was observed to have directly invaded the left side of the transverse colon. Left hemicolectomy, lymph node dissection, and appendectomy were performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged from the hospital on the 16th day after surgery. This report presents a rare operative case of descending colon cancer in an adult patient with intestinal malrotation. PMID:27042367

  6. Guidelines for management of home parenteral support in adult chronic intestinal failure patients.

    PubMed

    Messing, Bernard; Joly, Francisca

    2006-02-01

    Management of home parenteral support in adult benign but chronic intestinal failure patients requires a nutrition support team using disease-specific pathways. Education of patients to ensure they self manage home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is cornerstone to obtain minimal rate of technical complications and improvement in quality of life. Nutritive mixtures, compounded by pharmacists in single "all-in-one" bags, must be tailored according to the nutritional and intestinal status of individual patients with definition of macronutrients and water-electrolyte needs, respectively. Each PN cycle should be complete in essential nutrients to be nutritionally efficient and should have sufficient amounts of amino acids, dextrose, water, minerals, and micronutrients to avoid deficiency. When the nutritional goal is achieved, a minimum number of PN cycles per week should be implemented, guided ideally by digestive balance(s) (In-Out) of macronutrients and minerals of individual patients. Indeed, HPN is, in most cases, a complementary nonexclusive mode of nutritional support. In short gut patients--who represent 75% of chronic intestinal failure patients--encouraging enteral feeding decrease PN delivery and the risk of metabolic liver disease associated with HPN. In short gut patients with no severe renal impairment, blood citrulline dosage, in association with the remnant anatomy, is a tool to delineate transient from permanent intestinal failure. The latter group includes candidates for trophic gut factors and rehabilitative or reconstructive surgery, including intestinal transplantation. Thus, outcome improvement for intestinal failure patients needs intestinal failure teams having expertise in all medical and surgical aspects of this field. PMID:16473071

  7. Xylitol affects the intestinal microbiota and metabolism of daidzein in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motoi; Hoshi, Chigusa; Hori, Sachiko

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of xylitol on mouse intestinal microbiota and urinary isoflavonoids. Xylitol is classified as a sugar alcohol and used as a food additive. The intestinal microbiota seems to play an important role in isoflavone metabolism. Xylitol feeding appears to affect the gut microbiota. We hypothesized that dietary xylitol changes intestinal microbiota and, therefore, the metabolism of isoflavonoids in mice. Male mice were randomly divided into two groups: those fed a 0.05% daidzein with 5% xylitol diet (XD group) and those fed a 0.05% daidzein-containing control diet (CD group) for 28 days. Plasma total cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). Urinary amounts of equol were significantly higher in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). The fecal lipid contents (% dry weight) were significantly greater in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.01). The cecal microbiota differed between the two dietary groups. The occupation ratios of Bacteroides were significantly greater in the CD than in the XD group (p < 0.05). This study suggests that xylitol has the potential to affect the metabolism of daidzein by altering the metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiota and/or gut environment. Given that equol affects bone health, dietary xylitol plus isoflavonoids may exert a favorable effect on bone health. PMID:24336061

  8. Xylitol Affects the Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolism of Daidzein in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Motoi; Hoshi, Chigusa; Hori, Sachiko

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of xylitol on mouse intestinal microbiota and urinary isoflavonoids. Xylitol is classified as a sugar alcohol and used as a food additive. The intestinal microbiota seems to play an important role in isoflavone metabolism. Xylitol feeding appears to affect the gut microbiota. We hypothesized that dietary xylitol changes intestinal microbiota and, therefore, the metabolism of isoflavonoids in mice. Male mice were randomly divided into two groups: those fed a 0.05% daidzein with 5% xylitol diet (XD group) and those fed a 0.05% daidzein-containing control diet (CD group) for 28 days. Plasma total cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). Urinary amounts of equol were significantly higher in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). The fecal lipid contents (% dry weight) were significantly greater in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.01). The cecal microbiota differed between the two dietary groups. The occupation ratios of Bacteroides were significantly greater in the CD than in the XD group (p < 0.05). This study suggests that xylitol has the potential to affect the metabolism of daidzein by altering the metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiota and/or gut environment. Given that equol affects bone health, dietary xylitol plus isoflavonoids may exert a favorable effect on bone health. PMID:24336061

  9. Escherichia coli Isolate for Studying Colonization of the Mouse Intestine and Its Application to Two-Component Signaling Knockouts

    PubMed Central

    Lasaro, Melissa; Liu, Zhi; Bishar, Rima; Kelly, Kathryn; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Paul, Sandip; Sokurenko, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    The biology of Escherichia coli in its primary niche, the animal intestinal tract, is remarkably unexplored. Studies with the streptomycin-treated mouse model have produced important insights into the metabolic requirements for Escherichia coli to colonize mice. However, we still know relatively little about the physiology of this bacterium growing in the complex environment of an intestine that is permissive for the growth of competing flora. We have developed a system for studying colonization using an E. coli strain, MP1, isolated from a mouse. MP1 is genetically tractable and does not require continuous antibiotic treatment for stable colonization. As an application of this system, we separately knocked out each two-component system response regulator in MP1 and performed competitions against the wild-type strain. We found that only three response regulators, ArcA, CpxR, and RcsB, produce strong colonization defects, suggesting that in addition to anaerobiosis, adaptation to cell envelope stress is a critical requirement for E. coli colonization of the mouse intestine. We also show that the response regulator OmpR, which had previously been hypothesized to be important for adaptation between in vivo and ex vivo environments, is not required for MP1 colonization due to the presence of a third major porin. PMID:24563035

  10. Interaction of mouse intestinal P-glycoprotein with oral antidiabetic drugs and its inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Harman; Grewal, Ravneet K

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a progressive insulin secretory defect accompanied by resistance to insulin, and thereby making glycemic control a major concern in the treatment of these patients. Oral drug administration, though a popular option for its non-invasiveness, suffer from poor bioavailability. It could be related to the efflux transport of intestinal P-glycoprotein (Pgp). In the present study, we explored the binding interactions of antidiabetic drugs i.e., sulfonylurea drugs (glimepiride, glipizide, glyburide) and rapid acting insulin secretagogues viz., nateglinide, repaglinide and rosiglitazone; and Pgp inhibitors i.e., Generation I (verapamil and tamoxifen), III (tetradrine and tariquidar), and natural inhibitors (fumagillin and piperine) in mouse Pgp model. Our results revealed that fumagillin piperine and verapamil possess maximum interaction energies with Pgp compared to antidiabetic drugs. These observations elucidate the role of fumagillin and piperine as potential natural compounds which could intervene in the efflux action of Pgp in extruding the antidiabetic drugs and may have implications for increasing efficacy of oral antidiabetic therapy. PMID:26548081

  11. Element concentrations in the intestinal mucosa of the mouse as measured by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    von Zglinicki, T; Roomans, G M

    1989-06-01

    Subcellular ion distribution in villus, crypt, Paneth and smooth muscle cells of the mouse small intestine under resting conditions was investigated by X-ray microanalysis of ultrathin cryosections. In addition, the mass distribution was estimated by measuring the optical transmission of the compartments in transmission electron micrographs. Each cell type is characterized by a special composition in terms of the major monovalent ions Na, K, and Cl. In particular, among crypt epithelial cells, those cells containing small secretion granula (termed crypt A cells) also display cytoplasmic ion concentrations significantly different from crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula (crypt B cells). Monovalent ion concentrations in the cytoplasm of Paneth cells, muscle cells, and crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula are higher than expected from osmotic considerations. Hence, significant binding of ions to cytoplasmic polyelectrolytes is assumed in these cells. There are gradients of dry mass and K concentration from the luminal to the basal side of the cell, both in crypt and in villus cells. The terminal web in these cells is rich in Na and Cl. The elemental composition of the large, dark secretion granula in Paneth cells is similar to that of the small dark granula in crypt cells. However, the two morphologically different types of granula within the Paneth cells have a significantly different elemental composition, which might reflect maturation of secretion granula. PMID:2814397

  12. Lovastatin, but not orlistat, reduces intestinal polyp volume in an ApcMin/+ mouse model.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Maria; Barone, Michele; Francavilla, Antonio; Tutino, Valeria; Bianco, Giusy; Tafaro, Angela; Minoia, Mario; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Napoli, Anna; Scavo, Maria Principia; Caruso, Maria Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    The statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoAR) and orlistat, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase (FAS), inhibit tumor cell growth by restricting cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis, respectively. We previously demonstrated that an omega (ω)-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)- or olive oil-enriched diet reduced the polyp number and volume in ApcMin/+ mice. This phenomenon was associated with a significant inhibition of FAS and HMGCoAR, as well as an increase in the estrogen receptor (ER)β/α ratio. Herein, we evaluated the effect of lovastatin and orlistat on polyp development and ER expression in ApcMin/+ mice, in order to confirm previous data obtained with ω‑3-PUFAs and olive oil. As expected, the use of lovastatin and orlistat significantly reduced HMGCoAR and FAS enzymatic activities and gene expression in colonic tissues, but did not affect the number of intestinal polyps, while there was a statistically significant reduction in polyp volume only in the mouse group treated with lovastatin. In the mice receiving orlistat, we observed a significant increase in cell proliferation in the polyp tissue, as well as enhanced expression of ERα. Moreover, the overexpression of ERα was associated with a statistically significant increase in PES1, Shh and Gli1 protein levels, considered ERα-related molecular targets. PMID:27277576

  13. Wnt signaling in adult intestinal stem cells and cancer.

    PubMed

    Krausova, Michaela; Korinek, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Signaling initiated by secreted glycoproteins of the Wnt family regulates many aspects of embryonic development and it is involved in homeostasis of adult tissues. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract the Wnt pathway maintains the self-renewal capacity of epithelial stem cells. The stem cell attributes are conferred by mutual interactions of the stem cell with its local microenvironment, the stem cell niche. The niche ensures that the threshold of Wnt signaling in the stem cell is kept in physiological range. In addition, the Wnt pathway involves various feedback loops that balance the opposing processes of cell proliferation and differentiation. Today, we have compelling evidence that mutations causing aberrant activation of the Wnt pathway promote expansion of undifferentiated progenitors and lead to cancer. The review summarizes recent advances in characterization of adult epithelial stem cells in the gut. We mainly focus on discoveries related to molecular mechanisms regulating the output of the Wnt pathway. Moreover, we present novel experimental approaches utilized to investigate the epithelial cell signaling circuitry in vivo and in vitro. Pivotal aspects of tissue homeostasis are often deduced from studies of tumor cells; therefore, we also discuss some latest results gleaned from the deep genome sequencing studies of human carcinomas of the colon and rectum. PMID:24308963

  14. An improved isolation procedure for adult mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pinz, Ilka; Zhu, Ming; Mende, Ulrike; Ingwall, Joanne S

    2011-09-01

    Isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes are an important tool in cardiovascular research, but are challenging to prepare. Because the energy supply determines cell function and viability, we compared total creatine ([Cr]) and [ATP] in isolated cardiomyocytes with the intact mouse heart. Isolated myocytes suffered severe losses of Cr (-70%) and ATP (-53%). Myocytes were not able to replete [Cr] during a 5 h incubation period in medium supplemented with 1 mM Cr. In contrast, adding 20 mM Cr to the digestion buffers was sufficient to maintain normal [Cr]. Supplementing buffers with 5 mM of inosine (Ino) and adenosine (Ado) to prevent loss of cellular nucleosides partially protected against loss of ATP. To test whether maintaining [ATP] and [Cr] improves contractile function, myocytes were challenged by varying pacing rate from 0.5 to 10 Hz and by adding isoproterenol (Iso) at 5 and 10 Hz. All groups performed well up to 5 Hz, showing a positive cell shortening-frequency relationship; however, only 16% of myocytes isolated under standard conditions were able to sustain pacing with Iso challenge at 10 Hz. In contrast, 30-50% of the myocytes with normal Cr levels were able to contract and maintain low diastolic [Ca(2+)]. Cell yield also improved in Cr and the Cr/Ino/Ado-treated groups (85-90% vs. 70-75% rod shaped in untreated myocytes). These data suggest that viability and performance of isolated myocytes are improved when they are protected from the severe loss of Cr and ATP during the isolation, making them an even better research tool. PMID:21327944

  15. GLP-2 Prevents Intestinal Mucosal Atrophy and Improves Tissue Antioxidant Capacity in a Mouse Model of Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Qiucheng; Bi, Jingcheng; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Wu, Chao; Tian, Feng; Gao, Xuejin; Wan, Xiao; Zheng, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on mucosal atrophy and intestinal antioxidant capacity in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Male mice (6–8 weeks old) were divided into three groups (n = 8 for each group): a control group fed a standard laboratory chow diet, and experimental TPN (received standard TPN solution) and TPN + GLP-2 groups (received TPN supplemented with 60 µg/day of GLP-2 for 5 days). Mice in the TPN group had lower body weight and reduced intestinal length, villus height, and crypt depth compared to the control group (all p < 0.05). GLP-2 supplementation increased all parameters compared to TPN only (all p < 0.05). Intestinal total superoxide dismutase activity and reduced-glutathione level in the TPN + GLP-2 group were also higher relative to the TPN group (all p < 0.05). GLP-2 administration significantly upregulated proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and increased glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) abundance. Compared with the control and TPN + GLP-2 groups, intestinal cleaved caspase-3 was increased in the TPN group (all p < 0.05). This study shows GLP-2 reduces TPN-associated intestinal atrophy and improves tissue antioxidant capacity. This effect may be dependent on enhanced epithelial cell proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and upregulated GRP78 expression. PMID:26761030

  16. Expression pattern of Dkk-3, a secreted Wnt pathway inhibitor, in mouse intestinal tissue and three-dimensional cultured Caco-2 spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Ken; Rikitake, Yuji; Ayabe, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the expression pattern of Dkk-3, a secreted Wnt pathway inhibitor, in mouse intestinal tissue and three-dimensional cultured Caco-2 spheroids. Dkk-3 was expressed at the bottom of crypts from the mouse small intestine. Human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells expressed Dkk-3 under a semi-confluent condition, but Dkk-3 expression was seen in only some of the Caco-2 cells when the cells were sparse. Caco-2 cells formed hollow spheroids in Matrigel, and the layer-forming cells in the hollow spheroids expressed Dkk-3. Our results demonstrated that Dkk-3 might affect intestinal cells when the fate of stem cells changes.

  17. Isolation of high-purity myenteric plexus from adult human and mouse gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Grundmann, David; Klotz, Markus; Rabe, Holger; Glanemann, Matthias; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2015-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) orchestrates a broad range of important gastrointestinal functions such as intestinal motility and gastric secretion. The ENS can be affected by environmental factors, diet and disease. Changes due to these alterations are often hard to evaluate in detail when whole gut samples are used. Analyses based on pure ENS tissue can more effectively reflect the ongoing changes during pathological processes. Here, we present an optimized approach for the isolation of pure myenteric plexus (MP) from adult mouse and human. To do so, muscle tissue was individually digested with a purified collagenase. After incubation and a gentle mechanical disruption step, MP networks could be collected with anatomical integrity. These tissues could be stored and used either for immediate genomic, proteomic or in vitro approaches, and enteric neurospheres could be generated and differentiated. In a pilot experiment, the influence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on human MP was analyzed using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The method also allows investigation of factors that are secreted by myenteric tissue in vitro. The isolation of pure MP in large amounts allows new analytical approaches that can provide a new perspective in evaluating changes of the ENS in experimental models, human disease and aging. PMID:25791532

  18. Intestinal helminth infections amongst HIV-infected adults in Mthatha General Hospital, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Wright, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, studies on the prevalence of intestinal helminth co-infection amongst HIV-infected patients as well as possible interactions between these two infections are limited. Aim To investigate the prevalence of intestinal helminth infestation amongst adults living with HIV or AIDS at Mthatha General Hospital. Setting Study participants were recruited at the outpatient department of Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2013 amongst consecutive consenting HIV-positive adult patients. Socio-demographic and clinical information were obtained using data collection forms and structured interviews. Stool samples were collected to investigate the presence of helminths whilst blood samples were obtained for the measurement of CD4+ T-cell count and viral load. Results Data were obtained on 231 participants, with a mean age of 34.9 years, a mean CD4 count of 348 cells/µL and a mean viral load of 4.8 log10 copies/mL. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 24.7%, with Ascaris Lumbricoides (42.1%) the most prevalent identified species. Statistically significant association was found between CD4 count of less than 200 cells/µL and helminth infection (p = 0.05). No statistically significant association was found between intestinal helminth infection and the mean CD4 count (p = 0.79) or the mean viral load (p = 0.98). Conclusion A high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was observed amongst the study population. Therefore, screening and treatment of helminths should be considered as part of the management of HIV and AIDS in primary health care. PMID:26842519

  19. Characterization of Intestinal Bacteria in Wild and Domesticated Adult Black Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon)

    PubMed Central

    Rungrassamee, Wanilada; Klanchui, Amornpan; Maibunkaew, Sawarot; Chaiyapechara, Sage; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2014-01-01

    The black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) is a marine crustacean of economic importance in the world market. To ensure sustainability of the shrimp industry, production capacity and disease outbreak prevention must be improved. Understanding healthy microbial balance inside the shrimp intestine can provide an initial step toward better farming practice and probiotic applications. In this study, we employed a barcode pyrosequencing analysis of V3-4 regions of 16S rRNA genes to examine intestinal bacteria communities in wild-caught and domesticated P. monodon broodstock. Shrimp faeces were removed from intestines prior to further analysis in attempt to identify mucosal bacterial population. Five phyla, Actinobacteria, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, were found in all shrimp from both wild and domesticated environments. The operational taxonomic unit (OTU) was assigned at 97% sequence identity, and our pyrosequencing results identified 18 OTUs commonly found in both groups. Sequences of the shared OTUs were similar to bacteria in three phyla, namely i) Proteobacteria (Vibrio, Photobacterium, Novosphingobium, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas and Undibacterium), ii) Firmicutes (Fusibacter), and iii) Bacteroidetes (Cloacibacterium). The shared bacterial members in P. monodon from two different habitats provide evidence that the internal environments within the host shrimp also exerts selective pressure on bacterial members. Intestinal bacterial profiles were compared using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The sequences from DGGE bands were similar to those of Vibrio and Photobacterium in all shrimp, consistent with pyrosequencing results. This work provides the first comprehensive report on bacterial populations in the intestine of adult black tiger shrimp and reveals some similar bacterial members between the intestine of wild-caught and domesticated shrimp. PMID:24618668

  20. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A.; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  1. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  2. Cell death (apoptosis) in mouse intestine after continuous irradiation with gamma rays and with beta rays from tritiated water

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiri, K.

    1989-04-01

    Apoptosis is a pattern of cell death involving nuclear pycnosis, cytoplasmic condensation, and karyorrhexis. Apoptosis induced by continuous irradiation with gamma rays (externally given by a 137Cs source) or with beta rays (from tritiated water injected ip) was quantified in the crypts of two portions of mouse bowel, the small intestine and descending colon. The time-course change in the incidence of apoptosis after each type of radiation could be explained on the basis of the innate circadian rhythm of the cells susceptible to apoptotic death and of the excretion of tritiated water (HTO) from the body. For 6-h continuous gamma irradiation at various dose rates (0.6-480 mGy/h) and for 6 h after injection of HTO of various radioactivities (0.15-150 GBq per kg body wt), the relationships between dose and incidence of apoptosis were obtained. Survival curves were then constructed from the curves for dose vs incidence of apoptosis. For the calculation of the absorbed dose from HTO, the water content both of the mouse body and of the cells was assumed to be 70%. One megabecquerel of HTO per mouse (i.e., 40 MBq/kg body wt) gave a dose rate of 0.131 mGy/h. The mean lethal doses (D0) were calculated for gamma rays and HTO, and relative biological effectiveness values of HTO relative to gamma rays were obtained. The D0 values for continuous irradiation with gamma rays were 210 mGy for small intestine and 380 mGy for descending colon, and the respective values for HTO were 130 and 280 mGy, indicating the high radiosensitivity of target cells for apoptotic death. The relative biological effectiveness of HTO relative to 137Cs gamma rays for cell killing in both the small intestine and the descending colon in the mouse was 1.4-2.1.

  3. The Hippo pathway regulates intestinal stem cell proliferation during Drosophila adult midgut regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Rachael L.; Kohlmaier, Alexander; Polesello, Cédric; Veelken, Cornelia; Edgar, Bruce A.; Tapon, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in the adult Drosophila midgut proliferate to self-renew and to produce differentiating daughter cells that replace those lost as part of normal gut function. Intestinal stress induces the activation of Upd/Jak/Stat signalling, which promotes intestinal regeneration by inducing rapid stem cell proliferation. We have investigated the role of the Hippo (Hpo) pathway in the Drosophila intestine (midgut). Hpo pathway inactivation in either the ISCs or the differentiated enterocytes induces a phenotype similar to that observed under stress situations, including increased stem cell proliferation and expression of Jak/Stat pathway ligands. Hpo pathway targets are induced by stresses such as bacterial infection, suggesting that the Hpo pathway functions as a sensor of cellular stress in the differentiated cells of the midgut. In addition, Yki, the pro-growth transcription factor target of the Hpo pathway, is required in ISCs to drive the proliferative response to stress. Our results suggest that the Hpo pathway is a mediator of the regenerative response in the Drosophila midgut. PMID:21068063

  4. DLL4 promotes continuous adult intestinal lacteal regeneration and dietary fat transport

    PubMed Central

    Bernier-Latmani, Jeremiah; Cisarovsky, Christophe; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Bruand, Marine; Jaquet, Muriel; Davanture, Suzel; Ragusa, Simone; Siegert, Stefanie; Dormond, Olivier; Benedito, Rui; Radtke, Freddy; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Petrova, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    The small intestine is a dynamic and complex organ that is characterized by constant epithelium turnover and crosstalk among various cell types and the microbiota. Lymphatic capillaries of the small intestine, called lacteals, play key roles in dietary fat absorption and the gut immune response; however, little is known about the molecular regulation of lacteal function. Here, we performed a high-resolution analysis of the small intestinal stroma and determined that lacteals reside in a permanent regenerative, proliferative state that is distinct from embryonic lymphangiogenesis or quiescent lymphatic vessels observed in other tissues. We further demonstrated that this continuous regeneration process is mediated by Notch signaling and that the expression of the Notch ligand delta-like 4 (DLL4) in lacteals requires activation of VEGFR3 and VEGFR2. Moreover, genetic inactivation of Dll4 in lymphatic endothelial cells led to lacteal regression and impaired dietary fat uptake. We propose that such a slow lymphatic regeneration mode is necessary to match a unique need of intestinal lymphatic vessels for both continuous maintenance, due to the constant exposure to dietary fat and mechanical strain, and efficient uptake of fat and immune cells. Our work reveals how lymphatic vessel responses are shaped by tissue specialization and uncover a role for continuous DLL4 signaling in the function of adult lymphatic vasculature. PMID:26529256

  5. Activation of Sox3 Gene by Thyroid Hormone in the Developing Adult Intestinal Stem Cell During Xenopus Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guihong; Fu, Liezhen; Wen, Luan

    2014-01-01

    The maturation of the intestine into the adult form involves the formation of adult stem cells in a thyroid hormone (T3)-dependent process in vertebrates. In mammals, this takes place during postembryonic development, a period around birth when the T3 level peaks. Due to the difficulty of manipulating late-stage, uterus-enclosed embryos, very little is known about the development of the adult intestinal stem cells. Interestingly, the remodeling of the intestine during the T3-dependent amphibian metamorphosis mimics the maturation of mammalian intestine. Our earlier microarray studies in Xenopus laevis revealed that the transcription factor SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 3 (Sox3), well known for its involvement in neural development, was upregulated in the intestinal epithelium during metamorphosis. Here, we show that Sox3 is highly and specifically expressed in the developing adult intestinal progenitor/stem cells. We further show that its induction by T3 is independent of new protein synthesis, suggesting that Sox3 is directly activated by liganded T3 receptor. Thus, T3 activates Sox3 as one of the earliest changes in the epithelium, and Sox3 in turn may facilitate the dedifferentiation of the larval epithelial cells into adult stem cells. PMID:25211587

  6. Antibiotic Selection of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 in a Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model

    PubMed Central

    Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The ability of different antibiotics to select for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli remains a topic of discussion. In a mouse intestinal colonization model, we evaluated the selective abilities of nine common antimicrobials (cefotaxime, cefuroxime, dicloxacillin, clindamycin, penicillin, ampicillin, meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and amdinocillin) against a CTX-M-15-producing E. coli sequence type 131 (ST131) isolate with a fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Mice (8 per group) were orogastrically administered 0.25 ml saline with 108 CFU/ml E. coli ST131. On that same day, antibiotic treatment was initiated and given subcutaneously once a day for three consecutive days. CFU of E. coli ST131, Bacteroides, and Gram-positive aerobic bacteria in fecal samples were studied, with intervals, until day 8. Bacteroides was used as an indicator organism for impact on the Gram-negative anaerobic population. For three antibiotics, prolonged colonization was investigated with additional fecal CFU counts determined on days 10 and 14 (cefotaxime, dicloxacillin, and clindamycin). Three antibiotics (cefotaxime, dicloxacillin, and clindamycin) promoted overgrowth of E. coli ST131 (P < 0.05). Of these, only clindamycin suppressed Bacteroides, while the remaining two antibiotics had no negative impact on Bacteroides or Gram-positive organisms. Only clindamycin treatment resulted in prolonged colonization. The remaining six antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, did not promote overgrowth of E. coli ST131 (P > 0.95), nor did they suppress Bacteroides or Gram-positive organisms. The results showed that antimicrobials both with and without an impact on Gram-negative anaerobes can select for ESBL-producing E. coli, indicating that not only Gram-negative anaerobes have a role in upholding colonization resistance. Other, so-far-unknown bacterial populations must be of importance for preventing colonization by incoming E. coli. PMID:25092712

  7. Antibiotic selection of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 in a mouse intestinal colonization model.

    PubMed

    Boetius Hertz, Frederik; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2014-10-01

    The ability of different antibiotics to select for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli remains a topic of discussion. In a mouse intestinal colonization model, we evaluated the selective abilities of nine common antimicrobials (cefotaxime, cefuroxime, dicloxacillin, clindamycin, penicillin, ampicillin, meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and amdinocillin) against a CTX-M-15-producing E. coli sequence type 131 (ST131) isolate with a fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Mice (8 per group) were orogastrically administered 0.25 ml saline with 10(8) CFU/ml E. coli ST131. On that same day, antibiotic treatment was initiated and given subcutaneously once a day for three consecutive days. CFU of E. coli ST131, Bacteroides, and Gram-positive aerobic bacteria in fecal samples were studied, with intervals, until day 8. Bacteroides was used as an indicator organism for impact on the Gram-negative anaerobic population. For three antibiotics, prolonged colonization was investigated with additional fecal CFU counts determined on days 10 and 14 (cefotaxime, dicloxacillin, and clindamycin). Three antibiotics (cefotaxime, dicloxacillin, and clindamycin) promoted overgrowth of E. coli ST131 (P < 0.05). Of these, only clindamycin suppressed Bacteroides, while the remaining two antibiotics had no negative impact on Bacteroides or Gram-positive organisms. Only clindamycin treatment resulted in prolonged colonization. The remaining six antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, did not promote overgrowth of E. coli ST131 (P > 0.95), nor did they suppress Bacteroides or Gram-positive organisms. The results showed that antimicrobials both with and without an impact on Gram-negative anaerobes can select for ESBL-producing E. coli, indicating that not only Gram-negative anaerobes have a role in upholding colonization resistance. Other, so-far-unknown bacterial populations must be of importance for preventing colonization by incoming E. coli. PMID:25092712

  8. Requirement of matrix metalloproteinase-1 for intestinal homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Chung, Hae-Young; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2012-03-10

    Stem cells are tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteolytic enzymes, modulate the turnover of numerous substrates, including cytokine precursors, growth factors, and ECM molecules. However, the roles of MMPs in the regulation of adult stem cells are poorly understood. In the present study, we utilize the Drosophila midgut, which is an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology, to show that Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). The results showed that Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut and that its expression increases with age and with exposure to oxidative stress. Mmp1 knockdown or Timp-overexpressing flies and flies heterozygous for a viable, hypomorphic Mmp1 allele increased ISC proliferation in the gut, as shown by staining with an anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. Reduced Mmp1 levels induced intestinal hyperplasia, and the Mmp1depletion-induced ISC proliferation was rescued by the suppression of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that Mmp1 regulates ISC proliferation through the EGFR signaling pathway. Furthermore, adult gut-specific knockdown and whole-animal heterozygotes of Mmp1 increased additively sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress and shortened lifespan. Our data suggest that Drosophila Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation for maintenance of gut homeostasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1-related ISC proliferation is associated with EGFR signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 in the gut is required for the intestinal homeostasis and longevity.

  9. Development of a primary mouse intestinal epithelial cell monolayer culture system to evaluate factors that modulate IgA transcytosis

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Clara; VanDussen, Kelli L.; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2013-01-01

    There is significant interest in the use of primary intestinal epithelial cells in monolayer culture to model intestinal biology. However, it has proven to be challenging to create functional, differentiated monolayers using current culture methods, likely due to the difficulty in expanding these cells. Here, we adapted our recently developed method for the culture of intestinal epithelial spheroids to establish primary epithelial cell monolayers from the colon of multiple genetic mouse strains. These monolayers contained differentiated epithelial cells that displayed robust transepithelial electrical resistance. We then functionally tested them by examining IgA transcytosis across Transwells. IgA transcytosis required induction of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) expression, which could be stimulated by a combination of LPS and inhibition of γ-secretase. In agreement with previous studies using immortalized cell lines, we found that TNFα, IL-1β, IL-17 and heat-killed microbes also stimulated pIgR expression and IgA transcytosis. We used wild-type and knockout cells to establish that amongst these cytokines, IL-17 was the most potent inducer of pIgR expression/IgA transcytosis. IFNγ however did not induce pIgR expression, and instead led to cell death. This new method will allow the use of primary cells for studies of intestinal physiology. PMID:24220295

  10. Protocols for Analyzing the Role of Paneth Cells in Regenerating the Murine Intestine using Conditional Cre-lox Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Lee; Young, Madeleine; El Marjou, Fatima; Clarke, Alan Richard

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial surface of the mammalian intestine is a dynamic tissue that renews every 3 - 7 days. Understanding this renewal process identified a population of rapidly cycling intestinal stem cells (ISCs) characterized by their expression of the Lgr5 gene. These are supported by a quiescent stem cell population, marked by Bmi-1 expression, capable of replacing them in the event of injury. Investigating the interactions between these populations is crucial to understanding their roles in disease and cancer. The ISCs exist within crypts on the intestinal surface, these niches support the ISC in replenishing the epithelia. The interaction between active and quiescent ISCs likely involves other differentiated cells within the niche, as it has previously been demonstrated that the ‘‘stemness’’ of the Lgr5 ISC is closely tied to the presence of their neighboring Paneth cells. Using conditional cre-lox mouse models we tested the effect of deleting the majority of active ISCs in the presence or absence of the Paneth cells. Here we describe the techniques and analysis undertaken to characterize the intestine and demonstrate that the Paneth cells play a crucial role within the ISC niche in aiding recovery following substantial insult. PMID:26649885

  11. Congenital intestinal malrotation in adolescent and adult patients: a 12-year clinical and radiological survey.

    PubMed

    Husberg, Britt; Salehi, Karin; Peters, Trevor; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Michanek, Margareta; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Strigård, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Congenital intestinal malrotation is mainly detected in childhood and caused by incomplete rotation and fixation of the intestines providing the prerequisites for life-threatening volvulus of the midgut. The objective of this study was to evaluate a large cohort of adult patients with intestinal malrotation. Thirty-nine patients, 15-67 years, were diagnosed and admitted to a university setting with congenital intestinal malrotation 2002-2013. The patients were divided into three age groups for stratified evaluation. Medical charts were scrutinized, and clinical outcome of surgery was reviewed. Twelve patients presented as emergency cases, whereas 27 were admitted as elective cases. Diagnosis was established in 33 patients who underwent radiological investigation and in the remaining 6 during surgery. A Ladd's operation was performed in 31 symptomatic patients; a conservative strategy was chosen in eight cases. Volvulus was more common in the younger age group. Twenty-six surgically treated patients were available for telephone interview, 1-12 years after surgery. All patients, except one, regarded their general condition improved to a high degree (n = 18) or with some reservation (n = 7). Twelve patients suffered remaining abdominal pain of a chronic and diffuse character. Due to recurrence of malrotation six patients were reoperated. Symptomatic malrotation occurs in both children and the adult population. Improved awareness and an accurately performed CT scan can reveal the malformation and enable surgical treatment. A Ladd's procedure relieved most patients from their severe complaints even when a history of several years of suffering existed. PMID:27026938

  12. Clinical characteristics of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mann, S; Debinski, H; Kamm, M

    1997-01-01

    prolonged, and prokinetic drug therapies are not usually helpful. Ongoing management problems include pain relief and nutritional support. 

 Keywords: adult; intestinal; pseudo-obstruction; myopathy; neuropathy PMID:9414977

  13. Female Adult Mouse Cardiomyocytes Are Protected Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangfei; He, Quan; Sun, Ying; Dai, Xiangguo; Yang, Xiao-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Premenopausal women have less cardiovascular disease and lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than men the same age. Our previous studies showed that female mice have lower mortality and better preserved cardiac function after myocardial infarction. However, the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for such a sex difference are not well established. Using cultured adult mouse cardiomyocytes (ACMs), we tested the hypothesis that the survival advantage of females stems from activated estrogen receptors (ER) and Akt survival signaling pathways. ACMs were isolated from male and female C57BL/6J mice and treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 100 μM) for 30 min. Cell survival was indicated by rod ratio (rod shaped cells/total cells) and cell death by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and positive staining of Annexin-V (AV+, a marker for apoptosis) and propidium iodide (PI+, a marker for necrosis). In response to H2O2, female ACMs exhibited a higher rod ratio, lower LDH release and fewer AV+ and PI+ cells compared to males. Phospho-Akt was greater in females both at baseline and after H2O2 stimulation. The downstream molecule of Akt, phosphor-GSK-3β (inactivation), was also higher while caspase-3 activity was lower in females in response to H2O2. Bcl-2 did not differ between genders. ERα was the dominant isoform in females, whereas ERβ was low but similar in both genders. Our findings demonstrate that female ACMs have a greater survival advantage when challenged with oxidative stress-induced cell death. This may be attributable to activation of Akt and inhibition of GSK-3β and caspase-3 through an ERα-mediated mechanism. PMID:20212261

  14. Generating intestinal tissue from stem cells: potential for research and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Jonathan C; Wells, James M

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal resection and malformations in adult and pediatric patients result in devastating consequences. Unfortunately, allogeneic transplantation of intestinal tissue into patients has not been met with the same measure of success as the transplantation of other organs. Attempts to engineer intestinal tissue in vitro include disaggregation of adult rat intestine into subunits called organoids, harvesting native adult stem cells from mouse intestine and spontaneous generation of intestinal tissue from embryoid bodies. Recently, by utilizing principles gained from the study of developmental biology, human pluripotent stem cells have been demonstrated to be capable of directed differentiation into intestinal tissue in vitro. Pluripotent stem cells offer a unique and promising means to generate intestinal tissue for the purposes of modeling intestinal disease, understanding embryonic development and providing a source of material for therapeutic transplantation. PMID:22050526

  15. Profound Chemopreventative Effects of a Hydrogen Sulfide-Releasing NSAID in the APCMin/+ Mouse Model of Intestinal Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Paul-Clark, Mark; Elsheikh, Wagdi; Kirkby, Nicholas; Chan, Melissa; Devchand, Pallavi; Agbor, Terence A; Flannigan, Kyle L; Cheadle, Charlotte; Freydin, Maxim; Ianaro, Angela; Mitchell, Jane A; Wallace, John L

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been shown to reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal cancers, but the propensity of these drugs to cause ulcers and bleeding limits their use. H2S has been shown to be a powerful cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory substance in the digestive system. This study explored the possibility that a H2S-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ATB-346) would be effective in a murine model of hereditary intestinal cancer (APCMin+ mouse) and investigated potential mechanisms of action via transcriptomics analysis. Daily treatment with ATB-346 was significantly more effective at preventing intestinal polyp formation than naproxen. Significant beneficial effects were seen with a treatment period of only 3-7 days, and reversal of existing polyps was observed in the colon. ATB-346, but not naproxen, significantly decreased expression of intestinal cancer-associated signaling molecules (cMyc, β-catenin). Transcriptomic analysis identified 20 genes that were up-regulated in APCMin+ mice, 18 of which were reduced to wild-type levels by one week of treatment with ATB-346. ATB-346 is a novel, gastrointestinal-sparing anti-inflammatory drug that potently and rapidly prevents and reverses the development of pre-cancerous lesions in a mouse model of hereditary intestinal tumorigenesis. These effects may be related to the combined effects of suppression of cyclooxygenase and release of H2S, and correction of most of the APCMin+-associated alterations in the transcriptome. ATB-346 may represent a promising agent for chemoprevention of tumorigenesis in the GI tract and elsewhere. PMID:26910063

  16. Profound Chemopreventative Effects of a Hydrogen Sulfide-Releasing NSAID in the APCMin/+ Mouse Model of Intestinal Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Clark, Mark; Elsheikh, Wagdi; Kirkby, Nicholas; Chan, Melissa; Devchand, Pallavi; Agbor, Terence A.; Flannigan, Kyle L.; Cheadle, Charlotte; Freydin, Maxim; Ianaro, Angela; Mitchell, Jane A.; Wallace, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been shown to reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal cancers, but the propensity of these drugs to cause ulcers and bleeding limits their use. H2S has been shown to be a powerful cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory substance in the digestive system. This study explored the possibility that a H2S-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ATB-346) would be effective in a murine model of hereditary intestinal cancer (APCMin+ mouse) and investigated potential mechanisms of action via transcriptomics analysis. Daily treatment with ATB-346 was significantly more effective at preventing intestinal polyp formation than naproxen. Significant beneficial effects were seen with a treatment period of only 3–7 days, and reversal of existing polyps was observed in the colon. ATB-346, but not naproxen, significantly decreased expression of intestinal cancer-associated signaling molecules (cMyc, β-catenin). Transcriptomic analysis identified 20 genes that were up-regulated in APCMin+ mice, 18 of which were reduced to wild-type levels by one week of treatment with ATB-346. ATB-346 is a novel, gastrointestinal-sparing anti-inflammatory drug that potently and rapidly prevents and reverses the development of pre-cancerous lesions in a mouse model of hereditary intestinal tumorigenesis. These effects may be related to the combined effects of suppression of cyclooxygenase and release of H2S, and correction of most of the APCMin+-associated alterations in the transcriptome. ATB-346 may represent a promising agent for chemoprevention of tumorigenesis in the GI tract and elsewhere. PMID:26910063

  17. β-carotene-producing bacteria residing in the intestine provide vitamin A to mouse tissues in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wassef, Lesley; Wirawan, Ruth; Chikindas, Michael; Breslin, Paul A S; Hoffman, Daniel J; Quadro, Loredana

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is an overwhelming public health problem that affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. A definitive solution to VAD has yet to be identified. Because it is an essential nutrient, vitamin A or its carotenoid precursor β-carotene can only be obtained from food or supplements. In this study, we wanted to establish whether β-carotene produced in the mouse intestine by bacteria synthesizing the provitamin A carotenoid could be delivered to various tissues within the body. To achieve this, we took advantage of the Escherichia coli MG1655*, an intestine-adapted spontaneous mutant of E. coli MG1655, and the plasmid pAC-BETA, containing the genes coding for the 4 key enzymes of the β-carotene biosynthetic pathway (geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, and lycopene cyclase) from Erwinia herbicola. We engineered the E. coli MG1655* to produce β-carotene during transformation with pAC-BETA (MG1655*-βC) and gavaged wild-type and knockout mice for the enzyme β-carotene 15,15'-oxygenase with this recombinant strain. Various regimens of bacteria administration were tested (single vs. multiple and low vs. high doses). β-Carotene concentration was measured by HPLC in mouse serum, liver, intestine, and feces. Enumeration of MG1655*-βC cells in the feces was performed to assess efficiency of intestinal colonization. We demonstrated in vivo that probiotic bacteria could be used to deliver vitamin A to the tissues of a mammalian host. These results have the potential to pave the road for future investigations aimed at identifying alternative, novel approaches to treat VAD. PMID:24598882

  18. Comparative toxicogenomic analysis of oral Cr(VI) exposure effects in rat and mouse small intestinal epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Kopec, Anna K.; Thompson, Chad M.; Kim, Suntae; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2012-07-15

    Continuous exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal tumors in mice but not rats. Concentration-dependent gene expression effects were evaluated in female F344 rat duodenal and jejunal epithelia following 7 and 90 days of exposure to 0.3–520 mg/L (as sodium dichromate dihydrate, SDD) in drinking water. Whole-genome microarrays identified 3269 and 1815 duodenal, and 4557 and 1534 jejunal differentially expressed genes at 8 and 91 days, respectively, with significant overlaps between the intestinal segments. Functional annotation identified gene expression changes associated with oxidative stress, cell cycle, cell death, and immune response that were consistent with reported changes in redox status and histopathology. Comparative analysis with B6C3F1 mouse data from a similarly designed study identified 2790 differentially expressed rat orthologs in the duodenum compared to 5013 mouse orthologs at day 8, and only 1504 rat and 3484 mouse orthologs at day 91. Automated dose–response modeling resulted in similar median EC{sub 50}s in the rodent duodenal and jejunal mucosae. Comparative examination of differentially expressed genes also identified divergently regulated orthologs. Comparable numbers of differentially expressed genes were observed at equivalent Cr concentrations (μg Cr/g duodenum). However, mice accumulated higher Cr levels than rats at ≥ 170 mg/L SDD, resulting in a ∼ 2-fold increase in the number of differentially expressed genes. These qualitative and quantitative differences in differential gene expression, which correlate with differences in tissue dose, likely contribute to the disparate intestinal tumor outcomes. -- Highlights: ► Cr(VI) elicits dose-dependent changes in gene expression in rat intestine. ► Cr(VI) elicits less differential gene expression in rats compared to mice. ► Cr(VI) gene expression can be phenotypically anchored to intestinal changes. ► Species

  19. Interferon Tau Affects Mouse Intestinal Microbiota and Expression of IL-17

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Gang; Hussain, Tarique; Hao, Xiao; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of interferon tau (IFNT) on the intestinal microbiota and expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) in the intestine of mice. IFNT supplementation increased microbial diversity in the jejunum and ileum but decreased microbial diversity in the feces. IFNT supplementation influenced the composition of the intestinal microbiota as follows: (1) decreasing the percentage of Firmicutes and increasing Bacteroidetes in the jejunum and ileum; (2) enhancing the percentage of Firmicutes but decreasing Bacteroidetes in the colon and feces; (3) decreasing Lactobacillus in the jejunum and ileum; (4) increasing the percentage of Blautia, Bacteroides, Alloprevotella, and Lactobacillus in the colon; and (5) increasing the percentage of Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Allobaculum, while decreasing Blautia in the feces. Also, IFNT supplementation decreased the expression of IL-17 in the intestines of normal mice and of an intestinal pathogen infected mice. In conclusion, IFNT supplementation modulates the intestinal microbiota and intestinal IL-17 expression, indicating the applicability of IFNT to treat the intestinal diseases involving IL-17 expression and microbiota. PMID:27610003

  20. Interferon Tau Affects Mouse Intestinal Microbiota and Expression of IL-17.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Gang; Hussain, Tarique; Hao, Xiao; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Tan, Bie; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of interferon tau (IFNT) on the intestinal microbiota and expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) in the intestine of mice. IFNT supplementation increased microbial diversity in the jejunum and ileum but decreased microbial diversity in the feces. IFNT supplementation influenced the composition of the intestinal microbiota as follows: (1) decreasing the percentage of Firmicutes and increasing Bacteroidetes in the jejunum and ileum; (2) enhancing the percentage of Firmicutes but decreasing Bacteroidetes in the colon and feces; (3) decreasing Lactobacillus in the jejunum and ileum; (4) increasing the percentage of Blautia, Bacteroides, Alloprevotella, and Lactobacillus in the colon; and (5) increasing the percentage of Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Allobaculum, while decreasing Blautia in the feces. Also, IFNT supplementation decreased the expression of IL-17 in the intestines of normal mice and of an intestinal pathogen infected mice. In conclusion, IFNT supplementation modulates the intestinal microbiota and intestinal IL-17 expression, indicating the applicability of IFNT to treat the intestinal diseases involving IL-17 expression and microbiota. PMID:27610003

  1. Blockage of VIP during mouse embryogenesis modifies adult behavior and results in permanent changes in brain chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joanna M; Hauser, Janet M; Sheppard, Lia M; Abebe, Daniel; Spivak-Pohis, Irit; Kushnir, Michal; Deitch, Iris; Gozes, Illana

    2007-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) regulates growth and development during the early postimplantation period of mouse embryogenesis. Blockage of VIP with a VIP antagonist during this period results in growth restriction, microcephaly, and developmental delays. Similar treatment of neonatal rodents also causes developmental delays and impaired diurnal rhythms, and the adult brains of these animals exhibit neuronal dystrophy and increased VIP binding. These data suggest that blockage of VIP during the development of the nervous system can result in permanent changes to the brain. In the current study, pregnant mice were treated with a VIP antagonist during embryonic days 8 through 10. The adult male offspring were examined in tests of novelty, paired activity, and social recognition. Brain tissue was examined for several measures of chemistry and gene expression of VIP and related compounds. Glial cells from the cortex of treated newborn mice were plated with neurons and examined for VIP binding and their ability to enhance neuronal survival. Treated adult male mice exhibited increased anxiety-like behavior and deficits in social behavior. Brain tissue exhibited regionally specific changes in VIP chemistry and a trend toward increased gene expression of VIP and related compounds that reached statistical significance in the VIP receptor, VPAC-1, in the female cortex. When compared to control astrocytes, astrocytes from treated cerebral cortex produced further increases in neuronal survival with excess synaptic connections and reduced VIP binding. In conclusion, impaired VIP activity during mouse embryogenesis resulted in permanent changes to both adult brain chemistry/cell biology and behavior with aspects of autism-like social deficits. PMID:17726225

  2. Hepatocyte Growth Factor and MET Support Mouse Enteric Nervous System Development, the Peristaltic Response, and Intestinal Epithelial Proliferation in Response to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Avetisyan, Marina; Wang, Hongtao; Schill, Ellen Merrick; Bery, Saya; Grider, John R.; Hassell, John A.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus

    2015-01-01

    Factors providing trophic support to diverse enteric neuron subtypes remain poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and the HGF receptor MET might support some types of enteric neurons. HGF and MET are expressed in fetal and adult enteric nervous system. In vitro, HGF increased enteric neuron differentiation and neurite length, but only if vanishingly small amounts (1 pg/ml) of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were included in culture media. HGF effects were blocked by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitor and by MET-blocking antibody. Both of these inhibitors and MEK inhibition reduced neurite length. In adult mice, MET was restricted to a subset of calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive (IR) myenteric plexus neurons thought to be intrinsic primary afferent neurons (IPANs). Conditional MET kinase domain inactivation (Metfl/fl; Wnt1Cre+) caused a dramatic loss of myenteric plexus MET-IR neurites and 1–1′-dioctodecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyamine perchlorate (DiI) labeling suggested reduced MET-IR neurite length. In vitro, Metfl/fl; Wnt1Cre+ mouse bowel had markedly reduced peristalsis in response to mucosal deformation, but normal response to radial muscle stretch. However, whole-bowel transit, small-bowel transit, and colonic-bead expulsion were normal in Metfl/fl; Wnt1Cre+ mice. Finally, Metfl/fl; Wnt1Cre+ mice had more bowel injury and reduced epithelial cell proliferation compared with WT animals after dextran sodium sulfate treatment. These results suggest that HGF/MET signaling is important for development and function of a subset IPANs and that these cells regulate intestinal motility and epithelial cell proliferation in response to bowel injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The enteric nervous system has many neuronal subtypes that coordinate and control intestinal activity. Trophic factors that support these neuron types and enhance neurite growth after fetal development are not well

  3. Gene Expression Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton or Gamma-Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda; Nie, Ying; Gridley, Daila; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Seidel, Derek V.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Crew members face potential consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment including acute radiation syndrome and cancer. The space radiation environment is ample with protons, and numerous studies have been devoted to the understanding of the health consequences of proton exposures. In this project, C57BL/6 mice underwent whole-body exposure to 250 MeV of protons at doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 2 and 6 Gy and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation. Standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes in the tissue showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest dose of 0.1 Gy, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. Results of gene expression changes showed consistent up- or down- regulation, up to 10 fold, of a number of genes across exposure doses that may play a role in proton-induced oxidative stress including Gpx2. A separate study in C57BL/6 mice using the same four hour time point but whole-body gamma-irradiation showed damage to the small intestine with lesions appearing at the smallest dose of 0.05 Gy and increasing with increasing absorbed dose. Expressions of genes associated with oxidative stress processes were analyzed at four hours and twenty-four hours after exposure to gamma rays. We saw a much greater number of genes with significant up- or down-regulation twenty-four hours post-exposure as compared to the four hour time point. At both four hours and twenty-four hours post-exposure, Duox1 and Mpo underwent up-regulation for the highest dose of 6 Gy. Both protons and gamma rays lead to significant variation in gene expressions and these changes may provide insight into the mechanism of injury seen in the GI tract following radiation exposure. We have also completed experiments using a BALB/c mouse model undergoing whole-body exposure to protons. Doses of 0, 0.1, 1 and 2 Gy were used and results will be compared to the work mentioned

  4. [An adult with mechanical ileus in association with non-rotation of the intestine].

    PubMed

    Andriessen, M J G; Koop, K A; Consten, E C J

    2005-05-01

    A mechanical ileus was considered in the differential diagnosis of a 28-year-old man who presented to the Emergency Clinic with acute, severe, painful cramps in the lower abdomen of 2 hours' duration, without radiation and with an urge to move constantly. An emergency laparotomy was then performed, revealing non-rotation of the intestine; the last segment ofthe small intestine was pinched off by a strangulation. Several strangulations were cleaved, after which the symptoms disappeared. Non-rotation, a form of malrotation, is a congenital anomaly of intestinal rotation. In adults, non-rotation is a rare diagnosis with a variable presentation. Surgical intervention is necessary in both the acute and the more chronic presentation. The chronic presentation is usually discovered by chance in patients who have had aspecific recurrent abdominal complaints for a long time; if malrotation is suspected, additional investigation, for example by means of a gastrointestinal contrast study, is necessary before resorting to surgery. In the acute situation, immediate surgery is the only proper decision. Surgical intervention comprises reduction of the volvulus, inspection of the mesenteric bands (Ladd's bands) that run from the coecum to the lateral peritoneum and compress the duodenum, and an appendectomy: the Ladd procedure. PMID:15909395

  5. Ileal duplication mimicking intestinal intussusception: a congenital condition rarely reported in adult.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing-Lu; Huang, Xin; Zheng, Chao-Ji; Zhou, Jiao-Lin; Zhao, Yu-Pei

    2013-10-14

    Intestinal duplication is an uncommon congenital condition in young adults. A 25-year-old man complained of chronic, intermittent abdominal pain for 3 years following previous appendectomy for the treatment of suspected appendicitis. Abdominal discomfort and pain, suggestive of intestinal obstruction, recurred after operation. A tubular mass was palpable in the right lower quadrant. Computed tomography enterography scan identified suspicious intestinal intussusception, while Tc-99m pertechnetate scintigraphy revealed a cluster of strip-like abnormal radioactivity in the right lower quadrant. On exploratory laparotomy, a tubular-shaped ileal duplication cyst was found arising from the mesenteric margin of the native ileal segment located 15 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve. Ileectomy was performed along with the removal of the duplication disease, and the end-to-end anastomosis was done to restore the gastrointestinal tract continuity. Pathological examination showed ileal duplication with ectopic gastric mucosa. The patient experienced an eventless postoperative recovery and remained asymptomatic within 2 years of postoperative follow-up. PMID:24151372

  6. Xenobiotic Effects on Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation in Adult Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L) Workers

    PubMed Central

    Forkpah, Cordelia; Dixon, Luke R.; Fahrbach, Susan E.; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-01-01

    The causes of the current global decline in honey bee health are unknown. One major group of hypotheses invokes the pesticides and other xenobiotics to which this important pollinator species is often exposed. Most studies have focused on mortality or behavioral deficiencies in exposed honey bees while neglecting other biological functions and target organs. The midgut epithelium of honey bees presents an important interface between the insect and its environment. It is maintained by proliferation of intestinal stem cells throughout the adult life of honey bees. We used caged honey bees to test multiple xenobiotics for effects on the replicative activity of the intestinal stem cells under laboratory conditions. Most of the tested compounds did not alter the replicative activity of intestinal stem cells. However, colchicine, methoxyfenozide, tetracycline, and a combination of coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate significantly affected proliferation rate. All substances except methoxyfenozide decreased proliferation rate. Thus, the results indicate that some xenobiotics frequently used in apiculture and known to accumulate in honey bee hives may have hitherto unknown physiological effects. The nutritional status and the susceptibility to pathogens of honey bees could be compromised by the impacts of xenobiotics on the maintenance of the midgut epithelium. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that more comprehensive testing of xenobiotics may be required before novel or existing compounds can be considered safe for honey bees and other non-target species. PMID:24608542

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of intestinal intussusception in adults: a rare experience for surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Ciftci, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We evaluated the aetiological factors, diagnoses and treatment outcomes of adult cases of invagination of the intestine, or intussusception. We elucidated the role of ultrasonography (USG), computed tomography (CT) and other techniques in the diagnosis of such cases. Patients and Methods: Six patients with sufficient medical data, all of whom were followed-up and treated for intussusception at Safa Hospital, General Surgery Clinic, Istanbul, Turkey, between July 2008 and December 2013, were enrolled. Results: The site of intussusception was the small bowel in five cases. The aetiopathology was benign in 5 (83.3%) cases and included inflammatory fibroid polyp (IFP) and adhesion. The malignant case was adenocarcinoma. The bowel segments involved were ileoileal in five cases and ileocolic in one case. Conclusions: USG and CT aided with the diagnosis. Although more rare in adults than in children, cases of ileus presenting with acute abdominal disorder, particularly those with an uncertain diagnosis, should be considered possible intussusception cases. PMID:26309690

  8. Survival of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota in the intestines of healthy Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Chen, Shanbin; Jin, Junhua; Ren, Fazheng; Li, Yang; Qiao, Zhenxing; Wang, Yue; Zhao, Liang

    2015-05-01

    Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) is a widely used probiotic strain with health benefits. In this study, the survival of LcS in the intestines of healthy Chinese adults was assessed and the effects of LcS on stool consistency, stool SCFAs and intestinal microbiota evaluated. Subjects consumed 100 mL per day of a probiotic beverage containing 1.0 × 10(8) CFU/mL of LcS for 14 days. LcS were enumerated using a culture method and the colony identity confirmed by ELISA. Fourteen days after ingestion, the amount of LcS recovered from fecal samples was between 6.86 ± 0.80 and 7.17 ± 0.57 Log10 CFU/g of feces (mean ± SD). The intestinal microbiotas were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Principal component analysis showed that consuming LcS significantly changed fecal microbiota profiles. According to redundancy analysis, the amounts of 25 bacterial strains were significantly correlated with LcS intake (P < 0.05), 11 of them positively and fourteen negatively. Concentrations of acetic acid and propionic acid in feces were significantly lower during the ingestion period than during the baseline period (P < 0.05). These results confirm that LcS can survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract of Chinese people; however, they were found to have little ability to persist once their consumption had ceased. Furthermore, consumption of probiotic beverages containing LcS can modulate the composition of the intestinal microbiota on a long-term basis, resulting in decreased concentrations of SCFAs in the gut. PMID:25707300

  9. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity.

    PubMed

    van de Heijning, Bert J M; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%-75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed. PMID:26184291

  10. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity

    PubMed Central

    van de Heijning, Bert J. M.; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%–75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed. PMID:26184291

  11. Determination of tolerable fatty acids and cholera toxin concentrations using human intestinal epithelial cells and BALB/c mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tamari, Farshad; Tychowski, Joanna; Lorentzen, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The positive role of fatty acids in the prevention and alleviation of non-human and human diseases have been and continue to be extensively documented. These roles include influences on infectious and non-infectious diseases including prevention of inflammation as well as mucosal immunity to infectious diseases. Cholera is an acute intestinal illness caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. It occurs in developing nations and if left untreated, can result in death. While vaccines for cholera exist, they are not always effective and other preventative methods are needed. We set out to determine tolerable concentrations of three fatty acids (oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids) and cholera toxin using mouse BALB/C macrophages and human intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. We solubilized the above fatty acids and used cell proliferation assays to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of the fatty acids that are not detrimental to human intestinal epithelial cell viability. We solubilized cholera toxin and used it in an assay to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of cholera toxin that do not statistically decrease cell viability in BALB/C macrophages. We found the optimum fatty acid concentrations to be between 1-5 ng/μl, and that for cholera toxin to be < 30 ng per treatment. This data may aid future studies that aim to find a protective mucosal role for fatty acids in prevention or alleviation of cholera infections. PMID:23748896

  12. Myosin Ia is required for CFTR brush border membrane trafficking and ion transport in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, Dmitri V; Caputo, Christina; Collaco, Anne; Hoekstra, Nadia; Egan, Marie E; Mooseker, Mark S; Ameen, Nadia A

    2012-08-01

    In enterocytes of the small intestine, endocytic trafficking of CFTR channels from the brush border membrane (BBM) to the subapical endosomes requires the minus-end motor, myosin VI (Myo6). The subapical localization of Myo6 is dependent on myosin Ia (Myo1a) the major plus-end motor associated with the BBM, suggestive of functional synergy between these two motors. In villus enterocytes of the Myo1a KO mouse small intestine, CFTR accumulated in syntaxin-3 positive subapical endosomes, redistributed to the basolateral domain and was absent from the BBM. In colon, where villi are absent and Myo1a expression is low, CFTR exhibited normal localization to the BBM in the Myo1a KO similar to WT. cAMP-stimulated CFTR anion transport in the small intestine was reduced by 58% in the KO, while anion transport in the colon was comparable to WT. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the association of CFTR with Myo1a. These data indicate that Myo1a is an important regulator of CFTR traffic and anion transport in the BBM of villus enterocytes and suggest that Myo1a may power apical CFTR movement into the BBM from subapical endosomes. Alternatively, it may anchor CFTR channels in the BBM of villus enterocytes as was proposed for Myo1a's role in BBM localization of sucrase-isomaltase. PMID:22510086

  13. Selective evaluation of high density lipoprotein from mouse small intestine by an in situ perfusion technique[S

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Zhang, Bo; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Seino, Utako; Kanagawa, Akiko; Segawa, Masaru; Nagasaka, Hironori; Suzuki, Akira; Miida, Takashi; Yamada, Sohsuke; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Doi, Takefumi; Saku, Keijiro; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine (SI) is the second-greatest source of HDL in mice. However, the selective evaluation of SI-derived HDL (SI-HDL) has been difficult because even the origin of HDL obtained in vivo from the intestinal lymph duct of anesthetized rodents is doubtful. To shed light on this question, we have developed a novel in situ perfusion technique using surgically isolated mouse SI, with which the possible filtration of plasma HDL into the SI lymph duct can be prevented. With the developed method, we studied the characteristics of and mechanism for the production and regulation of SI-HDL. Nascent HDL particles were detected in SI lymph perfusates in WT mice, but not in ABCA1 KO mice. SI-HDL had a high protein content and was smaller than plasma HDL. SI-HDL was rich in TG and apo AIV compared with HDL in liver perfusates. SI-HDL was increased by high-fat diets and reduced in apo E KO mice. In conclusion, with our in situ perfusion model that enables the selective evaluation of SI-HDL, we demonstrated that ABCA1 plays an important role in intestinal HDL production, and SI-HDL is small, dense, rich in apo AIV, and regulated by nutritional and genetic factors. PMID:24569139

  14. Radioprotector WR-2721 and mitigating peptidoglycan synergistically promote mouse survival through the amelioration of intestinal and bone marrow damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Qiu; Wu, Shu; Xia, Xiaochun; Wu, Anqing; Cui, Fengmei; Gu, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Xueguang; Cao, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    The identification of an agent effective for the treatment of intestinal and bone marrow injury following radiation exposure remains a major issue in radiological medicine. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic impact of single agent or combination treatments with 2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylsulphanyl phosphonic acid (WR-2721) and peptidoglycan (PGN, a toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) agonist) on radiation-induced injury of the intestine and bone marrow in lethally irradiated male C57BL/6 mice. A dose of 3 mg of WR-2721 per mouse (167 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was given 30 min before irradiation, and 30 μg of PGN per mouse (1.7 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 24 h after 10 Gy irradiation. Bone marrow cluster of differentiation (CD)45(+) and CD34(+) markers of multiple haematopoietic lineages, number of granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte (GEMM) progenitor colonies, bone marrow histopathology, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) expression in the intestines, xylose absorption and intestinal histopathology were all assessed at various time-points after irradiation. Furthermore, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 protein in the ileum was stained by immunofluorescent labelling. PGN-treated irradiated mice showed an increase in CD45(+)CD34(+) cells compared with untreated mice 1.25 days after 10 Gy ionizing radiation (IR) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, combined PGN and WR-2721 treatment had an obviously synergistic radio-protective effect in nucleated cells in the bone marrow, including GEMM progenitors and CD45(+)CD34(+) cells 4 days after 10 Gy IR. Single agent PGN or WR-2721 treatment after 10 Gy IR clearly increased Lgr5-positive pit cells (P < 0.05) and xylose absorption (P < 0.05). However only PGN and WR-2721 combination treatment markedly increased villus height (P < 0.05), number of crypts (P < 0.05) and whole-body weights after 10 Gy whole-body irradiation (WBI). The NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated to the

  15. Generation of slow wave type action potentials in the mouse small intestine involves a non-L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Richardson, D; Farraway, L; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1995-10-01

    Intrinsic electrical activities in various isolated segments of the mouse small intestine were recorded (i) to characterize action potential generation and (ii) to obtain a profile on the ion channels involved in initiating the slow wave type action potentials (slow waves). Gradients in slow wave frequency, resting membrane potential, and occurrence of spiking activity were found, with the proximal intestine exhibiting the highest frequency, the most hyperpolarized cell membrane, and the greatest occurrence of spikes. The slow waves were only partially sensitive to L-type calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine, verapamil, and pinaverium bromide abolished spikes that occurred on the plateau phase of the slow waves in all tissues. The activity that remained in the presence of L-type calcium channel blockers, the upstroke potential, retained a similar amplitude to the original slow wave and was of identical frequency. The upstroke potential was not sensitive to a reduction in extracellular chloride or to the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin and mexiletine. Abolishment of the Na+ gradient by removal of 120 mM extracellular Na+ reduced the upstroke potential frequency by 13 - 18% and its amplitude by 50 - 70% in the ileum. The amplitude was similarly reduced by Ni2+ (up to 5 mM), and by flufenamic acid (100 mu M), a nonspecific cation and chloride channel blocker. Gadolinium, a nonspecific blocker of cation and stretch-activated channels, had no effect. Throughout these pharmacological manipulations, a robust oscillation remained at 5 - 10 mV. This oscillation likely reflects pacemaker activity. It was rapidly abolished by removal of extracellular calcium but not affected by L-type calcium channel blockers. In summary, the mouse small intestine has been established as a model for research into slow wave generation and electrical pacemaker activity. The upstroke part of the slow wave has two components, the pacemaker component involves a non-L-type calcium channel

  16. GPR18 Controls Reconstitution of Mouse Small Intestine Intraepithelial Lymphocytes following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Becker, Amy M; Callahan, Derrick J; Richner, Justin M; Choi, Jaebok; DiPersio, John F; Diamond, Michael S; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2015-01-01

    Specific G protein coupled receptors (GPRs) regulate the proper positioning, function, and development of immune lineage subsets. Here, we demonstrate that GPR18 regulates the reconstitution of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) of the small intestine following bone marrow transplantation. Through analysis of transcriptional microarray data, we find that GPR18 is highly expressed in IELs, lymphoid progenitors, and mature follicular B cells. To establish the physiological role of this largely uncharacterized GPR, we generated Gpr18-/- mice. Despite high levels of GPR18 expression in specific hematopoietic progenitors, Gpr18-/- mice have no defects in lymphopoiesis or myelopoiesis. Moreover, antibody responses following immunization with hapten-protein conjugates or infection with West Nile virus are normal in Gpr18-/- mice. Steady-state numbers of IELs are also normal in Gpr18-/- mice. However, competitive bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that GPR18 is cell-intrinsically required for the optimal restoration of small intestine TCRγδ+ and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ IELs. In contrast, GPR18 is dispensable for the reconstitution of large intestine IELs. Moreover, Gpr18-/- bone marrow reconstitutes small intestine IELs similarly to controls in athymic recipients. Gpr18-/- chimeras show no changes in susceptibility to intestinal insults such as Citrobacter rodentium infections or graft versus host disease. These data reveal highly specific requirements for GPR18 in the development and reconstitution of thymus-derived intestinal IEL subsets in the steady-state and after bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26197390

  17. Snai1 regulates cell lineage allocation and stem cell maintenance in the mouse intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Horvay, Katja; Jardé, Thierry; Casagranda, Franca; Perreau, Victoria M; Haigh, Katharina; Nefzger, Christian M; Akhtar, Reyhan; Gridley, Thomas; Berx, Geert; Haigh, Jody J; Barker, Nick; Polo, Jose M; Hime, Gary R; Abud, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Snail family members regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during invasion of intestinal tumours, but their role in normal intestinal homeostasis is unknown. Studies in breast and skin epithelia indicate that Snail proteins promote an undifferentiated state. Here, we demonstrate that conditional knockout of Snai1 in the intestinal epithelium results in apoptotic loss of crypt base columnar stem cells and bias towards differentiation of secretory lineages. In vitro organoid cultures derived from Snai1 conditional knockout mice also undergo apoptosis when Snai1 is deleted. Conversely, ectopic expression of Snai1 in the intestinal epithelium in vivo results in the expansion of the crypt base columnar cell pool and a decrease in secretory enteroendocrine and Paneth cells. Following conditional deletion of Snai1, the intestinal epithelium fails to produce a proliferative response following radiation-induced damage indicating a fundamental requirement for Snai1 in epithelial regeneration. These results demonstrate that Snai1 is required for regulation of lineage choice, maintenance of CBC stem cells and regeneration of the intestinal epithelium following damage. PMID:25759216

  18. GPR18 Controls Reconstitution of Mouse Small Intestine Intraepithelial Lymphocytes following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Amy M.; Callahan, Derrick J.; Richner, Justin M.; Choi, Jaebok; DiPersio, John F.; Diamond, Michael S.; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2015-01-01

    Specific G protein coupled receptors (GPRs) regulate the proper positioning, function, and development of immune lineage subsets. Here, we demonstrate that GPR18 regulates the reconstitution of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) of the small intestine following bone marrow transplantation. Through analysis of transcriptional microarray data, we find that GPR18 is highly expressed in IELs, lymphoid progenitors, and mature follicular B cells. To establish the physiological role of this largely uncharacterized GPR, we generated Gpr18-/- mice. Despite high levels of GPR18 expression in specific hematopoietic progenitors, Gpr18-/- mice have no defects in lymphopoiesis or myelopoiesis. Moreover, antibody responses following immunization with hapten-protein conjugates or infection with West Nile virus are normal in Gpr18-/- mice. Steady-state numbers of IELs are also normal in Gpr18-/- mice. However, competitive bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that GPR18 is cell-intrinsically required for the optimal restoration of small intestine TCRγδ+ and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ IELs. In contrast, GPR18 is dispensable for the reconstitution of large intestine IELs. Moreover, Gpr18-/- bone marrow reconstitutes small intestine IELs similarly to controls in athymic recipients. Gpr18-/- chimeras show no changes in susceptibility to intestinal insults such as Citrobacter rodentium infections or graft versus host disease. These data reveal highly specific requirements for GPR18 in the development and reconstitution of thymus-derived intestinal IEL subsets in the steady-state and after bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26197390

  19. Genome-Wide Tissue-Specific Farnesoid X Receptor Binding in Mouse Liver and Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ann M.; Hart, Steven N.; Kong, Bo; Fang, Jianwen; Zhong, Xiao-bo; Guo, Grace L.

    2016-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is highly expressed in liver and intestine and crosstalk mediated by FXR in these two organs is critical in maintaining bile acid homeostasis. FXR deficiency has been implicated in many liver and intestine diseases. However, regulation of transcription by FXR at the genomic level is not known. This study analyzed genome-wide FXR binding in liver and intestine of mice treated with a synthetic FXR ligand (GW4064) by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). The results showed a large degree of tissue-specific FXR binding, with only 11% of total sites shared between liver and intestine. The sites were widely distributed between intergenic, upstream, intragenic, and downstream of genes, with novel sites identified within even known FXR target genes. Motif analysis revealed a half nuclear receptor binding site, normally bound by a few orphan nuclear receptors, adjacent to the FXR response elements, indicating possible involvement of some orphan nuclear receptors in modulating FXR function. Furthermore, pathway analysis indicated that FXR may be extensively involved in multiple cellular metabolic pathways. Conclusion This study reports genome-wide FXR binding in vivo and the results clearly demonstrate tissue-specific FXR/gene interaction. In addition, FXR may be involved in regulating broader biological pathways in maintaining hepatic and intestinal homeostasis. PMID:20091679

  20. Food Additive P-80 Impacts Mouse Gut Microbiota Promoting Intestinal Inflammation, Obesity and Liver Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ratnesh Kumar; Wheildon, Nolan; Ishikawa, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity has emerged as one of the most important global public health issue. The change to the human microbiome as a result of changes in the quality and quantity of food intake over the past several decades has been implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We administered polysorbate-80 to mice via gavage. The researchers monitor liver noninvasively using a bioluminescence imaging. For the liver dysfunction we measure the liver enzymes and PAS stain on liver, electron microscopy liver mitochondria. For the assessment of intestinal inflammation we measured fecal LCN2, LPS, MPO and flagellin by ELISA and qPCR. We use confocal microscopy to detect closet bacteria near the epithelium. 16S sequence was used for the composition of microbiota. Compared with control mice, those receiving emulsifier, showed impaired glycemic tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, altered liver enzymes, larger mitochondria and increased gall bladder size. Additionally, mice in the experimental group showed higher levels of DCA, reduced Muc2 RNA expression, reduced mucus thickness in the intestinal epithelium and increased gut permeability. Intestinal bacteria of mice receiving P-80 were found deeper in the mucus and closer to the intestinal epithelium and had increased level of bioactive LPS, flagellin and LCN2 expression. The result of the study are supportive of evidence that emulsifier agents such as polysorbate-80, may be contributing to obesity related intestinal inflammation and progression of liver dysfunction and alternation of gut microbiota. PMID:27430014

  1. A rare presentation of midgut malrotation as an acute intestinal obstruction in an adult: Two case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shailendra; Das, Anupam; Chawla, A.S.; Arya, S.V.; Chaggar, Jasneet

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Midgut malrotation is a congenital anomaly presenting mainly in the childhood. Its presentation as an acute intestinal obstruction is extremely rare in adults usually recognized intra-operatively, therefore a high index of suspicion is always required when dealing with any case of acute intestinal obstruction. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report two cases of young adults who presented with symptoms of acute intestinal obstruction and were diagnosed intra-operatively as cecal volvulus and paraduodenal hernia, respectively, caused by midgut malrotation. Post-operative CT scan confirmed these findings. DISCUSSION Malrotation of the intestinal tract is a product of an aberrant embryology. The presentation of intestinal malrotation in adults is rare (0.2–0.5%). Contrast enhanced CT can show the abnormal anatomic location of a right sided small bowel, a left-sided colon and an abnormal relationship of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) situated to the left of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) instead of to the right. CONCLUSION Anomalies like midgut malrotation can present as an operative surprise and awareness regarding these anomalies can help surgeons deal with these conditions. PMID:23123419

  2. Intestinal establishment and reproduction of adult Trichinella spp. in single and mixed species infections in foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Webster, Pia; Kapel, Christian M O

    2005-06-30

    Intestinal establishment and reproduction of adult Trichinella spiralis, Trichinella nativa, Trichinella britovi and Trichinella pseudospiralis were examined as single species or mixed species infections in foxes. This is the first study of intestinal dynamics of Trichinella spp. in a carnivore model and the results suggest that the intestinal phase is relatively short as only very few worms were recovered 10 days post-inoculation (dpi). In mixed species infection with equal doses of T. nativa and T. spiralis, molecular typing demonstrated that 64% of the intestinal worms and 78% of the muscle larvae were T. nativa. Conversely, T. spiralis dominated in the mixed species infections with T. pseudospiralis, constituting 66% of the intestinal worms and 94% of the muscle larvae. Although, the individual recoveries of intestinal worms were only up to 5.6% on day 1, and up to 1.5% on day 4 post-infection, the muscle larvae establishment was comparable to other fox studies. Infectivity, measured as muscle larvae burden did not differ among the four species of Trichinella, which is in contrast to other models with mice, rats, pigs or herbivores. Although statistically significant differences in intestinal worm burdens were found for some days, no distinct species were recovered in consistently higher numbers than the others. PMID:15925724

  3. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xin; Guan, Wuqiang; Yu, Yong-Chun; Fu, Yinghui

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU{sup +} cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU{sup +} cells, very few are mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1{sup +} microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition.

  4. Transport of Particles in Intestinal Mucus under Simulated Infant and Adult Physiological Conditions: Impact of Mucus Structure and Extracellular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R.; Bajka, Balazs H.; Rigby, Neil M.; Nau, Françoise; Dupont, Didier

    2014-01-01

    The final boundary between digested food and the cells that take up nutrients in the small intestine is a protective layer of mucus. In this work, the microstructural organization and permeability of the intestinal mucus have been determined under conditions simulating those of infant and adult human small intestines. As a model, we used the mucus from the proximal (jejunal) small intestines of piglets and adult pigs. Confocal microscopy of both unfixed and fixed mucosal tissue showed mucus lining the entire jejunal epithelium. The mucus contained DNA from shed epithelial cells at different stages of degradation, with higher amounts of DNA found in the adult pig. The pig mucus comprised a coherent network of mucin and DNA with higher viscosity than the more heterogeneous piglet mucus, which resulted in increased permeability of the latter to 500-nm and 1-µm latex beads. Multiple-particle tracking experiments revealed that diffusion of the probe particles was considerably enhanced after treating mucus with DNase. The fraction of diffusive 500-nm probe particles increased in the pig mucus from 0.6% to 64% and in the piglet mucus from ca. 30% to 77% after the treatment. This suggests that extracellular DNA can significantly contribute to the microrheology and barrier properties of the intestinal mucus layer. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the structure and permeability of the small intestinal mucus have been compared between different age groups and the contribution of extracellular DNA highlighted. The results help to define rules governing colloidal transport in the developing small intestine. These are required for engineering orally administered pharmaceutical preparations with improved delivery, as well as for fabricating novel foods with enhanced nutritional quality or for controlled calorie uptake. PMID:24755941

  5. Binding kinetics of Clostridium difficile toxins A and B to intestinal brush border membranes from infant and adult hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, R.D. )

    1991-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if the relative resistance of neonates and infants to Clostridium difficile-associated intestinal disease can be related to age-dependent differences in intestinal receptors for C. difficile toxins A and B. Brush border membranes (BBMs) from the small intestines of adult and infant hamsters were examined for their ability to bind radiolabeled toxins A and B. (125I)toxin A bound to both infant and adult hamster BBMs at physiological temperature, whereas (125I)toxin B did not bind to the BBMs under any of the conditions examined. The number of (125I)toxin A molecules bound at saturation was approximately 4 x 10(10) per micrograms of membrane protein for adult BBMs and 1 x 10(11) per micrograms of membrane protein for infant BBMs. Scatchard plot analysis suggested the presence of a single class of toxin A binding sites on both infant and adult hamster BBMs. Maximal binding capacity and Kd values were 0.63 pmol/mg of protein and 66.7 nM, respectively, for the infant BBMs, and 0.24 pmol/mg of protein and 27 nM, respectively, for the adult BBMs. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analyses of extracted BBM proteins revealed differences in the proteins of infant and adult BBMs. However, there were not any detectable differences in the protein bands which bound (125I)toxin A between infant and adult hamsters. The results from these investigations indicate that differences in the binding kinetics of toxins A and/or B to infant and adult hamster BBMs do not account for the observed differences in their susceptibility to C. difficile-associated intestinal disease.

  6. The ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase regulates adult intestinal stem cell proliferation during homeostasis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenghan; Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Yang, Eungi; Nojima, Hisashi; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-05-15

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation, and is aberrantly activated in colorectal cancer. Inhibitors of the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks) have become lead therapeutic candidates for Wnt-driven cancers, following the recent discovery that Tnks targets Axin, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, for proteolysis. Initial reports indicated that Tnks is important for Wnt pathway activation in cultured human cell lines. However, the requirement for Tnks in physiological settings has been less clear, as subsequent studies in mice, fish and flies suggested that Tnks was either entirely dispensable for Wnt-dependent processes in vivo, or alternatively, had tissue-specific roles. Here, using null alleles, we demonstrate that the regulation of Axin by the highly conserved Drosophila Tnks homolog is essential for the control of ISC proliferation. Furthermore, in the adult intestine, where activity of the Wingless pathway is graded and peaks at each compartmental boundary, Tnks is dispensable for signaling in regions where pathway activity is high, but essential where pathway activity is relatively low. Finally, as observed previously for Wingless pathway components, Tnks activity in absorptive enterocytes controls the proliferation of neighboring ISCs non-autonomously by regulating JAK/STAT signaling. These findings reveal the requirement for Tnks in the control of ISC proliferation and suggest an essential role in the amplification of Wnt signaling, with relevance for development, homeostasis and cancer. PMID:27190037

  7. METABOLISM OF 1-NITROPYRENE BY HUMAN, RAT, AND MOUSE INTESTINAL FLORA: NYTAGENICITY OF ISOLATED METABOLITES BY DIRECT ANALYSIS OF HPLC FRACTIONS WITH A MICROSUSPENSION REVERSE MUTATION ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Among the nitro-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons identified in environmental samples and known to be genotoxic, 1-nitropyrene is one of the most abundant. he biotransformation of 1-nitro[14C]pyrene by human, rat, and mouse intestinal microflora and the mutagenicity of...

  8. Effects of laxative and N-acetylcysteine on mucus accumulation, bacterial load, transit, and inflammation in the cystic fibrosis mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    De Lisle, Robert C; Roach, Eileen; Jansson, Kyle

    2007-09-01

    The accumulation of mucus in affected organs is characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF). The CF mouse small intestine has dramatic mucus accumulation and exhibits slower interdigestive intestinal transit. These factors are proposed to play cooperative roles that foster small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and contribute to the innate immune response of the CF intestine. It was hypothesized that decreasing the mucus accumulation would reduce SIBO and might improve other aspects of the CF intestinal phenotype. To test this, solid chow-fed CF mice were treated with an osmotic laxative to improve gut hydration or liquid-fed mice were treated orally with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to break mucin disulfide bonds. Treatment with laxative or NAC reduced mucus accumulation by 43% and 50%, respectively, as measured histologically as dilation of the intestinal crypts. Laxative and NAC also reduced bacterial overgrowth in the CF intestine by 92% and 63%, respectively. Treatment with laxative normalized small intestinal transit in CF mice, whereas NAC did not. The expression of innate immune response-related genes was significantly reduced in laxative-treated CF mice, whereas there was no significant effect in NAC-treated CF mice. In summary, laxative and NAC treatments of CF mice reduced mucus accumulation to a similar extent, but laxative was more effective than NAC at reducing bacterial load. Eradication of bacterial overgrowth by laxative treatment was associated with normalized intestinal transit and a reduction in the innate immune response. These results suggest that both mucus accumulation and slowed interdigestive small intestinal transit contribute to SIBO in the CF intestine. PMID:17615175

  9. Downregulation of mouse intestinal Na(+)-coupled glucose transporter SGLT1 by gum arabic (Acacia Senegal).

    PubMed

    Nasir, Omaima; Artunc, Ferruh; Wang, Kan; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Föller, Michael; Ebrahim, Ammar; Kempe, Daniela S; Biswas, Raja; Bhandaru, Madhuri; Walter, Michael; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Wagner, Carsten A; Saeed, Amal M; Lang, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal Na(+)-coupled glucose transporter SGLT1 determines the rate of glucose transport, which in turn influences glucose-induced insulin release and development of obesity. The present study explored effects of Gum Arabic (GA), a dietary polysaccharide from dried exudates of Acacia Senegal, on intestinal glucose transport and body weight in wild-type C57Bl/6 mice. Treatment with GA (100 g/l) in drinking water for four weeks did not affect intestinal SGLT1 transcript levels but decreased SGLT1 protein abundance in jejunal brush border membrane vesicles. Glucose-induced jejunal short-circuit currents revealed that GA treatment decreased electrogenic glucose transport. Drinking a 20% glucose solution for four weeks significantly increased body weight and fasting plasma glucose concentrations, effects significantly blunted by simultaneous treatment with GA. GA further significantly blunted the increase in body weight, fasting plasma glucose and fasting insulin concentrations during high fat diet. In conclusion, the present observations disclose a completely novel effect of gum arabic, i.e. its ability to decrease intestinal SGLT1 expression and activity and thus to counteract glucose-induced obesity. PMID:20110681

  10. Contribution of mucosal maltase-glucoamylase activities to mouse small intestinal starch alpha-glucogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digestion of starch requires activities provided by 6 interactive small intestinal enzymes. Two of these are luminal endo-glucosidases named alpha-amylases. Four are exo-glucosidases bound to the luminal surface of enterocytes. These mucosal activities were identified as 4 different maltases. Two ma...

  11. Relative biologic effectiveness determination in mouse intestine for scanning proton beam at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. Influence of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gueulette, John . E-mail: gueulette@rbnt.ucl.ac.be; Blattmann, Hans; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, A.; Coster, Blanche de; Mahy, Pierre; Wambersie, Andre; Goitein, Gudrun

    2005-07-01

    Purpose To determine the relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) scanning proton beam in reference conditions and to evaluate the influence of intestine motion on the proton dose homogeneity. Methods and Materials: First, RBE was determined for crypt regeneration in mice after irradiation in a single fraction. Irradiation was performed at the middle of a 7-cm spread out Bragg peak (SOBP; reference position), as well as in the proximal part of the plateau and at the distal end of the SOBP. Control {gamma}-irradiation was randomized with proton irradiation and performed simultaneously. Second, motion of mouse intestine was determined by radiographs after copper wire markers had been placed on the jejunum and intestinal wall. Results: Proton RBE (reference {sup 60}Co {gamma}) was equal to 1.16 for irradiation at the middle of the SOBP and to 1.11 and 1.21 for irradiation in the initial plateau and end of the SOBP, respectively. The confidence intervals for these RBE values were much larger than those obtained in the other proton beams we have tested so far. They exceeded {+-}0.20 (compared with the usual value of {+-}0.07), which resulted from the unusually large dispersion of the individual proton data. The instantaneous positions of the mice intestines varied by {+-}2 mm in the course of irradiation. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that the RBE of the PSI proton beam is in total accordance with the RBE obtained at the other centers. This experiment has corroborated that proton RBE at the middle of the SOBP is slightly larger than the generic value of 1.10 and that there is a slight tendency for the RBE to increase close to the end of the SOBP. Also, excessive dispersion of individual proton data may be considered to result from intestine motion, taking into account that irradiation at the PSI is delivered dynamically by scanning the target volume with a pencil proton beam ('spot scanning'). Because 2-mm movements

  12. Thyroid hormone activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling involved in adult epithelial development during intestinal remodeling in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenta; Kajita, Mitsuko; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko

    2016-08-01

    During amphibian intestinal remodeling, thyroid hormone (TH) induces some larval epithelial cells to dedifferentiate into adult stem cells, which newly generate the absorptive epithelium analogous to the mammalian epithelium. To clarify molecular mechanisms underlying adult epithelial development, we here focus on TH response genes that are associated with the canonical Wnt pathway. Our quantitative reverse transcription plus polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analyses indicate that all of the genes examined, including β-catenin, c-Myc and secreted frizzle-related protein 2 (SFRP2), are up-regulated in Xenopus laevis intestine during both natural and TH-induced metamorphosis. Moreover, immunoreactivity for nuclear β-catenin becomes detectable in adult stem cells from the start of their appearance and then increases in intensity in adult epithelial primordia derived from the stem cells, which actively proliferate and coexpress Wnt target genes c-Myc and LGR5. These expression profiles strongly suggest the involvement of the canonical Wnt pathway in the maintenance and/or proliferation of adult stem/progenitor cells. More importantly, by using organ cultures of the tadpole intestine, we have experimentally shown that the addition of exogenous SFRP2 protein to the culture medium promotes cell proliferation of the adult epithelial primordia, whereas inhibition of endogenous SFRP2 by its antibody suppresses their proliferation. The inhibition of SFRP2 suppresses larval epithelial changes in shape from simple columnar to stem-cell-like roundish cells, resulting in the failure of epithelial dedifferentiation. Thus, TH-up-regulated SFRP2 in the postembryonic intestine promotes adult stem cell development, possibly by acting as an agonist of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:27068920

  13. Baicalein induces CD4+Foxp3+ T cells and enhances intestinal barrier function in a mouse model of food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Min-Jung; Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong; Jung, Sun Young; Kwon, Da-Ae; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of food allergy, which is triggered by allergen permeation of the gastrointestinal tract followed by a T-helper (Th) 2-mediated immune response, has been increasing annually worldwide. We examined the effects of baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis used in oriental herbal medicine, on regulatory T (Treg) cell induction and intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions in a mouse model of food allergy. An allergic response was induced by oral challenge with ovalbumin, and the incidence of allergic symptoms and T cell-related activity in the mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed with and without the presence of baicalein. Our results demonstrated that the administration of baicalein ameliorated the symptoms of food allergy and attenuated serum IgE and effector T cells. However, Treg-related factors were up-regulated by baicalein. Furthermore, baicalein was shown to enhance intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions. We also found that baicalein treatment induced the differentiation of Treg cells via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). Thus, the action of baicalein as an agonist of AhR can induce Treg differentiation and enhance barrier function, suggesting that baicalein might serve as an effective immune regulator derived from foods for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:27561877

  14. Baicalein induces CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells and enhances intestinal barrier function in a mouse model of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Min-Jung; Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong; Jung, Sun Young; Kwon, Da-Ae; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of food allergy, which is triggered by allergen permeation of the gastrointestinal tract followed by a T-helper (Th) 2-mediated immune response, has been increasing annually worldwide. We examined the effects of baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis used in oriental herbal medicine, on regulatory T (Treg) cell induction and intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions in a mouse model of food allergy. An allergic response was induced by oral challenge with ovalbumin, and the incidence of allergic symptoms and T cell-related activity in the mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed with and without the presence of baicalein. Our results demonstrated that the administration of baicalein ameliorated the symptoms of food allergy and attenuated serum IgE and effector T cells. However, Treg-related factors were up-regulated by baicalein. Furthermore, baicalein was shown to enhance intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions. We also found that baicalein treatment induced the differentiation of Treg cells via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). Thus, the action of baicalein as an agonist of AhR can induce Treg differentiation and enhance barrier function, suggesting that baicalein might serve as an effective immune regulator derived from foods for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:27561877

  15. Localization of PPAR isotypes in the adult mouse and human brain

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Anna; Truitt, Jay; Merriman, Morgan; Ponomareva, Olga; Jameson, Kelly; Ferguson, Laura B.; Mayfield, R. Dayne; Harris, R. Adron

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. PPAR agonists have well-documented anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective roles in the central nervous system. Recent evidence suggests that PPAR agonists are attractive therapeutic agents for treating neurodegenerative diseases as well as addiction. However, the distribution of PPAR mRNA and protein in brain regions associated with these conditions (i.e. prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, ventral tegmental area) is not well defined. Moreover, the cell type specificity of PPARs in mouse and human brain tissue has yet to be investigated. We utilized quantitative PCR and double immunofluorescence microscopy to determine that both PPAR mRNA and protein are expressed ubiquitously throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PPARs have unique cell type specificities that are consistent between species. PPARα was the only isotype to colocalize with all cell types in both adult mouse and adult human brain tissue. Overall, we observed a strong neuronal signature, which raises the possibility that PPAR agonists may be targeting neurons rather than glia to produce neuroprotection. Our results fill critical gaps in PPAR distribution and define novel cell type specificity profiles in the adult mouse and human brain. PMID:27283430

  16. Aeromonas caviae strain induces Th1 cytokine response in mouse intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S L; Lye, D J; McKinstry, Craig A.; Vesper, Sephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus. Microarray profiling of murine small intestinal extracts, 24 hours after oral infection with an A. caviae strain, provides evidence of a Th1 type immune response. A large number of gamma-interferon (γ-IFN) induced genes are up-regulated as well as several tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) transcripts. A. caviae has always been considered as opportunistic pathogen because it lacks obvious virulence factors. This current effort suggests that an A. caviae strain can colonize the murine intestinal tract and cause what has been described by others as a dysregulatory cytokine response. This response could explain why a number of diarrheal waterborne disease cases have been attributed to A. caviae even though it lacks obvious enteropathogenic properties.

  17. In vivo depletion and genetic targeting of mouse intestinal CX3CR1(+) mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Koscsó, Balázs; Gowda, Kavitha; Bogunovic, Milena

    2016-05-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) are an essential component of the intestinal immune system. They are comprised of a few dendritic cell and macrophage subsets, all with the common ability to sample extracellular milieu and to discriminate between dangerous and innocuous signals. Despite the commonality, each MP subset acquires distinct developmental pathways and unique functions, likely to fulfill needs of the tissue in which they reside. Some MP subsets develop from monocytes and are distinguished by their expression of CX3C-chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1). This manuscript summarizes our expertise in vivo targeting of intestinal CX3CR1(+) MP subsets. The described tools might be useful for studies of CX3CR1(+) MP function in various murine experimental models, particularly under non-inflammatory conditions. PMID:26705686

  18. Heat-killed bacteria induce genome instability in mouse small intestine, liver and spleen tissues.

    PubMed

    Koturbash, Igor; Thomas, James E; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2009-06-15

    Bacterial infection has been associated with several malignancies, yet the exact mechanism of infection-associated carcinogenesis remains obscure. Furthermore, it is still not clear whether oncontransformation requires an active infection process, or merely the presence of inactivated bacteria remnants is enough to cause deleterious effects. Here, we analyzed whether or not consumption of non-pathogenic and pathogenic heat-killed Escherichia coli leads to changes in genome stability in somatic tissues of exposed animals. For one week, mice were given to drink filtered or not-filtered water contaminated with heat-killed non-pathogenic E. coli DH5alpha or heat-killed pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 Sakai. Control animals received tap water. One week after exposure, molecular changes were analyzed in the small intestine, an organ that is in immediate contact with contaminated water. Additionally, we studied the effect in the distant spleen and liver, the organs that are involved in an immune response and detoxification, respectively. Finally, muscles were chosen as neutral tissues that were not supposed to be affected. Intestinal, liver and spleen but not muscle cells responded to all bacterial treatments with an increased level of DNA damage monitored by the induction of gammaH2AX foci. In the intestine, elevated levels of DNA damage were in parallel with an increase in Ku70 and p53 expression. We have also found an elevated level of cellular proliferation in the intestine, liver and spleen but not in muscle tissues of all exposed animals as measured by increase in PCNA levels. Our data suggest that exposure to heat-killed filtered bacteria can trigger substantial molecular responses and cause genomic instability in target and distant organs. Even though bacteria were non-pathogenic and unable to cause infection, their remnants still caused a profound effect on exposed animals. PMID:19440049

  19. Serial transplantation reveals the stem-cell-like regenerative potential of adult mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Overturf, K.; al-Dhalimy, M.; Ou, C. N.; Finegold, M.; Grompe, M.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has shown that adult mouse hepatocytes can divide at least 18 times in vivo. To test whether this represents the upper limit of their regenerative capacity, we performed serial transplantation of hepatocytes in the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency murine model of liver repopulation. Hepatocytes from adult donors were serially transplanted in limiting numbers six times and resulted in complete repopulation during each cycle. This corresponds to a minimal number of 69 cell doublings or a 7.3 x 10(20)-fold expansion. No evidence for abnormal liver function or altered hepatic architecture was found in repopulated animals. We conclude that a fraction of adult mouse hepatocytes have growth potential similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9358753

  20. TLR4-HMGB1-, MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling in mouse intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; He, Gui-Zhen; Wang, Yu-Kang; Zhu, Qian-Kun; Chen, Wei; Guo, Tai

    2015-01-01

    small intestine compared with the control group in the mouse intestinal I/R model. The administration of anti-HMGB1, anti-MyD88, and anti-TRIF antibodies markedly reduced damage caused by I/R, for which anti-HMGB1 antibody had the most obvious effect. CONCLUSION: HMGB1 and its downstream signaling pathway play important roles in the mouse intestinal I/R injury, and the effect of the TRIF-dependent pathway is slightly greater. PMID:26217083

  1. A comprehensive transcriptomic analysis of infant and adult mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Pan, Linlin; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiaonuan; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian

    2014-10-01

    Ovary development is a complex process involving numerous genes. A well-developed ovary is essential for females to keep fertility and reproduce offspring. In order to gain a better insight into the molecular mechanisms related to the process of mammalian ovary development, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis on ovaries isolated from infant and adult mice by using next-generation sequencing technology (SOLiD). We identified 15,454 and 16,646 transcriptionally active genes at the infant and adult stage, respectively. Among these genes, we also identified 7021 differentially expressed genes. Our analysis suggests that, in general, the adult ovary has a higher level of transcriptomic activity. However, it appears that genes related to primordial follicle development, such as those encoding Figla and Nobox, are more active in the infant ovary, whereas expression of genes vital for follicle development, such as Gdf9, Bmp4 and Bmp15, is upregulated in the adult. These data suggest a dynamic shift in gene expression during ovary development and it is apparent that these changes function to facilitate follicle maturation, when additional functional gene studies are considered. Furthermore, our investigation has also revealed several important functional pathways, such as apoptosis, MAPK and steroid biosynthesis, that appear to be much more active in the adult ovary compared to those of the infant. These findings will provide a solid foundation for future studies on ovary development in mice and other mammals and help to expand our understanding of the complex molecular and cellular events that occur during postnatal ovary development. PMID:25251848

  2. DNA-methylome analysis of mouse intestinal adenoma identifies a tumour-specific signature that is partly conserved in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Christina; Chavez, Lukas; Vilardell, Mireia; Farrall, Alexandra L; Tierling, Sascha; Böhm, Julia W; Grote, Phillip; Lienhard, Matthias; Dietrich, Jörn; Timmermann, Bernd; Walter, Jörn; Schweiger, Michal R; Lehrach, Hans; Herwig, Ralf; Herrmann, Bernhard G; Morkel, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant CpG methylation is a universal epigenetic trait of cancer cell genomes. However, human cancer samples or cell lines preclude the investigation of epigenetic changes occurring early during tumour development. Here, we have used MeDIP-seq to analyse the DNA methylome of APC(Min) adenoma as a model for intestinal cancer initiation, and we present a list of more than 13,000 recurring differentially methylated regions (DMRs) characterizing intestinal adenoma of the mouse. We show that Polycomb Repressive Complex (PRC) targets are strongly enriched among hypermethylated DMRs, and several PRC2 components and DNA methyltransferases were up-regulated in adenoma. We further demonstrate by bisulfite pyrosequencing of purified cell populations that the DMR signature arises de novo in adenoma cells rather than by expansion of a pre-existing pattern in intestinal stem cells or undifferentiated crypt cells. We found that epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressors, which occurs frequently in colon cancer, was rare in adenoma. Quite strikingly, we identified a core set of DMRs, which is conserved between mouse adenoma and human colon cancer, thus possibly revealing a global panel of epigenetically modified genes for intestinal tumours. Our data allow a distinction between early conserved epigenetic alterations occurring in intestinal adenoma and late stochastic events promoting colon cancer progression, and may facilitate the selection of more specific clinical epigenetic biomarkers. PMID:23408899

  3. Long-Term Differential Changes in Mouse Intestinal Metabolomics after γ and Heavy Ion Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Prabhjit; Singh, Rajbir; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Tissue consequences of radiation exposure are dependent on radiation quality and high linear energy transfer (high-LET) radiation, such as heavy ions in space is known to deposit higher energy in tissues and cause greater damage than low-LET γ radiation. While radiation exposure has been linked to intestinal pathologies, there are very few studies on long-term effects of radiation, fewer involved a therapeutically relevant γ radiation dose, and none explored persistent tissue metabolomic alterations after heavy ion space radiation exposure. Using a metabolomics approach, we report long-term metabolomic markers of radiation injury and perturbation of signaling pathways linked to metabolic alterations in mice after heavy ion or γ radiation exposure. Intestinal tissues (C57BL/6J, female, 6 to 8 wks) were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QToF-MS) two months after 2 Gy γ radiation and results were compared to an equitoxic 56Fe (1.6 Gy) radiation dose. The biological relevance of the metabolites was determined using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Metabolic profile analysis showed radiation-type-dependent spatial separation of the groups. Decreased adenine and guanosine and increased inosine and uridine suggested perturbed nucleotide metabolism. While both the radiation types affected amino acid metabolism, the 56Fe radiation preferentially altered dipeptide metabolism. Furthermore, 56Fe radiation caused upregulation of ‘prostanoid biosynthesis’ and ‘eicosanoid signaling’, which are interlinked events related to cellular inflammation and have implications for nutrient absorption and inflammatory bowel disease during space missions and after radiotherapy. In conclusion, our data showed for the first time that metabolomics can not only be used to distinguish between heavy ion and γ radiation exposures, but also as a radiation

  4. Mouse matriptase-2: identification, characterization and comparative mRNA expression analysis with mouse hepsin in adult and embryonic tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, John D; Campagnolo, Luisa; Goodarzi, Goodarz; Truong, Tony N; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Quigley, James P

    2003-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of mouse matriptase-2 (m-matriptase-2), an 811-amino-acid protein composed of an N-terminal cytoplasmic domain, a membrane-spanning domain, two CUB (complement protein subcomponents C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 1) domains, three LDLR (low-density-lipoprotein receptor class A) domains and a C-terminal serine-protease domain. All m-matriptase-2 protein domain boundaries corresponded with intron/exon junctions of the encoding gene, which spans approx. 29 kb and comprises 18 exons. Matriptase-2 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat, with the rat matriptase-2 gene ( r-maltriptase-2 ) predicted to encode transmembrane and soluble isoforms. Western-blot analysis indicated that m-matriptase-2 migrates close to its theoretical molecular mass of 91 kDa, and immunofluorescence analysis was consistent with the proposed surface membrane localization of this protein. Reverse-transcription PCR and in-situ -hybridization analysis indicated that m-matriptase-2 expression overlaps with the distribution of mouse hepsin (m-hepsin, a cell-surface serine protease identified in hepatoma cells) in adult tissues and during embryonic development. In adult tissues both are expressed at highest levels in liver, kidney and uterus. During embryogenesis m-matriptase-2 expression peaked between days 12.5 and 15.5. m-hepsin expression was biphasic, with peaks at day 7.5 to 8.5 and again between days 12.5 and 15.5. In situ hybridization of embryonic tissues indicated abundant expression of both m-matriptase-2 and m-hepsin in the developing liver and at lower levels in developing pharyngo-tympanic tubes. While m-hepsin was detected in the residual embryonic yolk sac and with lower intensity in lung, heart, gastrointestinal tract, developing kidney tubules and epithelium of the oral cavity, m-matriptase-2 was absent in these tissues, but strongly expressed within the nasal cavity by olfactory epithelial

  5. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org). PMID:22832508

  6. AT1R blocker losartan attenuates intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis in a mouse model of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Jing; Shi, Yong-Yan; Wang, En-Bo; Zhu, Tong; Zhao, Qun

    2016-02-01

    Angiotensin II, which is the main effector of the renin‑angiotensin system, has an important role in intestinal inflammation via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of the AT1R blocker losartan on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Losartan was administered to male adult C57BL/6 J mice 2 weeks prior to the induction of colitis, and images of the whole colon were captured to record changes, scored according to a microscopic scoring system, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed in order to investigate colonic inflammation. In addition, intestinal epithelial barrier permeability was evaluated, and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis was measured using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and apoptosis-related protein expression levels were detected by western blotting. Losartan was able to attenuate TNBS-induced body weight loss and colonic damage. Furthermore, T helper 1-mediated proinflammatory cytokines were suppressed by losartan, and gut permeability was largely preserved. TUNEL staining revealed reduced IEC apoptosis in the losartan-treated mice. Losartan also increased the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2)/Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) ratio and suppressed caspase-3 induction. These results suggested that the AT1R blocker losartan may attenuate TNBS-induced colitis by inhibiting the apoptosis of IECs. The effects of losartan were partially mediated through increasing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and subsequently suppressing the induction of the proapoptotic mediator caspase-3. PMID:26676112

  7. Cardiomyogenic potential of c-kit+ expressing cells derived from neonatal and adult mouse hearts

    PubMed Central

    Zaruba, Marc-Michael; Soonpaa, Mark; Reuter, Sean; Field, Loren J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background c-kit is a receptor tyrosine kinase family member expressed in hematopoietic stem cells. c-kit is also transiently expressed in cardiomyocyte precursors during development, and in a rare cell population in the normal adult heart. Here, the cardiomyogenic potential of c-kit+ cells isolated from normal neonatal, normal adult and infarcted adult mouse hearts was evaluated. Methods and Results Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) was used to prepare c-kit+ cells from the hearts of ACT-EGFP/MHC-nLAC double transgenic mice. These animals exhibit widespread enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression and cardiomyocyte-restricted nuclear β-galactosidase activity, thus permitting simultaneous tracking of cell survival and differentiation. A subset of the c-kit+ cells from double transgenic neonatal hearts acquired a cardiomyogenic phenotype when co-cultured with fetal cardiomyocytes (2.4% of all EGFP+ cells screened), but not when cultured alone or when co-cultured with mouse fibroblasts (0.03% and 0.05% of the EGFP+ cells screened, respectively). In contrast, c-kit+ cells from normal adult double transgenic hearts failed to undergo cardiomyogenic differentiation when co-cultured with non-transgenic fetal cardiomyocytes (>18,000 EGFP+ cells screened) or when transplanted into normal or infarcted adult mouse hearts (14 EGFP+ grafts examined). A single c-kit+ cell from an infarcted double transgenic adult heart was observed to acquire a cardiomyogenic phenotype in co-culture (>37,000 EGFP+ cells screened). Conclusions These data suggest that the ability of cardiac-resident c-kit+ cells to acquire a cardiomyogenic phenotype is subject to temporal limitations, or alternatively that the cardiomyogenic population is lost. Elucidation of the underlying molecular basis may permit robust cardiomyogenic induction in adult-derived cardiac c-kit+ cells. PMID:20421520

  8. Hair cell replacement in adult mouse utricles after targeted ablation of hair cells with diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed

    Golub, Justin S; Tong, Ling; Ngyuen, Tot B; Hume, Cliff R; Palmiter, Richard D; Rubel, Edwin W; Stone, Jennifer S

    2012-10-24

    We developed a transgenic mouse to permit conditional and selective ablation of hair cells in the adult mouse utricle by inserting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) gene into the Pou4f3 gene, which encodes a hair cell-specific transcription factor. In adult wild-type mice, administration of diphtheria toxin (DT) caused no significant hair cell loss. In adult Pou4f3(+/DTR) mice, DT treatment reduced hair cell numbers to 6% of normal by 14 days post-DT. Remaining hair cells were located primarily in the lateral extrastriola. Over time, hair cell numbers increased in these regions, reaching 17% of untreated Pou4f3(+/DTR) mice by 60 days post-DT. Replacement hair cells were morphologically distinct, with multiple cytoplasmic processes, and displayed evidence for active mechanotransduction channels and synapses characteristic of type II hair cells. Three lines of evidence suggest replacement hair cells were derived via direct (nonmitotic) transdifferentiation of supporting cells: new hair cells did not incorporate BrdU, supporting cells upregulated the pro-hair cell gene Atoh1, and supporting cell numbers decreased over time. This study introduces a new method for efficient conditional hair cell ablation in adult mouse utricles and demonstrates that hair cells are spontaneously regenerated in vivo in regions where there may be ongoing hair cell turnover. PMID:23100430

  9. Effect of in ovo administration of an adult-derived microbiota on establishment of the intestinal microbiome in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Adriana A; Batal, Amy B; Lee, Margie D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of in ovo administration of a probiotic on development of the intestinal microbiota of 2 genetic lineages (modern and heritage) of chickens. SAMPLE 10 newly hatched chicks and 40 fertile eggs to determine intestinal microbiota at hatch, 900 fertile eggs to determine effects of probiotic on hatchability, and 1,560 chicks from treated or control eggs. PROCEDURES A probiotic competitive-exclusion product derived from adult microbiota was administered in ovo to fertile eggs of both genetic lineages. Cecal contents and tissues were collected from embryos, newly hatched chicks, and chicks. A PCR assay was used to detect bacteria present within the cecum of newly hatched chicks. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and vitality staining were used to detect viable bacteria within intestines of embryos. The intestinal microbiota was assessed by use of 16S pyrosequencing. RESULTS Microscopic evaluation of embryonic cecal contents and tissues subjected to differential staining techniques revealed viable bacteria in low numbers. Development of the intestinal microbiota of broiler chicks of both genetic lineages was enhanced by in ovo administration of adult microbiota. Although the treatment increased diversity and affected composition of the microbiota of chicks, most bacterial species present in the probiotic were transient colonizers. However, the treatment decreased the abundance of undesirable bacterial species within heritage lineage chicks. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In ovo inoculation of a probiotic competitive-exclusion product derived from adult microbiota may be a viable method of managing development of the microbiota and reducing the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria in chickens. PMID:27111019

  10. Culture and establishment of self-renewing human and mouse adult liver and pancreas 3D organoids and their genetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Broutier, Laura; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Hindley, Christopher J; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-09-01

    Adult somatic tissues have proven difficult to expand in vitro, largely because of the complexity of recreating appropriate environmental signals in culture. We have overcome this problem recently and developed culture conditions for adult stem cells that allow the long-term expansion of adult primary tissues from small intestine, stomach, liver and pancreas into self-assembling 3D structures that we have termed 'organoids'. We provide a detailed protocol that describes how to grow adult mouse and human liver and pancreas organoids, from cell isolation and long-term expansion to genetic manipulation in vitro. Liver and pancreas cells grow in a gel-based extracellular matrix (ECM) and a defined medium. The cells can self-organize into organoids that self-renew in vitro while retaining their tissue-of-origin commitment, genetic stability and potential to differentiate into functional cells in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo (hepatocytes and endocrine cells). Genetic modification of these organoids opens up avenues for the manipulation of adult stem cells in vitro, which could facilitate the study of human biology and allow gene correction for regenerative medicine purposes. The complete protocol takes 1-4 weeks to generate self-renewing 3D organoids and to perform genetic manipulation experiments. Personnel with basic scientific training can conduct this protocol. PMID:27560176

  11. Whole Mount Dissection and Immunofluorescence of the Adult Mouse Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Scott C; Cox, Brandon C

    2016-01-01

    The organ of Corti, housed in the cochlea of the inner ear, contains mechanosensory hair cells and surrounding supporting cells which are organized in a spiral shape and have a tonotopic gradient for sound detection. The mouse cochlea is approximately 6 mm long and often divided into three turns (apex, middle, and base) for analysis. To investigate cell loss, cell division, or mosaic gene expression, the whole mount or surface preparation of the cochlea is useful. This dissection method allows visualization of all cells within the organ of Corti when combined with immunostaining and confocal microscopy to image cells at different planes in the z-axis. Multiple optical cross-sections can also be obtained from these z-stack images. In addition, the whole mount dissection method can be used for scanning electron microscopy, although a different fixation method is needed. Here, we present a method to isolate the organ of Corti as three intact cochlear turns (apex, middle, and base). This method can be used for mice ranging from one week of age through adulthood and differs from the technique used for neonatal samples where calcification of the cochlea is incomplete. A slightly modified version can be used for dissection of the rat cochlea. We also demonstrate a procedure for immunostaining with fluorescently tagged antibodies. PMID:26779585

  12. Carriage of λ Latent Virus Is Costly for Its Bacterial Host due to Frequent Reactivation in Monoxenic Mouse Intestine.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Marianne; Tournier, Laurent; Moncaut, Elisabeth; Son, Olivier; Langella, Philippe; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2016-02-01

    Temperate phages, the bacterial viruses able to enter in a dormant prophage state in bacterial genomes, are present in the majority of bacterial strains for which the genome sequence is available. Although these prophages are generally considered to increase their hosts' fitness by bringing beneficial genes, studies demonstrating such effects in ecologically relevant environments are relatively limited to few bacterial species. Here, we investigated the impact of prophage carriage in the gastrointestinal tract of monoxenic mice. Combined with mathematical modelling, these experimental results provided a quantitative estimation of key parameters governing phage-bacteria interactions within this model ecosystem. We used wild-type and mutant strains of the best known host/phage pair, Escherichia coli and phage λ. Unexpectedly, λ prophage caused a significant fitness cost for its carrier, due to an induction rate 50-fold higher than in vitro, with 1 to 2% of the prophage being induced. However, when prophage carriers were in competition with isogenic phage susceptible bacteria, the prophage indirectly benefited its carrier by killing competitors: infection of susceptible bacteria led to phage lytic development in about 80% of cases. The remaining infected bacteria were lysogenized, resulting overall in the rapid lysogenization of the susceptible lineage. Moreover, our setup enabled to demonstrate that rare events of phage gene capture by homologous recombination occurred in the intestine of monoxenic mice. To our knowledge, this study constitutes the first quantitative characterization of temperate phage-bacteria interactions in a simplified gut environment. The high prophage induction rate detected reveals DNA damage-mediated SOS response in monoxenic mouse intestine. We propose that the mammalian gut, the most densely populated bacterial ecosystem on earth, might foster bacterial evolution through high temperate phage activity. PMID:26871586

  13. Carriage of λ Latent Virus Is Costly for Its Bacterial Host due to Frequent Reactivation in Monoxenic Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, Marianne; Tournier, Laurent; Moncaut, Elisabeth; Son, Olivier; Langella, Philippe; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Temperate phages, the bacterial viruses able to enter in a dormant prophage state in bacterial genomes, are present in the majority of bacterial strains for which the genome sequence is available. Although these prophages are generally considered to increase their hosts’ fitness by bringing beneficial genes, studies demonstrating such effects in ecologically relevant environments are relatively limited to few bacterial species. Here, we investigated the impact of prophage carriage in the gastrointestinal tract of monoxenic mice. Combined with mathematical modelling, these experimental results provided a quantitative estimation of key parameters governing phage-bacteria interactions within this model ecosystem. We used wild-type and mutant strains of the best known host/phage pair, Escherichia coli and phage λ. Unexpectedly, λ prophage caused a significant fitness cost for its carrier, due to an induction rate 50-fold higher than in vitro, with 1 to 2% of the prophage being induced. However, when prophage carriers were in competition with isogenic phage susceptible bacteria, the prophage indirectly benefited its carrier by killing competitors: infection of susceptible bacteria led to phage lytic development in about 80% of cases. The remaining infected bacteria were lysogenized, resulting overall in the rapid lysogenization of the susceptible lineage. Moreover, our setup enabled to demonstrate that rare events of phage gene capture by homologous recombination occurred in the intestine of monoxenic mice. To our knowledge, this study constitutes the first quantitative characterization of temperate phage-bacteria interactions in a simplified gut environment. The high prophage induction rate detected reveals DNA damage-mediated SOS response in monoxenic mouse intestine. We propose that the mammalian gut, the most densely populated bacterial ecosystem on earth, might foster bacterial evolution through high temperate phage activity. PMID:26871586

  14. Effect of Dietary l-arabinose on the Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolism of Dietary Daidzein in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Motoi; KURUSU, Yukie; HORI, Sachiko

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of L-arabinose on mouse intestinal microbiota and urinary isoflavonoids. Male mice were randomly divided into two groups: those fed a 0.05% daidzein–2.5% L-arabinose diet (AR group) and those fed a 0.05% daidzein control diet (CO group) for 28 days. The amounts of daidzein detected in urine were significantly lower in the AR group than in the CO group. The ratio of equol/daidzein was significantly higher in the AR group (p<0.01) than in the CO group. The composition of caecal flora differed between the AR and CO groups. The occupation ratios of Prevotella and Lactobacillales were significantly lower in the AR group. This study suggests that dietary L-arabinose has the potential to affect the metabolism of equol from daidzein by altering the metabolic activity of intestinal microbiota. PMID:24936350

  15. Systematic literature review on self-reported quality of life in adult intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ceulemans, Laurens J; Lomme, Céline; Pirenne, Jacques; De Geest, Sabina

    2016-04-01

    Quality of life (QoL) gains importance in intestinal transplantation (ITx). This systematic review aimed to summarize all evidence on self-reported QoL in adult ITx. PubMed, EMBASE, CCTR, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched until October 2014. Structured data abstraction was performed and methodological quality was assessed using a standardized checklist. Nine eligible studies were identified addressing one or more study-aims: (i) QoL comparison pre- and post-ITx (n=4); (ii) QoL follow-up post-ITx (n=1); and (iii) QoL comparison between ITx and home parenteral nutrition (HPN) patients (n=6), healthy subjects (n=1), general population (n=1). Assessments indicated sub-optimal methodology throughout, e.g., retrospective (n=2) and cross-sectional (n=7) study designs, non-probabilistic sampling with inadequate matching of ITx subjects, non-standard terminology, lack of operational definitions and variety in assessment instruments. Still, despite these inconsistencies, this review produced three encouraging findings: (i) post-ITx QoL improved versus pre-ITx (anxiety, sleep, social support, leisure); (ii) post-ITx QoL improved with longer follow-up (anxiety, impulsiveness/control); and (iii) QoL between ITx and HPN patients was similar for most domains yet ITx patients excelled for energy, social functioning and travel ability. Although results are encouraging, QoL research in adult ITx is scarce and needs methodological improvement by implementing prospective multicenter studies, adequate QoL conceptualization and appropriate measurements. PMID:27066940

  16. Grape Seed Procyanidins and Cholestyramine Differentially Alter Bile Acid and Cholesterol Homeostatic Gene Expression in Mouse Intestine and Liver

    PubMed Central

    Heidker, Rebecca M.; Caiozzi, Gianella C.; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Bile acid (BA) sequestrants, lipid-lowering agents, may be prescribed as a monotherapy or combination therapy to reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. Over 33% of adults in the United States use complementary and alternative medicine strategies, and we recently reported that grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) reduces enterohepatic BA recirculation as a means to reduce serum triglyceride (TG) levels. The current study was therefore designed to assess the effects on BA, cholesterol and TG homeostatic gene expression following co-administration with GSPE and the BA sequestrant, cholestyramine (CHY). Eight-week old male C57BL/6 mice were treated for 4 weeks with either a control or 2% CHY-supplemented diet, after which, they were administered vehicle or GSPE for 14 hours. Liver and intestines were harvested and gene expression was analyzed. BA, cholesterol, non-esterified fatty acid and TG levels were also analyzed in serum and feces. Results reveal that GSPE treatment alone, and co-administration with CHY, regulates BA, cholesterol and TG metabolism differently than CHY administration alone. Notably, GSPE decreased intestinal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (Asbt) gene expression, while CHY significantly induced expression. Administration with GSPE or CHY robustly induced hepatic BA biosynthetic gene expression, especially cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), compared to control, while co-administration further enhanced expression. Treatment with CHY induced both intestinal and hepatic cholesterologenic gene expression, while co-administration with GSPE attenuated the CHY-induced increase in the liver but not intestine. CHY also induced hepatic lipogenic gene expression, which was attenuated by co-administration with GSPE. Consequently, a 25% decrease in serum TG levels was observed in the CHY+GSPE group, compared to the CHY group. Collectively, this study presents novel evidence demonstrating that GSPE provides additive and complementary

  17. Grape Seed Procyanidins and Cholestyramine Differentially Alter Bile Acid and Cholesterol Homeostatic Gene Expression in Mouse Intestine and Liver.

    PubMed

    Heidker, Rebecca M; Caiozzi, Gianella C; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Bile acid (BA) sequestrants, lipid-lowering agents, may be prescribed as a monotherapy or combination therapy to reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. Over 33% of adults in the United States use complementary and alternative medicine strategies, and we recently reported that grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) reduces enterohepatic BA recirculation as a means to reduce serum triglyceride (TG) levels. The current study was therefore designed to assess the effects on BA, cholesterol and TG homeostatic gene expression following co-administration with GSPE and the BA sequestrant, cholestyramine (CHY). Eight-week old male C57BL/6 mice were treated for 4 weeks with either a control or 2% CHY-supplemented diet, after which, they were administered vehicle or GSPE for 14 hours. Liver and intestines were harvested and gene expression was analyzed. BA, cholesterol, non-esterified fatty acid and TG levels were also analyzed in serum and feces. Results reveal that GSPE treatment alone, and co-administration with CHY, regulates BA, cholesterol and TG metabolism differently than CHY administration alone. Notably, GSPE decreased intestinal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (Asbt) gene expression, while CHY significantly induced expression. Administration with GSPE or CHY robustly induced hepatic BA biosynthetic gene expression, especially cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), compared to control, while co-administration further enhanced expression. Treatment with CHY induced both intestinal and hepatic cholesterologenic gene expression, while co-administration with GSPE attenuated the CHY-induced increase in the liver but not intestine. CHY also induced hepatic lipogenic gene expression, which was attenuated by co-administration with GSPE. Consequently, a 25% decrease in serum TG levels was observed in the CHY+GSPE group, compared to the CHY group. Collectively, this study presents novel evidence demonstrating that GSPE provides additive and complementary

  18. Meckel's diverticulum--a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adults.

    PubMed

    Bălălău, C; Bacalbaşa, N; Motofei, I; Popa, Fl; Voiculescu, S; Scăunaşu, R V

    2015-01-01

    Although many people have Meckel's diverticulum, only some experience any symptoms, most under the age of 10. In adults it is usually asymptomatic but approximately 4% develop complications. Meckel's diverticulum is usually diagnosed in the first years of life and after that the risk of the complications decreases with increasing age, with no predictive factors for the development of complications. We describe the case of a 34-year-old man admitted in the emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain, nausea, flatulence and lack of transit for feces and gas. The patient had been previously operated for peritonitis due to a perforated ulcer. Clinical examination and paraclinical investigations (abdominal radiography and ultrasound) suggested the diagnosis of intestinal obstruction, probably produced by adhesions due to previous abdominal intervention. The diverticulum was resected using a linear stapler and the patient recovered without any complications. Small bowel obstruction due to Meckel's diverticulitis may be caused by entangled loop of small bowel around a fibrous cord, intussusception, volvulus, or incarceration within a hernia sac. The discovery of a Meckel's diverticulum complication in a mid thirties patient represented an intra-operatory surprise and is the peculiarity of the case. PMID:25970960

  19. [Clinical aspects and therapy of intestinal non-rotation in adults].

    PubMed

    von Flüe, M; Bailleux, A; Stähelin, F; Vogt, B

    1990-06-01

    The intestinal non-rotation is a rare fetal disorder of the gut torsion. Its manifestation is very rarely seen in the adult, either in form of a volvulus of the midgut or ileocecal with an acute onset, or as chronic recurrent abdominal pain. Each diagnostic or therapeutic delay increases the risk of strangulation and may end as an abdominal disaster. We describe three own cases and we try to elucidate the diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Our proceeding: In the acute symptomatic form the explorative laparotomy with a consequent staging of the abdominal situs is the safest way to get an exact diagnosis. Therapeutically the procedure described by LADD is the best torsion prophylaxis; the ascending colon is sawn to the descending colon. Due to a paratopia, the appendectomy is recommended. In the chronic forms the contrast enema and the gastrointestinal barium study are the main diagnostic procedures. In the operation described by Fitzgerald and the ascending colon and the mesentery of the small bowel are--after incision of the common mesentery--fixed at their anatomical site. PMID:2228684

  20. Perilipin-2 Modulates Lipid Absorption and Microbiome Responses in the Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Daniel N.; Bales, Elise S.; Monks, Jenifer; Jackman, Matthew J.; MacLean, Paul S.; Ir, Diana; Robertson, Charles E.; Orlicky, David J.; McManaman, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and its co-morbidities, such as fatty liver disease, are increasingly prevalent worldwide health problems. Intestinal microorganisms have emerged as critical factors linking diet to host physiology and metabolic function, particularly in the context of lipid homeostasis. We previously demonstrated that deletion of the cytoplasmic lipid drop (CLD) protein Perilipin-2 (Plin2) in mice largely abrogates long-term deleterious effects of a high fat (HF) diet. Here we test the hypotheses that Plin2 function impacts the earliest steps of HF diet-mediated pathogenesis as well as the dynamics of diet-associated changes in gut microbiome diversity and function. WT and perilipin-2 null mice raised on a standard chow diet were randomized to either low fat (LF) or HF diets. After four days, animals were assessed for changes in physiological (body weight, energy balance, and fecal triglyceride levels), histochemical (enterocyte CLD content), and fecal microbiome parameters. Plin2-null mice had significantly lower respiratory exchange ratios, diminished frequencies of enterocyte CLDs, and increased fecal triglyceride levels compared with WT mice. Microbiome analyses, employing both 16S rRNA profiling and metagenomic deep sequencing, indicated that dietary fat content and Plin2 genotype were significantly and independently associated with gut microbiome composition, diversity, and functional differences. These data demonstrate that Plin2 modulates rapid effects of diet on fecal lipid levels, enterocyte CLD contents, and fuel utilization properties of mice that correlate with structural and functional differences in their gut microbial communities. Collectively, the data provide evidence of Plin2 regulated intestinal lipid uptake, which contributes to rapid changes in the gut microbial communities implicated in diet-induced obesity. PMID:26147095

  1. Inflammation Controls Sensitivity of Human and Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells to Galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Muglia, Cecilia I; Gobbi, Rodrigo Papa; Smaldini, Paola; Delgado, María Lucía Orsini; Candia, Martín; Zanuzzi, Carolina; Sambuelli, Alicia; Rocca, Andrés; Toscano, Marta A; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Docena, Guillermo H

    2016-07-01

    Galectins play key roles in the inflammatory cascade. In this study, we aimed to analyze the effect of galectin-1 (Gal-1) in the function of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) isolated from healthy and inflamed mucosa. IECs isolated from mice or patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) were incubated with different pro-inflammatory cytokines, and Gal-1 binding, secretion of homeostatic factors and viability were assessed. Experimental models of food allergy and colitis were used to evaluate the in vivo influence of inflammation on Gal-1 binding and modulation of IECs. We found an enhanced binding of Gal-1 to: (a) murine IECs exposed to IL-1β, TNF, and IL-13; (b) IECs from inflamed areas in intestinal tissue from IBD patients; (c) small bowel of allergic mice; and (d) colon from mice with experimental colitis. Our results showed that low concentrations of Gal-1 favored a tolerogenic micro-environment, whereas high concentrations of this lectin modulated viability of IECs through mechanisms involving activation of caspase-9 and modulation of Bcl-2 protein family members. Our results showed that, when added in the presence of diverse pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-13 and IL-5, Gal-1 differentially promoted the secretion of growth factors including thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), epidermal growth factor (EGF), IL-10, IL-25, and transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 ). In conclusion, we found an augmented binding of Gal-1 to IECs when exposed in vitro or in vivo to inflammatory stimuli, showing different effects depending on Gal-1 concentration. These findings highlight the importance of the inflammatory micro-environment of mucosal tissues in modulating IECs susceptibility to the immunoregulatory lectin Gal-1 and its role in epithelial cell homeostasis. PMID:26566180

  2. Perilipin-2 Modulates Lipid Absorption and Microbiome Responses in the Mouse Intestine.

    PubMed

    Frank, Daniel N; Bales, Elise S; Monks, Jenifer; Jackman, Matthew J; MacLean, Paul S; Ir, Diana; Robertson, Charles E; Orlicky, David J; McManaman, James L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and its co-morbidities, such as fatty liver disease, are increasingly prevalent worldwide health problems. Intestinal microorganisms have emerged as critical factors linking diet to host physiology and metabolic function, particularly in the context of lipid homeostasis. We previously demonstrated that deletion of the cytoplasmic lipid drop (CLD) protein Perilipin-2 (Plin2) in mice largely abrogates long-term deleterious effects of a high fat (HF) diet. Here we test the hypotheses that Plin2 function impacts the earliest steps of HF diet-mediated pathogenesis as well as the dynamics of diet-associated changes in gut microbiome diversity and function. WT and perilipin-2 null mice raised on a standard chow diet were randomized to either low fat (LF) or HF diets. After four days, animals were assessed for changes in physiological (body weight, energy balance, and fecal triglyceride levels), histochemical (enterocyte CLD content), and fecal microbiome parameters. Plin2-null mice had significantly lower respiratory exchange ratios, diminished frequencies of enterocyte CLDs, and increased fecal triglyceride levels compared with WT mice. Microbiome analyses, employing both 16S rRNA profiling and metagenomic deep sequencing, indicated that dietary fat content and Plin2 genotype were significantly and independently associated with gut microbiome composition, diversity, and functional differences. These data demonstrate that Plin2 modulates rapid effects of diet on fecal lipid levels, enterocyte CLD contents, and fuel utilization properties of mice that correlate with structural and functional differences in their gut microbial communities. Collectively, the data provide evidence of Plin2 regulated intestinal lipid uptake, which contributes to rapid changes in the gut microbial communities implicated in diet-induced obesity. PMID:26147095

  3. Adult mouse cortical cell taxonomy revealed by single cell transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T; Sorensen, Staci A; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-02-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. We constructed a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice on the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing. We identified 49 transcriptomic cell types, including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and 7 non-neuronal types. We also analyzed cell type-specific mRNA processing and characterized genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we found that some of our transcriptomic cell types displayed specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single-cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  4. Adult Mouse Cortical Cell Taxonomy by Single Cell Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T.; Sorensen, Staci A.; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M.; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. Here, we construct a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice based on single cell RNA-sequencing. We identify 49 transcriptomic cell types including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and seven non-neuronal types. We also analyze cell-type specific mRNA processing and characterize genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we show that some of our transcriptomic cell types display specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  5. A Comparison of Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton- or Gamma-Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Hamilton, Stanley; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    There are many consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment which can adversely affect the health of a crew member. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) involving nausea and vomiting, damage to radio-sensitive tissue such as the blood forming organs and gastrointestinal tract, and cancer are some of these negative effects. The space radiation environment is ample with protons and contains gamma rays as well. Little knowledge exists to this point, however, regarding the effects of protons on mammalian systems; conversely several studies have been performed observing the effects of gamma rays on different animal models. For the research presented here, we wish to compare our previous work looking at whole-body exposure to protons using a mouse model to our studies of mice experiencing whole-body exposure to gamma rays as part of the radio-adaptive response. Radio-adaptation is a well-documented phenomenon in which cells exposed to a priming low dose of radiation prior to a higher dose display a reduction in endpoints like chromosomal aberrations, cell death, micronucleus formation, and more when compared to their counterparts receiving high dose-irradiation only. Our group has recently completed a radio-adaptive experiment with C57BL/6 mice. For both this study and the preceding proton research, the gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the isolated small intestinal tissue was fixed in formalin for histopathological examination or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen for RNA isolation. Histopathologic observation of the tissue using standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest doses of 0.1 Gy of protons and 0.05 Gy of gamma rays, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. A smaller percentage of crypts showed 3 or more apoptotic lesions in animals that received 6 Gy of gamma-irradiation compared to mice

  6. Rac1 drives intestinal stem cell proliferation and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Myant, Kevin B; Scopelliti, Alessandro; Haque, Sara; Vidal, Marcos; Sansom, Owen J; Cordero, Julia B

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells are responsible for maintaining the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation within self-renewing tissues. The molecular and cellular mechanisms mediating such balance are poorly understood. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has emerged as an important mediator of stem cell homeostasis in various systems. Our recent work demonstrates that Rac1-dependent ROS production mediates intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in mouse models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we use the adult Drosophila midgut and the mouse small intestine to directly address the role of Rac1 in ISC proliferation and tissue regeneration in response to damage. Our results demonstrate that Rac1 is necessary and sufficient to drive ISC proliferation and regeneration in an ROS-dependent manner. Our data point to an evolutionarily conserved role of Rac1 in intestinal homeostasis and highlight the value of combining work in the mammalian and Drosophila intestine as paradigms to study stem cell biology. PMID:23974108

  7. Transgenic expression of oncogenic BRAF induces loss of stem cells in the mouse intestine, which is antagonized by β-catenin activity.

    PubMed

    Riemer, P; Sreekumar, A; Reinke, S; Rad, R; Schäfer, R; Sers, C; Bläker, H; Herrmann, B G; Morkel, M

    2015-06-11

    Colon cancer cells frequently carry mutations that activate the β-catenin and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. Yet how oncogenic alterations interact to control cellular hierarchies during tumor initiation and progression is largely unknown. We found that oncogenic BRAF modulates gene expression associated with cell differentiation in colon cancer cells. We therefore engineered a mouse with an inducible oncogenic BRAF transgene, and analyzed BRAF effects on cellular hierarchies in the intestinal epithelium in vivo and in primary organotypic culture. We demonstrate that transgenic expression of oncogenic BRAF in the mouse strongly activated MAPK signal transduction, resulted in the rapid development of generalized serrated dysplasia, but unexpectedly also induced depletion of the intestinal stem cell (ISC) pool. Histological and gene expression analyses indicate that ISCs collectively converted to short-lived progenitor cells after BRAF activation. As Wnt/β-catenin signals encourage ISC identity, we asked whether β-catenin activity could counteract oncogenic BRAF. Indeed, we found that intestinal organoids could be partially protected from deleterious oncogenic BRAF effects by Wnt3a or by small-molecule inhibition of GSK3β. Similarly, transgenic expression of stabilized β-catenin in addition to oncogenic BRAF partially prevented loss of stem cells in the mouse intestine. We also used BRAF(V637E) knock-in mice to follow changes in the stem cell pool during serrated tumor progression and found ISC marker expression reduced in serrated hyperplasia forming after BRAF activation, but intensified in progressive dysplastic foci characterized by additional mutations that activate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Our study suggests that oncogenic alterations activating the MAPK and Wnt/β-catenin pathways must be consecutively and coordinately selected to assure stem cell maintenance during colon cancer initiation and progression. Notably, loss of

  8. Psidium guajava leaf extract prevents intestinal colonization of Citrobacter rodentium in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja; Birdi, Tannaz

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are the second highest cause of mortality of children under 5 years worldwide. There is a continuous search for developing a cost-effective treatment for diarrhea as the present ones are facing challenges. Medicinal plants can be explored further as an alternative treatment for diarrhea. Psidium guajava leaves have been used as an antidiarrheal globally. Citrobacter rodentium, a common mouse pathogen, is known to mimic the pathogenecity of enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic E. coli. It can thus present an effective model to study infectious diarrhea. In the present study, the P. guajava leaf extract was tested for its efficacy in treating infectious diarrhea using a C. rodentium mouse model. The mice in the test group (treated with P. guajava leaf extract) showed quicker clearance of infection as compared with the control group. The bacterial load in the fecal sample of the mice in the test group was high on Day 4 as compared with that in the control group, suggesting a flush out of the bacteria. In the test group, 6/7 (85.71%) mice showed clearance of infection by Day 19. The control group continued to show infection till Day 29. P. guajava leaf extract thus has the potential for use in the treatment of infectious diarrhea. PMID:25878465

  9. Escherichia coli F-18 and E. coli K-12 eda mutants do not colonize the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, N J; Laux, D C; Cohen, P S

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli human fecal isolates F-18 and K-12 are excellent colonizers of the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine. E. coli F-18 and E. coli K-12 eda mutants (unable to utilize glucuronate, galacturonate, and gluconate) were constructed by insertional mutagenesis. Neither the E. coli F-18 eda nor the E. coli K-12 eda mutant was able to colonize the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine, whether they were fed to mice together with their respective parental strains or alone. Complementation of the eda mutants with pTC190 (containing a functional E. coli K-12 eda gene) completely restored the colonization ability of both eda mutants. Relative to their parental strains, the E. coli F-18 eda mutant and the E. coli K-12 eda mutant grew poorly in cecal mucus isolated from mice fed either normal mouse chow or a synthetic diet containing sucrose as the sole carbon source, yet the mutants and parental strains demonstrated identical growth rates in minimal medium with glucose as the carbon source. E. coli F-18 edd eda and E. coli K-12 edd eda double mutants colonized the streptomycin-treated intestine when fed to mice alone; however, when fed simultaneously with their respective parental strains, they were poor colonizers. Since the edd gene is involved only in gluconate metabolism via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, these results implicate the utilization of gluconate and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway as important elements in E. coli colonization of the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine. PMID:8751891

  10. TNFα/IFNγ Mediated Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction Is Attenuated by MicroRNA-93 Downregulation of PTK6 in Mouse Colonic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Haines, Ricci J; Beard, Richard S; Eitner, Rebecca A; Chen, Liwei; Wu, Mack H

    2016-01-01

    Since inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) represent significant morbidity and mortality in the US, the need for defining novel drug targets and inflammatory mechanisms would be of considerable benefit. Although protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6, also known as breast tumor kinase BRK) has been primarily studied in an oncogenic context, it was noted that PTK6 null mice exhibited significantly enhanced colonic epithelial barrier function. Considering that the inflammatory functions of PTK6 have not yet been explored, we hypothesized that cytokines responsible for mediating IBD, such as TNFα/IFNγ, may solicit the action of PTK6 to alter barrier function. After first assessing critical mediators of TNFα/IFNγ driven epithelial barrier dysfunction, we further explored the possibility of PTK6 in this inflammatory context. In this report, we showed that PTK6 siRNA and PTK6 null young adult mouse colonic epithelial cells (YAMC) exhibited significant attenuation of TNFα/IFNγ induced barrier dysfunction as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) assay and permeability assays. In addition, PTK6 null cells transfected with PTK6 cDNA displayed restored barrier dysfunction in response to TNFα/IFNγ, while the cells transfected with vector alone showed similar attenuation of barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, using subcellular fractionation and immunocytochemistry experiments, we found that PTK6 plays a role in FoxO1 nuclear accumulation leading to down-regulation of claudin-3, a tight junction protein. Moreover, we searched for relevant miRNA candidates putative for targeting PTK6 in order to identify and assess the impact of microRNA that target PTK6 with respect to TNFα/IFNγ induced barrier dysfunction. Subsequently, we assayed likely targets and determined their effectiveness in attenuating PTK6 expression as well as cytokine induced barrier dysfunction. Results showed that miR-93 reduced PTK6 expression and attenuated TNFα/IFNγ imposed decrease in

  11. TNFα/IFNγ Mediated Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction Is Attenuated by MicroRNA-93 Downregulation of PTK6 in Mouse Colonic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Richard S.; Eitner, Rebecca A.; Chen, Liwei; Wu, Mack H.

    2016-01-01

    Since inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) represent significant morbidity and mortality in the US, the need for defining novel drug targets and inflammatory mechanisms would be of considerable benefit. Although protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6, also known as breast tumor kinase BRK) has been primarily studied in an oncogenic context, it was noted that PTK6 null mice exhibited significantly enhanced colonic epithelial barrier function. Considering that the inflammatory functions of PTK6 have not yet been explored, we hypothesized that cytokines responsible for mediating IBD, such as TNFα/IFNγ, may solicit the action of PTK6 to alter barrier function. After first assessing critical mediators of TNFα/IFNγ driven epithelial barrier dysfunction, we further explored the possibility of PTK6 in this inflammatory context. In this report, we showed that PTK6 siRNA and PTK6 null young adult mouse colonic epithelial cells (YAMC) exhibited significant attenuation of TNFα/IFNγ induced barrier dysfunction as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) assay and permeability assays. In addition, PTK6 null cells transfected with PTK6 cDNA displayed restored barrier dysfunction in response to TNFα/IFNγ, while the cells transfected with vector alone showed similar attenuation of barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, using subcellular fractionation and immunocytochemistry experiments, we found that PTK6 plays a role in FoxO1 nuclear accumulation leading to down-regulation of claudin-3, a tight junction protein. Moreover, we searched for relevant miRNA candidates putative for targeting PTK6 in order to identify and assess the impact of microRNA that target PTK6 with respect to TNFα/IFNγ induced barrier dysfunction. Subsequently, we assayed likely targets and determined their effectiveness in attenuating PTK6 expression as well as cytokine induced barrier dysfunction. Results showed that miR-93 reduced PTK6 expression and attenuated TNFα/IFNγ imposed decrease in

  12. Retinoic acid receptor beta2 and neurite outgrowth in the adult mouse spinal cord in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Jonathan; So, Po-Lin; Barber, Robert D; Vincent, Karen J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Maden, Malcolm

    2002-10-01

    Retinoic acid, acting through the nuclear retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2), stimulates neurite outgrowth from peripheral nervous system tissue that has the capacity to regenerate neurites, namely, embryonic and adult dorsal root ganglia. Similarly, in central nervous system tissue that can regenerate, namely, embryonic mouse spinal cord, retinoic acid also stimulates neurite outgrowth and RARbeta2 is upregulated. By contrast, in the adult mouse spinal cord, which cannot regenerate, no such upregulation of RARbeta2 by retinoic acid is observed and no neurites are extended in vitro. To test our hypothesis that the upregulation of RARbeta2 is crucial to neurite regeneration, we have transduced adult mouse or rat spinal cord in vitro with a minimal equine infectious anaemia virus vector expressing RARbeta2. After transduction, prolific neurite outgrowth occurs. Outgrowth does not occur when the cord is transduced with a different isoform of RARbeta nor does it occur following treatment with nerve growth factor. These data demonstrate that RARbeta2 is involved in neurite outgrowth, at least in vitro, and that this gene may in the future be of some therapeutic use. PMID:12235288

  13. Subretinal delivery and electroporation in pigmented and nonpigmented adult mouse eyes

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, John M.; Goodman, Penny; Chrenek, Micah A.; Johnson, Christiana J.; Berglin, Lennart; Redmond, T. Michael.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.

    2013-01-01

    Subretinal injection offers one of the best ways to deliver many classes of drugs, reagents, cells and treatments to the photoreceptor, Müller, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells of the retina. Agents delivered to this space are placed within microns of the intended target cell, accumulating to high concentrations because there is no dilution due to transport processes or diffusion. Dilution in the interphotoreceptor space (IPS) is minimal because the IPS volume is only 10-20 microliters in the human eye and less than 1 microliter in the mouse eye. For gene delivery purposes, we wished to transfect the cells adjacent to the IPS in adult mouse eyes. Others transfect these cells in neonatal rats to study the development of the retina. In both neonates and adults, electroporation is found to be effective Here we describe the optimization of electroporation conditions for RPE cells in the adult mouse eye with naked plasmids. However, both techniques, subretinal injection and electroporation, present some technical challenges that require skill on the part of the surgeon to prevent untoward damage to the eye. Here we describe methods that we have used for the past ten years (1). PMID:22688698

  14. Isolation and Culture of Adult Mouse Cardiomyocytes for Cell Signaling and in vitro Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daxiang; Wu, Jian; Bai, Yan; Zhao, Xiaochen; Liu, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have made genetically modified mice, including transgenic and gene knockout mice, an essential tool in many research fields. Adult cardiomyocytes are widely accepted as a good model for cardiac cellular physiology and pathophysiology, as well as for pharmaceutical intervention. Genetically modified mice preclude the need for complicated cardiomyocyte infection processes to generate the desired genotype, which are inefficient due to cardiomyocytes’ terminal differentiation. Isolation and culture of high quantity and quality functional cardiomyocytes will dramatically benefit cardiovascular research and provide an important tool for cell signaling transduction research and drug development. Here, we describe a well-established method for isolation of adult mouse cardiomyocytes that can be implemented with little training. The mouse heart is excised and cannulated to an isolated heart system, then perfused with a calcium-free and high potassium buffer followed by type II collagenase digestion in Langendorff retrograde perfusion mode. This protocol yields a consistent result for the collection of functional adult mouse cardiomyocytes from a variety of genetically modified mice. PMID:24894542

  15. Stem cell niches in the adult mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Konrad; Cesselli, Daniela; Rota, Marcello; Nascimbene, Angelo; De Angelis, Antonella; Hosoda, Toru; Bearzi, Claudia; Boni, Alessandro; Bolli, Roberto; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero; Leri, Annarosa

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in the adult heart, but the microenvironment that protects the slow-cycling, undifferentiated, and self-renewing CSCs remains to be determined. We report that the myocardium possesses interstitial structures with the architectural organization of stem cell niches that harbor long-term BrdU-retaining cells. The recognition of long-term label-retaining cells provides functional evidence of resident CSCs in the myocardium, indicating that the heart is an organ regulated by a stem cell compartment. Cardiac niches contain CSCs and lineage-committed cells, which are connected to supporting cells represented by myocytes and fibroblasts. Connexins and cadherins form gap and adherens junctions at the interface of CSCs–lineage-committed cells and supporting cells. The undifferentiated state of CSCs is coupled with the expression of α4-integrin, which colocalizes with the α2-chain of laminin and fibronectin. CSCs divide symmetrically and asymmetrically, but asymmetric division predominates, and the replicating CSC gives rise to one daughter CSC and one daughter committed cell. By this mechanism of growth kinetics, the pool of primitive CSCs is preserved, and a myocyte progeny is generated together with endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, CSCs regulate myocyte turnover that is heterogeneous across the heart, faster at the apex and atria, and slower at the base–midregion of the ventricle. PMID:16754876

  16. Organ-Specific and Size-Dependent Ag Nanoparticle Toxicity in Gills and Intestines of Adult Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Olivia J; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Yu, Xuechen; Wang, Xiang; Lin, Shuo; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-10-27

    We studied adult zebrafish to determine whether the size of 20 and 110 nm citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgC NPs) differentially impact the gills and intestines, known target organs for Ag toxicity in fish. Following exposure for 4 h, 4 days, or 4 days plus a 7 day depuration period, we obtained different toxicokinetic profiles for different particle sizes, as determined by Ag content of the tissues. Ionic AgNO3 served as a positive control. The gills showed a significantly higher Ag content for the 20 nm particles at 4 h and 4 days than the 110 nm particles, while the values were more similar in the intestines. Both particle types were retained in the intestines even after depuration. These toxicokinetics were accompanied by striking size-dependent differences in the ultrastructural features and histopathology in the target organs in response to the particulates. Ag staining of the gills and intestines confirmed prominent Ag deposition in the basolateral membranes for the 20 nm but not for the 110 nm particles. Furthermore, it was possible to link the site of tissue deposition to disruption of the Na(+)/K(+) ion channel, which is also localized to the basolateral membrane. This was confirmed by a reduction in ATPase activity and immunohistochemical detection of the α subunit of this channel in both target organs, with the 20 nm particles causing significantly higher inhibition and disruption than the larger size particles or AgNO3. These results demonstrate the importance of particle size in determining the hazardous impact of AgNPs in the gills and intestines of adult zebrafish. PMID:26327297

  17. Effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating intestinal hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Long, Yanqin; Liu, Ying; Tong, Jingjing; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiaohua

    2010-06-25

    Trimebutine maleate, which modulates the calcium and potassium channels, relieves abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. However, its effect on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome is not clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating colonic hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Mice infected up to 8 weeks with T. spiralis underwent abdominal withdrawal reflex to colorectal distention to evaluate the visceral sensitivity at different time points. Tissues were examined for histopathology scores. Colonic longitudinal muscle strips were prepared in the organ bath under basal condition or to be stimulated by acetylcholine and potassium chloride, and consecutive concentrations of trimebutine maleate were added to the bath to record the strip responses. Significant inflammation was observed in the intestines of the mice infected 2 weeks, and it resolved in 8 weeks after infection. Visceral hyperalgesia and colonic muscle hypercontractility emerged after infection, and trimebutine maleate could effectively reduce the colonic hyperreactivity. Hypercontractility of the colonic muscle stimulated by acetylcholine and high K(+) could be inhibited by trimebutine maleate in solution with Ca(2+), but not in Ca(2+) free solution. Compared with 8-week postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome group, 2-week acute infected strips were much more sensitive to the stimulators and the drug trimebutine maleate. Trimebutine maleate was effective in reducing the colonic muscle hypercontractility of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome mice. The findings may provide evidence for trimebutine maleate to treat postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome patients effectively. PMID:20371236

  18. Vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulates melanogenesis in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells via CREB/MITF/tyrosinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xing-Hua; Yao, Cheng; Oh, Jang-Hee; Park, Chi-Hyun; Tian, Yu-Dan; Han, Mira; Kim, Ji Eun; Chung, Jin Ho; Jin, Zhe-Hu; Lee, Dong Hun

    2016-08-26

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), one of the major skin neuropeptides, has been suggested to have active roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, which can commonly cause post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. However, the effect of VIP on melanogenesis remains unknown. In this study, we showed that the melanin contents, tyrosinase activity, and gene expression of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) were significantly increased by treatment with VIP in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells and the stimulatory melanogenic effect was further examined in human epidermal melanocytes (HEMns). In addition, phosphorylated levels of CRE-binding protein (CREB) and protein kinase A (PKA) were markedly increased after VIP treatment, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), or Akt, indicating the possible PKA-CREB signaling pathway involved in VIP-induced melanogenesis. This result was further verified by the fact that VIP induced increased melanin synthesis, and protein levels of phosphorylated CREB, MITF, tyrosinase were significantly attenuated by H89 (a specific PKA inhibitor). These data suggest that VIP-induced upregulation of tyrosinase through the CREB-MITF signaling pathway plays an important role in finding new treatment strategy for skin inflammatory diseases related pigmentation disorders. PMID:27343558

  19. Effects of increase in fish oil intake on intestinal eicosanoids and inflammation in a mouse model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases affecting about 1% of western populations. New eating behaviors might contribute to the global emergence of IBD. Although the immunoregulatory effects of omega-3 fatty acids have been well characterized in vitro, their role in IBD is controversial. Methods The aim of this study was to assess the impact of increased fish oil intake on colonic gene expression, eicosanoid metabolism and development of colitis in a mouse model of IBD. Rag-2 deficient mice were fed fish oil (FO) enriched in omega-3 fatty acids i.e. EPA and DHA or control diet for 4 weeks before colitis induction by adoptive transfer of naïve T cells and maintained in the same diet for 4 additional weeks. Onset of colitis was monitored by colonoscopy and further confirmed by immunological examinations. Whole genome expression profiling was made and eicosanoids were measured by HPLC-MS/MS in colonic samples. Results A significant reduction of colonic proinflammatory eicosanoids in FO fed mice compared to control was observed. However, neither alteration of colonic gene expression signature nor reduction in IBD scores was observed under FO diet. Conclusion Thus, increased intake of dietary FO did not prevent experimental colitis. PMID:23725086

  20. Early Changes in Microbial Colonization Selectively Modulate Intestinal Enzymes, but Not Inducible Heat Shock Proteins in Young Adult Swine

    PubMed Central

    Arnal, Marie-Edith; Zhang, Jing; Messori, Stefano; Bosi, Paolo; Smidt, Hauke; Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic diseases and obesity are developing worldwide in a context of plethoric intake of high energy diets. The intestine may play a pivotal role due to diet-induced alterations in microbiota composition and increased permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide inducing metabolic inflammation. Early programming of metabolic disorders appearing in later life is also suspected, but data on the intestine are lacking. Therefore, we hypothesized that early disturbances in microbial colonization have short- and long-lasting consequences on selected intestinal components including key digestive enzymes and protective inducible heat shock proteins (HSP). The hypothesis was tested in swine offspring born to control mothers (n = 12) or mothers treated with the antibiotic amoxicillin around parturition (n = 11), and slaughtered serially at 14, 28 and 42 days of age to assess short-term effects. To evaluate long-term consequences, young adult offspring from the same litters were offered a normal or a fat-enriched diet for 4 weeks between 140 and 169 days of age and were then slaughtered. Amoxicillin treatment transiently modified both mother and offspring microbiota. This was associated with early but transient reduction in ileal alkaline phosphatase, HSP70 (but not HSP27) and crypt depth, suggesting a milder or delayed intestinal response to bacteria in offspring born to antibiotic-treated mothers. More importantly, we disclosed long-term consequences of this treatment on jejunal alkaline phosphatase (reduced) and jejunal and ileal dipeptidylpeptidase IV (increased and decreased, respectively) of offspring born to antibiotic-treated dams. Significant interactions between early antibiotic treatment and later diet were observed for jejunal alkaline phosphatase and sucrase. By contrast, inducible HSPs were not affected. In conclusion, our data suggest that early changes in bacterial colonization not only modulate intestinal architecture and function transiently, but

  1. Probiotics stimulate enterocyte migration and microbial diversity in the neonatal mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Preidis, Geoffrey A; Saulnier, Delphine M; Blutt, Sarah E; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Riehle, Kevin P; Major, Angela M; Venable, Susan F; Finegold, Milton J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Conner, Margaret E; Versalovic, James

    2012-05-01

    Beneficial microbes and probiotics show promise for the treatment of pediatric gastrointestinal diseases. However, basic mechanisms of probiosis are not well understood, and most investigations have been performed in germ-free or microbiome-depleted animals. We sought to functionally characterize probiotic-host interactions in the context of normal early development. Outbred CD1 neonatal mice were orally gavaged with one of two strains of human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri or an equal volume of vehicle. Transcriptome analysis was performed on enterocyte RNA isolated by laser-capture microdissection. Enterocyte migration and proliferation were assessed by labeling cells with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, and fecal microbial community composition was determined by 16S metagenomic sequencing. Probiotic ingestion altered gene expression in multiple canonical pathways involving cell motility. L. reuteri strain DSM 17938 dramatically increased enterocyte migration (3-fold), proliferation (34%), and crypt height (29%) compared to vehicle-treated mice, whereas strain ATCC PTA 6475 increased cell migration (2-fold) without affecting crypt proliferative activity. In addition, both probiotic strains increased the phylogenetic diversity and evenness between taxa of the fecal microbiome 24 h after a single probiotic gavage. These experiments identify two targets of probiosis in early development, the intestinal epithelium and the gut microbiome, and suggest novel mechanisms for probiotic strain-specific effects. PMID:22267340

  2. Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue After Proton Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Whole body exposure to protons in mice causes significant apoptosis in the crypts of the small intestine. Increasing numbers of crypts contained more apoptotic lesions as the dose of exposure increased. 16 genes associated with apoptotic pathways were shown to have significantly altered expression as compared to control samples for at least one of the doses of proton exposure 1 gene, Trp53inp1, was significantly up-regulated across all three doses. Those animals exposed to 0.1 Gy of proton irradiation showed greater amounts of significant alterations in gene expression as compared to 1 Gy and 2 Gy exposures. The differences in gene expression changes of low and high dose proton irradiated mice may offer insight into the molecular mechanisms of the possible high sensitivity at low proton doses. RAIDD (CRADD) may be responsible for the hypersensitivity observed in the duodenum of mice exposed to low doses of protons. Caspase-1 may also play a role in the hypersensitivity seen following proton irradiation at a dose of 0.1 Gy. FOXO3A may be involved in the down-regulation of GILZ observed at high doses of proton exposure.

  3. Sphingosine and FTY720 Modulate Pacemaking Activity in Interstitial Cells of Cajal from Mouse Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Joo Hyun; Kim, Woo Kyung; Kim, Byung Joo

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemakers of the gastrointestinal tract, and transient receptor potential melastatin type 7 (TRPM7) and Ca2+ activated Cl− channels (ANO1) are candidate the generators of pacemaker potentials in ICCs. The effects of D-erythro-sphingosine (SPH) and structural analogues of SPH, that is, N,N-dimethyl-Derythro-sphingosine (N,N-DMS), FTY720, and FTY720-P on the pacemaking activities of ICCs were examined using the whole cell patch clamp technique. SPH, N,N-DMS, and FTY720 decreased the amplitudes of pacemaker potentials in ICC clusters, but resting membrane potentials displayed little change. Also, perfusing SPH, N,N-DMS, or FTY720 in the bath reduced both inward and outward TRPM7-like currents in single ICCs, and inhibited ANO1 currents. The another structural analogue of SPH, FTY720-P was ineffective at the pacemaker potentials in ICC clusters and the TRPM7-like currents in single ICCs. Furthermore, FTY720- P had no effect on ANO1. These results suggest that SPH, N,N-DMS, and FTY720 modulate the pacemaker activities of ICCs, and that TRPM7 and ANO1 channels affect intestinal motility. PMID:23912597

  4. X-ray microanalysis of rotavirus-infected mouse intestine: A new concept of diarrhoeal secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, A.J.; Osborne, M.P.; Haddon, S.J.; Collins, J.; Starkey, W.G.; Candy, D.C.; Stephen, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Neonatal mice were infected at 7 days of age with rotavirus (epizootic diarrhea of infant mice (EDIM) virus) and killed at 24-h intervals postinfection (PI). Cytoplasmic concentrations of Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, and Ca intestinal epithelial cells from infected and age-matched control animals were measured by x-ray microanalysis. In villus tip cells, Ca concentration increased at 24-96 h PI; Na concentration increased at 24-72 h PI; Ca and Na concentrations were near normal by 168 h PI. K concentration decreased 24-72 h PI, and Cl concentration decreased 48-96 h PI. In crypt cells, changes were observed without a discernible pattern: at 96 h PI, Na, Mg, S, and Cl concentrations increased and K concentration decreased; at 120 h PI, the concentrations of all elements except Na and Ca increased. In villus base cells, the mean concentrations of all elements except Ca peaked at 48-72 h PI and at 120 h PI. Na and Cl concentrations increased dramatically in some cells from 48 h PI onward. All the above concentration values were obtained from freeze-dried specimens and expressed in millimoles per kilogram of dry weight. Conversion of a limited number of data, pertaining to villus base cells, from dry weight to wet weight was possible. This conversion revealed that villus base cells in infected animals were more hydrated than corresponding cells from control animals. Also, the Na and Cl concentrations in mmol/kg H2O were significantly higher in villus base cells from infected animals than in those from corresponding controls: 137 +/- 7 versus 38 +/- 4 (Na) and 121 +/- 5 versus 89 +/- 6 (Cl). Wet weight concentrations of other elements were either the same (Mg) or lower (P, S, and K) after infection with virus.

  5. Rapid and efficient gene delivery into the adult mouse brain via focal electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yusuke; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery is required for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of various biological events. Virus-mediated gene transfer or generation of transgenic animals is widely used; however, these methods are time-consuming and expensive. Here we show an improved electroporation technique for acute gene delivery into the adult mouse brain. Using a syringe-based microelectrode, local DNA injection and the application of electric current can be performed simultaneously; this allows rapid and efficient gene transduction of adult non-neuronal cells. Combining this technique with various expression vectors that carry specific promoters resulted in targeted gene expression in astrocytic cells. Our results constitute a powerful strategy for the genetic manipulation of adult brains in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. PMID:27430903

  6. Oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the mouse juvenile and adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sueli; Zeisel, Amit; Codeluppi, Simone; van Bruggen, David; Mendanha Falcão, Ana; Xiao, Lin; Li, Huiliang; Häring, Martin; Hochgerner, Hannah; Romanov, Roman A; Gyllborg, Daniel; Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B; La Manno, Gioele; Lönnerberg, Peter; Floriddia, Elisa M; Rezayee, Fatemah; Ernfors, Patrik; Arenas, Ernest; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Harkany, Tibor; Richardson, William D; Linnarsson, Sten; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo

    2016-06-10

    Oligodendrocytes have been considered as a functionally homogeneous population in the central nervous system (CNS). We performed single-cell RNA sequencing on 5072 cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage from 10 regions of the mouse juvenile and adult CNS. Thirteen distinct populations were identified, 12 of which represent a continuum from Pdgfra(+) oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to distinct mature oligodendrocytes. Initial stages of differentiation were similar across the juvenile CNS, whereas subsets of mature oligodendrocytes were enriched in specific regions in the adult brain. Newly formed oligodendrocytes were detected in the adult CNS and were responsive to complex motor learning. A second Pdgfra(+) population, distinct from OPCs, was found along vessels. Our study reveals the dynamics of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation, uncoupling them at a transcriptional level and highlighting oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the CNS. PMID:27284195

  7. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N.; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Panganiban, Clarisse H.; Havens, Luke T.; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  8. Rapid and efficient gene delivery into the adult mouse brain via focal electroporation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yusuke; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery is required for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of various biological events. Virus-mediated gene transfer or generation of transgenic animals is widely used; however, these methods are time-consuming and expensive. Here we show an improved electroporation technique for acute gene delivery into the adult mouse brain. Using a syringe-based microelectrode, local DNA injection and the application of electric current can be performed simultaneously; this allows rapid and efficient gene transduction of adult non-neuronal cells. Combining this technique with various expression vectors that carry specific promoters resulted in targeted gene expression in astrocytic cells. Our results constitute a powerful strategy for the genetic manipulation of adult brains in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. PMID:27430903

  9. Histology and Ultrastructure of Transitional Changes in Skin Morphology in the Juvenile and Adult Four-Striped Mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Eranée; Ajao, Moyosore Salihu

    2013-01-01

    The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. In both the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse, pigment-containing cells were observed in the dermis and were homogeneously dispersed throughout this layer. Apart from these cells, the histology of the skin of the adult four-striped mouse was similar to normal mammalian skin. In the juvenile four-striped mouse, abundant hair follicles of varying sizes were observed in the dermis and hypodermis, while hair follicles of similar size were only present in the dermis of adult four-striped mouse. Ultrastructural analysis of juvenile hair follicles revealed that the arrangement and differentiation of cellular layers were typical of a mammal. This study therefore provides unique transition pattern in the four-striped mouse skin morphology different from the textbook description of the normal mammalian skin. PMID:24288469

  10. Kinetics and genomic profiling of adult human and mouse β-cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Szabat, Marta; Pourghaderi, Poya; Soukhatcheva, Galina; Verchere, C Bruce; Warnock, Garth L; Piret, James M; Johnson, James D

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is a multifactorial metabolic disorder defined by the loss of functional pancreatic insulin-producing β-cells. The functional maturation and dedifferentiation of adult β-cells is central to diabetes pathogenesis and to β-cell replacement therapy for the treatment of diabetes. Despite its importance, the dynamics and mechanisms of adult β-cell maturation remain poorly understood. Using a novel Pdx1/Ins1 dual fluorescent reporter lentiviral vector, we previously found that individual adult human and mouse β-cells exist in at least two differentiation states distinguishable by the activation of the rat Ins1 promoter and performed the first real-time imaging of the maturation of individual cultured β-cells. Our previous study focused on transformed (MIN6) β-cells as a model to investigatethe kinetics of β-cell maturation. In the present study, we investigated the kinetics of the maturation process in primary human and mouse β-cells and performed gene expression profiling. Gene expression profiling of FACS purified immature Pdx1 (+) /Ins1 (low) cells and mature Pdx1 (high) /Ins1 (high ) cells from cultures of human islets, mouse islets and MIN6 cells revealed that Pdx1 (+) /Ins1 (low) cells are enriched for multiple genes associated with β-cell development/progenitor cells, proliferation, apoptosis, as well as genes coding for other islet cell hormones such as glucagon. We also demonstrated that the heterogeneity in β-cell maturation states previously observed in vitro, can also be found in vivo. Collectively, these experiments contribute to the understanding of maturation, dedifferentiation and plasticity of adult pancreatic β-cells. The results have significant implications for islet regeneration and for in vitro generation of functional β-cells to treat diabetes. PMID:21633187

  11. Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue after Proton Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Zhang, Ye; Hamilton, Stanley; Wu, Honglu

    Radiation in space, especially energetic protons emitted from solar particle events (SPEs), poses serious health risks to astronauts and is especially dangerous for long duration missions. Protons are the most abundant particles in space and to date there is little known about the details of the negative consequences crew members will face upon exposure to them. To elucidate some of the possible health effects induced by protons, BALB/C mice were subjected to 250 MeV of proton radiation at doses of 0 Gy, 0.1 Gy, 1 Gy, and 2 Gy. Three specimens per dose were studied. The gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the isolated small intestinal tissue was fixed in formalin for histopathological examination or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen for RNA isolation. Histopathologic observation of the tissue using standard HE staining methods to screen for morphologic changes showed a marked increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest dose of 0.1 Gy, and the dose response showed possible hyper sensitivities at low dose. Tissue of the gastrointestinal tract was also homogenized and RNA was isolated for cDNA synthesis and real-time PCR analysis for genes involved in apoptosis. Results of gene expression changes revealed consistent up or down regulation of a number of genes for all of the exposure doses that may play a role in proton-induced apoptosis (e.g. Hsp90ab1). In addition, several genes were found to have significant changes in the RNA level after only the low dose (0.1 Gy), but not the high dose (1 and 2 Gy), proton exposures (e.g. Bok and Casp1), whereas some genes had expression changes only after high dose proton exposures (e.g. Tsc22d3). These findings demonstrated that apoptosis may occur in gastrointestinal tracts after even low dose proton exposures, and the different gene expression patterns between low and high dose proton irradiated mice may offer insight into the molecular mechanisms of the possible hyper

  12. Exercise effects on polyp burden and immune markers in the ApcMin/+ mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Jamie L; Steiner, Jennifer L; Day, Stani D; Enos, Reilly T; Davis, Mark J; Singh, Udai P; Murphy, E Angela

    2014-08-01

    Many observational epidemiologic studies suggest an association between exercise and colon cancer risk. The mechanisms contributing to a preventative effect of exercise on colon cancer are complex and multifaceted. Altered immune system function is one possible mechanism that has been largely unexplored. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of exercise on markers associated with macrophages and select T cell populations in a mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis and to relate this to polyp characteristics. Male Apc(Min/+) mice were randomly assigned to either sedentary (Sed) or exercise (Ex) treatment (n=6-9/group). The exercise treatment consisted of treadmill running for 1 h/day and 6 days a week at 15 m/min from 4 until 16 weeks of age. Intestinal polyps were counted and categorized by size. Mucosal tissue was analyzed for mRNA expression of overall macrophages (F4/80), for genes associated with M1 (IL-12, IL-23 and Nos2) and M2 (CD206, IL-10, IL-4, CCL17, CCL22 and Arg-1) macrophages and the macrophage chemoattractants MCP-1, fetuin A and CXCL14. Markers for cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) and regulatory T cells were also examined by measuring mRNA expression of CD8 and Foxp3, respectively. While there was no significant difference in overall polyp number between the groups (Sed, 23.3±4.3; and Ex, 16.5±4.3), Ex did have a reduction in the number of large polyps (Sed, 6.1±1.1; and Ex, 3.0±0.6) (P<0.05). This was consistent with a decrease in spleen weight (P<0.05). Similarly, Ex reduced mRNA expression of overall macrophages (F4/80) as well as markers associated with both M1 (IL-12) and M2 (CD206, CCL22 and Arg-1) subtypes (P<0.05) but there was no significant decrease in macrophage chemoattractants. CD8 expression was increased while Foxp3 expression was decreased with Ex (P<0.05). Overall the data provide important new information on immune regulation as a possible mechanism for the documented benefits of exercise training on reducing

  13. Sertoli Cells Maintain Leydig Cell Number and Peritubular Myoid Cell Activity in the Adult Mouse Testis

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana; Milne, Laura; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Jeffrey, Nathan; Guillou, Florian; Freeman, Tom C.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2014-01-01

    The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR) specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health. PMID:25144714

  14. Light Scattering Properties Vary across Different Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue. PMID:23874433

  15. [Adult Case of Invagination Due to Small Intestinal Metastases of Malignant Melanoma].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Atsushi; Kanazawa, Akifumi; Miura, Yoshiyuki; Hosoda, Yohei; Esaki, Hidekazu; Inoue, Naoya; Awane, Masaaki; Tsunekawa, Shoji; Taki, Yoshiro; Imamura, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    An 84-year-old woman was diagnosed with malignant melanoma after resection of a nasal cavity tumor in February 2008. In April 2010, she underwent small bowel resection because of ileus due to small intestinal metastases. She was diagnosed with ileus again in October 2010. Computed tomography (CT) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) revealed invagination of the small intestine and small intestinal metastases. We performed a palliative small bowel resection. She had a good postoperative course and was discharged 2 weeks after surgery. Oral intake was possible for 6 months until her death. PMID:26805140

  16. Effect of Exposure to Atmospheric Ultrafine Particles on Production of Free Fatty Acids and Lipid Metabolites in the Mouse Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongsong; Navab, Kaveh; Hough, Greg; Daher, Nancy; Zhang, Min; Mittelstein, David; Lee, Katherine; Pakbin, Payam; Saffari, Arian; Bhetraratana, May; Sulaiman, Dawoud; Beebe, Tyler; Wu, Lan; Jen, Nelson; Wine, Eytan; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Araujo, Jesus A.; Fogelman, Alan; Sioutas, Constantinos; Navab, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to ambient ultrafine particulate matter (UFP) is a well-recognized risk factor for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, little is known about the effects of air pollution on gastrointestinal disorders. Objective: We sought to assess whether exposure to ambient UFP (diameter < 180 nm) increased free fatty acids and lipid metabolites in the mouse small intestine. Methods: Ldlr-null mice were exposed to filtered air (FA) or UFP collected at an urban Los Angeles, California, site that was heavily affected by vehicular emissions; the exposure was carried out for 10 weeks in the presence or absence of D-4F, an apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide with antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties on a high-fat or normal chow diet. Results: Compared with FA, exposure to UFP significantly increased intestinal hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), including 15-HETE, 12-HETE, 5-HETE, as well as hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs), including 13-HODE and 9-HODE. Arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) as well as some of the lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) in the small intestine were also increased in response to UFP exposure. Administration of D-4F significantly reduced UFP-mediated increase in HETEs, HODEs, AA, PGD2, and LPA. Although exposure to UFP further led to shortened villus length accompanied by prominent macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the intestinal villi, administration of D-4F mitigated macrophage infiltration. Conclusions: Exposure to UFP promotes lipid metabolism, villus shortening, and inflammatory responses in mouse small intestine, whereas administration of D-4F attenuated these effects. Our findings provide a basis to further assess the mechanisms underlying UFP-mediated lipid metabolism in the digestive system with clinical relevance to gut homeostasis and diseases. Citation: Li R, Navab K, Hough G, Daher N, Zhang M, Mittelstein D, Lee K, Pakbin P, Saffari A, Bhetraratana M, Sulaiman D, Beebe T, Wu L, Jen

  17. Ultrastructural analysis of adult mouse neocortex comparing aldehyde perfusion with cryo fixation

    PubMed Central

    Korogod, Natalya; Petersen, Carl CH; Knott, Graham W

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of brain ultrastructure using electron microscopy typically relies on chemical fixation. However, this is known to cause significant tissue distortion including a reduction in the extracellular space. Cryo fixation is thought to give a truer representation of biological structures, and here we use rapid, high-pressure freezing on adult mouse neocortex to quantify the extent to which these two fixation methods differ in terms of their preservation of the different cellular compartments, and the arrangement of membranes at the synapse and around blood vessels. As well as preserving a physiological extracellular space, cryo fixation reveals larger numbers of docked synaptic vesicles, a smaller glial volume, and a less intimate glial coverage of synapses and blood vessels compared to chemical fixation. The ultrastructure of mouse neocortex therefore differs significantly comparing cryo and chemical fixation conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05793.001 PMID:26259873

  18. Ultrastructural analysis of adult mouse neocortex comparing aldehyde perfusion with cryo fixation.

    PubMed

    Korogod, Natalya; Petersen, Carl C H; Knott, Graham W

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of brain ultrastructure using electron microscopy typically relies on chemical fixation. However, this is known to cause significant tissue distortion including a reduction in the extracellular space. Cryo fixation is thought to give a truer representation of biological structures, and here we use rapid, high-pressure freezing on adult mouse neocortex to quantify the extent to which these two fixation methods differ in terms of their preservation of the different cellular compartments, and the arrangement of membranes at the synapse and around blood vessels. As well as preserving a physiological extracellular space, cryo fixation reveals larger numbers of docked synaptic vesicles, a smaller glial volume, and a less intimate glial coverage of synapses and blood vessels compared to chemical fixation. The ultrastructure of mouse neocortex therefore differs significantly comparing cryo and chemical fixation conditions. PMID:26259873

  19. ChIP-Seq analysis of the adult male mouse brain after developmental exposure to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christina R; Weber, Jessica A; Labrecque, Matthew; Hessinger, Justin M; Edwards, Jeremy S; Allan, Andrea M

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to the common environmental contaminant arsenic impacts the epigenetic landscape, including DNA methylation and histone modifications, of several cell types. Developmental arsenic exposure (DAE) increases acetylation and methylation of histone proteins and the protein expression of several chromatin-modifying enzymes in the dentate gyrus (DG) subregion of the adult male mouse brain [26]. To complement and support these data, ChIP-Seq analysis of DNA associated with trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) derived from the adult male DG after DAE was performed. DAE induced differential H3K4me3 enrichment on genes in pathways associated with cellular development and growth, cell death and survival, and neurological disorders, particularly as they relate to cancer, in the adult male brain. Comparison of H3K4me3 enrichment in controls revealed mechanisms that are potentially lacking in arsenic-exposed animals, including neurotransmission, neuronal growth and development, hormonal regulation, protein synthesis, and cellular homeostasis. New pathways impacted by arsenic include cytoskeleton organization, cell signaling, and potential disruption of immune function and warrant further investigation using this DAE paradigm in the mouse brain. PMID:26543888

  20. Bioactivity and Bioavailability of Ginsenosides Are Dependent on the Glycosidase Activities of the A/J Mouse Intestinal Microbiome Defined by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Tao; Smith, Diane; Yang, Zhen; Gao, Song; Yin, Taijun; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; You, Ming; Gibbs, Richard A.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Hu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The ability of bacteria in the intestinal microbiome to convert naturally occurring primary ginsenosides in red ginseng extract or RGE to active secondary ginsenosides was investigated. Methods The anti-proliferative activity of ginsenosides was tested using the mouse lung cancer LM1 cells. Their permeabilities were evaluated in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Systemic exposure of secondary ginsenosides was determined in A/J mice. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to determine membership and abundance of bacteria in the intestinal microbiome. Results Secondary ginsenoside C-K exhibited higher anti-proliferative activity and permeability than primary ginsenosides, and significant amounts of secondary ginsenosides (F2 and C-K) were found in the blood of A/J mice following oral administration of the primary ginsenoside Rb1. Because mammalian cells did not hydrolyze ginsenoside, we determined the ability of bacteria to hydrolyze ginsenosides and found that the primary ginsenoside Rb1 underwent stepwise hydrolysis to Rd, F2, and then C-K. Formation of F2 from Rd was the rate-limiting step in the biotransformation of Rb1 to C-K. Conclusion This is the first study to characterize the A/J mouse intestinal microbiome and reveal the presence of certain bacterial families capable of efficiently converting inactive primary ginsenosides to active secondary ginsenosides in vivo. PMID:23254888

  1. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras.

    PubMed

    Keighren, Margaret A; Flockhart, Jean H; West, John D

    2016-01-01

    The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera with functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1(-/-) null cells in adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras and determine if Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes in one female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c), this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many adult tissues. PMID:27103217

  2. Isolating Intestinal Stem Cells from Adult Drosophila Midguts by FACS to Study Stem Cell Behavior During Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pandur, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Aging tissue is characterized by a continuous decline in functional ability. Adult stem cells are crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis particularly in tissues that have a high turnover rate such as the intestinal epithelium. However, adult stem cells are also subject to aging processes and the concomitant decline in function. The Drosophila midgut has emerged as an ideal model system to study molecular mechanisms that interfere with the intestinal stem cells’ (ISCs) ability to function in tissue homeostasis. Although adult ISCs can be easily identified and isolated from midguts of young flies, it has been a major challenge to study endogenous molecular changes of ISCs during aging. This is due to the lack of a combination of molecular markers suitable to isolate ISCs from aged intestines. Here we propose a method that allows for successful dissociation of midgut tissue into living cells that can subsequently be separated into distinct populations by FACS. By using dissociated cells from the esg-Gal4, UAS-GFP fly line, in which both ISCs and the enteroblast (EB) progenitor cells express GFP, two populations of cells are distinguished based on different GFP intensities. These differences in GFP expression correlate with differences in cell size and granularity and represent enriched populations of ISCs and EBs. Intriguingly, the two GFP-positive cell populations remain distinctly separated during aging, presenting a novel technique for identifying and isolating cell populations enriched for either ISCs or EBs at any time point during aging. The further analysis, for example transcriptome analysis, of these particular cell populations at various time points during aging is now possible and this will facilitate the examination of endogenous molecular changes that occur in these cells during aging. PMID:25548862

  3. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi; Peters, Christoph; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  4. Species-Dependent Uptake of Glycylsarcosine but Not Oseltamivir in Pichia pastoris Expressing the Rat, Mouse, and Human Intestinal Peptide Transporter PEPT1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongjun; Chen, Xiaomei

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether glycylsarcosine (a model dipeptide) and oseltamivir (an antiviral prodrug) exhibited a species-dependent uptake in yeast Pichia pastoris expressing the rat, mouse, and human homologs of PEPT1. Experiments were performed with [3H]glycylsarcosine (GlySar) in yeast P. pastoris expressing human, mouse, and rat peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1), in which uptake was examined as a function of time, concentration, potential inhibitors, and the dose-response inhibition of GlySar by oseltamivir. Studies with [14C]oseltamivir were also performed under identical experimental conditions. We found that GlySar exhibited saturable uptake in all three species, with Km values for human (0.86 mM) > mouse (0.30 mM) > rat (0.16 mM). GlySar uptake in the yeast transformants was specific for peptides (glycylproline) and peptide-like drugs (cefadroxil, cephradine, and valacyclovir), but was unaffected by glycine, l-histidine, cefazolin, cephalothin, cephapirin, acyclovir, 4-acetamido-4′-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid, tetraethylammonium, and elacridar. Although oseltamivir caused a dose-dependent inhibition of GlySar uptake [IC50 values for human (27.4 mM) > rat (18.3 mM) > mouse (10.7 mM)], the clinical relevance of this interaction would be very low in humans. Of importance, oseltamivir was not a substrate for the intestinal PEPT1 transporter in yeast expressing the three mammalian species tested. Instead, the prodrug exhibited nonspecific binding to the yeast vector and PEPT1 transformants. Finally, the mouse appeared to be a better animal model than the rat for exploring the intestinal absorption and pharmacokinetics of peptides and peptide-like drugs in human. PMID:22490229

  5. Tegumental ultrastructure of adult Quinqueserialis quinqueserialis (Trematoda: Notocotylidae): an intestinal parasite of muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus).

    PubMed

    Naem, Soraya; Smythe, Ashleigh B

    2015-07-01

    Ten adult Quinqueserialis quinqueserialis specimens were removed from the intestine of a naturally infected muskrat, and scanning electron microscopy was used to study the morphological characteristics of the trematodes. The mature trematode, which was easy to recognize by the monostome holdfast organ, with no anterior cone, measured 2200-2500 μm in length by 900-1050 μm in width. The body was elongated and tapering at the anterior end, but the posterior end was rounded, and in some specimens was slightly truncated. The mouth opening lay at the anterior end and was surrounded by the oral sucker, which was round, small to medium in size, and subterminal. The tegument of the rim and inside of the oral sucker was smooth and had two types of papillae, domed and rosette papillae. Around the oral sucker, tegument was covered with sharp, pointed spines. The common genital pore was located on the median line of the body, posterior to the oral sucker. The cirrus had smooth tegument at the base and was armed with numerous conical spines throughout its length. The ventral surface was concave and provided with five distinct longitudinal rows of ventral papillae, which extended from the anterior to the posterior end of the body. Each row consisted of 15 to 20 papillae, making 81 to 88 papillae in all. These papillae were variable in size. In most specimens, the papillae were simple knob-like structures, but in some cases, they appeared to be bi- or trifurcate. The tegument at the base of each ventral papilla showed minute spiny pattern, but it was smooth or folded on top and had small rosette and ciliated papillae. Tegument at the edges of the worm was smooth in the mid-parts, spiny on lateral parts, and included rosette papillae. The dorsal surface of the worm was smooth and slightly convex, and the tegument was provided with two large domed papillae in one third of the anterior end of the dorsal part, few thick spines in the mid-part, and excretory pore at the level just

  6. MicroRNA-146a-mediated downregulation of IRAK1 protects mouse and human small intestine against ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, Cécilia; Hempel, Cordelia; Stockinger, Silvia; Dupont, Aline; Kübler, Joachim F; Wedemeyer, Jochen; Vandewalle, Alain; Hornef, Mathias W

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury causes inflammation and tissue damage and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Uncontrolled activation of the innate immune system through toll-like receptors (Tlr) plays a key role in I/R-mediated tissue damage but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully resolved. Here, we identify post-transcriptional upregulation of the essential Tlr signalling molecule interleukin 1 receptor-associated kinase (Irak) 1 as the causative mechanism for post-ischemic immune hyper-responsiveness of intestinal epithelial cells. Increased Irak1 protein levels enhanced epithelial ligand responsiveness, chemokine secretion, apoptosis and mucosal barrier disruption in an experimental intestinal I/R model using wild-type, Irak1−/− and Tlr4−/− mice and ischemic human intestinal tissue. Irak1 accumulation under hypoxic conditions was associated with reduced K48 ubiquitination and enhanced Senp1-mediated deSUMOylation of Irak1. Importantly, administration of microRNA (miR)-146a or induction of miR-146a by the phytochemical diindolylmethane controlled Irak1 upregulation and prevented immune hyper-responsiveness in mouse and human tissue. These findings indicate that Irak1 accumulation triggers I/R-induced epithelial immune hyper-responsiveness and suggest that the induction of miR-146a offers a promising strategy to prevent I/R tissue injury. PMID:23143987

  7. The Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus on the Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contraction through PKC/MLCK/MLC Signaling Pathway in TBI Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Huan; Zhu, Lina; Gao, Ning; Zhu, Jingci

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that probiotics influence gastrointestinal motility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which probiotic Lactobacillus modulates intestinal motility in traumatic brain injury (TBI) mouse model have not been explored. In the present study, we provided evidence showing that treatment of TBI mice with Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly improved the terminal ileum villus morphology, restored the impaired interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and the disrupted ICC networks after TBI, and prevented TBI-mediated inhibition of contractile activity in intestinal smooth muscle. Mechanistically, the decreased concentration of MLCK, phospho-MLC20 and phospho-MYPT1 and increased concentration of MLCP and PKC were observed after TBI, and these events mediated by TBI were efficiently prevented by Lactobacillus acidophilus application. These findings may provide a novel mechanistic basis for the application of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the treatment of TBI. PMID:26030918

  8. Regrowth of Serotonin Axons in the Adult Mouse Brain Following Injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunju; Dougherty, Sarah E; Wood, Kevin; Sun, Landy; Cudmore, Robert H; Abdalla, Aya; Kannan, Geetha; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Hashemi, Parastoo; Linden, David J

    2016-08-17

    It is widely believed that damaged axons in the adult mammalian brain have little capacity to regrow, thereby impeding functional recovery after injury. Studies using fixed tissue have suggested that serotonin neurons might be a notable exception, but remain inconclusive. We have employed in vivo two-photon microscopy to produce time-lapse images of serotonin axons in the neocortex of the adult mouse. Serotonin axons undergo massive retrograde degeneration following amphetamine treatment and subsequent slow recovery of axonal density, which is dominated by new growth with little contribution from local sprouting. A stab injury that transects serotonin axons running in the neocortex is followed by local regression of cut serotonin axons and followed by regrowth from cut ends into and across the stab rift zone. Regrowing serotonin axons do not follow the pathways left by degenerated axons. The regrown axons release serotonin and their regrowth is correlated with recovery in behavioral tests. PMID:27499084

  9. Effect of dietary lysine on growth, intestinal enzymes activities and antioxidant status of sub-adult grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Yin; Tang, Ling; Hu, Kai; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Chen, Gang-Fu; Li, Shu-Hong; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Feng, Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-06-01

    The dietary lysine requirement of sub-adult grass carp (460 ± 1.5 g) was assessed by feeding diets supplemented with grade levels of lysine (6.6, 8.5, 10.8, 12.9, 15.0 and 16.7 g kg(-1) diet) for 56 days. The test diets (28% CP) contained fish meal, casein and gelatin as sources of intact protein, supplemented with crystalline amino acids. Weight gain (WG), feed intake and feed efficiency were significantly improved with increasing levels of lysine up to 12.9 g kg(-1) diet and thereafter declined (P < 0.05). Quadratic regression analysis of WG at 95% maximum response indicated lysine requirement was 10.9 g kg(-1) diet. Activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and alkaline phosphatase in intestine, creatine kinase activity in proximal and mid-intestine responded similar to WG (P < 0.05). In addition, lipid and protein oxidation decreased with increasing levels of lysine up to certain values and increased thereafter (P < 0.05); the anti-hydroxyl radical capacity, dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and glutathione content were increased with increasing dietary lysine levels up to certain values in the detected tissues, except for hepatopancreatic GST. Requirement estimated on the basis of malondialdehyde content in intestine and hepatopancreas was 10.6 and 9.53 g lysine kg(-1) diet, respectively. PMID:24174167

  10. mTOR disruption causes intestinal epithelial cell defects and intestinal atrophy postinjury in mice.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Leesa L; Davis, Ashley K; Grogg, Matthew W; Zheng, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) drive small intestinal epithelial homeostasis and regeneration. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates stem and progenitor cell metabolism and is frequently dysregulated in human disease, but its physiologic functions in the mammalian small intestinal epithelium remain poorly defined. We disrupted the genes mTOR, Rptor, Rictor, or both Rptor and Rictor in mouse ISCs, progenitors, and differentiated intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) using Villin-Cre. Mutant tissues and wild-type or heterozygous littermate controls were analyzed by histologic immunostaining, immunoblots, and proliferation assays. A total of 10 Gy irradiation was used to injure the intestinal epithelium and induce subsequent crypt regeneration. We report that mTOR supports absorptive enterocytes and secretory Paneth and goblet cell function while negatively regulating chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cell number. Through additional Rptor, Rictor, and Rptor/Rictor mutant mouse models, we identify mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 as the major IEC regulatory pathway, but mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 also contributes to ileal villus maintenance and goblet cell size. Homeostatic adult small intestinal crypt cell proliferation, survival, and canonical wingless-int (WNT) activity are not mTOR dependent, but Olfm4(+) ISC/progenitor population maintenance and crypt regeneration postinjury require mTOR. Overall, we conclude that mTOR regulates multiple IEC lineages and promotes stem and progenitor cell activity during intestinal epithelium repair postinjury. PMID:26631481

  11. Expression of Quaking RNA-Binding Protein in the Adult and Developing Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Aono, Kentaro; Kawashima, Togo; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Ku, Li; Feng, Yue; Koike, Chieko

    2016-01-01

    Quaking (QKI), which belongs to the STAR family of KH domain-containing RNA-binding proteins, functions in pre-mRNA splicing, microRNA regulation, and formation of circular RNA. QKI plays critical roles in myelinogenesis in the central and peripheral nervous systems and has been implicated neuron-glia fate decision in the brain; however, neither the expression nor function of QKI in the neural retina is known. Here we report the expression of QKI RNA-binding protein in the developing and mature mouse retina. QKI was strongly expressed by Müller glial cells in both the developing and adult retina. Intriguingly, during development, QKI was expressed in early differentiating neurons, such as the horizontal and amacrine cells, and subsequently in later differentiating bipolar cells, but not in photoreceptors. Neuronal expression was uniformly weak in the adult. Among QKI isoforms (5, 6, and 7), QKI-5 was the predominantly expressed isoform in the adult retina. To study the function of QKI in the mouse retina, we examined quakingviable(qkv) mice, which have a dysmyelination phenotype that results from deficiency of QKI expression and reduced numbers of mature oligodendrocytes. In homozygous qkv mutant mice (qkv/qkv), the optic nerve expression levels of QKI-6 and 7, but not QKI-5 were reduced. In the retina of the mutant homozygote, QKI-5 levels were unchanged, and QKI-6 and 7 levels, already low, were also unaffected. We conclude that QKI is expressed in developing and adult Müller glia. QKI is additionally expressed in progenitors and in differentiating neurons during retinal development, but expression weakened or diminished during maturation. Among QKI isoforms, we found that QKI-5 predominated in the adult mouse retina. Since Müller glial cells are thought to share properties with retinal progenitor cells, our data suggest that QKI may contribute to maintaining retinal progenitors prior to differentiation into neurons. On the other hand, the expression of QKI in

  12. An Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 missense mutant colonizes the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine better than the wild type but is not a better probiotic.

    PubMed

    Adediran, Jimmy; Leatham-Jensen, Mary P; Mokszycki, Matthew E; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Krogfelt, Karen A; Kazmierczak, Krystyna; Kenney, Linda J; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2014-02-01

    Previously we reported that the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine selected for two different Escherichia coli MG1655 mutants with improved colonizing ability: nonmotile E. coli MG1655 flhDC deletion mutants that grew 15% faster in vitro in mouse cecal mucus and motile E. coli MG1655 envZ missense mutants that grew slower in vitro in mouse cecal mucus yet were able to cocolonize with the faster-growing flhDC mutants. The E. coli MG1655 envZ gene encodes a histidine kinase that is a member of the envZ-ompR two-component signal transduction system, which regulates outer membrane protein profiles. In the present investigation, the envZP41L gene was transferred from the intestinally selected E. coli MG1655 mutant to E. coli Nissle 1917, a human probiotic strain used to treat gastrointestinal infections. Both the E. coli MG1655 and E. coli Nissle 1917 strains containing envZP41L produced more phosphorylated OmpR than their parents. The E. coli Nissle 1917 strain containing envZP41L also became more resistant to bile salts and colicin V and grew 50% slower in vitro in mucus and 15% to 30% slower on several sugars present in mucus, yet it was a 10-fold better colonizer than E. coli Nissle 1917. However, E. coli Nissle 1917 envZP41L was not better at preventing colonization by enterohemorrhagic E. coli EDL933. The data can be explained according to our "restaurant" hypothesis for commensal E. coli strains, i.e., that they colonize the intestine as sessile members of mixed biofilms, obtaining the sugars they need for growth locally, but compete for sugars with invading E. coli pathogens planktonically. PMID:24478082

  13. Genetic and Diet-Induced Obesity Increased Intestinal Tumorigenesis in the Double Mutant Mouse Model Multiple Intestinal Neoplasia X Obese via Disturbed Glucose Regulation and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Ha Thi; Hetland, Ragna Bogen; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Steffensen, Inger-Lise

    2015-01-01

    We have studied how spontaneous or carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis was affected by genetic or diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6J-ApcMin/+ X C57BL/6J-Lepob/+ mice. Obesity was induced by the obese (ob) mutation in the lep gene coding for the hormone leptin, or by a 45% fat diet. The effects of obesity were examined on spontaneous intestinal tumors caused by the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene and on tumors induced by the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). F1 ob/ob (homozygous mutated) mice had increased body weight (bw) and number of spontaneous and PhIP-induced small intestinal tumors (in ApcMin/+ mice), versus ob/wt (heterozygous mutated) and wt/wt mice (homozygous wild-type). A 45% fat diet exacerbated bw and spontaneous tumor numbers versus 10% fat, but not PhIP-induced tumors. Except for bw, ob/wt and wt/wt were not significantly different. The obesity caused hyperglucosemia and insulinemia in ob/ob mice. A 45% fat diet further increased glucose, but not insulin. Inflammation was seen as increased TNFα levels in ob/ob mice. Thus the results implicate disturbed glucose regulation and inflammation as mechanisms involved in the association between obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis. Ob/ob mice had shorter lifespan than ob/wt and wt/wt mice. PMID:26347815

  14. GATA4 mediates gene repression in the mature mouse small intestine through interactions with Friend of GATA (FOG) cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Beuling, Eva; Bosse, Tjalling; aan de Kerk, Daniel J.; Piaseckyj, Christina M.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Katz, Samuel G.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Grand, Richard J.; Krasinski, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    GATA4, a transcription factor expressed in the proximal small intestine but not in the distal ileum, maintains proximal-distal distinctions by multiple processes involving gene repression, gene activation, and cell fate determination. Friend of GATA (FOG) is an evolutionarily conserved family of cofactors whose members physically associate with GATA factors and mediate GATA-regulated repression in multiple tissues. Using a novel, inducible, intestine-specific Gata4 knock-in model in mice, in which wild-type GATA4 is specifically inactivated in the small intestine, but a GATA4 mutant that does not bind FOG cofactors (GATA4ki) continues to be expressed, we found that ileal-specific genes were significantly induced in the proximal small intestine (P<0.01); in contrast, genes restricted to proximal small intestine and cell lineage markers were unaffected, indicating that GATA4-FOG interactions contribute specifically to the repression function of GATA4 within this organ. Fog1 mRNA displayed a proximal-distal pattern that parallels that of Gata4, and FOG1 protein was co-expressed with GATA4 in intestinal epithelial cells, implicating FOG1 as the likely mediator of GATA4 function in the small intestine. Our data are the first to indicate FOG function and expression in the mammalian small intestine. PMID:18692040

  15. Distribution of EphA5 receptor protein in the developing and adult mouse nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Margaret A.; Crockett, David P.; Nowakowski, Richard S.; Gale, Nicholas W.; Zhou, Renping

    2009-01-01

    The EphA5 receptor tyrosine kinase plays key roles in axon guidance during development. However, the presence of EphA5 protein in the nervous system has not been fully characterized. To better examine EphA5 localization, mutant mice, in which the EphA5 cytoplasmic domain was replaced with β-galactosidase, were analyzed for both temporal and regional changes in the distribution of EphA5 protein in the developing and adult nervous system. During embryonic development, high levels of EphA5 protein were found in the retina, olfactory bulb, cerebral neocortex, hippocampus, pretectum, tectum, cranial nerve nuclei, and the spinal cord. Variations in intensity were observed as development proceeded. Staining of pretectal nuclei, tectal nuclei, and other areas of the mesencephalon became more diffuse after maturity whereas the cerebral neocortex gained more robust intensity. In the adult, receptor protein continued to be detected in many areas including the olfactory nuclei, neocortex, piriform cortex, induseum griseum, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, hypothalamus and septum. In addition, EphA5 protein was found in the claustrum, stria terminalis, barrel cortex, striatal patches, and along discrete axon tracts within the corpus callosum of the adult. These observations suggest that EphA5 function is not limited to the developing mouse brain and may play a role in synaptic plasticity in the adult. PMID:19326470

  16. Sexually dimorphic effect of in vitro fertilization (IVF) on adult mouse fat and liver metabolomes.

    PubMed

    Feuer, Sky K; Donjacour, Annemarie; Simbulan, Rhodel K; Lin, Wingka; Liu, Xiaowei; Maltepe, Emin; Rinaudo, Paolo F

    2014-11-01

    The preimplantation embryo is particularly vulnerable to environmental perturbation, such that nutritional and in vitro stresses restricted exclusively to this stage may alter growth and affect long-term metabolic health. This is particularly relevant to the over 5 million children conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF). We previously reported that even optimized IVF conditions reprogram mouse postnatal growth, fat deposition, and glucose homeostasis in a sexually dimorphic fashion. To more clearly interrogate the metabolic changes associated with IVF in adulthood, we used nontargeted mass spectrometry to globally profile adult IVF- and in vivo-conceived liver and gonadal adipose tissues. There was a sex- and tissue-specific effect of IVF on adult metabolite signatures indicative of metabolic reprogramming and oxidative stress and reflective of the observed phenotypes. Additionally, we observed a striking effect of IVF on adult sexual dimorphism. Male-female differences in metabolite concentration were exaggerated in hepatic IVF tissue and significantly reduced in IVF adipose tissue, with the majority of changes affecting amino acid and lipid metabolites. We also observed female-specific changes in markers of oxidative stress and adipogenesis, including reduced glutathione, cysteine glutathione disulfide, ophthalmate, urate, and corticosterone. In summary, embryo manipulation and early developmental experiences can affect adult patterns of sexual dimorphism and metabolic physiology. PMID:25211591

  17. Establishment of Leptin-Responsive Cell Lines from Adult Mouse Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Iwakura, Hiroshi; Dote, Katsuko; Bando, Mika; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2016-01-01

    Leptin resistance is considered to be the primary cause of obesity. However, the cause of leptin resistance remains incompletely understood, and there is currently no cure for the leptin-resistant state. In order to identify novel drug-target molecules that could overcome leptin resistance, it would be useful to develop in vitro assay systems for evaluating leptin resistance. In this study, we established immortalized adult mouse hypothalamus—derived cell lines, termed adult mouse hypothalamus (AMH) cells, by developing transgenic mice in which SV40 Tag was overexpressed in chromogranin A—positive cells in a tamoxifen-dependent manner. In order to obtain leptin-responsive clones, we selected clones based on the phosphorylation levels of STAT3 induced by leptin. The selected clones were fairly responsive to leptin in terms of STAT3, ERK, and Akt phosphorylation and induction of c-Fos mRNA induction. Pretreatment with leptin, insulin, and palmitate attenuated the c-Fos mRNA response to leptin, suggesting that certain aspects of leptin resistance might be reconstituted in this cellular model. These cell lines are useful tools for understanding the molecular nature of the signal disturbance in the leptin-resistant state and for identifying potential target molecules for drugs that relieve leptin resistance, although they have drawbacks including de-differentiated nature and lack of long-time stability. PMID:26849804

  18. Caspase-Mediated Apoptosis in Sensory Neurons of Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Hamid Reza; Soleimani Mehranjani, Malek; Shariatzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Haddadi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) undergo apoptosis after peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to investigate sensory neuron death and the mechanism involved in the death of these neurons in cultured DRG. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, L5 DRG from adult mouse were dissected and incubated in culture medium for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Freshly dissected and cultured DRG were then fixed and sectioned using a cryostat. Morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis were investigated using fluorescent staining (Propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342) and the terminal Deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method respectively. To study the role of caspases, general caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD.fmk, 100 μM) and immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 were used. Results: After 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours in culture, sensory neurons not only displayed morphological features of apoptosis but also they appeared TUNEL positive. The application of Z-VAD.fmk inhibited apoptosis in these neurons over the same time period. In addition, intense activated caspase-3 immunoreactivity was found both in the cytoplasm and the nuclei of these neurons after 24 and 48 hours. Conclusion: Results of the present study show caspase-dependent apoptosis in the sensory neurons of cultured DRG from adult mouse. PMID:24027661

  19. Intestinal lactase (beta-galactosidase) and other glycosidase activities in suckling and adult tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Walcott, P J; Messer, M

    1980-10-01

    The activities of various glycosidases in homogenates of the small intestinal mucosa of two adult and 18 suckling tammar wallabies (M. eugenii) aged from 6 to 50 weeks were investigated. Lactase (beta-D-galactosidase), beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase activities were high during the first 34 weeks post partum and then declined to very low levels. Maltase, isomaltase, sucrase and trehalase activities were very low or absent during the first 34 weeks, and then increased. The lactase activity was unusual in being greater in the distal than the middle or proximal thirds of the intestine, and in its low pH optimum (pH 4.6), inhibition by p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate but not by Tris, and lack of cellobiase activity. These properties are those of a lysosomal acid beta-galactosidase rather than of a brush border neutral lactase. The maltase activity had the characteristics of a lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase early in lactation and of a brush border neutral maltase in adult animals. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to changes in dietary carbohydrates during weaning and to the mode of digestion of milk carbohydrates by the pouch young. PMID:6783021

  20. Epithelial-connective tissue interactions induced by thyroid hormone receptor are essential for adult stem cell development in the Xenopus laevis intestine

    PubMed Central

    Hasebe, Takashi; Buchholz, Daniel R.; Shi, Yun-Bo; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko

    2012-01-01

    In the amphibian intestine during metamorphosis, stem cells appear and generate the adult absorptive epithelium, analogous to the mammalian one, under the control of thyroid hormone (TH). We have previously shown that the adult stem cells originate from differentiated larval epithelial cells in the Xenopus laevis intestine. To clarify whether TH signaling in the epithelium alone is sufficient for inducing the stem cells, we have now performed tissue recombinant culture experiments, using transgenic X. laevis tadpoles that express a dominant positive TH receptor (dpTR) under a control of heat shock promoter. Wild-type (Wt) or dpTR transgenic (Tg) larval epithelium (Ep) was isolated from the tadpole intestine, recombined with homologous or heterologous non-epithelial tissues (non-Ep), and then cultivated in the absence of TH with daily heat shocks to induce transgenic dpTR expression. Adult epithelial progenitor cells expressing sonic hedgehog became detectable on day 5 in both the recombinant intestine of Tg Ep and Tg non-Ep (Tg/Tg) and that of Tg Ep and Wt non-Ep (Tg/Wt). However, in Tg/Wt intestine, they did not express other stem cell markers such as Musashi-1 and never generated the adult epithelium expressing a marker for absorptive epithelial cells. Our results indicate that, while it is unclear why some larval epithelial cells dedifferentiate into adult progenitor/stem cells, TR-mediated gene expression in the surrounding tissues other than the epithelium is required for them to develop into adult stem cells, suggesting the importance of TH-inducible epithelial-connective tissue interactions in establishment of the stem cell niche in the amphibian intestine. PMID:21280164

  1. European Society of Coloproctology consensus on the surgical management of intestinal failure in adults.

    PubMed

    Vaizey, C J; Maeda, Y; Barbosa, E; Bozzetti, F; Calvo, J; Irtun, Ø; Jeppesen, P B; Klek, S; Panisic-Sekeljic, M; Papaconstantinou, I; Pascher, A; Panis, Y; Wallace, W D; Carlson, G; Boermeester, M

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is a debilitating condition of inadequate nutrition due to an anatomical and/or physiological deficit of the intestine. Surgical management of patients with acute and chronic IF requires expertise to deal with technical challenges and make correct decisions. Dedicated IF units have expertise in patient selection, operative risk assessment and multidisciplinary support such as nutritional input and interventional radiology, which dramatically improve the morbidity and mortality of this complex condition and can beneficially affect the continuing dependence on parenteral nutritional support. Currently there is little guidance to bridge the gap between general surgeons and specialist IF surgeons. Fifteen European experts took part in a consensus process to develop guidance to support surgeons in the management of patients with IF. Based on a systematic literature review, statements were prepared for a modified Delphi process. The evidence for each statement was graded using Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The current paper contains the statements reflecting the position and practice of leading European experts in IF encompassing the general definition of IF surgery and organization of an IF unit, strategies to prevent IF, management of acute IF, management of wound, fistula and stoma, rehabilitation, intestinal and abdominal reconstruction, criteria for referral to a specialist unit and intestinal transplantation. PMID:26946219

  2. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras

    PubMed Central

    Keighren, Margaret A.; Flockhart, Jean H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1−/− null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1−/− null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera with functional Gpi1−/− null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1−/− null cells in adult Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaeras and determine if Gpi1−/− null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1−/− null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1−/− null oocytes in one female Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1−/− null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c, this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1−/− null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1−/− null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1−/− null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1−/− null cells could survive in many adult tissues. PMID:27103217

  3. Localization and regulation of PML bodies in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hall, Małgorzata H; Magalska, Adriana; Malinowska, Monika; Ruszczycki, Błażej; Czaban, Iwona; Patel, Satyam; Ambrożek-Latecka, Magdalena; Zołocińska, Ewa; Broszkiewicz, Hanna; Parobczak, Kamil; Nair, Rajeevkumar R; Rylski, Marcin; Pawlak, Robert; Bramham, Clive R; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M

    2016-06-01

    PML is a tumor suppressor protein involved in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic leukemia. In non-neuronal cells, PML is a principal component of characteristic nuclear bodies. In the brain, PML has been implicated in the control of embryonic neurogenesis, and in certain physiological and pathological phenomena in the adult brain. Yet, the cellular and subcellular localization of the PML protein in the brain, including its presence in the nuclear bodies, has not been investigated comprehensively. Because the formation of PML bodies appears to be a key aspect in the function of the PML protein, we investigated the presence of these structures and their anatomical distribution, throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PML is broadly expressed across the gray matter, with the highest levels in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. In the cerebral cortex PML is present exclusively in neurons, in which it forms well-defined nuclear inclusions containing SUMO-1, SUMO 2/3, but not Daxx. At the ultrastructural level, the appearance of neuronal PML bodies differs from the classic one, i.e., the solitary structure with more or less distinctive capsule. Rather, neuronal PML bodies have the form of small PML protein aggregates located in the close vicinity of chromatin threads. The number, size, and signal intensity of neuronal PML bodies are dynamically influenced by immobilization stress and seizures. Our study indicates that PML bodies are broadly involved in activity-dependent nuclear phenomena in adult neurons. PMID:25956166

  4. Clonal identification of multipotent precursors from adult mouse pancreas that generate neural and pancreatic lineages.

    PubMed

    Seaberg, Raewyn M; Smukler, Simon R; Kieffer, Timothy J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Asghar, Zeenat; Wheeler, Michael B; Korbutt, Gregory; van der Kooy, Derek

    2004-09-01

    The clonal isolation of putative adult pancreatic precursors has been an elusive goal of researchers seeking to develop cell replacement strategies for diabetes. We report the clonal identification of multipotent precursor cells from the adult mouse pancreas. The application of a serum-free, colony-forming assay to pancreatic cells enabled the identification of precursors from pancreatic islet and ductal populations. These cells proliferate in vitro to form clonal colonies that coexpress neural and pancreatic precursor markers. Upon differentiation, individual clonal colonies produce distinct populations of neurons and glial cells, pancreatic endocrine beta-, alpha- and delta-cells, and pancreatic exocrine and stellate cells. Moreover, the newly generated beta-like cells demonstrate glucose-dependent Ca(2+) responsiveness and insulin release. Pancreas colonies do not express markers of embryonic stem cells, nor genes suggestive of mesodermal or neural crest origins. These cells represent a previously unidentified adult intrinsic pancreatic precursor population and are a promising candidate for cell-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:15322557

  5. Growth Arrest Specific 1 (GAS1) Is Abundantly Expressed in the Adult Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zarco, Natanael; Bautista, Elizabeth; Cuéllar, Manola; Vergara, Paula; Flores-Rodriguez, Paola; Aguilar-Roblero, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Growth arrest specific 1 (GAS1) is a pleiotropic protein that induces apoptosis and cell arrest in different tumors, but it is also involved in the development of the nervous system and other tissues and organs. This dual ability is likely caused by its capacity to interact both by inhibiting the intracellular signaling cascade induced by glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor and by facilitating the activity of the sonic hedgehog pathway. The presence of GAS1 mRNA has been described in adult mouse brain, and here we corroborated this observation. We then proceeded to determine the distribution of the protein in the adult central nervous system (CNS). We detected, by western blot analysis, expression of GAS1 in olfactory bulb, caudate-putamen, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, mesencephalon, medulla oblongata, cerebellum, and cervical spinal cord. To more carefully map the expression of GAS1, we performed double-label immunohistochemistry and noticed expression of GAS1 in neurons in all brain areas examined. We also observed expression of GAS1 in astroglial cells, albeit the pattern of expression was more restricted than that seen in neurons. Briefly, in the present article, we report the widespread distribution and cellular localization of the GAS1 native protein in adult mammalian CNS. PMID:23813868

  6. Abca7 deletion does not affect adult neurogenesis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyun; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) is highly expressed in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ABCA7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk, however, the mechanisms by which ABCA7 may control AD risk remain to be fully elucidated. Based on previous research suggesting that certain ABC transporters may play a role in the regulation of neurogenesis, we conducted a study of cell proliferation and neurogenic potential using cellular bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in adult Abca7 deficient mice and wild-type-like (WT) littermates. In the present study counting of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in an established adult neurogenesis site in the dentate gyrus (DG) indicated there were no significant differences when WT and Abca7 deficient mice were compared. We also measured the area occupied by immunohistochemical staining for BrdU and DCX in the DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the same mice and this confirmed that ABCA7 does not play a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation or neurogenesis in the adult mouse. PMID:26792809

  7. Characterization of neural stem cells and their progeny in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Furube, Eriko; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    Although evidence has accumulated that neurogenesis and gliogenesis occur in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of adult mammalian brains, recent studies indicate the presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) in adult brains, particularly the circumventricular regions. In the present study, we aimed to determine characterization of NSCs and their progenitor cells in the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), including organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, subfornical organ, and area postrema of adult mouse. There were two types of NSCs: tanycyte-like ependymal cells and astrocyte-like cells. Astrocyte-like NSCs proliferated slowly and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) actively divided. Molecular marker protein expression of NSCs and their progenitor cells were similar to those reported in the SVZ and SGZ, except that astrocyte-like NSCs expressed S100β. These circumventricular NSCs possessed the capacity to give rise to oligodendrocytes and sparse numbers of neurons and astrocytes in the sensory CVOs and adjacent brain regions. The inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling by using a VEGF receptor-associated tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 largely suppressed basal proliferation of OPCs. A single systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide attenuated proliferation of OPCs and induced remarkable proliferation of microglia. The present study indicates that sensory circumventricular NSCs provide new neurons and glial cells in the sensory CVOs and adjacent brain regions. PMID:25994374

  8. Abca7 deletion does not affect adult neurogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyun; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) is highly expressed in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ABCA7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk, however, the mechanisms by which ABCA7 may control AD risk remain to be fully elucidated. Based on previous research suggesting that certain ABC transporters may play a role in the regulation of neurogenesis, we conducted a study of cell proliferation and neurogenic potential using cellular bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in adult Abca7 deficient mice and wild-type-like (WT) littermates. In the present study counting of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in an established adult neurogenesis site in the dentate gyrus (DG) indicated there were no significant differences when WT and Abca7 deficient mice were compared. We also measured the area occupied by immunohistochemical staining for BrdU and DCX in the DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the same mice and this confirmed that ABCA7 does not play a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation or neurogenesis in the adult mouse. PMID:26792809

  9. Intestinal lipid alterations occur prior to antibody-induced prostaglandin E2 production in a mouse model of ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sparkes, Byron L.; Slone, Emily E. Archer; Roth, Mary; Welti, Ruth; Fleming, Sherry D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Ischemia/reperfusion (IR) induced injury results in significant tissue damage in wild-type, but not antibody-deficient, Rag-1−/− mice. However, Rag-1−/− mice sustain intestinal damage after administration of wild-type antibodies or naturally occurring, specific anti-phospholipid related monoclonal antibodies, suggesting involvement of a lipid antigen. We hypothesized that IR initiates metabolism of cellular lipids, resulting in production of an antigen recognized by anti-phospholipid antibodies. At multiple time points after Sham or IR treatment, lipids extracted from mouse jejunal sections were analyzed by electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Within 15 min of reperfusion, IR induced significantly more lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), lysophosphatidylglycerol (lysoPG) and free arachidonic acid (AA) production than Sham treatment. While lysoPC, lysoPG, and free AA levels were similar in C57Bl/6 (wild-type) and Rag-1−/− mice, IR led to Cox-2 activation and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in wild-type, but not in the antibody-deficient, Rag-1−/− mice. Administration of wild-type antibodies to Rag-1−/− mice restored PGE2 production and intestinal damage. These data indicate that IR-induced intestinal damage requires antibodies for Cox-2 stimulated PGE2 production but not for production of lysoPC and free AA. PMID:20083230

  10. In vivo colonization of the mouse large intestine and in vitro penetration of intestinal mucus by an avirulent smooth strain of Salmonella typhimurium and its lipopolysaccharide-deficient mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Nevola, J J; Laux, D C; Cohen, P S

    1987-01-01

    The relative abilities of an avirulent Salmonella typhimurium strain with wild-type lipopolysaccharide (LPS) character, SL5319, and a nearly isogenic LPS-deficient mutant, SL5325, to colonize the large intestines of streptomycin-treated CD-1 mice in vivo and to penetrate colonic mucus in vitro were studied. Previously it had been shown that, when fed simultaneously to streptomycin-treated mice (approximately 10(10) CFU each), the S. typhimurium strain with wild-type LPS colonized at 10(8) CFU/g of feces indefinitely, whereas the LPS-deficient mutant dropped within 3 days to a level of only 10(4) CFU/g of feces. In the present investigation, when SL5325 was allowed to colonize for 8 days before feeding mice SL5319 or when it was fed to mice simultaneously with an Escherichia coli strain of human fecal origin (10(10) CFU each), both strains colonized indefinitely at 10(7) CFU/g of feces. Moreover, when the wild-type and LPS-deficient mutant strains were fed to mice simultaneously in low numbers (approximately 10(5) CFU each) the strains survived equally well in the large intestines for 8 days, after which the LPS-deficient mutant was eliminated (less than 10(2) CFU/g of feces), whereas the wild-type colonized at a level of 10(7) CFU/g of feces. In addition although both strains were able to adhere to mucus and epithelial cell preparations in vitro, the wild-type strain was shown to have greater motility and chemotactic activity on CD-1 mouse colonic mucus in vitro and to more rapidly penetrate and form a stable association with immobilized colonic mucosal components in vitro. Based on these data, we suggest that the ability of an S. typhimurium strain to colonize the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine may, in part, depend on its ability to penetrate deeply into the mucus layer on the intestinal wall and subsequently, through growth, colonize the mucosa. PMID:3316026

  11. Use of computed tomography to evaluate the intestinal tract of adult llamas.

    PubMed

    Van Hoogmoed, L; Roberts, G; Snyder, J R; Yarbrough, T; Harmon, F

    1998-01-01

    In the llama, signs of colic are obscure and may be exhibited as persistent sternal recumbency and anorexia even in the presence of a surgical lesion. Diagnostic methods for evaluation of abdominal disorders are limited. As a result, surgical intervention may be prolonged and increase the risk of mortality and postoperative complications. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of computed tomography to evaluate the llama intestinal tract. Eighteen hours prior to the computed tomography scan, six llamas were given barium sulfate (15%) via an orogastric tube. Following induction of general anesthesia, the llamas were positioned in sternal recumbency, and 10 mm contiguous slices were obtained from the diaphragm to the tuber ischiadicum. Structures that were consistently identified included the first, second, and third compartments (C1, 2, and 3), small intestine, spiral colon, and ascending colon. C1 was easily identified in the cranial aspect of the abdomen due to its large size relative to the other compartments and characteristic saccules. C2 was located cranial, ventral, and to the right of C1, while C3 was visualized as a tubular structure to the right and ventral to C1 and C2, C3 was traced caudally until it turned dorsally and continued cranially to a dilated ampulla in the right cranial abdomen delineating the entrance to the small intestine. The spiral colon was identified consistently in the left ventral caudal abdomen. Structures that could not be conclusively identified included the cecum and mesenteric lymph nodes. Computed tomography allowed a consistent evaluation of the major intestinal structures associated with colic in the llama. Thus, computed tomography is a potentially valuable noninvasive diagnostic tool to effectively evaluate the abdominal cavity and differentiate medical from surgical lesions in the llama. PMID:9548138

  12. Exercise training reduces inflammatory mediators in the intestinal tract of healthy older adult mice.

    PubMed

    Packer, Nicholas; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2012-06-01

    Aging is associated with increased intestinal inflammation and elevated risk of chronic diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases and colon cancer; many epidemiologic studies show that regular exercise reduces risk. This study examined the effects of long-term voluntary exercise on inflammatory mediators expressed in the intestine of older (15-16 months), healthy C57BL/6 mice. Animals were assigned to four months of freewheel running (WR; n = 20) or to a "sedentary" no wheel running (NWR; n = 20) control group. Intestinal lymphocytes were harvested and analysed for expression of (1) pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β) and pleiotropic (IL-6) cytokines, and (2) pro-(caspase-3/-7) and anti-(Bcl-2) apoptotic proteins. Training was confirmed by skeletal muscle enzyme activity; stress was assessed by plasma 8-iso-PGF(2α) and corticosterone. The WR mice had a lower expression of TNF-α, caspase-7, and 8-isoprostanes (p < .05) compared to sedentary controls, suggesting that long-term exercise may "protect" the bowel by reducing inflammatory cytokine and apoptotic protein expression. PMID:22647663

  13. A mouse model of adult-onset anaemia due to erythropoietin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shun; Souma, Tomokazu; Hirano, Ikuo; Pan, Xiaoqing; Minegishi, Naoko; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin regulates erythropoiesis in a hypoxia-inducible manner. Here we generate inherited super-anaemic mice (ISAM) as a mouse model of adult-onset anaemia caused by erythropoietin deficiency. ISAM express erythropoietin in the liver but lack erythropoietin production in the kidney. Around weaning age, when the major erythropoietin-producing organ switches from the liver to the kidney, ISAM develop anaemia due to erythropoietin deficiency, which is curable by administration of recombinant erythropoietin. In ISAM severe chronic anaemia enhances transgenic green fluorescent protein and Cre expression driven by the complete erythropoietin-gene regulatory regions, which facilitates efficient labelling of renal erythropoietin-producing cells. We show that the majority of cortical and outer medullary fibroblasts have the innate potential to produce erythropoietin, and also reveal a new set of erythropoietin target genes. ISAM are a useful tool for the evaluation of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and to trace the dynamics of erythropoietin-producing cells. PMID:23727690

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor prevents dendritic retraction of adult mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Binley, Kate E; Ng, Wai S; Barde, Yves-Alain; Song, Bing; Morgan, James E

    2016-08-01

    We used cultured adult mouse retinae as a model system to follow and quantify the retraction of dendrites using diolistic labelling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following explantation. Cell death was monitored in parallel by nuclear staining as 'labelling' with RGC and apoptotic markers was inconsistent and exceedingly difficult to quantify reliably. Nuclear staining allowed us to delineate a lengthy time window during which dendrite retraction can be monitored in the absence of RGC death. The addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a marked reduction in dendritic degeneration, even when application was delayed for 3 days after retinal explantation. These results suggest that the delayed addition of trophic factors may be functionally beneficial before the loss of cell bodies in the course of conditions such as glaucoma. PMID:27285957

  15. Telomerase expression confers cardioprotection in the adult mouse heart after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Rosa; Tejera, Agueda; Ayuso, Eduard; Jimenez, Veronica; Formentini, Ivan; Bobadilla, Maria; Mizrahi, Jacques; de Martino, Alba; Gomez, Gonzalo; Pisano, David; Mulero, Francisca; Wollert, Kai C.; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is one of the main causes of death in the developed world, and treatment success remains modest, with high mortality rates within 1 year after myocardial infarction (MI). Thus, new therapeutic targets and effective treatments are necessary. Short telomeres are risk factors for age-associated diseases, including heart disease. Here we address the potential of telomerase (Tert) activation in prevention of heart failure after MI in adult mice. We use adeno-associated viruses for cardiac-specific Tert expression. We find that upon MI, hearts expressing Tert show attenuated cardiac dilation, improved ventricular function and smaller infarct scars concomitant with increased mouse survival by 17% compared with controls. Furthermore, Tert treatment results in elongated telomeres, increased numbers of Ki67 and pH3-positive cardiomyocytes and a gene expression switch towards a regeneration signature of neonatal mice. Our work suggests telomerase activation could be a therapeutic strategy to prevent heart failure after MI. PMID:25519492

  16. Persistent cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition downregulates NF-{kappa}B, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation in the min/+ mouse model of colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Carothers, Adelaide M; Davids, Jennifer S; Damas, Beatrice C; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2010-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition prevents adenoma formation in humans and mouse models of colon cancer. The selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib reduces COX-2 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) expression and adenomas in the intestine of Min/+ mice after treatment for several weeks, but prolonged treatment increases PGE(2) production, resulting in drug-resistant tumor formation and transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta)-dependent intestinal fibrosis. In this study, we examined pathways that regulate COX-2 expression and suppress chronic intestinal inflammation. We show that NF-kappaB signaling was inhibited in the ileum of Min/+ mice receiving long-term treatment with celecoxib. This effect was associated with inhibition of TGFbeta-associated kinase-1 and IkappaB kinase alpha/beta activities and reduced expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 that enhance colonic barrier function. Additionally, we observed reduced activities of protein kinases c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1 and protein kinase A and transcription factor cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein, regulators of COX-2 expression, which cross-talk with NF-kappaB. In ileum subjected to long-term celecoxib treatment, we noted relatively higher expression of COX-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and interleukin-1beta in Paneth cells, whereas NF-kappaB and COX-2 were more strongly expressed by an expanded population of stromal myofibroblasts. Our findings argue that celecoxib resistance is an acquired adaptation to changes in the crypt microenvironment that is associated with chronic intestinal inflammation and impaired acute wound-healing responsiveness. PMID:20484034

  17. Induction of Sd(a)-sialomucin and sulfated H-sulfomucin in mouse small intestinal mucosa by infection with parasitic helminth.

    PubMed

    Tsubokawa, Daigo; Ishiwata, Kenji; Goso, Yukinobu; Yokoyama, Takuya; Kanuka, Hirotaka; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takeshi; Tsuji, Naotoshi

    2015-06-01

    Mucin is a major component of mucus on gastrointestinal mucosa. Mucin alteration in the host is considered to be the principal event for expulsion of intestinal helminths. However, it is unclear what mucin alterations are induced by various helminth infections. In this study, the alterations of mouse small intestinal mucin after infection with two nematodes, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus, which parasitize the jejunal epithelium, and a cestode, Vampirolepis nana, which parasitizes the ileal epithelium, were examined biochemically and histologically using two anti-mucin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), HCM31 and PGM34, which recognize Sd(a) antigen, NeuAcα2-3(GalNAcβ1-4)Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ-, and sulphated H type 2 antigen, Fucα1-2Galβ1-4GlcNAc(6SO₃H)β-, respectively. The goblet cell mucins that reacted with HCM31 increased conspicuously on the jejunal mucosa concurrently with expulsion of N. brasiliensis. Increased levels of HCM31-reactive mucins were observed in the jejunal mucosa after H. polygyrus infection, despite the ongoing parasitism. Goblet cell mucins that reacted with PGM34 increased on the ileal mucosa during V. nana parasitism. Small intestinal goblet cells reacting with the two mAbs were not observed in non-infected mice, although sialomucins and sulfomucins were abundantly present. Additionally, the number of ileal goblet cells that reacted with the two mAbs was increased at the time of expulsion of heterophyid trematode. These results indicate that the type of specific acidic mucins expressed after infection varies among species of intestinal helminth, and, furthermore, that the relationship with worm expulsion is also different. PMID:25819298

  18. Isolation and Culture of Dental Epithelial Stem Cells from the Adult Mouse Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Miquella G.; Hu, Jimmy; Seidel, Kerstin; Li, Chunying; Jheon, Andrew; Naveau, Adrien; Horst, Orapin; Klein, Ophir D.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie tooth regeneration and renewal has become a topic of great interest1-4, and the mouse incisor provides a model for these processes. This remarkable organ grows continuously throughout the animal's life and generates all the necessary cell types from active pools of adult stem cells housed in the labial (toward the lip) and lingual (toward the tongue) cervical loop (CL) regions. Only the dental stem cells from the labial CL give rise to ameloblasts that generate enamel, the outer covering of teeth, on the labial surface. This asymmetric enamel formation allows abrasion at the incisor tip, and progenitors and stem cells in the proximal incisor ensure that the dental tissues are constantly replenished. The ability to isolate and grow these progenitor or stem cells in vitro allows their expansion and opens doors to numerous experiments not achievable in vivo, such as high throughput testing of potential stem cell regulatory factors. Here, we describe and demonstrate a reliable and consistent method to culture cells from the labial CL of the mouse incisor. PMID:24834972

  19. Hormonal regulation of epidermal growth factor and protease in the submandibular gland of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Gresik, E W; Schenkein, I; van der Noen, H; Barka, T

    1981-09-01

    The structure of the granular convoluted tubules of the mouse submandibular gland is influenced by androgens, adrenal steroids, and thyroid hormones. We wished to investigate the effects of variations in hormonal status on the quantitative and qualitative distribution of two secretory products of these tubules, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and protease. The effects of the thyroid and adrenal glands on EGF content and protease activity of the submandibular glands of adult female mice were studied by RIAs (EGF), enzyme assays (protease), and immunocytochemical methods. In animals rendered chronically hypothyroid by propylthiouracil (4 months) or in animals which were adrenalectomized and ovariectomized (3 weeks), protease activity and EGF levels were reduced by 81-97%. The administration of testosterone induced these polypeptides even in hypothyroid animals. Daily administration of L-T4 (T4; 1 micrograms/g BW) for 7 days increased EGF and protease activity 3.6-fold in intact mice and reversed the effect of hypothyroidism. EGF and protease were also induced by T4 in adrenalectomized and ovariectomized mice, although to a lesser degree than in intact animals. Immunocytochemical stainings of submandibular glands indicated that the number of granular convoluted tubule cells immunoreactive for EGF correlated with the levels of EGF determined by RIAs. With respect to immunostaining for protease, such a correlation was not observed. The data indicate multihormonal regulation of EGF and protease in the mouse submandibular gland. PMID:7021131

  20. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Benjamin B; Tebbutt, Niall C; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy L; Doggett, Karen; Bao, Shisan; Johnstone, Cameron N; Masson, Frederick; Hollande, Frederic; Burgess, Antony W; Scott, Andrew M; Ernst, Matthias; Heath, Joan K

    2015-08-01

    The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33) is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33(-/-) mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33(-/-) mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33(-/-) mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM) followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33(-/-) mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33(-/-) mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33(-/-) mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms linking intestinal

  1. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1's importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1's functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sor(tm1(Cre/ERT)Nat)/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1's role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  2. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R. Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1’s importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1’s functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sortm1(Cre/ERT)Nat/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1’s role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  3. Generation of a novel mouse model that recapitulates early and adult onset glycogenosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Akman, H Orhan; Sheiko, Tatiana; Tay, Stacey K H; Finegold, Milton J; Dimauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J

    2011-11-15

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic feature of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age of disease onset. Absence of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy affecting primarily muscle and liver. However, residual enzyme activity (5-20%) leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects muscle as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Here, we describe two mouse models of GSD IV that reflect this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to insert flippase recognition target recombination sites around exon 7 of the Gbe1 gene and a phosphoglycerate kinase-Neomycin cassette within intron 7, leading to a reduced synthesis of GBE. Mice bearing this mutation (Gbe1(neo/neo)) exhibit a phenotype similar to juvenile onset GSD IV, with wide spread accumulation of PG. Meanwhile, FLPe-mediated homozygous deletion of exon 7 completely eliminated GBE activity (Gbe1(-/-)), leading to a phenotype of lethal early onset GSD IV, with significant in utero accumulation of PG. Adult mice with residual GBE exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. Differently from muscle, PG in liver is a degradable source of glucose and readily depleted by fasting, emphasizing that there are structural and regulatory differences in glycogen metabolism among tissues. Both mouse models recapitulate typical histological and physiological features of two human variants of branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:21856731

  4. A method for high purity intestinal epithelial cell culture from adult human and murine tissues for the investigation of innate immune function

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Christina L.; Harden, Scott W.; LaPato, Melissa; Nelson, Michael; Amador, Byron; Sorenson, Heather; Frazier, Charles J.; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serve as an important physiologic barrier between environmental antigens and the host intestinal immune system. Thus, IECs serve as a first line of defense and may act as sentinel cells during inflammatory insults. Despite recent renewed interest in IEC contributions to host immune function, the study of primary IEC has been hindered by lack of a robust culture technique, particularly for small intestinal and adult tissues. Here, a novel adaptation for culture of primary IEC is described for human duodenal organ donor tissue as well as duodenum and colon of adult mice. These epithelial cell cultures display characteristic phenotypes and are of high purity. In addition, the innate immune function of human primary IEC, specifically with regard to Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and microbial ligand responsiveness, is contrasted with a commonly used intestinal epithelial cell line (HT-29). Specifically, TLR expression at the mRNA level and production of cytokine (IFNγ and TNFα) in response to TLR agonist stimulation is assessed. Differential expression of TLRs as well as innate immune responses to ligand stimulation is observed in human-derived cultures compared to that of HT-29. Thus, use of this adapted method to culture primary epithelial cells from adult human donors and from adult mice will allow for more appropriate studies of IECs as innate immune effectors. PMID:25193428

  5. Contribution of radixin to P-glycoprotein expression and transport activity in mouse small intestine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kentaro; Tomono, Takumi; Sakai, Riyo; Kano, Takashi; Morimoto, Kaori; Kato, Yukio; Ogihara, Takuo

    2013-08-01

    The ERM proteins, ezrin, radixin, and moesin, are membrane-cytoskeleton cross-linkers with multiple physiological functions. We previously showed that radixin is involved in posttranslational regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. Here, we investigated the physiological role of radixin in regulating P-gp expression and activity in the small intestine by comparing wild-type- and radixin knockout (Rdx) mice. In intestinal tissue homogenates, P-gp protein levels increased markedly from the upper part to the lower part of the small intestine in both wild-type- and Rdx(-/-) mice. In the membrane fractions, a similar pattern was seen in wild-type mice. However, the membrane expression of P-gp protein remained at the same level from the upper to the lower part of the small intestine in Rdx(-/-) mice. When rhodamine123 (Rho123), a substrate of P-gp, was orally administered to Rdx(-/-) and wild-type mice, the absorption phase of Rho123 was greater in Rdx(-/-) than in wild-type mice, whereas the elimination phase in Rdx(-/-) mice was not different from that of wild-type mice. Our results indicate that radixin plays an important role in regulating P-gp localization and P-gp functional activity at the intestinal membrane. PMID:23754525

  6. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  7. Spatial distribution of Escherichia coli in the mouse large intestine inferred from rRNA in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, L K; Lan, F; Kristensen, C S; Hobolth, P; Molin, S; Krogfelt, K A

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescent oligonucleotide probes targeting rRNA were used to develop an in situ hybridization technique by which the spatial distribution of Escherichia coli in the large intestines of streptomycin-treated mice was determined. Single E. coli cells were identified in thin frozen sections from the large intestines by the use of a probe specific for E. coli 23S rRNA. Furthermore, the total bacterial population was visualized with an rRNA probe targeting the domain Bacteria. By this technique, all E. coli cells were seen embedded in the mucosal material overlying the epithelial cells of the large intestine, and no direct attachment to the epithelium was observed. Images PMID:7927805

  8. Establishment of a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for widespread and temporal genetic modification in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ichise, Hirotake; Hori, Akiko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu; Ichise, Taeko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-07-29

    Temporal genetic modification of mice using the ligand-inducible Cre/loxP system is an important technique that allows the bypass of embryonic lethal phenotypes and access to adult phenotypes. In this study, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for the purpose of widespread and temporal Cre recombination. The new line, named CM32, expresses the GFPneo-fusion gene in a wide variety of tissues before FLP recombination and tamoxifen-inducible Cre after FLP recombination. Using FLP-recombined CM32 mice (CM32Δ mice) and Cre reporter mouse lines, we evaluated the efficiency of Cre recombination with and without tamoxifen administration to adult mice, and found tamoxifen-dependent induction of Cre recombination in a variety of adult tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that conditional activation of an oncogene could be achieved in adults using CM32Δ mice. CM32Δ;T26 mice, which harbored a Cre recombination-driven, SV40 large T antigen-expressing transgene, were viable and fertile. No overt phenotype was found in the mice up to 3 months after birth. Although they displayed pineoblastomas (pinealoblastomas) and/or thymic enlargement due to background Cre recombination by 6 months after birth, they developed epidermal hyperplasia when administered tamoxifen. Collectively, our results suggest that the CM32Δ transgenic mouse line can be applied to the assessment of adult phenotypes in mice with loxP-flanked transgenes. PMID:26923756

  9. Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function in the adult mouse main olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Steve; Sickles, Heather M.; DeLeonardis, Chris; Alcaraz, Ana; Gridley, Thomas; Lin, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Notch receptors are expressed in neurons and glia in the adult nervous system, but why this expression persists is not well-understood. Here we examine the role of the Notch pathway in the postnatal mouse main olfactory system, and show evidence consistent with a model where Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function. In the absence of Notch2, the laminar nature of these glial-like cells is disrupted. Hes1, Hey1, and Six1, which are downstream effectors of the Notch pathway, are down-regulated, and cytochrome P450 and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) expression by sustentacular cells is reduced. Functional levels of GST activity are also reduced. These disruptions are associated with increased olfactory sensory neuron degeneration. Surprisingly, expression of Notch3 is also down-regulated. This suggests the existence of a feedback loop where expression of Notch3 is initially independent of Notch2, but requires Notch2 for maintained expression. While the Notch pathway has previously been shown to be important for promoting gliogenesis during development, this is the first demonstration that the persistent expression of Notch receptors is required for maintaining glial function in adult. PMID:18155189

  10. Inhibition of Notch activity promotes nonmitotic regeneration of hair cells in the adult mouse utricles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Vincent; Golub, Justin S; Nguyen, Tot Bui; Hume, Clifford R; Oesterle, Elizabeth C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2011-10-26

    The capacity of adult mammals to regenerate sensory hair cells is not well defined. To explore early steps in this process, we examined reactivation of a transiently expressed developmental gene, Atoh1, in adult mouse utricles after neomycin-induced hair cell death in culture. Using an adenoviral reporter for Atoh1 enhancer, we found that Atoh1 transcription is activated in some hair cell progenitors (supporting cells) 3 d after neomycin treatment. By 18 d after neomycin, the number of cells with Atoh1 transcriptional activity increased significantly, but few cells acquired hair cell features (i.e., accumulated ATOH1 or myosin VIIa protein or developed stereocilia). Treatment with DAPT, an inhibitor of γ-secretase, reduced notch pathway activity, enhanced Atoh1 transcriptional activity, and dramatically increased the number of Atoh1-expressing cells with hair cell features, but only in the striolar/juxtastriolar region. Similar effects were seen with TAPI-1, an inhibitor of another enzyme required for notch activity (TACE). Division of supporting cells was rare in any control or DAPT-treated utricles. This study shows that mature mammals have a natural capacity to initiate vestibular hair cell regeneration and suggests that regional notch activity is a significant inhibitor of direct transdifferentiation of supporting cells into hair cells following damage. PMID:22031879

  11. AhR activation by 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin inhibit the development of mouse intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo-Hung; Choi, Ah-Jeong; Kim, Soo-Ji; Cheong, Seon-Woo; Jeong, So-Yeon

    2016-04-01

    The intestinal epithelium plays a central role in immune homeostasis in the intestine. AhR, a ligand-activated transcription factor, plays an important role in diverse physiological processes. The intestines are exposed to various exogenous and endogenous AhR ligands. Thus, AhR may regulate the intestinal homeostasis, directly acting on the development of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). In this study, we demonstrated that 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) inhibited the in vitro development of mouse intestinal organoids. The number of Paneth cells in the small intestine and the depth of crypts of the small and large intestines were reduced in mice administrated with FICZ. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric assays revealed that AhR was highly expressed in Lgr5(+) stem cells. FICZ inhibited Wnt signaling lowering the level of β-catenin protein. Gene expression analyses demonstrated that FICZ increased expression of Lgr5, Math1, BMP4, and Indian Hedgehog while inhibiting that of Lgr4. PMID:26950395

  12. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Wang, Zhenghan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-02-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the major compartment boundaries of the adult intestine, has essential functions. Wg pathway activation in the intestinal epithelium is required not only to specify cell fate near compartment boundaries during development, but also to control ISC proliferation within compartments during homeostasis. Further, in contrast with the previous focus on Wg pathway activation within ISCs, we demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which Wg signaling regulates ISC proliferation during homeostasis is non-autonomous. Activation of the Wg pathway in absorptive enterocytes is required to suppress JAK-STAT signaling in neighboring ISCs, and thereby their proliferation. We conclude that Wg signaling gradients have essential roles during homeostasis and development of the adult intestine, non-autonomously controlling stem cell proliferation inside compartments, and autonomously specifying cell fate near compartment boundaries. PMID:26845150

  13. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Wang, Zhenghan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the major compartment boundaries of the adult intestine, has essential functions. Wg pathway activation in the intestinal epithelium is required not only to specify cell fate near compartment boundaries during development, but also to control ISC proliferation within compartments during homeostasis. Further, in contrast with the previous focus on Wg pathway activation within ISCs, we demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which Wg signaling regulates ISC proliferation during homeostasis is non-autonomous. Activation of the Wg pathway in absorptive enterocytes is required to suppress JAK-STAT signaling in neighboring ISCs, and thereby their proliferation. We conclude that Wg signaling gradients have essential roles during homeostasis and development of the adult intestine, non-autonomously controlling stem cell proliferation inside compartments, and autonomously specifying cell fate near compartment boundaries. PMID:26845150

  14. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  15. Temporal profiles of synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult mouse hippocampus with methotrexate treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Juhwan; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Joong-Sun; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong

    2012-07-25

    Methotrexate, which is used to treat many malignancies and autoimmune diseases, affects brain functions including hippocampal-dependent memory function. However, the precise mechanisms underlying methotrexate-induced hippocampal dysfunction are poorly understood. To evaluate temporal changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals, the expression and activity of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cAMP responsive element-binding protein, glutamate receptor 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were examined in the hippocampi of adult C57BL/6 mice after methotrexate (40 mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection. Western blot analysis showed biphasic changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult hippocampi following methotrexate treatment. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and glutamate receptor 1 were acutely activated during the early phase (1 day post-injection), while extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and cAMP responsive element-binding protein activation showed biphasic increases during the early (1 day post-injection) and late phases (7-14 days post-injection). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression increased significantly during the late phase (7-14 days post-injection). Therefore, methotrexate treatment affects synaptic plasticity-related signals in the adult mouse hippocampus, suggesting that changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals may be associated with neuronal survival and plasticity-related cellular remodeling. PMID:25657706

  16. Expression of Npas4 mRNA in Telencephalic Areas of Adult and Postnatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Slaton, G. Simona; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor neuronal PAS domain-containing protein 4 (Npas4) is an inducible immediate early gene which regulates the formation of inhibitory synapses, and could have a significant regulatory role during cortical circuit formation. However, little is known about basal Npas4 mRNA expression during postnatal development. Here, postnatal and adult mouse brain sections were processed for isotopic in situ hybridization using an Npas4 specific cRNA antisense probe. In adults, Npas4 mRNA was found in the telencephalon with very restricted or no expression in diencephalon or mesencephalon. In most telencephalic areas, including the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex, neocortex, hippocampus, dorsal caudate putamen (CPu), septum and basolateral amygdala nucleus (BLA), basal Npas4 expression was detected in scattered cells which exhibited strong hybridization signal. In embryonic and neonatal brain sections, Npas4 mRNA expression signals were very low. Starting at postnatal day 5 (P5), transcripts for Npas4 were detected in the AON, CPu and piriform cortex. At P8, additional Npas4 hybridization was found in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal layer, and in primary motor cortex. By P13, robust mRNA expression was located in layers IV and VI of all sensory cortices, frontal cortex and cingulate cortex. After onset of expression, postnatal spatial mRNA distribution was similar to that in adults, with the exception of the CPu, where Npas4 transcripts became gradually restricted to the most dorsal part. In conclusion, the spatial distribution of Npas4 mRNA is mostly restricted to telencephalic areas, and the temporal expression increases with developmental age during postnatal development, which seem to correlate with the onset of activity-driven excitatory transmission. PMID:26633966

  17. Doublecortin (DCX) is not Essential for Survival and Differentiation of Newborn Neurons in the Adult Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Jagroop; Xi, Yanwei; Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Germain, Johanne; Francis, Fiona; Lagace, Diane C.

    2016-01-01

    In the adult brain, expression of the microtubule-associated protein Doublecortin (DCX) is associated with neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that give rise to new neurons in the dentate gyrus. Many studies quantify the number of DCX-expressing cells as a proxy for the level of adult neurogenesis, yet no study has determined the effect of removing DCX from adult hippocampal NPCs. Here, we use a retroviral and inducible mouse transgenic approach to either knockdown or knockout DCX from adult NPCs in the dentate gyrus and examine how this affects cell survival and neuronal maturation. Our results demonstrate that shRNA-mediated knockdown of DCX or Cre-mediated recombination in floxed DCX mice does not alter hippocampal neurogenesis and does not change the neuronal fate of the NPCs. Together these findings show that the survival and maturation of adult-generated hippocampal neurons does not require DCX. PMID:26793044

  18. High yield extraction of pure spinal motor neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single embryo and adult mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Marie-Josée; Yang, Qiurui; Cadau, Sébastien; Blais, Mathieu; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Gros-Louis, François; Berthod, François

    2015-01-01

    Extraction of mouse spinal motor neurons from transgenic mouse embryos recapitulating some aspects of neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has met with limited success. Furthermore, extraction and long-term culture of adult mouse spinal motor neurons and glia remain also challenging. We present here a protocol designed to extract and purify high yields of motor neurons and glia from individual spinal cords collected on embryos and adult (5-month-old) normal or transgenic mice. This method is based on mild digestion of tissue followed by gradient density separation allowing to obtain two millions motor neurons over 92% pure from one E14.5 single embryo and more than 30,000 from an adult mouse. These cells can be cultured more than 14 days in vitro at a density of 100,000 cells/cm2 to maintain optimal viability. Functional astrocytes and microglia and small gamma motor neurons can be purified at the same time. This protocol will be a powerful and reliable method to obtain motor neurons and glia to better understand mechanisms underlying spinal cord diseases. PMID:26577180

  19. Permissive replication of homologous murine rotavirus in the mouse intestine is primarily regulated by VP4 and NSP1.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ningguo; Yasukawa, Linda L; Sen, Adrish; Greenberg, Harry B

    2013-08-01

    Homologous rotaviruses (RV) are, in general, more virulent and replicate more efficiently than heterologous RV in the intestine of the homologous host. The genetic basis for RV host range restriction is not fully understood and is likely to be multigenic. In previous studies, RV genes encoding VP3, VP4, VP7, nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1), and NSP4 have all been implicated in strain- and host species-specific infection. These studies used different RV strains, variable measurements of host range, and different animal hosts, and no clear consensus on the host range restriction determinants emerged. We used a murine model to demonstrate that enteric replication of murine RV EW is 1,000- to 10,000-fold greater than that of a simian rotavirus (RRV) in suckling mice. Intestinal replication of a series of EW × RRV reassortants was used to identify several RV genes that influenced RV replication in the intestine. The role of VP4 (encoded by gene 4) in enteric infection was strain specific. RRV VP4 reduced murine RV infectivity only slightly; however, a reassortant expressing VP4 from a bovine RV strain (UK) severely restricted intestinal replication in the suckling mice. The homologous murine EW NSP1 (encoded by gene 5) was necessary but not sufficient for promoting efficient enteric growth. Efficient enteric replication required a constellation of murine genes encoding VP3, NSP2, and NSP3 along with NSP1. PMID:23698306

  20. Permissive Replication of Homologous Murine Rotavirus in the Mouse Intestine Is Primarily Regulated by VP4 and NSP1

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ningguo; Yasukawa, Linda L.; Sen, Adrish

    2013-01-01

    Homologous rotaviruses (RV) are, in general, more virulent and replicate more efficiently than heterologous RV in the intestine of the homologous host. The genetic basis for RV host range restriction is not fully understood and is likely to be multigenic. In previous studies, RV genes encoding VP3, VP4, VP7, nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1), and NSP4 have all been implicated in strain- and host species-specific infection. These studies used different RV strains, variable measurements of host range, and different animal hosts, and no clear consensus on the host range restriction determinants emerged. We used a murine model to demonstrate that enteric replication of murine RV EW is 1,000- to 10,000-fold greater than that of a simian rotavirus (RRV) in suckling mice. Intestinal replication of a series of EW × RRV reassortants was used to identify several RV genes that influenced RV replication in the intestine. The role of VP4 (encoded by gene 4) in enteric infection was strain specific. RRV VP4 reduced murine RV infectivity only slightly; however, a reassortant expressing VP4 from a bovine RV strain (UK) severely restricted intestinal replication in the suckling mice. The homologous murine EW NSP1 (encoded by gene 5) was necessary but not sufficient for promoting efficient enteric growth. Efficient enteric replication required a constellation of murine genes encoding VP3, NSP2, and NSP3 along with NSP1. PMID:23698306

  1. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy L.; Doggett, Karen; Bao, Shisan; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Masson, Frederick; Hollande, Frederic; Burgess, Antony W.; Scott, Andrew M.; Ernst, Matthias; Heath, Joan K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33) is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM) followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms linking

  2. Overexpression of Peroxiredoxin 4 Affects Intestinal Function in a Dietary Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hirotsugu; Mazaki, Yuichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Izumi, Hiroto; Wang, Ke-Yong; Guo, Xin; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Fujii, Junichi; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Akihide; Nakayama, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence has shown that methionine- and choline-deficient high fat (MCD+HF) diet induces the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), in which elevated reactive oxygen species play a crucial role. We have reported that peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4), a unique secretory member of the PRDX antioxidant family, protects against NAFLD progression. However, the detailed mechanism and potential effects on the intestinal function still remain unclear. Methods & Results Two weeks after feeding mice a MCD+HF diet, the livers of human PRDX4 transgenic (Tg) mice exhibited significant suppression in the development of NAFLD compared with wild-type (WT) mice. The serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels were significantly lower in Tg mice. In contrast, the Tg small intestine with PRDX4 overexpression showed more suppressed shortening of total length and villi height, and more accumulation of lipid in the jejunum, along with lower levels of dihydroethidium binding. The enterocytes exhibited fewer apoptotic but more proliferating cells, and inflammation was reduced in the mucosa. Furthermore, the small intestine of Tg mice had significantly higher expression of cholesterol absorption-regulatory factors, including liver X receptor-α, but lower expression of microsomal triglyceride-transfer protein. Conclusion Our present data provide the first evidence of the beneficial effects of PRDX4 on intestinal function in the reduction of the severity of NAFLD, by ameliorating oxidative stress-induced local and systemic injury. We can suggest that both liver and intestine are spared, to some degree, by the antioxidant properties of PRDX4. PMID:27035833

  3. Functional characteristics of intraepithelial lymphocytes from mouse small intestine. II. In vivo and in vitro responses of intraepithelial lymphocytes to mitogenic and allogeneic stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, A M; MacKenzie, S; Baca, M E; Felstein, M V; Parrott, D M

    1986-01-01

    Although isolated intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) have been shown to have specific and non-specific cytolytic functions, their ability to proliferate in response to T-cell mitogens or alloantigens is controversial. Here we show that IEL from mouse small intestine do not respond to mitogens such as concanavalin A and phytohaemagglutinin A or in mixed lymphocyte reactions unless an accessory spleen cell is also present. Adherent spleen cells possess the most potent helper function, but a dividing accessory cell may also be required. Supernatants from stimulated lymphocytes also assist IEL to proliferate in vitro, particularly in the presence of adherent accessory cells. IEL could not mediate lethal graft-versus-host disease in irradiated hosts, but could produce popliteal lymph node hypertrophy or splenomegaly in unirradiated hosts. Thus, IEL have the potential for proliferative activities characteristic of T cells, but they require accessory cells and/or factors such as interleukin-2 for their function in vitro and in vivo. PMID:2942464

  4. Appendicitis and abscess in an adult patient with intestinal nonrotation: Case report.

    PubMed

    Assenza, M; Reali, C; Valesini, L; Marenga, G; Bartolucci, P; Rossi, D; Modini, C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is showing a particular case of midgut nonrotation. It is a congenital defect of the bowel development, during which fails the rotation of 270° around the vascular pedicle. This anomaly causes a different intestinal arrangement: the small bowel is located in the right side of abdominal cavity while the large bowel is situated in the left side. We present a case of acute appendicitis and abscess treated successfully with urgent surgical intervention in a patient completely asymptomatic for nonrotation. Nonrotation may lead to acute symptoms, vague abdominal pain or may remain asymptomatic throughout all life and be discovered only accidentally. Radiological exams and laparoscopy can help to make a correct diagnosis. A conservative treatment could be preferred in asymptomatic patients and Ladd's surgical procedure should be performed in selected cases. PMID:25945440

  5. Cocoa Flavonoid-Enriched Diet Modulates Systemic and Intestinal Immunoglobulin Synthesis in Adult Lewis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Massot-Cladera, Malen; Franch, Àngels; Castellote, Cristina; Castell, Margarida; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that a diet containing 10% cocoa, a rich source of flavonoids, has immunomodulatory effects on rats and, among others effects, is able to attenuate the immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis in both systemic and intestinal compartments. The purpose of the present study was focused on investigating whether these effects were attributed exclusively to the flavonoid content or to other compounds present in cocoa. To this end, eight-week-old Lewis rats were fed, for two weeks, either a standard diet or three isoenergetic diets containing increasing proportions of cocoa flavonoids from different sources: one with 0.2% polyphenols from conventional defatted cocoa, and two others with 0.4% and 0.8% polyphenols, respectively, from non-fermented cocoa. Diet intake and body weight were monitored and fecal samples were obtained throughout the study to determine fecal pH, IgA, bacteria proportions, and IgA-coated bacteria. Moreover, IgG and IgM concentrations in serum samples collected during the study were quantified. At the end of the dietary intervention no clear changes of serum IgG or IgM concentrations were quantified, showing few effects of cocoa polyphenol diets at the systemic level. However, in the intestine, all cocoa polyphenol-enriched diets attenuated the age-related increase of both fecal IgA and IgA-coated bacteria, as well as the proportion of bacteria in feces. As these effects were not dependent on the dose of polyphenol present in the diets, other compounds and/or the precise polyphenol composition present in cocoa raw material used for the diets could be key factors in this effect. PMID:23966108

  6. Rhythmic Ganglion Cell Activity in Bleached and Blind Adult Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Menzler, Jacob; Channappa, Lakshmi; Zeck, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa – a degenerative disease which often leads to incurable blindness- the loss of photoreceptors deprives the retina from a continuous excitatory input, the so-called dark current. In rodent models of this disease this deprivation leads to oscillatory electrical activity in the remaining circuitry, which is reflected in the rhythmic spiking of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). It remained unclear, however, if the rhythmic RGC activity is attributed to circuit alterations occurring during photoreceptor degeneration or if rhythmic activity is an intrinsic property of healthy retinal circuitry which is masked by the photoreceptor’s dark current. Here we tested these hypotheses by inducing and analysing oscillatory activity in adult healthy (C57/Bl6) and blind mouse retinas (rd10 and rd1). Rhythmic RGC activity in healthy retinas was detected upon partial photoreceptor bleaching using an extracellular high-density multi-transistor-array. The mean fundamental spiking frequency in bleached retinas was 4.3 Hz; close to the RGC rhythm detected in blind rd10 mouse retinas (6.5 Hz). Crosscorrelation analysis of neighbouring wild-type and rd10 RGCs (separation distance <200 µm) reveals synchrony among homologous RGC types and a constant phase shift (∼70 msec) among heterologous cell types (ON versus OFF). The rhythmic RGC spiking in these retinas is driven by a network of presynaptic neurons. The inhibition of glutamatergic ganglion cell input or the inhibition of gap junctional coupling abolished the rhythmic pattern. In rd10 and rd1 retinas the presynaptic network leads to local field potentials, whereas in bleached retinas additional pharmacological disinhibition is required to achieve detectable field potentials. Our results demonstrate that photoreceptor bleaching unmasks oscillatory activity in healthy retinas which shares many features with the functional phenotype detected in rd10 retinas. The quantitative physiological differences advance the

  7. Adult Plasticity in the Subcortical Auditory Pathway of the Maternal Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Jason A.; Shepard, Kathryn N.; McClintock, Shannon K.; Liu, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Subcortical auditory nuclei were traditionally viewed as non-plastic in adulthood so that acoustic information could be stably conveyed to higher auditory areas. Studies in a variety of species, including humans, now suggest that prolonged acoustic training can drive long-lasting brainstem plasticity. The neurobiological mechanisms for such changes are not well understood in natural behavioral contexts due to a relative dearth of in vivo animal models in which to study this. Here, we demonstrate in a mouse model that a natural life experience with increased demands on the auditory system – motherhood – is associated with improved temporal processing in the subcortical auditory pathway. We measured the auditory brainstem response to test whether mothers and pup-naïve virgin mice differed in temporal responses to both broadband and tone stimuli, including ultrasonic frequencies found in mouse pup vocalizations. Mothers had shorter latencies for early ABR peaks, indicating plasticity in the auditory nerve and the cochlear nucleus. Shorter interpeak latency between waves IV and V also suggest plasticity in the inferior colliculus. Hormone manipulations revealed that these cannot be explained solely by estrogen levels experienced during pregnancy and parturition in mothers. In contrast, we found that pup-care experience, independent of pregnancy and parturition, contributes to shortening auditory brainstem response latencies. These results suggest that acoustic experience in the maternal context imparts plasticity on early auditory processing that lasts beyond pup weaning. In addition to establishing an animal model for exploring adult auditory brainstem plasticity in a neuroethological context, our results have broader implications for models of perceptual, behavioral and neural changes that arise during maternity, where subcortical sensorineural plasticity has not previously been considered. PMID:24992362

  8. Effects of acid-base variables and the role of carbonic anhydrase on oxalate secretion by the mouse intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Frost, Susan C; Hatch, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria is a major risk factor for calcium oxalate kidney stones and the intestine is recognized as an important extra-renal pathway for eliminating oxalate. The membrane-bound chloride/bicarbonate (Cl−/) exchangers are involved in the transcellular movement of oxalate, but little is understood about how they might be regulated. , CO2, and pH are established modulators of intestinal NaCl cotransport, involving Na+/H+ and Cl−/ exchange, but their influence on oxalate transport is unknown. Measuring 14C-oxalate and 36Cl fluxes across isolated, short-circuited segments of the mouse distal ileum and distal colon we examined the role of these acid-base variables and carbonic anhydrase (CA) in oxalate and Cl− transport. In standard buffer both segments performed net oxalate secretion (and Cl− absorption), but only the colon, and the secretory pathway were responsive to and CO2. Ethoxzolamide abolished net oxalate secretion by the distal colon, and when used in tandem with an impermeant CA inhibitor, signaled an intracellular CA isozyme was required for secretion. There was a clear dependence on as their removal eliminated secretion, while at 42 mmol/L was also decreased and eradicated. Independent of pH, raising Pco2 from 28 to 64 mmHg acutely stimulated net oxalate secretion 41%. In summary, oxalate secretion by the distal colon was dependent on , CA and specifically modulated by CO2, whereas the ileum was remarkably unresponsive. These findings highlight the distinct segmental heterogeneity along the intestine, providing new insights into the oxalate transport mechanism and how it might be regulated. PMID:25716924

  9. Intestinal Lesions Are Associated with Altered Intestinal Microbiome and Are More Frequent in Children and Young Adults with Cystic Fibrosis and Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Flass, Thomas; Tong, Suhong; Frank, Daniel N.; Wagner, Brandie D.; Robertson, Charles E.; Kotter, Cassandra Vogel; Sokol, Ronald J.; Zemanick, Edith; Accurso, Frank; Hoffenberg, Edward J.; Narkewicz, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Cirrhosis (CIR) occurs in 5–7% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We hypothesized that alterations in intestinal function in CF contribute to the development of CIR. Aims: Determine the frequency of macroscopic intestinal lesions, intestinal inflammation, intestinal permeability and characterize fecal microbiome in CF CIR subjects and CF subjects with no liver disease (CFnoLIV). Methods 11 subjects with CFCIR (6 M, 12.8 yrs ± 3.8) and 19 matched with CFnoLIV (10 M, 12.6 yrs ± 3.4) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, intestinal permeability testing by urinary lactulose: mannitol excretion ratio, fecal calprotectin determination and fecal microbiome characterization. Results CFCIR and CFnoLIV did not differ in key demographics or CF complications. CFCIR had higher GGT (59±51 U/L vs 17±4 p = 0.02) and lower platelet count (187±126 vs 283±60 p = 0.04) and weight (-0.86 ± 1.0 vs 0.30 ± 0.9 p = 0.002) z scores. CFCIR had more severe intestinal mucosal lesions on capsule endoscopy (score ≥4, 4/11 vs 0/19 p = 0.01). Fecal calprotectin was similar between CFCIR and CFnoLIV (166 μg/g ±175 vs 136 ± 193 p = 0.58, nl <120). Lactulose:mannitol ratio was elevated in 27/28 subjects and was slightly lower in CFCIR vs CFnoLIV (0.08±0.02 vs 0.11±0.05, p = 0.04, nl ≤0.03). Small bowel transit time was longer in CFCIR vs CFnoLIV (195±42 min vs 167±68 p<0.001, nl 274 ± 41). Bacteroides were decreased in relative abundance in CFCIR and were associated with lower capsule endoscopy score whereas Clostridium were more abundant in CFCIR and associated with higher capsule endoscopy score. Conclusions CFCIR is associated with increased intestinal mucosal lesions, slower small bowel transit time and alterations in fecal microbiome. Abnormal intestinal permeability and elevated fecal calprotectin are common in all CF subjects. Disturbances in intestinal function in CF combined with changes in the microbiome may contribute to the development of

  10. An organotypic slice model for ex vivo study of neural, immune, and microbial interactions of mouse intestine

    PubMed Central

    Schwerdtfeger, Luke A.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.

    2015-01-01

    Organotypic tissue slices provide seminatural, three-dimensional microenvironments for use in ex vivo study of specific organs and have advanced investigative capabilities compared with isolated cell cultures. Several characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract have made in vitro models for studying the intestine challenging, such as maintaining the intricate structure of microvilli, the intrinsic enteric nervous system, Peyer's patches, the microbiome, and the active contraction of gut muscles. In the present study, an organotypic intestinal slice model was developed that allows for functional investigation across regions of the intestine. Intestinal tissue slices were maintained ex vivo for several days in a physiologically relevant environment that preserved normal enterocyte structure, intact and proliferating crypt cells, submucosal organization, and muscle wall composure. Cell death was measured by a membrane-impermeable DNA binding indicator, ethidium homodimer, and less than 5% of cells were labeled in all regions of the villi and crypt epithelia at 24 h ex vivo. This tissue slice model demonstrated intact myenteric and submucosal neuronal plexuses and functional interstitial cells of Cajal to the extent that nonstimulated, segmental contractions occurred for up to 48 h ex vivo. To detect changes in physiological responses, slices were also assessed for segmental contractions in the presence and absence of antibiotic treatment, which resulted in slices with lesser or greater amounts of commensal bacteria, respectively. Segmental contractions were significantly greater in slices without antibiotics and increased native microbiota. This model renders mechanisms of neuroimmune-microbiome interactions in a complex gut environment available to direct observation and controlled perturbation. PMID:26680736

  11. Intermittent fasting modulates IgA levels in the small intestine under intense stress: a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Arciniega-Martínez, Ivonne Maciel; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Cruz-Hernández, Teresita Rocío; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2015-08-15

    Intermittent fasting prolongs the lifespan and unlike intense stress provides health benefits. Given the role of the immunoglobulin A (IgA) in the intestinal homeostasis, the aim of this study was to assess the impact of intermittent fasting plus intense stress on secretory IgA (SIgA) production and other mucosal parameters in the duodenum and ileum. Two groups of six mice, with intermittent fasting or fed ad libitum for 12weeks, were submitted to a session of intense stress by a bout of forced swimming. Unstressed ad libitum fed or intermittently fasted groups were included as controls. After sacrifice, we evaluated intestinal SIgA and plasma adrenal hormones, lamina propria IgA+ plasma-cells, mRNA expression of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, α- and J-chains in the liver and intestinal mucosa, as well as pro- (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and Interferon-γ) and anti- (interleukin-2, -4, -10 and transforming growth factor-β) inflammatory cytokines in mucosal samples. Under intense stress, intermittent fasting down- or up-modulated the levels of most parameters in the duodenum and ileum, respectively while up-regulated corticosterone levels without affecting epinephrine. Our data suggest intermittent fasting plus intense stress elicited neuroendocrine pathways that differentially controlled IgA and pIgR expression in duodenum and ileum. These findings provide experimental foundations for a presumable impact of intermittent fasting under intense stress on the intestinal homeostasis or inflammation by triggering or reducing the IgA production in ileum or duodenum respectively. PMID:26198915

  12. Glucose and Palmitate Differentially Regulate PFKFB3/iPFK2 and Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Botchlett, Rachel; Li, Honggui; Guo, Xin; Qi, Ting; Zhao, JiaJia; Zheng, Juan; Woo, Shih-Lung; Pei, Ya; Liu, Mengyang; Hu, Xiang; Chen, Guang; Guo, Ting; Yang, Sijun; Li, Qifu; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Huo, Yuqing; Wu, Chaodong

    2016-01-01

    The gene PFKFB3 encodes for inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase, a glycolysis-regulatory enzyme that protects against diet-induced intestine inflammation. However, it is unclear how nutrient overload regulates PFKFB3 expression and inflammatory responses in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). In the present study, primary IECs were isolated from small intestine of C57BL/6J mice fed a low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Additionally, CMT-93 cells, a cell line for IECs, were cultured in low glucose (LG, 5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose (HG, 27.5 mmol/L) medium and treated with palmitate (50 μmol/L) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) for 24 hr. These cells were analyzed for PFKFB3 and inflammatory markers. Compared with LFD, HFD feeding decreased IEC PFKFB3 expression and increased IEC proinflammatory responses. In CMT-93 cells, HG significantly increased PFKFB3 expression and proinflammatory responses compared with LG. Interestingly, palmitate decreased PFKFB3 expression and increased proinflammatory responses compared with BSA, regardless of glucose concentrations. Furthermore, HG significantly increased PFKFB3 promoter transcription activity compared with LG. Upon PFKFB3 overexpression, proinflammatory responses in CMT-93 cells were decreased. Taken together, these results indicate that in IECs glucose stimulates PFKFB3 expression and palmitate contributes to increased proinflammatory responses. Therefore, PFKFB3 regulates IEC inflammatory status in response to macronutrients. PMID:27387960

  13. Administration of a DPP-IV Inhibitor Enhances the Intestinal Adaptation in a Mouse Model of Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Holst, Jens J.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-2(GLP-2) induces small intestine mucosal epithelial cell (EC) proliferation; and may have benefit for patients suffering from short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, GLP-2 is rapidly inactivated in vivo by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV). Therefore, we hypothesized that selectively inhibiting DPPIV would prolong the circulating life of GLP-2 and lead to increased intestinal adaptation after development of SBS. Methods 8-week old C57BL/6J mice underwent a 50% proximal small bowel resection and were treated with either sitagliptin, a DPPIV-inhibitor (DPPIV-I), starting 1 day before surgery versus placebo. DPPIV-I efficacy was assessed 3 days after resection, including intestinal morphology, EC apoptosis and EC proliferation. Adaptive mechanisms were assessed with quantitative real-time PCR, and plasma bioactive GLP-2 was measured by radioimmunoassay. RESULT Body weight loss and peripheral blood glucose levels did not change compared to SBS controls. DPPIV-I treatment led to significant increases in villus height and crypt depth. DPPIV-I treatment did not significantly change EC apoptosis rates, but significantly increased crypt EC proliferation versus placebo-SBS controls. DPPIV-I treatment markedly increased mRNA expression of β-catenin and c-myc in ileal mucosa. Plasma GLP-2 levels significantly increased(~40.9%) in DPPIV-I-SBS mice. Conclusions DPPIV- I treatment increased SBS adaptation, and may potentially be useful for SBS patients. PMID:21719060

  14. Involvement of 5-HT₃ and 5-HT₄ receptors in the regulation of circadian clock gene expression in mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Natsumi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Okada, Kazuya; Aoki, Kazuyuki; Imanishi, Takuma; Yoshida, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Ryosuke; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that 5-HT receptors play a critical role in the expression of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the main circadian oscillator in hamsters. The contributions of 5-HT-receptor subtypes in the intestine, where they are expressed at high concentrations, are however not yet clarified. The 5-HT synthesis inhibitor, p-chlorophenylalanine, attenuated the daily rhythm of Per1 and Per2 gene expression in the intestine. Injection of 5-HT and agonists of the 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors increased Per1/Per2 expression and decreased Bmal1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Although treatment with antagonists of 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 alone did not affect clock gene expression, co-injection of these antagonists with 5-HT blocked the 5-HT-induced changes in clock gene expression. Increased tissue levels of 5-HT due to treatment with the antidepressants clomipramine and fluvoxamine did not affect clock gene expression. The present results suggest that the 5-HT system in the small intestine may play a critical role in regulating circadian rhythms through 5-HT3/5-HT4-receptor activation. PMID:24492464

  15. Quantitative Expression Profile of Distinct Functional Regions in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Mamoru; Uno, Kenichiro D.; Tsujino, Kaori; Hanashima, Carina; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-01-01

    The adult mammalian brain is composed of distinct regions with specialized roles including regulation of circadian clocks, feeding, sleep/awake, and seasonal rhythms. To find quantitative differences of expression among such various brain regions, we conducted the BrainStars (B*) project, in which we profiled the genome-wide expression of ∼50 small brain regions, including sensory centers, and centers for motion, time, memory, fear, and feeding. To avoid confounds from temporal differences in gene expression, we sampled each region every 4 hours for 24 hours, and pooled the samples for DNA-microarray assays. Therefore, we focused on spatial differences in gene expression. We used informatics to identify candidate genes with expression changes showing high or low expression in specific regions. We also identified candidate genes with stable expression across brain regions that can be used as new internal control genes, and ligand-receptor interactions of neurohormones and neurotransmitters. Through these analyses, we found 8,159 multi-state genes, 2,212 regional marker gene candidates for 44 small brain regions, 915 internal control gene candidates, and 23,864 inferred ligand-receptor interactions. We also found that these sets include well-known genes as well as novel candidate genes that might be related to specific functions in brain regions. We used our findings to develop an integrated database (http://brainstars.org/) for exploring genome-wide expression in the adult mouse brain, and have made this database openly accessible. These new resources will help accelerate the functional analysis of the mammalian brain and the elucidation of its regulatory network systems. PMID:21858037

  16. Role of oxidative stress in rabies virus infection of adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alan C; Kammouni, Wafa; Zherebitskaya, Elena; Fernyhough, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Rabies virus infection of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was studied in vitro with cultured adult mouse DRG neurons. Recent in vivo studies of transgenic mice that express the yellow fluorescent protein indicate that neuronal process degeneration, involving both dendrites and axons, occurs in mice infected with the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of rabies virus by footpad inoculation. Because of the similarities of the morphological changes in experimental rabies and in diabetic neuropathy and other diseases, we hypothesize that neuronal process degeneration occurs as a result of oxidative stress. DRG neurons were cultured from adult ICR mice. Two days after plating, they were infected with CVS. Immunostaining was evaluated with CVS- and mock-infected cultures for neuron specific beta-tubulin, rabies virus antigen, and amino acid adducts of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) (marker of lipid peroxidation and hence oxidative stress). Neuronal viability (by trypan blue exclusion), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, and axonal growth were also assessed with the cultures. CVS infected 33 to 54% of cultured DRG neurons. Levels of neuronal viability and TUNEL staining were similar in CVS- and mock-infected DRG neurons. There were significantly more 4-HNE-labeled puncta at 2 and 3 days postinfection in CVS-infected cultures than in mock-infected cultures, and axonal outgrowth was reduced at these time points in CVS infection. Axonal swellings with 4-HNE-labeled puncta were also associated with aggregations of actively respiring mitochondria. We have found evidence that rabies virus infection in vitro causes axonal injury of DRG neurons through oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may be important in vivo in rabies and may explain previous observations of the degeneration of neuronal processes. PMID:20181692

  17. Adult mouse model of early hepatocellular carcinoma promoted by alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Aditya; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Gyongyosi, Benedek; Lowe, Patrick; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a mouse model of alcohol-driven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that develops in livers with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: Adult C57BL/6 male mice received multiple doses of chemical carcinogen diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) followed by 7 wk of 4% Lieber-DeCarli diet. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and liver Cyp2e1 were assessed. Expression of F4/80, CD68 for macrophages and Ly6G, MPO, E-selectin for neutrophils was measured. Macrophage polarization was determined by IL-1β/iNOS (M1) and Arg-1/IL-10/CD163/CD206 (M2) expression. Liver steatosis and fibrosis were measured by oil-red-O and Sirius red staining respectively. HCC development was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging, confirmed by histology. Cellular proliferation was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). RESULTS: Alcohol-DEN mice showed higher ALTs than pair fed-DEN mice throughout the alcohol feeding without weight gain. Alcohol feeding resulted in increased ALT, liver steatosis and inflammation compared to pair-fed controls. Alcohol-DEN mice had reduced steatosis and increased fibrosis indicating advanced liver disease. Molecular characterization showed highest levels of both neutrophil and macrophage markers in alcohol-DEN livers. Importantly, M2 macrophages were predominantly higher in alcohol-DEN livers. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased numbers of intrahepatic cysts and liver histology confirmed the presence of early HCC in alcohol-DEN mice compared to all other groups. This correlated with increased serum alpha-fetoprotein, a marker of HCC, in alcohol-DEN mice. PCNA immunostaining revealed significantly increased hepatocyte proliferation in livers from alcohol-DEN compared to pair fed-DEN or alcohol-fed mice. CONCLUSION: We describe a new 12-wk HCC model in adult mice that develops in livers with alcoholic hepatitis and defines ALD as co-factor in HCC. PMID:27122661

  18. Contribution of mucosal maltase-glucoamylase to mouse small intestinal starch alpha-glucogenesis and total glucose metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digestion of starch requires four mucosal maltases; sucrase and isomaltase (Si) and maltase and glucoamylase (Mgam). We ablated Mgam to study its roles. The in vitro effect was a slowing of null mucosal activity to 10% of WT. Here we report in vivo effects of Mgam KO on mouse glucose metabolism. alp...

  19. Expression of slow skeletal TnI in adult mouse hearts confers metabolic protection to ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pound, Kayla M.; Arteaga, Grace M.; Fasano, Mathew; Wilder, Tanganyika; Fischer, Susan K.; Warren, Chad M.; Wende, Adam R.; Farjah, Mariam; Abel, E. Dale; Solaro, R. John; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Changes in metabolic and myofilament phenotypes coincide in developing hearts. Posttranslational modification of sarcomere proteins influences contractility, affecting the energetic cost of contraction. However, metabolic adaptations to sarcomeric phenotypes are not well understood, particularly during pathophysiological stress. This study explored metabolic adaptations to expression of the fetal, slow skeletal muscle troponin I (ssTnI). Hearts expressing ssTnI exhibited no significant ATP loss during 5 minutes of global ischemia, while non-transgenic littermates (NTG) showed continual ATP loss. At 7 min ischemia TG-ssTnI hearts retained 80±12% of ATP vs. 49±6% in NTG (P<0.05). Hearts expressing ssTnI also had increased AMPK phosphorylation. The mechanism of ATP preservation was augmented glycolysis. Glycolytic end products (lactate and alanine) were 38% higher in TG-ssTnI than NTG at 2 min and 27% higher at 5 min. This additional glycolysis was supported exclusively by exogenous glucose, and not glycogen. Thus, expression of a fetal myofilament protein in adult mouse hearts induced elevated anaerobic ATP production during ischemia via metabolic adaptations consistent with the resistance to hypoxia of fetal hearts. The general findings hold important relevance to both our current understanding of the association between metabolic and contractile phenotypes and the potential for invoking cardioprotective mechanisms against ischemic stress. PMID:21640727

  20. MicroRNA Clusters in the Adult Mouse Heart: Age-Associated Changes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Azhar, Gohar; Williams, Emmanuel D.; Rogers, Steven C.; Wei, Jeanne Y.

    2015-01-01

    The microRNAs and microRNA clusters have been implicated in normal cardiac development and also disease, including cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and arrhythmias. Since a microRNA cluster has from two to dozens of microRNAs, the expression of a microRNA cluster could have a substantial impact on its target genes. In the present study, the configuration and distribution of microRNA clusters in the mouse genome were examined at various inter-microRNA distances. Three important microRNA clusters that are significantly impacted during adult cardiac aging, the miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25, were also examined in terms of their genomic location, RNA transcript character, sequence homology, and their relationship with the corresponding microRNA families. Multiple microRNAs derived from the three clusters potentially target various protein components of the cdc42-SRF signaling pathway, which regulates cytoskeleton dynamics associated with cardiac structure and function. The data indicate that aging impacted the expression of both guide and passenger strands of the microRNA clusters; nutrient stress also affected the expression of the three microRNA clusters. The miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 clusters are likely to impact the Cdc42-SRF signaling pathway and thereby affect cardiac morphology and function during pathological conditions and the aging process. PMID:26221604

  1. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activity of Tryptophan Metabolites in Young Adult Mouse Colonocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yating; Jin, Un-Ho; Allred, Clint D; Jayaraman, Arul; Chapkin, Robert S; Safe, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    The tryptophan microbiota metabolites indole-3-acetate, indole-3-aldehyde, indole, and tryptamine are aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands, and in this study we investigated their AhR agonist and antagonist activities in nontransformed young adult mouse colonocyte (YAMC) cells. Using Cyp1a1 mRNA as an Ah-responsive end point, we observed that the tryptophan metabolites were weak AhR agonists and partial antagonists in YAMC cells, and the pattern of activity was different from that previously observed in CaCo2 colon cancer cells. However, expansion of the end points to other Ah-responsive genes including the Cyp1b1, the AhR repressor (Ahrr), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (TiParp) revealed a highly complex pattern of AhR agonist/antagonist activities that were both ligand- and gene-dependent. For example, the magnitude of induction of Cyp1b1 mRNA was similar for TCDD, tryptamine, and indole-3-acetate, whereas lower induction was observed for indole and indole-3-aldehyde was inactive. These results suggest that the tryptophan metabolites identified in microbiota are selective AhR modulators. PMID:25873348

  2. Neurotoxic effects of ochratoxin A on the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paradells, Sara; Rocamonde, Brenda; Llinares, Cristina; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Jimenez, Misericordia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Zipancic, Ivan; Soria, Jose Miguel; Garcia-Esparza, Ma Angeles

    2015-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin that was discovered as a secondary metabolite of the fungal species Aspergillus and Penicillium, is a common contaminant in food and animal feed. This mycotoxin has been described as teratogenic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and has been proven a potent neurotoxin. Other authors have previously reported the effects of OTA in different structures of the central nervous system as well as in some neurogenic regions. However, the impact of OTA exposure in the subventricular zone (SVZ) has not been assessed yet. To elucidate whether OTA affects neural precursors of the mouse SVZ we investigated, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of OTA exposure on the SVZ and on the neural precursors obtained from this neurogenic niche. In this work, we prove the cumulative effect of OTA exposure on proliferation, differentiation and depletion of neural stem cells cultured from the SVZ. In addition, we corroborated these results in vivo by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. As a result, we found a significant alteration in the proliferation process, which was evidenced by a decrease in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells and glial cells, as well as, a significant decrease in the number of neuroblasts in the SVZ. To summarize, in this study we demonstrate how OTA could be a threat to the developing and the adult SVZ through its impact in cell viability, proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25256750

  3. Adult pallium transcriptomes surprise in not reflecting predicted homologies across diverse chicken and mouse pallial sectors

    PubMed Central

    Belgard, T. Grant; Montiel, Juan F.; Wang, Wei Zhi; García-Moreno, Fernando; Ponting, Chris P.; Molnár, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    The thorniest problem in comparative neurobiology is the identification of the particular brain region of birds and reptiles that corresponds to the mammalian neocortex [Butler AB, Reiner A, Karten HJ (2011) Ann N Y Acad Sci 1225:14–27; Wang Y, Brzozowska-Prechtl A, Karten HJ (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(28):12676–12681]. We explored which genes are actively transcribed in the regions of controversial ancestry in a representative bird (chicken) and mammal (mouse) at adult stages. We conducted four analyses comparing the expression patterns of their 5,130 most highly expressed one-to-one orthologous genes that considered global patterns of expression specificity, strong gene markers, and coexpression networks. Our study demonstrates transcriptomic divergence, plausible convergence, and, in two exceptional cases, conservation between specialized avian and mammalian telencephalic regions. This large-scale study potentially resolves the complex relationship between developmental homology and functional characteristics on the molecular level and settles long-standing evolutionary debates. PMID:23878249

  4. Adult pallium transcriptomes surprise in not reflecting predicted homologies across diverse chicken and mouse pallial sectors.

    PubMed

    Belgard, T Grant; Montiel, Juan F; Wang, Wei Zhi; García-Moreno, Fernando; Margulies, Elliott H; Ponting, Chris P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2013-08-01

    The thorniest problem in comparative neurobiology is the identification of the particular brain region of birds and reptiles that corresponds to the mammalian neocortex [Butler AB, Reiner A, Karten HJ (2011) Ann N Y Acad Sci 1225:14-27; Wang Y, Brzozowska-Prechtl A, Karten HJ (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(28):12676-12681]. We explored which genes are actively transcribed in the regions of controversial ancestry in a representative bird (chicken) and mammal (mouse) at adult stages. We conducted four analyses comparing the expression patterns of their 5,130 most highly expressed one-to-one orthologous genes that considered global patterns of expression specificity, strong gene markers, and coexpression networks. Our study demonstrates transcriptomic divergence, plausible convergence, and, in two exceptional cases, conservation between specialized avian and mammalian telencephalic regions. This large-scale study potentially resolves the complex relationship between developmental homology and functional characteristics on the molecular level and settles long-standing evolutionary debates. PMID:23878249

  5. Time-lapse imaging of neuroblast migration in acute slices of the adult mouse forebrain.

    PubMed

    Khlghatyan, Jivan; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2012-01-01

    the stationary and migratory phases is crucial for the unambiguous interpretation of results. We also performed multiple z-step acquisitions to monitor neuroblasts migration in 3D. Wide-field fluorescent imaging has been used extensively to visualize neuronal migration. Here, we describe detailed protocol for labeling neuroblasts, performing real-time video-imaging of neuroblast migration in acute slices of the adult mouse forebrain, and analyzing cell migration. While the described protocol exemplified the migration of neuroblasts in the adult RMS, it can also be used to follow cell migration in embryonic and early postnatal brains. PMID:23007608

  6. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-Yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  7. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  8. Enhanced Intestinal Tumor Multiplicity and Grade in vivo after HZE Exposure: Mouse Models for Space Radiation Risk Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Trani, Daniela; Datta, Kamal; Doiron, Kathryn; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Carcinogenesis induced by space radiation is considered a major risk factor in manned interplanetary and other extended missions. The models presently used to estimate the risk for cancer induction following deep space radiation exposure are based on data from A-bomb survivor cohorts and do not account for important biological differences existing between high-linear energy transfer (LET) and low-LET-induced DNA damage. High-energy and charge (HZE) radiation, the main component of galactic cosmic rays (CGR), causes highly complex DNA damage compared to low-LET radiation, which may lead to increased frequency of chromosomal rearrangements, and contribute to carcinogenic risk in astronauts. Gastrointestinal (GI) tumors are frequent in the United States, and colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer accounting for 10% of all cancer deaths. On the basis of the aforementioned epidemiological observations and the frequency of spontaneous precancerous GI lesions in the general population, even a modest increase in incidence by space radiation exposure could have a significant effect on health risk estimates for future manned space flights. Ground-based research is necessary to reduce the uncertainties associated with projected cancer risk estimates and to gain insights into molecular mechanisms involved in space radiation-induced carcinogenesis. We investigated in vivo differential effects of γ-rays and HZE ions on intestinal tumorigenesis using two different murine models, ApcMin/+ and Apc1638 N/+. We showed that γ- and/or HZE exposure significantly enhances development and progression of intestinal tumors in a mutant-line-specific manner, and identified suitable models for in vivo studies of space radiation–induced intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:20490531

  9. Intussusception causing postoperative intestinal obstruction following free jejunum transfer in adults: two case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Akira; Watanabe, Masayuki; Shigaki, Hironobu; Okumura, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Koujiro; Mine, Shinji; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Sano, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    Intussusception is a rare cause of postoperative intestinal obstruction in adults. We experienced two cases of bowel obstruction due to the jejuno-jejunal intussusception after harvest of a free jejunum graft for reconstruction after cervical esophagectomy. Bowel obstruction occurred early in the postoperative course, and reoperations were needed in both cases. In both case, the anastomotic site was resected and re-anastomosed in a side-to-side fashion. Recurrence of intussusception has not been observed. In the literature, such a complication has been documented in two case series and a case report. The reported incidence of postoperative intussusception of the case series was 2.8% and 7.4%, respectively. The jejuno-jejunal anastomoses were performed with end-to-end fashion by two layered hand-sewn suture (Albert-Lembert method) in all cases reported. In order to prevent the occurrence of postoperative intussusception, we recommend to harvest a free jejunal graft as far from the Treitz ligament as possible and to avoid reconstruction by an Albert-Lembert end-to-end anastomosis. PMID:26943396

  10. Dynamic expression of TrkB receptor protein on proliferating and maturing cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael H.; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2008-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated in regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, presumably via its primary receptor, TrkB, but controversy exists about how BDNF affects neurogenesis (e.g. proliferation vs. survival/differentiation). This controversy arises, in part, due to the lack of information about if and when TrkB is expressed on adult neural precursors in vivo. Using multiple methods to analyze proliferating and maturing cells in the adult mouse subgranular zone (SGZ), we find that the proportion of proliferating cells that are TrkB-IR is low and it remains low for at least one week following BrdU labeling, but increases as neuroblasts mature. Use of the nestin-GFP transgenic mouse revealed the likelihood of being TrkB-IR increased with presumed maturity of the cell type. Stem-like cells, which rarely divide, were likely to express TrkB. However, early progenitors and late progenitors, which are still in the cell cycle had rare TrkB expression. Immature neuroblasts, however, were more likely to express TrkB, especially as their morphology became more mature. Taken together, these findings emphasize that expression of TrkB protein is closely linked to progression towards neuronal maturity. This provides evidence that maturing cells but not proliferating cells in the adult mouse SGZ have the molecular machinery necessary to respond directly to BDNF. Furthermore, these findings lay critical groundwork for further exploration of the role of BDNF-TrkB signaling in regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:18240316

  11. Prevalence and Predictors of Intestinal Helminth Infections Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1–Infected Adults in an Urban African Setting

    PubMed Central

    Modjarrad, Kayvon; Zulu, Isaac; Redden, David T.; Njobvu, Lungowe; Freedman, David O.; Vermund, Sten H.

    2009-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is disproportionately burdened by intestinal helminth and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection. Recent evidence suggests detrimental immunologic effects from concomitant infection with the two pathogens. Few studies, however, have assessed the prevalence of and predictors for intestinal helminth infection among HIV-1–infected adults in urban African settings where HIV infection rates are highest. We collected and analyzed sociodemographic and parasitologic data from 297 HIV-1–infected adults (mean age = 31.1 years, 69% female) living in Lusaka, Zambia to assess the prevalence and associated predictors of helminth infection. We found at least one type of intestinal helminth in 24.9% of HIV-infected adults. Thirty-nine (52.7%) were infected with Ascaris lumbricoides, and 29 (39.2%) were infected with hookworm. More than 80% were light-intensity infections. A recent visit to a rural area, food shortage, and prior history of helminth infection were significant predictors of current helminth status. The high helminth prevalence and potential for adverse interactions between helminths and HIV suggests that helminth diagnosis and treatment should be part of routine HIV care. PMID:16222025

  12. 5-Fluorouracil Induces Diarrhea with Changes in the Expression of Inflammatory Cytokines and Aquaporins in Mouse Intestines

    PubMed Central

    Sagara, Atsunobu; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Sato, Ken; Nishizaki, Maiko; Shoji, Tetsuro; Horie, Syunji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced diarrhea remain unclear, accumulating evidence has indicated that changes in the mucosal immune system and aquaporins (AQPs) may play a role in its pathogenesis. Therefore, we investigated the possible changes in the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and AQPs in the intestines of mice with 5-FU-induced diarrhea. In the present study, the expressions of mRNAs that encode inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, Il-17A and IL-22, were significantly increased throughout the entire colon of mice that exhibited diarrhea following 5-FU administration. In contrast, the gene expression of IFNγ was upregulated only in the distal colon. These increases were significantly reduced by the administration of etanercept. However, 5-FU-induced diarrhea was not recovered by etanercept. On the other hand, the genes for AQPs 4 and 8 were markedly present in the colon, and these expressions in the intestines were significantly decreased by treatment with 5-FU. These decreases were not reversed by etanercept. These findings suggest TNF-α neutralization had no effect on the acutely 5-FU-induced diarrhea and impaired AQPs but reduced dramatically several inflammatory cytokines. PMID:23382968

  13. The bHLH transcription factor Tcf12 (ME1) mRNA is abundantly expressed in Paneth cells of mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Yoko; Yakura, Rieko; Komiya, Tohru

    2007-06-01

    Using a large-scale in situ hybridization screening system, we found that mRNA coding for ME1, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, was abundantly expressed in Paneth cells of adult small intestinal crypts. Other functionally related E-protein mRNAs, ME2, and E2A, however, could not be detected in the cells. ME1 mRNA was first detected in the jejunum and ileum two weeks after birth when the number of Paneth cells starts to increase. ME1 is the first identified bHLH transcription factor expressed in the Paneth cells and may be used as a molecular marker and a key molecule for analyzing transcriptional regulation in the Paneth cell. PMID:17405739

  14. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α is required for cell differentiation and homeostasis in the adult mouse gastric epithelium.

    PubMed

    Moore, Benjamin D; Khurana, Shradha S; Huh, Won Jae; Mills, Jason C

    2016-08-01

    We have previously shown that the sequential transcription factors Xbp1→Mist1 (Bhlha15) govern the ultrastructural maturation of the secretory apparatus in enzyme-secreting zymogenic chief cells (ZCs) in the gastric unit. Here we sought to identify transcriptional regulators upstream of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) and MIST1. We used immunohistochemistry to characterize Hnf4α(flox/flox) adult mouse stomachs after tamoxifen-induced deletion of Hnf4α We used qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and chromatin immunoprecipitation to define the molecular interaction between hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and Xbp1 in mouse stomach and human gastric cells. We show that HNF4α protein is expressed in pit (foveolar) cells, mucous neck cells, and zymogenic chief cells (ZCs) of the corpus gastric unit. Loss of HNF4α in adult mouse stomach led to reduced ZC size and ER content, phenocopying previously characterized effects of Xbp1 deletion. However, HNF4α(Δ/Δ) stomachs also exhibited additional phenotypes including increased proliferation in the isthmal stem cell zone and altered mucous neck cell migration, indicating a role of HNF4α in progenitor cells as well as in ZCs. HNF4α directly occupies the Xbp1 promoter locus in mouse stomach, and forced HNF4α expression increased abundance of XBP1 mRNA in human gastric cancer cells. Finally, as expected, loss of HNF4α caused decreased Xbp1 and Mist1 expression in mouse stomachs. We show that HNF4α regulates homeostatic proliferation in the gastric epithelium and is both necessary and sufficient for the upstream regulation of the Xbp1→Mist1 axis in maintenance of ZC secretory architecture. PMID:27340127

  15. Hes3 expression in the adult mouse brain is regulated during demyelination and remyelination.

    PubMed

    Toutouna, Louiza; Nikolakopoulou, Polyxeni; Poser, Steven W; Masjkur, Jimmy; Arps-Forker, Carina; Troullinaki, Maria; Grossklaus, Sylvia; Bosak, Viktoria; Friedrich, Ulrike; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Bornstein, Stefan R; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Hes3 is a component of the STAT3-Ser/Hes3 Signaling Axis controlling the growth and survival of neural stem cells and other plastic cells. Pharmacological activation of this pathway promotes neuronal rescue and behavioral recovery in models of ischemic stroke and Parkinson's disease. Here we provide initial observations implicating Hes3 in the cuprizone model of demyelination and remyelination. We focus on the subpial motor cortex of mice because we detected high Hes3 expression. This area is of interest as it is impacted both in human demyelinating diseases and in the cuprizone model. We report that Hes3 expression is reduced at peak demyelination and is partially restored within 1 week after cuprizone withdrawal. This raises the possibility of Hes3 involvement in demyelination/remyelination that may warrant additional research. Supporting a possible role of Hes3 in the maintenance of oligodendrocyte markers, a Hes3 null mouse strain shows lower levels of myelin basic protein in undamaged adult mice, compared to wild-type controls. We also present a novel method for culturing the established oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line oli-neu in a manner that maintains Hes3 expression as well as its self-renewal and differentiation potential, offering an experimental tool to study Hes3. Based upon this approach, we identify a Janus kinase inhibitor and dbcAMP as powerful inducers of Hes3 gene expression. We provide a new biomarker and cell culture method that may be of interest in demyelination/remyelination research. PMID:27018293

  16. Selective expression of prion protein in peripheral tissues of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Ford, M J; Burton, L J; Morris, R J; Hall, S M

    2002-01-01

    The level of expression of normal cellular prion protein, PrP(c) (cellular prion protein), controls both the rate and the route of neuroinvasive infection, from peripheral entry portal to the CNS. Paradoxically, an overview of the distribution of PrP(c) within tissues outside the CNS is lacking. We have used novel antibodies that recognise cellular prion protein in glutaraldehyde-fixed tissue (in order to optimise immunohistochemical labelling of this conformationally labile protein), in combination with in situ hybridisation, to examine the expression of PrP(c) in peripheral tissues of the adult mouse. We found that although prion protein is expressed in many tissues, it is expressed at high levels only in discrete subpopulations of cells. Prominent amongst these are elements of the "hardwired neuroimmune network" that integrate the body's immune defence and neuroendocrine systems under CNS control. These prion protein-expressing elements include small diameter afferent nerves in the skin and the lamina propria of the aerodigestive tract, sympathetic ganglia and nerves, antigen presenting and processing cells (both follicular and non-follicular dendritic cells) and sub-populations of lymphocytes particularly in skin, gut- and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissues. Prion protein is also expressed in the parasympathetic and enteric nervous systems, in the dispersed neuroendocrine system, and in peripheral nervous system axons and their associated Schwann cells. This selective expression of cellular prion protein provides a variety of alternative routes for the propagation and transport of prion infection entering from peripheral sites, either naturally (via the aerodigestive tract or abraded skin) or experimentally (by intraperitoneal injection) to the brain. Key regulatory cells that express prion protein, and in particular enteroendocrine cells in the mucosal wall of the gut, and dendritic cells that convey pathogens from epithelial layers to secondary lymphoid

  17. Effect of Cyanotoxins on the Hypothalamic–Pituitary–Gonadal Axis in Male Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huajun

    2014-01-01

    Background Microcystins LR (MC-LR) are hepatotoxic cyanotoxins that have been shown to induce reproductive toxicity, and Hypothalamic–Pituitary–Gonadal Axis (HPG) is responsible for the control of reproductive functions. However, few studies have been performed to evaluate the effects of MC-LR on HPG axis. This study aimed to investigate the MC-LR-induced toxicity in the reproductive system of mouse and focus on the HPG axis. Methods Adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to various concentrations of MC-LR (0, 3.75, 7.50, 15.00 and 30.00 µg/kg body weight per day) for 1 to 14 days, and it was found that exposure to different concentrations of MC-LR significantly disturbed sperm production in the mice testes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To elucidate the associated possible mechanisms, the serum levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) were assessed. Meanwhile, PCR assays were employed to detect alterations in a series of genes involved in HPG axis, such as FSH, LH, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and their complement receptors. Furthermore, the effect of MC-LR on the viability and testosterone production of Leydig cells were tested in vitro. Results: MC-LR significantly impaired the spermatogenesis of mice possibly through the direct or indirect inhibition of GnRH synthesis at the hypothalamic level, which resulted in reduction of serum levels of LH that lead to suppression of testosterone production in the testis of mice. Conclusions MC-LR may be a GnRH toxin that would disrupt the reproductive system of mice. PMID:25375936

  18. Brief Isoflurane Anesthesia Produces Prominent Phosphoproteomic Changes in the Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kohtala, Samuel; Theilmann, Wiebke; Suomi, Tomi; Wigren, Henna-Kaisa; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Elo, Laura L; Rokka, Anne; Rantamäki, Tomi

    2016-06-15

    Anesthetics are widely used in medical practice and experimental research, yet the neurobiological basis governing their effects remains obscure. We have here used quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the protein phosphorylation changes produced by a 30 min isoflurane anesthesia in the adult mouse hippocampus. Altogether 318 phosphorylation alterations in total of 237 proteins between sham and isoflurane anesthesia were identified. Many of the hit proteins represent primary pharmacological targets of anesthetics. However, findings also enlighten the role of several other proteins-implicated in various biological processes including neuronal excitability, brain energy homeostasis, synaptic plasticity and transmission, and microtubule function-as putative (secondary) targets of anesthetics. In particular, isoflurane increases glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylation at the inhibitory Ser(9) residue and regulates the phosphorylation of multiple proteins downstream and upstream of this promiscuous kinase that regulate diverse biological functions. Along with confirmatory Western blot data for GSK3β and p44/42-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase; reduced phosphorylation of the activation loop), we observed increased phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) on residues (Thr(1620,1623)) that have been shown to render its dissociation from microtubules and alterations in microtubule stability. We further demonstrate that diverse anesthetics (sevoflurane, urethane, ketamine) produce essentially similar phosphorylation changes on GSK3β, p44/p42-MAPK, and MAP2 as observed with isoflurane. Altogether our study demonstrates the potential of quantitative phosphoproteomics to study the mechanisms of anesthetics (and other drugs) in the mammalian brain and reveals how already a relatively brief anesthesia produces pronounced phosphorylation changes in multiple proteins in the central nervous system. PMID:27074656

  19. Bergmann glia are patterned into topographic molecular zones in the developing and adult mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Reeber, Stacey L.; Arancillo, Marife K. V.; Sillitoe, Roy V.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar circuits are patterned into an array of topographic parasagittal domains called zones. Zones are best revealed by gene expression, circuit anatomy, and cellular degeneration patterns. Thus far, the study of zones has been focused heavily on how neurons are organized. Because of this, detailed neuronal patterning maps have been established for Purkinje cells, granule cells, Golgi cells, unipolar brush cells, and also for the terminal field organization of climbing fiber and mossy fiber afferents. In comparison, however, it remains poorly understood if glial cells are also organized into zones. We have identified an Npy-Gfp BAC transgenic mouse line (Tau-Sapphire Green fluorescent protein (Gfp) is under the control of the neuropeptide Y (Npy) gene regulatory elements) that can be used to label Bergmann glial cells with Golgi-like resolution. In these adult transgenic mice we found that Npy-Gfp expression was localized to Bergmann glia mainly in lobules VI/VII and IX/X. Using double immunofluorescence, we show that in these lobules, Npy-Gfp expression in the Bergmann glia overlaps with the pattern of the small heat shock protein HSP25, a Purkinje cell marker for zones located in lobules VI/VII and IX/X. Developmental analysis starting from the day of birth showed that HSP25 and Npy-Gfp expression follow a similar program of spatial and temporal patterning. However, loss of Npy signaling did not alter the patterning of Purkinje cell zones. We conclude that Bergmann glial cells are zonally organized and their patterns are restricted by boundaries that also confine cerebellar neurons into a topographic circuit map. PMID:24906823

  20. Designer Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Scaffolds for Adult Mouse Neural Stem Cell 3-Dimensional Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gelain, Fabrizio; Bottai, Daniele; Vescovi, Angleo; Zhang, Shuguang

    2006-01-01

    Biomedical researchers have become increasingly aware of the limitations of conventional 2-dimensional tissue cell culture systems, including coated Petri dishes, multi-well plates and slides, to fully address many critical issues in cell biology, cancer biology and neurobiology, such as the 3-D microenvironment, 3-D gradient diffusion, 3-D cell migration and 3-D cell-cell contact interactions. In order to fully understand how cells behave in the 3-D body, it is important to develop a well-controlled 3-D cell culture system where every single ingredient is known. Here we report the development of a 3-D cell culture system using a designer peptide nanofiber scaffold with mouse adult neural stem cells. We attached several functional motifs, including cell adhesion, differentiation and bone marrow homing motifs, to a self-assembling peptide RADA16 (Ac-RADARADARADARADA-COHN2). These functionalized peptides undergo self-assembly into a nanofiber structure similar to Matrigel. During cell culture, the cells were fully embedded in the 3-D environment of the scaffold. Two of the peptide scaffolds containing bone marrow homing motifs significantly enhanced the neural cell survival without extra soluble growth and neurotrophic factors to the routine cell culture media. In these designer scaffolds, the cell populations with β-Tubulin+, GFAP+ and Nestin+ markers are similar to those found in cell populations cultured on Matrigel. The gene expression profiling array experiments showed selective gene expression, possibly involved in neural stem cell adhesion and differentiation. Because the synthetic peptides are intrinsically pure and a number of desired function cellular motifs are easy to incorporate, these designer peptide nanofiber scaffolds provide a promising controlled 3-D culture system for diverse tissue cells, and are useful as well for general molecular and cell biology. PMID:17205123

  1. Reproducible expansion and characterization of mouse neural stem/progenitor cells in adherent cultures derived from the adult subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Theus, Michelle H.; Ricard, Jerome; Liebl, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) residing in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult mouse forebrain have been shown to enhance their neurogenic potential in response to CNS injury. Mechanisms involved in regulating adult neurogenesis under naïve or stressed conditions can be studied using a monolayer cell-culture system of the nestin-expressing NSPC lineage to analyze proliferation, survival and differentiation. Here, we describe a protocol for the expansion of NSPCs for studies aimed at understanding the functional role of NSPCs in maintaining adult neurogenic processes. In this unit, we outline in detail the procedures for: (1) isolation, maintenance and culture of the NSPC component of the SVZ niche from the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle; (2) characterization of NSPC functions by examining proliferation, survival and differentiation; and (3) efficient siRNA transfection methods in 96-well format. PMID:22415840

  2. Colonization of the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine by a human fecal Escherichia coli strain: role of growth in mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Wadolkowski, E A; Laux, D C; Cohen, P S

    1988-01-01

    The relative colonizing abilities of Escherichia coli F-18, isolated from the feces of a healthy human, and E. coli F-18col-, a strain derived from it which does not make the E. coli F-18 colicin, were studied. In a previous report, it was shown that when each strain was fed individually to streptomycin-treated mice, at approximately 10(10) CFU per mouse, each colonized the large intestine at between 10(7) and 10(8) CFU/g of feces indefinitely. However, when simultaneously fed to mice, although E. coli F-18 colonized at about 10(8) CFU/g of feces, E. coli F-18col- dropped to a level of 10(3) CFU/g of feces within 3 to 5 days. In the present investigation, we show that when given enough time to establish a state of colonization, E. coli F-18col- persists in feces in high numbers despite subsequent challenge by E. coli F-18. Therefore, a major defect in the ability of E. coli F-18col- to colonize in the presence of E. coli F-18 appears to be in initiating that state. In addition, when mucus was scraped from the cecal wall and, without further treatment, was inoculated with E. coli F-18 or F-18col-, both strains grew well. However, when cecal mucus was inoculated with both strains simultaneously, E. coli F-18 grew far more rapidly than E. coli F-18col-. Moreover, neither strain grew in cecal luminal contents. Together, these data suggest the possibility that both E. coli F-18 and F-18col- must grow in mucus to colonize the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine, that E. coli F-18col- is eliminated by E. coli F-18 because it does not grow in mucus as well as E. coli F-18, and that E. coli F-18col- can resist elimination by E. coli F-18 if it is allowed enough time to establish itself within the mucus layer. PMID:3281898

  3. Interactions between the colonic transcriptome, metabolome, and microbiome in mouse models of obesity-induced intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pfalzer, Anna C; Kamanu, Frederick K; Parnell, Laurence D; Tai, Albert K; Liu, Zhenhua; Mason, Joel B; Crott, Jimmy W

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the relative contribution of high-fat (HF) consumption and excess adiposity remains unclear. It is becoming apparent that obesity perturbs both the intestinal microbiome and metabolome, and each has the potential to induce protumorigenic changes in the epithelial transcriptome. The physiological consequences and the degree to which these different biologic systems interact remain poorly defined. To understand the mechanisms by which obesity drives colonic tumorigenesis, we profiled the colonic epithelial transcriptome of HF-fed and genetically obese (DbDb) mice with a genetic predisposition to intestinal tumorigenesis (Apc(1638N)); 266 and 584 genes were differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa of HF and DbDb mice, respectively. These genes mapped to pathways involved in immune function, and cellular proliferation and cancer. Furthermore, Akt was central within the networks of interacting genes identified in both gene sets. Regression analyses of coexpressed genes with the abundance of bacterial taxa identified three taxa, previously correlated with tumor burden, to be significantly correlated with a gene module enriched for Akt-related genes. Similarly, regression of coexpressed genes with metabolites found that adenosine, which was negatively associated with inflammatory markers and tumor burden, was also correlated with a gene module enriched with Akt regulators. Our findings provide evidence that HF consumption and excess adiposity result in changes in the colonic transcriptome that, although distinct, both appear to converge on Akt signaling. Such changes could be mediated by alterations in the colonic microbiome and metabolome. PMID:27317588

  4. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Vinicius S; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  5. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  6. Trichinella spiralis: the influence of short chain fatty acids on the proliferation of lymphocytes, the goblet cell count and apoptosis in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Piekarska, J; Miśta, D; Houszka, M; Króliczewska, B; Zawadzki, W; Gorczykowski, M

    2011-08-01

    This study was carried out to determine the influence of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) on spleen and mesenteric lymph node lymphocyte proliferation, goblet cells and apoptosis in the mouse small intestine during invasion by Trichinella spiralis. BALB/c mice were infected with 250 larvae of T. spiralis. An SCFA water solution containing acetic, propionic and butyric acids (30:15:20 mM) was administered orally starting 5 days before infection and ending 20 days post infection (dpi). Fragments of the jejunum were collected by dissection 7 and 10 dpi, and were examined for apoptotic cells in the lamina propria of the intestinal mucosa, and for goblet cells. The proliferation index of the cultured spleen and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes with MTT test was also determined. The orally administered SCFA solution decreased the proliferation of mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes in the mice infected with T. spiralis at both examination times, but did not influence the proliferative activity of the spleen cells. Seven dpi, both in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, the highest proliferation index of concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymphocytes was found in the group of uninfected animals receiving SCFA animals. This tendency could still be seen 10 dpi in the mesenteric lymph nodes but not in the spleen, where the proliferation index in this group had significantly decreased. In vitro studies revealed, that butyric and propionic acids added to the cell cultures suppressed the proliferation of Con A-stimulated mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen lymphocytes taken from uninfected and T. spiralis-infected mice. Acetic acid stimulated proliferation of splenocytes taken from uninfected mice but did not affect lymphocyte proliferation in mesenteric lymph nodes from uninfected or infected mice. Orally administered SCFA increased the number of goblet cells found in the epithelium of the jejunum 7 dpi, but this number had decreased 10 dpi. The number of apoptotic cells in the

  7. Comprehensive Analysis of Neonatal versus Adult Unilateral Decortication in a Mouse Model Using Behavioral, Neuroanatomical, and DNA Microarray Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Previously, studying the development, especially of corticospinal neurons, it was concluded that the main compensatory mechanism after unilateral brain injury in rat at the neonatal stage was due in part to non-lesioned ipsilateral corticospinal neurons that escaped selection by axonal elimination or neuronal apoptosis. However, previous results suggesting compensatory mechanism in neonate brain were not correlated with high functional recovery. Therefore, what is the difference among neonate and adult in the context of functional recovery and potential mechanism(s) therein? Here, we utilized a brain unilateral decortication mouse model and compared motor functional recovery mechanism post-neonatal brain hemisuction (NBH) with adult brain hemisuction (ABH). Three analyses were performed: (1) Quantitative behavioral analysis of forelimb movements using ladder walking test; (2) neuroanatomical retrograde tracing analysis of unlesioned side corticospinal neurons; and (3) differential global gene expressions profiling in unlesioned-side neocortex (rostral from bregma) in NBH and ABH on a 8 × 60 K mouse whole genome Agilent DNA chip. Behavioral data confirmed higher recovery ability in NBH over ABH is related to non-lesional frontal neocortex including rostral caudal forelimb area. A first inventory of differentially expressed genes genome-wide in the NBH and ABH mouse model is provided as a resource for the scientific community. PMID:25490135

  8. Nutritional basis for colonization resistance by human commensal Escherichia coli strains HS and Nissle 1917 against E. coli O157:H7 in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Maltby, Rosalie; Leatham-Jensen, Mary P; Gibson, Terri; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a single species consisting of many biotypes, some of which are commensal colonizers of mammals and others that cause disease. Humans are colonized on average with five commensal biotypes, and it is widely thought that the commensals serve as a barrier to infection by pathogens. Previous studies showed that a combination of three pre-colonized commensal E. coli strains prevents colonization of E. coli O157:H7 in a mouse model (Leatham, et al., 2010, Infect Immun 77: 2876-7886). The commensal biotypes included E. coli HS, which is known to successfully colonize humans at high doses with no adverse effects, and E. coli Nissle 1917, a human commensal strain that is used in Europe as a preventative of traveler's diarrhea. We hypothesized that commensal biotypes could exert colonization resistance by consuming nutrients needed by E. coli O157:H7 to colonize, thus preventing this first step in infection. Here we report that to colonize streptomycin-treated mice E. coli HS consumes six of the twelve sugars tested and E. coli Nissle 1917 uses a complementary yet divergent set of seven sugars to colonize, thus establishing a nutritional basis for the ability of E. coli HS and Nissle 1917 to occupy distinct niches in the mouse intestine. Together these two commensals use the five sugars previously determined to be most important for colonization of E. coli EDL933, an O157:H7 strain. As predicted, the two commensals prevented E. coli EDL933 colonization. The results support a model in which invading pathogenic E. coli must compete with the gut microbiota to obtain the nutrients needed to colonize and establish infection; accordingly, the outcome of the challenge is determined by the aggregate capacity of the native microbiota to consume the nutrients required by the pathogen. PMID:23349773

  9. Nutritional Basis for Colonization Resistance by Human Commensal Escherichia coli Strains HS and Nissle 1917 against E. coli O157:H7 in the Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Maltby, Rosalie; Leatham-Jensen, Mary P.; Gibson, Terri; Cohen, Paul S.; Conway, Tyrrell

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a single species consisting of many biotypes, some of which are commensal colonizers of mammals and others that cause disease. Humans are colonized on average with five commensal biotypes, and it is widely thought that the commensals serve as a barrier to infection by pathogens. Previous studies showed that a combination of three pre-colonized commensal E. coli strains prevents colonization of E. coli O157:H7 in a mouse model (Leatham, et al., 2010, Infect Immun 77: 2876–7886). The commensal biotypes included E. coli HS, which is known to successfully colonize humans at high doses with no adverse effects, and E. coli Nissle 1917, a human commensal strain that is used in Europe as a preventative of traveler's diarrhea. We hypothesized that commensal biotypes could exert colonization resistance by consuming nutrients needed by E. coli O157:H7 to colonize, thus preventing this first step in infection. Here we report that to colonize streptomycin-treated mice E. coli HS consumes six of the twelve sugars tested and E. coli Nissle 1917 uses a complementary yet divergent set of seven sugars to colonize, thus establishing a nutritional basis for the ability of E. coli HS and Nissle 1917 to occupy distinct niches in the mouse intestine. Together these two commensals use the five sugars previously determined to be most important for colonization of E. coli EDL933, an O157:H7 strain. As predicted, the two commensals prevented E. coli EDL933 colonization. The results support a model in which invading pathogenic E. coli must compete with the gut microbiota to obtain the nutrients needed to colonize and establish infection; accordingly, the outcome of the challenge is determined by the aggregate capacity of the native microbiota to consume the nutrients required by the pathogen. PMID:23349773

  10. Identification of different functional types of spinal afferent neurons innervating the mouse large intestine using a novel CGRPα transgenic reporter mouse.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Timothy J; Kestell, Garreth R; Kyloh, Melinda A; Brookes, Simon J H; Wattchow, David A; Spencer, Nick J

    2016-04-15

    Spinal afferent neurons detect noxious and physiological stimuli in visceral organs. Five functional classes of afferent terminals have been extensively characterized in the colorectum, primarily from axonal recordings. Little is known about the corresponding somata of these classes of afferents, including their morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology. To address this, we made intracellular recordings from somata in L6/S1 dorsal root ganglia and applied intraluminal colonic distensions. A transgenic calcitonin gene-related peptide-α (CGRPα)-mCherry reporter mouse, which enabled rapid identification of soma neurochemistry and morphology following electrophysiological recordings, was developed. Three distinct classes of low-threshold distension-sensitive colorectal afferent neurons were characterized; an additional group was distension-insensitive. Two of three low-threshold classes expressed CGRPα. One class expressing CGRPα discharged phasically, with inflections on the rising phase of their action potentials, at low frequencies, to both physiological (<30 mmHg) and noxious (>30 mmHg) distensions. The second class expressed CGRPα and discharged tonically, with smooth, briefer action potentials and significantly greater distension sensitivity than phasically firing neurons. A third class that lacked CGRPα generated the highest-frequency firing to distension and had smaller somata. Thus, CGRPα expression in colorectal afferents was associated with lower distension sensitivity and firing rates and larger somata, while colorectal afferents that generated the highest firing frequencies to distension had the smallest somata and lacked CGRPα. These data fill significant gaps in our understanding of the different classes of colorectal afferent somata that give rise to distinct functional classes of colorectal afferents. In healthy mice, the majority of sensory neurons that respond to colorectal distension are low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range afferents

  11. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Shi, Lei; Pang, Wenhui; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Guanggang

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD). Objective We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. Methods The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g.) administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight), respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) content in fecal samples using real-time PCR. Results Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly. Conclusion Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper

  12. Loss of ADAM17-Mediated Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling in Intestinal Cells Attenuates Mucosal Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongjia; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Xiao, Weidong; Ralls, Matthew W.; Stoeck, Alex; Wilson, Carole L.; Raines, Elaine W.

    2015-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is commonly used clinically to sustain patients; however, TPN is associated with profound mucosal atrophy, which may adversely affect clinical outcomes. Using a mouse TPN model, removing enteral nutrition leads to decreased crypt proliferation, increased intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis and increased mucosal tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression that ultimately produces mucosal atrophy. Upregulation of TNF-α signaling plays a central role in mediating TPN-induced mucosal atrophy without intact epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Currently, the mechanism and the tissue-specific contributions of TNF-α signaling to TPN-induced mucosal atrophy remain unclear. ADAM17 is an ectodomain sheddase that can modulate the signaling activity of several cytokine/growth factor receptor families, including the TNF-α/TNF receptor and ErbB ligand/EGFR pathways. Using TPN-treated IEC-specific ADAM17-deficient mice, the present study demonstrates that a loss of soluble TNF-α signaling from IECs attenuates TPN-induced mucosal atrophy. Importantly, this response remains dependent on the maintenance of functional EGFR signaling in IECs. TNF-α blockade in wild-type mice receiving TPN confirmed that soluble TNF-α signaling is responsible for downregulation of EGFR signaling in IECs. These results demonstrate that ADAM17-mediated TNF-α signaling from IECs has a significant role in the development of the proinflammatory state and mucosal atrophy observed in TPN-treated mice. PMID:26283731

  13. 18F-FDG PET imaging for identifying the dynamics of intestinal disease caused by SFTSV infection in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaka, Daisuke; Nishi, Kodai; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Shimada, Satoshi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Morita, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging disease that causes fever, enteritis, thrombocytopenia, and leucopenia and can be fatal in up to 30% of cases. However, the mechanism of severe disease is not fully understood. Molecular imaging approaches, such as positron-emission tomography (PET), are functional in vivo imaging techniques that provide real-time dynamics of disease progression, assessments of pharmacokinetics, and diagnoses for disease progression. Molecular imaging also potentially provides useful approaches to explore the pathogenesis of viral infections. Thus, the purpose of this study was to image the pathological features of SFTSV infection in vivo by PET imaging. In a mouse model, we showed that 18F-FDG accumulations clearly identified the intestinal tract site as a pathological site. We also demonstrated that 18F-FDG PET imaging can assess disease progression and response to antiserum therapy within the same individual. This is the first report demonstrating a molecular imaging strategy for SFTSV infection. Our results provide potentially useful information for preclinical studies such as the elucidation of the mechanism of SFTSV infection in vivo and the assessment of drugs for SFTS treatment. PMID:26700962

  14. Space radiation exposure persistently increased leptin and IGF1 in serum and activated leptin-IGF1 signaling axis in mouse intestine

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Travel into outer space is fraught with risk of exposure to energetic heavy ion radiation such as 56Fe ions, which due to its high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics deposits higher energy per unit volume of tissue traversed and thus more damaging to cells relative to low-LET radiation such as γ rays. However, estimates of human health risk from energetic heavy ion exposure are hampered due to lack of tissue specific in vivo molecular data. We investigated long-term effects of 56Fe radiation on adipokines and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling axis in mouse intestine and colon. Six- to eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1.6 Gy of 56Fe ions. Serum and tissues were collected up to twelve months post-irradiation. Serum was analyzed for leptin, adiponectin, IGF1, and IGF binding protein 3. Receptor expressions and downstream signaling pathway alterations were studied in tissues. Irradiation increased leptin and IGF1 levels in serum, and IGF1R and leptin receptor expression in tissues. When considered along with upregulated Jak2/Stat3 pathways and cell proliferation, our data supports the notion that space radiation exposure is a risk to endocrine alterations with implications for chronic pathophysiologic changes in gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27558773

  15. Space radiation exposure persistently increased leptin and IGF1 in serum and activated leptin-IGF1 signaling axis in mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J; Datta, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Travel into outer space is fraught with risk of exposure to energetic heavy ion radiation such as (56)Fe ions, which due to its high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics deposits higher energy per unit volume of tissue traversed and thus more damaging to cells relative to low-LET radiation such as γ rays. However, estimates of human health risk from energetic heavy ion exposure are hampered due to lack of tissue specific in vivo molecular data. We investigated long-term effects of (56)Fe radiation on adipokines and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling axis in mouse intestine and colon. Six- to eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1.6 Gy of (56)Fe ions. Serum and tissues were collected up to twelve months post-irradiation. Serum was analyzed for leptin, adiponectin, IGF1, and IGF binding protein 3. Receptor expressions and downstream signaling pathway alterations were studied in tissues. Irradiation increased leptin and IGF1 levels in serum, and IGF1R and leptin receptor expression in tissues. When considered along with upregulated Jak2/Stat3 pathways and cell proliferation, our data supports the notion that space radiation exposure is a risk to endocrine alterations with implications for chronic pathophysiologic changes in gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27558773

  16. 18F-FDG PET imaging for identifying the dynamics of intestinal disease caused by SFTSV infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, Daisuke; Nishi, Kodai; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Shimada, Satoshi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Morita, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging disease that causes fever, enteritis, thrombocytopenia, and leucopenia and can be fatal in up to 30% of cases. However, the mechanism of severe disease is not fully understood. Molecular imaging approaches, such as positron-emission tomography (PET), are functional in vivo imaging techniques that provide real-time dynamics of disease progression, assessments of pharmacokinetics, and diagnoses for disease progression. Molecular imaging also potentially provides useful approaches to explore the pathogenesis of viral infections. Thus, the purpose of this study was to image the pathological features of SFTSV infection in vivo by PET imaging. In a mouse model, we showed that 18F-FDG accumulations clearly identified the intestinal tract site as a pathological site. We also demonstrated that 18F-FDG PET imaging can assess disease progression and response to antiserum therapy within the same individual. This is the first report demonstrating a molecular imaging strategy for SFTSV infection. Our results provide potentially useful information for preclinical studies such as the elucidation of the mechanism of SFTSV infection in vivo and the assessment of drugs for SFTS treatment. PMID:26700962

  17. Inhibitory effects of SKF96365 on the activities of K+ channels in mouse small intestinal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    TANAHASHI, Yasuyuki; WANG, Ban; MURAKAMI, Yuri; UNNO, Toshihiro; MATSUYAMA, Hayato; NAGANO, Hiroshi; KOMORI, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of SKF96365 (SKF), which is a non-selective cationic channel blocker, on K+ channel currents, we recorded currents through ATP sensitive K+ (IKATP), voltage-gated K+ (IKv) and Ca2+ activated K+ channels (IBK) in the absence and presence of SKF in single small intestinal myocytes of mice with patch-clamp techniques. SKF (10 µM) reversibly abolished IKATP that was induced by cromakalim (10 µM), which is a selective ATP sensitive K+ channel opener. These inhibitory effects were induced in a concentration-dependent and voltage-independent manner. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 0.85 µM, which was obviously lower than that reported for the muscarinic cationic current. In addition, SKF (1 µM ≈ the IC50 value in IKATP suppression) reversibly inhibited the IKv that was induced by repetitive depolarizing pulses from −80 to 20 mV. However, the extent of the inhibitory effects was only ~30%. In contrast, SKF (1 µM) had no significant effects on spontaneous transient IBK and caffeine-induced IBK. These results indicated that SKF inhibited ATP sensitive K+ channels and voltage-gated K+ channels, with the ATP sensitive K+ channels being more sensitive than the voltage-gated K+ channels. These inhibitory effects on K+ channels should be considered when SKF is used as a cationic channel blocker. PMID:26498720

  18. Location of a protein of the fodrin-spectrin-TW260/240 family in the mouse intestinal brush border.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, N; Cheney, R E; Willard, M

    1983-03-01

    We have determined that a protein of the fodrin-spectrin-TW260/240 (FST) family is a component of the thin fibrils (approximately 5 nm wide, 100-200 nm long) that cross-link bundles of actin filaments to adjacent actin bundles and to the plasma membrane in the terminal web of the brush border of the intestinal epithelium. When isolated brush borders were incubated with anti-fodrin antibodies and prepared for electron microscopy by the quick-freeze, deep-etch technique, these approximately 5 nm fibrils were specifically decorated with the antibody. In addition, these cross-linking fibrils disappeared when the anti-fodrin-reactive proteins were extracted from the brush border. We conclude that FST is a component of a cross-linking system composed of approximately 5 nm fibrils that are morphologically distinct from the approximately 8 nm myosin-containing fibrils which were identified by anti-myosin decoration. In addition to linking actin bundles to adjacent actin bundles and to the plasma membrane, these FST fibrils may mediate actin-vesicle, actin-intermediate filament and vesicle-plasma membrane linkages. PMID:6831563

  19. Opposing effects of TIGAR- and RAC1-derived ROS on Wnt-driven proliferation in the mouse intestine

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Eric C.; Lee, Pearl; Ceteci, Fatih; Nixon, Colin; Blyth, Karen; Sansom, Owen J.; Vousden, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in numerous cell responses, including proliferation, DNA damage, and cell death. Based on these disparate activities, both promotion and inhibition of ROS have been proposed for cancer therapy. However, how the ROS response is determined is not clear. We examined the activities of ROS in a model of Apc deletion, where loss of the Wnt target gene Myc both rescues APC loss and prevents ROS accumulation. Following APC loss, Myc has been shown to up-regulate RAC1 to promote proliferative ROS through NADPH oxidase (NOX). However, APC loss also increased the expression of TIGAR, which functions to limit ROS. To explore this paradox, we used three-dimensional (3D) cultures and in vivo models to show that deletion of TIGAR increased ROS damage and inhibited proliferation. These responses were suppressed by limiting damaging ROS but enhanced by lowering proproliferative NOX-derived ROS. Despite having opposing effects on ROS levels, loss of TIGAR and RAC1 cooperated to suppress intestinal proliferation following APC loss. Our results indicate that the pro- and anti-proliferative effects of ROS can be independently modulated in the same cell, with two key targets in the Wnt pathway functioning to integrate the different ROS signals for optimal cell proliferation. PMID:26679840

  20. Isolation and Assessment of Single Long-Term Reconstituting Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Adult Mouse Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Kent, David G; Dykstra, Brad J; Eaves, Connie J

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells with long-term repopulating activity can now be routinely obtained at purities of 40% to 50% from suspensions of adult mouse bone marrow. Here we describe robust protocols for both their isolation as CD45(+) EPCR(+) CD150(+) CD48(-) (ESLAM) cells using multiparameter cell sorting and for tracking their clonal growth and differentiation activity in irradiated mice transplanted with single ESLAM cells. The simplicity of these procedures makes them attractive for characterizing the molecular and biological properties of individual hematopoietic stem cells with unprecedented power and precision. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532815

  1. Capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor in the small intestine of a young adult woman: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XU, XIAOLING; CAO, ZHENGLONG; ZHU, HAIHANG

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are mesenchymal tumors that mainly arise in the gastrointestinal tract. They are usually asymptomatic and are incidentally discovered during endoscopy or surgery. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological examination of the specimen. This is the case report of an asymptomatic GIST of the small intestine diagnosed by wireless capsule endoscopy. The tumor was initially suspected to be a leiomyoma, as GISTs in young adults are rare and are mainly discovered incidentally during colorectal cancer screening. The patient was a 35-year-old woman with occult gastrointestinal bleeding, with a normal medical history. An endoscopic assessment of the upper and lower GI tract (gastroscopy and colonoscopy) was performed, but did not reveal any abnormalities. Subsequently, an exophytic tumor initially suspected as leiomyoma or external pressure was detected in the small intestine by capsule endoscopy. A computed tomography scan was suggestive of a soft tissue tumor arising from the small intestine. A surgical specimen was obtained and the immunohistochemical examination revealed that the tumor was positive for CD117 and discovered on GIST-1 markers, while the markers of carcinoma, melanoma and lymphoma were negative, which was consistent with a diagnosis of a low-risk GIST with a mitotic count of <5/50 high-power fields. In this study, we aimed to present in detail the capsule endoscopic and radiological characteristics, as well as the findings of the histological examination of the surgical specimen. In conclusion, when occult blood is detected in the stool, even when gastroscopy and colonoscopy reveal no abnormal findings, small intestinal lesions should be suspected. Exophytic small intestinal GISTs, although rare, particularly in younger patients, they should be considered by physicians in the differential diagnosis of obscure GI bleeding of unknown origin, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. Capsule endoscopy may be considered to

  2. Intestinal Microbial Dysbiosis and Colonic Epithelial Cell Hyperproliferation by Dietary α-Mangostin is Independent of Mouse Strain

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Galley, Jeffrey D.; Bailey, Michael T.; Clinton, Steven K.; Lesinski, Gregory B.; Failla, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Beverages and supplements prepared from mangosteen fruit are claimed to support gut health and immunity, despite the absence of supporting evidence from clinical trials. We recently reported that α-mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, altered the intestinal microbiome, promoted dysbiosis, and exacerbated colitis in C57BL/6J mice. The objective of this study was to determine whether induction of dysbiosis by dietary α-MG is limited to the C57BL/6J strain or represents a more generic response to chronic intake of the xanthone on the gut microbiota of mice. C3H, Balb/c, Nude FoxN1nu, and C57BL/6J mice, each demonstrating unique microbiomes, were fed standard diet or diet containing 0.1% α-MG for four weeks. Dietary α-MG significantly altered the cecal and colonic microbiota in all four strains of mice, promoting a reduction in generally assumed beneficial bacterial groups while increasing the abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Consumption of α-MG was associated with reduced abundance of Firmicutes and increased abundance of Proteobacteria. The abundance of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae was reduced in α-MG-fed mice, while that of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae was increased. Dietary α-MG also was associated with increased proliferation of colonic epithelial cells, infiltration of immune cells, infiltration of immune cells and increased fluid content in stool. These results suggest that ingestion of pharmacologic doses of xanthones in mangosteen-containing supplements may adversely alter the gut microbiota and should be used with caution. PMID:25621505

  3. Intestinal microbial dysbiosis and colonic epithelial cell hyperproliferation by dietary α-mangostin is independent of mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Galley, Jeffrey D; Bailey, Michael T; Clinton, Steven K; Lesinski, Gregory B; Failla, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Beverages and supplements prepared from mangosteen fruit are claimed to support gut health and immunity, despite the absence of supporting evidence from clinical trials. We recently reported that α-mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, altered the intestinal microbiome, promoted dysbiosis, and exacerbated colitis in C57BL/6J mice. The objective of this study was to determine whether induction of dysbiosis by dietary α-MG is limited to the C57BL/6J strain or represents a more generic response to chronic intake of the xanthone on the gut microbiota of mice. C3H, Balb/c, Nude FoxN1nu, and C57BL/6J mice, each demonstrating unique microbiomes, were fed standard diet or diet containing 0.1% α-MG for four weeks. Dietary α-MG significantly altered the cecal and colonic microbiota in all four strains of mice, promoting a reduction in generally assumed beneficial bacterial groups while increasing the abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Consumption of α-MG was associated with reduced abundance of Firmicutes and increased abundance of Proteobacteria. The abundance of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae was reduced in α-MG-fed mice, while that of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae was increased. Dietary α-MG also was associated with increased proliferation of colonic epithelial cells, infiltration of immune cells, infiltration of immune cells and increased fluid content in stool. These results suggest that ingestion of pharmacologic doses of xanthones in mangosteen-containing supplements may adversely alter the gut microbiota and should be used with caution. PMID:25621505

  4. Paternal B Vitamin Intake Is a Determinant of Growth, Hepatic Lipid Metabolism and Intestinal Tumor Volume in Female Apc1638N Mouse Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Julia A.; Park, Lara K.; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Tai, Albert K.; Koh, Gar Yee; Pfalzer, Anna C.; Parnell, Laurence D.; Mason, Joel B.; Liu, Zhenhua; Byun, Alexander J.; Crott, Jimmy W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of maternal nutrition to offspring health and risk of disease is well established. Emerging evidence suggests paternal diet may affect offspring health as well. Objective In the current study we sought to determine whether modulating pre-conception paternal B vitamin intake alters intestinal tumor formation in offspring. Additionally, we sought to identify potential mechanisms for the observed weight differential among offspring by profiling hepatic gene expression and lipid content. Methods Male Apc1638N mice (prone to intestinal tumor formation) were fed diets containing replete (control, CTRL), mildly deficient (DEF), or supplemental (SUPP) quantities of vitamins B2, B6, B12, and folate for 8 weeks before mating with control-fed wild type females. Wild type offspring were euthanized at weaning and hepatic gene expression profiled. Apc1638N offspring were fed a replete diet and euthanized at 28 weeks of age to assess tumor burden. Results No differences in intestinal tumor incidence or burden were found between male Apc1638N offspring of different paternal diet groups. Although in female Apc1638N offspring there were no differences in tumor incidence or multiplicity, a stepwise increase in tumor volume with increasing paternal B vitamin intake was observed. Interestingly, female offspring of SUPP and DEF fathers had a significantly lower body weight than those of CTRL fed fathers. Moreover, hepatic trigylcerides and cholesterol were elevated 3-fold in adult female offspring of SUPP fathers. Weanling offspring of the same fathers displayed altered expression of several key lipid-metabolism genes. Hundreds of differentially methylated regions were identified in the paternal sperm in response to DEF and SUPP diets. Aside from a few genes including Igf2, there was a striking lack of overlap between these genes differentially methylated in sperm and differentially expressed in offspring. Conclusions In this animal model, modulation of

  5. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  6. Chronic serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake transporter inhibition modifies basal respiratory output in adult mouse in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Kelly A.; Solomon, Irene C.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory disturbances are a common feature of panic disorder and present as breathing irregularity, hyperventilation, and increased sensitivity to carbon dioxide. Common therapeutic interventions, such as tricyclic (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants, have been shown to ameliorate not only the psychological components of panic disorder but also the respiratory disturbances. These drugs are also prescribed for generalized anxiety and depressive disorders, neither of which are characterized by respiratory disturbances, and previous studies have demonstrated that TCAs and SSRIs exert effects on basal respiratory activity in animal models without panic disorder symptoms. Whether serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) have similar effects on respiratory activity remains to be determined. Therefore, the current study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic administration of the SNRI antidepressant venlafaxine (VHCL) on basal respiratory output. For these experiments, we recorded phrenic nerve discharge in an in vitro arterially-perfused adult mouse preparation and diaphragm electromyogram (EMG) activity in an in vivo urethane-anesthetized adult mouse preparation. We found that following 28-d VHCL administration, basal respiratory burst frequency was markedly reduced due to an increase in expiratory duration (TE), and the inspiratory duty cycle (TI/Ttot) was significantly shortened. In addition, post-inspiratory and spurious expiratory discharges were seen in vitro. Based on our observations, we suggest that drugs capable of simultaneously blocking both 5-HT and NE reuptake transporters have the potential to influence the respiratory control network in patients using SNRI therapy. PMID:22871263

  7. PPARγ mRNA in the adult mouse hypothalamus: distribution and regulation in response to dietary challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Ying; Lee, Syann; Bookout, Angie L.; Castorena, Carlos M.; Wu, Hua; Gautron, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that was originally identified as a regulator of peroxisome proliferation and adipocyte differentiation. Emerging evidence suggests that functional PPARγ signaling also occurs within the hypothalamus. However, the exact distribution and identities of PPARγ-expressing hypothalamic cells remains under debate. The present study systematically mapped PPARγ mRNA expression in the adult mouse brain using in situ hybridization histochemistry. PPARγ mRNA was found to be expressed at high levels outside the hypothalamus including the neocortex, the olfactory bulb, the organ of the vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (VOLT), and the subfornical organ. Within the hypothalamus, PPARγ was present at moderate levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh) and the ependymal of the 3rd ventricle. In all examined feeding-related hypothalamic nuclei, PPARγ was expressed at very low levels that were close to the limit of detection. Using qPCR techniques, we demonstrated that PPARγ mRNA expression was upregulated in the SCh in response to fasting. Double in situ hybridization further demonstrated that PPARγ was primarily expressed in neurons rather than glia. Collectively, our observations provide a comprehensive map of PPARγ distribution in the intact adult mouse hypothalamus. PMID:26388745

  8. Targeted deletion of Vglut2 expression in the embryonal telencephalon promotes an anxiolytic phenotype of the adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nordenankar, Karin; Bergfors, Assar

    2015-01-01

    Background Anxiety is a natural emotion experienced by all individuals. However, when anxiety becomes excessive, it contributes to the substantial group of anxiety disorders that affect one in three people and thus are among the most common psychiatric disorders. Anxiolysis, the reduction of anxiety, is mediated via several large groups of therapeutical compounds, but the relief is often only temporary, and increased knowledge of the neurobiology underlying anxiety is needed in order to improve future therapies. Aim We previously demonstrated that mice lacking forebrain expression of the Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (Vglut2) from adolescence showed a strong anxiolytic behaviour as adults. In the current study, we wished to analyse if removal of Vglut2 expression already from mid-gestation of the mouse embryo would give rise to similar anxiolysis in the adult mouse. Methods We produced transgenic mice lacking Vglut2 from mid-gestation and analysed their affective behaviour, including anxiety, when they had reached adulthood. Results The transgenic mice lacking Vglut2 expression from mid-gestation showed certain signs of anxiolytic behaviour, but this phenotype was not as prominent as when Vglut2 was removed during adolescence. Conclusion Our results suggest that both embryonal and adolescent forebrain expression of Vglut2 normally contributes to balancing the level of anxiety. As the neurobiological basis for anxiety is similar across species, our results in mice may help improve the current understanding of the neurocircuitry of anxiety, and hence anxiolysis, also in humans. PMID:25857802

  9. Activation of CB1 inhibits NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zun-Yi; McDowell, Thomas; Wang, Peiqing; Alvarez, Roxanne; Gomez, Timothy; Bjorling, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-containing afferent neurons convey nociceptive signals and play an essential role in pain sensation. Exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF) rapidly increases TRPV1 activity (sensitization). In the present study, we investigated whether treatment with the selective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) affects NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) afferent neurons. We found that CB1, NGF receptor tyrosine kinase A (trkA), and TRPV1 are present in cultured adult mouse small- to medium-sized afferent neurons and treatment with NGF (100 ng/ml) for 30 minutes significantly increased the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin (as indicated by increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration). Pretreatment with the CB1 agonist ACEA (10 nM) inhibited the NGF-induced response, and this effect of ACEA was reversed by a selective CB1 antagonist. Further, pretreatment with ACEA inhibited NGF-induced phosphorylation of AKT. Blocking PI3 kinase activity also attenuated the NGF-induced increase in the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin. Our results indicate that the analgesic effect of CB1 activation may in part be due to inhibition of NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 and also that the effect of CB1 activation is at least partly mediated by attenuation of NGF-induced increased PI3 signaling. PMID:25088915

  10. A Novel Procedure for Rapid Imaging of Adult Mouse Brains with MicroCT Using Iodine-Based Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan; Maga, A. Murat

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been the primary modality for obtaining 3D cross-sectional anatomical information in animals for soft tissue, particularly brain. However, costs associated with MRI can be considerably high for large phenotypic screens for gross differences in the structure of the brain due to pathology and/or experimental manipulations. MicroCT (mCT), especially benchtop mCT, is becoming a common laboratory equipment with throughput rates equal or faster than any form of high-resolution MRI at lower costs. Here we explore adapting previously developed contrast based mCT to image adult mouse brains in-situ. We show that 2% weight per volume (w/v) iodine-potassium iodide solution can be successfully used to image adult mouse brains within 48 hours post-mortem when a structural support matrix is used. We demonstrate that hydrogel can be effectively used as a perfusant which limits the tissue shrinkage due to iodine. PMID:26571123

  11. Genetic manipulation of adult-born hippocampal neurons rescues memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Richetin, Kevin; Leclerc, Clémence; Toni, Nicolas; Gallopin, Thierry; Pech, Stéphane; Roybon, Laurent; Rampon, Claire

    2015-02-01

    In adult mammals, neural progenitors located in the dentate gyrus retain their ability to generate neurons and glia throughout lifetime. In rodents, increased production of new granule neurons is associated with improved memory capacities, while decreased hippocampal neurogenesis results in impaired memory performance in several memory tasks. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, neurogenesis is impaired and the granule neurons that are generated fail to integrate existing networks. Thus, enhancing neurogenesis should improve functional plasticity in the hippocampus and restore cognitive deficits in these mice. Here, we performed a screen of transcription factors that could potentially enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We identified Neurod1 as a robust neuronal determinant with the capability to direct hippocampal progenitors towards an exclusive granule neuron fate. Importantly, Neurod1 also accelerated neuronal maturation and functional integration of new neurons during the period of their maturation when they contribute to memory processes. When tested in an APPxPS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, directed expression of Neurod1 in cycling hippocampal progenitors conspicuously reduced dendritic spine density deficits on new hippocampal neurons, to the same level as that observed in healthy age-matched control animals. Remarkably, this population of highly connected new neurons was sufficient to restore spatial memory in these diseased mice. Collectively our findings demonstrate that endogenous neural stem cells of the diseased brain can be manipulated to become new neurons that could allow cognitive improvement. PMID:25518958

  12. Stem cells and lineages of the intestine: a developmental and evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shigeo; Gold, David; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-03-01

    The intestine consists of epithelial cells that secrete digestive enzymes and mucus (gland cells), absorb food particles (enterocytes), and produce hormones (endocrine cells). Intestinal cells are rapidly turned over and need to be replaced. In cnidarians, mitosis of differentiated intestinal cells accounts for much of the replacement; in addition, migratory, multipotent stem cells (interstitial cells) contribute to the production of intestinal cells. In other phyla, intestinal cell replacement is solely the function of stem cells entering the gut from the outside (such as in case of the neoblasts of platyhelminths) or intestinal stem cells located within the midgut epithelium (as in both vertebrates or arthropods). We will attempt in the following to review important aspects of midgut stem cells in different animal groups: where are they located, what types of lineages do they produce, and how do they develop. We will start out with a comparative survey of midgut cell types found across the animal kingdom; then briefly look at the specification of these cells during embryonic development; and finally focus on the stem cells that regenerate midgut cells during adult life. In a number of model systems, including mouse, zebrafish and Drosophila, the molecular pathways controlling intestinal stem cells proliferation and the specification of intestinal cell types are under intensive investigation. We will highlight findings of the recent literature, focusing on aspects that are shared between the different models and that point at evolutionary ancient mechanisms of intestinal cell formation. PMID:23179635

  13. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for atrazine and its main metabolites in the adult male C57BL/6 mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2011-02-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a chlorotriazine herbicide that is widely used and relatively persistent in the environment. In laboratory rodents, excessive exposure to ATR is detrimental to the reproductive, immune, and nervous systems. To better understand the toxicokinetics of ATR and to fill the need for a mouse model, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for ATR and its main chlorotriazine metabolites (Cl-TRIs) desethyl atrazine (DE), desisopropyl atrazine (DIP), and didealkyl atrazine (DACT) was developed for the adult male C57BL/6 mouse. Taking advantage of all relevant and recently made available mouse-specific data, a flow-limited PBPK model was constructed. The ATR and DACT sub-models included blood, brain, liver, kidney, richly and slowly perfused tissue compartments, as well as plasma protein binding and red blood cell binding, whereas the DE and DIP sub-models were constructed as simple five-compartment models. The model adequately simulated plasma levels of ATR and Cl-TRIs and urinary dosimetry of Cl-TRIs at four single oral dose levels (250, 125, 25, and 5 mg/kg). Additionally, the model adequately described the dose dependency of brain and liver ATR and DACT concentrations. Cumulative urinary DACT amounts were accurately predicted across a wide dose range, suggesting the model's potential use for extrapolation to human exposures by performing reverse dosimetry. The model was validated using previously reported data for plasma ATR and DACT in mice and rats. Overall, besides being the first mouse PBPK model for ATR and its Cl-TRIs, this model, by analogy, provides insights into tissue dosimetry for rats. The model could be used in tissue dosimetry prediction and as an aid in the exposure assessment to this widely used herbicide.

  14. Fine structure and cytochemical analysis of the intestinal wall along the body of adult female of Litomosoides chagasfilhoi (Nematoda: Filarioidea).

    PubMed

    de Moraes Neto, A H A; Cunha, G S P; Ferreira, T F; de Carvalho, S N; Guimarães, E V; de Souza, W

    2006-05-01

    Litomosoides chagasfilhoi is a filariid nematode parasite of the abdominal cavity of the wild rodent Akodon cursor (Winge, 1887), that has been described and used in Brazil as a new model for human filariasis. The fine structure of the intestine of this nematode was analyzed based on observations made by light and transmission electron microscopies of serial sections along the body. Cytochemical analysis was carried out to investigate the composition of the intestinal wall. This structure consisted of a basal lamina and an epithelium of variable thickness, composed of cells that have an irregular shape. The cytoplasm of intestinal cells contains few organelles: vacuoles, lysosomal bodies, spheroid bodies, endoplasmic reticulum, and many large lipid droplets. In the anterior portion of the intestine, the lysosomal bodies, spheroid bodies, and vacuoles presented positive reaction for acid phosphatase, and carbohydrates were detected in lysosomal bodies. The midbody and posterior regions presented less organelles and lipid droplets, and nuclei were more abundant. Residues of L-fucose were detected by Ulex europaeus lectin binding in the midbody sections. Basic proteins were associated to lipid droplets, in the posterior region. In the whole extension of the intestine, carbohydrates were detected on tight junctions. These results indicate that the metabolized material in the epithelium can contribute to the microfilariae development and also probably can be involved with the excretory/secretory mechanism of these nematodes. PMID:16416290

  15. Enteric duplication cyst as a leading point for ileoileal intussusception in an adult: A rare cause of complete small intestinal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qahtani, Hamad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of alimentary tract (DAT) presenting as an ileoileal intussusception is a very rare clinical entity. Herein, a case of an ileoileal intussusception due to DAT is presented. A 32-year-old woman was hospitalized due to diffuse, intermittent abdominal pain, vomiting and constipation for 3 d associated with abdominal distention. Plain abdominal X-ray revealed dilated small bowel. Abdominal computed tomography showed grossly dilated small bowel with “sausage” and “doughnut” signs of small bowel intussusception. She underwent laparotomy, with findings of ileoileal intussusception due to a cystic lesion adjacent to the mesenteric side. Resection of the cystic lesion along with the affected segment of intestine, with an end to end anastomosis was performed. The histopathology was consistent with enteric duplication cyst. This case highlights the DAT, although, an uncommon cause of adult ileoileal intussusception should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intussusception in adults, particularly when the leading point is a cystic lesion. PMID:27358681

  16. The effects of feeding with synbiotic (Pediococcus acidilactici and fructooligosaccharide) enriched adult Artemia on skin mucus immune responses, stress resistance, intestinal microbiota and performance of angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare).

    PubMed

    Azimirad, Mahmood; Meshkini, Saeed; Ahmadifard, Nasrollah; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of feeding on synbiotic (Pediococcus acidilactici and fructooligosaccharide) enriched adult Artemia franciscana on skin mucus immune responses, stress resistance, intestinal microbiota and growth performance of angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare). Three hundred and sixty fish with initial weight 3.2 ± 0.13 g were randomly divided into twelve aquaria (50 L) assigned to four groups in triplicates. Fish were fed for 7 weeks with dietary treatments, including treatment 1: feeding adult Artemia without enrichment (control group), treatment 2: feeding adult Artemia enriched with lyophilised probiotic P. acidilactici (700 mg L(-1)), 3: feeding adult Artemia enriched with prebiotic fructooligosaccharide (FOS) (100 mg L(-1)), group 4: feeding adult Artemia enriched with synbiotic (P. acidilactici (700 mg L(-1)) + FOS (100 mg L(-1))). Skin mucus immune responses (lysozyme activity, total Immunoglobulin and protease), stress resistance against environmental stress (acute decrease of temperature and increase salinity), intestinal microbiota as well as growth indices were measured at the end of feeding trial. Artemia enriched with synbiotic significantly improved growth performance compared to other treatments (P < 0.05). The highest weight gain and specific growth rate (SGR) was observed in synbiotic fed fish (P < 0.05). Compared to the other treatments, the population of lactic acid bacteria was significantly higher in the intestinal microbiota of fish fed synbiotic supplemented diet (P < 0.05). In the environmental stress challenge test, the maximum resistance to abrupt decrease of temperature (17 °C) or elevation of salinity (12 g per liter) was observed in the synbiotic treatment. Also, the total immunoglobulin and lysozyme activity level of skin mucus was significantly elevated in fish fed Artemia enriched with synbiotic (P < 0.05). These results revealed that feeding angelfish with synbiotic

  17. Sustained and selective suppression of intestinal cholesterol synthesis by Ro 48-8071, an inhibitor of 2,3-oxidosqualene:lanosterol cyclase, in the BALB/c mouse.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Valasek, Mark A; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Repa, Joyce J; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-04-01

    The small intestine plays a fundamentally important role in regulating whole body cholesterol balance and plasma lipoprotein composition. This is articulated through the interplay of a constellation of genes that ultimately determines the net amount of chylomicron cholesterol delivered to the liver. Major advances in our insights into regulation of the cholesterol absorption pathway have been made using genetically manipulated mouse models and agents such as ezetimibe. One unresolved question is how a sustained pharmacological inhibition of intestinal cholesterol synthesis in vivo may affect cholesterol handling by the absorptive cells. Here we show that the lanosterol cyclase inhibitor, Ro 48-8071, when fed to BALB/c mice in a chow diet (20 mg/day/kg body weight), leads to a rapid and sustained inhibition (>50%) of cholesterol synthesis in the whole small intestine. Sterol synthesis was also reduced in the large intestine and stomach. In contrast, hepatic cholesterol synthesis, while markedly suppressed initially, rebounded to higher than baseline rates within 7 days. Whole body cholesterol synthesis, fractional cholesterol absorption, and fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretion were not consistently changed with Ro 48-8071 treatment. There were no discernible effects of this agent on intestinal histology as determined by H&E staining and the level of Ki67, an index of proliferation. The mRNA expression for multiple genes involved in intestinal cholesterol regulation including NPC1L1 was mostly unchanged although there was a marked rise in the mRNA level for the PXR target genes CYP3A11 and CES2A. PMID:24486573

  18. Sustained and Selective Suppression of Intestinal Cholesterol Synthesis by Ro 48-8071, an Inhibitor of 2,3-Oxidosqualene:Lanosterol Cyclase, in the BALB/c Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Valasek, Mark A.; Lopez, Adam M.; Posey, Kenneth S.; Repa, Joyce J.; Turley, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine plays a fundamentally important role in regulating whole body cholesterol balance and plasma lipoprotein composition. This is articulated through the interplay of a constellation of genes that ultimately determines the net amount of chylomicron cholesterol delivered to the liver. Major advances in our insights into regulation of the cholesterol absorption pathway have been made using genetically manipulated mouse models and agents such as ezetimibe. One unresolved question is how a sustained pharmacological inhibition of intestinal cholesterol synthesis in vivo may affect cholesterol handling by the absorptive cells. Here we show that the lanosterolcyclase inhibitor, Ro 48-8071, when fed to BALB/c mice in a chow diet (20 mg/day/kg body weight), leads to a rapid and sustained inhibition (>50%) of cholesterol synthesis in the whole small intestine. Sterol synthesis was also reduced in the large intestine and stomach. In contrast, hepatic cholesterol synthesis, while markedly suppressed initially, rebounded to higher than baseline rates within 7 days. Whole body cholesterol synthesis, fractional cholesterol absorption, and fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretion were not consistently changed with Ro 48-8071 treatment. There were no discernible effects of this agent on intestinal histology as determined by H&E staining and the level of Ki67, an index of proliferation. The mRNA expression for multiple genes involved in intestinal cholesterol regulation including NPC1L1 was mostly unchanged although there was a marked rise in the mRNA level for the PXR target genes CYP3A11 and CES2A. PMID:24486573

  19. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J H

    1992-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops. Images PMID:1576584

  20. The Spleen Responds to Intestinal Manipulation but Does Not Participate in the Inflammatory Response in a Mouse Model of Postoperative Ileus

    PubMed Central

    Costes, Léa M. M.; van der Vliet, Jan; Farro, Giovanna; Matteoli, Gianluca; van Bree, Sjoerd H. W.; Olivier, Brenda J.; Nolte, Martijn A.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Cailotto, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Background Postoperative ileus is characterized by a transient impairment of the gastrointestinal motility after abdominal surgery. The intestinal inflammation, triggered by handling of the intestine, is the main factor responsible for the prolonged dysmotility of the gastrointestinal tract. Secondary lymphoid organs of the intestine were identified as essential components in the dissemination of inflammation to the entire gastrointestinal tract also called field effect. The involvement of the spleen, however, remains unclear. Aim In this study, we investigated whether the spleen responds to manipulation of the intestine and participates in the intestinal inflammation underlying postoperative ileus. Methods Mice underwent Laparotomy (L) or Laparotomy followed by Intestinal Manipulation (IM). Twenty-four hours later, intestinal and colonic inflammation was assessed by QPCR and measurement of the intestinal transit was performed. Analysis of homeostatic chemokines in the spleen was performed by QPCR and splenic cell populations analysed by Flow Cytometry. Blockade of the egress of cells from the spleen was performed by administration of the Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) agonist CYM-5442 10 h after L/IM. Results A significant decrease in splenic weight and cellularity was observed in IM mice 24 h post-surgery, a phenomenon associated with a decreased splenic expression level of the homeostatic chemokine CCL19. Splenic denervation restored the expression of CCL19 and partially prevented the reduction of splenocytes in IM mice. Treatment with CYM-5442 prevented the egress of splenocytes but did not ameliorate the intestinal inflammation underlying postoperative ileus. Conclusions Intestinal manipulation results in two distinct phenomena: local intestinal inflammation and a decrease in splenic cellularity. The splenic response relies on an alteration of cell trafficking in the spleen and is partially regulated by the splenic nerve. The spleen however does not

  1. MicroRNAs and Their Targets Are Differentially Regulated in Adult and Neonatal Mouse CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Wissink, Erin M; Smith, Norah L; Spektor, Roman; Rudd, Brian D; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Immunological memory, which protects organisms from re-infection, is a hallmark of the mammalian adaptive immune system and the underlying principle of vaccination. In early life, however, mice and other mammals are deficient at generating memory CD8+ T cells, which protect organisms from intracellular pathogens. The molecular basis that differentiates adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are both developmentally regulated and required for normal adult CD8+ T cell functions. We used next-generation sequencing to identify mouse miRNAs that are differentially regulated in adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells, which may contribute to the impaired development of neonatal memory cells. The miRNA profiles of adult and neonatal cells were surprisingly similar during infection; however, we observed large differences prior to infection. In particular, miR-29 and miR-130 have significant differential expression between adult and neonatal cells before infection. Importantly, using RNA-Seq, we detected reciprocal changes in expression of messenger RNA targets for both miR-29 and miR-130. Moreover, targets that we validated include Eomes and Tbx21, key genes that regulate the formation of memory CD8+ T cells. Notably, age-dependent changes in miR-29 and miR-130 are conserved in human CD8+ T cells, further suggesting that these developmental differences are biologically relevant. Together, these results demonstrate that miR-29 and miR-130 are likely important regulators of memory CD8+ T cell formation and suggest that neonatal cells are committed to a short-lived effector cell fate prior to infection. PMID:26416483

  2. MicroRNAs and Their Targets Are Differentially Regulated in Adult and Neonatal Mouse CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wissink, Erin M.; Smith, Norah L.; Spektor, Roman; Rudd, Brian D.; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory, which protects organisms from re-infection, is a hallmark of the mammalian adaptive immune system and the underlying principle of vaccination. In early life, however, mice and other mammals are deficient at generating memory CD8+ T cells, which protect organisms from intracellular pathogens. The molecular basis that differentiates adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are both developmentally regulated and required for normal adult CD8+ T cell functions. We used next-generation sequencing to identify mouse miRNAs that are differentially regulated in adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells, which may contribute to the impaired development of neonatal memory cells. The miRNA profiles of adult and neonatal cells were surprisingly similar during infection; however, we observed large differences prior to infection. In particular, miR-29 and miR-130 have significant differential expression between adult and neonatal cells before infection. Importantly, using RNA-Seq, we detected reciprocal changes in expression of messenger RNA targets for both miR-29 and miR-130. Moreover, targets that we validated include Eomes and Tbx21, key genes that regulate the formation of memory CD8+ T cells. Notably, age-dependent changes in miR-29 and miR-130 are conserved in human CD8+ T cells, further suggesting that these developmental differences are biologically relevant. Together, these results demonstrate that miR-29 and miR-130 are likely important regulators of memory CD8+ T cell formation and suggest that neonatal cells are committed to a short-lived effector cell fate prior to infection. PMID:26416483

  3. Chronic hemodynamic unloading regulates the morphologic development of newborn mouse hearts transplanted into the ear of isogeneic adult mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The morphologic development of newborn mouse hearts transplanted into the pinna of the ears of isogeneic adult mice was assessed in comparison to in situ ventricular myocardium of recipients. The grafted hearts became vascularized from the auricular artery at the base of the ear, and although these preparations appeared not to be intrinsically innervated, most of them showed grossly visible pulsatile activity. Since they were not subjected to hemodynamic load due to working against a pressure gradient, this technique provided an interesting experimental model for studies on the growth of chronically unloaded tissue. The ultrastructure of the myocardium from neonatal mouse hearts, which were fixed immediately after dissection, revealed no differences in comparison to previously published observations. By 2 months, there was virtually no change in the myocardial cell size as compared with newborn mouse cardiac tissue. The heterotopic hearts showed a mature ultrastructural appearance, with parallel bands of myofibrils alternating with rows of mitochondria and differentiated intercalated discs comparable to in situ myocardium. The interstitial space was widened due to fibrous tissue, with activated fibroblasts and a few mononuclear cells. In contrast, by 6 months after transplantation, the heterotopic myocardium showed a dispersion of the measured cell diameter of myocytes, with atrophy of a certain population of cells and hypertrophy in others; nevertheless, the mean cell diameter was similar to that observed in 2-month grafts. The myocytes showed significant dissociation from each other in fibrous tissue and a cellular infiltrate composed predominantly of mononuclear cells, and greater variability of the parallel arrangement of cells. They often contained myofibrils coursing in different directions rather than in parallel. Normal-sized or predominantly atrophic degenerated myocytes, characterized by a wide variety of ultrastructural alterations, were present. By 12

  4. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  5. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2(+) cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a "Percoll-Plate-Wait" procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 10(6) cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2(+) cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2(+) cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  6. Daily rhythms of core temperature and locomotor activity indicate different adaptive strategies to cold exposure in adult and aged mouse lemurs acclimated to a summer-like photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Terrien, Jeremy; Zizzari, Philippe; Epelbaum, Jacques; Perret, Martine; Aujard, Fabienne

    2009-07-01

    Daily variations in core temperature (Tc) within the normothermic range imply thermoregulatory processes that are essential for optimal function and survival. Higher susceptibility towards cold exposure in older animals suggests that these processes are disturbed with age. In the mouse lemur, a long-day breeder, we tested whether aging affected circadian rhythmicity of Tc, locomotor activity (LA), and energy balance under long-day conditions when exposed to cold. Adult (N = 7) and aged (N = 5) mouse lemurs acclimated to LD14/10 were exposed to 10-day periods at 25 and 12 degrees C. Tc and LA rhythms were recorded by telemetry, and caloric intake (CI), body mass changes, and plasma IGF-1 were measured. During exposure to 25 degrees C, both adult and aged mouse lemurs exhibited strong daily variations in Tc. Aged animals exhibited lower levels of nocturnal LA and nocturnal and diurnal Tc levels in comparison to adults. Body mass and IGF-1 levels remained unchanged with aging. Under cold exposure, torpor bout occurrence was never observed whatever the age category. Adult and aged mouse lemurs maintained their Tc in the normothermic range and a positive energy balance. All animals exhibited increase in CI and decrease in IGF-1 in response to cold. The decrease in IGF-1 was delayed in aged mouse lemurs compared to adults. Moreover, both adult and aged animals responded to cold exposure by increasing their diurnal LA compared to those under Ta = 25 degrees C. However, aged animals exhibited a strong decrease in nocturnal LA and Tc, whereas cold effects were only slight in adults. The temporal organization and amplitude of the daily phase of low Tc were particularly well preserved under cold exposure in both age groups. Sexually active mouse lemurs exposed to cold thus seemed to prevent torpor exhibition and temporal disorganization of daily rhythms of Tc, even during aging. However, although energy balance was not impaired with age in mouse lemurs after cold exposure

  7. CLARITY and PACT-based imaging of adult zebrafish and mouse for whole-animal analysis of infections.

    PubMed

    Cronan, Mark R; Rosenberg, Allison F; Oehlers, Stefan H; Saelens, Joseph W; Sisk, Dana M; Jurcic Smith, Kristen L; Lee, Sunhee; Tobin, David M

    2015-12-01

    Visualization of infection and the associated host response has been challenging in adult vertebrates. Owing to their transparency, zebrafish larvae have been used to directly observe infection in vivo; however, such larvae have not yet developed a functional adaptive immune system. Cells involved in adaptive immunity mature later and have therefore been difficult to access optically in intact animals. Thus, the study of many aspects of vertebrate infection requires dissection of adult organs or ex vivo isolation of immune cells. Recently, CLARITY and PACT (passive clarity technique) methodologies have enabled clearing and direct visualization of dissected organs. Here, we show that these techniques can be applied to image host-pathogen interactions directly in whole animals. CLARITY and PACT-based clearing of whole adult zebrafish and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mouse lungs enables imaging of mycobacterial granulomas deep within tissue to a depth of more than 1 mm. Using established transgenic lines, we were able to image normal and pathogenic structures and their surrounding host context at high resolution. We identified the three-dimensional organization of granuloma-associated angiogenesis, an important feature of mycobacterial infection, and characterized the induction of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) within the granuloma using an established fluorescent reporter line. We observed heterogeneity in TNF induction within granuloma macrophages, consistent with an evolving view of the tuberculous granuloma as a non-uniform, heterogeneous structure. Broad application of this technique will enable new understanding of host-pathogen interactions in situ. PMID:26449262

  8. CLARITY and PACT-based imaging of adult zebrafish and mouse for whole-animal analysis of infections

    PubMed Central

    Cronan, Mark R.; Rosenberg, Allison F.; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Sisk, Dana M.; Jurcic Smith, Kristen L.; Lee, Sunhee; Tobin, David M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Visualization of infection and the associated host response has been challenging in adult vertebrates. Owing to their transparency, zebrafish larvae have been used to directly observe infection in vivo; however, such larvae have not yet developed a functional adaptive immune system. Cells involved in adaptive immunity mature later and have therefore been difficult to access optically in intact animals. Thus, the study of many aspects of vertebrate infection requires dissection of adult organs or ex vivo isolation of immune cells. Recently, CLARITY and PACT (passive clarity technique) methodologies have enabled clearing and direct visualization of dissected organs. Here, we show that these techniques can be applied to image host-pathogen interactions directly in whole animals. CLARITY and PACT-based clearing of whole adult zebrafish and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mouse lungs enables imaging of mycobacterial granulomas deep within tissue to a depth of more than 1 mm. Using established transgenic lines, we were able to image normal and pathogenic structures and their surrounding host context at high resolution. We identified the three-dimensional organization of granuloma-associated angiogenesis, an important feature of mycobacterial infection, and characterized the induction of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) within the granuloma using an established fluorescent reporter line. We observed heterogeneity in TNF induction within granuloma macrophages, consistent with an evolving view of the tuberculous granuloma as a non-uniform, heterogeneous structure. Broad application of this technique will enable new understanding of host-pathogen interactions in situ. PMID:26449262

  9. Modifications of perineuronal nets and remodelling of excitatory and inhibitory afferents during vestibular compensation in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Faralli, Alessio; Dagna, Federico; Albera, Andrea; Bekku, Yoko; Oohashi, Toshitaka; Albera, Roberto; Rossi, Ferdinando; Carulli, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are aggregates of extracellular matrix molecules surrounding several types of neurons in the adult CNS, which contribute to stabilising neuronal connections. Interestingly, a reduction of PNN number and staining intensity has been observed in conditions associated with plasticity in the adult brain. However, it is not known whether spontaneous PNN changes are functional to plasticity and repair after injury. To address this issue, we investigated PNN expression in the vestibular nuclei of the adult mouse during vestibular compensation, namely the resolution of motor deficits resulting from a unilateral peripheral vestibular lesion. After unilateral labyrinthectomy, we found that PNN number and staining intensity were strongly attenuated in the lateral vestibular nucleus on both sides, in parallel with remodelling of excitatory and inhibitory afferents. Moreover, PNNs were completely restored when vestibular deficits of the mice were abated. Interestingly, in mice with genetically reduced PNNs, vestibular compensation was accelerated. Overall, these results strongly suggest that temporal tuning of PNN expression may be crucial for vestibular compensation. PMID:26264050

  10. Status epilepticus stimulates NDEL1 expression via the CREB/CRE pathway in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sik; Lee, Boyoung; Hansen, Katelin F; Aten, Sydney; Horning, Paul; Wheaton, Kelin L; Impey, Soren; Hoyt, Kari R; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear distribution element-like 1 (NDEL1/NUDEL) is a mammalian homolog of the Aspergillus nidulans nuclear distribution molecule NudE. NDEL1 plays a critical role in neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth and neuronal positioning during brain development; however within the adult central nervous system, limited information is available regarding NDEL1 expression and functions. Here, the goal was to examine inducible NDEL1 expression in the adult mouse forebrain. Immunolabeling revealed NDEL1 within the forebrain, including the cortex and hippocampus, as well as the midbrain and hypothalamus. Expression was principally localized to perikarya. Using a combination of immunolabeling and RNA seq profiling, we detected a marked and long-lasting upregulation of NDEL1 expression within the hippocampus following a pilocarpine-evoked repetitive seizure paradigm. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis identified a cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding site within the CpG island proximal to the NDEL1 gene, and in vivo transgenic repression of CREB led to a marked downregulation of seizure-evoked NDEL1 expression. Together these data indicate that NDEL1 is inducibly expressed in the adult nervous system, and that signaling via the CREB/CRE transcriptional pathway is likely involved. The role of NDEL1 in neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth during development raises the interesting prospect that inducible NDEL1 in the mature nervous system could contribute to the well-characterized structural and functional plasticity resulting from repetitive seizure activity. PMID:27298008

  11. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  12. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  13. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. Different tumours induced by benzo(a)pyrene and its 7,8-dihydrodiol injected into adult mouse salivary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Wigley, C. B.; Amos, J.; Brookes, P.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison has been made between the carcinogenic activities of benzo(a)pyrene and the proposed proximate carcinogen, benzo(a)pyrene 7,8-dihydrodiol, in the adult C57BL mouse submandibular salivary gland. In preliminary studies using a range of doses, the dihydrodiol was slightly less active than the parent hydrocarbon in this system. There was a difference in the type of tumour induced by the 2 compounds. Benzo(a)pyrene induced tumours of the salivary glands at the site of injection, whereas the dihydrodiol induced malignant lymphosarcomas, particularly of the thymus, which were often metastatic to other orgnas. Possible reasons for the different sites of action of the 2 compounds are discussed. PMID:580763

  15. RUNX1B Expression Is Highly Heterogeneous and Distinguishes Megakaryocytic and Erythroid Lineage Fate in Adult Mouse Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Julia E.; Sroczynska, Patrycja; Tsoulaki, Olga; Leong, Hui Sun; Fadlullah, Muhammad Z. H.; Miller, Crispin; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    The Core Binding Factor (CBF) protein RUNX1 is a master regulator of definitive hematopoiesis, crucial for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) emergence during ontogeny. RUNX1 also plays vital roles in adult mice, in regulating the correct specification of numerous blood lineages. Akin to the other mammalian Runx genes, Runx1 has two promoters P1 (distal) and P2 (proximal) which generate distinct protein isoforms. The activities and specific relevance of these two promoters in adult hematopoiesis remain to be fully elucidated. Utilizing a dual reporter mouse model we demonstrate that the distal P1 promoter is broadly active in adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) populations. By contrast the activity of the proximal P2 promoter is more restricted and its upregulation, in both the immature Lineage- Sca1high cKithigh (LSK) and bipotential Pre-Megakaryocytic/Erythroid Progenitor (PreMegE) populations, coincides with a loss of erythroid (Ery) specification. Accordingly the PreMegE population can be prospectively separated into “pro-erythroid” and “pro-megakaryocyte” populations based on Runx1 P2 activity. Comparative gene expression analyses between Runx1 P2+ and P2- populations indicated that levels of CD34 expression could substitute for P2 activity to distinguish these two cell populations in wild type (WT) bone marrow (BM). Prospective isolation of these two populations will enable the further investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in megakaryocytic/erythroid (Mk/Ery) cell fate decisions. Having characterized the extensive activity of P1, we utilized a P1-GFP homozygous mouse model to analyze the impact of the complete absence of Runx1 P1 expression in adult mice and observed strong defects in the T cell lineage. Finally, we investigated how the leukemic fusion protein AML1-ETO9a might influence Runx1 promoter usage. Short-term AML1-ETO9a induction in BM resulted in preferential P2 upregulation, suggesting its expression may be important to

  16. Mouse Models of Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type-1–Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, B.; Niewiesk, S.; Lairmore, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a number of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory conditions including HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Development of animal models to study the pathogenesis of HTLV-1–associated diseases has been problematic. Mechanisms of early infection and cell-to-cell transmission can be studied in rabbits and nonhuman primates, but lesion development and reagents are limited in these species. The mouse provides a cost-effective, highly reproducible model in which to study factors related to lymphoma development and the preclinical efficacy of potential therapies against ATL. The ability to manipulate transgenic mice has provided important insight into viral genes responsible for lymphocyte transformation. Expansion of various strains of immunodeficient mice has accelerated the testing of drugs and targeted therapy against ATL. This review compares various mouse models to illustrate recent advances in the understanding of HTLV-1–associated ATL development and how improvements in these models are critical to the future development of targeted therapies against this aggressive T-cell lymphoma. PMID:20442421

  17. Genomic structure, promoter identification, and chromosomal mapping of a mouse nuclear orphan receptor expressed in embryos and adult testes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Wei, Li-Na; Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1995-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized overlapping genomic clones containing the complete transcribed region of a newly isolated mouse cDNA encoding an orphan receptor expressed specifically in midgestation embryos and adult testis. This gene spans a distance of more than 50 kb and is organized into 13 exons. The transcription initiation site is located at the 158th nucleotide upstream from the translation initiation codon. All the exon/intron junction sequences follow the GT/AG rule. Based upon Northern blot analysis and the size of the transcribed region of the gene, its transcript was determined to be approximately 2.5 kb. Within approximately 500 hp upstream from the transcription initiation site, several immune response regulatory elements were identified but no TATA box was located. This gene was mapped to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10 and its locus has been designated Tr2-11. Immunohistochemical studies show that the Tr2-11 protein is present mainly in advanced germ cell populations of mature testes and that Tr2-11 gene expression is dramatically decreased in vitamin A-depleted animals. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  18. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood–brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  19. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin V.; Yoon, Jin H.; Kang, Bo Ram; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Sejin; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kim, Joo Won; Cho, Yakdol; Woo, Jiwan; Kim, YoungSoo

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve cognitive deficits to be allowed to accelerate on to clinical trials. Our study focuses on taurine, an endogenous amino acid found in high concentrations in humans. It has demonstrated neuroprotective properties against many forms of dementia. In this study, we assessed cognitively enhancing property of taurine in transgenic mouse model of AD. We orally administered taurine via drinking water to adult APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model for 6 weeks. Taurine treatment rescued cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice up to the age-matching wild-type mice in Y-maze and passive avoidance tests without modifying the behaviours of cognitively normal mice. In the cortex of APP/PS1 mice, taurine slightly decreased insoluble fraction of Aβ. While the exact mechanism of taurine in AD has not yet been ascertained, our results suggest that taurine can aid cognitive impairment and may inhibit Aβ-related damages. PMID:25502280

  20. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood-brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  1. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  2. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  3. A comparison of the multiple oocyte maturation gene expression patterns between the newborn and adult mouse ovary

    PubMed Central

    Bahmanpour, Soghra; Talaei Khozani, Tahereh; Zarei fard, Nehleh; Jaberipour, Mansoureh; Hosseini, Ahmah; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The interaction between follicular cells and oocyte leads to a change in gene expression involved in oocyte maturation processes. Objective: The purpose of this study was to quantify the expression of more common genes involved in follicular growth and oocyte developmental competence. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the expression of genes was evaluated with qRT-PCR assay in female BALB/c mice pups at 3-day of pre-pubertal and 8 week old virgin adult ovaries. The tissue was prepared by H&E staining for normal morphological appearance. The data were calculated with the 2-∆Ct formula and assessed using non-parametric two-tailed Mann-Whitney test. The p<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The data showed a significant increase in the level of Stra8 and GDF9 in adult compared with newborn mice ovaries (p=0.049). In contrast, a significant decrease in the level of Mvh, REC8, SCP1, SCP3, and ZP2 was observed in adult mice ovaries compared to those in the newborn mice ovaries (all p=0.049 except SCP1: p=0.046). There was no significant difference in the level of OCT4 and Cx37 expression between adult and newborn mice ovaries. Conclusion: The modifications in gene expression patterns coordinate the follicular developmental processes. Furthermore, the findings showed higher expression level of premeiotic gene (Stra8) and lower level of meiotic entry markers (SCP1, SCP3, and REC8) in juvenile than newborn mouse ovaries. This article extracted from Ph.D. thesis. (Nehleh Zarei fard) PMID:24639702

  4. The channel opening rate of adult- and fetal-type mouse muscle nicotinic receptors activated by acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Maconochie, David J; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we examine acetylcholine (ACh)-induced currents in quail fibroblast cell lines expressing either the fetal (Q-F18) or the adult (Q-A33) complement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits derived from mouse skeletal muscle. Pulses of ACh were applied to outside-out patches of cell membrane by means of a fast perfusion system, at concentrations from 100 nM to 10 mM. We obtained current records with intracellular potentials of -60 and +40 mV. The goal of this study was to estimate the channel opening rate.By fitting sums of exponentials to averaged responses, we estimated the rate of development of the current on the application of acetylcholine. The rate constant of the predominant exponential component (the on-rate) ranges over 3 orders of magnitude, from around 100 s−1 (fetal) at low concentrations of ACh to over 100 000 s−1 (fetal and adult) at the highest concentrations.We establish that our measurement of the on-rate is not limited by technical constraints, and can therefore be related to the rate constants of a kinetic scheme. Our observations are consistent with a model having a rate-limiting channel opening step with a forwards rate constant (β) of 80 000 s−1 on average for adult receptors and 60 000 s−1 for fetal receptors, and a minimum opening to closing ratio (β/α) of around 33 (adult) or 50 (fetal). The channel opening rate, β, varies from around 30 000 s−1 to well over 100 000 s−1 for different patches. The large variation cannot all be ascribed to errors of measurement, but indicates patch to patch variation. PMID:9481672

  5. Stem cells and lineages of the intestine: a developmental and evolutionary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shigeo; Gold, David; Hartenstein, Volker

    2012-01-01

    The intestine consists of epithelial cells that secrete digestive enzymes and mucus (gland cells), absorb food particles (enterocytes), and produce hormones (endocrine cells). Intestinal cells are rapidly turned over and need to be replaced. In cnidarians, mitosis of differentiated intestinal cells accounts for much of the replacement; in addition, migratory, multipotent stem cells (interstitial cells) contribute to the production of intestinal cells. In other phyla, intestinal cell replacement is solely the function of stem cells entering the gut from the outside (such as in case of the neoblasts of platyhelmints) or intestinal stem cells located within the midgut epithelium (as in both vertebrates or arthropods). We will attempt in the following to review important aspects of midgut stem cells in different animal groups: where are they located, what types of lineages do they produce, and how do they develop. We will start out with a comparative survey of midgut cell types found across the animal kingdom; then briefly look at the specification of these cells during embryonic development; and finally focus on the stem cells that regenerate midgut cells during adult life. In a number of model systems, including mouse, zebrafish and Drosophila, the molecular pathways controlling ISC proliferation and the specification of intestinal cell types are under intensive investigation. We will highlight findings of the recent literature, focusing on aspects that are shared between the different models and that point at evolutionary ancient mechanisms of intestinal cell formation. PMID:23179635

  6. Early-Life Exposure to Antibiotics, Alterations in the Intestinal Microbiome, and Risk of Metabolic Disease in Children and Adults.

    PubMed

    Yallapragada, Sushmita G; Nash, Colleen B; Robinson, Daniel T

    2015-11-01

    The intestinal microbiome is a complex ecosystem of microorganisms that colonize the human gastrointestinal tract. The microbiome evolves rapidly in early life with contributions from diet, genetics and immunomodulatory factors. Changes in composition of the microbiota due to antibiotics may lead to negative long-term effects including obesity and diabetes mellitus, as evidenced by both animal and large human studies. Inappropriate exposures to antibiotics occur frequently in early childhood. Therefore, an evidence-based system of antimicrobial use should be employed by all providers, especially those who care for pediatric patients. This article explores the natural evolution of the intestinal microbiome from the perinatal period into early childhood, the effect of antibiotics on the microbial ecology, and the implications for future health and disease. PMID:26587819

  7. c-Src drives intestinal regeneration and transformation

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Julia B; Ridgway, Rachel A; Valeri, Nicola; Nixon, Colin; Frame, Margaret C; Muller, William J; Vidal, Marcos; Sansom, Owen J

    2014-01-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Src, hereafter referred to as Src, is overexpressed or activated in multiple human malignancies. There has been much speculation about the functional role of Src in colorectal cancer (CRC), with Src amplification and potential activating mutations in up to 20%of the human tumours, although this has never been addressed due to multiple redundant family members. Here, we have used the adult Drosophila and mouse intestinal epithelium as paradigms to define a role for Src during tissue homeostasis, damage-induced regeneration and hyperplasia. Through genetic gain and loss of function experiments, we demonstrate that Src is necessary and sufficient to drive intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation during tissue self-renewal, regeneration and tumourigenesis. Surprisingly, Src plays a non-redundant role in the mouse intestine, which cannot be substituted by the other family kinases Fyn and Yes. Mechanistically, we show that Src drives ISC proliferation through upregulation of EGFR and activation of Ras/MAPK and Stat3 signalling. Therefore, we demonstrate a novel essential role for Src in intestinal stem/progenitor cell proliferation and tumourigenesis initiation in vivo. PMID:24788409

  8. Expression of the Argonaute protein PiwiL2 and piRNAs in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qiuling; Ma, Qi; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Wilson, Amber; Xia, Linghui; Yu, Hong; Webster, Keith A.

    2010-06-11

    Piwi (P-element-induced wimpy testis) first discovered in Drosophila is a member of the Argonaute family of micro-RNA binding proteins with essential roles in germ-cell development. The murine homologue of PiwiL2, also known as Mili is selectively expressed in the testes, and mice bearing targeted mutations of the PiwiL2 gene are male-sterile. PiwiL2 proteins are thought to protect the germ line genome by suppressing retrotransposons, stabilizing heterochromatin structure, and regulating target genes during meiosis and mitosis. Here, we report that PiwiL2 and associated piRNAs (piRs) may play similar roles in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells. We found that PiwiL2 is expressed in the cytoplasm of metaphase mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow of adult and aged mice. Knockdown of PiwiL2 with a specific siRNA enhanced cell proliferation, significantly increased the number of cells in G1/S and G2/M cell cycle phases and was associated with increased expression of cell cycle genes CCND1, CDK8, microtubule regulation genes, and decreased expression of tumor suppressors Cables 1, LATS, and Cxxc4. The results suggest broader roles for Piwi in genome surveillance beyond the germ line and a possible role in regulating the cell cycle of mesenchymal stem cells.

  9. The Bulk of Autotaxin Activity Is Dispensable for Adult Mouse Life.

    PubMed

    Katsifa, Aggeliki; Kaffe, Eleanna; Nikolaidou-Katsaridou, Nefeli; Economides, Aris N; Newbigging, Susan; McKerlie, Colin; Aidinis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX, Enpp2) is a secreted lysophospholipase D catalysing the production of lysophosphatidic acid, a pleiotropic growth factor-like lysophospholipid. Increased ATX expression has been detected in a number of chronic inflammatory diseases and different types of cancer, while genetic interventions have proven a role for ATX in disease pathogenesis. Therefore, ATX has emerged as a potential drug target and a large number of ATX inhibitors have been developed exhibiting promising therapeutic potential. However, the embryonic lethality of ATX null mice and the ubiquitous expression of ATX and LPA receptors in adult life question the suitability of ATX as a drug target. Here we show that inducible, ubiquitous genetic deletion of ATX in adult mice, as well as long-term potent pharmacologic inhibition, are well tolerated, alleviating potential toxicity concerns of ATX therapeutic targeting. PMID:26569406

  10. The Bulk of Autotaxin Activity Is Dispensable for Adult Mouse Life

    PubMed Central

    Katsifa, Aggeliki; Kaffe, Eleanna; Nikolaidou-Katsaridou, Nefeli; Economides, Aris N.; Newbigging, Susan; McKerlie, Colin; Aidinis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX, Enpp2) is a secreted lysophospholipase D catalysing the production of lysophosphatidic acid, a pleiotropic growth factor-like lysophospholipid. Increased ATX expression has been detected in a number of chronic inflammatory diseases and different types of cancer, while genetic interventions have proven a role for ATX in disease pathogenesis. Therefore, ATX has emerged as a potential drug target and a large number of ATX inhibitors have been developed exhibiting promising therapeutic potential. However, the embryonic lethality of ATX null mice and the ubiquitous expression of ATX and LPA receptors in adult life question the suitability of ATX as a drug target. Here we show that inducible, ubiquitous genetic deletion of ATX in adult mice, as well as long-term potent pharmacologic inhibition, are well tolerated, alleviating potential toxicity concerns of ATX therapeutic targeting. PMID:26569406

  11. Roles of Wnt Signaling in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse Ventricular-Subventricular Zone.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Sawada, Masato; Huang, Shih-Hui; Ogino, Takashi; Ohata, Shinya; Kubo, Akiharu; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2016-02-01

    In many animal species, the production of new neurons (neurogenesis) occurs throughout life, in a specialized germinal region called the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ). In this region, neural stem cells undergo self-renewal and generate neural progenitor cells and new neurons. In the olfactory system, the new neurons migrate rostrally toward the olfactory bulb, where they differentiate into mature interneurons. V-SVZ-derived new neurons can also migrate toward sites of brain injury, where they contribute to neural regeneration. Recent studies indicate that two major branches of the Wnt signaling pathway, the Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/planar cell polarity pathways, play essential roles in various facets of adult neurogenesis. Here, we review the Wnt signaling-mediated regulation of adult neurogenesis in the V-SVZ under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26572545

  12. Variable partial unilateral ureteral obstruction and its release in the neonatal and adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, Barbara A; Chevalier, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive nephropathy is the most important cause of renal failure in children. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in the neonatal mouse provides a useful model to investigate the response of the developing kidney to urine flow obstruction. Creation of reversible variable partial UUO (compared to complete UUO) more closely approximates congenital lesions, and permits the study of recovery following release of the obstruction. Implementation of this technique requires the appropriate optical, surgical, and anesthetic equipment, as well as adaptations appropriate to the very small animals undergoing surgical procedures. Care of the pups must include minimizing trauma to delicate tissues, close monitoring of anesthesia and body temperature, and ensuring acceptance of the pups by the mother. It is important to document the severity and patency of the partial UUO by ureteral measurement and pelvic injection of India ink. Finally, removal of kidneys for histologic examination should be accomplished with gentle handling and processing. PMID:22639278

  13. DNA delivery in adult mouse eyes: An update with corneal endothelium outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, John M.; Getz, Shannon E.; Sellers, Jana T.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Goodman, Penny; Bernal, Christiana J.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular injection (intravitreal, subretinal, or into the anterior space) is an efficient approach to deliver many classes of drugs, cells, and other treatments to various cell types of the eye. In particular, subretinal injection is efficient since delivered agents accumulate as there is no dilution due to transport processes or diffusion and because the volume of the interphotoreceptor space (IPS) is minimal (10–20 microliters in the human eye, less than 1 microliter in the mouse eye). We previously reported methods using subretinal injection and electroporation to deliver DNA to photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in retinas of live mice(1–3). Here we detail further optimization of that approach and additionally report its use in delivering DNA expression plasmids to the corneal endothelium. PMID:24510822

  14. Characterization and isolation of immature neurons of the adult mouse piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Rubio, A; Belles, M; Belenguer, G; Vidueira, S; Fariñas, I; Nacher, J

    2016-07-01

    Physiological studies indicate that the piriform or primary olfactory cortex of adult mammals exhibits a high degree of synaptic plasticity. Interestingly, a subpopulation of cells in the layer II of the adult piriform cortex expresses neurodevelopmental markers, such as the polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) or doublecortin (DCX). This study analyzes the nature, origin, and potential function of these poorly understood cells in mice. As previously described in rats, most of the PSA-NCAM expressing cells in layer II could be morphologically classified as tangled cells and only a small proportion of larger cells could be considered semilunar-pyramidal transitional neurons. Most were also immunoreactive for DCX, confirming their immature nature. In agreement with this, detection of PSA-NCAM combined with that of different cell lineage-specific antigens revealed that most PSA-NCAM positive cells did not co-express markers of glial cells or mature neurons. Their time of origin was evaluated by birthdating experiments with halogenated nucleosides performed at different developmental stages and in adulthood. We found that virtually all cells in this paleocortical region, including PSA-NCAM-positive cells, are born during fetal development. In addition, proliferation analyses in adult mice revealed that very few cells were cycling in layer II of the piriform cortex and that none of them was PSA-NCAM-positive. Moreover, we have established conditions to isolate and culture these immature neurons in the adult piriform cortex layer II. We find that although they can survive under certain conditions, they do not proliferate in vitro either. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 748-763, 2016. PMID:26487449

  15. A lacZ reporter gene expression atlas for 313 adult KOMP mutant mouse lines.

    PubMed

    West, David B; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Baridon, Brian; Djan, Esi; Trainor, Amanda; Griffey, Stephen M; Engelhard, Eric K; Rapp, Jared; Li, Bowen; de Jong, Pieter J; Lloyd, K C Kent

    2015-04-01

    Expression of the bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter gene (lacZ) in the vector used for the Knockout Mouse Project (KOMP) is driven by the endogenous promoter of the target gene. In tissues from KOMP mice, histochemical staining for LacZ enzyme activity can be used to determine gene expression patterns. With this technique, we have produced a comprehensive resource of gene expression using both whole mount (WM) and frozen section (FS) LacZ staining in 313 unique KOMP mutant mouse lines. Of these, ∼ 80% of mutants showed specific staining in one or more tissues, while ∼ 20% showed no specific staining, ∼ 13% had staining in only one tissue, and ∼ 25% had staining in >6 tissues. The highest frequency of specific staining occurred in the brain (∼ 50%), male gonads (42%), and kidney (39%). The WM method was useful for rapidly identifying whole organ and some substructure staining, while the FS method often revealed substructure and cellular staining specificity. Both staining methods had >90% repeatability in biological replicates. Nonspecific LacZ staining occurs in some tissues due to the presence of bacteria or endogenous enzyme activity. However, this can be effectively distinguished from reporter gene activity by the combination of the WM and FS methods. After careful annotation, LacZ staining patterns in a high percentage of mutants revealed a unique structure-function not previously reported for many of these genes. The validation of methods for LacZ staining, annotation, and expression analysis reported here provides unique insights into the function of genes for which little is currently known. PMID:25591789

  16. Genistein exposure inhibits growth and alters steroidogenesis in adult mouse antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-02-15

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36μM) for 18-96h. Every 24h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26792615

  17. A lacZ reporter gene expression atlas for 313 adult KOMP mutant mouse lines

    PubMed Central

    Pasumarthi, Ravi K.; Baridon, Brian; Djan, Esi; Trainor, Amanda; Griffey, Stephen M.; Engelhard, Eric K.; Rapp, Jared; Li, Bowen; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, K.C. Kent

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter gene (lacZ) in the vector used for the Knockout Mouse Project (KOMP) is driven by the endogenous promoter of the target gene. In tissues from KOMP mice, histochemical staining for LacZ enzyme activity can be used to determine gene expression patterns. With this technique, we have produced a comprehensive resource of gene expression using both whole mount (WM) and frozen section (FS) LacZ staining in 313 unique KOMP mutant mouse lines. Of these, ∼80% of mutants showed specific staining in one or more tissues, while ∼20% showed no specific staining, ∼13% had staining in only one tissue, and ∼25% had staining in >6 tissues. The highest frequency of specific staining occurred in the brain (∼50%), male gonads (42%), and kidney (39%). The WM method was useful for rapidly identifying whole organ and some substructure staining, while the FS method often revealed substructure and cellular staining specificity. Both staining methods had >90% repeatability in biological replicates. Nonspecific LacZ staining occurs in some tissues due to the presence of bacteria or endogenous enzyme activity. However, this can be effectively distinguished from reporter gene activity by the combination of the WM and FS methods. After careful annotation, LacZ staining patterns in a high percentage of mutants revealed a unique structure-function not previously reported for many of these genes. The validation of methods for LacZ staining, annotation, and expression analysis reported here provides unique insights into the function of genes for which little is currently known. PMID:25591789

  18. Polyclonal origin and hair induction ability of dermal papillae in neonatal and adult mouse back skin

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Charlotte A.; Jensen, Kim B.; MacRae, Elizabeth J.; Mansfield, William; Watt, Fiona M.

    2012-01-01

    Hair follicle development and growth are regulated by Wnt signalling and depend on interactions between epidermal cells and a population of fibroblasts at the base of the follicle, known as the dermal papilla (DP). DP cells have a distinct gene expression signature from non-DP dermal fibroblasts. However, their origins are largely unknown. By generating chimeric mice and performing skin reconstitution assays we show that, irrespective of whether DP form during development, are induced by epidermal Wnt activation in adult skin or assemble from disaggregated cells, they are polyclonal in origin. While fibroblast proliferation is necessary for hair follicle formation in skin reconstitution assays, mitotically inhibited cells readily contribute to DP. Although new hair follicles do not usually develop in adult skin, adult dermal fibroblasts are competent to contribute to DP during hair follicle neogenesis, irrespective of whether they originate from skin in the resting or growth phase of the hair cycle or skin with β-catenin-induced ectopic follicles. We propose that during skin reconstitution fibroblasts may be induced to become DP cells by interactions with hair follicle epidermal cells, rather than being derived from a distinct subpopulation of cells. PMID:22537489

  19. Adult neurogenesis and specific replacement of interneuron subtypes in the mouse main olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Joshua; LaRocca, Greg; Jimenez, Daniel A; Urban, Nathaniel N

    2007-01-01

    Background New neurons are generated in the adult brain from stem cells found in the subventricular zone (SVZ). These cells proliferate in the SVZ, generating neuroblasts which then migrate to the main olfactory bulb (MOB), ending their migration in the glomerular layer (GLL) and the granule cell layer (GCL) of the MOB. Neuronal populations in these layers undergo turnover throughout life, but whether all neuronal subtypes found in these areas are replaced and when neurons begin to express subtype-specific markers is not known. Results Here we use BrdU injections and immunohistochemistry against (calretinin, calbindin, N-copein, tyrosine hydroxylase and GABA) and show that adult-generated neurons express markers of all major subtypes of neurons in the GLL and GCL. Moreover, the fractions of new neurons that express subtype-specific markers at 40 and 75 days post BrdU injection are very similar to the fractions of all neurons expressing these markers. We also show that many neurons in the glomerular layer do not express NeuN, but are readily and specifically labeled by the fluorescent nissl stain Neurotrace. Conclusion The expression of neuronal subtype-specific markers by new neurons in the GLL and GCL changes rapidly during the period from 14–40 days after BrdU injection before reaching adult levels. This period may represent a critical window for cell fate specification similar to that observed for neuronal survival. PMID:17996088

  20. Polyclonal origin and hair induction ability of dermal papillae in neonatal and adult mouse back skin.

    PubMed

    Collins, Charlotte A; Jensen, Kim B; MacRae, Elizabeth J; Mansfield, William; Watt, Fiona M

    2012-06-15

    Hair follicle development and growth are regulated by Wnt signalling and depend on interactions between epidermal cells and a population of fibroblasts at the base of the follicle, known as the dermal papilla (DP). DP cells have a distinct gene expression signature from non-DP dermal fibroblasts. However, their origins are largely unknown. By generating chimeric mice and performing skin reconstitution assays we show that, irrespective of whether DP form during development, are induced by epidermal Wnt activation in adult skin or assemble from disaggregated cells, they are polyclonal in origin. While fibroblast proliferation is necessary for hair follicle formation in skin reconstitution assays, mitotically inhibited cells readily contribute to DP. Although new hair follicles do not usually develop in adult skin, adult dermal fibroblasts are competent to contribute to DP during hair follicle neogenesis, irrespective of whether they originate from skin in the resting or growth phase of the hair cycle or skin with β-catenin-induced ectopic follicles. We propose that during skin reconstitution fibroblasts may be induced to become DP cells by interactions with hair follicle epidermal cells, rather than being derived from a distinct subpopulation of cells. PMID:22537489

  1. Wnt-dependent de novo hair follicle regeneration in adult mouse skin after wounding.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mayumi; Yang, Zaixin; Andl, Thomas; Cui, Chunhua; Kim, Noori; Millar, Sarah E; Cotsarelis, George

    2007-05-17

    The mammalian hair follicle is a complex 'mini-organ' thought to form only during development; loss of an adult follicle is considered permanent. However, the possibility that hair follicles develop de novo following wounding was raised in studies on rabbits, mice and even humans fifty years ago. Subsequently, these observations were generally discounted because definitive evidence for follicular neogenesis was not presented. Here we show that, after wounding, hair follicles form de novo in genetically normal adult mice. The regenerated hair follicles establish a stem cell population, express known molecular markers of follicle differentiation, produce a hair shaft and progress through all stages of the hair follicle cycle. Lineage analysis demonstrated that the nascent follicles arise from epithelial cells outside of the hair follicle stem cell niche, suggesting that epidermal cells in the wound assume a hair follicle stem cell phenotype. Inhibition of Wnt signalling after re-epithelialization completely abrogates this wounding-induced folliculogenesis, whereas overexpression of Wnt ligand in the epidermis increases the number of regenerated hair follicles. These remarkable regenerative capabilities of the adult support the notion that wounding induces an embryonic phenotype in skin, and that this provides a window for manipulation of hair follicle neogenesis by Wnt proteins. These findings suggest treatments for wounds, hair loss and other degenerative skin disorders. PMID:17507982

  2. Promotion of Cortical Neurogenesis from the Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Mouse Subcallosal Zone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Choi, Kyuhyun; Shaker, Mohammed R; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Boram; Lee, Eunsoo; Park, Jae-Yong; Lim, Mi-Sun; Park, Chang-Hwan; Shin, Ki Soon; Kim, Hyun; Geum, Dongho; Sun, Woong

    2016-04-01

    Neurogenesis occurs spontaneously in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle in adult rodent brain, but it has long been debated whether there is sufficient adult neurogenesis in human SVZ. Subcallosal zone (SCZ), a posterior continuum of SVZ closely associated with posterior regions of cortical white matter, has also been reported to contain adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in both rodents and humans. However, little is known whether SCZ-derived aNSC (SCZ-aNSCs) can produce cortical neurons following brain injury. We found that SCZ-aNSCs exhibited limited neuronal differentiation potential in culture and after transplantation in mice. Neuroblasts derived from SCZ initially migrated toward injured cortex regions following brain injury, but later exhibited apoptosis. Overexpression of anti-apoptotic bcl-xL in the SCZ by retroviral infection rescued neuroblasts from cell death in the injured cortex, but neuronal maturation was still limited, resulting in atrophy. In combination with Bcl-xL, infusion of brain-derived neurotropic factor rescued atrophy, and importantly, a subset of such SCZ-aNSCs differentiated and attained morphological and physiological characteristics of mature, excitatory neurons. These results suggest that the combination of anti-apoptotic and neurotrophic factors might enable the use of aNSCs derived from the SCZ in cortical neurogenesis for neural replacement therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:888-901. PMID:26701067