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Sample records for adult mouse pancreas

  1. ADAPTATION OF GROUP B COXSACKIE VIRUS TO ADULT MOUSE PANCREAS

    PubMed Central

    Dalldorf, Gilbert; Gifford, Rebecca

    1952-01-01

    An alteration of tissue tropism of a Coxsackie virus has been observed following different methods of propagation of the virus in animals. Tropism for the adult mouse pancreas, as described by Pappenheimer, appeared to be irrevocably lost following prolonged brain-to-brain transfer. It was present in the same strain on reisolation from human feces, was intensified following pancreas transfers, and suppressed by brain transfers. Pancreatotropism may be correlated with the titer of virus in the pancreas. PMID:13000059

  2. Inflammation increases cells expressing ZSCAN4 and progenitor cell markers in the adult pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kyokane, Kazuhiro; Niida, Shumpei; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently identified the zinc finger and SCAN domain containing 4 (Zscan4), which is transiently expressed and regulates telomere elongation and genome stability in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of ZSCAN4 in the adult pancreas and elucidate the role of ZSCAN4 in tissue inflammation and subsequent regeneration. The expression of ZSCAN4 and other progenitor or differentiated cell markers in the human pancreas was immunohistochemically examined. Pancreas sections of alcoholic or autoimmune pancreatitis patients before and under maintenance corticosteroid treatment were used in this study. In the adult human pancreas a small number of ZSCAN4-positive (ZSCAN4+) cells are present among cells located in the islets of Langerhans, acini, ducts, and oval-shaped cells. These cells not only express differentiated cell markers for each compartment of the pancreas but also express other tissue stem/progenitor cell markers. Furthermore, the number of ZSCAN4+ cells dramatically increased in patients with chronic pancreatitis, especially in the pancreatic tissues of autoimmune pancreatitis actively regenerating under corticosteroid treatment. Interestingly, a number of ZSCAN4+ cells in the pancreas of autoimmune pancreatitis returned to the basal level after 1 yr of maintenance corticosteroid treatment. In conclusion, coexpression of progenitor cell markers and differentiated cell markers with ZSCAN4 in each compartment of the pancreas may indicate the presence of facultative progenitors for both exocrine and endocrine cells in the adult pancreas. PMID:23599043

  3. GATA4 and GATA6 control mouse pancreas organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Manuel; Delgado, Irene; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Francisco; Rojas, Anabel

    2012-01-01

    Recently, heterozygous mutations in GATA6 have been found in neonatal diabetic patients with failed pancreatic organogenesis. To investigate the roles of GATA4 and GATA6 in mouse pancreas organogenesis, we conditionally inactivated these genes within the pancreas. Single inactivation of either gene did not have a major impact on pancreas formation, indicating functional redundancy. However, double Gata4/Gata6 mutant mice failed to develop pancreata, died shortly after birth, and displayed hyperglycemia. Morphological defects in Gata4/Gata6 mutant pancreata were apparent during embryonic development, and the epithelium failed to expand as a result of defects in cell proliferation and differentiation. The number of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, including PDX1+ cells, was reduced in the Gata4/Gata6 mutant pancreatic epithelium. Remarkably, deletion of only 1 Gata6 allele on a Gata4 conditional knockout background severely reduced pancreatic mass. In contrast, a single WT allele of Gata4 in Gata6 conditional knockout mice was sufficient for normal pancreatic development, indicating differential contributions of GATA factors to pancreas formation. Our results place GATA factors at the top of the transcriptional network hierarchy controlling pancreas organogenesis. PMID:23006330

  4. Regeneration of the Pancreas in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jennifer B.; Koustubhan, Punita; Greenman, Melanie; Parsons, Michael J.; Walter, Ingrid; Moss, Larry G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Regenerating organs in diverse biological systems have provided clues to processes that can be harnessed to repair damaged tissue. Adult mammalian β-cells have a limited capacity to regenerate, resulting in diabetes and lifelong reliance on insulin. Zebrafish have been used as a model for the regeneration of many organs. We demonstrate the regeneration of adult zebrafish pancreatic β-cells. This nonmammalian model can be used to define pathways for islet-cell regeneration in humans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adult transgenic zebrafish were injected with a single high dose of streptozotocin or metronidazole and anesthetized at 3, 7, or 14 days or pancreatectomized. Blood glucose measurements were determined and gut sections were analyzed using specific endocrine, exocrine, and duct cell markers as well as markers for dividing cells. RESULTS Zebrafish recovered rapidly without the need for insulin injections, and normoglycemia was attained within 2 weeks. Although few proliferating cells were present in vehicles, ablation caused islet destruction and a striking increase of proliferating cells, some of which were Pdx1 positive. Dividing cells were primarily associated with affected islets and ducts but, with the exception of surgical partial pancreatectomy, were not extensively β-cells. CONCLUSIONS The ability of the zebrafish to regenerate a functional pancreas using chemical, genetic, and surgical approaches enabled us to identify patterns of cell proliferation in islets and ducts. Further study of the origin and contribution of proliferating cells in reestablishing islet function could provide strategies for treating human diseases. PMID:19491207

  5. Proteomic analysis of pancreas derived from adult cloned pig

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Jung-Il; Cho, Young Keun; Cho, Seong-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Han, Yong-Mahn; Koo, Deog-Bon Lee, Kyung-Kwang

    2008-02-08

    The potential medical applications of animal cloning include xenotransplantation, but the complex molecular cascades that control porcine organ development are not fully understood. Still, it has become apparent that organs derived from cloned pigs may be suitable for transplantation into humans. In this study, we examined the pancreas of an adult cloned pig developed through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and Western blotting. Proteomic analysis revealed 69 differentially regulated proteins, including such apoptosis-related species as annexins, lamins, and heat shock proteins, which were unanimously upregulated in the SCNT sample. Among the downregulated proteins in SCNT pancreas were peroxiredoxins and catalase. Western blot results indicate that several antioxidant enzymes and the anti-apoptotic protein were downregulated in SCNT pancreas, whereas several caspases were upregulated. Together, these data suggest that the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pancreas of an adult cloned pig leads to apoptosis.

  6. p120 Catenin is required for normal tubulogenesis but not epithelial integrity in developing mouse pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hendley, Audrey M; Provost, Elayne; Bailey, Jennifer M; Wang, Yue J; Cleveland, Megan H; Blake, Danielle; Bittman, Ross W; Roeser, Jeffrey C; Maitra, Anirban; Reynolds, Albert B; Leach, Steven D

    2015-03-01

    The intracellular protein p120 catenin aids in maintenance of cell-cell adhesion by regulating E-cadherin stability in epithelial cells. In an effort to understand the biology of p120 catenin in pancreas development, we ablated p120 catenin in mouse pancreatic progenitor cells, which resulted in deletion of p120 catenin in all epithelial lineages of the developing mouse pancreas: islet, acinar, centroacinar, and ductal. Loss of p120 catenin resulted in formation of dilated epithelial tubules, expansion of ductal epithelia, loss of acinar cells, and the induction of pancreatic inflammation. Aberrant branching morphogenesis and tubulogenesis were also observed. Throughout development, the phenotype became more severe, ultimately resulting in an abnormal pancreas comprised primarily of duct-like epithelium expressing early progenitor markers. In pancreatic tissue lacking p120 catenin, overall epithelial architecture remained intact; however, actin cytoskeleton organization was disrupted, an observation associated with increased cytoplasmic PKCζ. Although we observed reduced expression of adherens junction proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, and α-catenin, p120 catenin family members p0071, ARVCF, and δ-catenin remained present at cell membranes in homozygous p120(f/f) pancreases, potentially providing stability for maintenance of epithelial integrity during development. Adult mice homozygous for deletion of p120 catenin displayed dilated main pancreatic ducts, chronic pancreatitis, acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), and mucinous metaplasia that resembles PanIN1a. Taken together, our data demonstrate an essential role for p120 catenin in pancreas development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Onset of cell-specific gene expression in the developing mouse pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Gittes, G K; Rutter, W J

    1992-01-01

    A central question in developmental biology has been the initiation of cell-specific gene expression and its temporal relationship to morphogenesis. We have coupled embryo microdissection with the exquisite sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction to define the onset of cell-specific gene expression during pancreatic organogenesis. Using the precise assignment of gestational age by the number of somites in each embryo, we determined the onset of transcription of major genes of the endocrine and exocrine pancreas during mouse development to within 2-3 hr. Somatostatin mRNA was detected at the 10-somite stage throughout the foregut, consistent with the presence of somatostatin-producing cells throughout the adult gut. Mature mRNA for insulin and glucagon first appears surprisingly early, at the 20-somite stage in the wall of the embryonic foregut and is restricted to only the area of the duodenum from which the pancreas will arise 10-12 hr later. In contrast, exocrine gene transcription begins 24 hr after formation of the pancreatic diverticulum. Thus cell-specific gene expression in the endocrine pancreas begins in a "pre-morphogenetic phase." This early expression of insulin and glucagon could reflect the initiation of an endocrine cell lineage. Images PMID:1371010

  8. Clonal and territorial development of the pancreas as revealed by eGFP-labelled mouse chimeras.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Daniel; Jockusch, Harald

    2010-10-01

    The clonal structure of the pancreas was analysed in neonatal and adult mouse chimeras in which one partner displayed cell patches expressing green fluorescent protein (eGFP). Coherent growth during pancreatic histogenesis was suggested by the presence of large eGFP-labelled acinar clusters rather than a scattered distribution of individual labelled acinar cells. The adult chimeric pancreas contained monophenotypic acini, whereas surprisingly 5% of acini in neonates were polyclonal. Monophenotypic acini presumably arose by coherent expansion leading to large 3D patches and may not be monoclonal. Islets of Langerhans were oligoclonal at both ages investigated. The proportion of eGFP positive cells within islets did not correlate with that of the surrounding acinar tissue indicating clonal independence of islets from their neighbourhood. The patterns observed argue against a secondary contribution of blood-borne progenitor/stem cells to the acinar compartment during tissue turnover. The different clonal origins of acini and islets are integrated into a model of pancreatic histogenesis.

  9. Pancreas-specific deletion of mouse Gata4 and Gata6 causes pancreatic agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Shouhong; Borok, Matthew J.; Decker, Kimberly J.; Battle, Michele A.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Hale, Michael A.; Macdonald, Raymond J.; Sussel, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic agenesis is a human disorder caused by defects in pancreas development. To date, only a few genes have been linked to pancreatic agenesis in humans, with mutations in pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) and pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (PTF1A) reported in only 5 families with described cases. Recently, mutations in GATA6 have been identified in a large percentage of human cases, and a GATA4 mutant allele has been implicated in a single case. In the mouse, Gata4 and Gata6 are expressed in several endoderm-derived tissues, including the pancreas. To analyze the functions of GATA4 and/or GATA6 during mouse pancreatic development, we generated pancreas-specific deletions of Gata4 and Gata6. Surprisingly, loss of either Gata4 or Gata6 in the pancreas resulted in only mild pancreatic defects, which resolved postnatally. However, simultaneous deletion of both Gata4 and Gata6 in the pancreas caused severe pancreatic agenesis due to disruption of pancreatic progenitor cell proliferation, defects in branching morphogenesis, and a subsequent failure to induce the differentiation of progenitor cells expressing carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) and neurogenin 3 (NEUROG3). These studies address the conserved and nonconserved mechanisms underlying GATA4 and GATA6 function during pancreas development and provide a new mouse model to characterize the underlying developmental defects associated with pancreatic agenesis. PMID:23006325

  10. Acidic duodenal pH alters gene expression in the cystic fibrosis mouse pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simran; Norkina, Oxana; Ziemer, Donna; Samuelson, Linda C; De Lisle, Robert C

    2004-08-01

    The duodenum is abnormally acidic in cystic fibrosis (CF) due to decreased bicarbonate ion secretion that is dependent on the CF gene product CFTR. In the CFTR null mouse, the acidic duodenum results in increased signaling from the intestine to the exocrine pancreas in an attempt to stimulate pancreatic bicarbonate ion secretion. Excess stimulation is proposed to add to the stress/inflammation of the pancreas in CF. DNA microarray analysis of the CF mouse revealed altered pancreatic gene expression characteristic of stress/inflammation. When the duodenal pH was corrected genetically (crossing CFTR null with gastrin null mice) or pharmacologically (use of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole), expression levels of genes measured by quantitative RT-PCR were significantly normalized. It is concluded that the acidic duodenal pH in CF contributes to the stress on the exocrine pancreas and that normalizing duodenal pH reduces this stress.

  11. Unlimited in vitro expansion of adult bi-potent pancreas progenitors through the Lgr5/R-spondin axis

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Meritxell; Bonfanti, Paola; Boj, Sylvia F; Sato, Toshiro; Loomans, Cindy J M; van de Wetering, Marc; Sojoodi, Mozhdeh; Li, Vivian S W; Schuijers, Jurian; Gracanin, Ana; Ringnalda, Femke; Begthel, Harry; Hamer, Karien; Mulder, Joyce; van Es, Johan H; de Koning, Eelco; Vries, Robert G J; Heimberg, Harry; Clevers, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Lgr5 marks adult stem cells in multiple adult organs and is a receptor for the Wnt-agonistic R-spondins (RSPOs). Intestinal, stomach and liver Lgr5+ stem cells grow in 3D cultures to form ever-expanding organoids, which resemble the tissues of origin. Wnt signalling is inactive and Lgr5 is not expressed under physiological conditions in the adult pancreas. However, we now report that the Wnt pathway is robustly activated upon injury by partial duct ligation (PDL), concomitant with the appearance of Lgr5 expression in regenerating pancreatic ducts. In vitro, duct fragments from mouse pancreas initiate Lgr5 expression in RSPO1-based cultures, and develop into budding cyst-like structures (organoids) that expand five-fold weekly for >40 weeks. Single isolated duct cells can also be cultured into pancreatic organoids, containing Lgr5 stem/progenitor cells that can be clonally expanded. Clonal pancreas organoids can be induced to differentiate into duct as well as endocrine cells upon transplantation, thus proving their bi-potentiality. PMID:24045232

  12. PNA lectin for purifying mouse acinar cells from the inflamed pancreas.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Zimmerman, Ray; Song, Zewen; Nebres, Philip; Ricks, David Matthew; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Husain, Sohail Z; Gittes, George K

    2016-02-17

    Better methods for purifying human or mouse acinar cells without the need for genetic modification are needed. Such techniques would be advantageous for the specific study of certain mechanisms, such as acinar-to-beta-cell reprogramming and pancreatitis. Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin has been used to label and isolate acinar cells from the pancreas. However, the purity of the UEA-I-positive cell fraction has not been fully evaluated. Here, we screened 20 widely used lectins for their binding specificity for major pancreatic cell types, and found that UEA-I and Peanut agglutinin (PNA) have a specific affinity for acinar cells in the mouse pancreas, with minimal affinity for other major pancreatic cell types including endocrine cells, duct cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, PNA-purified acinar cells were less contaminated with mesenchymal and inflammatory cells, compared to UEA-I purified acinar cells. Thus, UEA-I and PNA appear to be excellent lectins for pancreatic acinar cell purification. PNA may be a better choice in situations where mesenchymal cells or inflammatory cells are significantly increased in the pancreas, such as type 1 diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  13. PNA lectin for purifying mouse acinar cells from the inflamed pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Zimmerman, Ray; Song, Zewen; Nebres, Philip; Ricks, David Matthew; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Husain, Sohail Z.; Gittes, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Better methods for purifying human or mouse acinar cells without the need for genetic modification are needed. Such techniques would be advantageous for the specific study of certain mechanisms, such as acinar-to-beta-cell reprogramming and pancreatitis. Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin has been used to label and isolate acinar cells from the pancreas. However, the purity of the UEA-I-positive cell fraction has not been fully evaluated. Here, we screened 20 widely used lectins for their binding specificity for major pancreatic cell types, and found that UEA-I and Peanut agglutinin (PNA) have a specific affinity for acinar cells in the mouse pancreas, with minimal affinity for other major pancreatic cell types including endocrine cells, duct cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, PNA-purified acinar cells were less contaminated with mesenchymal and inflammatory cells, compared to UEA-I purified acinar cells. Thus, UEA-I and PNA appear to be excellent lectins for pancreatic acinar cell purification. PNA may be a better choice in situations where mesenchymal cells or inflammatory cells are significantly increased in the pancreas, such as type 1 diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26884345

  14. Structural similarities and differences between the human and the mouse pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dolenšek, Jurij; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Mice remain the most studied animal model in pancreas research. Since the findings of this research are typically extrapolated to humans, it is important to understand both similarities and differences between the 2 species. Beside the apparent difference in size and macroscopic organization of the organ in the 2 species, there are a number of less evident and only recently described differences in organization of the acinar and ductal exocrine tissue, as well as in the distribution, composition, and architecture of the endocrine islets of Langerhans. Furthermore, the differences in arterial, venous, and lymphatic vessels, as well as innervation are potentially important. In this article, the structure of the human and the mouse pancreas, together with the similarities and differences between them are reviewed in detail in the light of conceivable repercussions for basic research and clinical application.

  15. Structural similarities and differences between the human and the mouse pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Dolenšek, Jurij; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Mice remain the most studied animal model in pancreas research. Since the findings of this research are typically extrapolated to humans, it is important to understand both similarities and differences between the 2 species. Beside the apparent difference in size and macroscopic organization of the organ in the 2 species, there are a number of less evident and only recently described differences in organization of the acinar and ductal exocrine tissue, as well as in the distribution, composition, and architecture of the endocrine islets of Langerhans. Furthermore, the differences in arterial, venous, and lymphatic vessels, as well as innervation are potentially important. In this article, the structure of the human and the mouse pancreas, together with the similarities and differences between them are reviewed in detail in the light of conceivable repercussions for basic research and clinical application. PMID:26030186

  16. Organoids from adult liver and pancreas: Stem cell biology and biomedical utility.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher J; Cordero-Espinoza, Lucía; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-12-15

    The liver and pancreas are critical organs maintaining whole body metabolism. Historically, the expansion of adult-derived cells from these organs in vitro has proven challenging and this in turn has hampered studies of liver and pancreas stem cell biology, as well as being a roadblock to disease modelling and cell replacement therapies for pathologies in these organs. Recently, defined culture conditions have been described which allow the in vitro culture and manipulation of adult-derived liver and pancreatic material. Here we review these systems and assess their physiological relevance, as well as their potential utility in biomedicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. STAT3 modulates β-cell cycling in injured mouse pancreas and protects against DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    De Groef, S; Renmans, D; Cai, Y; Leuckx, G; Roels, S; Staels, W; Gradwohl, G; Baeyens, L; Heremans, Y; Martens, G A; De Leu, N; Sojoodi, M; Van de Casteele, M; Heimberg, H

    2016-01-01

    Partial pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) of mouse pancreas induces a doubling of the β-cell mass mainly through proliferation of pre-existing and newly formed β-cells. The molecular mechanism governing this process is still largely unknown. Given the inflammatory nature of PDL and inflammation-induced signaling via the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), the activation and the role of STAT3 in PDL-induced β-cell proliferation were investigated. Duct ligation stimulates the expression of several cytokines that can act as ligands inducing STAT3 signaling and phosphorylation in β-cells. β-Cell cycling increased by conditional β-cell-specific Stat3 knockout and decreased by STAT3 activation through administration of interleukin-6. In addition, the level of DNA damage in β-cells of PDL pancreas increased after deletion of Stat3. These data indicate a role for STAT3 in maintaining a steady state in the β-cell, by modulating its cell cycle and protection from DNA damage. PMID:27336716

  18. Development of the pancreas in medaka, Oryzias latipes, from embryo to adult.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Takayoshi; Tsukahara, Tatsuya; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    To address conserved and unique features of fish pancreas development, we performed extensive analyses of pancreatic development in medaka embryos and adults using pdx1- and ptf1a-transgenic medaka, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. The markers used in these analyses included pdx1, nkx6.1, nkx6.2, nkx2.2, Islet1, insulin, Somatostatin, glucagon, ptf1a, ela3l, trypsin, and amylase. The double transgenic (Tg) fish produced in the present study visualizes the development of endocrine (pdx1+) and exocrine (ptf1a+) parts simultaneously in living fishes. Like other vertebrates, the medaka pancreas develops as two (dorsal and ventral) buds in the anterior gut tube, which soon fuse into a single anlagen. The double Tg fish demonstrates that the differential property between the two buds is already established at the initial phase of bud development as indicated by strong pdx1 expression in the dorsal one. This Tg fish also allowed us to examine the gross morphology and the structure of adult pancreas and revealed unique characters of medaka pancreas such as broad and multiple connections with the gut tube along the anterior-posterior axis. © 2015 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  19. Conditional Tissue-Specific Foxa2 Ablation in Mouse Pancreas Causes Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia: RETRACTED.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zengbin; Fei, Aihua; Liu, Yingbin; Pan, Shuming

    The forkhead/winged helix transcription factor Foxa2 is a major upstream regulator of Pdx1, a transcription factor necessary for pancreatic development. In the present study, we conditionally knocked out Foxa2 in Pdx1-expressing domain and further analyzed the contribution of Foxa2 to α- and β-cell development and the effect of Foxa2 deletion on plasma insulin, glucagon, and glucose levels. Homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice and heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice were generated by homologous recombination using a Foxa2 gene-targeting vector. α- and β-cell mass was examined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Plasma glucose, insulin, and plasma were measured at postnatal day 10. For pdx1 lineage tracing studies, heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 EYFP and homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 EYFP mice were used. Our immunofluorescence analysis revealed that in the pancreas sections of the homozygous mutant mice, Foxa2 was virtually absent from non-β cells and its expression almost exclusively coincided with remnant β cells. The density of both α and β cells apparently decreased in the pancreas of the heterozygous mutant mice and in the pancreas of the homozygous mutant mice, α cells lost its predominance and β cells increased proportionally. Direct Pdx1 cell lineage tracing revealed that, on embryonic day 18.5, in the homozygous mutant mice, Pdx1 expression coincided almost exclusively with that of insulin-secreting β cells. Chemiluminescence assays revealed that heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice had significantly lower insulin levels than control mice (P < 0.01). However, no apparent difference was observed between homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice and control mice (P > 0.05). Chemiluminescence assays also showed that Foxa2 deletion significantly depressed plasma glucagon levels in both homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice and heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice (P < 0.01 vs. controls). Plasma glucose on postnatal day 10 was significantly lower in homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice compared with control mice (P < 0.01). Our study

  20. Effects of chronic isoproterenol administration of. beta. /sub 1/-adrenoceptors and growth of pancreas of young and adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Schneyer, C.A.; Humphreys-Beher, M.

    1988-06-01

    (/sup 3/H)Dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding of membranes of adult pancreas differed from that of pancreas of young rats, and the DHA binding in the presence of atenolol or butoxamine also was different in the two age groups. The adult pancreas had 93% ..beta../sub 2/- and 7% ..beta../sub 1/-adrenoceptors and did not exhibit an increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) following 2 days of DL-isoproterenol (ISO) administration; in contrast, pancreas of the 20-day-old rat had 71% ..beta../sub 2/-adrenoceptors and 27% ..beta../sub 1/-adrenoceptors and exhibited a 34-fold increase over that of adult, and a 6-fold increase over that of the control 20-day-old pancreas. Acinar cell differentiation was also accelerated by a 7-day regimen of ISO administration from 13 to 20 days of age. These growth responses to ISO appear to be ..beta../sub 1/ mediated. The lack of ..beta../sub 1/-adrenoceptors in the adult may account for the failure of the adult pancreas to exhibit a growth response to ISO.

  1. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells.

  2. Pluripotency of adult stem cells derived from human and rat pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Birth, M.; Rohwedel, J.; Assmuth, K.; Goepel, A.; Wedel, T.

    Adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells found within fully developed tissues or organs of an adult individuum. Until recently, these cells have been considered to bear less self-renewal ability and differentiation potency compared to embryonic stem cells. In recent studies an undifferentiated cell type was found in primary cultures of isolated acini from exocrine pancreas termed pancreatic stellate cells. Here we show that pancreatic stellate-like cells have the capacity of extended self-renewal and are able to differentiate spontaneously into cell types of all three germ layers expressing markers for smooth muscle cells, neurons, glial cells, epithelial cells, chondrocytes and secretory cells (insulin, amylase). Differentiation and subsequent formation of three-dimensional cellular aggregates (organoid bodies) were induced by merely culturing pancreatic stellate-like cells in hanging drops. These cells were developed into stable, long-term, in vitro cultures of both primary undifferentiated cell lines as well as organoid cultures. Thus, evidence is given that cell lineages of endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal origin arise spontaneously from a single adult undifferentiated cell type. Based on the present findings it is assumed that pancreatic stellate-like cells are a new class of lineage uncommitted pluripotent adult stem cells with a remarkable self-renewal ability and differentiation potency. The data emphasize the versatility of adult stem cells and may lead to a reappraisal of their use for the treatment of inherited disorders or acquired degenerative diseases.

  3. PERK is required in the adult pancreas and is essential for maintenance of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Sartori, Daniel J; Li, Changhong; Yu, Qian-Chun; Kushner, Jake A; Simon, M Celeste; Diehl, J Alan

    2012-12-01

    Germ line PERK mutations are associated with diabetes mellitus and growth retardation in both rodents and humans. In contrast, late embryonic excision of PERK permits islet development and was found to prevent onset of diabetes, suggesting that PERK may be dispensable in the adult pancreas. To definitively establish the functional role of PERK in adult pancreata, we generated mice harboring a conditional PERK allele in which excision is regulated by tamoxifen administration. Deletion of PERK in either young adult or mature adult mice resulted in hyperglycemia associated with loss of islet and β cell architecture. PERK excision triggered intracellular accumulation of proinsulin and Glut2, massive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) expansion, and compensatory activation of the remaining unfolded-protein response (UPR) signaling pathways specifically in pancreatic tissue. Although PERK excision increased β cell death, this was not a result of decreased proliferation as previously reported. In contrast, a significant and specific increase in β cell proliferation was observed, a result reflecting increased cyclin D1 accumulation. This work demonstrates that contrary to expectations, PERK is required for secretory homeostasis and β cell survival in adult mice.

  4. An analysis of the lack of donor pancreas utilization from younger adult organ donors.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Alexander C; Wainright, Jennifer L; Sleeman, Elizabeth; McBride, Maureen A; Baker, Tim; Samana, Ciara; Stock, Peter

    2010-09-15

    Donor pancreas utilization rates for whole organ transplant have remained low and have decreased over time. To identify the reasons for nonuse of pancreas from donors who meet common baseline acceptance criteria, we examined Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network data from 2005 to 2007 and identified a subgroup of 1763 "potential pancreas donors" defined by age (19-40 years), body mass index (<30 kg/m), successful liver donation, and negative viral serology testing, which were not used. We characterize this cohort of potential donors including reasons for refusal, factors that may contribute to pancreas acceptance and function, and potential explanations for the lack of growth in pancreas organ utilization.

  5. Transcriptional control of mammalian pancreas organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cano, David A; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Francisco; Rojas, Anabel

    2014-07-01

    The field of pancreas development has markedly expanded over the last decade, significantly advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pancreas organogenesis. This growth has been fueled, in part, by the need to generate new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of diabetes. The creation of sophisticated genetic tools in mice has been instrumental in this progress. Genetic manipulation involving activation or inactivation of genes within specific cell types has allowed the identification of many transcription factors (TFs) that play critical roles in the organogenesis of the pancreas. Interestingly, many of these TFs act at multiple stages of pancreatic development, and adult organ function or repair. Interaction with other TFs, extrinsic signals, and epigenetic regulation are among the mechanisms by which TFs may play context-dependent roles during pancreas organogenesis. Many of the pancreatic TFs directly regulate each other and their own expression. These combinatorial interactions generate very specific gene regulatory networks that can define the different cell lineages and types in the developing pancreas. Here, we review recent progress made in understanding the role of pancreatic TFs in mouse pancreas formation. We also summarize our current knowledge of human pancreas development and discuss developmental pancreatic TFs that have been associated with human pancreatic diseases.

  6. Spontaneous myogenic differentiation of Flk-1-positive cells from adult pancreas and other nonmuscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Tritarelli, Alessandra; Toietta, Gabriele; Gatto, Ilaria; Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Pagani, Francesca; Mangoni, Antonella; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2008-02-01

    At the embryonic or fetal stages, autonomously myogenic cells (AMCs), i.e., cells able to spontaneously differentiate into skeletal myotubes, have been identified from several different sites other than skeletal muscle, including the vascular compartment. However, in the adult animal, AMCs from skeletal muscle-devoid tissues have been described in only two cases. One is represented by thymic myoid cells, a restricted population of committed myogenic progenitors of unknown derivation present in the thymic medulla; the other is represented by a small subset of adipose tissue-associated cells, which we recently identified. In the present study we report, for the first time, the presence of spontaneously differentiating myogenic precursors in the pancreas and in other skeletal muscle-devoid organs such as spleen and stomach, as well as in the periaortic tissue of adult mice. Immunomagnetic selection procedures indicate that AMCs derive from Flk-1(+) progenitors. Individual clones of myogenic cells from nonmuscle organs are morphologically and functionally indistinguishable from skeletal muscle-derived primary myoblasts. Moreover, they can be induced to proliferate in vitro and are able to participate in muscle regeneration in vivo. Thus, we provide evidence that fully competent myogenic progenitors can be derived from the Flk-1(+) compartment of several adult tissues that are embryologically unrelated to skeletal muscle.

  7. Analysis of the tumor-initiating and metastatic capacity of PDX1-positive cells from the adult pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ischenko, Irene; Petrenko, Oleksi; Hayman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies. A striking feature of pancreatic cancer is that activating Kras mutations are found in ∼90% of cases. However, apart from a restricted population of cells expressing pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), most pancreatic cells are refractory to Kras-driven transformation. In the present study, we sought to determine which subsets of PDX1+ cells may be responsible for tumor growth. Using the Lox-Stop-Lox–KrasG12D genetic mouse model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, we isolated a population of KrasG12D-expressing PDX1+ cells with an inherent capacity to metastasize. This population of cells bears the surface phenotype of EpCAM+CD24+CD44+CD133–SCA1− and is closer in its properties to stem-like cells than to more mature cell types. We further demonstrate that the tumorigenic capacity of PDX1+ cells is limited, becoming progressively lost as the cells acquire a mature phenotype. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the adult pancreas harbors a dormant progenitor cell population that is capable of initiating tumor growth under conditions of oncogenic stimulation. We present evidence that constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling and stabilization of the MYC protein are the two main driving forces behind the development of pancreatic cancer cells with stem-cell–like properties and high metastatic potential. Our results suggest that pancreatic cells bearing Kras mutation can be induced to differentiate into quasi-normal cells with suppressed tumorigenicity by selective inhibition of the MAPK/ERK/MYC signaling cascade. PMID:24550494

  8. Age-Related Changes of Claudin Expression in Mouse Liver, Kidney, and Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Theresa; Sherman-Baust, Cheryl A.; Poosala, Suresh; Mullin, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) play crucial roles in tissue homeostasis and inflammation through their roles in the control of paracellular transport and barrier function. There is evidence that these functions are compromised in older organisms, but the exact mechanisms leading to TJ deterioration are not well understood. Claudin proteins are a family of membrane proteins that constitute the structural barrier elements of TJs and therefore play a major role in their formation and function. Using immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, we have studied the expression of six different claudin proteins (claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, and -7) in three tissues (liver, kidney, and pancreas) of aging male and female mice. In general, we find an age-dependent decrease in the expression of several claudin proteins in all three tissues observed, although the exact changes are tissue specific. Our findings provide a possible basis for the decrease in tissue barrier function in older organisms. PMID:19692671

  9. Development of the Endocrine Pancreas in the Beagle Dog: From Fetal to Adult Life.

    PubMed

    Bricout-Neveu, Emilie; Pechberty, Severine; Reynaud, Karine; Maenhoudt, Cindy; José Lecomte, Marie; Ravassard, Philippe; Czernichow, Paul

    2017-03-14

    Our objectives were to describe, in Beagle dogs, the ontogenesis of beta (insulin-producing) and alpha (glucagon-producing) cells from fetal to early postnatal life and adulthood. In addition, to have some insight into interspecies comparison, Beagle dog pancreases were compared to pancreases from a Labrador and Chow Chow. At midgestation, the epithelium was dense, beta cells scarce, and alpha cells numerous and concentrated in the center of the pancreatic bud. From 36 to 45 days post conception (pc), beta cell numbers increased and the epithelium expanded and branched out. At 55 days pc, large beta cell aggregates were seen. At weaning, the islets were similar to those in adults, with limited alpha cells intermingled with numerous beta cells. Quantification of the Alpha to Beta cells ratio has shown a gradual increase of beta cells proportion throughout development. Similar findings were obtained in the 2 other breeds. In conclusion, in the fetal Beagle dog beta cells emerge from the pancreatic bud at midgestation, but the endocrine structure is mature only in early postnatal life. The ontogenesis of the endocrine pancreas demonstrated in dogs resembles that reported in rats and mice. In contrast, human beta cells appear earlier, at the beginning of the second trimester of gestation. Our study provides a detailed morphological description of pancreatic development in dogs but supplies no information on alpha- or beta-cell function during fetal life. The morphological data reported here provide a foundation for building physiological studies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  11. Characterization of pancreatic stem cells derived from adult human pancreas ducts by fluorescence activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han-Tso; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Kao, Chung-Lan; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Jen; Tarng, Yih-Wen; Ho, Larry L-T; Kwok, Ching-Fai; Ku, Hung-Hai

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To isolate putative pancreatic stem cells (PSCs) from human adult tissues of pancreas duct using serum-free, conditioned medium. The characterization of surface phenotype of these PSCs was analyzed by flow cytometry. The potential for pancreatic lineage and the capability of β-cell differentiation in these PSCs were evaluated as well. METHODS: By using serum-free medium supplemented with essential growth factors, we attempted to isolate the putative PSCs which has been reported to express nestin and pdx-1. The Matrigel™ was employed to evaluate the differential capacity of isolated cells. Dithizone staining, insulin content/secretion measurement, and immunohistochemistry staining were used to monitor the differentiation. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to detect the phenotypic markers of putative PSCs. RESULTS: A monolayer of spindle-like cells was cultivated. The putative PSCs expressed pdx-1 and nestin. They were also able to differentiate into insulin-, glucagon-, and somatostatin-positive cells. The spectrum of phenotypic markers in PSCs was investigated; a similarity was revealed when using human bone marrow-derived stem cells as the comparative experiment, such as CD29, CD44, CD49, CD50, CD51, CD62E, PDGFR-α, CD73 (SH2), CD81, CD105(SH3). CONCLUSION: In this study, we successfully isolated PSCs from adult human pancreatic duct by using serum-free medium. These PSCs not only expressed nestin and pdx-1 but also exhibited markers attributable to mesenchymal stem cells. Although work is needed to elucidate the role of these cells, the application of these PSCs might be therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus. PMID:16874866

  12. Short exposure to collagenase and coculture with mouse embryonic pancreas improve human dermal fibroblast culture.

    PubMed

    Pandamooz, Sareh; Hadipour, Abbas; Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh; Pourghasem, Mohsen; Abedian, Zeinab; Ardekani, Ali Motevallizadeh; Golpour, Monireh; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Mostafazadeh, Amrollah

    2012-01-01

    The dermal fibroblast as a major component of connective tissue has attracted much attention in the past few years, and application of these very fast growing cells in several fields has been intensively studied. Isolating dermal fibroblasts is an appropriate way to expand these fast growing cells in vitro. Although using a dissociated fibroblast culture method is more convenient than skin explant culture, its enzymatic digestion is critical because a large number of cells can be lost over prolonged exposure to collagenase. This study was performed to increase the number of viable cells after digestion of fresh human foreskin of donors aged from 1 to 3 months with collagenase and also by to design a coculture system for resuscitation of the injured fibroblast. Our results demonstrate that we can maximize cell yield while maintaining cell viability by cutting the specimens into very small pieces (1-2 mm³) after removing the epidermal layer with dispase II and also by collecting released cells every 20 Min subsequent to digesting the dermal layer with collagenase. Moreover, our data strongly indicate that coculturing of isolated fibroblasts with embryonic pancreas explants can enhance the rate of proliferation in cultured fibroblasts.

  13. A Single-Cell Transcriptomic Map of the Human and Mouse Pancreas Reveals Inter- and Intra-cell Population Structure.

    PubMed

    Baron, Maayan; Veres, Adrian; Wolock, Samuel L; Faust, Aubrey L; Gaujoux, Renaud; Vetere, Amedeo; Ryu, Jennifer Hyoje; Wagner, Bridget K; Shen-Orr, Shai S; Klein, Allon M; Melton, Douglas A; Yanai, Itai

    2016-10-26

    Although the function of the mammalian pancreas hinges on complex interactions of distinct cell types, gene expression profiles have primarily been described with bulk mixtures. Here we implemented a droplet-based, single-cell RNA-seq method to determine the transcriptomes of over 12,000 individual pancreatic cells from four human donors and two mouse strains. Cells could be divided into 15 clusters that matched previously characterized cell types: all endocrine cell types, including rare epsilon-cells; exocrine cell types; vascular cells; Schwann cells; quiescent and activated stellate cells; and four types of immune cells. We detected subpopulations of ductal cells with distinct expression profiles and validated their existence with immuno-histochemistry stains. Moreover, among human beta- cells, we detected heterogeneity in the regulation of genes relating to functional maturation and levels of ER stress. Finally, we deconvolved bulk gene expression samples using the single-cell data to detect disease-associated differential expression. Our dataset provides a resource for the discovery of novel cell type-specific transcription factors, signaling receptors, and medically relevant genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of Insulin-Immunoreactive Cells and Endocrine Cells Within the Duct System of the Adult Human Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Yu, Lan; Zou, Xia; Zhao, Hailu

    2016-01-01

    The adult pancreatic duct system accommodates endocrine cells that have the potential to produce insulin. Here we report the characterization and distribution of insulin-immunoreactive cells and endocrine cells within the ductal units of adult human pancreas. Sequential pancreas sections from 12 nondiabetic adults were stained with biomarkers of ductal epithelial cells (cytokeratin 19), acinar cells (amylase), endocrine cells (chromogranin A; neuron-specific enolase), islet hormones (insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide), cell proliferation (Ki-67), and neogenesis (CD29). The number of islet hormone-immunoreactive cells increased from large ducts to the terminal branches. The insulin-producing cells outnumbered endocrine cells reactive for glucagon, somatostatin, or pancreatic polypeptide. The proportions of insulin-immunoreactive count compared with local islets (100% as a baseline) were 1.5% for the main ducts, 7.2% for interlobular ducts, 24.8% for intralobular ducts, 67.9% for intercalated ducts, and 348.9% for centroacinar cells. Both Ki-67- and CD29-labeled cells were predominantly localized in the terminal branches around the islets. The terminal branches also showed cells coexpressing islet hormones and cytokeratin 19. The adult human pancreatic ducts showed islet hormone-producing cells. The insulin-reactive cells predominantly localized in terminal branches where they may retain potential capability for β-cell neogenesis.

  15. Annular pancreas concurrent with pancreaticobiliary maljunction presented with symptoms until adult age: case report with comparative data on pediatric cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Annular pancreas (AP) concurrent with pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBMJ), an unusual coexisted congenital anomaly, often presented symptoms and subjected surgical treatment at the early age of life. We reported the first adult case of concurrent AP with PBMJ presented with symptoms until his twenties, and performed a literature review to analyze the clinicopathological features of such cases comparing with its pediatric counterpart. Case presentation The main clinical features of this case were abdominal pain and increased levels of plasma amylase as well as liver function test. A complete type of annular pancreas with duodenal stenosis was found, and dilated common bile duct with high confluence of pancreaticobiliary ducts was also observed. Meanwhile, extremely high levels of bile amylase were detected both in common bile duct and gallbladder. The patient received duodenojejunostomy (side-to-side anastomosis) as well as choledochojejunostomy (Roux-en-Y anastomosis), adnd was discharged in a good condition. Conclusion AP concurrent with PBMJ usually presents as duodenal obstruction in infancy, while manifests as pancreatitis in adulthood. Careful long-term follow-up is required for children with AP considering its association with PBMJ which would induce various intractable pathologic conditions in the biliary tract and pancreas. PMID:24156788

  16. Standardized bioenergetic profiling of adult mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Readnower, Ryan D; Brainard, Robert E; Hill, Bradford G; Jones, Steven P

    2012-12-18

    Mitochondria are at the crux of life and death and as such have become ideal targets of intervention in cardiovascular disease. Generally, current methods to measure mitochondrial dysfunction rely on working with the isolated organelle and fail to incorporate mitochondrial function in a cellular context. Extracellular flux methodology has been particularly advantageous in this respect; however, certain primary cell types, such as adult cardiac myocytes, have been difficult to standardize with this technology. Here, we describe methods for using extracellular flux (XF) analysis to measure mitochondrial bioenergetics in isolated, intact, adult mouse cardiomyocytes (ACMs). Following isolation, ACMs were seeded overnight onto laminin-coated (20 μg/ml) microplates, which resulted in high attachment efficiency. After establishing seeding density, we found that a commonly used assay medium (containing a supraphysiological concentration of pyruvate at 1 mmol/l) produced a maximal bioenergetic response. After performing a pyruvate dose-response, we determined that pyruvate titrated to 0.1 mmol/l was optimal for examining alternative substrate oxidation. Methods for measuring fatty acid oxidation were established. These methods lay the framework using XF analysis to profile metabolism of ACMs and will likely augment our ability to understand mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure and acute myocardial ischemia. This platform could easily be extended to models of diabetes or other metabolic defects.

  17. Cavernous hemangioma of adult pancreas: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Henkes, David; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic hemangioma is a rare type of benign vascular tumor. Low clinical suspicion and inability of current cross sectional imaging techniques to differentiate it from other pancreatic lesions, contribute to the difficulty in making the correct diagnosis. Without a definitive diagnosis, and due to concern for malignancy, in many instances, surgery is performed. We report a case of pancreas cavernous hemangioma in an 18-year-old female. The patient presented with three-month history of epigastric pain. Physical examination and routine blood tests were normal. Abdominal Computed Tomography scan revealed a 5 cm × 6 cm complex non-enhancing cystic mass in the head of pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and EUS guided fine needle aspiration cytology were non-diagnostic. Because of uncontrolled symptoms, the patient underwent surgical resection. Histopathology and Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of pancreas. PMID:26361427

  18. Metabolic Control With the Bio-inspired Artificial Pancreas in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Monika; Herrero, Pau; Sharkawy, Mohamed El; Pesl, Peter; Jugnee, Narvada; Pavitt, Darrell; Godsland, Ian F.; Alberti, George; Toumazou, Christofer; Johnston, Desmond G.; Georgiou, Pantelis; Oliver, Nick S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Bio-inspired Artificial Pancreas (BiAP) is a closed-loop insulin delivery system based on a mathematical model of beta-cell physiology and implemented in a microchip within a low-powered handheld device. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the BiAP over 24 hours, followed by a substudy assessing the safety of the algorithm without and with partial meal announcement. Changes in lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were investigated for the first time during closed-loop. Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled open-label crossover study. Participants were randomly assigned to attend either a 24-hour closed-loop visit connected to the BiAP system or a 24-hour open-loop visit (standard insulin pump therapy). The primary outcome was percentage time spent in target range (3.9-10 mmol/l) measured by sensor glucose. Secondary outcomes included percentage time in hypoglycemia (<3.9 mmol/l) and hyperglycemia (>10 mmol/l). Participants were invited to attend for an additional visit to assess the BiAP without and with partial meal announcements. Results: A total of 12 adults with type 1 diabetes completed the study (58% female, mean [SD] age 45 [10] years, BMI 25 [4] kg/m2, duration of diabetes 22 [12] years and HbA1c 7.4 [0.7]% [58 (8) mmol/mol]). The median (IQR) percentage time in target did not differ between closed-loop and open-loop (71% vs 66.9%, P = .9). Closed-loop reduced time spent in hypoglycemia from 17.9% to 3.0% (P < .01), but increased time was spent in hyperglycemia (10% vs 28.9%, P = .01). The percentage time in target was higher when all meals were announced during closed-loop compared to no or partial meal announcement (65.7% [53.6-80.5] vs 45.5% [38.2-68.3], P = .12). Conclusions: The BiAP is safe and achieved equivalent time in target as measured by sensor glucose, with improvement in hypoglycemia, when compared to standard pump therapy. PMID:26581881

  19. Annular pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001142.htm Annular pancreas To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An annular pancreas is a ring of pancreatic tissue that encircles ...

  20. Visualization of cancer-related chemical components in mouse pancreas tissue by tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yoichi; Satoh, Shuya; Naito, Junpei; Kyogaku, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is an informative approach for the comprehensive analysis of multiple components inside biological specimens. We used novel tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method to visualize cancer-related chemical components in the mouse pancreas tissue section at a sampling pitch of 100 µm. Positive ion mode measurements from m/z 100 to 1500 resulted in the visualization of multiple components that are tentatively assigned as polyamines, lipids and proteins. Their signal intensities inside the cancerous and the non-cancerous regions were found to be significantly different by the two-sample t-test.

  1. Partial annular pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gunjan; Mittal, Amit; Singal, Rikki; Singal, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Annular pancreas is a developmental anomaly that can be associated with other conditions such as Down syndrome, duodenal atresia, and Hirschsprung disease. A band of pancreatic tissue, in continuity with the pancreatic head, completely or incompletely encircles the descending duodenum, sometimes assuming a “crocodile jaw” configuration. We present the case of an adult who presented with epigastric pain and vomiting and was found to have annular pancreas. PMID:27695176

  2. Duct- to islet-cell differentiation and islet growth in the pancreas of duct-ligated adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, R N; Klöppel, G; Bouwens, L

    1995-12-01

    We investigated the growth of islet beta and alpha cells in adult rats which had undergone partial pancreatic duct ligation. Whereas the non-ligated head portion of the pancreas remained unaffected in terms of histology and cell population dynamics, the ligated tail part of the pancreas showed pronounced changes in histology and cell growth. These changes included replacement of exocrine acini by ductal complexes and significant growth of islet cells. Using immunocytochemistry and morphometry, we found that the beta-cell population had nearly doubled within 1 week and that a smaller, but also significant growth of the alpha-cell population had occurred. In addition, small islets and islet-cell clusters were more numerous in the pancreatic tail, indicating islet neogenesis. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse labelling index of beta and alpha cells increased five fold and threefold, respectively, in the tail. However, the observed beta-cell labelling index remained below 1% which was largely insufficient to explain the increased number of beta cells. This indicates that recruitment from a proliferating stem-cell compartment was the main source for the beta-cell hyperplasia. A tenfold-elevated BrdU labelling index (18%) was observed in the duct-cell compartment which was identified by specific immunostaining for cytokeratin 20. Transitional cytodifferentiation forms between duct cells expressing cytokeratin 20 and beta cells expressing insulin, or alpha cells expressing glucagon, were demonstrated by double immunostaining. Pancreatic duct ligation also induced the expression of the beta-cell-specific glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT-2) in duct cells, indicating their metaplastic state. We concluded that in this adult rat model, the proliferation and differentiation of exocrine duct cells represents the major mechanism of endocrine beta-cell neogenesis. Our study thus demonstrates that in normal adult rats islet-cell neogenesis can be reactivated by stimulation of

  3. Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, David ER

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is generally treated with oral diabetic drugs and/or insulin. However, the morbidity and mortality associated with this condition increases over time, even in patients receiving intensive insulin treatment, and this is largely attributable to diabetic complications or the insulin therapy itself. Pancreas transplantation in humans was first conducted in 1966, since when there has been much debate regarding the legitimacy of this procedure. Technical refinements and the development of better immunosuppressants and better postoperative care have brought about marked improvements in patient and graft survival and a reduction in postoperative morbidity. Consequently, pancreas transplantation has become the curative treatment modality for diabetes, particularly for type I diabetes. An overview of pancreas transplantation is provided herein, covering the history of pancreas transplantation, indications for transplantation, cadaveric and living donors, surgical techniques, immunosuppressants, and outcome following pancreas transplantation. The impact of successful pancreas transplantation on the complications of diabetes will also be reviewed briefly. PMID:21253293

  4. Protective effect of aqueous seed extract of Vitis Vinifera against oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the pancreas of adult male rats with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Adam, Siti Hajar; Giribabu, Nelli; Kassim, Normadiah; Kumar, Kilari Eswar; Brahmayya, Manuri; Arya, Aditya; Salleh, Naguib

    2016-07-01

    Protective effects of Vitis Vinifera seed aqueous extract (VVSAE) against pancreatic dysfunctions and elevation of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the pancreas in diabetes were investigated. Histopathological changes in the pancreas were examined under light microscope. Blood and pancreas were collected from adult male diabetic rats receiving 28days treatment with VVSAE orally. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin and lipid profile levels and activity levels of anti-oxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase-SOD, catalase-CAT and glutathione peroxidase-GPx) in the pancreas were determined by biochemical assays. Histopathological changes in the pancreas were examined under light microscopy and levels of insulin, glucose transporter (GLUT)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, Ikkβ and caspase-3 mRNA and protein were analyzed by real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry respectively. Radical scavenging activity of VVSAE was evaluated by in-vitro anti-oxidant assay while gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to identify the major compounds in the extract. GC-MS analyses indicated the presence of compounds that might exert anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis effects. Near normal FBG, HbAIc, lipid profile and serum insulin levels with lesser signs of pancreatic destruction were observed following administration of VVSAE to diabetic rats. Higher insulin, GLUT-2, SOD, CAT and GPx levels but lower TNF-α, Ikkβ and caspase-3 levels were also observed in the pancreas of VVSAE-treated diabetic rats (p<0.05 compared to non-treated diabetic rats). The extract possesses high in-vitro radical scavenging activities. In conclusions, administration of VVSAE to diabetic rats could help to protect the pancreas against oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis-induced damage while preserving pancreatic function near normal in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Vascular development in the vertebrate pancreas.

    PubMed

    Azizoglu, D Berfin; Chong, Diana C; Villasenor, Alethia; Magenheim, Judith; Barry, David M; Lee, Simon; Marty-Santos, Leilani; Fu, Stephen; Dor, Yuval; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-12-01

    The vertebrate pancreas is comprised of a highly branched tubular epithelium, which is intimately associated with an extensive and specialized vasculature. While we know a great deal about basic vascular anatomy of the adult pancreas, as well as islet capillaries, surprisingly little is known about the ontogeny of its blood vessels. Here, we analyze development of the pancreatic vasculature in the mouse embryo. We show that pancreatic epithelial branches intercalate with the fine capillary plexus of the surrounding pancreatic mesenchyme. Endothelial cells (ECs) within this mesenchyme are heterogeneous from the onset of organogenesis. Pancreatic arteries take shape before veins, in a manner analogous to early embryonic vessels. The main central artery forms during mid-gestation, as a result of vessel coalescence and remodeling of a vascular plexus. In addition, we show that vessels in the forming pancreas display a predictable architecture that is dependent on VEGF signaling. Over-expression of VEGF disrupts vascular patterning and arteriovenous differentiation within the developing pancreas. This study constitutes a first-time in-depth cellular and molecular characterization of pancreatic blood vessels, as they coordinately grow along with the pancreatic epithelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell Proliferation and Neurogenesis in Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bordiuk, Olivia L.; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J.; Semënov, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain. PMID:25375658

  7. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  8. Outpatient 60-hour day-and-night glucose control with dual-hormone artificial pancreas, single-hormone artificial pancreas, or sensor-augmented pump therapy in adults with type 1 diabetes: An open-label, randomised, crossover, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Ahmad; Messier, Virginie; Legault, Laurent; Ladouceur, Martin; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2017-05-01

    To assess whether the dual-hormone (insulin and glucagon) artificial pancreas reduces hypoglycaemia compared to the single-hormone (insulin alone) artificial pancreas in outpatient settings during the day and night. In a randomized, three-way, crossover trial we compared the dual-hormone artificial pancreas, the single-hormone artificial pancreas and sensor-augmented pump therapy (control) in 23 adults with type 1 diabetes. Each intervention was applied from 8 AM Day 1 to 8 PM Day 3 (60 hours) in outpatient free-living conditions. The primary outcome was time spent with sensor glucose levels below 4.0 mmol/L. A P value of less than .017 was regarded as significant. The median difference between the dual-hormone system and the single-hormone system was -2.3% (P = .072) for time spent below 4.0 mmol/L, -1.3% (P = .017) for time below 3.5 mmol/L, and -0.7% (P = .031) for time below 3.3 mmol/L. Both systems reduced (P < .017) hypoglycaemia below 4.0, 3.5 and 3.3 mmol/L compared to control therapy, but reductions were larger with the dual-hormone system than with the single-hormone system (medians -4.0% vs -3.4% for 4.0 mmol/L; -2.7% vs -2.2% for 3.5 mmol/L; and -2.2% vs -1.2% for 3.3 mmol/L). There were 34 hypoglycaemic events (<3.0 mmol/L for 20 minutes) with control therapy, 14 with the single-hormone system and 6 with the dual-hormone system. These differences in hypoglycaemia were observed while mean glucose level was low and comparable in all interventions (P = NS). The dual-hormone artificial pancreas had the lowest risk of hypoglycaemia, but the differences were not statistically significant. Larger studies are needed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Colony-forming progenitor cells in the postnatal mouse liver and pancreas give rise to morphologically distinct insulin-expressing colonies in 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Feng, Tao; Chai, Jing; Ghazalli, Nadiah; Gao, Dan; Zerda, Ricardo; Li, Zhuo; Hsu, Jasper; Mahdavi, Alborz; Tirrell, David A; Riggs, Arthur D; Ku, Hsun Teresa

    2014-01-01

    In our previous studies, colony-forming progenitor cells isolated from murine embryonic stem cell-derived cultures were differentiated into morphologically distinct insulin-expressing colonies. These colonies were small and not light-reflective when observed by phase-contrast microscopy (therefore termed "Dark" colonies). A single progenitor cell capable of giving rise to a Dark colony was termed a Dark colony-forming unit (CFU-Dark). The goal of the current study was to test whether endogenous pancreas, and its developmentally related liver, harbored CFU-Dark. Here we show that dissociated single cells from liver and pancreas of one-week-old mice give rise to Dark colonies in methylcellulose-based semisolid culture media containing either Matrigel or laminin hydrogel (an artificial extracellular matrix protein). CFU-Dark comprise approximately 0.1% and 0.03% of the postnatal hepatic and pancreatic cells, respectively. Adult liver also contains CFU-Dark, but at a much lower frequency (~0.003%). Microfluidic qRT-PCR, immunostaining, and electron microscopy analyses of individually handpicked colonies reveal the expression of insulin in many, but not all, Dark colonies. Most pancreatic insulin-positive Dark colonies also express glucagon, whereas liver colonies do not. Liver CFU-Dark require Matrigel, but not laminin hydrogel, to become insulin-positive. In contrast, laminin hydrogel is sufficient to support the development of pancreatic Dark colonies that express insulin. Postnatal liver CFU-Dark display a cell surface marker CD133⁺CD49f(low)CD107b(low) phenotype, while pancreatic CFU-Dark are CD133⁻. Together, these results demonstrate that specific progenitor cells in the postnatal liver and pancreas are capable of developing into insulin-expressing colonies, but they differ in frequency, marker expression, and matrix protein requirements for growth.

  10. A Comprehensive Atlas of the Adult Mouse Penis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tiffany R.; Wright, David K.; Gradie, Paul E.; Johnston, Leigh A.; Pask, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Mice are routinely used to study the development of the external genitalia and, in particular, the process of male urethral closure. This is because misplacement of the male penile urethra, or hypospadias, is amongst the most common birth defects reported in humans. While mice present a tractable model to study penile development, several structures differ between mice and humans, and there is a lack of consensus in the literature on their annotation and developmental origins. Defining the ontology of the mouse prepuce is especially important for the relevance and interpretation of mouse models of hypospadias to human conditions. We have developed a detailed annotation of the adult mouse penis that addresses these differences and enables an accurate comparison of murine and human hypospadias phenotypes. Through MRI data, gross morphology and section histology, we define the origin of the mouse external and internal prepuces, their relationship to the single human foreskin as well as provide a comprehensive view of the various structures of the mouse penis and their associated muscle attachments within the body. These data are combined to annotate structures in a novel 3D adult penis atlas that can be downloaded, viewed at any angle, and manipulated to examine the relationship of various structures. PMID:26112156

  11. A Comprehensive Atlas of the Adult Mouse Penis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tiffany R; Wright, David K; Gradie, Paul E; Johnston, Leigh A; Pask, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Mice are routinely used to study the development of the external genitalia and, in particular, the process of male urethral closure. This is because misplacement of the male penile urethra, or hypospadias, is amongst the most common birth defects reported in humans. While mice present a tractable model to study penile development, several structures differ between mice and humans, and there is a lack of consensus in the literature on their annotation and developmental origins. Defining the ontology of the mouse prepuce is especially important for the relevance and interpretation of mouse models of hypospadias to human conditions. We have developed a detailed annotation of the adult mouse penis that addresses these differences and enables an accurate comparison of murine and human hypospadias phenotypes. Through MRI data, gross morphology and section histology, we define the origin of the mouse external and internal prepuces, their relationship to the single human foreskin as well as provide a comprehensive view of the various structures of the mouse penis and their associated muscle attachments within the body. These data are combined to annotate structures in a novel 3D adult penis atlas that can be downloaded, viewed at any angle, and manipulated to examine the relationship of various structures. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Artifical Pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jiangfeng

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, JDRF launched the Artificial Pancreas Project (APP) to accelerate the development of a commercially-viable artificial pancreas system to closely mimic the biological function of the pancreas individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes. By automating detection of blood sugar levels and delivery of insulin in response to those levels, an artificial pancreas has the potential to transform the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. The 6-step APP development pathway serves as JDRF's APP strategic funding plan and defines the priorities of product research and development. Each step in the plan represents incremental advances in automation beginning with devices that shut off insulin delivery to prevent episodes of low blood sugar and progressing ultimately to a fully automated ``closed loop'' system that maintains blood glucose at a target level without the need to bolus for meals or adjust for exercise.

  13. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Association Events Messaging Tools Recruiting Advocates Local Market Planning Training Webinars News & Events Advocacy News Call ... risky. Each person needs to carefully weigh the potential benefits and risks. Benefits of Pancreas Transplants You ...

  14. Pancreas divisum

    MedlinePlus

    ... it. Alternative Names Pancreatic divisum Images Digestive system Endocrine glands Pancreas References Forsmark CE. Pancreatitis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  15. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical Therapy . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:511-5. Gruessner AC, Gruessner RWG. Pancreas and kidney transplantation for diabetic nephropathy. In: Morris PJ, Knechtle SJ, eds. Kidney Transplantation: ...

  16. New Insights on the Morphology of Adult Mouse Penis1

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Esequiel; Weiss, Dana A.; Yang, Jennifer H.; Menshenina, Julia; Ferretti, Max; Cunha, Tristan J.; Barcellos, Dale; Chan, Lok Yun; Risbridger, Gail; Cunha, Gerald R.; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adult mouse penis represents the end point of masculine sex differentiation of the embryonic genital tubercle and contains bone, cartilage, the urethra, erectile bodies, several types of epithelium, and many individual cell types arrayed into specific anatomical structures. Using contemporary high-resolution imaging techniques, we sought to provide new insights to the current description of adult mouse penile morphology to enable understanding of penile abnormalities, including hypospadias. Examination of serial transverse and longitudinal sections, scanning electron microscopy, and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction provided a new appreciation of the individual structures in the adult mouse penis and their 3D interrelationships. In so doing, we discovered novel paired erectile bodies, the male urogenital mating protuberance (MUMP), and more accurately described the urethral meatus. These morphological observations were quantified by morphometric analysis and now provide accurate morphological end points of sex differentiation of mouse penis that will be the foundation of future studies to identify normal and abnormal penile development. PMID:21918128

  17. Relatively high rates of G:C → A:T transitions at CpG sites were observed in certain epithelial tissues including pancreas and submaxillary gland of adult big blue® mice.

    PubMed

    Prtenjaca, Anita; Tarnowski, Heather E; Marr, Alison M; Heney, Melanie A; Creamer, Laura; Sathiamoorthy, Sarmitha; Hill, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    With few exceptions, spontaneous mutation frequency and pattern are similar across tissue types and relatively constant in young to middle adulthood in wild type mice. Underrepresented in surveys of spontaneous mutations across murine tissues is the diversity of epithelial tissues. For the first time, spontaneous mutations were detected in pancreas and submaxillary gland and compared with kidney, lung, and male germ cells from five adult male Big Blue® mice. Mutation load was assessed quantitatively through measurement of mutant and mutation frequency and qualitatively through identification of mutations and characterization of recurrent mutations, multiple mutations, mutation pattern, and mutation spectrum. A total of 9.6 million plaque forming units were screened, 226 mutants were collected, and 196 independent mutations were identified. Four novel mutations were discovered. Spontaneous mutation frequency was low in pancreas and high in the submaxillary gland. The submaxillary gland had multiple recurrent mutations in each of the mice and one mutant had two independent mutations. Mutation patterns for epithelial tissues differed from that observed in male germ cells with a striking bias for G:C to A:T transitions at CpG sites. A comprehensive review of lacI spontaneous mutation patterns in young adult mice and rats identified additional examples of this mutational bias. An overarching observation about spontaneous mutation frequency in adult tissues of the mouse remains one of stability. A repeated observation in certain epithelial tissues is a higher rate of G:C to A:T transitions at CpG sites and the underlying mechanisms for this bias are not known.

  18. The fetal/neonatal mouse liver exhibits transcriptional features of the adult pancreas.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver’s ability to detoxify and eliminate xenobiotics through the expression of xenobiotic metabolism enxymes (XME). The fetus and neonate have been hypothesized to exhibit increased sensitivity to xenobiotic toxicity. T...

  19. The fetal/neonatal mouse liver exhibits transcriptional features of the adult pancreas.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver’s ability to detoxify and eliminate xenobiotics through the expression of xenobiotic metabolism enxymes (XME). The fetus and neonate have been hypothesized to exhibit increased sensitivity to xenobiotic toxicity. T...

  20. Organ Facts: Kidney / Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Kidney/Pancreas Facts The kidneys are a pair of reddish- ... the chemical (electrolyte) composition of the blood. The pancreas is a five to six inch gland located ...

  1. Nonproliferative and Proliferative Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Pancreas and Salivary Glands of the Rat and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Thomas; Brander-Weber, Patricia; Dangler, Charles; Deschl, Ulrich; Elwell, Michael R.; Greaves, Peter; Hailey, Richard; Leach, Michael W.; Pandiri, Arun R.; Rogers, Arlin; Shackelford, Cynthia C.; Spencer, Andrew; Tanaka, Takuji; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2016-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) project is a joint initiative of the Societies of Toxicologic Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP), and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for nonproliferative and proliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for classifying lesions in the digestive system including the salivary glands and the exocrine pancreas of laboratory rats and mice. Most lesions are illustrated by color photomicrographs. The standardized nomenclature, the diagnostic criteria, and the photomicrographs are also available electronically on the Internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material included histopathology databases from government, academia, and industrial laboratories throughout the world. Content includes spontaneous and age related lesions as well as lesions induced by exposure to test items. Relevant infectious and parasitic lesions are included as well. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for the digestive system will decrease misunderstandings among regulatory and scientific research organizations in different countries and provide a common language to increase and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists. PMID:26973378

  2. Microvesicles but Not Exosomes from Pathfinder Cells Stimulate Functional Recovery of the Pancreas in a Mouse Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Model.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Dagmara; Anthony, Diana F; Moulisova, Vladimira; MacDonald, Alasdair I; MacIntyre, Alan; Thomson, Jacqueline; Nag, Abhijeet; Davies, R Wayne; Shiels, Paul G

    2016-06-01

    Pathfinder cells (PCs), a novel cell type derived from the pancreas of adult rats, have been demonstrated to stimulate recovery of tissue structure and function in two animal models of acute tissue damage to date-streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and ischemia-reperfusion damage to the kidney. In repaired tissue, PCs and their progeny typically represent only 0.02% of the repaired tissue, suggesting that they act via a paracrine mechanism on native cells in the damaged area. Extracellular vesicles are strong candidates for mediating such a paracrine effect. Therefore, we studied the effects of two PC-derived extracellular vesicle fractions on tissue repair in the STZ diabetes model, one containing primarily microvesicles and the second containing predominantly exosomes. Treatment of STZ-induced diabetic mice with the microvesicles preparation led to blood glucose, insulin, glucagon, and C-peptide levels similar to those found with PC treatment. Furthermore, analysis of the histopathology of the pancreas indicated islet regeneration. In contrast, the exosome fraction demonstrated no repair activity, and STZ diabetic mice treated with exosome preparations had blood glucose values that were indistinguishable from those of vehicle-only treated controls. Therefore, we conclude that exosomes play no part in PC action as detected by this assay, whereas microvesicles provide all or a large component of the paracrine activity of PCs. Because they act to stimulate repair of multiple tissues, PC-derived microvesicles may similarly have the potential to stimulate repair of many damaged tissues, identifying a very significant cell-free therapeutic opportunity in regenerative medicine.

  3. In Vitro Spermatogenesis in Explanted Adult Mouse Testis Tissues.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takuya; Katagiri, Kumiko; Kojima, Kazuaki; Komeya, Mitsuru; Yao, Masahiro; Ogawa, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Research on in vitro spermatogenesis is important for elucidating the spermatogenic mechanism. We previously developed an organ culture method which can support spermatogenesis from spermatogonial stem cells up to sperm formation using immature mouse testis tissues. In this study, we examined whether it is also applicable to mature testis tissues of adult mice. We used two lines of transgenic mice, Acrosin-GFP and Gsg2-GFP, which carry the marker GFP gene specific for meiotic and haploid cells, respectively. Testis tissue fragments of adult GFP mice, aged from 4 to 29 weeks old, which express GFP at full extension, were cultured in medium supplemented with 10% KSR or AlbuMAX. GFP expression decreased rapidly and became the lowest at 7 to 14 days of culture, but then slightly increased during the following culture period. This increase reflected de novo spermatogenesis, confirmed by BrdU labeling in spermatocytes and spermatids. We also used vitamin A-deficient mice, whose testes contain only spermatogonia. The testes of those mice at 13-21 weeks old, showing no GFP expression at explantation, gained GFP expression during culturing, and spermatogenesis was confirmed histologically. In addition, the adult testis tissues of Sl/Sld mutant mice, which lack spermatogenesis due to Kit ligand mutation, were cultured with recombinant Kit ligand to induce spermatogenesis up to haploid formation. Although the efficiency of spermatogenesis was lower than that of pup, present results showed that the organ culture method is effective for the culturing of mature adult mouse testis tissue, demonstrated by the induction of spermatogenesis from spermatogonia to haploid cells.

  4. Phytoestrogens are partial estrogen agonists in the adult male mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Mäkelä, S; Santti, R; Salo, L; McLachlan, J A

    1995-01-01

    The intake, as well as serum and urinary concentrations, of phytoestrogens is high in countries where incidence of prostate cancer is low, suggesting a chemopreventive role for phytoestrogens. Their significance could be explained by the ability to antagonize the action of more potent endogenous estrogens in initiation or promotion of tumor formation. We have studied estrogenicity and antiestrogenicity of dietary soy and two phytoestrogens, coumestrol and daidzein, in our neoDES mouse model for the study or prostatic neoplasia. Soy was chosen because it is rich in phytoestrogens, is widely used in Oriental diets, and has antiestrogenic and anticarcinogenic properties in the neoDES mouse when given from fertilization onward. In short-term tests with adult animals, no evidence for estrogenicity or antiestrogenicity (capability to antagonize the action of 17 beta-estradiol) of soy was found when development of epithelial metaplasia and expression of c-fos protooncogene in prostate were used as end points of estrogen action. Estrogenic activity of coumestrol and daidzein on c-fos expression was subtle. Coumestrol, either given alone or in combination with 17 beta-estradiol, had no effect on development of epithelial metaplasia. These marginal or missing effects in adult males could be interpreted by assuming that the neonatal period is more critical for estrogenic or antiestrogenic action of soy and phytoestrogens. Once initiated, estrogen-related lesions would develop spontaneously. Alternatively, the chemopreventive action of soy is not due to antiestrogenicity of soy-derived phytoestrogens. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:8593857

  5. Electrophysiological Properties of Subventricular Zone Cells in Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Bin; Mao, Xiao Ou; Xie, Lin; Chang, Su-Youne; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Jin, Kunlin; Greenberg, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is a principal site of adult neurogenesis and appears to participate in the brain’s response to injury. Thus, measures that enhance SVZ neurogenesis may have a role in treatment of neurological disease. To better characterize SVZ cells and identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention, we studied electrophysiological properties of SVZ cells in adult mouse brain slices using patch-clamp techniques. Electrophysiology was correlated with immunohistochemical phenotype by injecting cells with lucifer yellow and by studying transgenic mice carrying green fluorescent protein under control of the doublecortin (DCX) or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. We identified five types of cells in the adult mouse SVZ: type 1 cells, with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)/tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive and CdCl2-sensitive inward currents; type 2 cells, with Ca2+-sensitive K+ and both 4-AP/TEA-sensitive and -insensitive currents; type 3 cells, with 4-AP/TEA-sensitive and -insensitive and small Na+ currents; type 4 cells, with slowly activating, large linear outward current and sustained outward current without fast-inactivating component; and type 5 cells, with a large outward rectifying current with a fast inactivating component. Type 2 and 3 cells expressed DCX, types 4 and 5 cells expressed GFAP, and type 1 cells expressed neither. We propose that SVZ neurogenesis involves a progression of electrophysiological cell phenotypes from types 4 and 5 cells (astrocytes) to type 1 cells (neuronal progenitors) to types 2 and 3 cells (nascent neurons), and that drugs acting on. ion channels expressed during neurogenesis might promote therapeutic neurogenesis in the injured brain. PMID:20434436

  6. National Pancreas Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... NPF Centers Animated Pancreas Patient About the Pancreas Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Children/Pediatric Other Pancreas ... Providing hope to those suffering from pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Support Pancreatic Research Slide2 Providing hope to those ...

  7. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 761x736 ... View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows the ...

  8. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  9. Aquaporins in the adult mouse submandibular and sublingual salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Aure, Marit H; Ruus, Ann-Kristin; Galtung, Hilde K

    2014-02-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) is a family of membrane bound water channels found in most tissues. In addition to contribute to transepithelial water movement, AQPs are shown to be involved in a variety of processes such as proliferation, cell migration, and apoptosis. In salivary glands, it is well known that AQP5 plays an important role in fluid secretion. In recent years, several AQPs that demonstrate specific expression trends during development have been found in the mouse submandibular gland (SMG). In this study, we wanted to further investigate the presence and localization of the AQP family in the adult mouse SMG in addition to the less studied sublingual gland. Real time PCR and Western blot demonstrated the presence of AQP3, 4, 8, 9, and 11 transcripts and proteins. AQP1 and AQP7 were shown to be localized in endothelial cells, while AQP4 was found in the satellite cells of the parasympathetic ganglia in both glands. The result from this study shows that AQPs are found in defined subpopulations of cells in salivary glands, providing novel insights to their specific roles in salivary glands.

  10. Retinoids in the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Pierre-Jacques; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A and its natural and synthetic analogs) are required by most tissues for maintaining the normal health of the tissue. This is certainly true for the pancreas. The recent literature is convincing that retinoids are needed by the adult to assure normal pancreatic endocrine functions, especially those of the α- and β-cells. It is also well established that retinoids are required to insure normal pancreas development in utero, including the development of the endocrine pancreas. The actions of retinoids for maintaining normal pancreatic islet functions has drawn considerable research interest from investigators interested in understanding and treating metabolic disease. Pancreatic retinoids are also of interest to investigators studying the origins of pancreatic disease, including the development of pancreatic fibrosis and its sequelae. This research interest is focused on pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) which store retinoids and possess the metabolic machinery needed to metabolize retinoids. The literature on pancreatic disease and retinoids suggests that there is an association between impairments in pancreatic retinoid storage and metabolism and the development of pancreatic disease. These topics will be considered in this review. PMID:26904552

  11. Function of GATA Factors in the Adult Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rena; Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Zong, Yiwei; Wang, Liqing; Russo, Pierre; Hancock, Wayne; Stanger, Ben Z.; Hardison, Ross C.; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2013-01-01

    GATA transcription factors and their Friend of Gata (FOG) cofactors control the development of diverse tissues. GATA4 and GATA6 are essential for the expansion of the embryonic liver bud, but their expression patterns and functions in the adult liver are unclear. We characterized the expression of GATA and FOG factors in whole mouse liver and purified hepatocytes. GATA4, GATA6, and FOG1 are the most prominently expressed family members in whole liver and hepatocytes. GATA4 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 4409 occupied sites, associated with genes enriched in ontologies related to liver function, including lipid and glucose metabolism. However, hepatocyte-specific excision of Gata4 had little impact on gross liver architecture and function, even under conditions of regenerative stress, and, despite the large number of GATA4 occupied genes, resulted in relatively few changes in gene expression. To address possible redundancy between GATA4 and GATA6, both factors were conditionally excised. Surprisingly, combined Gata4,6 loss did not exacerbate the phenotype resulting from Gata4 loss alone. This points to the presence of an unusually robust transcriptional network in adult hepatocytes that ensures the maintenance of liver function. PMID:24367609

  12. Doublecortin in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Jenna J.; Messier, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein.Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, but at a lower level of expression than in neuronal precursor.Doublecortin is not associated with a potential immature neuronal phenotype in Oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are glial cells that differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes during embryogenesis and early stages of post-natal life. OPCs continue to divide throughout adulthood and some eventually differentiate into oligodendrocytes in response to demyelinating lesions. There is growing evidence that OPCs are also involved in activity-driven de novo myelination of previously unmyelinated axons and myelin remodeling in adulthood. Considering these roles in the adult brain, OPCs are likely mobile cells that can migrate on some distances before they differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. A number of studies have noted that OPCs express doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in neural precursor cells and in migrating immature neurons. Here we describe the distribution of DCX in OPCs. We found that almost all OPCs express DCX, but the level of expression appears to be much lower than what is found in neural precursor. We found that DCX is downregulated when OPCs start expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and is absent in myelinating oligodendrocytes. DCX does not appear to signal an immature neuronal phenotype in OPCs in the adult mouse brain. Rather, it could be involved either in cell migration, or as a marker of an immature oligodendroglial cell phenotype. PMID:28400715

  13. Efficacy of single-hormone and dual-hormone artificial pancreas during continuous and interval exercise in adult patients with type 1 diabetes: randomised controlled crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Taleb, Nadine; Emami, Ali; Suppere, Corinne; Messier, Virginie; Legault, Laurent; Ladouceur, Martin; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Haidar, Ahmad; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the dual-hormone (insulin and glucagon) artificial pancreas reduces hypoglycaemia compared with the single-hormone (insulin alone) artificial pancreas during two types of exercise. An open-label randomised crossover study comparing both systems in 17 adults with type 1 diabetes (age, 37.2 ± 13.6 years; HbA1c, 8.0 ± 1.0% [63.9 ± 10.2 mmol/mol]) during two exercise types on an ergocycle and matched for energy expenditure: continuous (60% [Formula: see text] for 60 min) and interval (2 min alternating periods at 85% and 50% [Formula: see text] for 40 min, with two 10 min periods at 45% [Formula: see text] at the start and end of the session). Blocked randomisation (size of four) with a 1:1:1:1 allocation ratio was computer generated. The artificial pancreas was applied from 15:30 hours until 19:30 hours; exercise was started at 18:00 hours and announced 20 min earlier to the systems. The study was conducted at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal. During single-hormone control compared with dual-hormone control, exercise-induced hypoglycaemia (plasma glucose <3.3 mmol/l with symptoms or <3.0 mmol/l regardless of symptoms) was observed in four (23.5%) vs two (11.8%) interventions (p = 0.5) for continuous exercise and in six (40%) vs one (6.25%) intervention (p = 0.07) for interval exercise. For the pooled analysis (single vs dual hormone), the median (interquartile range) percentage time spent at glucose levels below 4.0 mmol/l was 11% (0.0-46.7%) vs 0% (0-0%; p = 0.0001) and at glucose levels between 4.0 and 10.0 mmol/l was 71.4% (53.2-100%) vs 100% (100-100%; p = 0.003). Higher doses of glucagon were needed during continuous (0.126 ± 0.057 mg) than during interval exercise (0.093 ± 0.068 mg) (p = 0.03), with no reported side-effects in all interventions. The dual-hormone artificial pancreas outperformed the single-hormone artificial pancreas in

  14. Mouse xenograft modeling of human adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia provides mechanistic insights into adult LIC biology

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Aditi; Castleton, Anna Z.; Schwab, Claire; Samuel, Edward; Sivakumaran, Janani; Beaton, Brendan; Zareian, Nahid; Zhang, Christie Yu; Rai, Lena; Enver, Tariq; Moorman, Anthony V.; Fielding, Adele K.

    2014-01-01

    The distinct nature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults, evidenced by inferior treatment outcome and different genetic landscape, mandates specific studies of disease-initiating mechanisms. In this study, we used NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγ nullc (NSG) mouse xenotransplantation approaches to elucidate leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) biology in primary adult precursor B (pre-B) ALL to optimize disease modeling. In contrast with xenografting studies of pediatric ALL, we found that modification of the NSG host environment using preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) was indispensable for efficient engraftment of adult non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL, whereas t(4;11) pre-B ALL was successfully reconstituted without this adaptation. Furthermore, TBI-based xenotransplantation of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL enabled detection of a high frequency of LICs (<1:6900) and permitted frank leukemic engraftment from a remission sample containing drug-resistant minimal residual disease. Investigation of TBI-sensitive stromal-derived factor-1/chemokine receptor type 4 signaling revealed greater functional dependence of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL on this niche-based interaction, providing a possible basis for the differential engraftment behavior. Thus, our studies establish the optimal conditions for experimental modeling of human adult pre-B ALL and demonstrate the critical protumorogenic role of microenvironment-derived SDF-1 in regulating adult pre-B LIC activity that may present a therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24825861

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Severity Affects Neurogenesis in Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Gao, Xiang; Michalski, Stephanie; Zhao, Shu; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-04-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been proven to enhance neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, various groups have reported contradictory results on whether TBI increases neurogenesis, partially due to a wide range in the severities of injuries seen with different TBI models. To address whether the severity of TBI affects neurogenesis in the injured brain, we assessed neurogenesis in mouse brains receiving different severities of controlled cortical impact (CCI) with the same injury device. The mice were subjected to mild, moderate, or severe TBI by a CCI device. The effects of TBI severity on neurogenesis were evaluated at three stages: NSC proliferation, immature neurons, and newly-generated mature neurons. The results showed that mild TBI did not affect neurogenesis at any of the three stages. Moderate TBI promoted NSC proliferation without increasing neurogenesis. Severe TBI increased neurogenesis at all three stages. Our data suggest that the severity of injury affects adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and thus it may partially explain the inconsistent results of different groups regarding neurogenesis following TBI. Further understanding the mechanism of TBI-induced neurogenesis may provide a potential approach for using endogenous NSCs to protect against neuronal loss after trauma.

  16. The Adult Mouse Anatomical Dictionary: a tool for annotating and integrating data.

    PubMed

    Hayamizu, Terry F; Mangan, Mary; Corradi, John P; Kadin, James A; Ringwald, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an ontology to provide standardized nomenclature for anatomical terms in the postnatal mouse. The Adult Mouse Anatomical Dictionary is structured as a directed acyclic graph, and is organized hierarchically both spatially and functionally. The ontology will be used to annotate and integrate different types of data pertinent to anatomy, such as gene expression patterns and phenotype information, which will contribute to an integrated description of biological phenomena in the mouse.

  17. The Adult Mouse Anatomical Dictionary: a tool for annotating and integrating data

    PubMed Central

    Hayamizu, Terry F; Mangan, Mary; Corradi, John P; Kadin, James A; Ringwald, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an ontology to provide standardized nomenclature for anatomical terms in the postnatal mouse. The Adult Mouse Anatomical Dictionary is structured as a directed acyclic graph, and is organized hierarchically both spatially and functionally. The ontology will be used to annotate and integrate different types of data pertinent to anatomy, such as gene expression patterns and phenotype information, which will contribute to an integrated description of biological phenomena in the mouse. PMID:15774030

  18. Estrogen Receptor α Regulates β-Cell Formation During Pancreas Development and Following Injury.

    PubMed

    Yuchi, Yixing; Cai, Ying; Legein, Bart; De Groef, Sofie; Leuckx, Gunter; Coppens, Violette; Van Overmeire, Eva; Staels, Willem; De Leu, Nico; Martens, Geert; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; Heimberg, Harry; Van de Casteele, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Identifying pathways for β-cell generation is essential for cell therapy in diabetes. We investigated the potential of 17β-estradiol (E2) and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling for stimulating β-cell generation during embryonic development and in the severely injured adult pancreas. E2 concentration, ER activity, and number of ERα transcripts were enhanced in the pancreas injured by partial duct ligation (PDL) along with nuclear localization of ERα in β-cells. PDL-induced proliferation of β-cells depended on aromatase activity. The activation of Neurogenin3 (Ngn3) gene expression and β-cell growth in PDL pancreas were impaired when ERα was turned off chemically or genetically (ERα(-/-)), whereas in situ delivery of E2 promoted β-cell formation. In the embryonic pancreas, β-cell replication, number of Ngn3(+) progenitor cells, and expression of key transcription factors of the endocrine lineage were decreased by ERα inactivation. The current study reveals that E2 and ERα signaling can drive β-cell replication and formation in mouse pancreas.

  19. Getting a New Pancreas: Facts about Pancreas Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1, 2003 December 2006 March 2012 Getting A New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants American Society of ... represent the views of the Society. _________________________________________________________________ Getting a New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants When you get ...

  20. What Is the Pancreas?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer The Pancreas Parts of ...

  1. Pancreas transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100129.htm Pancreas transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 6 out of 6 Overview The pancreas resides in the back of the abdomen. It ...

  2. Annular pancreas (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Annular pancreas is an abnormal ring or collar of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum (the part of the ... intestine that connects to stomach). This portion of pancreas can constrict the duodenum and block or impair ...

  3. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in adults: A shared position statement of the Italian association for the study of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Andriulli, Angelo; Bassi, Claudio; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Cantore, Maurizio; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Falconi, Massimo; Frulloni, Luca

    2013-01-01

    This is a medical position statement developed by the Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency collaborative group which is a part of the Italian Association for the Study of the Pancreas (AISP). We covered the main diseases associated with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) which are of common interest to internists/gastroenterologists, oncologists and surgeons, fully aware that EPI may also occur together with many other diseases, but less frequently. A preliminary manuscript based on an extended literature search (Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar) of published reports was prepared, and key recommendations were proposed. The evidence was discussed at a dedicated meeting in Bologna during the National Meeting of the Association in October 2012. Each of the proposed recommendations and algorithms was discussed and an initial consensus was reached. The final draft of the manuscript was then sent to the AISP Council for approval and/or modification. All concerned parties approved the final version of the manuscript in June 2013. PMID:24307787

  4. The gene expression profile of CD11c+ CD8α- dendritic cells in the pre-diabetic pancreas of the NOD mouse.

    PubMed

    Beumer, Wouter; Welzen-Coppens, Jojanneke M C; van Helden-Meeuwsen, Cornelia G; Gibney, Sinead M; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Versnel, Marjan A

    2014-01-01

    Two major dendritic cell (DC) subsets have been described in the pancreas of mice: The CD11c+ CD8α- DCs (strong CD4+ T cell proliferation inducers) and the CD8α+ CD103+ DCs (T cell apoptosis inducers). Here we analyzed the larger subset of CD11c+ CD8α- DCs isolated from the pancreas of pre-diabetic NOD mice for genome-wide gene expression (validated by Q-PCR) to elucidate abnormalities in underlying gene expression networks. CD11c+ CD8α- DCs were isolated from 5 week old NOD and control C57BL/6 pancreas. The steady state pancreatic NOD CD11c+ CD8α- DCs showed a reduced expression of several gene networks important for the prime functions of these cells, i.e. for cell renewal, immune tolerance induction, migration and for the provision of growth factors including those for beta cell regeneration. A functional in vivo BrdU incorporation test showed the reduced proliferation of steady state pancreatic DC. The reduced expression of tolerance induction genes (CD200R, CCR5 and CD24) was supported on the protein level by flow cytometry. Also previously published functional tests on maturation, immune stimulation and migration confirm the molecular deficits of NOD steady state DC. Despite these deficiencies NOD pancreas CD11c+ CD8α- DCs showed a hyperreactivity to LPS, which resulted in an enhanced pro-inflammatory state characterized by a gene profile of an enhanced expression of a number of classical inflammatory cytokines. The enhanced up-regulation of inflammatory genes was supported by the in vitro cytokine production profile of the DCs. In conclusion, our data show that NOD pancreatic CD11c+ CD8α- DCs show various deficiencies in steady state, while hyperreactive when encountering a danger signal such as LPS.

  5. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  6. Prostaglandin E2 Regulates Liver versus Pancreas Cell Fate Decisions and Endodermal Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Nissim, Sahar; Sherwood, Richard I.; Wucherpfennig, Julia; Saunders, Diane; Harris, James M.; Esain, Virginie; Carroll, Kelli J.; Frechette, Gregory M.; Kim, Andrew J.; Hwang, Katie L.; Cutting, Claire C.; Elledge, Susanna; North, Trista E.; Goessling, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The liver and pancreas arise from common endodermal progenitors. How these distinct cell fates are specified is poorly understood. Here, we describe prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a regulator of endodermal fate specification during development. Modulating PGE2 activity has opposing effects on liver-versus-pancreas specification in zebrafish embryos as well as mouse endodermal progenitors. The PGE2 synthetic enzyme cox2a and receptor ep2a are patterned such that cells closest to PGE2 synthesis acquire a liver fate whereas more distant cells acquire a pancreas fate. PGE2 interacts with the bmp2b pathway to regulate fate specification. At later stages of development, PGE2 acting via the ep4a receptor promotes outgrowth of both the liver and pancreas. PGE2 remains important for adult organ growth, as it modulates liver regeneration. This work provides in vivo evidence that PGE2 may act as a morphogen to regulate cell fate decisions and outgrowth of the embryonic endodermal anlagen. PMID:24530296

  7. Stepwise reprogramming of liver cells to a pancreas progenitor state by the transcriptional regulator Tgif2

    PubMed Central

    Cerdá-Esteban, Nuria; Naumann, Heike; Ruzittu, Silvia; Mah, Nancy; Pongrac, Igor M.; Cozzitorto, Corinna; Hommel, Angela; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Bonifacio, Ezio; Spagnoli, Francesca M.

    2017-01-01

    The development of a successful lineage reprogramming strategy of liver to pancreas holds promises for the treatment and potential cure of diabetes. The liver is an ideal tissue source for generating pancreatic cells, because of its close developmental origin with the pancreas and its regenerative ability. Yet, the molecular bases of hepatic and pancreatic cellular plasticity are still poorly understood. Here, we report that the TALE homeoprotein TGIF2 acts as a developmental regulator of the pancreas versus liver fate decision and is sufficient to elicit liver-to-pancreas fate conversion both ex vivo and in vivo. Hepatocytes expressing Tgif2 undergo extensive transcriptional remodelling, which represses the original hepatic identity and, over time, induces a pancreatic progenitor-like phenotype. Consistently, in vivo forced expression of Tgif2 activates pancreatic progenitor genes in adult mouse hepatocytes. This study uncovers the reprogramming activity of TGIF2 and suggests a stepwise reprogramming paradigm, whereby a ‘lineage-restricted' dedifferentiation step precedes the identity switch. PMID:28193997

  8. Sox2 and Jagged1 Expression in Normal and Drug-Damaged Adult Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sean; Taylor, Ruth R.; Forge, Andrew; Hume, Clifford R.

    2007-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells detect environmental signals associated with hearing, balance, and body orientation. In humans and other mammals, significant hair cell loss leads to irreversible hearing and balance deficits, whereas hair cell loss in nonmammalian vertebrates is repaired by the spontaneous generation of replacement hair cells. Research in mammalian hair cell regeneration is hampered by the lack of in vivo damage models for the adult mouse inner ear and the paucity of cell-type-specific markers for non-sensory cells within the sensory receptor epithelia. The present study delineates a protocol to drug damage the adult mouse auditory epithelium (organ of Corti) in situ and uses this protocol to investigate Sox2 and Jagged1 expression in damaged inner ear sensory epithelia. In other tissues, the transcription factor Sox2 and a ligand member of the Notch signaling pathway, Jagged1, are involved in regenerative processes. Both are involved in early inner ear development and are expressed in developing support cells, but little is known about their expressions in the adult. We describe a nonsurgical technique for inducing hair cell damage in adult mouse organ of Corti by a single high-dose injection of the aminoglycoside kanamycin followed by a single injection of the loop diuretic furosemide. This drug combination causes the rapid death of outer hair cells throughout the cochlea. Using immunocytochemical techniques, Sox2 is shown to be expressed specifically in support cells in normal adult mouse inner ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 is absent from auditory hair cells, but is expressed in a subset of vestibular hair cells. Double-labeling experiments with Sox2 and calbindin suggest Sox2-positive hair cells are Type II. Jagged1 is also expressed in support cells in the adult ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 and Jagged1 may be involved in the maintenance of support cells in adult mouse inner ear. PMID:18157569

  9. Sox2 and JAGGED1 expression in normal and drug-damaged adult mouse inner ear.

    PubMed

    Oesterle, Elizabeth C; Campbell, Sean; Taylor, Ruth R; Forge, Andrew; Hume, Clifford R

    2008-03-01

    Inner ear hair cells detect environmental signals associated with hearing, balance, and body orientation. In humans and other mammals, significant hair cell loss leads to irreversible hearing and balance deficits, whereas hair cell loss in nonmammalian vertebrates is repaired by the spontaneous generation of replacement hair cells. Research in mammalian hair cell regeneration is hampered by the lack of in vivo damage models for the adult mouse inner ear and the paucity of cell-type-specific markers for non-sensory cells within the sensory receptor epithelia. The present study delineates a protocol to drug damage the adult mouse auditory epithelium (organ of Corti) in situ and uses this protocol to investigate Sox2 and Jagged1 expression in damaged inner ear sensory epithelia. In other tissues, the transcription factor Sox2 and a ligand member of the Notch signaling pathway, Jagged1, are involved in regenerative processes. Both are involved in early inner ear development and are expressed in developing support cells, but little is known about their expressions in the adult. We describe a nonsurgical technique for inducing hair cell damage in adult mouse organ of Corti by a single high-dose injection of the aminoglycoside kanamycin followed by a single injection of the loop diuretic furosemide. This drug combination causes the rapid death of outer hair cells throughout the cochlea. Using immunocytochemical techniques, Sox2 is shown to be expressed specifically in support cells in normal adult mouse inner ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 is absent from auditory hair cells, but is expressed in a subset of vestibular hair cells. Double-labeling experiments with Sox2 and calbindin suggest Sox2-positive hair cells are Type II. Jagged1 is also expressed in support cells in the adult ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 and Jagged1 may be involved in the maintenance of support cells in adult mouse inner ear.

  10. Differential Expression of Sclerostin In Adult and Juvenile Mouse Calvaria

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Matthew D.; Quarto, Natalina; Gupta, Deepak M.; Slater, Bethany; Wan, Derrick C.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Background An understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling bone formation is central to skeletal tissue engineering efforts. The observation that immature animals are able to heal calvarial defects while adult animals are not has proven to be a useful tool for examining these mechanisms. Thus, we compared expression of sclerostin, a bone inhibitor, between the calvaria of juvenile and adult mice. Methods Parietal bone was harvested from juvenile (6 day old, n=20) and adult (60 day old, n=20) mice. Sclerostin transcript and protein levels were compared between the parietal bone of juvenile and adult mice using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Finally, osteoblasts from the parietal bone of juvenile and adult mice were harvested and cultured under osteogenic differentiation conditions with and without recombinant sclerostin (200ng/ml). Terminal osteogenic differentiation was assessed at 21 days with Alizarin red staining. Results PCR, Western blot analysis, and IHC all confirmed greater expression of sclerostin in the parietal bone of adult mice when compared to that of juvenile mice. Osteoblasts, whether from juvenile or adult parietal bones, demonstrated reduced capacity for osteogenic differentiation when exposed to recombinant sclerostin. Conclusion Given sclerostin’s role in inhibiting bone formation, our findings suggest that differences in expression levels of sclerostin may play a role in the differential regenerative capacity of calvaria from juvenile and adult animals. These findings suggest it as a potential target to abrogate in future tissue engineering studies. PMID:21285764

  11. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xin; Guan, Wuqiang; Yu, Yong-Chun; Fu, Yinghui

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU{sup +} cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU{sup +} cells, very few are mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1{sup +} microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition.

  12. Insulin-positive, Glut2-low cells present within mouse pancreas exhibit lineage plasticity and are enriched within extra-islet endocrine cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Beamish, Christine A; Strutt, Brenda J; Arany, Edith J; Hill, David J

    2016-04-18

    Regeneration of insulin-producing β-cells from resident pancreas progenitors requires an understanding of both progenitor identity and lineage plasticity. One model suggested that a rare β-cell sub-population within islets demonstrated multi-lineage plasticity. We hypothesized that β-cells from young mice (postnatal day 7, P7) exhibit such plasticity and used a model of islet dedifferentiation toward a ductal epithelial-cell phenotype to test this theory. RIPCre;Z/AP(+/+) mice were used to lineage trace the fate of β-cells during dedifferentiation culture by a human placental alkaline phosphatase (HPAP) reporter. There was a significant loss of HPAP-expressing β-cells in culture, but remaining HPAP(+) cells lost insulin expression while gaining expression of the epithelial duct cell marker cytokeratin-19 (Ck19). Flow cytometry and recovery of β-cell subpopulations from whole pancreas vs. islets suggest that the HPAP(+)Ck19(+) cells had derived from insulin-positive, glucose-transporter-2-low (Ins(+)Glut2(LO)) cells, representing 3.5% of all insulin-expressing cells. The majority of these cells were found outside of islets within clusters of <5 β-cells. These insulin(+)Glut2(LO) cells demonstrated a greater proliferation rate in vivo and in vitro as compared to insulin(+)Glut2(+) cells at P7, were retained into adulthood, and a subset differentiated into endocrine, ductal, and neural lineages, illustrating substantial plasticity. Results were confirmed using RIPCre;ROSA- eYFP mice. Quantitative PCR data indicated these cells possess an immature β-cell phenotype. These Ins(+)Glut2(LO) cells may represent a resident population of cells capable of forming new, functional β-cells, and which may be potentially exploited for regenerative therapies in the future.

  13. Stem cells to replace or regenerate the diabetic pancreas: Huge potential & existing hurdles

    PubMed Central

    Bhartiya, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Various stem cell sources are being explored to treat diabetes since the proof-of-concept for cell therapy was laid down by transplanting cadaveric islets as a part of Edmonton protocol in 2000. Human embryonic stem (hES) cells derived pancreatic progenitors have got US-FDA approval to be used in clinical trials to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, these progenitors more closely resemble their foetal counterparts and thus whether they will provide long-term regeneration of adult human pancreas remains to be demonstrated. In addition to lifestyle changes and administration of insulin sensitizers, regeneration of islets from endogenous pancreatic stem cells may benefit T2DM patients. The true identity of pancreatic stem cells, whether these exist or not, whether regeneration involves reduplication of existing islets or ductal epithelial cells transdifferentiate, remains a highly controversial area. We have recently demonstrated that a novel population of very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) is involved during regeneration of adult mouse pancreas after partial-pancreatectomy. VSELs (pluripotent stem cells in adult organs) should be appreciated as an alternative for regenerative medicine as these are autologous (thus immune rejection issues do not exist) with no associated risk of teratoma formation. T2DM is a result of VSELs dysfunction with age and uncontrolled proliferation of VSELs possibly results in pancreatic cancer. Extensive brainstorming and financial support are required to exploit the potential of endogenous VSELs to regenerate the pancreas in a patient with diabetes. PMID:27241638

  14. Distribution and accumulation of a mixture of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel, and vanadium in mouse small intestine, kidneys, pancreas, and femur following oral administration in water or feed.

    PubMed

    Radike, Martha; Warshawsky, David; Caruso, Joseph; Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Reilman, Raymond; Collins, Tyrone; Yaeger, Marlene; Wang, Jiansheng; Vela, Nohora; Olsen, Lisa; Schneider, Joanne

    2002-12-13

    Manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites are contaminated with coal tar and may contain metals such as arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), and vanadium (V). These metals are known to cause cancer or other adverse health conditions in humans, and the extent and cost of remediating MGP sites may be influenced by the presence of these metals. Studies assessed the distribution of these metals in female B6C3F1 mice ingesting (1) a metal mixture in water or (2) an MGP mixture in NIH-31 feed. The highest metal levels were measured in the small intestine and kidneys of mice receiving the metal mixture in water. For mice receiving the metal mixture in water, levels of As, Cd, and Cr, in the small intestine, levels of As, Cd, Cr, and V in the kidneys, levels of As and Cd in the pancreas, and levels of Cr and V in the femur were significantly greater than controls at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 wk. Except for Ni levels in the small intestine and femur and Cr levels in the kidneys, levels of metals were much lower in mice administered the MGP mixture in feed. The highest concentrations of metals in mice ingesting the MGP mixture in feed were found in the small intestine and kidneys, but few were significantly greater than controls. Levels of As in the small intestine at 6 and 18 wk and levels of Cr in the kidneys at 12, 18, and 24 wk were significantly greater than in controls. The data suggest that tissue burdens in small intestine, kidneys, pancreas, and femur of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and vanadium are less when metals are present as an MGP mixture in feed than as a mixture in water. The reduced distribution and accumulation of metals in the organs of mice ingesting the MGP mixture in feed compared to the levels in organs of mice ingesting the metal mixture in water suggests that metals may be less likely to accumulate in humans ingesting MGP mixtures, thereby presenting a lower overall human health risk. The data presented indicate that the matrix in which

  15. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tourlakis, Marina E; Zhang, Siyi; Ball, Heather L; Gandhi, Rikesh; Liu, Hongrui; Zhong, Jian; Yuan, Julie S; Guidos, Cynthia J; Durie, Peter R; Rommens, Johanna M

    2015-06-01

    Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15(Ink4b) and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis, were determined to

  16. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tourlakis, Marina E.; Zhang, Siyi; Ball, Heather L.; Gandhi, Rikesh; Liu, Hongrui; Zhong, Jian; Yuan, Julie S.; Guidos, Cynthia J.; Durie, Peter R.; Rommens, Johanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15Ink4b and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis, were determined to

  17. "Ductal adenocarcinoma in anular pancreas".

    PubMed

    Benassai, Giacomo; Perrotta, Stefano; Furino, Ermenegildo; De Werra, Carlo; Aloia, Sergio; Del Giudice, Roberto; Amato, Bruno; Vigliotti, Gabriele; Limite, Gennaro; Quarto, Gennaro

    2015-09-01

    The annular pancreas is a congenital anomaly in which pancreatic tissue partially or completely surrounds the second portion of the duodenum. Its often located above of papilla of Vater (85%), rarely below (15%). This pancreatic tissue is often easily dissociable to the duodenum but there is same cases where it the tissue is into the muscolaris wall of the duodenum. We describe three case of annular pancreas hospitalized in our facility between January 2004 and January 2009. There were 2 male 65 and 69 years old respectively and 1 female of 60 years old, presented complaining of repeated episodes of mild epigastric pain. Laboratory tests (including tumor markers), a direct abdomen X-ray with enema, EGDS and total body CT scan were performed to study to better define the diagnosis. EUS showed the presence of tissue infiltrating the muscle layer all around the first part of duodenum. Biopsies performed found the presence of pancreatic tissue with focal areas of adenocarcinoma. Subtotal gastrectomy with Roux was performed. The histological examinations shows an annular pancreas of D1 with multiple focal area of adenocarcinoma. (T1aN0M0). We performed a follow up at 5 years. One patients died after 36 months for cardiovascular hit. Two patients, one male and one female, was 5-years disease-free. Annular pancreas is an uncommon congenital anomaly which usually presents itself in infants and newborn. Rarely it can present in late adult life with wide range of clinical severities thereby making its diagnosis difficult. Pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult. CT scan can illustrate the pancreatic tissue encircling the duodenum. ERCP and MRCP are useful in outlining the annular pancreatic duct. Surgery still remains necessary to confirm diagnosis and bypassing the obstructed segment. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mouse matriptase-2: identification, characterization and comparative mRNA expression analysis with mouse hepsin in adult and embryonic tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, John D; Campagnolo, Luisa; Goodarzi, Goodarz; Truong, Tony N; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Quigley, James P

    2003-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of mouse matriptase-2 (m-matriptase-2), an 811-amino-acid protein composed of an N-terminal cytoplasmic domain, a membrane-spanning domain, two CUB (complement protein subcomponents C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 1) domains, three LDLR (low-density-lipoprotein receptor class A) domains and a C-terminal serine-protease domain. All m-matriptase-2 protein domain boundaries corresponded with intron/exon junctions of the encoding gene, which spans approx. 29 kb and comprises 18 exons. Matriptase-2 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat, with the rat matriptase-2 gene ( r-maltriptase-2 ) predicted to encode transmembrane and soluble isoforms. Western-blot analysis indicated that m-matriptase-2 migrates close to its theoretical molecular mass of 91 kDa, and immunofluorescence analysis was consistent with the proposed surface membrane localization of this protein. Reverse-transcription PCR and in-situ -hybridization analysis indicated that m-matriptase-2 expression overlaps with the distribution of mouse hepsin (m-hepsin, a cell-surface serine protease identified in hepatoma cells) in adult tissues and during embryonic development. In adult tissues both are expressed at highest levels in liver, kidney and uterus. During embryogenesis m-matriptase-2 expression peaked between days 12.5 and 15.5. m-hepsin expression was biphasic, with peaks at day 7.5 to 8.5 and again between days 12.5 and 15.5. In situ hybridization of embryonic tissues indicated abundant expression of both m-matriptase-2 and m-hepsin in the developing liver and at lower levels in developing pharyngo-tympanic tubes. While m-hepsin was detected in the residual embryonic yolk sac and with lower intensity in lung, heart, gastrointestinal tract, developing kidney tubules and epithelium of the oral cavity, m-matriptase-2 was absent in these tissues, but strongly expressed within the nasal cavity by olfactory epithelial

  19. Ascl3 marks adult progenitor cells of the mouse salivary gland

    PubMed Central

    Rugel-Stahl, Anastasia; Elliot, Marilyn; Ovitt, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    The Ascl3 transcription factor marks a subset of salivary gland duct cells present in the three major salivary glands of the mouse. In vivo, these cells generate both duct and secretory acinar cell descendants. Here, we have analyzed whether Ascl3-expressing cells retain this multipotent lineage potential in adult glands. Cells isolated from mouse salivary glands were cultured in vitro as non-adherent spheres. Lineage tracing of the Ascl3-expressing cells within the spheres demonstrates that Ascl3+ cells isolated from adult glands remain multipotent, generating both duct and acinar cell types in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the progenitor cells characterized by Keratin 5 expression are an independent population from Ascl3+ progenitor cells. We conclude that the Ascl3+ cells are intermediate lineage-restricted progenitor cells of the adult salivary glands. PMID:22370009

  20. A comprehensive transcriptomic analysis of infant and adult mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Pan, Linlin; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiaonuan; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian

    2014-10-01

    Ovary development is a complex process involving numerous genes. A well-developed ovary is essential for females to keep fertility and reproduce offspring. In order to gain a better insight into the molecular mechanisms related to the process of mammalian ovary development, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis on ovaries isolated from infant and adult mice by using next-generation sequencing technology (SOLiD). We identified 15,454 and 16,646 transcriptionally active genes at the infant and adult stage, respectively. Among these genes, we also identified 7021 differentially expressed genes. Our analysis suggests that, in general, the adult ovary has a higher level of transcriptomic activity. However, it appears that genes related to primordial follicle development, such as those encoding Figla and Nobox, are more active in the infant ovary, whereas expression of genes vital for follicle development, such as Gdf9, Bmp4 and Bmp15, is upregulated in the adult. These data suggest a dynamic shift in gene expression during ovary development and it is apparent that these changes function to facilitate follicle maturation, when additional functional gene studies are considered. Furthermore, our investigation has also revealed several important functional pathways, such as apoptosis, MAPK and steroid biosynthesis, that appear to be much more active in the adult ovary compared to those of the infant. These findings will provide a solid foundation for future studies on ovary development in mice and other mammals and help to expand our understanding of the complex molecular and cellular events that occur during postnatal ovary development.

  1. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org).

  2. Endothelium-derived essential signals involved in pancreas organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Talavera-Adame, Dodanim; Dafoe, Donald C

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are essential for pancreas differentiation, endocrine specification, and endocrine function. They are also involved in the physiopathology of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. During embryogenesis, aortic ECs provide specific factors that maintain the expression of key genes for pancreas development such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1. Other unknown factors are also important for pancreatic endocrine specification and formation of insulin-producing beta cells. Endocrine precursors proliferate interspersed with ductal cells and exocrine precursors and, at some point of development, these endocrine precursors migrate to pancreatic mesenchyme and start forming the islets of Langerhans. By the end of the gestation and close to birth, these islets contain immature beta cells with the capacity to express vascular endothelial growth factor and therefore to recruit ECs from the surrounding microenvironment. ECs in turn produce factors that are essential to maintain insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. Once assembled, a cross talk between endocrine cells and ECs maintain the integrity of islets toward an adequate function during the whole life of the adult individual. This review will focus in the EC role in the differentiation and maturation of pancreatic beta cells during embryogenesis as well as the current knowledge about the involvement of endothelium to derive pancreatic beta cells in vitro from mouse or human pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25992319

  3. Assessment of pancreas cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Pancreatic islets were obtained from guinea pig pancreas by the collagenase method and kept alive in tissue culture prior to further studies. Pancreas cell morphology was studied by standard histochemical techniques using light microscopy. Preparative vertical electrophoresis-levitation of dispersed fetal guinea pig pancreas cells was conducted in phosphate buffer containing a heavy water (D20) gradient which does not cause clumping of cells or alter the osmolarity of the buffers. The faster migrating fractions tended to be enriched in beta-cell content. Alpha and delta cells were found to some degree in most fractions. A histogram showing the cell count distribution is included.

  4. Metabolic Control With the Bio-inspired Artificial Pancreas in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: A 24-Hour Randomized Controlled Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Monika; Herrero, Pau; Sharkawy, Mohamed El; Pesl, Peter; Jugnee, Narvada; Pavitt, Darrell; Godsland, Ian F; Alberti, George; Toumazou, Christofer; Johnston, Desmond G; Georgiou, Pantelis; Oliver, Nick S

    2015-11-17

    The Bio-inspired Artificial Pancreas (BiAP) is a closed-loop insulin delivery system based on a mathematical model of beta-cell physiology and implemented in a microchip within a low-powered handheld device. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the BiAP over 24 hours, followed by a substudy assessing the safety of the algorithm without and with partial meal announcement. Changes in lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were investigated for the first time during closed-loop. This is a prospective randomized controlled open-label crossover study. Participants were randomly assigned to attend either a 24-hour closed-loop visit connected to the BiAP system or a 24-hour open-loop visit (standard insulin pump therapy). The primary outcome was percentage time spent in target range (3.9-10 mmol/l) measured by sensor glucose. Secondary outcomes included percentage time in hypoglycemia (<3.9 mmol/l) and hyperglycemia (>10 mmol/l). Participants were invited to attend for an additional visit to assess the BiAP without and with partial meal announcements. A total of 12 adults with type 1 diabetes completed the study (58% female, mean [SD] age 45 [10] years, BMI 25 [4] kg/m(2), duration of diabetes 22 [12] years and HbA1c 7.4 [0.7]% [58 (8) mmol/mol]). The median (IQR) percentage time in target did not differ between closed-loop and open-loop (71% vs 66.9%, P = .9). Closed-loop reduced time spent in hypoglycemia from 17.9% to 3.0% (P < .01), but increased time was spent in hyperglycemia (10% vs 28.9%, P = .01). The percentage time in target was higher when all meals were announced during closed-loop compared to no or partial meal announcement (65.7% [53.6-80.5] vs 45.5% [38.2-68.3], P = .12). The BiAP is safe and achieved equivalent time in target as measured by sensor glucose, with improvement in hypoglycemia, when compared to standard pump therapy. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  5. Histopathological studies of acute and chronic effects of Calliandra portoricensis leaf extract on the stomach and pancreas of adult Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Ofusori, David A; Adejuwon, Adebomi O

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the consequence of oral administration of Calliandra portoricensis (C. portoricensis) leaf extract on the stomach and pancreas in Swiss albino mice. Three groups of mice (B, C and D) were treated with 4 mg/kg of C. portoricensis extract. Group A was the control and received an equivalent volume of distilled water. Group B received C. portoricensis leaf extract for 7 days, Group C received C. portoricensis leaf extract for 14 days, and Group D received C. portoricensis leaf extract for 28 days. At different stages in the study, the mice were sacrificed and the stomach and pancreas were excised and fixed in 10% formol saline for histological analysis. The result showed a normal microstructural outline in groups B and C as compared with the control. However, animals in group D showed disorganization of the mucosa and discontinuation of epithelial lining of the stomach while the islets of Langerans in the pancreas were at various degree of degeneration as compared with the control mice. The present finding suggests that chronic administration (28 days as seen in this study) of C. portoricensis leaf extract may inhibit the proper function of the stomach and pancreas.

  6. Histopathological studies of acute and chronic effects of Calliandra portoricensis leaf extract on the stomach and pancreas of adult Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Ofusori, David A; Adejuwon, Adebomi O

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the consequence of oral administration of Calliandra portoricensis (C. portoricensis) leaf extract on the stomach and pancreas in Swiss albino mice. Methods Three groups of mice (B, C and D) were treated with 4 mg/kg of C. portoricensis extract. Group A was the control and received an equivalent volume of distilled water. Group B received C. portoricensis leaf extract for 7 days, Group C received C. portoricensis leaf extract for 14 days, and Group D received C. portoricensis leaf extract for 28 days. At different stages in the study, the mice were sacrificed and the stomach and pancreas were excised and fixed in 10% formol saline for histological analysis. Results The result showed a normal microstructural outline in groups B and C as compared with the control. However, animals in group D showed disorganization of the mucosa and discontinuation of epithelial lining of the stomach while the islets of Langerans in the pancreas were at various degree of degeneration as compared with the control mice. Conclusions The present finding suggests that chronic administration (28 days as seen in this study) of C. portoricensis leaf extract may inhibit the proper function of the stomach and pancreas. PMID:23569755

  7. Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after Targeted Ablation of Hair Cells with Diphtheria Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Justin S.; Tong, Ling; Ngyuen, Tot B.; Hume, Cliff R.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Stone, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a transgenic mouse to permit conditional and selective ablation of hair cells in the adult mouse utricle by inserting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) gene into the Pou4f3 gene, which encodes a hair cell-specific transcription factor. In adult wild-type mice, administration of diphtheria toxin (DT) caused no significant hair cell loss. In adult Pou4f3 +/DTR mice, DT treatment reduced hair cell numbers to 6% of normal by 14 days post-DT. Remaining hair cells were located primarily in the lateral extrastriola. Over time, hair cell numbers increased in these regions, reaching 17% of untreated Pou4f3 +/DTR mice by 60 days post-DT. Replacement hair cells were morphologically distinct, with multiple cytoplasmic processes, and displayed evidence for active mechanotransduction channels and synapses characteristic of type II hair cells. Three lines of evidence suggest replacement hair cells were derived via direct (nonmitotic) transdifferentiation of supporting cells: new hair cells did not incorporate BrdU, supporting cells upregulated the pro-hair cell gene Atoh1, and supporting cell numbers decreased over time. This study introduces a new method for efficient conditional hair cell ablation in adult mouse utricles and demonstrates that hair cells are spontaneously regenerated in vivo in regions where there may be ongoing hair cell turnover. PMID:23100430

  8. Whole Mount Dissection and Immunofluorescence of the Adult Mouse Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Scott C; Cox, Brandon C

    2016-01-01

    The organ of Corti, housed in the cochlea of the inner ear, contains mechanosensory hair cells and surrounding supporting cells which are organized in a spiral shape and have a tonotopic gradient for sound detection. The mouse cochlea is approximately 6 mm long and often divided into three turns (apex, middle, and base) for analysis. To investigate cell loss, cell division, or mosaic gene expression, the whole mount or surface preparation of the cochlea is useful. This dissection method allows visualization of all cells within the organ of Corti when combined with immunostaining and confocal microscopy to image cells at different planes in the z-axis. Multiple optical cross-sections can also be obtained from these z-stack images. In addition, the whole mount dissection method can be used for scanning electron microscopy, although a different fixation method is needed. Here, we present a method to isolate the organ of Corti as three intact cochlear turns (apex, middle, and base). This method can be used for mice ranging from one week of age through adulthood and differs from the technique used for neonatal samples where calcification of the cochlea is incomplete. A slightly modified version can be used for dissection of the rat cochlea. We also demonstrate a procedure for immunostaining with fluorescently tagged antibodies.

  9. Fluoxetine increases plasticity and modulates the proteomic profile in the adult mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Perera, L.; Muniz, M.; Vierci, G.; Bornia, N.; Baroncelli, L.; Sale, A.; Rossi, F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The scarce functional recovery of the adult CNS following injuries or diseases is largely due to its reduced potential for plasticity, the ability to reorganize neural connections as a function of experience. Recently, some new strategies restoring high levels of plasticity in the adult brain have been identified, especially in the paradigmatic model of the visual system. A chronic treatment with the anti-depressant fluoxetine reinstates plasticity in the adult rat primary visual cortex, inducing recovery of vision in amblyopic animals. The molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain largely unknown. Here, we explored fluoxetine effects on mouse visual cortical plasticity, and exploited a proteomic approach to identify possible candidates mediating the outcome of the antidepressant treatment on adult cortical plasticity. We showed that fluoxetine restores ocular dominance plasticity in the adult mouse visual cortex, and identified 31 differentially expressed protein spots in fluoxetine-treated animals vs. controls. MALDITOF/TOF mass spectrometry identification followed by bioinformatics analysis revealed that these proteins are involved in the control of cytoskeleton organization, endocytosis, molecular transport, intracellular signaling, redox cellular state, metabolism and protein degradation. Altogether, these results indicate a complex effect of fluoxetine on neuronal signaling mechanisms potentially involved in restoring plasticity in the adult brain. PMID:26205348

  10. Deconstructing Pancreas Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Cecil M.; Goodyer, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The relentless nature and increasing prevalence of human pancreatic diseases, in particular, diabetes mellitus and adenocarcinoma, has motivated further understanding of pancreas organogenesis. The pancreas is a multifunctional organ whose epithelial cells govern a diversity of physiologically vital endocrine and exocrine functions. The mechanisms governing the birth, differentiation, morphogenesis, growth, maturation, and maintenance of the endocrine and exocrine components in the pancreas have been discovered recently with increasing tempo. This includes recent studies unveiling mechanisms permitting unexpected flexibility in the developmental potential of immature and mature pancreatic cell subsets, including the ability to interconvert fates. In this article, we describe how classical cell biology, genetic analysis, lineage tracing, and embryological investigations are being complemented by powerful modern methods including epigenetic analysis, time-lapse imaging, and flow cytometry-based cell purification to dissect fundamental processes of pancreas development. PMID:22587935

  11. Metabolic conversion of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in adult and newborn mouse skin and mouse liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Berry, D L; Bracken, W M; Fischer, S M; Viaje, A; Slaga, T J

    1978-08-01

    Tritiated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was applied to adult mouse skin; at specified time intervals the mice were killed, and the labeled phorbol was extracted and subjected to separation and quantitation by high-pressure liquid chromatography. After 24 hr, TPA comprised greater than 96% of the recovered label from the skin, and its apparent half-life was 17.8 hr. Pretreatment of adult skin with TPA for 4 weeks before treatment with labeled TPA resulted in an increase in the clearance rate of TPA from the skin. Skin from newborn mice was capable of converting TPA into monoesters and phorbol, but the clearance rate in the adult was about 12 times more rapid than it was in the newborn. Epidermal homogenates converted TPA into 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol, phorbol-13-acetate, and phorbol. Hepatic homogenates were able to convert TPA to monoesters and phorbol at rates 14 to 15 times faster than were epidermal homogenates. Attempts to isolate any previously undescribed metabolites of TPA by use of liver homogenates were unsuccessful, and mixed-function oxidation did not contribute to the metabolism of TPA. From inhibitor studies it was judged that esterases were implicated in the conversion of TPA to monoesters and phorbol. The results support the hypothesis that the tumor-promoting activity of TPA is directly related to its concentration in a specific tissue and that conversion of TPA to an active metabolite probably does not occur.

  12. [Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas].

    PubMed

    Davies, Nestor R; Kasparian, Andres C; Viotto, Lucas E; Moreno, Walter A; Gramática, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas represents around 6-36% of mucinous cystic neoplasm. The lesions are usually found in the body and tail of the pancreas and are generally solitary with a size range of 6-36 cm. We present a clinical case of a 63 years old patient with abdominal pain and weight loss. We used radiographic imaging studies. It was treated with surgery by distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and transverse colectomy. Patient was not post operative complications.

  13. Control of cell identity in pancreas development and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stanger, Ben Z; Hebrok, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    The endocrine and exocrine cells in the adult pancreas are not static, but can change their differentiation state in response to injury or stress. This concept of cells in flux means that there may be ways to generate certain types of cells (such as insulin-producing β-cells) and prevent formation of others (such as transformed neoplastic cells). We review different aspects of cell identity in the pancreas, discussing how cells achieve their identity during embryonic development and maturation, and how this identity remains plastic, even in the adult pancreas.

  14. Adult Mouse Cortical Cell Taxonomy by Single Cell Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T.; Sorensen, Staci A.; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M.; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. Here, we construct a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice based on single cell RNA-sequencing. We identify 49 transcriptomic cell types including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and seven non-neuronal types. We also analyze cell-type specific mRNA processing and characterize genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we show that some of our transcriptomic cell types display specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  15. Isolation and cultivation of stem cells from adult mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Kaomei; Wolf, Frieder; Becker, Alexander; Engel, Wolfgang; Nayernia, Karim; Hasenfuss, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    The successful isolation and cultivation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) as well as induction of SSCs into pluripotent stem cells will allow us to study their biological characteristics and their applications in therapeutic approaches. Here we provide step-by-step procedures on the basis of previous work in our laboratory for: the isolation of testicular cells from adolescent mice by a modified enzymatic procedure; the enrichment of undifferentiated spermatogonia by laminin selection or genetic selection using Stra8-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) transgenic mice; the cultivation and conversion of undifferentiated spermatogonia into embryonic stem-like cells, so-called multipotent adult germline stem cells (maGSCs); and characterization of these cells. Normally, it will take about 16 weeks to obtain stable maGSC lines starting from the isolation of testicular cells.

  16. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  17. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of vinclozolin induced mouse adult onset disease and associated sperm epigenome biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Covert, Trevor R; Haque, Md M; Settles, Matthew; Nilsson, Eric E; Anway, Matthew D; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-12-01

    The endocrine disruptor vinclozolin has previously been shown to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease in the rat. The current study was designed to investigate the transgenerational actions of vinclozolin on the mouse. Transient exposure of the F0 generation gestating female during gonadal sex determination promoted transgenerational adult onset disease in F3 generation male and female mice, including spermatogenic cell defects, testicular abnormalities, prostate abnormalities, kidney abnormalities and polycystic ovarian disease. Pathology analysis demonstrated 75% of the vinclozolin lineage animals developed disease with 34% having two or more different disease states. Interestingly, the vinclozolin induced transgenerational disease was observed in the outbred CD-1 strain, but not the inbred 129 mouse strain. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified differential DNA methylation regions that can potentially be utilized as epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational exposure and disease.

  18. Subretinal delivery and electroporation in pigmented and nonpigmented adult mouse eyes

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, John M.; Goodman, Penny; Chrenek, Micah A.; Johnson, Christiana J.; Berglin, Lennart; Redmond, T. Michael.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.

    2013-01-01

    Subretinal injection offers one of the best ways to deliver many classes of drugs, reagents, cells and treatments to the photoreceptor, Müller, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells of the retina. Agents delivered to this space are placed within microns of the intended target cell, accumulating to high concentrations because there is no dilution due to transport processes or diffusion. Dilution in the interphotoreceptor space (IPS) is minimal because the IPS volume is only 10-20 microliters in the human eye and less than 1 microliter in the mouse eye. For gene delivery purposes, we wished to transfect the cells adjacent to the IPS in adult mouse eyes. Others transfect these cells in neonatal rats to study the development of the retina. In both neonates and adults, electroporation is found to be effective Here we describe the optimization of electroporation conditions for RPE cells in the adult mouse eye with naked plasmids. However, both techniques, subretinal injection and electroporation, present some technical challenges that require skill on the part of the surgeon to prevent untoward damage to the eye. Here we describe methods that we have used for the past ten years (1). PMID:22688698

  19. The Cdk4-E2f1 pathway regulates early pancreas development by targeting Pdx1+ progenitors and Ngn3+ endocrine precursors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yoon; Rane, Sushil G.

    2011-01-01

    Cell division and cell differentiation are intricately regulated processes vital to organ development. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are master regulators of the cell cycle that orchestrate the cell division and differentiation programs. Cdk1 is essential to drive cell division and is required for the first embryonic divisions, whereas Cdks 2, 4 and 6 are dispensable for organogenesis but vital for tissue-specific cell development. Here, we illustrate an important role for Cdk4 in regulating early pancreas development. Pancreatic development involves extensive morphogenesis, proliferation and differentiation of the epithelium to give rise to the distinct cell lineages of the adult pancreas. The cell cycle molecules that specify lineage commitment within the early pancreas are unknown. We show that Cdk4 and its downstream transcription factor E2f1 regulate mouse pancreas development prior to and during the secondary transition. Cdk4 deficiency reduces embryonic pancreas size owing to impaired mesenchyme development and fewer Pdx1+ pancreatic progenitor cells. Expression of activated Cdk4R24C kinase leads to increased Nkx2.2+ and Nkx6.1+ cells and a rise in the number and proliferation of Ngn3+ endocrine precursors, resulting in expansion of the β cell lineage. We show that E2f1 binds and activates the Ngn3 promoter to modulate Ngn3 expression levels in the embryonic pancreas in a Cdk4-dependent manner. These results suggest that Cdk4 promotes β cell development by directing E2f1-mediated activation of Ngn3 and increasing the pool of endocrine precursors, and identify Cdk4 as an important regulator of early pancreas development that modulates the proliferation potential of pancreatic progenitors and endocrine precursors. PMID:21490060

  20. Portal Annular Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Harnoss, Jonathan M.; Harnoss, Julian C.; Diener, Markus K.; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B.; Büchler, Markus W.; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF). On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered. In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery). Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option. PMID:25207658

  1. Brain transcriptional stability upon prion protein-encoding gene invalidation in zygotic or adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The physiological function of the prion protein remains largely elusive while its key role in prion infection has been expansively documented. To potentially assess this conundrum, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the brain of wild-type mice with that of transgenic mice invalidated at this locus either at the zygotic or at the adult stages. Results Only subtle transcriptomic differences resulting from the Prnp knockout could be evidenced, beside Prnp itself, in the analyzed adult brains following microarray analysis of 24 109 mouse genes and QPCR assessment of some of the putatively marginally modulated loci. When performed at the adult stage, neuronal Prnp disruption appeared to sequentially induce a response to an oxidative stress and a remodeling of the nervous system. However, these events involved only a limited number of genes, expression levels of which were only slightly modified and not always confirmed by RT-qPCR. If not, the qPCR obtained data suggested even less pronounced differences. Conclusions These results suggest that the physiological function of PrP is redundant at the adult stage or important for only a small subset of the brain cell population under classical breeding conditions. Following its early reported embryonic developmental regulation, this lack of response could also imply that PrP has a more detrimental role during mouse embryogenesis and that potential transient compensatory mechanisms have to be searched for at the time this locus becomes transcriptionally activated. PMID:20649983

  2. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase σ binds to neurons in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Yu, Panpan; Lourie, Jacob; Bangayan, Nathanael J.; Symes, Aviva J.; Geller, Herbert M.

    2014-01-01

    The role of type IIA receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), which includes LAR, RPTPσ and RPTPδ, in the nervous system is becoming increasingly recognized. Evidence supports a significant role for these RPTPs during the development of the nervous system as well as after injury, and mutations in RPTPs are associated with human disease. However, a major open question is the nature of the ligands that interact with type IIA RPTPs in the adult brain. Candidates include several different proteins as well as the glycosaminoglycan chains of proteoglycans. In order to investigate this problem, we used a receptor affinity probe assay with RPTPσ-AP fusion proteins on sections of adult mouse brain and to cultured neurons. Our results demonstrate that the major binding sites for RPTPσ in adult mouse brain are on neurons and are not proteoglycan GAG chains, as RPTPσ binding overlaps with the neuronal marker NeuN and was not significantly altered by treatments which eliminate chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate, or both. We also demonstrate no overlap of binding of RPTPσ with perineuronal nets, and a unique modulation of RPTPσ binding to brain by divalent cations. Our data therefore point to neuronal proteins, rather than CSPGs, as being the ligands for RPTPσ in the adult, uninjured brain. PMID:24530640

  3. The Reg family member INGAP is a marker of endocrine patterning in the embryonic pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hamblet, Natasha S; Shi, Wenjing; Vinik, Aaron I; Taylor-Fishwick, David A

    2008-01-01

    Adult islet neogenesis is believed to recapitulate elements of pancreatic endocrine development. Identifying factors that regulate islet neogenesis-associated protein (INGAP) gene activity could provide links to pancreas development. Predicted transcriptional regulators of INGAP were screened in an INGAP-promoter-reporter assay. Based upon their temporal expression, the occurrence of INGAP-positive cells during pancreas embryonic development were studied. Pancreatic transcription factors, PDX-1, Ngn3, NeuroD, and Isl-1, activated the INGAP promoter, but PAX4, PAX6, and Nkx2.2 did not. The INGAP-positive cells were present in the developing pancreatic bud of the mouse embryo. Emerging clusters of unorganized endocrine cells were INGAP positive. These cells coexpressed insulin or somatostatin, but glucagon-expressing cells remained distinct. The INGAP-positive cells were also detected in the maturing neonatal endocrine cells organized into islets. In direct contrast to the embryo, glucagon localized with most INGAP-positive cells in the postnatal endocrine cells. The INGAP-positive cells juxtaposed pancreatic duct cells. A subset of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive/INGAP-positive cells was detected in the neonatal pancreas. These data implicate INGAP and/or Reg family proteins in endocrine cell patterning during embryonic development and suggest that INGAP immunoreactivity is a key marker associated with early endocrine cells.

  4. Expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in the adult and developing mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Tuhina; Verma, Amrisha; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the retina and plays an important role in retinal neurovascular function. We have recently shown that increased expression of ACE2 and angiotensin (1-7) [Ang (1-7)], two components of the protective axis of the RAS, in the retina via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery, conferred protection against diabetes-induced retinopathy. We hypothesized that the protective molecular and cellular mechanisms of Ang (1-7) are mediated by its receptor, Mas, and the expression level and cellular localization dictate the response to Ang (1-7) and activation of subsequent protective signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by examining the expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in adult and developing mouse retinas. The cellular localization of the Mas receptor protein was determined with immunofluorescence of the eyes of adult and postnatal day 1 (P1), P5, P7, P15, and P21 mice using the Mas receptor-specific antibody, and mRNA was detected with in situ hybridization of paraffin-embedded sections. Western blotting and real-time reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR analysis were performed to determine the relative levels of the Mas protein and mRNA in adult and developing retinas, as well as in cultured retinal Müller glial and RPE cells. In the adult eye, the Mas receptor protein was abundantly present in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and photoreceptor cells; a lower level of expression was observed in endothelial cells, Müller glial cells, and other neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina. In the developing retina, Mas receptor mRNA and protein expression was detected in the inner retina at P1, and the expression levels increased with age to reach the adult level and pattern by P15. In the adult mouse retina, Mas receptor mRNA was expressed at a much higher level when compared to angiotensin II (Ang II) type I (AT1R) and type II (AT2R) receptor m

  5. Histology and Ultrastructure of Transitional Changes in Skin Morphology in the Juvenile and Adult Four-Striped Mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Eranée; Ajao, Moyosore Salihu

    2013-01-01

    The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. In both the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse, pigment-containing cells were observed in the dermis and were homogeneously dispersed throughout this layer. Apart from these cells, the histology of the skin of the adult four-striped mouse was similar to normal mammalian skin. In the juvenile four-striped mouse, abundant hair follicles of varying sizes were observed in the dermis and hypodermis, while hair follicles of similar size were only present in the dermis of adult four-striped mouse. Ultrastructural analysis of juvenile hair follicles revealed that the arrangement and differentiation of cellular layers were typical of a mammal. This study therefore provides unique transition pattern in the four-striped mouse skin morphology different from the textbook description of the normal mammalian skin. PMID:24288469

  6. Histology and ultrastructure of transitional changes in skin morphology in the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio).

    PubMed

    Stewart, Eranée; Ajao, Moyosore Salihu; Ihunwo, Amadi Ogonda

    2013-01-01

    The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. In both the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse, pigment-containing cells were observed in the dermis and were homogeneously dispersed throughout this layer. Apart from these cells, the histology of the skin of the adult four-striped mouse was similar to normal mammalian skin. In the juvenile four-striped mouse, abundant hair follicles of varying sizes were observed in the dermis and hypodermis, while hair follicles of similar size were only present in the dermis of adult four-striped mouse. Ultrastructural analysis of juvenile hair follicles revealed that the arrangement and differentiation of cellular layers were typical of a mammal. This study therefore provides unique transition pattern in the four-striped mouse skin morphology different from the textbook description of the normal mammalian skin.

  7. A case of adult cannibalism in the gray mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Anni

    2012-09-01

    Cannibalism, defined as the eating of conspecific flesh, has been observed in a number of primate species, although it is still a relatively rare phenomenon. In cases where primates were seen feeding on an individual of the same species, the victims have exclusively been infants or juveniles. Here, I report an event of a free-living, adult male gray mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus, cannibalizing an adult conspecific female that died of an unknown cause. This observation has implications for the basic ecology of the species and highlights the potential for great flexibility in diet and behavior by a primate. This is, to my knowledge, the first communication of cannibalistic behavior in this species, as well as the first reported case of a nonhuman primate cannibalizing an adult conspecific.

  8. Running increases cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    van Praag, H; Kempermann, G; Gage, F H

    1999-03-01

    Exposure to an enriched environment increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult rodents. Environmental enrichment, however, typically consists of many components, such as expanded learning opportunities, increased social interaction, more physical activity and larger housing. We attempted to separate components by assigning adult mice to various conditions: water-maze learning (learner), swim-time-yoked control (swimmer), voluntary wheel running (runner), and enriched (enriched) and standard housing (control) groups. Neither maze training nor yoked swimming had any effect on bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cell number. However, running doubled the number of surviving newborn cells, in amounts similar to enrichment conditions. Our findings demonstrate that voluntary exercise is sufficient for enhanced neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

  9. Oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the mouse juvenile and adult central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Codeluppi, Simone; van Bruggen, David; Mendanha Falcão, Ana; Xiao, Lin; Li, Huiliang; Häring, Martin; Hochgerner, Hannah; Romanov, Roman A.; Gyllborg, Daniel; Muñoz Manchado, Ana; La Manno, Gioele; Lönnerberg, Peter; Floriddia, Elisa M.; Rezayee, Fatemah; Ernfors, Patrik; Arenas, Ernest; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Harkany, Tibor; Richardson, William D.; Linnarsson, Sten; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes have been considered as a functionally homogenous population in the central nervous system (CNS). We performed single-cell RNA-Seq on 5072 cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage from ten regions of the mouse juvenile/adult CNS. Twelve populations were identified, representing a continuum from Pdgfra+ oligodendrocyte precursors (OPCs) to distinct mature oligodendrocytes. Initial stages of differentiation were similar across the juvenile CNS, whereas subsets of mature oligodendrocytes were enriched in specific regions in the adult brain. Newly-formed oligodendrocytes were found to be resident in the adult CNS and responsive to complex motor learning. A second Pdgfra+ population, distinct from OPCs, was found along vessels. Our study reveals the dynamics of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation, uncoupling them at a transcriptional level and highlighting oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the CNS. PMID:27284195

  10. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N.; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Panganiban, Clarisse H.; Havens, Luke T.; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  11. Rapid and efficient gene delivery into the adult mouse brain via focal electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yusuke; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery is required for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of various biological events. Virus-mediated gene transfer or generation of transgenic animals is widely used; however, these methods are time-consuming and expensive. Here we show an improved electroporation technique for acute gene delivery into the adult mouse brain. Using a syringe-based microelectrode, local DNA injection and the application of electric current can be performed simultaneously; this allows rapid and efficient gene transduction of adult non-neuronal cells. Combining this technique with various expression vectors that carry specific promoters resulted in targeted gene expression in astrocytic cells. Our results constitute a powerful strategy for the genetic manipulation of adult brains in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. PMID:27430903

  12. Arteriovenous Malformation in the Adult Mouse Brain Resembling the Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Espen J.; Su, Hua; Shen, Fanxia; Choi, Eun-Jung; Oh, S. Paul; Chen, Grant; Lawton, Michael T.; Kim, Helen; Chen, Yongmei; Chen, Wanqiu; Young, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVM) are an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The underlying mechanisms are not clear. No animal model for adult bAVM is available for mechanistic exploration. Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Type2 (HHT2) with activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; ACVRL1) mutations have a higher incidence of bAVM than the general population. We tested the hypothesis that VEGF stimulation with regional homozygous deletion of Alk1 induces severe dysplasia in the adult mouse brain, akin to human bAVM. Methods Alk12f/2f (exons 4–6 flanked by loxP sites) and wild-type (WT) mice (8–10 weeks old) were injected with Ad-Cre (2×107 PFU, adenoviral vector expressing Cre recombinase) and AAV-VEGF (2×109 genome copies, adeno-associated viral vectors expressing VEGF) into the basal ganglia. At 8 weeks, blood vessels were analyzed. Results Gross vascular irregularities were seen in Alk1 2f/2f mouse brain injected with Ad-Cre and AAV-VEGF. The vessels were markedly enlarged with abnormal patterning resembling aspects of the human bAVM phenotype, displayed altered expression of the arterial and venous markers (EphB4 and Jagged-1), and showed evidence of arteriovenous shunting. Vascular irregularities were not seen in similarly treated WT mice. Interpretation Our data indicate that post-natal, adult formation of the human disease bAVM is possible, and that both genetic mutation and angiogenic stimulation are necessary for lesion development. Our work not only provides a testable adult mouse bAVM model for the first time, but also suggests that specific medical therapy can be developed to slow bAVM growth and potentially stabilize the rupture-prone abnormal vasculature. PMID:21437931

  13. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  14. Hippo Signaling Regulates Pancreas Development through Inactivation of Yap

    PubMed Central

    Day, Caroline E.; Boerner, Brian P.; Johnson, Randy L.; Sarvetnick, Nora E.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian pancreas is required for normal metabolism, with defects in this vital organ commonly observed in cancer and diabetes. Development must therefore be tightly controlled in order to produce a pancreas of correct size, cell type composition, and physiologic function. Through negative regulation of Yap-dependent proliferation, the Hippo kinase cascade is a critical regulator of organ growth. To investigate the role of Hippo signaling in pancreas biology, we deleted Hippo pathway components in the developing mouse pancreas. Unexpectedly, the pancreas from Hippo-deficient offspring was reduced in size, with defects evident throughout the organ. Increases in the dephosphorylated nuclear form of Yap are apparent throughout the exocrine compartment and correlate with increases in levels of cell proliferation. However, the mutant exocrine tissue displays extensive disorganization leading to pancreatitis-like autodigestion. Interestingly, our results suggest that Hippo signaling does not directly regulate the pancreas endocrine compartment as Yap expression is lost following endocrine specification through a Hippo-independent mechanism. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Hippo signaling plays a crucial role in pancreas development and provide novel routes to a better understanding of pathological conditions that affect this organ. PMID:23071096

  15. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Up About Us Board of Directors Newsletter Partners Financial & Privacy Policy Contact Us Patient Information About the Pancreas NPF ... here . About Us Board of Directors Newsletter Partners Financial & Privacy Policy Contact Us Patient Information About the Pancreas Genetics & ...

  16. SIRT1 deficiency compromises mouse embryonic stem cell hematopoietic differentiation, and embryonic and adult hematopoiesis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xuan; Chae, Hee-Don; Wang, Rui-Hong; Shelley, William C.; Cooper, Scott; Taylor, Tammi; Kim, Young-June; Deng, Chu-Xia; Yoder, Mervin C.

    2011-01-01

    SIRT1 is a founding member of a sirtuin family of 7 proteins and histone deacetylases. It is involved in cellular resistance to stress, metabolism, differentiation, aging, and tumor suppression. SIRT1−/− mice demonstrate embryonic and postnatal development defects. We examined hematopoietic and endothelial cell differentiation of SIRT1−/− mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro, and hematopoietic progenitors in SIRT1+/++/−, and −/− mice. SIRT1−/− ESCs formed fewer mature blast cell colonies. Replated SIRT1−/− blast colony-forming cells demonstrated defective hematopoietic potential. Endothelial cell production was unaltered, but there were defects in formation of a primitive vascular network from SIRT1−/−-derived embryoid bodies. Development of primitive and definitive progenitors derived from SIRT1−/− ESCs were also delayed and/or defective. Differentiation delay/defects were associated with delayed capacity to switch off Oct4, Nanog and Fgf5 expression, decreased β-H1 globin, β-major globin, and Scl gene expression, and reduced activation of Erk1/2. Ectopic expression of SIRT1 rescued SIRT1−/− ESC differentiation deficiencies. SIRT1−/− yolk sacs manifested fewer primitive erythroid precursors. SIRT1−/− and SIRT1+/− adult marrow had decreased numbers and cycling of hematopoietic progenitors, effects more apparent at 5%, than at 20%, oxygen tension, and these progenitors survived less well in vitro under conditions of delayed growth factor addition. This suggests a role for SIRT1 in ESC differentiation and mouse hematopoiesis. PMID:20966168

  17. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Juboori, Saif I.

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  18. Light Scattering Properties Vary across Different Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue. PMID:23874433

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of the developing and adult mouse cochlear sensory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Smeti, Ibtihel; Assou, Said; Savary, Etienne; Masmoudi, Saber; Zine, Azel

    2012-01-01

    The adult mammalian cochlea lacks regenerative ability and the irreversible degeneration of cochlear sensory hair cells leads to permanent hearing loss. Previous data show that early postnatal cochlea harbors stem/progenitor-like cells and shows a limited regenerative/repair capacity. These properties are progressively lost later during the postnatal development. Little is known about the genes and pathways that are potentially involved in this difference of the regenerative/repair potentialities between early postnatal and adult mammalian cochlear sensory epithelia (CSE). The goal of our study is to investigate the transcriptomic profiles of these two stages. We used Mouse Genome 430 2.0 microarray to perform an extensive analysis of the genes expressed in mouse postnatal day-3 (P3) and adult CSE. Statistical analysis of microarray data was performed using SAM (Significance Analysis of Microarrays) software. We identified 5644 statistically significant differentially expressed transcripts with a fold change (FC) >2 and a False Discovery Rate (FDR) ≤0.05. The P3 CSE signature included 3,102 transcripts, among which were known genes in the cochlea, but also new transcripts such as, Hmga2 (high mobility group AT-hook 2) and Nrarp (Notch-regulated ankyrin repeat protein). The adult CSE overexpressed 2,542 transcripts including new transcripts, such as Prl (Prolactin) and Ar (Androgen receptor), that previously were not known to be expressed in the adult cochlea. Our comparative study revealed important genes and pathways differentially expressed between the developing and adult CSE. The identification of new candidate genes would be useful as potential markers of the maintenance or the loss of stem cells and regenerative/repair ability during mammalian cochlear development.

  20. Sertoli Cells Maintain Leydig Cell Number and Peritubular Myoid Cell Activity in the Adult Mouse Testis

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana; Milne, Laura; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Jeffrey, Nathan; Guillou, Florian; Freeman, Tom C.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2014-01-01

    The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR) specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health. PMID:25144714

  1. Use of small donors (<28 kg) for pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Illanes, H G; Quarin, C M; Maurette, R; Sánchez, N G; Reniero, L; Casadei, D H

    2009-01-01

    Small donors have long been considered a potential source of organs for simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) and pancreas transplantation alone (PTA). Our aim was to analyze our experience with SPK and PTA using small donors weighing <28 kg. Between September 2006 and October 2008, we performed 68 SPK, 3 PTA, and 3 pancreas after kidney transplantations (PAK). All recipients were adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus, including 8 who received small donor organs (<28 kg): 6 SPK and 2 PTA. We used 3 graft combinations for SPK: pancreas and single kidney; pancreas and en bloc kidneys; and en bloc dual kidney-pancreas. In contrast, we used conventional grafts for PTA. Mean weight among donors was 20.82 kg (range, 9.6-27 kg). We observed neither delayed graft function nor mortality. At a follow-up of approximately 281 days, all patients were free of insulin and dialysis treatments. Kidneys and pancreas from donors weighing <28 kg can be used in adult type 1 diabetic patients with excellent results. These small pediatric donors enabled us to enlarge the number of transplantations by 10.81%.

  2. Ultrastructural analysis of adult mouse neocortex comparing aldehyde perfusion with cryo fixation

    PubMed Central

    Korogod, Natalya; Petersen, Carl CH; Knott, Graham W

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of brain ultrastructure using electron microscopy typically relies on chemical fixation. However, this is known to cause significant tissue distortion including a reduction in the extracellular space. Cryo fixation is thought to give a truer representation of biological structures, and here we use rapid, high-pressure freezing on adult mouse neocortex to quantify the extent to which these two fixation methods differ in terms of their preservation of the different cellular compartments, and the arrangement of membranes at the synapse and around blood vessels. As well as preserving a physiological extracellular space, cryo fixation reveals larger numbers of docked synaptic vesicles, a smaller glial volume, and a less intimate glial coverage of synapses and blood vessels compared to chemical fixation. The ultrastructure of mouse neocortex therefore differs significantly comparing cryo and chemical fixation conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05793.001 PMID:26259873

  3. The expression of Troponin T1 gene is induced by ketamine in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Xiu R; Lu, Xiaochen; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2007-10-12

    The glutamatergic system has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease, which also have a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Treatment with ketamine, a non-competitive glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, is known to have paradoxical effects of neuroprotection and neurotoxicity. We investigated gene expression in brain tissue of adult mice treated with ketamine to characterize the expression profiles and to identify the affected metabolic pathways. Adult male mice were treated by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either s(+)ketamine (80 mg/kg) or distilled water (as the control). Fifty genes were differentially expressed in ketamine-treated mouse brains compared with control mice using oligonucleotide microarray analysis, and the expression of Troponin T1 (Tnnt1) gene was consistently elevated (2- to 4-fold) (p<0.001). Ketamine-induced Tnnt1 expression was confirmed and characterized using RNA in situ hybridization techniques in paraffin embedded brain tissue sections. Tnnt1 expression was induced in the granule layer of the hippocampus, amygdala, hypothalamus, Purkinje cells of cerebellum (p<0.0001), and cerebral cortex. Tnnt1 gene is known to interact directly with FoxO1, which is involved in multiple peripheral metabolic pathways and central energy homeostasis. Our findings suggest that the induction of Tnnt1 gene expression in adult mouse brains by ketamine may illustrate the genes involved in the metabolic syndromes observed in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Differential regulation of laminin b1 transgene expression in the neonatal and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K A; Baker, H; Gudas, L J

    2004-01-01

    Laminins are the major glycoproteins present in basement membrane, a type of extracellular matrix. We showed that the LAMB1 gene, which encodes the laminin beta1 subunit, is transcriptionally activated by retinoic acid in embryonic stem cells. However, little information is available concerning LAMB1 developmental regulation and spatial expression in the adult mouse brain. In this study we used transgenic mice expressing different lengths of LAMB1 promoter driving beta-galactosidase to investigate developmental and adult transcriptional regulation in the regions of the brain in which the laminin beta1 protein is expressed. CNS expression was not observed in transgenic mice carrying a 1.4LAMB1betagal construct. Mice carrying a 2.5LAMB1betagal construct expressed the LAMB1 transgene, as assayed by X-gal staining, only in the molecular layer of the neonatal cerebellum. In contrast, a 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene showed broad regional expression in the adult mouse brain, including the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, colliculi, striatum, and substantia nigra. Similar expression patterns were observed for the endogenous laminin beta1 protein and for the 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene, analyzed with an antibody against the beta-galactosidase protein. The 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene expression in the hippocampal tri-synaptic circuit suggests a role for the LAMB1 gene in learning and memory.

  5. Human tau expression reduces adult neurogenesis in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Yutaro; Xu, Guixiang; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lamb, Bruce T

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is a central feature of a class of neurodegenerative diseases termed tauopathies. Notably, there is increasing evidence that tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease, are also characterized by a reduction in neurogenesis, the birth of adult neurons. However, the exact relationship between hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of MAPT and neurogenic deficits remains unclear, including whether this is an early- or late-stage disease marker. In the present study, we used the genomic-based hTau mouse model of tauopathy to examine the temporal and spatial regulation of adult neurogenesis during the course of the disease. Surprisingly, hTau mice exhibited reductions in adult neurogenesis in 2 different brain regions by as early as 2 months of age, before the development of robust MAPT pathology in this model. This reduction was found to be due to reduced proliferation and not because of enhanced apoptosis in the hippocampus. At these same time points, hTau mice also exhibited altered MAPT phosphorylation with neurogenic precursors. To examine whether the effects of MAPT on neurogenesis were cell autonomous, neurospheres prepared from hTau animals were examined in vitro, revealing a growth deficit when compared with non-transgenic neurosphere cultures. Taken together, these studies provide evidence that altered adult neurogenesis is a robust and early marker of altered, cell-autonomous function of MAPT in the hTau mouse mode of tauopathy and that altered adult neurogenesis should be examined as a potential marker and therapeutic target for human tauopathies.

  6. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras.

    PubMed

    Keighren, Margaret A; Flockhart, Jean H; West, John D

    2016-05-15

    The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera with functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1(-/-) null cells in adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras and determine if Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes in one female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c), this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many adult tissues.

  7. A novel mouse model that recapitulates adult-onset glycogenosis type 4

    PubMed Central

    Orhan Akman, H.; Emmanuele, Valentina; Kurt, Yasemin Gülcan; Kurt, Bülent; Sheiko, Tatiana; DiMauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age at onset. Complete loss of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy and affects primarily the muscle and the liver. However, residual enzyme activity as low as 5–20% leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects the central and peripheral nervous system and muscles and in the latter is termed adult polyglucosan body disease (APBD). Here, we describe a mouse model of GSD IV that reflects this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to knock in the most common GBE1 mutation p.Y329S c.986A > C found in APBD patients of Ashkenazi Jewish decent. Mice homozygous for this allele (Gbe1ys/ys) exhibit a phenotype similar to APBD, with widespread accumulation of PG. Adult mice exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. While the onset of symptoms is limited to adult mice, PG accumulates in tissues of newborn mice but is initially absent from the cerebral cortex and heart muscle. Thus, PG is well tolerated in most tissues, but the eventual accumulation in neurons and their axons causes neuropathy that leads to hind limb spasticity and premature death. This mouse model mimics the pathology and pathophysiologic features of human adult-onset branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:26385640

  8. A detailed characterization of the adult mouse model of glycogen storage disease Ia.

    PubMed

    Salganik, Susan V; Weinstein, David A; Shupe, Thomas D; Salganik, Max; Pintilie, Dana G; Petersen, Bryon E

    2009-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is caused by a genetic defect in the hepatic enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase-alpha), which manifests as life-threatening hypoglycemia with related metabolic complications. A G6Pase-alpha knockout (KO) mouse model was generated to study potential therapies for correcting this disorder. Since then, gene therapy studies have produced promising results, showing long-term improvement in liver histology and glycogen metabolism. Under existing protocols, however, untreated KO pups seldom survived weaning. Here, we present a thorough characterization of the G6Pase-alpha KO mouse, as well as the husbandry protocol for rearing this strain to adulthood. These mice were raised with only palliative care, and characterized from birth through 6 months of age. Once KO mice have survived the very frail weaning period, their size, agility, serum lipids and glycemic control improve dramatically, reaching levels approaching their wild-type littermates. In addition, our data reveal that adult mice lacking G6Pase-alpha are able to mate and produce viable offspring. However, liver histology and glycogen accumulation do not improve with age. Overall, the reliable production of mature KO mice could provide a critical tool for advancing the GSDIa field, as the availability of a robust enzyme-deficient adult offers a new spectrum of treatment avenues that would not be tolerated by the frail pups. Most importantly, our detailed characterization of the adult KO mouse provides a crucial baseline for accurately gauging the efficacy of experimental therapies in this important model.

  9. Pancreas-Specific Deletion of Prox1 Affects Development and Disrupts Homeostasis of the Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    WESTMORELAND, JOBY J.; KILIC, GAMZE; SARTAIN, CAROLINE; SIRMA, SEMA; BLAIN, JENNIFER; REHG, JEROLD; HARVEY, NATASHA; SOSA–PINEDA, BEATRIZ

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The exocrine portion of the pancreas functions in digestion and preserves pancreatic homeostasis. Learning how this tissue forms during embryogenesis could improve our understanding of human pancreatic diseases. Expression of the homeo-box gene Prox1 in the exocrine pancreas changes throughout development in mice. We investigated the role of Prox1 in development of the exocrine pancreas in mice. METHODS Mice with pancreas-specific deletion of Prox1 (Prox1ΔPanc) were generated and their pancreatic tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, histologic techniques, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and morphometric analysis. RESULTS Loss of Prox1 from the pancreas led to multiple exocrine alterations, most notably premature acinar cell differentiation, increased ductal cell proliferation, altered duct morphogenesis, and imbalanced expression of claudin proteins. Prox1ΔPanc mice also had some minor alterations in islet cells, but beta-cell development was not affected. The exocrine congenital defects of Prox1ΔPanc pancreata appeared to initiate a gradual process of deterioration that resulted in extensive loss of acinar cells, lipomatosis, and damage to ductal tissue in adult mice. CONCLUSIONS Pancreas-specific deletion of Prox1 causes premature differentiation of acinar cells and poor elongation of epithelial branches; these defects indicate that Prox1 controls the expansion of tip progenitors in the early developing pancreas. During later stages of embryogenesis, Prox1 appears to regulate duct cell proliferation and morphogenesis. These findings identify Prox1 as an important regulator of pancreatic exocrine development. PMID:22178591

  10. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi; Peters, Christoph; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  11. Model individualization for artificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Messori, Mirko; Toffanin, Chiara; Del Favero, Simone; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Cobelli, Claudio; Magni, Lalo

    2016-07-05

    The inter-subject variability characterizing the patients affected by type 1 diabetes mellitus makes automatic blood glucose control very challenging. Different patients have different insulin responses, and a control law based on a non-individualized model could be ineffective. The definition of an individualized control law in the context of artificial pancreas is currently an open research topic. In this work we consider two novel identification approaches that can be used for individualizing linear glucose-insulin models to a specific patient. The first approach belongs to the class of black-box identification and is based on a novel kernel-based nonparametric approach, whereas the second is a gray-box identification technique which relies on a constrained optimization and requires to postulate a model structure as prior knowledge. The latter is derived from the linearization of the average nonlinear adult virtual patient of the UVA/Padova simulator. Model identification and validation are based on in silico data collected during simulations of clinical protocols designed to produce a sufficient signal excitation without compromising patient safety. The identified models are evaluated in terms of prediction performance by means of the coefficient of determination, fit, positive and negative max errors, and root mean square error. Both identification approaches were used to identify a linear individualized glucose-insulin model for each adult virtual patient of the UVA/Padova simulator. The resulting model simulation performance is significantly improved with respect to the performance achieved by a linear average model. The approaches proposed in this work have shown a good potential to identify glucose-insulin models for designing individualized control laws for artificial pancreas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Laparoscopic Biopsies in Pancreas Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Uva, P D; Odorico, J S; Giunippero, A; Cabrera, I C; Gallo, A; Leon, L R; Minue, E; Toniolo, F; Gonzalez, I; Chuluyan, E; Casadei, D H

    2017-08-01

    As there is no precise laboratory test or imaging study for detection of pancreas allograft rejection, there is increasing interest in obtaining pancreas tissue for diagnosis. Pancreas allograft biopsies are most commonly performed percutaneously, transcystoscopically, or endoscopically, yet pancreas transplant surgeons often lack the skills to perform these types of biopsies. We have performed 160 laparoscopic pancreas biopsies in 95 patients. There were 146 simultaneous kidney-pancreas biopsies and 14 pancreas-only biopsies due to pancreas alone, kidney loss, or extraperitoneal kidney. Biopsies were performed for graft dysfunction (89) or per protocol (71). In 13 cases, an additional laparoscopic procedure was performed at the same operation. The pancreas diagnostic tissue yield was 91.2%; however, the pancreas could not be visualized in eight cases (5%) and in 6 cases the tissue sample was nondiagnostic (3.8%). The kidney tissue yield was 98.6%. There were four patients with intraoperative complications requiring laparotomy (2.5%) with two additional postoperative complications. Half of all these complications were kidney related. There were no episodes of pancreatic enzyme leak and there were no graft losses related to the procedure. We conclude that laparoscopic kidney and pancreas allograft biopsies can be safely performed with very high tissue yields. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  13. Pax7 is expressed in the capsules surrounding adult mouse neuromuscular spindles.

    PubMed

    Rodger, J; Ziman, M R; Papadimitriou, J M; Kay, P H

    1999-01-01

    The multigene Pax family of transcription factors plays an important role in the development of the central nervous system as well as in organ morphogenesis. Expression of one of the members of the family, Pax7, has been described in embryonic muscle and in both embryonic and adult brain. We recently detected Pax7 transcripts in RNA isolated from adult mouse skeletal muscle and brain and here use in situ hybridisation to localise the expression within these tissues. Pax7 expression was observed in neural cells of the brain and in cells of neural crest origin in the inner and outer capsules of neuromuscular spindles. The results suggest that Pax7 may be implicated in the formation and maintenance of neuromuscular contacts within the muscle spindle throughout life.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Micro-Computed Tomography Combined Atlas of Developing and Adult Mouse Brains for Stereotaxic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Zhang, Jiangyang; Miller, Michael I.; Sidman, Richard L.; Mori, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    Stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are important in neuroscience research for targeting of specific internal brain structures during surgical operations. The effectiveness of stereotaxic surgery depends on accurate mapping of the brain structures relative to landmarks on the skull. During postnatal development in the mouse, rapid growth-related changes in the brain occur concurrently with growth of bony plates at the cranial sutures, therefore adult mouse brain atlases cannot be used to precisely guide stereotaxis in developing brains. In this study, three-dimensional stereotaxic atlases of C57BL/6J mouse brains at six postnatal developmental stages: P7, P14, P21, P28, P63 and in adults (P140–P160) were developed, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and micro-computed tomography (CT). At present, most widely-used stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are based on histology, but the anatomical fidelity of ex vivo atlases to in vivo mouse brains has not been evaluated previously. To account for ex vivo tissue distortion due to fixation as well as individual variability in the brain, we developed a population-averaged in vivo MRI adult mouse brain stereotaxic atlas, and a distortion-corrected DTI atlas was generated by nonlinearly warping ex vivo data to the population-averaged in vivo atlas. These atlas resources were developed and made available through a new software user-interface with the objective of improving the accuracy of targeting brain structures during stereotaxic surgery in developing and adult C57BL/6J mouse brains. PMID:19490934

  15. Localized CT-Guided Irradiation Inhibits Neurogenesis in Specific Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ford, E. C.; Achanta, P.; Purger, D.; Armour, M.; Reyes, J.; Fong, J.; Kleinberg, L.; Redmond, K.; Wong, J.; Jang, M. H.; Jun, H.; Song, H-J.; Quinones-Hinojosa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation is used in the study of neurogenesis in the adult mouse both as a model for patients undergoing radiation therapy for CNS malignancies and as a tool to interrupt neurogenesis. We describe the use of a dedicated CT-guided precision device to irradiate specific sub-regions of the adult mouse brain. Improved CT visualization was accomplished with intrathecal injection of iodinated contrast agent, which enhances the lateral ventricles. T2-weighted MRI images were also used for target localization. Visualization of delivered beams (10 Gy) in tissue was accomplished with immunohistochemical staining for the protein γ-H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks. γ-H2AX stains showed that the lateral ventricle wall could be targeted with an accuracy of 0.19 mm (n = 10). In the hippocampus, γ-H2AX staining showed that the dentate gyrus can be irradiated unilaterally with a localized arc treatment. This resulted in a significant decrease of proliferative neural progenitor cells as measured by Ki-67 staining (P < 0.001) while leaving the contralateral side intact. Two months after localized irradiation, neurogenesis was significantly inhibited in the irradiated region as seen with EdU/NeuN double labeling (P < 0.001). Localized radiation in the rodent brain is a promising new tool for the study of neurogenesis. PMID:21449714

  16. Establishment of Leptin-Responsive Cell Lines from Adult Mouse Hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Iwakura, Hiroshi; Dote, Katsuko; Bando, Mika; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2016-01-01

    Leptin resistance is considered to be the primary cause of obesity. However, the cause of leptin resistance remains incompletely understood, and there is currently no cure for the leptin-resistant state. In order to identify novel drug-target molecules that could overcome leptin resistance, it would be useful to develop in vitro assay systems for evaluating leptin resistance. In this study, we established immortalized adult mouse hypothalamus-derived cell lines, termed adult mouse hypothalamus (AMH) cells, by developing transgenic mice in which SV40 Tag was overexpressed in chromogranin A-positive cells in a tamoxifen-dependent manner. In order to obtain leptin-responsive clones, we selected clones based on the phosphorylation levels of STAT3 induced by leptin. The selected clones were fairly responsive to leptin in terms of STAT3, ERK, and Akt phosphorylation and induction of c-Fos mRNA induction. Pretreatment with leptin, insulin, and palmitate attenuated the c-Fos mRNA response to leptin, suggesting that certain aspects of leptin resistance might be reconstituted in this cellular model. These cell lines are useful tools for understanding the molecular nature of the signal disturbance in the leptin-resistant state and for identifying potential target molecules for drugs that relieve leptin resistance, although they have drawbacks including de-differentiated nature and lack of long-time stability.

  17. Nestin Expression in the Adult Mouse Retina with Pharmaceutically Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the temporal pattern and cellular localization of nestin in the adult mouse retina with pharmaceutically induced retinal degeneration using N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). After a single intraperitoneal injection of MNU in 8-week-old C57BL/6 mice, the animals were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 21 days (n = 6, in each stage). The eyes were examined by means of immunohistochemical tests using nestin, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule (Iba-1), CD11b, F4/80, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Western blot analysis and manual cell counting were performed for quantification. Nestin expression was increased after MNU administration. Nestin+/Iba-1+ cells were migrated into outer nuclear layer (ONL) and peaked at day 3 post injection (PI). Nestin+/CD11b+ cells were also mainly identified in ONL at day 3 PI and peaked at day 5. Nestin+/F4/80+ cells were shown in the subretinal space and peaked at day 3 PI. Nestin+/GFAP+ cells were distinctly increased at day 1 PI and peaked at day 5 PI. The up-regulation of nestin expression after MNU administration in adult mouse retinal microglia, and monocyte/macrophage suggests that when retinal degeneration progresses, these cells may revert to a more developmentally immature state. Müller cells also showed reactive gliosis and differentiational changes. PMID:28049248

  18. Nestin Expression in the Adult Mouse Retina with Pharmaceutically Induced Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chan Hee; Cho, Heeyoon; Kim, Yoon Kyung; Park, Tae Kwann

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the temporal pattern and cellular localization of nestin in the adult mouse retina with pharmaceutically induced retinal degeneration using N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). After a single intraperitoneal injection of MNU in 8-week-old C57BL/6 mice, the animals were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 21 days (n = 6, in each stage). The eyes were examined by means of immunohistochemical tests using nestin, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule (Iba-1), CD11b, F4/80, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Western blot analysis and manual cell counting were performed for quantification. Nestin expression was increased after MNU administration. Nestin+/Iba-1+ cells were migrated into outer nuclear layer (ONL) and peaked at day 3 post injection (PI). Nestin+/CD11b+ cells were also mainly identified in ONL at day 3 PI and peaked at day 5. Nestin+/F4/80+ cells were shown in the subretinal space and peaked at day 3 PI. Nestin+/GFAP+ cells were distinctly increased at day 1 PI and peaked at day 5 PI. The up-regulation of nestin expression after MNU administration in adult mouse retinal microglia, and monocyte/macrophage suggests that when retinal degeneration progresses, these cells may revert to a more developmentally immature state. Müller cells also showed reactive gliosis and differentiational changes.

  19. Establishment of Leptin-Responsive Cell Lines from Adult Mouse Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Iwakura, Hiroshi; Dote, Katsuko; Bando, Mika; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2016-01-01

    Leptin resistance is considered to be the primary cause of obesity. However, the cause of leptin resistance remains incompletely understood, and there is currently no cure for the leptin-resistant state. In order to identify novel drug-target molecules that could overcome leptin resistance, it would be useful to develop in vitro assay systems for evaluating leptin resistance. In this study, we established immortalized adult mouse hypothalamus—derived cell lines, termed adult mouse hypothalamus (AMH) cells, by developing transgenic mice in which SV40 Tag was overexpressed in chromogranin A—positive cells in a tamoxifen-dependent manner. In order to obtain leptin-responsive clones, we selected clones based on the phosphorylation levels of STAT3 induced by leptin. The selected clones were fairly responsive to leptin in terms of STAT3, ERK, and Akt phosphorylation and induction of c-Fos mRNA induction. Pretreatment with leptin, insulin, and palmitate attenuated the c-Fos mRNA response to leptin, suggesting that certain aspects of leptin resistance might be reconstituted in this cellular model. These cell lines are useful tools for understanding the molecular nature of the signal disturbance in the leptin-resistant state and for identifying potential target molecules for drugs that relieve leptin resistance, although they have drawbacks including de-differentiated nature and lack of long-time stability. PMID:26849804

  20. Properties of sodium currents in neonatal and young adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Melissa A; Farrell, Kristen E; Graham, Brett A; Brichta, Alan M; Callister, Robert J

    2015-03-28

    Superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons process nociceptive information and their excitability is partly determined by the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. Recently, we showed the excitability and action potential properties of mouse SDH neurons change markedly during early postnatal development. Here we compare sodium currents generated in neonate (P0-5) and young adult (≥P21) SDH neurons. Whole cell recordings were obtained from lumbar SDH neurons in transverse spinal cord slices (CsF internal, 32°C). Fast activating and inactivating TTX-sensitive inward currents were evoked by depolarization from a holding potential of -100 mV. Poorly clamped currents, based on a deflection in the IV relationship at potentials between -60 and -50 mV, were not accepted for analysis. Current density and decay time increased significantly between the first and third weeks of postnatal development, whereas time to peak was similar at both ages. This was accompanied by more subtle changes in activation range and steady state inactivation. Recovery from inactivation was slower and TTX-sensitivity was reduced in young adult neurons. Our study suggests sodium channel expression changes markedly during early postnatal development in mouse SDH neurons. The methods employed in this study can now be applied to future investigations of spinal cord sodium channel plasticity in murine pain models.

  1. Rescue of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in a Mouse Model of HIV Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Wang, Tongguang; Jang, Mi-Hyeon; Steiner, Joseph; Haughey, Norman; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun; Nath, Avindra; Venkatesan, Arun

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of central nervous system (CNS) neurologic dysfunction associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continues to increase, despite the use of antiretroviral therapy. Previous work has focused on the deleterious effects of HIV on mature neurons and on development of neuroprotective strategies, which have consistently failed to show a meaningful clinical benefit. It is now well established that new neurons are continuously generated in discrete regions in the adult mammalian brain, and accumulating evidence supports important roles for these neurons in specific cognitive functions. In a transgenic mouse model of HIV neurologic disease with glial expression of the HIV envelope protein gp120, we demonstrate a significant reduction in proliferation of hippocampal neural progenitors in the dentate gyrus of adult animals, resulting in a dramatic decrease in the number of newborn neurons in the adult brain. We identify amplifying neural progenitor cells (ANPs) as the first class of progenitors affected by gp120, and we also demonstrate that newly generated neurons exhibit aberrant dendritic development. Furthermore, voluntary exercise and treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor increase the ANP population and rescue the observed deficits in gp120 transgenic mice. Thus, during HIV infection, the envelope protein gp120 may potently inhibit adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and neurorestorative approaches may be effective in ameliorating these effects. Our study has significant implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for HIV-infected individuals with neurologic dysfunction and may be applicable to other neurodegenerative diseases in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired. PMID:21146610

  2. Ultrastructural evidence of exosome secretion by progenitor cells in adult mouse myocardium and adult human cardiospheres.

    PubMed

    Barile, Lucio; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Moccetti, Tiziano; Vassalli, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The demonstration of beneficial effects of cell therapy despite the persistence of only few transplanted cells in vivo suggests secreted factors may be the active component of this treatment. This so-called paracrine hypothesis is supported by observations that culture media conditioned by progenitor cells contain growth factors that mediate proangiogenic and cytoprotective effects. Cardiac progenitor cells in semi-suspension culture form spherical clusters (cardiospheres) that deliver paracrine signals to neighboring cells. A key component of paracrine secretion is exosomes, membrane vesicles that are stored intracellularly in endosomal compartments and are secreted when these structures fuse with the cell plasma membrane. Exosomes have been identified as the active component of proangiogenic effects of bone marrow CD34⁺ stem cells in mice and the regenerative effects of embryonic mesenchymal stem cells in infarcted hearts in pigs and mice. Here, we provide electron microscopic evidence of exosome secretion by progenitor cells in mouse myocardium and human cardiospheres. Exosomes are emerging as an attractive vector of paracrine signals delivered by progenitor cells. They can be stored as an "off-the-shelf" product. As such, exosomes have the potential for circumventing many of the limitations of viable cells for therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine.

  3. Expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in the adult and developing mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Tuhina; Verma, Amrisha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have provided evidence that a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the retina and plays an important role in retinal neurovascular function. We have recently shown that increased expression of ACE2 and angiotensin (1-7) [Ang (1-7)], two components of the protective axis of the RAS, in the retina via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery, conferred protection against diabetes-induced retinopathy. We hypothesized that the protective molecular and cellular mechanisms of Ang (1-7) are mediated by its receptor, Mas, and the expression level and cellular localization dictate the response to Ang (1-7) and activation of subsequent protective signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by examining the expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in adult and developing mouse retinas. Methods The cellular localization of the Mas receptor protein was determined with immunofluorescence of the eyes of adult and postnatal day 1 (P1), P5, P7, P15, and P21 mice using the Mas receptor-specific antibody, and mRNA was detected with in situ hybridization of paraffin-embedded sections. Western blotting and real-time reverse-transcription (RT)–PCR analysis were performed to determine the relative levels of the Mas protein and mRNA in adult and developing retinas, as well as in cultured retinal Müller glial and RPE cells. Results In the adult eye, the Mas receptor protein was abundantly present in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and photoreceptor cells; a lower level of expression was observed in endothelial cells, Müller glial cells, and other neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina. In the developing retina, Mas receptor mRNA and protein expression was detected in the inner retina at P1, and the expression levels increased with age to reach the adult level and pattern by P15. In the adult mouse retina, Mas receptor mRNA was expressed at a much higher level when compared to angiotensin II (Ang II) type I (AT1R) and

  4. Voluntary physical exercise promotes ocular dominance plasticity in adult mouse primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Haack, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2014-11-12

    Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) declines during aging and is absent beyond postnatal day (P) 110 when mice are raised in standard cages (SCs; Lehmann and Löwel, 2008). In contrast, raising mice in an enriched environment (EE) preserved a juvenile-like OD plasticity into late adulthood (Greifzu et al., 2014). EE raising provides the mice with more social interactions, voluntary physical exercise, and cognitive stimulation compared with SC, raising the question whether all components are needed or whether one of them is already sufficient to prolong plasticity. To test whether voluntary physical exercise alone already prolongs the sensitive phase for OD plasticity, we raised mice from 7 d before birth to adulthood in slightly larger than normal SCs with or without a running wheel (RW). When the mice were older than P135, we visualized V1 activity before and after monocular deprivation (MD) using intrinsic signal optical imaging. Adult RW-raised mice continued to show an OD shift toward the open eye after 7 d of MD, while age-matched SC mice without a RW did not show OD plasticity. Notably, running just during the 7 d MD period restored OD plasticity in adult SC-raised mice. In addition, the OD shift of the RW mice was mediated by a decrease of deprived-eye responses in V1, a signature of "juvenile-like" plasticity. We conclude that voluntary physical exercise alone is sufficient to promote plasticity in adult mouse V1.

  5. Expression of cyclin E in postmitotic neurons during development and in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yayoi; Matsunaga, Yuko; Takiguchi, Masahito; Ikeda, Masa-Aki

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin E, a member of the G1 cyclins, is essential for the G1/S transition of the cell cycle in cultured cells, but its roles in vivo are not fully defined. The present study characterized the spatiotemporal expression profile of cyclin E in two representative brain regions in the mouse, the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. Western blotting showed that the levels of cyclin E increased towards adulthood. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed the distributions of cyclin E mRNA and protein were comparable in the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum. Immunohistochemistry for the proliferating cell marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) revealed that cyclin E was expressed by both proliferating and non-proliferating cells in the cerebral cortex at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and in the cerebellum at postnatal day 1 (P1). Subcellular localization in neurons was examined using immunofluorescence and western blotting. Cyclin E expression was nuclear in proliferating neuronal precursor cells but cytoplasmic in postmitotic neurons during embryonic development. Nuclear cyclin E expression in neurons remained faint in newborns, increased during postnatal development and was markedly decreased in adults. In various adult brain regions, cyclin E staining was more intense in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus in most neurons. These data suggest a role for cyclin E in the development and function of the mammalian central nervous system and that its subcellular localization in neurons is important. Our report presents the first detailed analysis of cyclin E expression in postmitotic neurons during development and in the adult mouse brain.

  6. Expression patterns of epiplakin1 in pancreas, pancreatic cancer and regenerating pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tetsu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Baba, Hideo; Goto, Mizuki; Fujiwara, Sakuhei; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2008-07-01

    Epiplakin1 (Eppk1) is a plakin family gene with its function remains largely unknown, although the plakin genes are known to function in interconnecting cytoskeletal filaments and anchoring them at plasma membrane-associated adhesive junction. Here we analyzed the expression patterns of Eppk1 in the developing and adult pancreas in the mice. In the embryonic pancreas, Eppk1+/Pdx1+ and Eppk1+/Sox9+ pancreatic progenitor cells were observed in early pancreatic epithelium. Since Pdx1 expression overlapped with that of Sox9 at this stage, these multipotent progenitor cells are Eppk1+/Pdx1+/Sox9+ cells. Then Eppk1 expression becomes confined to Ngn3+ or Sox9+ endocrine progenitor cells, and p48+ exocrine progenitor cells, and then restricted to the duct cells and a cells at birth. In the adult pancreas, Eppk1 is expressed in centroacinar cells (CACs) and in duct cells. Eppk1 is observed in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), previously identified as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) precursor lesions. In addition, the expansion of Eppk1-positive cells occurs in a caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, an acinar cell regeneration model. Furthermore, in the partial pancreatectomy (Px) regeneration model using mice, Eppk1 is expressed in "ducts in foci", a tubular structure transiently induced. These results suggest that Eppk1 serves as a useful marker for detecting pancreatic progenitor cells in developing and regenerating pancreas.

  7. The left-sided pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, G.D.; Gibson, R.N.

    1986-06-01

    Ultrasonography (US) performed in nine patients (two with pancreatic carcinoma, one with hepatomegaly), six with no relevant abdominal disease) showed the pancreas to lie wholly to the left of the aorta. This not uncommon location may give rise to difficulty in demonstrating the pancreas on real-time US scans. The superior mesenteric vessels and splenic vein remain useful land-marks for locating the head of the pancreas in this position.

  8. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras

    PubMed Central

    Keighren, Margaret A.; Flockhart, Jean H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1−/− null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1−/− null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera with functional Gpi1−/− null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1−/− null cells in adult Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaeras and determine if Gpi1−/− null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1−/− null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1−/− null oocytes in one female Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1−/− null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c, this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1−/− null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1−/− null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1−/− null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1−/− null cells could survive in many adult tissues. PMID:27103217

  9. Phenotypical and ultrastructural features of Oct4-positive cells in the adult mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Galiger, Celimene; Kostin, Sawa; Golec, Anita; Ahlbrecht, Katrin; Becker, Sven; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Morty, Rory E; Seeger, Werner; Voswinckel, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Octamer binding trascription factor 4 (Oct4) is a transcription factor of POU family specifically expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). A role for maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal of ESCs is assigned to Oct4 as a pluripotency marker. Oct4 can also be detected in adult stem cells such as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Several studies suggest a role for Oct4 in sustaining self-renewal capacity of adult stem cells. However, Oct4 gene ablation in adult stem cells revealed no abnormalities in tissue turnover or regenerative capacity. In the present study we have conspicuously found pulmonary Oct4-positive cells closely resembling the morphology of telocytes (TCs). These cells were found in the perivascular and peribronchial areas and their presence and location were confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, we have used Oct4-GFP transgenic mice which revealed a similar localization of the Oct4-GFP signal. We also found that Oct4 co-localized with several described TC markers such as vimentin, Sca-1, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta C-kit and VEGF. By flow cytometry analyses carried out with Oct4-GFP reporter mice, we described a population of EpCAMneg/CD45neg/Oct4-GFPpos that in culture displayed TC features. These results were supported by qRT-PCR with mRNA isolated from lungs by using laser capture microdissection. In addition, Oct4-positive cells were found to express Nanog and Klf4 mRNA. It is concluded for the first time that TCs in adult lung mouse tissue comprise Oct4-positive cells, which express pluripotency-related genes and represent therefore a population of adult stem cells which might contribute to lung regeneration. PMID:24889158

  10. Localization and regulation of PML bodies in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hall, Małgorzata H; Magalska, Adriana; Malinowska, Monika; Ruszczycki, Błażej; Czaban, Iwona; Patel, Satyam; Ambrożek-Latecka, Magdalena; Zołocińska, Ewa; Broszkiewicz, Hanna; Parobczak, Kamil; Nair, Rajeevkumar R; Rylski, Marcin; Pawlak, Robert; Bramham, Clive R; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M

    2016-06-01

    PML is a tumor suppressor protein involved in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic leukemia. In non-neuronal cells, PML is a principal component of characteristic nuclear bodies. In the brain, PML has been implicated in the control of embryonic neurogenesis, and in certain physiological and pathological phenomena in the adult brain. Yet, the cellular and subcellular localization of the PML protein in the brain, including its presence in the nuclear bodies, has not been investigated comprehensively. Because the formation of PML bodies appears to be a key aspect in the function of the PML protein, we investigated the presence of these structures and their anatomical distribution, throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PML is broadly expressed across the gray matter, with the highest levels in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. In the cerebral cortex PML is present exclusively in neurons, in which it forms well-defined nuclear inclusions containing SUMO-1, SUMO 2/3, but not Daxx. At the ultrastructural level, the appearance of neuronal PML bodies differs from the classic one, i.e., the solitary structure with more or less distinctive capsule. Rather, neuronal PML bodies have the form of small PML protein aggregates located in the close vicinity of chromatin threads. The number, size, and signal intensity of neuronal PML bodies are dynamically influenced by immobilization stress and seizures. Our study indicates that PML bodies are broadly involved in activity-dependent nuclear phenomena in adult neurons.

  11. Abca7 deletion does not affect adult neurogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyun; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-20

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) is highly expressed in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ABCA7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk, however, the mechanisms by which ABCA7 may control AD risk remain to be fully elucidated. Based on previous research suggesting that certain ABC transporters may play a role in the regulation of neurogenesis, we conducted a study of cell proliferation and neurogenic potential using cellular bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in adult Abca7 deficient mice and wild-type-like (WT) littermates. In the present study counting of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in an established adult neurogenesis site in the dentate gyrus (DG) indicated there were no significant differences when WT and Abca7 deficient mice were compared. We also measured the area occupied by immunohistochemical staining for BrdU and DCX in the DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the same mice and this confirmed that ABCA7 does not play a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation or neurogenesis in the adult mouse.

  12. Growth Arrest Specific 1 (GAS1) Is Abundantly Expressed in the Adult Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zarco, Natanael; Bautista, Elizabeth; Cuéllar, Manola; Vergara, Paula; Flores-Rodriguez, Paola; Aguilar-Roblero, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Growth arrest specific 1 (GAS1) is a pleiotropic protein that induces apoptosis and cell arrest in different tumors, but it is also involved in the development of the nervous system and other tissues and organs. This dual ability is likely caused by its capacity to interact both by inhibiting the intracellular signaling cascade induced by glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor and by facilitating the activity of the sonic hedgehog pathway. The presence of GAS1 mRNA has been described in adult mouse brain, and here we corroborated this observation. We then proceeded to determine the distribution of the protein in the adult central nervous system (CNS). We detected, by western blot analysis, expression of GAS1 in olfactory bulb, caudate-putamen, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, mesencephalon, medulla oblongata, cerebellum, and cervical spinal cord. To more carefully map the expression of GAS1, we performed double-label immunohistochemistry and noticed expression of GAS1 in neurons in all brain areas examined. We also observed expression of GAS1 in astroglial cells, albeit the pattern of expression was more restricted than that seen in neurons. Briefly, in the present article, we report the widespread distribution and cellular localization of the GAS1 native protein in adult mammalian CNS. PMID:23813868

  13. MR imaging of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Erin; Hammond, Nancy; Miller, Frank H

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pancreas is useful as both a problem-solving tool and an initial imaging examination of choice. With newer imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging, MR offers improved ability to detect and characterize lesions and identify and stage tumors and inflammation. MR cholangiopancreatography can be used to visualize the pancreatic and biliary ductal system. In this article, the use of MR to evaluate the pancreas, including recent advances, is reviewed and the normal appearance of the pancreas on different imaging sequences, as well as inflammatory diseases, congenital abnormalities, and neoplasms of the pancreas, are discussed.

  14. Molecular taxonomy of major neuronal classes in the adult mouse forebrain.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Ken; Hempel, Chris M; Miller, Mark N; Hattox, Alexis M; Shapiro, Peter; Wu, Caizi; Huang, Z Josh; Nelson, Sacha B

    2006-01-01

    Identifying the neuronal cell types that comprise the mammalian forebrain is a central unsolved problem in neuroscience. Global gene expression profiles offer a potentially unbiased way to assess functional relationships between neurons. Here, we carried out microarray analysis of 12 populations of neurons in the adult mouse forebrain. Five of these populations were chosen from cingulate cortex and included several subtypes of GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal neurons. The remaining seven were derived from the somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus. Using these expression profiles, we were able to construct a taxonomic tree that reflected the expected major relationships between these populations, such as the distinction between cortical interneurons and projection neurons. The taxonomic tree indicated highly heterogeneous gene expression even within a single region. This dataset should be useful for the classification of unknown neuronal subtypes, the investigation of specifically expressed genes and the genetic manipulation of specific neuronal circuit elements.

  15. Chronic atypical antipsychotics, but not haloperidol, increase neurogenesis in the hippocampus of adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Chikama, Koji; Yamada, Hidetaka; Tsukamoto, Tatsuo; Kajitani, Kosuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Uchimura, Naohisa

    2017-09-09

    It is suggested that altered neuroplasticity contributes to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and antipsychotics may exhibit some of their therapeutic efficacies by improving neurogenesis and/or proliferation of neural progenitors. The aim of this study is to investigate whether chronic antipsychotics treatment affect neurogenesis in adult mouse hippocampus. Animals were administered olanzapine, quetiapine, clozapine, risperidone, aripiprazole, or haloperidol via the osmotic minipump for 21 days and then injected with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label mitotic cells. BrdU-positive cells in the hippocampus were quantified by stereology. Aripiprazole, quetiapine, clozapine, and olanzapine significantly increased density of BrdU-positive cells in the hippocampus. Interestingly, other antipsychotic drugs had tendency to increasing BrdU-positive cells, whereas haloperidol had propensity to decrease with a marginal significance. These results suggest that differences of neurogenesis among these drugs may, at least in part, account for their pharmacological profiles. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Genome-wide atlas of gene expression in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lein, Ed S; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Ao, Nancy; Ayres, Mikael; Bensinger, Amy; Bernard, Amy; Boe, Andrew F; Boguski, Mark S; Brockway, Kevin S; Byrnes, Emi J; Chen, Lin; Chen, Li; Chen, Tsuey-Ming; Chin, Mei Chi; Chong, Jimmy; Crook, Brian E; Czaplinska, Aneta; Dang, Chinh N; Datta, Suvro; Dee, Nick R; Desaki, Aimee L; Desta, Tsega; Diep, Ellen; Dolbeare, Tim A; Donelan, Matthew J; Dong, Hong-Wei; Dougherty, Jennifer G; Duncan, Ben J; Ebbert, Amanda J; Eichele, Gregor; Estin, Lili K; Faber, Casey; Facer, Benjamin A; Fields, Rick; Fischer, Shanna R; Fliss, Tim P; Frensley, Cliff; Gates, Sabrina N; Glattfelder, Katie J; Halverson, Kevin R; Hart, Matthew R; Hohmann, John G; Howell, Maureen P; Jeung, Darren P; Johnson, Rebecca A; Karr, Patrick T; Kawal, Reena; Kidney, Jolene M; Knapik, Rachel H; Kuan, Chihchau L; Lake, James H; Laramee, Annabel R; Larsen, Kirk D; Lau, Christopher; Lemon, Tracy A; Liang, Agnes J; Liu, Ying; Luong, Lon T; Michaels, Jesse; Morgan, Judith J; Morgan, Rebecca J; Mortrud, Marty T; Mosqueda, Nerick F; Ng, Lydia L; Ng, Randy; Orta, Geralyn J; Overly, Caroline C; Pak, Tu H; Parry, Sheana E; Pathak, Sayan D; Pearson, Owen C; Puchalski, Ralph B; Riley, Zackery L; Rockett, Hannah R; Rowland, Stephen A; Royall, Joshua J; Ruiz, Marcos J; Sarno, Nadia R; Schaffnit, Katherine; Shapovalova, Nadiya V; Sivisay, Taz; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R; Smith, Simon C; Smith, Kimberly A; Smith, Bryan I; Sodt, Andy J; Stewart, Nick N; Stumpf, Kenda-Ruth; Sunkin, Susan M; Sutram, Madhavi; Tam, Angelene; Teemer, Carey D; Thaller, Christina; Thompson, Carol L; Varnam, Lee R; Visel, Axel; Whitlock, Ray M; Wohnoutka, Paul E; Wolkey, Crissa K; Wong, Victoria Y; Wood, Matthew; Yaylaoglu, Murat B; Young, Rob C; Youngstrom, Brian L; Yuan, Xu Feng; Zhang, Bin; Zwingman, Theresa A; Jones, Allan R

    2007-01-11

    Molecular approaches to understanding the functional circuitry of the nervous system promise new insights into the relationship between genes, brain and behaviour. The cellular diversity of the brain necessitates a cellular resolution approach towards understanding the functional genomics of the nervous system. We describe here an anatomically comprehensive digital atlas containing the expression patterns of approximately 20,000 genes in the adult mouse brain. Data were generated using automated high-throughput procedures for in situ hybridization and data acquisition, and are publicly accessible online. Newly developed image-based informatics tools allow global genome-scale structural analysis and cross-correlation, as well as identification of regionally enriched genes. Unbiased fine-resolution analysis has identified highly specific cellular markers as well as extensive evidence of cellular heterogeneity not evident in classical neuroanatomical atlases. This highly standardized atlas provides an open, primary data resource for a wide variety of further studies concerning brain organization and function.

  17. New Role of Adult Lung c-kit+ Cells in a Mouse Model of Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cappetta, Donato; Urbanek, Konrad; Esposito, Grazia; Matteis, Maria; Sgambato, Manuela; Tartaglione, Gioia; Rossi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airflow obstruction in asthma. Emerging evidence points to the involvement of c-kit+ cells in lung homeostasis, although their potential role in asthma is unknown. Our aim was to isolate c-kit+ cells from normal mouse lungs and to test whether these cells can interfere with hallmarks of asthma in an animal model. Adult mouse GFP-tagged c-kit+ cells, intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, positively affected airway remodeling and improved airway function. In bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of cell-treated animals, a reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and in IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 release, along with an increase of IL-10, was observed. In MSC-treated mice, the macrophage polarization to M2-like subset may explain, at least in part, the increment in the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. After in vitro stimulation of c-kit+ cells with proinflammatory cytokines, the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and TGFβ were upregulated. These data, together with the increased apoptosis of inflammatory cells in vivo, indicate that c-kit+ cells downregulate immune response in asthma by influencing local environment, possibly by cell-to-cell contact combined to paracrine action. In conclusion, intratracheally administered c-kit+ cells reduce inflammation, positively modulate airway remodeling, and improve function. These data document previously unrecognized properties of c-kit+ cells, able to impede pathophysiological features of experimental airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:28090152

  18. Expression of the Norrie disease gene (Ndp) in developing and adult mouse eye, ear, and brain

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Smallwood, Philip; Nathans, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The Norrie disease gene (Ndp) codes for a secreted protein, Norrin, that activates canonical Wnt signaling by binding to its receptor, Frizzled-4. This signaling system is required for normal vascular development in the retina and for vascular survival in the cochlea. In mammals, the pattern of Ndp expression beyond the retina is poorly defined due to the low abundance of Norrin mRNA and protein. Here we characterize Ndp expression during mouse development by studying a knock-in mouse that carries the coding sequence of human placental alkaline phosphatase (AP) inserted at the Ndp locus (NdpAP). In the CNS, NdpAP expression is apparent by E10.5 and is dynamic and complex. The anatomically delimited regions of NdpAP expression observed prenatally in the CNS are replaced postnatally by widespread expression in astrocytes in the forebrain and midbrain, Bergman glia in the cerebellum, and Müller glia in the retina. In the developing and adult cochlea, NdpAP expression is closely associated with two densely vascularized regions, the stria vascularis and a capillary plexus between the organ of Corti and the spiral ganglion. These observations suggest the possibility that Norrin may have developmental and/or homeostatic functions beyond the retina and cochlea. PMID:21055480

  19. The Thoc1 encoded ribonucleoprotein is required for myeloid progenitor cell homeostasis in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Pitzonka, Laura; Ullas, Sumana; Chinnam, Meenalakshmi; Povinelli, Benjamin J; Fisher, Daniel T; Golding, Michelle; Appenheimer, Michelle M; Nemeth, Michael J; Evans, Sharon; Goodrich, David W

    2014-01-01

    Co-transcriptionally assembled ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes are critical for RNA processing and nuclear export. RNPs have been hypothesized to contribute to the regulation of coordinated gene expression, and defects in RNP biogenesis contribute to genome instability and disease. Despite the large number of RNPs and the importance of the molecular processes they mediate, the requirements for individual RNP complexes in mammalian development and tissue homeostasis are not well characterized. THO is an evolutionarily conserved, nuclear RNP complex that physically links nascent transcripts with the nuclear export apparatus. THO is essential for early mouse embryonic development, limiting characterization of the requirements for THO in adult tissues. To address this shortcoming, a mouse strain has been generated allowing inducible deletion of the Thoc1 gene which encodes an essential protein subunit of THO. Bone marrow reconstitution was used to generate mice in which Thoc1 deletion could be induced specifically in the hematopoietic system. We find that granulocyte macrophage progenitors have a cell autonomous requirement for Thoc1 to maintain cell growth and viability. Lymphoid lineages are not detectably affected by Thoc1 loss under the homeostatic conditions tested. Myeloid lineages may be more sensitive to Thoc1 loss due to their relatively high rate of proliferation and turnover.

  20. The Thoc1 Encoded Ribonucleoprotein Is Required for Myeloid Progenitor Cell Homeostasis in the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chinnam, Meenalakshmi; Povinelli, Benjamin J.; Fisher, Daniel T.; Golding, Michelle; Appenheimer, Michelle M.; Nemeth, Michael J.; Evans, Sharon; Goodrich, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Co-transcriptionally assembled ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes are critical for RNA processing and nuclear export. RNPs have been hypothesized to contribute to the regulation of coordinated gene expression, and defects in RNP biogenesis contribute to genome instability and disease. Despite the large number of RNPs and the importance of the molecular processes they mediate, the requirements for individual RNP complexes in mammalian development and tissue homeostasis are not well characterized. THO is an evolutionarily conserved, nuclear RNP complex that physically links nascent transcripts with the nuclear export apparatus. THO is essential for early mouse embryonic development, limiting characterization of the requirements for THO in adult tissues. To address this shortcoming, a mouse strain has been generated allowing inducible deletion of the Thoc1 gene which encodes an essential protein subunit of THO. Bone marrow reconstitution was used to generate mice in which Thoc1 deletion could be induced specifically in the hematopoietic system. We find that granulocyte macrophage progenitors have a cell autonomous requirement for Thoc1 to maintain cell growth and viability. Lymphoid lineages are not detectably affected by Thoc1 loss under the homeostatic conditions tested. Myeloid lineages may be more sensitive to Thoc1 loss due to their relatively high rate of proliferation and turnover. PMID:24830368

  1. Isolation, characterization and propagation of mitotically active germ cells from adult mouse and human ovaries.

    PubMed

    Woods, Dori C; Tilly, Jonathan L

    2013-05-01

    Accruing evidence indicates that production of new oocytes (oogenesis) and their enclosure by somatic cells (folliculogenesis) are processes not limited to the perinatal period in mammals. Endpoints ranging from oocyte counts to genetic lineage tracing and transplantation experiments support a paradigm shift in reproductive biology involving active renewal of oocyte-containing follicles during postnatal life. The recent purification of mitotically active oocyte progenitor cells, termed female germline stem cells (fGSCs) or oogonial stem cells (OSCs), from mouse and human ovaries opens up new avenues for research into the biology and clinical utility of these cells. Here we detail methods for the isolation of mouse and human OSCs from adult ovarian tissue, cultivation of the cells after purification, and characterization of the cells before and after ex vivo expansion. The latter methods include analysis of germ cell-specific markers and in vitro oogenesis, as well as the use of intraovarian transplantation to test the oocyte-forming potential of OSCs in vivo.

  2. Subretinal transplantation of MACS purified photoreceptor precursor cells into the adult mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Dominic; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Grahl, Sandra; Ader, Marius

    2014-02-22

    Vision impairment and blindness due to the loss of the light-sensing cells of the retina, i.e. photoreceptors, represents the main reason for disability in industrialized countries. Replacement of degenerated photoreceptors by cell transplantation represents a possible treatment option in future clinical applications. Indeed, recent preclinical studies demonstrated that immature photoreceptors, isolated from the neonatal mouse retina at postnatal day 4, have the potential to integrate into the adult mouse retina following subretinal transplantation. Donor cells generated a mature photoreceptor morphology including inner and outer segments, a round cell body located at the outer nuclear layer, and synaptic terminals in close proximity to endogenous bipolar cells. Indeed, recent reports demonstrated that donor photoreceptors functionally integrate into the neural circuitry of host mice. For a future clinical application of such cell replacement approach, purified suspensions of the cells of choice have to be generated and placed at the correct position for proper integration into the eye. For the enrichment of photoreceptor precursors, sorting should be based on specific cell surface antigens to avoid genetic reporter modification of donor cells. Here we show magnetic-associated cell sorting (MACS) - enrichment of transplantable rod photoreceptor precursors isolated from the neonatal retina of photoreceptor-specific reporter mice based on the cell surface marker CD73. Incubation with anti-CD73 antibodies followed by micro-bead conjugated secondary antibodies allowed the enrichment of rod photoreceptor precursors by MACS to approximately 90%. In comparison to flow cytometry, MACS has the advantage that it can be easier applied to GMP standards and that high amounts of cells can be sorted in relative short time periods. Injection of enriched cell suspensions into the subretinal space of adult wild-type mice resulted in a 3-fold higher integration rate compared to

  3. Comparison of melatonin with growth factors in promoting precursor cells proliferation in adult mouse subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Sotthibundhu, Areechun; Ekthuwapranee, Kasima; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, secreted mainly by the pineal gland, plays roles in various physiological functions including protecting cell death. We showed in previous study that the proliferation and differentiation of precursor cells from the adult mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) can be modulated by melatonin via the MT1 melatonin receptor. Since melatonin and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) share some signaling pathway components, we investigated whether melatonin can promote the proliferation of precursor cells from the adult mouse SVZ via the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase /mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathways in comparison with epidermal growth factor (EGF). Melatonin-induced ERK/MAPK pathways compared with EGF were measured by using in vitro and vivo models. We used neurosphere proliferation assay, immunocytochemistry, and immuno-blotting to analyze significant differences between melatonin and growth factor treatment. We also used specific antagonist and inhibitors to confirm the exactly signaling pathway including luzindole and U0126. We found that significant increase in proliferation was observed when two growth factors (EGF+bFGF) and melatonin were used simultaneously compared with EGF + bFGF or compared with melatonin alone. In addition, the present result suggested the synergistic effect occurred of melatonin and growth factors on the activating the ERK/MAPK pathway. This study exhibited that melatonin could act as a trophic factor, increasing proliferation in precursor cells mediated through the melatonin receptor coupled to ERK/MAPK signaling pathways. Understanding the mechanism by which melatonin regulates precursor cells may conduct to the development of novel strategies for neurodegenerative disease therapy. PMID:28275319

  4. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R. Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1’s importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1’s functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sortm1(Cre/ERT)Nat/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1’s role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  5. Retinal lesions induce fast intrinsic cortical plasticity in adult mouse visual system.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Katrien; Vreysen, Samme; Laramée, Marie-Eve; Cuyvers, Annemie; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Van Brussel, Leen; Eysel, Ulf T; Nys, Julie; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-09-01

    Neuronal activity plays an important role in the development and structural-functional maintenance of the brain as well as in its life-long plastic response to changes in sensory stimulation. We characterized the impact of unilateral 15° laser lesions in the temporal lower visual field of the retina, on visually driven neuronal activity in the afferent visual pathway of adult mice using in situ hybridization for the activity reporter gene zif268. In the first days post-lesion, we detected a discrete zone of reduced zif268 expression in the contralateral hemisphere, spanning the border between the monocular segment of the primary visual cortex (V1) with extrastriate visual area V2M. We could not detect a clear lesion projection zone (LPZ) in areas lateral to V1 whereas medial to V2M, agranular and granular retrosplenial cortex showed decreased zif268 levels over their full extent. All affected areas displayed a return to normal zif268 levels, and this was faster in higher order visual areas than in V1. The lesion did, however, induce a permanent LPZ in the retinorecipient layers of the superior colliculus. We identified a retinotopy-based intrinsic capacity of adult mouse visual cortex to recover from restricted vision loss, with recovery speed reflecting the areal cortical magnification factor. Our observations predict incomplete visual field representations for areas lateral to V1 vs. lack of retinotopic organization for areas medial to V2M. The validation of this mouse model paves the way for future interrogations of cortical region- and cell-type-specific contributions to functional recovery, up to microcircuit level.

  6. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  7. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  8. Functional adult acetylcholine receptor develops independently of motor innervation in Sol 8 mouse muscle cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Pinset, C; Mulle, C; Benoit, P; Changeux, J P; Chelly, J; Gros, F; Montarras, D

    1991-01-01

    We have defined culture conditions, using a feeder layer of cells from the embryonic mesenchymal cell line, 10T1/2 and a serum-free medium, which allow cells from the mouse myogenic cell line Sol 8 to form contracting myotubes for two weeks. Under these culture conditions, Sol 8 myotubes undergo a maturation process characterized by a sequential expression of two phenotypes. An early phenotype is typified by the expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) gamma-subunit transcripts and the presence of low conductance ACh-activated channels, typical of embryonic AChR. A late phenotype is characterized by the expression of AChR epsilon-subunit transcripts, the decreased accumulation of gamma-subunit transcripts and the appearance of high conductance ACh-activated channels, typical of adult AChR. These results indicate that the expression of functional adult type AChR does not require the presence of the motor nerve and therefore represents an intrinsic feature of the Sol 8 muscle cells. Chronic exposure of the cells to the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel blocking agent tetrodotoxin does not affect the appearance of the AChR epsilon-subunit transcripts but prevents the reduction of the steady-state level of the AChR gamma-subunit transcripts and yields a reduced proportion of the adult type channels. Thus, activity seems to facilitate the switch from the embryonic to the adult phenotype of the AChR protein. The Sol 8 cell system might be useful to analyse further the genetic and epigenetic regulation of muscle fibre maturation in mammals. Images PMID:1868829

  9. Oestradiol and Diet Modulate Energy Homeostasis and Hypothalamic Neurogenesis in the Adult Female Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bless, E. P.; Reddy, T.; Acharya, K. D.; Beltz, B. S.; Tetel, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin and oestradiol have overlapping functions in energy homeostasis and fertility, and receptors for these hormones are localised in the same hypothalamic regions. Although, historically, it was assumed that mammalian adult neurogenesis was confined to the olfactory bulbs and the hippocampus, recent research has found new neurones in the male rodent hypothalamus. Furthermore, some of these new neurones are leptin-sensitive and affected by diet. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that diet and hormonal status modulate hypothalamic neurogenesis in the adult female mouse. Adult mice were ovariectomised and implanted with capsules containing oestradiol (E2) or oil. Within each group, mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or maintained on standard chow (STND). All animals were administered i.c.v. 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 9 days and sacrificed 34 days later after an injection of leptin to induce phosphorylation of signal transducer of activation and transcription 3 (pSTAT3). Brain tissue was immunohistochemically labelled for BrdU (newly born cells), Hu (neuronal marker) and pSTAT3 (leptin sensitive). Although mice on a HFD became obese, oestradiol protected against obesity. There was a strong interaction between diet and hormone on new cells (BrdU+) in the arcuate, ventromedial hypothalamus and dorsomedial hypothalamus. HFD increased the number of new cells, whereas E2 inhibited this effect. Conversely, E2 increased the number of new cells in mice on a STND diet in all hypothalamic regions studied. Although the total number of new leptin-sensitive neurones (BrdU-Hu-pSTAT3) found in the hypothalamus was low, HFD increased these new cells in the arcuate, whereas E2 attenuated this induction. These results suggest that adult neurogenesis in the hypothalamic neurogenic niche is modulated by diet and hormonal status and is related to energy homeostasis in female mice. PMID:25182179

  10. Miracle of an Artificial Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes, the realization of a successful, fully automated artificial pancreas is a dearly held dream. It signifies a life freer from nightly wake-up calls to check blood glucose or deliver insulin, a life freer from ... successful artificial pancreas would mark another huge step toward better ...

  11. Establishment of a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for widespread and temporal genetic modification in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ichise, Hirotake; Hori, Akiko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu; Ichise, Taeko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-07-29

    Temporal genetic modification of mice using the ligand-inducible Cre/loxP system is an important technique that allows the bypass of embryonic lethal phenotypes and access to adult phenotypes. In this study, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for the purpose of widespread and temporal Cre recombination. The new line, named CM32, expresses the GFPneo-fusion gene in a wide variety of tissues before FLP recombination and tamoxifen-inducible Cre after FLP recombination. Using FLP-recombined CM32 mice (CM32Δ mice) and Cre reporter mouse lines, we evaluated the efficiency of Cre recombination with and without tamoxifen administration to adult mice, and found tamoxifen-dependent induction of Cre recombination in a variety of adult tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that conditional activation of an oncogene could be achieved in adults using CM32Δ mice. CM32Δ;T26 mice, which harbored a Cre recombination-driven, SV40 large T antigen-expressing transgene, were viable and fertile. No overt phenotype was found in the mice up to 3 months after birth. Although they displayed pineoblastomas (pinealoblastomas) and/or thymic enlargement due to background Cre recombination by 6 months after birth, they developed epidermal hyperplasia when administered tamoxifen. Collectively, our results suggest that the CM32Δ transgenic mouse line can be applied to the assessment of adult phenotypes in mice with loxP-flanked transgenes.

  12. Research Resource: Comprehensive Expression Atlas of the Fibroblast Growth Factor System in Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fon Tacer, Klementina; Bookout, Angie L.; Ding, Xunshan; Kurosu, Hiroshi; John, George B.; Wang, Lei; Goetz, Regina; Mohammadi, Moosa; Kuro-o, Makoto; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Although members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family and their receptors have well-established roles in embryogenesis, their contributions to adult physiology remain relatively unexplored. Here, we use real-time quantitative PCR to determine the mRNA expression patterns of all 22 FGFs, the seven principal FGF receptors (FGFRs), and the three members of the Klotho family of coreceptors in 39 different mouse tissues. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis of the mRNA expression data reveals that most FGFs and FGFRs fall into two groups the expression of which is enriched in either the central nervous system or reproductive and gastrointestinal tissues. Interestingly, the FGFs that can act as endocrine hormones, including FGF15/19, FGF21, and FGF23, cluster in a third group that does not include any FGFRs, underscoring their roles in signaling between tissues. We further show that the most recently identified Klotho family member, Lactase-like, is highly and selectively expressed in brown adipose tissue and eye and can function as an additional coreceptor for FGF19. This FGF atlas provides an important resource for guiding future studies to elucidate the physiological functions of FGFs in adult animals. PMID:20667984

  13. Cell proliferation, movement and differentiation during maintenance of the adult mouse adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su-Ping; Morrison, Hamish D; Nilsson, Frida; Kenyon, Christopher J; West, John D; Morley, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate maintenance and regeneration of adult endocrine organs is important in both normal physiology and disease. We investigated cell proliferation, movement and differentiation in the adult mouse adrenal cortex, using different 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling regimens and immunostaining for phenotypic steroidogenic cell markers. Pulse-labelling showed that cell division was largely confined to the outer cortex, with most cells moving inwards towards the medulla at around 13-20 µm per day, though a distinct labelled cell population remained in the outer 10% of the cortex. Pulse-chase-labelling coupled with phenotypic immunostaining showed that, unlike cells in the inner cortex, most BrdU-positive outer cortical cells did not express steroidogenic markers, while co-staining for BrdU and Ki67 revealed that some outer cortical BrdU-positive cells were induced to proliferate following acute adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) treatment. Extended pulse-chase-labelling identified cells in the outer cortex which retained BrdU label for up to 18-23 weeks. Together, these observations are consistent with the location of both slow-cycling stem/progenitor and transiently amplifying cell populations in the outer cortex. Understanding the relationships between these distinct adrenocortical cell populations will be crucial to clarify mechanisms underpinning adrenocortical maintenance and long-term adaptation to pathophysiological states.

  14. Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function in the adult mouse main olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Steve; Sickles, Heather M.; DeLeonardis, Chris; Alcaraz, Ana; Gridley, Thomas; Lin, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Notch receptors are expressed in neurons and glia in the adult nervous system, but why this expression persists is not well-understood. Here we examine the role of the Notch pathway in the postnatal mouse main olfactory system, and show evidence consistent with a model where Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function. In the absence of Notch2, the laminar nature of these glial-like cells is disrupted. Hes1, Hey1, and Six1, which are downstream effectors of the Notch pathway, are down-regulated, and cytochrome P450 and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) expression by sustentacular cells is reduced. Functional levels of GST activity are also reduced. These disruptions are associated with increased olfactory sensory neuron degeneration. Surprisingly, expression of Notch3 is also down-regulated. This suggests the existence of a feedback loop where expression of Notch3 is initially independent of Notch2, but requires Notch2 for maintained expression. While the Notch pathway has previously been shown to be important for promoting gliogenesis during development, this is the first demonstration that the persistent expression of Notch receptors is required for maintaining glial function in adult. PMID:18155189

  15. Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function in the adult mouse main olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Steve; Sickles, Heather M; Deleonardis, Chris; Alcaraz, Ana; Gridley, Thomas; Lin, David M

    2008-02-01

    Notch receptors are expressed in neurons and glia in the adult nervous system, but why this expression persists is not well-understood. Here we examine the role of the Notch pathway in the postnatal mouse main olfactory system, and show evidence consistent with a model where Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function. In the absence of Notch2, the laminar nature of these glial-like cells is disrupted. Hes1, Hey1, and Six1, which are downstream effectors of the Notch pathway, are down-regulated, and cytochrome P450 and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) expression by sustentacular cells is reduced. Functional levels of GST activity are also reduced. These disruptions are associated with increased olfactory sensory neuron degeneration. Surprisingly, expression of Notch3 is also down-regulated. This suggests the existence of a feedback loop where expression of Notch3 is initially independent of Notch2, but requires Notch2 for maintained expression. While the Notch pathway has previously been shown to be important for promoting gliogenesis during development, this is the first demonstration that the persistent expression of Notch receptors is required for maintaining glial function in adult.

  16. Vestibular dysfunction in the adult CBA/CaJ mouse after lead and cadmium treatment.

    PubMed

    Klimpel, Katarina E M; Lee, Min Young; King, W. Michael; Raphael, Yehoash; Schacht, Jochen; Neitzel, Richard L

    2017-03-01

    The vestibular system allows the perception of position and motion and its dysfunction presents as motion impairment, vertigo and balance abnormalities, leading to debilitating psychological discomfort and difficulty performing daily tasks. Although declines and deficits in vestibular function have been noted in rats exposed to lead (Pb) and in humans exposed to Pb and cadmium (Cd), no studies have directly examined the pathological and pathophysiological effects upon the vestibular apparatus of the inner ear. Eighteen young adult mice were exposed through their drinking water (3 mM Pb, 300 µM Cd, or a control treatment) for 10 weeks. Before and after treatment, they underwent a vestibular assessment, consisting of a rotarod performance test and a novel head stability test to measure the vestibulocolic reflex. At the conclusion of the study, the utricles were analyzed immunohistologically for condition of hair cells and nerve fibers. Increased levels of Pb exposure correlated with decreased head stability in space; no significant decline in performance on rotarod test was found. No damage to the hair cells or the nerve fibers of the utricle was observed in histology. The young adult CBA/CaJ mouse is able to tolerate occupationally-relevant Pb and Cd exposure well, but the correlation between Pb exposure and reduced head stability suggests that Pb exposure causes a decline in vestibular function. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 869-876, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Contributions of Mouse and Human Hematopoietic Cells to Remodeling of the Adult Auditory Nerve After Neuron Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Nishimoto, Eishi; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N; Noble, Kenyaria V; Barth, Jeremy L; LaRue, Amanda C; Ando, Kiyoshi; Schulte, Bradley A

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral auditory nerve (AN) carries sound information from sensory hair cells to the brain. The present study investigated the contribution of mouse and human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to cellular diversity in the AN following the destruction of neuron cell bodies, also known as spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Exposure of the adult mouse cochlea to ouabain selectively killed type I SGNs and disrupted the blood-labyrinth barrier. This procedure also resulted in the upregulation of genes associated with hematopoietic cell homing and differentiation, and provided an environment conducive to the tissue engraftment of circulating stem/progenitor cells into the AN. Experiments were performed using both a mouse-mouse bone marrow transplantation model and a severely immune-incompetent mouse model transplanted with human CD34+ cord blood cells. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of recipient mice demonstrated that ouabain injury promoted an increase in the number of both HSC-derived macrophages and HSC-derived nonmacrophages in the AN. Although rare, a few HSC-derived cells in the injured AN exhibited glial-like qualities. These results suggest that human hematopoietic cells participate in remodeling of the AN after neuron cell body loss and that hematopoietic cells can be an important resource for promoting AN repair/regeneration in the adult inner ear. PMID:27600399

  18. Multipotent stem cells isolated from the adult mouse retina are capable of producing functional photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianqing; Lewallen, Michelle; Chen, Shuyi; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Nian; Xie, Ting

    2013-06-01

    Various stem cell types have been tested for their potential application in treating photoreceptor degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Only embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have so far been shown to generate functional photoreceptor cells restoring light response of photoreceptor-deficient mice, but there is still some concern of tumor formation. In this study, we have successfully cultured Nestin(+)Sox2(+)Pax6(+) multipotent retinal stem cells (RSCs) from the adult mouse retina, which are capable of producing functional photoreceptor cells that restore the light response of photoreceptor-deficient rd1 mutant mice following transplantation. After they have been expanded for over 35 passages in the presence of FGF and EGF, the cultured RSCs still maintain stable proliferation and differentiation potential. Under proper differentiation conditions, they can differentiate into all the major retinal cell types found in the adult retina. More importantly, they can efficiently differentiate into photoreceptor cells under optimized differentiation conditions. Following transplantation into the subretinal space of slowly degenerating rd7 mutant eyes, RSC-derived photoreceptor cells integrate into the retina, morphologically resembling endogenous photoreceptors and forming synapases with resident retinal neurons. When transplanted into eyes of photoreceptor-deficient rd1 mutant mice, a RP model, RSC-derived photoreceptors can partially restore light response, indicating that those RSC-derived photoreceptors are functional. Finally, there is no evidence for tumor formation in the photoreceptor-transplanted eyes. Therefore, this study has demonstrated that RSCs isolated from the adult retina have the potential of producing functional photoreceptor cells that can potentially restore lost vision caused by loss of photoreceptor cells in RP and AMD.

  19. Stroke increases neural stem cells and angiogenesis in the neurogenic niche of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction.

  20. Distribution of doublecortin expressing cells near the lateral ventricles in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Helen K C; Sundholm-Peters, Nikki L; Goings, Gwendolyn E; Walker, Avery S; Hyland, Kenneth; Szele, Francis G

    2004-05-01

    Doublecortin (Dcx) is a microtubule-associated protein expressed by migrating neuroblasts in the embryo and in the adult subventricular zone (SVZ). The adult SVZ contains neuroblasts that migrate in the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to the olfactory bulbs. We have examined the distribution and phenotype of Dcx-positive cells in the adult mouse SVZ and surrounding regions. Chains of Dcx-positive cells in the SVZ were distributed in a tight dorsal population contiguous with the RMS, with a separate ventral population comprised of discontinuous chains. Unexpectedly, Dcx-positive cells were also found outside of the SVZ: dorsally in the corpus callosum, and ventrally in the nucleus accumbens, ventromedial striatum, ventrolateral septum, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Dcx-positive cells outside the SVZ had the morphology of migrating cells, occurred as individual cells or in chain-like clusters, and were more numerous anteriorly. Of the Dcx-positive cells found outside of the SVZ, 47% expressed the immature neuronal protein class III beta-tubulin, 8% expressed NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Dcx-positive cells did not express molecules found in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, or microglia. Structural and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that cells with the ultrastructural features of neuroblasts in the SVZ were Dcx+, and that clusters of neuroblasts emanated ventrally from the SVZ into the parenchyma. Our results suggest that the distribution of cells comprising the walls of the lateral ventricle are more heterogeneous than was thought previously, that SVZ cells may migrate dorsally and ventrally away from the SVZ, and that some emigrated cells express a neuronal phenotype.

  1. Expression of Npas4 mRNA in Telencephalic Areas of Adult and Postnatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Slaton, G. Simona; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor neuronal PAS domain-containing protein 4 (Npas4) is an inducible immediate early gene which regulates the formation of inhibitory synapses, and could have a significant regulatory role during cortical circuit formation. However, little is known about basal Npas4 mRNA expression during postnatal development. Here, postnatal and adult mouse brain sections were processed for isotopic in situ hybridization using an Npas4 specific cRNA antisense probe. In adults, Npas4 mRNA was found in the telencephalon with very restricted or no expression in diencephalon or mesencephalon. In most telencephalic areas, including the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex, neocortex, hippocampus, dorsal caudate putamen (CPu), septum and basolateral amygdala nucleus (BLA), basal Npas4 expression was detected in scattered cells which exhibited strong hybridization signal. In embryonic and neonatal brain sections, Npas4 mRNA expression signals were very low. Starting at postnatal day 5 (P5), transcripts for Npas4 were detected in the AON, CPu and piriform cortex. At P8, additional Npas4 hybridization was found in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal layer, and in primary motor cortex. By P13, robust mRNA expression was located in layers IV and VI of all sensory cortices, frontal cortex and cingulate cortex. After onset of expression, postnatal spatial mRNA distribution was similar to that in adults, with the exception of the CPu, where Npas4 transcripts became gradually restricted to the most dorsal part. In conclusion, the spatial distribution of Npas4 mRNA is mostly restricted to telencephalic areas, and the temporal expression increases with developmental age during postnatal development, which seem to correlate with the onset of activity-driven excitatory transmission. PMID:26633966

  2. Functional Vascular Smooth Muscle-like Cells Derived from Adult Mouse Uterine Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lachaud, Christian Claude; Pezzolla, Daniela; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Smani, Tarik

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian visceral organs, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) originate from an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of embryonic mesothelial cells (MCs). The ability of adult MCs to recapitulate EMT and to acquire smooth muscle (SM) markers upon provasculogenic culture suggested they might retain embryonic vasculogenic differentiation potential. However, it remains unknown whether adult MCs-derived SM-like cells may acquire specific vascular SM lineage markers and the functionality of differentiated contractile VSMCs. Here, we describe how a gentle trypsinization of adult mouse uterine cords could selectively detach their outermost uterine mesothelial layer cells. As other MCs; uterine MCs (UtMCs) uniformly expressed the epithelial markers β-catenin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, CD54, CD29, and CK18. When cultured in a modified SM differentiation media (SMDM) UtMCs initiated a loss of epithelial characteristics and gained markers expression of EMT (Twist, Snail, and Slug), stem and progenitor (Nanog, Sox2, C-kit, Gata-4, Isl-1, and nestin), SM (α-SMA, calponin, caldesmon, SM22α, desmin, SM-MHC, and smoothelin-B) and cardiac (BMP2, BMP4, ACTC1, sACTN, cTnI, cTnT, ANF, Cx43, and MLC2a). UtMCs repeatedly subcultured in SMDM acquired differentiated VSM-like characteristics and expressed smoothelin-B in the typical stress-fiber pattern expression of contractile VSMCs. Relevantly, UtMCs-derived VSM-like cells could generate “mechanical force” to compact collagen lattices and displayed in diverse degree voltage (K+) and receptor (endothelin-1, oxytocin, norepinephrine, carbachol and vasopressin)-induced [Ca2+]i rises and contraction. Thus, we show for the first time that UtMCs could recapitulate in vitro differentiative events of early cardiovascular differentiation and transdifferentiate in cells exhibiting molecular and functional characteristics of VSMCs. PMID:23405120

  3. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  4. Multipotent stem cells isolated from the adult mouse retina are capable of producing functional photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianqing; Lewallen, Michelle; Chen, Shuyi; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Nian; Xie, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Various stem cell types have been tested for their potential application in treating photoreceptor degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Only embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have so far been shown to generate functional photoreceptor cells restoring light response of photoreceptor-deficient mice, but there is still some concern of tumor formation. In this study, we have successfully cultured Nestin+Sox2+Pax6+ multipotent retinal stem cells (RSCs) from the adult mouse retina, which are capable of producing functional photoreceptor cells that restore the light response of photoreceptor-deficient rd1 mutant mice following transplantation. After they have been expanded for over 35 passages in the presence of FGF and EGF, the cultured RSCs still maintain stable proliferation and differentiation potential. Under proper differentiation conditions, they can differentiate into all the major retinal cell types found in the adult retina. More importantly, they can efficiently differentiate into photoreceptor cells under optimized differentiation conditions. Following transplantation into the subretinal space of slowly degenerating rd7 mutant eyes, RSC-derived photoreceptor cells integrate into the retina, morphologically resembling endogenous photoreceptors and forming synapases with resident retinal neurons. When transplanted into eyes of photoreceptor-deficient rd1 mutant mice, a RP model, RSC-derived photoreceptors can partially restore light response, indicating that those RSC-derived photoreceptors are functional. Finally, there is no evidence for tumor formation in the photoreceptor-transplanted eyes. Therefore, this study has demonstrated that RSCs isolated from the adult retina have the potential of producing functional photoreceptor cells that can potentially restore lost vision caused by loss of photoreceptor cells in RP and AMD. PMID:23567557

  5. Temporal profiles of synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult mouse hippocampus with methotrexate treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Juhwan; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Joong-Sun; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong

    2012-07-25

    Methotrexate, which is used to treat many malignancies and autoimmune diseases, affects brain functions including hippocampal-dependent memory function. However, the precise mechanisms underlying methotrexate-induced hippocampal dysfunction are poorly understood. To evaluate temporal changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals, the expression and activity of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cAMP responsive element-binding protein, glutamate receptor 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were examined in the hippocampi of adult C57BL/6 mice after methotrexate (40 mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection. Western blot analysis showed biphasic changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult hippocampi following methotrexate treatment. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and glutamate receptor 1 were acutely activated during the early phase (1 day post-injection), while extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and cAMP responsive element-binding protein activation showed biphasic increases during the early (1 day post-injection) and late phases (7-14 days post-injection). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression increased significantly during the late phase (7-14 days post-injection). Therefore, methotrexate treatment affects synaptic plasticity-related signals in the adult mouse hippocampus, suggesting that changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals may be associated with neuronal survival and plasticity-related cellular remodeling.

  6. High yield extraction of pure spinal motor neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single embryo and adult mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Marie-Josée; Yang, Qiurui; Cadau, Sébastien; Blais, Mathieu; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Gros-Louis, François; Berthod, François

    2015-01-01

    Extraction of mouse spinal motor neurons from transgenic mouse embryos recapitulating some aspects of neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has met with limited success. Furthermore, extraction and long-term culture of adult mouse spinal motor neurons and glia remain also challenging. We present here a protocol designed to extract and purify high yields of motor neurons and glia from individual spinal cords collected on embryos and adult (5-month-old) normal or transgenic mice. This method is based on mild digestion of tissue followed by gradient density separation allowing to obtain two millions motor neurons over 92% pure from one E14.5 single embryo and more than 30,000 from an adult mouse. These cells can be cultured more than 14 days in vitro at a density of 100,000 cells/cm2 to maintain optimal viability. Functional astrocytes and microglia and small gamma motor neurons can be purified at the same time. This protocol will be a powerful and reliable method to obtain motor neurons and glia to better understand mechanisms underlying spinal cord diseases. PMID:26577180

  7. Doublecortin (DCX) is not Essential for Survival and Differentiation of Newborn Neurons in the Adult Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Jagroop; Xi, Yanwei; Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Germain, Johanne; Francis, Fiona; Lagace, Diane C.

    2016-01-01

    In the adult brain, expression of the microtubule-associated protein Doublecortin (DCX) is associated with neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that give rise to new neurons in the dentate gyrus. Many studies quantify the number of DCX-expressing cells as a proxy for the level of adult neurogenesis, yet no study has determined the effect of removing DCX from adult hippocampal NPCs. Here, we use a retroviral and inducible mouse transgenic approach to either knockdown or knockout DCX from adult NPCs in the dentate gyrus and examine how this affects cell survival and neuronal maturation. Our results demonstrate that shRNA-mediated knockdown of DCX or Cre-mediated recombination in floxed DCX mice does not alter hippocampal neurogenesis and does not change the neuronal fate of the NPCs. Together these findings show that the survival and maturation of adult-generated hippocampal neurons does not require DCX. PMID:26793044

  8. Anoctamins support calcium-dependent chloride secretion by facilitating calcium signaling in adult mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Rainer; Faria, Diana; Skryabin, Boris V; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Rock, Jason R; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal epithelial electrolyte secretion is activated by increase in intracellular cAMP or Ca(2+) and opening of apical Cl(-) channels. In infants and young animals, but not in adults, Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels may cause secretory diarrhea during rotavirus infection. While detailed knowledge exists concerning the contribution of cAMP-activated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels, analysis of the role of Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels became possible through identification of the anoctamin (TMEM16) family of proteins. We demonstrate expression of several anoctamin paralogues in mouse small and large intestines. Using intestinal-specific mouse knockout models for anoctamin 1 (Ano1) and anoctamin 10 (Ano10) and a conventional knockout model for anoctamin 6 (Ano6), we demonstrate the role of anoctamins for Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion induced by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCH). Ano1 is preferentially expressed in the ileum and large intestine, where it supports Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) secretion. In contrast, Ano10 is essential for Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion in jejunum, where expression of Ano1 was not detected. Although broadly expressed, Ano6 has no role in intestinal cholinergic Cl(-) secretion. Ano1 is located in a basolateral compartment/membrane rather than in the apical membrane, where it supports CCH-induced Ca(2+) increase, while the essential and possibly only apical Cl(-) channel is CFTR. These results define a new role of Ano1 for intestinal Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion and demonstrate for the first time a contribution of Ano10 to intestinal transport.

  9. Adult plasticity in the subcortical auditory pathway of the maternal mouse.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Jason A; Shepard, Kathryn N; McClintock, Shannon K; Liu, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Subcortical auditory nuclei were traditionally viewed as non-plastic in adulthood so that acoustic information could be stably conveyed to higher auditory areas. Studies in a variety of species, including humans, now suggest that prolonged acoustic training can drive long-lasting brainstem plasticity. The neurobiological mechanisms for such changes are not well understood in natural behavioral contexts due to a relative dearth of in vivo animal models in which to study this. Here, we demonstrate in a mouse model that a natural life experience with increased demands on the auditory system - motherhood - is associated with improved temporal processing in the subcortical auditory pathway. We measured the auditory brainstem response to test whether mothers and pup-naïve virgin mice differed in temporal responses to both broadband and tone stimuli, including ultrasonic frequencies found in mouse pup vocalizations. Mothers had shorter latencies for early ABR peaks, indicating plasticity in the auditory nerve and the cochlear nucleus. Shorter interpeak latency between waves IV and V also suggest plasticity in the inferior colliculus. Hormone manipulations revealed that these cannot be explained solely by estrogen levels experienced during pregnancy and parturition in mothers. In contrast, we found that pup-care experience, independent of pregnancy and parturition, contributes to shortening auditory brainstem response latencies. These results suggest that acoustic experience in the maternal context imparts plasticity on early auditory processing that lasts beyond pup weaning. In addition to establishing an animal model for exploring adult auditory brainstem plasticity in a neuroethological context, our results have broader implications for models of perceptual, behavioral and neural changes that arise during maternity, where subcortical sensorineural plasticity has not previously been considered.

  10. Tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kircher, C H; Nielsen, S W

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the pancreas occur most commonly in dogs and cats and only rarely in other domestic species. The incidence of neoplasms, both exocrine and endocrine, increases with age. Exocrine adenocarcinomas are the most common malignant tumours and have three fairly distinct morphological patterns: small tubular, large tubular, and acinar cell (rare). They readily metastasize, usually before clinical signs are apparent. A "starry sky" pattern with clear histiocytes scattered among tumour cells is a regular feature of poorly differentiated areas of small tubular adenocarcinomas and undifferentiated carcinomas. Islet cell tumours occur in a significant number only in dogs. Metastases are found in about half of the tumours, but malignancy cannot always be predicted by the morphological appearance. Slightly more than half of the islet cell tumours reported in the dog have been associated with clinical signs of hypoglycaemia. Nodular hyperplasia and exocrine adenomas are sometimes difficult to differentiate. Adenomas are considered rare while nodular hyperplasia is common in old animals.

  11. Surgery for pancreas divisum.

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Subodh; Johnson, Colin D.

    2002-01-01

    We present our experience of open surgical treatment in 5 patients with symptomatic pancreas divisum (PD). Choice of therapy was based on allocation of patients to one of five clinical presentation groups: (i) with minor symptoms (no operation); (ii) with recurrent acute pancreatitis or upper abdominal pain (RAP/RUAP)--3 patients; (iii) with radiological evidence of chronic pancreatitis (CP)--1 patient; (iv) chronic pancreatic pain without radiological evidence of chronic pancreatitis (CPP); and (v) other pancreatic complications--1 patient. This classification helps to decide management and predict possible outcome. Various types of operation were performed as indicated (open surgical accessory sphincteroplasty [2 also had distal pancreatectomy], n = 3; Puestow's operation, n = 1; or Beger's pancreatectomy, n = 1). All patients improved significantly and are now leading normal personal, professional, and social lives. We conclude that, with careful selection of patients and appropriate therapy, the response to surgical treatment is good. PMID:12092866

  12. Vasoactive intestinal peptide antagonist treatment during mouse embryogenesis impairs social behavior and cognitive function of adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joanna M; Cuasay, Katrina; Abebe, Daniel T

    2007-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a regulator of rodent embryogenesis during the period of neural tube closure. VIP enhanced growth in whole cultured mouse embryos; treatment with a VIP antagonist during embryogenesis inhibited growth and development. VIP antagonist treatment during embryogenesis also had permanent effects on adult brain chemistry and impaired social recognition behavior in adult male mice. The neurological deficits of autism appear to be initiated during neural tube closure and social behavior deficits are among the key characteristics of this disorder that is more common in males and is frequently accompanied by mental retardation. The current study examined the blockage of VIP during embryogenesis as a model for the behavioral deficits of autism. Treatment of pregnant mice with a VIP antagonist during embryonic days 8 through 10 had no apparent effect on the general health or sensory or motor capabilities of adult offspring. However, male offspring exhibited reduced sociability in the social approach task and deficits in cognitive function, as assessed through cued and contextual fear conditioning. Female offspring did not show these deficiencies. These results suggest that this paradigm has usefulness as a mouse model for aspects of autism as it selectively impairs male offspring who exhibit the reduced social behavior and cognitive dysfunction seen in autism. Furthermore, the study indicates that the foundations of some aspects of social behavior are laid down early in mouse embryogenesis, are regulated in a sex specific manner and that interference with embryonic regulators such as VIP can have permanent effects on adult social behavior.

  13. Fluconazole Penetration into the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Shrikhande, Shailesh; Friess, Helmut; Issenegger, Claudia; Martignoni, Marcus E.; Yong, Huang; Gloor, Beat; Yeates, Rodney; Kleeff, Jörg; Büchler, Markus W.

    2000-01-01

    Because of antibiotic prophylaxis for necrotizing pancreatitis, the frequency of fungal superinfection in patients with pancreatic necrosis is increasing. In this study we analyzed the penetration of fluconazole into the human pancreas and in experimental acute pancreatitis. In human pancreatic tissues, the mean fluconazole concentration was 8.19 ± 3.38 μg/g (96% of the corresponding concentration in serum). In experimental edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis, 88 and 91% of the serum fluconazole concentration was found in the pancreas. These data show that fluconazole penetration into the pancreas is sufficient to prevent and/or treat fungal contamination in patients with pancreatic necrosis. PMID:10952621

  14. Distinct expression of Cbln family mRNAs in developing and adult mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Miura, Eriko; Iijima, Takatoshi; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2006-08-01

    Cbln1 belongs to the C1q and tumour necrosis factor superfamily, and plays crucial roles as a cerebellar granule cell-derived transneuronal regulator for synapse integrity and plasticity in Purkinje cells. Although Cbln2-Cbln4 are also expressed in the brain and could form heteromeric complexes with Cbln1, their precise expressions remain unclear. Here, we investigated gene expression of the Cbln family in developing and adult C57BL mouse brains by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blot, and high-resolution in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses. In the adult brain, spatial patterns of mRNA expression were highly differential depending on Cbln subtypes. Notably, particularly high levels of Cbln mRNAs were expressed in some nuclei and neurons, whereas their postsynaptic targets often lacked or were low for any Cbln mRNAs, as seen for cerebellar granule cells/Purkinje cells, entorhinal cortex/hippocampus, intralaminar group of thalamic nuclei/caudate-putamen, and dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus/central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. In the developing brain, Cbln1, 2, and 4 mRNAs appeared as early as embryonic day 10-13, and exhibited transient up-regulation during the late embryonic and neonatal periods. For example, Cbln2 mRNA was expressed in the cortical plate of the developing neocortex, displaying a high rostromedial to low caudolateral gradient. In contrast, Cbln3 mRNA was selective to cerebellar granule cells throughout development, and its onset was as late as postnatal day 7-10. These results will provide a molecular-anatomical basis for future studies that characterize roles played by the Cbln family.

  15. Activity-dependent Notch signalling in the hypothalamic-neurohypophysial system of adult mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Mannari, T; Miyata, S

    2014-08-01

    Notch signalling has a key role in cell fate specification in developing brains; however, recent studies have shown that Notch signalling also participates in the regulation of synaptic plasticity in adult brains. In the present study, we examined the expression of Notch3 and Delta-like ligand 4 (DLL4) in the hypothalamic-neurohypophysial system (HNS) of the adult mouse. The expression of DLL4 was higher in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) compared to adjacent hypothalamic regions. Double-labelling immunohistochemistry using vesicular GABA transporter and glutamate transporter revealed that DLL4 was localised at a subpopulation of excitatory and inhibitory axonal boutons against somatodendrites of arginine vasopressin (AVP)- and oxytocin (OXT)-containing magnocellular neurones. In the neurohypophysis (NH), the expression of DLL4 was seen at OXT- but not AVP-containing axonal terminals. The expression of Notch3 was seen at somatodendrites of AVP- and OXT-containing magnocellular neurones in the SON and PVN and at pituicytes in the NH. Chronic physiological stimulation by salt loading, which remarkably enhances the release of AVP and OXT, decreased the number of DLL4-immunoreactive axonal boutons in the SON and PVN. Moreover, chronic and acute osmotic stimulation promoted proteolytic cleavage of Notch3 to yield the intracellular fragments of Notch3 in the HNS. Thus, the present study demonstrates activity-dependent reduction of DLL4 expression and proteolytic cleavage of Notch3 in the HNS, suggesting that Notch signalling possibly participates in synaptic interaction in the hypothalamic nuclei and neuroglial interaction in the NH.

  16. Palm is expressed in both developing and adult mouse lens and retina

    PubMed Central

    Castellini, Meryl; Wolf, Louise V; Chauhan, Bharesh K; Galileo, Deni S; Kilimann, Manfred W; Cvekl, Ales; Duncan, Melinda K

    2005-01-01

    Background Paralemmin (Palm) is a prenyl-palmitoyl anchored membrane protein that can drive membrane and process formation in neurons. Earlier studies have shown brain preferred Palm expression, although this protein is a major water insoluble protein in chicken lens fiber cells and the Palm gene may be regulated by Pax6. Methods The expression profile of Palm protein in the embryonic, newborn and adult mouse eye as well as dissociated retinal neurons was determined by confocal immunofluorescence. The relative mRNA levels of Palm, Palmdelphin (PalmD) and paralemmin2 (Palm2) in the lens and retina were determined by real time rt-PCR. Results In the lens, Palm is already expressed at 9.5 dpc in the lens placode, and this expression is maintained in the lens vesicle throughout the formation of the adult lens. Palm is largely absent from the optic vesicle but is detectable at 10.5 dpc in the optic cup. In the developing retina, Palm expression transiently upregulates during the formation of optic nerve as well as in the formation of both the inner and outer plexiform layers. In short term dissociated chick retinal cultures, Palm protein is easily detectable, but the levels appear to reduce sharply as the cultures age. Palm mRNA was found at much higher levels relative to Palm2 or PalmD in both the retina and lens. Conclusion Palm is the major paralemmin family member expressed in the retina and lens and its expression in the retina transiently upregulates during active neurite outgrowth. The expression pattern of Palm in the eye is consistent with it being a Pax6 responsive gene. Since Palm is known to be able to drive membrane formation in brain neurons, it is possible that this molecule is crucial for the increase in membrane formation during lens fiber cell differentiation. PMID:15969763

  17. Signaling by FGFR2b controls the regenerative capacity of adult mouse incisors

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Sara; Kuremoto, Koh-ichi; Seidel, Kerstin; Tabatabai, Reza; MacKenzie, BreAnne; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Akiyama, Kentaro; Branch, Jonathan; Koh, Chester J.; Alam, Denise Al; Klein, Ophir D.; Bellusci, Saverio

    2010-01-01

    Rodent incisors regenerate throughout the lifetime of the animal owing to the presence of epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells in the proximal region of the tooth. Enamel, the hardest component of the tooth, is continuously deposited by stem cell-derived ameloblasts exclusively on the labial, or outer, surface of the tooth. The epithelial stem cells that are the ameloblast progenitors reside in structures called cervical loops at the base of the incisors. Previous studies have suggested that FGF10, acting mainly through fibroblast growth factor receptor 2b (FGFR2b), is crucial for development of the epithelial stem cell population in mouse incisors. To explore the role of FGFR2b signaling during development and adult life, we used an rtTA transactivator/tetracycline promoter approach that allows inducible and reversible attenuation of FGFR2b signaling. Downregulation of FGFR2b signaling during embryonic stages led to abnormal development of the labial cervical loop and of the inner enamel epithelial layer. In addition, postnatal attenuation of signaling resulted in impaired incisor growth, characterized by failure of enamel formation and degradation of the incisors. At a cellular level, these changes were accompanied by decreased proliferation of the transit-amplifying cells that are progenitors of the ameloblasts. Upon release of the signaling blockade, the incisors resumed growth and reformed an enamel layer, demonstrating that survival of the stem cells was not compromised by transient postnatal attenuation of FGFR2b signaling. Taken together, our results demonstrate that FGFR2b signaling regulates both the establishment of the incisor stem cell niches in the embryo and the regenerative capacity of incisors in the adult. PMID:20978072

  18. Adult mouse model of early hepatocellular carcinoma promoted by alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Aditya; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Gyongyosi, Benedek; Lowe, Patrick; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a mouse model of alcohol-driven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that develops in livers with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: Adult C57BL/6 male mice received multiple doses of chemical carcinogen diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) followed by 7 wk of 4% Lieber-DeCarli diet. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and liver Cyp2e1 were assessed. Expression of F4/80, CD68 for macrophages and Ly6G, MPO, E-selectin for neutrophils was measured. Macrophage polarization was determined by IL-1β/iNOS (M1) and Arg-1/IL-10/CD163/CD206 (M2) expression. Liver steatosis and fibrosis were measured by oil-red-O and Sirius red staining respectively. HCC development was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging, confirmed by histology. Cellular proliferation was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). RESULTS: Alcohol-DEN mice showed higher ALTs than pair fed-DEN mice throughout the alcohol feeding without weight gain. Alcohol feeding resulted in increased ALT, liver steatosis and inflammation compared to pair-fed controls. Alcohol-DEN mice had reduced steatosis and increased fibrosis indicating advanced liver disease. Molecular characterization showed highest levels of both neutrophil and macrophage markers in alcohol-DEN livers. Importantly, M2 macrophages were predominantly higher in alcohol-DEN livers. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased numbers of intrahepatic cysts and liver histology confirmed the presence of early HCC in alcohol-DEN mice compared to all other groups. This correlated with increased serum alpha-fetoprotein, a marker of HCC, in alcohol-DEN mice. PCNA immunostaining revealed significantly increased hepatocyte proliferation in livers from alcohol-DEN compared to pair fed-DEN or alcohol-fed mice. CONCLUSION: We describe a new 12-wk HCC model in adult mice that develops in livers with alcoholic hepatitis and defines ALD as co-factor in HCC. PMID:27122661

  19. [Laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Gürlich, R; Sixta, B; Oliverius, M; Kment, M; Rusina, R; Spicák, J; Sváb, J

    2005-09-01

    During the last two years, reports on laparoscopic procedures of the pancreas have been on increase. Laparoscopic resection of the pancreatic cauda is indicated, primarily, for benign cystic lesions of the cauda of the pancreas and for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (mainly insulinomas). We have not recorded any report on the above procedure in the Czech literature. Therefore, in our case review, we have described laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas with splenectomy for a pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas.

  20. Using pancreas tissue slices for in situ studies of islet of Langerhans and acinar cell biology.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Anja; Cohrs, Christian M; Tsata, Vasiliki; Chouinard, Julie A; Selck, Claudia; Stertmann, Julia; Reichelt, Saskia; Rose, Tobias; Ehehalt, Florian; Weitz, Jürgen; Solimena, Michele; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Speier, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Studies on the cellular function of the pancreas are typically performed in vitro on its isolated functional units, the endocrine islets of Langerhans and the exocrine acini. However, these approaches are hampered by preparation-induced changes of cell physiology and the lack of an intact surrounding. We present here a detailed protocol for the preparation of pancreas tissue slices. This procedure is less damaging to the tissue and faster than alternative approaches, and it enables the in situ study of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cell physiology in a conserved environment. Pancreas tissue slices facilitate the investigation of cellular mechanisms underlying the function, pathology and interaction of the endocrine and exocrine components of the pancreas. We provide examples for several experimental applications of pancreas tissue slices to study various aspects of pancreas cell biology. Furthermore, we describe the preparation of human and porcine pancreas tissue slices for the validation and translation of research findings obtained in the mouse model. Preparation of pancreas tissue slices according to the protocol described here takes less than 45 min from tissue preparation to receipt of the first slices.

  1. MicroRNA Clusters in the Adult Mouse Heart: Age-Associated Changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Azhar, Gohar; Williams, Emmanuel D; Rogers, Steven C; Wei, Jeanne Y

    2015-01-01

    The microRNAs and microRNA clusters have been implicated in normal cardiac development and also disease, including cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and arrhythmias. Since a microRNA cluster has from two to dozens of microRNAs, the expression of a microRNA cluster could have a substantial impact on its target genes. In the present study, the configuration and distribution of microRNA clusters in the mouse genome were examined at various inter-microRNA distances. Three important microRNA clusters that are significantly impacted during adult cardiac aging, the miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25, were also examined in terms of their genomic location, RNA transcript character, sequence homology, and their relationship with the corresponding microRNA families. Multiple microRNAs derived from the three clusters potentially target various protein components of the cdc42-SRF signaling pathway, which regulates cytoskeleton dynamics associated with cardiac structure and function. The data indicate that aging impacted the expression of both guide and passenger strands of the microRNA clusters; nutrient stress also affected the expression of the three microRNA clusters. The miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 clusters are likely to impact the Cdc42-SRF signaling pathway and thereby affect cardiac morphology and function during pathological conditions and the aging process.

  2. Differential Distribution of Major Brain Gangliosides in the Adult Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Vajn, Katarina; Viljetić, Barbara; Degmečić, Ivan Večeslav; Schnaar, Ronald L.; Heffer, Marija

    2013-01-01

    Gangliosides - sialic acid-bearing glycolipids - are major cell surface determinants on neurons and axons. The same four closely related structures, GM1, GD1a, GD1b and GT1b, comprise the majority of total brain gangliosides in mammals and birds. Gangliosides regulate the activities of proteins in the membranes in which they reside, and also act as cell-cell recognition receptors. Understanding the functions of major brain gangliosides requires knowledge of their tissue distribution, which has been accomplished in the past using biochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Armed with new knowledge about the stability and accessibility of gangliosides in tissues and new IgG-class specific monoclonal antibodies, we investigated the detailed tissue distribution of gangliosides in the adult mouse brain. Gangliosides GD1b and GT1b are widely expressed in gray and white matter. In contrast, GM1 is predominately found in white matter and GD1a is specifically expressed in certain brain nuclei/tracts. These findings are considered in relationship to the hypothesis that gangliosides GD1a and GT1b act as receptors for an important axon-myelin recognition protein, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Mediating axon-myelin interactions is but one potential function of the major brain gangliosides, and more detailed knowledge of their distribution may help direct future functional studies. PMID:24098718

  3. Expression of slow skeletal TnI in adult mouse hearts confers metabolic protection to ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pound, Kayla M.; Arteaga, Grace M.; Fasano, Mathew; Wilder, Tanganyika; Fischer, Susan K.; Warren, Chad M.; Wende, Adam R.; Farjah, Mariam; Abel, E. Dale; Solaro, R. John; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Changes in metabolic and myofilament phenotypes coincide in developing hearts. Posttranslational modification of sarcomere proteins influences contractility, affecting the energetic cost of contraction. However, metabolic adaptations to sarcomeric phenotypes are not well understood, particularly during pathophysiological stress. This study explored metabolic adaptations to expression of the fetal, slow skeletal muscle troponin I (ssTnI). Hearts expressing ssTnI exhibited no significant ATP loss during 5 minutes of global ischemia, while non-transgenic littermates (NTG) showed continual ATP loss. At 7 min ischemia TG-ssTnI hearts retained 80±12% of ATP vs. 49±6% in NTG (P<0.05). Hearts expressing ssTnI also had increased AMPK phosphorylation. The mechanism of ATP preservation was augmented glycolysis. Glycolytic end products (lactate and alanine) were 38% higher in TG-ssTnI than NTG at 2 min and 27% higher at 5 min. This additional glycolysis was supported exclusively by exogenous glucose, and not glycogen. Thus, expression of a fetal myofilament protein in adult mouse hearts induced elevated anaerobic ATP production during ischemia via metabolic adaptations consistent with the resistance to hypoxia of fetal hearts. The general findings hold important relevance to both our current understanding of the association between metabolic and contractile phenotypes and the potential for invoking cardioprotective mechanisms against ischemic stress. PMID:21640727

  4. Adult pallium transcriptomes surprise in not reflecting predicted homologies across diverse chicken and mouse pallial sectors.

    PubMed

    Belgard, T Grant; Montiel, Juan F; Wang, Wei Zhi; García-Moreno, Fernando; Margulies, Elliott H; Ponting, Chris P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2013-08-06

    The thorniest problem in comparative neurobiology is the identification of the particular brain region of birds and reptiles that corresponds to the mammalian neocortex [Butler AB, Reiner A, Karten HJ (2011) Ann N Y Acad Sci 1225:14-27; Wang Y, Brzozowska-Prechtl A, Karten HJ (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(28):12676-12681]. We explored which genes are actively transcribed in the regions of controversial ancestry in a representative bird (chicken) and mammal (mouse) at adult stages. We conducted four analyses comparing the expression patterns of their 5,130 most highly expressed one-to-one orthologous genes that considered global patterns of expression specificity, strong gene markers, and coexpression networks. Our study demonstrates transcriptomic divergence, plausible convergence, and, in two exceptional cases, conservation between specialized avian and mammalian telencephalic regions. This large-scale study potentially resolves the complex relationship between developmental homology and functional characteristics on the molecular level and settles long-standing evolutionary debates.

  5. Neurotoxic effects of ochratoxin A on the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paradells, Sara; Rocamonde, Brenda; Llinares, Cristina; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Jimenez, Misericordia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Zipancic, Ivan; Soria, Jose Miguel; Garcia-Esparza, Ma Angeles

    2015-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin that was discovered as a secondary metabolite of the fungal species Aspergillus and Penicillium, is a common contaminant in food and animal feed. This mycotoxin has been described as teratogenic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and has been proven a potent neurotoxin. Other authors have previously reported the effects of OTA in different structures of the central nervous system as well as in some neurogenic regions. However, the impact of OTA exposure in the subventricular zone (SVZ) has not been assessed yet. To elucidate whether OTA affects neural precursors of the mouse SVZ we investigated, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of OTA exposure on the SVZ and on the neural precursors obtained from this neurogenic niche. In this work, we prove the cumulative effect of OTA exposure on proliferation, differentiation and depletion of neural stem cells cultured from the SVZ. In addition, we corroborated these results in vivo by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. As a result, we found a significant alteration in the proliferation process, which was evidenced by a decrease in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells and glial cells, as well as, a significant decrease in the number of neuroblasts in the SVZ. To summarize, in this study we demonstrate how OTA could be a threat to the developing and the adult SVZ through its impact in cell viability, proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Layer-specific chromatin accessibility landscapes reveal regulatory networks in adult mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lucas T; Yao, Zizhen; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Zeng, Hongkui; Tasic, Bosiljka

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian cortex is a laminar structure, with each layer composed of a characteristic set of cell types with different morphological, electrophysiological, and connectional properties. Here, we define chromatin accessibility landscapes of major, layer-specific excitatory classes of neurons, and compare them to each other and to inhibitory cortical neurons using the Assay for Transposase-Accessible Chromatin with high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq). We identify a large number of layer-specific accessible sites, and significant association with genes that are expressed in specific cortical layers. Integration of these data with layer-specific transcriptomic profiles and transcription factor binding motifs enabled us to construct a regulatory network revealing potential key layer-specific regulators, including Cux1/2, Foxp2, Nfia, Pou3f2, and Rorb. This dataset is a valuable resource for identifying candidate layer-specific cis-regulatory elements in adult mouse cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21883.001 PMID:28112643

  7. A quantitative analysis of spinothalamic tract neurons in adult and developing mouse

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Steve; Truong, Hai; Giesler, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the development of nociceptive circuits is important for the proper treatment of pain and administration of anesthesia to prenatal, newborn and infant organisms. The spinothalamic tract (STT) is an integral pathway in the transmission of nociceptive information to the brain, yet the stage of development when axons from cells in the spinal cord reach the thalamus is unknown. Therefore, the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold was used to characterize the STT at several stages of development in the mouse, a species in which the STT was previously unexamined. One week old, two day old and embryonic day 18 mice did not differ from adults in the number or distribution of retrogradely labeled STT neurons. Approximately 3,500 neurons were retrogradely labeled from one side of the thalamus in each age group. Eighty percent of the labeled cells were located on the side of the spinal cord contralateral to the injection site. Sixty-three percent of all labeled cells were located within the cervical cord, 18% in thoracic cord and 19% in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Retrogradely labeled cells significantly increased in diameter over the first postnatal week. Arborizations and boutons within the ventrobasal complex of the thalamus were observed after the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the neonatal spinal cord. These data indicate that while neurons of the STT continue to increase in size during the postnatal period, their axons reach the thalamus before birth and possess some of the morphological features required for functionality. PMID:20575056

  8. Properties of doublecortin expressing neurons in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Spampanato, Jay; Sullivan, Robert K; Turpin, Fabrice R; Bartlett, Perry F; Sah, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is a neurogenic zone where neurons continue to be born throughout life, mature and integrate into the local circuitry. In adults, this generation of new neurons is thought to contribute to learning and memory formation. As newborn neurons mature, they undergo a developmental sequence in which different stages of development are marked by expression of different proteins. Doublecortin (DCX) is an early marker that is expressed in immature granule cells that are beginning migration and dendritic growth but is turned off before neurons reach maturity. In the present study, we use a mouse strain in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is expressed under the control of the DCX promoter. We show that these neurons have high input resistances and some cells can discharge trains of action potentials. In mature granule cells, action potentials are followed by a slow afterhyperpolarization that is absent in EGFP-positive neurons. EGFP-positive neurons had a lower spine density than mature neurons and stimulation of either the medial or lateral perforant pathway activated dual component glutamatergic synapses that had both AMPA and NMDA receptors. NMDA receptors present at these synapses had slow kinetics and were blocked by ifenprodil, indicative of high GluN2B subunit content. These results show that EGFP-positive neurons in the DCX-EGFP mice are functionally immature both in their firing properties and excitatory synapses.

  9. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Existence of Crypt Fission and Fusion in Adult Mouse Intestine.

    PubMed

    Bruens, Lotte; Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; van Rheenen, Jacco; Snippert, Hugo J

    2017-09-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a repetitive sheet of crypt and villus units with stem cells at the bottom of the crypts. During postnatal development, crypts multiply via fission, generating 2 daughter crypts from 1 parental crypt. In the adult intestine, crypt fission is observed at a low frequency. Using intravital microscopy in Lgr5(EGFP-Ires-CreERT2) mice, we monitored individual crypt dynamics over multiple days with single-cell resolution. We discovered the existence of crypt fusion, an almost exact reverse phenomenon of crypt fission, in which 2 crypts fuse into 1 daughter crypt. Examining 819 crypts in 4 mice, we found that 3.5% ± 0.6% of all crypts were in the process of fission, whereas 4.1 ± 0.9% of all crypts were undergoing crypt fusion. As counteracting processes, crypt fission and fusion could regulate crypt numbers during the lifetime of a mouse. Identifying the mechanisms that regulate rates of crypt fission and fusion could provide insights into intestinal adaptation to altered environmental conditions and disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Resolving stem and progenitor cells in the adult mouse incisor through gene co-expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Kerstin; Marangoni, Pauline; Tang, Cynthia; Houshmand, Bahar; Du, Wen; Maas, Richard L; Murray, Steven; Oldham, Michael C; Klein, Ophir D

    2017-01-01

    Investigations into stem cell-fueled renewal of an organ benefit from an inventory of cell type-specific markers and a deep understanding of the cellular diversity within stem cell niches. Using the adult mouse incisor as a model for a continuously renewing organ, we performed an unbiased analysis of gene co-expression relationships to identify modules of co-expressed genes that represent differentiated cells, transit-amplifying cells, and residents of stem cell niches. Through in vivo lineage tracing, we demonstrated the power of this approach by showing that co-expression module members Lrig1 and Igfbp5 define populations of incisor epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells. We further discovered that two adjacent mesenchymal tissues, the periodontium and dental pulp, are maintained by distinct pools of stem cells. These findings reveal novel mechanisms of incisor renewal and illustrate how gene co-expression analysis of intact biological systems can provide insights into the transcriptional basis of cellular identity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24712.001 PMID:28475038

  11. Prospective identification of functionally distinct stem cells and neurosphere-initiating cells in adult mouse forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Mich, John K; Signer, Robert AJ; Nakada, Daisuke; Pineda, André; Burgess, Rebecca J; Vue, Tou Yia; Johnson, Jane E; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-01-01

    Neurosphere formation is commonly used as a surrogate for neural stem cell (NSC) function but the relationship between neurosphere-initiating cells (NICs) and NSCs remains unclear. We prospectively identified, and isolated by flow cytometry, adult mouse lateral ventricle subventricular zone (SVZ) NICs as GlastmidEGFRhighPlexinB2highCD24−/lowO4/PSA-NCAM−/lowTer119/CD45− (GEPCOT) cells. They were highly mitotic and short-lived in vivo based on fate-mapping with Ascl1CreERT2 and Dlx1CreERT2. In contrast, pre-GEPCOT cells were quiescent, expressed higher Glast, and lower EGFR and PlexinB2. Pre-GEPCOT cells could not form neurospheres but expressed the stem cell markers Slc1a3-CreERT, GFAP-CreERT2, Sox2CreERT2, and Gli1CreERT2 and were long-lived in vivo. While GEPCOT NICs were ablated by temozolomide, pre-GEPCOT cells survived and repopulated the SVZ. Conditional deletion of the Bmi-1 polycomb protein depleted pre-GEPCOT and GEPCOT cells, though pre-GEPCOT cells were more dependent upon Bmi-1 for Cdkn2a (p16Ink4a) repression. Our data distinguish quiescent NSCs from NICs and make it possible to study their properties in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02669.001 PMID:24843006

  12. The impact of growth hormone on proteomic profiles: a review of mouse and adult human studies.

    PubMed

    Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Brittain, Alison L; Kopchick, John J

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a protein that is known to stimulate postnatal growth, counter regulate insulin's action and induce expression of insulin-like growth factor-1. GH exerts anabolic or catabolic effects depending upon on the targeted tissue. For instance, GH increases skeletal muscle and decreases adipose tissue mass. Our laboratory has spent the past two decades studying these effects, including the effects of GH excess and depletion, on the proteome of several mouse and human tissues. This review first discusses proteomic techniques that are commonly used for these types of studies. We then examine the proteomic differences found in mice with excess circulating GH (bGH mice) or mice with disruption of the GH receptor gene (GHR(-/-)). We also describe the effects of increased and decreased GH action on the proteome of adult patients with either acromegaly, GH deficiency or patients after short-term GH treatment. Finally, we explain how these proteomic studies resulted in the discovery of potential biomarkers for GH action, particularly those related with the effects of GH on aging, glucose metabolism and body composition.

  13. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... States is chronic alcohol consumption. Additional causes include cystic fibrosis and other hereditary disorders ofthe pancreas. For a ... inherited disorder that leads to chronic pancreatitis is cystic fibrosis. Recent research demonstrates genetic testing can be a ...

  14. Lesions of the avian pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Reavill, Drury R

    2014-01-01

    Although not well described, occasional reports of avian exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease are available. This article describes the lesions associated with common diseases of the avian pancreas reported in the literature and/or seen by the authors.

  15. Generating new pancreas from old.

    PubMed

    Hardikar, Anandwardhan A

    2004-07-01

    Pancreas regeneration after tissue damage is a key response to pancreatic injury, involving pancreatic duct progenitor cells and intra-islet precursor cells. Surgical removal of the pancreas, duct obstruction by cellophane wrapping and bone marrow-derived stem cell transplantation act as inductive stimuli, leading to pancreas regeneration. The exact role of growth and differentiation factors regulating pancreatic beta-cell mass remains unknown. Here, I will attempt to integrate recent findings and speculate on the factors that trigger this fascinating response, wherein the pancreas responds to a deficit in cell mass and undergoes new islet formation, leading to restoration of normal beta-cell mass. I will also discuss recent advances in regenerating endocrine pancreatic cells, which could affect stem cell-based approaches to treating diabetes mellitus.

  16. Current status of pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, D W; Sasaki, T

    1989-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation for the treatment of diabetes mellitus is being done with increasing frequency. Refined operative techniques, an improved immunosuppression regimen, and an earlier recognition of rejection have led to dramatic increases in both graft and patient survival rates. Preliminary data suggest that a functioning pancreatic allograft may arrest or reverse most of the complications of diabetes, although the effects on retinopathy remain controversial. Patients also acquire a strong sense of well-being after successful pancreas transplantation. PMID:2660412

  17. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  18. Haematopoietic progenitor cells from adult bone marrow differentiate into cells that express oligodendroglial antigens in the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Sonia; Alarcón, Pedro; Villaverde, Ramón; Aparicio, Pedro; Silva, Augusto; Martínez, Salvador

    2002-02-01

    Stem cells are self-renewable, pluripotent cells that, in adult life, proliferate by a characteristic asymmetric division in which one daughter cell is committed to differentiation whereas the other remains a stem cell. These cells are also characterized by their ability to differentiate into various cell types under heterotopic environmental influences. In the present study, we have explored the potential of adult haematopoietic bone marrow cells to differentiate into cells of oligodendroglial lineage under physiological, active myelinating conditions. We present evidence of generation of cells expressing oligodendroglial specific markers from a bone marrow subpopulation enriched on adult haematopoietic progenitor cells (CD117+) in vivo after intracerebral transplantation into the neonatal mouse brain. Our results suggest that adult bone marrow cells have the capacity to undergo differentiation from haematopoietic to oligodendroglial cells and add support the validity of bone marrow transplants as an alternative treatment for demyelinating diseases of the CNS including Multiple Sclerosis.

  19. Neurogenin 3 Expressing Cells in the Human Exocrine Pancreas Have the Capacity for Endocrine Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Danielle L.; O’Driscoll, Marci; Sheets, Timothy P.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Oberholzer, Jose; McGarrigle, James J.; Shamblott, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenin 3 (NGN3) is necessary and sufficient for endocrine differentiation during pancreatic development and is expressed by a population of progenitor cells that give rise exclusively to hormone-secreting cells within islets. NGN3 protein can be detected in the adult rodent pancreas only following certain types of injury, when it is transiently expressed by exocrine cells undergoing reprogramming to an endocrine cell fate. Here, NGN3 protein can be detected in 2% of acinar and duct cells in living biopsies of histologically normal adult human pancreata and 10% in cadaveric biopsies of organ donor pancreata. The percentage and total number of NGN3+ cells increase during culture without evidence of proliferation or selective cell death. Isolation of highly purified and viable NGN3+ cell populations can be achieved based on coexpression of the cell surface glycoprotein CD133. Transcriptome and targeted expression analyses of isolated CD133+ / NGN3+ cells indicate that they are distinct from surrounding exocrine tissue with respect to expression phenotype and Notch signaling activity, but retain high level mRNA expression of genes indicative of acinar and duct cell function. NGN3+ cells have an mRNA expression profile that resembles that of mouse early endocrine progenitor cells. During in vitro differentiation, NGN3+ cells express genes in a pattern characteristic of endocrine development and result in cells that resemble beta cells on the basis of coexpression of insulin C-peptide, chromogranin A and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1. NGN3 expression in the adult human exocrine pancreas marks a dedifferentiating cell population with the capacity to take on an endocrine cell fate. These cells represent a potential source for the treatment of diabetes either through ex vivo manipulation, or in vivo by targeting mechanisms controlling their population size and endocrine cell fate commitment. PMID:26288179

  20. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  1. Glucose-responsive insulin and glucagon delivery (dual-hormone artificial pancreas) in adults with type 1 diabetes: a randomized crossover controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Ahmad; Legault, Laurent; Dallaire, Maryse; Alkhateeb, Ammar; Coriati, Adèle; Messier, Virginie; Cheng, Peiyao; Millette, Maude; Boulet, Benoit; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Most patients with type 1 diabetes do not achieve their glycemic targets. We aimed to assess the efficacy of glucose-responsive insulin and glucagon closed-loop delivery for controlling glucose levels in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods: We conducted a randomized crossover trial involving 15 adults with type 1 diabetes, comparing standard insulin-pump therapy with dual-hormone, closed-loop delivery. Patients were admitted twice to a clinical research facility and received, in random order, both treatments. Each 15-hour visit (from 1600 to 0700) included an evening exercise session, followed by a medium-sized meal, a bedtime snack and an overnight stay. During visits that involved closed-loop delivery, basal insulin and glucagon miniboluses were delivered according to recommendations based on glucose sensor readings and a predictive dosing algorithm at 10-minute intervals. During visits involving standard insulin-pump therapy (control visits), patients used conventional treatment. Results: Dual-hormone closed-loop delivery increased the percentage of time for which patients’ plasma glucose levels were in the target range (median 70.7% [interquartile range (IQR) 46.1%–88.4%] for closed-loop delivery v. 57.3% [IQR 25.2%–71.8%] for control, p = 0.003) and decreased the percentage of time for which plasma glucose levels were in the low range (bottom of target range [< 4.0 mmol/L], 0.0% [IQR 0.0%–3.0%] for closed-loop delivery v. 10.2% [IQR 0.0%–13.0%] for control, p = 0.01; hypoglycemia threshold [< 3.3 mmol/L], 0.0% [IQR 0.0%–0.0%] for closed-loop delivery v. 2.8% [IQR 0.0%–5.9%] for control, p = 0.006). Eight participants (53%) had at least 1 hypoglycemic event (plasma glucose < 3.0 mmol/L) during standard treatment, compared with just 1 participant (7%) during closed-loop treatment (p = 0.02). Interpretation: Dual-hormone, closed-loop delivery guided by advanced algorithms improved short-term glucose control and reduced the risk of

  2. Glucose-responsive insulin and glucagon delivery (dual-hormone artificial pancreas) in adults with type 1 diabetes: a randomized crossover controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Ahmad; Legault, Laurent; Dallaire, Maryse; Alkhateeb, Ammar; Coriati, Adèle; Messier, Virginie; Cheng, Peiyao; Millette, Maude; Boulet, Benoit; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2013-03-05

    Most patients with type 1 diabetes do not achieve their glycemic targets. We aimed to assess the efficacy of glucose-responsive insulin and glucagon closed-loop delivery for controlling glucose levels in adults with type 1 diabetes. We conducted a randomized crossover trial involving 15 adults with type 1 diabetes, comparing standard insulin-pump therapy with dual-hormone, closed-loop delivery. Patients were admitted twice to a clinical research facility and received, in random order, both treatments. Each 15-hour visit (from 1600 to 0700) included an evening exercise session, followed by a medium-sized meal, a bedtime snack and an overnight stay. During visits that involved closed-loop delivery, basal insulin and glucagon miniboluses were delivered according to recommendations based on glucose sensor readings and a predictive dosing algorithm at 10-minute intervals. During visits involving standard insulin-pump therapy (control visits), patients used conventional treatment. Dual-hormone closed-loop delivery increased the percentage of time for which patients' plasma glucose levels were in the target range (median 70.7% [interquartile range (IQR) 46.1%-88.4%] for closed-loop delivery v. 57.3% [IQR 25.2%-71.8%] for control, p = 0.003) and decreased the percentage of time for which plasma glucose levels were in the low range (bottom of target range [< 4.0 mmol/L], 0.0% [IQR 0.0%-3.0%] for closed-loop delivery v. 10.2% [IQR 0.0%-13.0%] for control, p = 0.01; hypoglycemia threshold [< 3.3 mmol/L], 0.0% [IQR 0.0%-0.0%] for closed-loop delivery v. 2.8% [IQR 0.0%-5.9%] for control, p = 0.006). Eight participants (53%) had at least 1 hypoglycemic event (plasma glucose < 3.0 mmol/L) during standard treatment, compared with just 1 participant (7%) during closed-loop treatment (p = 0.02). Dual-hormone, closed-loop delivery guided by advanced algorithms improved short-term glucose control and reduced the risk of hypoglycemia in a group of 15 adults with type 1 diabetes

  3. Expression patterns of Slit and Robo family members in adult mouse spinal cord and peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Carr, Lauren; Parkinson, David B; Dun, Xin-Peng

    2017-01-01

    The secreted glycoproteins, Slit1-3, are classic axon guidance molecules that act as repulsive cues through their well characterised receptors Robo1-2 to allow precise axon pathfinding and neuronal migration. The expression patterns of Slit1-3 and Robo1-2 have been most characterized in the rodent developing nervous system and the adult brain, but little is known about their expression patterns in the adult rodent peripheral nervous system. Here, we report a detailed expression analysis of Slit1-3 and Robo1-2 in the adult mouse sciatic nerve as well as their expression in the nerve cell bodies within the ventral spinal cord (motor neurons) and dorsal root ganglion (sensory neurons). Our results show that, in the adult mouse peripheral nervous system, Slit1-3 and Robo1-2 are expressed in the cell bodies and axons of both motor and sensory neurons. While Slit1 and Robo2 are only expressed in peripheral axons and their cell bodies, Slit2, Slit3 and Robo1 are also expressed in satellite cells of the dorsal root ganglion, Schwann cells and fibroblasts of peripheral nerves. In addition to these expression patterns, we also demonstrate the expression of Robo1 in blood vessels of the peripheral nerves. Our work gives important new data on the expression patterns of Slit and Robo family members within the peripheral nervous system that may relate both to nerve homeostasis and the reaction of the peripheral nerves to injury.

  4. Genetic influences on exercise-induced adult hippocampal neurogenesis across 12 divergent mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Kohman, Rachel A.; Miller, Daniel S.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Brzezinska, Weronika J.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are continuously born in the hippocampus of several mammalian species throughout adulthood. Adult neurogenesis represents a natural model for understanding how to grow and incorporate new nerve cells into pre-existing circuits in the brain. Finding molecules or biological pathways that increase neurogenesis has broad potential for regenerative medicine. One strategy is to identify mouse strains that display large versus small increases in neurogenesis in response to wheel running so the strains can be contrasted to find common genes or biological pathways associated with enhanced neuron formation. Therefore, mice from 12 different isogenic strains were housed with or without running wheels for 43 days to measure the genetic regulation of exercise-induced neurogenesis. The first 10 days mice received daily injections of BrdU to label dividing cells. Neurogenesis was measured as the total number of BrdU cells co-expressing NeuN mature neuronal marker in the hippocampal granule cell layer by immunohistochemistry. Exercise increased neurogenesis in all strains, but the magnitude significantly depended on genotype. Strain means for distance run on wheels, but not distance traveled in cages without wheels, were significantly correlated with strain mean level of neurogenesis. Further, certain strains displayed greater neurogenesis than others for a fixed level of running. Strain means for neurogenesis under sedentary conditions were not correlated with neurogenesis under runner conditions suggesting that different genes influence baseline versus exercise-induced neurogenesis. Genetic contributions to exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis suggest that it may be possible to identify genes and pathways associated with enhanced neuroplastic responses to exercise. PMID:21223504

  5. Designer Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Scaffolds for Adult Mouse Neural Stem Cell 3-Dimensional Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gelain, Fabrizio; Bottai, Daniele; Vescovi, Angleo; Zhang, Shuguang

    2006-01-01

    Biomedical researchers have become increasingly aware of the limitations of conventional 2-dimensional tissue cell culture systems, including coated Petri dishes, multi-well plates and slides, to fully address many critical issues in cell biology, cancer biology and neurobiology, such as the 3-D microenvironment, 3-D gradient diffusion, 3-D cell migration and 3-D cell-cell contact interactions. In order to fully understand how cells behave in the 3-D body, it is important to develop a well-controlled 3-D cell culture system where every single ingredient is known. Here we report the development of a 3-D cell culture system using a designer peptide nanofiber scaffold with mouse adult neural stem cells. We attached several functional motifs, including cell adhesion, differentiation and bone marrow homing motifs, to a self-assembling peptide RADA16 (Ac-RADARADARADARADA-COHN2). These functionalized peptides undergo self-assembly into a nanofiber structure similar to Matrigel. During cell culture, the cells were fully embedded in the 3-D environment of the scaffold. Two of the peptide scaffolds containing bone marrow homing motifs significantly enhanced the neural cell survival without extra soluble growth and neurotrophic factors to the routine cell culture media. In these designer scaffolds, the cell populations with β-Tubulin+, GFAP+ and Nestin+ markers are similar to those found in cell populations cultured on Matrigel. The gene expression profiling array experiments showed selective gene expression, possibly involved in neural stem cell adhesion and differentiation. Because the synthetic peptides are intrinsically pure and a number of desired function cellular motifs are easy to incorporate, these designer peptide nanofiber scaffolds provide a promising controlled 3-D culture system for diverse tissue cells, and are useful as well for general molecular and cell biology. PMID:17205123

  6. Bergmann glia are patterned into topographic molecular zones in the developing and adult mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Reeber, Stacey L.; Arancillo, Marife K. V.; Sillitoe, Roy V.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar circuits are patterned into an array of topographic parasagittal domains called zones. Zones are best revealed by gene expression, circuit anatomy, and cellular degeneration patterns. Thus far, the study of zones has been focused heavily on how neurons are organized. Because of this, detailed neuronal patterning maps have been established for Purkinje cells, granule cells, Golgi cells, unipolar brush cells, and also for the terminal field organization of climbing fiber and mossy fiber afferents. In comparison, however, it remains poorly understood if glial cells are also organized into zones. We have identified an Npy-Gfp BAC transgenic mouse line (Tau-Sapphire Green fluorescent protein (Gfp) is under the control of the neuropeptide Y (Npy) gene regulatory elements) that can be used to label Bergmann glial cells with Golgi-like resolution. In these adult transgenic mice we found that Npy-Gfp expression was localized to Bergmann glia mainly in lobules VI/VII and IX/X. Using double immunofluorescence, we show that in these lobules, Npy-Gfp expression in the Bergmann glia overlaps with the pattern of the small heat shock protein HSP25, a Purkinje cell marker for zones located in lobules VI/VII and IX/X. Developmental analysis starting from the day of birth showed that HSP25 and Npy-Gfp expression follow a similar program of spatial and temporal patterning. However, loss of Npy signaling did not alter the patterning of Purkinje cell zones. We conclude that Bergmann glial cells are zonally organized and their patterns are restricted by boundaries that also confine cerebellar neurons into a topographic circuit map. PMID:24906823

  7. BAG3 regulates contractility and Ca(2+) homeostasis in adult mouse ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Arthur M; Gordon, Jennifer; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Myers, Valerie D; Tilley, Douglas G; Gao, Erhe; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Tomar, Dhanendra; Madesh, Muniswamy; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Koch, Walter J; Su, Feifei; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2016-03-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is a 575 amino acid anti-apoptotic protein that is constitutively expressed in the heart. BAG3 mutations, including mutations leading to loss of protein, are associated with familial cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, BAG3 levels have been found to be reduced in end-stage non-familial failing myocardium. In contrast to neonatal myocytes in which BAG3 is found in the cytoplasm and involved in protein quality control and apoptosis, in adult mouse left ventricular (LV) myocytes BAG3 co-localized with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and L-type Ca(2+) channels in the sarcolemma and t-tubules. BAG3 co-immunoprecipitated with β1-adrenergic receptor, L-type Ca(2+) channels and phospholemman. To simulate decreased BAG3 protein levels observed in human heart failure, we targeted BAG3 by shRNA (shBAG3) in adult LV myocytes. Reducing BAG3 by 55% resulted in reduced contraction and [Ca(2+)]i transient amplitudes in LV myocytes stimulated with isoproterenol. L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content but not Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange current (INaCa) or SR Ca(2+) uptake were reduced in isoproterenol-treated shBAG3 myocytes. Forskolin or dibutyryl cAMP restored ICa amplitude in shBAG3 myocytes to that observed in WT myocytes, consistent with BAG3 having effects upstream and at the level of the receptor. Resting membrane potential and action potential amplitude were unaffected but APD50 and APD90 were prolonged in shBAG3 myocytes. Protein levels of Ca(2+) entry molecules and other important excitation-contraction proteins were unchanged in myocytes with lower BAG3. Our findings that BAG3 is localized at the sarcolemma and t-tubules while modulating myocyte contraction and action potential duration through specific interaction with the β1-adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca(2+) channel provide novel insight into the role of BAG3 in cardiomyopathies and increased arrhythmia risks in heart failure.

  8. BAG3 regulates contractility and Ca2+ homeostasis in adult mouse ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Arthur M.; Gordon, Jennifer; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Myers, Valerie D.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Gao, Erhe; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Tomar, Dhanendra; Madesh, Muniswamy; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Koch, Walter J.; Su, Feifei; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is a 575 amino acid anti-apoptotic protein that is constitutively expressed in the heart. BAG3 mutations, including mutations leading to loss of protein, are associated with familial cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, BAG3 levels have been found to be reduced in end-stage non-familial failing myocardium. In contrast to neonatal myocytes in which BAG3 is found in the cytoplasm and involved in protein quality control and apoptosis, in adult mouse left ventricular (LV) myocytes BAG3 co-localized with Na+-K+-ATPase and L-type Ca2+ channels in the sarcolemma and t-tubules. BAG3 co-immunoprecipitated with β1-adrenergic receptor, L-type Ca2+ channels and phospholemman. To simulate decreased BAG3 protein levels observed in human heart failure, we targeted BAG3 by shRNA (shBAG3) in adult LV myocytes. Reducing BAG3 by 55% resulted in reduced contraction and [Ca2+]i transient amplitudes in LV myocytes stimulated with isoproterenol. L-type Ca2+ current (ICa) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content but not Na+/Ca2+ exchange current (INaCa) or SR Ca2+ uptake were reduced in isoproterenol-treated shBAG3 myocytes. Forskolin or dibutyrl cAMP restored ICa amplitude in shBAG3 myocytes to that observed in WT myocytes, consistent with BAG3 having effects upstream and at the level of the receptor. Resting membrane potential and action potential amplitude were unaffected but APD50 and APD90 were prolonged in shBAG3 myocytes. Protein levels of Ca2+ entry molecules and other important excitation-contraction proteins were unchanged in myocytes with lower BAG3. Our findings that BAG3 is localized at the sarcolemma and t-tubules while modulating myocyte contraction and action potential duration through specific interaction with the β1-adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca2+ channel provide novel insight into the role of BAG3 in cardiomyopathies and increased arrhythmia risks in heart failure. PMID:26796036

  9. Chlorophytum borivilianum root extract maintains near normal blood glucose, insulin and lipid profile levels and prevents oxidative stress in the pancreas of streptozotocin-induced adult male diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Giribabu, Nelli; Kumar, Kilari Eswar; Rekha, Somesula Swapna; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    The effect of C. borivilianum root on blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbAIc), insulin and lipid profile levels in diabetes mellitus are not fully understood. This study therefore investigated the effect of C. borivilianum root on the above parameters and oxidative stress of the pancreas in diabetes. C. borivilianum root aqueous extract (250 and 500 mg/kg/day) was administered to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced male diabetic rats for 28 days. Body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipid profile levels and glucose homeostasis indices were determined. Histopathological changes and oxidative stress parameters i.e. lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant enzymes activity levels of the pancreas were investigated. C. borivilianum root extract treatment to diabetic rats maintained near normal body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile and insulin levels with higher HOMA-β cell functioning index, number of Islets/pancreas, number of β-cells/Islets however with lower HOMA-insulin resistance (IR) index as compared to non-treated diabetic rats. Negative correlations between serum insulin and blood glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) levels were observed. C. borivilianum root extract administration prevented the increase in lipid peroxidation and the decrease in activity levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) with mild histopathological changes in the pancreas of diabetic rats. C. borivilianum root maintains near normal levels of these metabolites and prevented oxidative stress-induced damage to the pancreas in diabetes.

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of Neonatal versus Adult Unilateral Decortication in a Mouse Model Using Behavioral, Neuroanatomical, and DNA Microarray Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Previously, studying the development, especially of corticospinal neurons, it was concluded that the main compensatory mechanism after unilateral brain injury in rat at the neonatal stage was due in part to non-lesioned ipsilateral corticospinal neurons that escaped selection by axonal elimination or neuronal apoptosis. However, previous results suggesting compensatory mechanism in neonate brain were not correlated with high functional recovery. Therefore, what is the difference among neonate and adult in the context of functional recovery and potential mechanism(s) therein? Here, we utilized a brain unilateral decortication mouse model and compared motor functional recovery mechanism post-neonatal brain hemisuction (NBH) with adult brain hemisuction (ABH). Three analyses were performed: (1) Quantitative behavioral analysis of forelimb movements using ladder walking test; (2) neuroanatomical retrograde tracing analysis of unlesioned side corticospinal neurons; and (3) differential global gene expressions profiling in unlesioned-side neocortex (rostral from bregma) in NBH and ABH on a 8 × 60 K mouse whole genome Agilent DNA chip. Behavioral data confirmed higher recovery ability in NBH over ABH is related to non-lesional frontal neocortex including rostral caudal forelimb area. A first inventory of differentially expressed genes genome-wide in the NBH and ABH mouse model is provided as a resource for the scientific community. PMID:25490135

  11. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  12. Accumulated quiescent neural stem cells in adult hippocampus of the mouse model for the MECP2 duplication syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhifang; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Jingjing; Yuan, Bo; Yu, Bin; Tong, Dali; Cheng, Cheng; Shao, Yinqi; Xia, Shengnan; Zhang, Ran; Lyu, Jingwen; Yu, Xiuya; Dong, Chen; Zhou, Wen-Hao; Qiu, Zilong

    2017-01-01

    Duplications of Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) -containing segments lead to the MECP2 duplication syndrome, in which severe autistic symptoms were identified. Whether adult neurogenesis may play a role in pathogenesis of autism and the role of MECP2 on state determination of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) remain largely unclear. Using a MECP2 transgenic (TG) mouse model for the MECP2 duplication syndrome, we found that adult hippocampal quiescent NSCs were significantly accumulated in TG mice comparing to wild type (WT) mice, the neural progenitor cells (NPCs) were reduced and the neuroblasts were increased in adult hippocampi of MECP2 TG mice. Interestingly, we found that parvalbumin (PV) positive interneurons were significantly decreased in MECP2 TG mice, which were critical for determining fates of adult hippocampal NSCs between the quiescence and activation. In summary, we found that MeCP2 plays a critical role in regulating fate determination of adult NSCs. These evidences further suggest that abnormal development of NSCs may play a role in the pathogenesis of the MECP2 duplication syndrome. PMID:28139724

  13. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid activates neurogenesis of neural precursors within the subventricular zone of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Carnicero, E; Alonso, M I; Carretero, R; Lamus, F; Moro, J A; de la Mano, A; Fernández, J M F; Gato, A

    2013-01-01

    There is a nondeveloped neurogenic potential in the adult mammalian brain, which could be the basis for neuroregenerative strategies. Many research efforts have been made to understand the control mechanisms which regulate the transition from a neural precursor to a neuron in the adult brain. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a complex fluid which has been shown to play a key role in neural precursor behavior during development, working as a powerful neurogenic inductor. We tested if the neurogenic properties of embryonic CSF are able to increase the neurogenic activity of neuronal precursors from the subventricular zone (SVZ) in the brains of adult mice. Our results show that mouse embryonic CSF significantly increases the neurogenic activity in precursor cells from adult brain SVZ. This intense neurogenic effect was specific for embryonic CSF and was not induced by adult CSF. Embryonic CSF is a powerful neurogenesis inductor in homologous neuronal precursors in the adult brain. This property of embryonic CSF could be a useful tool in neuroregeneration strategies.

  14. Design of a bioartificial pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pareta, Rajesh A; Farney, Alan C; Opara, Emmanuel C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Islet transplantation has been shown to be a viable treatment option for patients afflicted with Type 1 diabetes. However, the severe shortage of human pancreas and the need to use risky immunosuppressive drugs to prevent transplant rejection remain two major obstacles to routine use of islet transplantation in diabetic patients. Successful development of a bioartificial pancreas using the approach of microencapsulation with perm-selective coating of islets in hydrogels for graft immunoisolation holds tremendous promise for diabetic patients because it has great potential to overcome these two barriers. In this review article, we will discuss the need for bioartificial pancreas, provide a detailed description of the microencapsulation process, and review the status of the technology in clinical development. We will also critically review the various factors that need to be taken into consideration in order to achieve the ultimate goal of routine clinical application. PMID:23652283

  15. Tissue-specific deletion of c-Jun in the pancreas has limited effects on pancreas formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ayako; Toyoda, Shuichi; Kato, Ken; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Hori, Masatsugu; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki

    2007-11-30

    It is well known that activating protein-1 (AP-1) is involved in a variety of cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. AP-1 is a dimer complex consisting of different subunits, and c-Jun is known to be one of its major components. In addition, it has been shown that mice lacking c-Jun are embryonic lethal and that c-Jun is essential for liver and heart development. However, the role of c-Jun in the pancreas is not well known. The aim of this study was to examine the possible role of c-Jun in the pancreas. First, c-Jun was strongly expressed in pancreatic duct-like structures at an embryonic stage, while a lower level of expression was observed in some part of the adult pancreas, implying that c-Jun might play a role during pancreas development. Second, to address this point, we generated pancreas-specific c-Jun knock-out mice (Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} mice) by crossing Ptf1a-Cre knock-in mice with c-Jun floxed mice. Ptf1a is a pancreatic transcription factor and its expression is confined to pancreatic stem/progenitor cells, which give rise to all three types of pancreatic tissue: endocrine, exocrine, and duct. Contrary to our expectation, however, there was no morphological difference in the pancreas between Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} and control mice. In addition, there was no difference in body weight, pancreas weight, and the expression of various pancreas-related factors (insulin, glucagon, cytokeratin, and amylase) between the two groups. Furthermore, there was no difference in glucose tolerance between Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} and control mice. Taken together, although we cannot exclude the possibility that c-Jun ablation is compensated by some unknown factors, c-Jun appears to be dispensable for pancreas development at least after ptf1a gene promoter is activated.

  16. Retinol Dehydrogenase-10 Regulates Pancreas Organogenesis and Endocrine Cell Differentiation via Paracrine Retinoic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Arregi, Igor; Climent, Maria; Iliev, Dobromir; Strasser, Jürgen; Gouignard, Nadège; Johansson, Jenny K; Singh, Tania; Mazur, Magdalena; Semb, Henrik; Artner, Isabella; Minichiello, Liliana; Pera, Edgar M

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin A-derived retinoic acid (RA) signals are critical for the development of several organs, including the pancreas. However, the tissue-specific control of RA synthesis in organ and cell lineage development has only poorly been addressed in vivo. Here, we show that retinol dehydrogenase-10 (Rdh10), a key enzyme in embryonic RA production, has important functions in pancreas organogenesis and endocrine cell differentiation. Rdh10 was expressed in the developing pancreas epithelium and surrounding mesenchyme. Rdh10 null mutant mouse embryos exhibited dorsal pancreas agenesis and a hypoplastic ventral pancreas with retarded tubulogenesis and branching. Conditional disruption of Rdh10 from the endoderm caused increased mortality, reduced body weight, and lowered blood glucose levels after birth. Endodermal Rdh10 deficiency led to a smaller dorsal pancreas with a reduced density of early glucagon(+) and insulin(+) cells. During the secondary transition, the reduction of Neurogenin3(+) endocrine progenitors in the mutant dorsal pancreas accounted for fewer α- and β-cells. Changes in the expression of α- and β-cell-specific transcription factors indicated that Rdh10 might also participate in the terminal differentiation of endocrine cells. Together, our results highlight the importance of both mesenchymal and epithelial Rdh10 for pancreogenesis and the first wave of endocrine cell differentiation. We further propose a model in which the Rdh10-expressing exocrine tissue acts as an essential source of RA signals in the second wave of endocrine cell differentiation.

  17. Possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Kin, Tatsuya; Korbutt, Gregory S; Shapiro, A M James

    2012-01-01

    We report on the incidental observation of ectopic pancreas in a donor for islet cell transplantation. The donor's clinical and imaging presentation was definitive for holoprosencephaly. This case report discusses a possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly.

  18. Development of the human pancreas from foregut to endocrine commitment.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Kirkwood-Wilson, Rebecca; Roberts, Neil A; Hearn, Thomas; Salisbury, Rachel J; Blaylock, Jennifer; Piper Hanley, Karen; Hanley, Neil A

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge of human pancreas development underpins our interpretation and exploitation of human pluripotent stem cell (PSC) differentiation toward a β-cell fate. However, almost no information exists on the early events of human pancreatic specification in the distal foregut, bud formation, and early development. Here, we have studied the expression profiles of key lineage-specific markers to understand differentiation and morphogenetic events during human pancreas development. The notochord was adjacent to the dorsal foregut endoderm during the fourth week of development before pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 detection. In contrast to the published data from mouse embryos, during human pancreas development, we detected only a single-phase of Neurogenin 3 (NEUROG3) expression and endocrine differentiation from approximately 8 weeks, before which Nirenberg and Kim homeobox 2.2 (NKX2.2) was not observed in the pancreatic progenitor cell population. In addition to revealing a number of disparities in timing between human and mouse development, these data, directly assembled from human tissue, allow combinations of transcription factors to define sequential stages and differentiating pancreatic cell types. The data are anticipated to provide a useful reference point for stem cell researchers looking to differentiate human PSCs in vitro toward the pancreatic β-cell so as to model human development or enable drug discovery and potential cell therapy.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Gafă, R; Grandi, E; Cavazzini, L

    1997-01-01

    A rare case of lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas is reported. Microscopically the cyst content consisted of keratinous material and the walls were lined by mature squamous epithelium surrounded by dense lymphoid tissue. Immunohistochemistry showed diffuse reactivity for CD20 and CD3 in the lymphoid tissue and uniform positivity for cytokeratins in the squamous epithelium. Although the histogenesis of lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas is not understood, awareness of this lesion is helpful in differentiating it from other pancreatic cystic lesions. Images PMID:9389985

  1. The economics of pancreas surgery.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Charles M

    2013-06-01

    Pancreas surgery is a paradigm for high-acuity surgical specialization. Given the current intrigue over containing health care expenditures, pancreas surgery provides an ideal model to investigate the cost of care. This article explores the economics of this field from literature accrued over the last 2 decades. The cost of performing a pancreatic resection is established and then embellished with a discussion of the effects of clinical care paths. Then the influence of complications on costs is explored. Next, cost is investigated as an emerging outcome metric regarding variations in pancreatic surgical care. Finally, the societal-level fiscal impact is considered.

  2. Lymphoepithelial Cyst of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Fletcher, Natalie; Kyriakides, Charis; Mears, Lisa; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst (LEC) of the pancreas is an extremely rare, benign pancreatic cystic lesion that is difficult to differentiate preoperatively from other cystic pancreatic lesions. LEC may have malignant potential. Here, we describe a case of LEC of the pancreas – initially suspected to be a mucinous cyst neoplasm – in an elderly man presenting with abdominal pain, who went on to have a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. We also review the relevant literature and discuss implications for the diagnosis and management of this rare lesion. PMID:27403123

  3. Isolation of multipotent neural stem/progenitor cells from both the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone of a single adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weixiang; Patzlaff, Natalie E.; Jobe, Emily M.; Zhao, Xinyu

    2013-01-01

    In adult mammals, the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles (SVZ) and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG) demonstrate ongoing neurogenesis, and multipotent neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) in these two regions exhibit different intrinsic properties. However, investigation of the mechanisms underlying such differences has been limited by a lack of efficient methods for isolating NSCs, particularly from the adult DG. Here we describe a protocol that enables us to isolate self-renewing and multipotent NSCs from the SVZ and the DG of the same adult mouse. The protocol involves the microdissection of the SVZ and DG from one adult mouse brain, isolation of NSCs from specific regions, and cultivation of NSCs in vitro. The entire procedure takes 2 to 3 hours. Since only one mouse is needed for each cell isolation procedure, this protocol will be particularly useful for studies with limited availability of mice, such as mice that contain multiple genetic modifications. PMID:23080272

  4. Comparative ultrastructural features of excitatory synapses in the visual and frontal cortices of the adult mouse and monkey.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Alexander; Luebke, Jennifer I; Medalla, Maria

    2017-06-15

    The excitatory glutamatergic synapse is the principal site of communication between cortical pyramidal neurons and their targets, a key locus of action of many drugs, and highly vulnerable to dysfunction and loss in neurodegenerative disease. A detailed knowledge of the structure of these synapses in distinct cortical areas and across species is a prerequisite for understanding the anatomical underpinnings of cortical specialization and, potentially, selective vulnerability in neurological disorders. We used serial electron microscopy to assess the ultrastructural features of excitatory (asymmetric) synapses in the layers 2-3 (L2-3) neuropil of visual (V1) and frontal (FC) cortices of the adult mouse and compared findings to those in the rhesus monkey (V1 and lateral prefrontal cortex [LPFC]). Analyses of multiple ultrastructural variables revealed four organizational features. First, the density of asymmetric synapses does not differ between frontal and visual cortices in either species, but is significantly higher in mouse than in monkey. Second, the structural properties of asymmetric synapses in mouse V1 and FC are nearly identical, by stark contrast to the significant differences seen between monkey V1 and LPFC. Third, while the structural features of postsynaptic entities in mouse and monkey V1 do not differ, the size of presynaptic boutons are significantly larger in monkey V1. Fourth, both presynaptic and postsynaptic entities are significantly smaller in the mouse FC than in the monkey LPFC. The diversity of synaptic ultrastructural features demonstrated here have broad implications for the nature and efficacy of glutamatergic signaling in distinct cortical areas within and across species. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. P2X7 receptors at adult neural progenitor cells of the mouse subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Messemer, Nanette; Kunert, Christin; Grohmann, Marcus; Sobottka, Helga; Nieber, Karen; Zimmermann, Herbert; Franke, Heike; Nörenberg, Wolfgang; Straub, Isabelle; Schaefer, Michael; Riedel, Thomas; Illes, Peter; Rubini, Patrizia

    2013-10-01

    Neurogenesis requires the balance between the proliferation of newly formed progenitor cells and subsequent death of surplus cells. RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry demonstrated the presence of P2X7 receptor mRNA and immunoreactivity in cultured neural progenitor cells (NPCs) prepared from the adult mouse subventricular zone (SVZ). Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings showed a marked potentiation of the inward current responses both to ATP and the prototypic P2X7 receptor agonist dibenzoyl-ATP (Bz-ATP) at low Ca(2+) and zero Mg(2+) concentrations in the bath medium. The Bz-ATP-induced currents reversed their polarity near 0 mV; in NPCs prepared from P2X7(-/-) mice, Bz-ATP failed to elicit membrane currents. The general P2X/P2Y receptor antagonist PPADS and the P2X7 selective antagonists Brilliant Blue G and A-438079 strongly depressed the effect of Bz-ATP. Long-lasting application of Bz-ATP induced an initial current, which slowly increased to a steady-state response. In combination with the determination of YO-PRO uptake, these experiments suggest the dilation of a receptor-channel and/or the recruitment of a dye-uptake pathway. Ca(2+)-imaging by means of Fura-2 revealed that in a Mg(2+)-deficient bath medium Bz-ATP causes [Ca(2+)](i) transients fully depending on the presence of external Ca(2+). The MTT test indicated a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability by Bz-ATP treatment. Correspondingly, Bz-ATP led to an increase in active caspase 3 immunoreactivity, indicating a P2X7-controlled apoptosis. In acute SVZ brain slices of transgenic Tg(nestin/EGFP) mice, patch-clamp recordings identified P2X7 receptors at NPCs with pharmacological properties identical to those of their cultured counterparts. We suggest that the apoptotic/necrotic P2X7 receptors at NPCs may be of particular relevance during pathological conditions which lead to increased ATP release and thus could counterbalance the ensuing excessive cell proliferation.

  6. The increased echogenicity of the pancreas in infants and children: the white pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schneider, K; Harms, K; Fendel, H

    1987-09-01

    An increased echogenicity of the pancreas ("white pancreas") was sonographically found in 25 children with various pancreatic and systemic diseases. Fifteen patients with cystic fibrosis had a small white pancreas. Five patients with haemosiderosis, two with pancreatitis and one with Shwachman-syndrome presented with a normal-sized or slightly enlarged pancreas. Fatty infiltration and calcifications of the pancreas can also increase its echogenicity.

  7. Chlorophytum borivilianum Root Extract Maintains near Normal Blood Glucose, Insulin and Lipid Profile Levels and Prevents Oxidative Stress in the Pancreas of Streptozotocin-Induced Adult Male Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Giribabu, Nelli; Kumar, Kilari Eswar; Rekha, Somesula Swapna; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    The effect of C. borivilianum root on blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbAIc), insulin and lipid profile levels in diabetes mellitus are not fully understood. This study therefore investigated the effect of C. borivilianum root on the above parameters and oxidative stress of the pancreas in diabetes. Methods: C. borivilianum root aqueous extract (250 and 500 mg/kg/day) was administered to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced male diabetic rats for 28 days. Body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipid profile levels and glucose homeostasis indices were determined. Histopathological changes and oxidative stress parameters i.e. lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant enzymes activity levels of the pancreas were investigated. Results: C. borivilianum root extract treatment to diabetic rats maintained near normal body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile and insulin levels with higher HOMA-β cell functioning index, number of Islets/pancreas, number of β-cells/Islets however with lower HOMA-insulin resistance (IR) index as compared to non-treated diabetic rats. Negative correlations between serum insulin and blood glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) levels were observed. C. borivilianum root extract administration prevented the increase in lipid peroxidation and the decrease in activity levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) with mild histopathological changes in the pancreas of diabetic rats. Conclusions: C. borivilianum root maintains near normal levels of these metabolites and prevented oxidative stress-induced damage to the pancreas in diabetes. PMID:25249786

  8. Deficits in adult neurogenesis, contextual fear conditioning, and spatial learning in a Gfap mutant mouse model of Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Tracy L; Paylor, Richard; Messing, Albee

    2013-11-20

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament of mature astrocytes in the mammalian CNS. Dominant gain of function mutations in GFAP lead to the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Alexander disease (AxD), which is characterized by cytoplasmic protein aggregates known as Rosenthal fibers along with variable degrees of leukodystrophy and intellectual disability. The mechanisms by which mutant GFAP leads to these pleiotropic effects are unknown. In addition to astrocytes, GFAP is also expressed in other cell types, particularly neural stem cells that form the reservoir supporting adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Here, we show that mouse models of AxD exhibit significant pathology in GFAP-positive radial glia-like cells in the dentate gyrus, and suffer from deficits in adult neurogenesis. In addition, they display impairments in contextual learning and spatial memory. This is the first demonstration of cognitive phenotypes in a model of primary astrocyte disease.

  9. Cystic tumors of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Morana, Giovanni; Guarise, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas are less frequent than solid lesions and are often detected incidentally, as many of these lesions are small and asymptomatic. However, they may be associated with pancreatitis or have malignant potential. With advancements in diagnostic imaging, cystic lesions of the pancreas are being detected with increasing frequency. Many lesions can cause a pancreatic cyst, most being non-neoplastic while approximately 10% are cystic tumors, ranging from benign to highly malignant tumors. With increasing experience it is becoming clear that the prevalence of pseudocyst among cystic lesions of the pancreas is lower than usually presumed. A presumptive diagnosis of pseudocyst based on imaging appearance alone can cause a diagnostic error, and neoplastic cysts of the pancreas are particularly susceptible to this misdiagnosis, which can result in inappropriate treatment. Cystic tumors of the pancreas are formed by serous or mucinous structures showing all stages of cellular differentiation. According to the WHO classification, they can be subdivided on the basis of their histological type and biological behavior into benign tumors, borderline tumors, and malignant tumors. Cystic pancreatic tumors can be subdivided into peripheral (serous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic tumors, solid and papillary epithelial neoplasms, cystic islet cell tumors), which do not communicate with the main pancreatic duct, and ductal tumors (mucinous tumor), according to their site of origin. On the basis of imaging criteria alone, it can be very difficult to differentiate non-tumoral cystic lesions from neoplastic ones. The management of these patients is complex, and it is important to correlate imaging findings with knowledge of the patient’s symptoms and of the natural history and predictors of malignancy in pancreatic cysts. PMID:16861136

  10. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix and Developmental Dysregulation in the Pancreas by Transgenic Production of Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung-Shik; Gu, Danling; Feng, Lili; Curriden, Scott; Arnush, Marc; Krahl, Troy; Gurushanthaiah, Deepak; Wilson, Curtis; Loskutoff, David L.; Fox, Howard; Sarvetnick, Nora

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the pancreatic β-islet cells directed by human insulin promoter were produced to study in vivo effects of TGF-β1. Fibroblast proliferation and abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix were observed from birth onward, finally replacing almost all the exocrine pancreas. Cellular infiltrates comprising macrophages and neutrophils were also observed. Plasminogen activator inhibitor was induced in the transgenic pancreas as well as fibronectin and laminin, partly explaining accumulation of extracellular matrix. TGF-β1 inhibited proliferation of acinar cells in vivo as evidenced by decreased bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Development of pancreatic islets was dysregulated, resulting in small islet cell clusters without formation of normal adult islets; however, the overall islet cell mass was not signfifcantly diminished. Additional transgenic lines with less pronounced phenotypes had less expression of TGF-β1 transgene. These findings suggest that TGF-β1 might be a mediator of diseases associated with extracellular matrix deposition such as chronic pancreatitis, and this mouse model will be useful for further analysis of the in vivo effects of TGF-β1, including its potential for immunosuppression. Imagesp43-aFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7604884

  11. Expression patterns of Slit and Robo family members in adult mouse spinal cord and peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Lauren; Parkinson, David B.; Dun, Xin-peng

    2017-01-01

    The secreted glycoproteins, Slit1-3, are classic axon guidance molecules that act as repulsive cues through their well characterised receptors Robo1-2 to allow precise axon pathfinding and neuronal migration. The expression patterns of Slit1-3 and Robo1-2 have been most characterized in the rodent developing nervous system and the adult brain, but little is known about their expression patterns in the adult rodent peripheral nervous system. Here, we report a detailed expression analysis of Slit1-3 and Robo1-2 in the adult mouse sciatic nerve as well as their expression in the nerve cell bodies within the ventral spinal cord (motor neurons) and dorsal root ganglion (sensory neurons). Our results show that, in the adult mouse peripheral nervous system, Slit1-3 and Robo1-2 are expressed in the cell bodies and axons of both motor and sensory neurons. While Slit1 and Robo2 are only expressed in peripheral axons and their cell bodies, Slit2, Slit3 and Robo1 are also expressed in satellite cells of the dorsal root ganglion, Schwann cells and fibroblasts of peripheral nerves. In addition to these expression patterns, we also demonstrate the expression of Robo1 in blood vessels of the peripheral nerves. Our work gives important new data on the expression patterns of Slit and Robo family members within the peripheral nervous system that may relate both to nerve homeostasis and the reaction of the peripheral nerves to injury. PMID:28234971

  12. Dynamic expression and localization of c-MET isoforms in the developing rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yulong; Cheng, Mei; Shi, Zhen; Feng, Zhenqing; Guan, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Pancreata from Sprague Dawley rats of different developmental stages were studied to determine the expression and cellular localization of different c-MET isoforms in the developing rat pancreas. Pancreatic mRNA and protein expression levels of c-MET at different developmental stages from embryo to adult were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and by western blotting. To identify the cellular localization of c-MET protein in the developing rat pancreas, double immunofluorescent staining was performed using antibodies for cell type-specific markers and for c-MET. The expression of two isoforms of c-MET (190 kDa and 170 kDa) coincided with the development of the pancreas. The 190 kDa isoform of c-MET is expressed during embryonic stages, and its expression is replaced by the expression of the 170 kDa isoform as the pancreas develops. Only the 170 kDa isoform is expressed in the adult rat pancreas. Throughout all stages of pancreatic development, c-MET is expressed by vimentin-positive cells. In contrast, c-MET staining was stronger in rat pancreata from newborn to adult stages and overlapped with insulin-positive beta-cells. The dynamic expression and localization of different c-MET isoforms in the rat pancreas during different developmental stages indicates that distinct c-MET isoform might be involved in different aspects of pancreatic development.

  13. Dynamic expression and localization of c-MET isoforms in the developing rat pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yulong; Cheng, Mei; Shi, Zhen; Feng, Zhenqing; Guan, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Pancreata from Sprague Dawley rats of different developmental stages were studied to determine the expression and cellular localization of different c-MET isoforms in the developing rat pancreas. Pancreatic mRNA and protein expression levels of c-MET at different developmental stages from embryo to adult were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and by western blotting. To identify the cellular localization of c-MET protein in the developing rat pancreas, double immunofluorescent staining was performed using antibodies for cell type-specific markers and for c-MET. The expression of two isoforms of c-MET (190 kDa and 170 kDa) coincided with the development of the pancreas. The 190 kDa isoform of c-MET is expressed during embryonic stages, and its expression is replaced by the expression of the 170 kDa isoform as the pancreas develops. Only the 170 kDa isoform is expressed in the adult rat pancreas. Throughout all stages of pancreatic development, c-MET is expressed by vimentin-positive cells. In contrast, c-MET staining was stronger in rat pancreata from newborn to adult stages and overlapped with insulin-positive beta-cells. The dynamic expression and localization of different c-MET isoforms in the rat pancreas during different developmental stages indicates that distinct c-MET isoform might be involved in different aspects of pancreatic development. PMID:25674220

  14. Low levels of citrin (SLC25A13) expression in adult mouse brain restricted to neuronal clusters.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Laura; Urbieta, Almudena; Kobayashi, Keiko; Saheki, Takeyori; Satrústegui, Jorgina

    2010-04-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carriers (AGC) aralar (SLC25A12) and citrin (SLC25A13) are components of the malate aspartate shuttle (MAS), a major intracellular pathway to transfer reducing equivalents from NADH to the mitochondrial matrix. Aralar is the main AGC isoform present in the adult brain, and it is expressed mainly in neurons. To search for the other AGC isoform, citrin, in brain glial cells, we used a citrin knockout mouse in which the lacZ gene was inserted into the citrin locus as reporter gene. In agreement with the low citrin levels known to be present in the adult mouse brain, beta-galactosidase expression was very low. Surprisingly, unlike the case with astroglial cultures that express citrin, no beta-galactosidase was found in brain glial cells. It was confined to neuronal cells within discrete neuronal clusters. Double-immunolabelling experiments showed that beta-galactosidase colocalized not with glial cell markers but with the pan-neuronal marker NeuN. The deep cerebellar nuclei and a few midbrain nuclei (reticular tegmental pontine nuclei; magnocellular red nuclei) were the regions where beta-galactosidase expression was highest, and it was up-regulated in fasted mice, as was also the case for liver beta-galactosidase. The results support the notion that glial cells have much lower AGC levels and MAS activity than neurons. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. PPARγ mRNA in the adult mouse hypothalamus: distribution and regulation in response to dietary challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Ying; Lee, Syann; Bookout, Angie L.; Castorena, Carlos M.; Wu, Hua; Gautron, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that was originally identified as a regulator of peroxisome proliferation and adipocyte differentiation. Emerging evidence suggests that functional PPARγ signaling also occurs within the hypothalamus. However, the exact distribution and identities of PPARγ-expressing hypothalamic cells remains under debate. The present study systematically mapped PPARγ mRNA expression in the adult mouse brain using in situ hybridization histochemistry. PPARγ mRNA was found to be expressed at high levels outside the hypothalamus including the neocortex, the olfactory bulb, the organ of the vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (VOLT), and the subfornical organ. Within the hypothalamus, PPARγ was present at moderate levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh) and the ependymal of the 3rd ventricle. In all examined feeding-related hypothalamic nuclei, PPARγ was expressed at very low levels that were close to the limit of detection. Using qPCR techniques, we demonstrated that PPARγ mRNA expression was upregulated in the SCh in response to fasting. Double in situ hybridization further demonstrated that PPARγ was primarily expressed in neurons rather than glia. Collectively, our observations provide a comprehensive map of PPARγ distribution in the intact adult mouse hypothalamus. PMID:26388745

  16. Modifications of hippocampal circuits and early disruption of adult neurogenesis in the tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Krezymon, Alice; Richetin, Kevin; Halley, Hélène; Roybon, Laurent; Lassalle, Jean-Michel; Francès, Bernard; Verret, Laure; Rampon, Claire

    2013-01-01

    At advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease, cognitive dysfunction is accompanied by severe alterations of hippocampal circuits that may largely underlie memory impairments. However, it is likely that anatomical remodeling in the hippocampus may start long before any cognitive alteration is detected. Using the well-described Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease that develops progressive age-dependent amyloidosis and cognitive deficits, we examined whether specific stages of the disease were associated with the expression of anatomical markers of hippocampal dysfunction. We found that these mice develop a complex pattern of changes in their dentate gyrus with aging. Those include aberrant expression of neuropeptide Y and reduced levels of calbindin, reflecting a profound remodeling of inhibitory and excitatory circuits in the dentate gyrus. Preceding these changes, we identified severe alterations of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in Tg2576 mice. We gathered converging data in Tg2576 mice at young age, indicating impaired maturation of new neurons that may compromise their functional integration into hippocampal circuits. Thus, disruption of adult hippocampal neurogenesis occurred before network remodeling in this mouse model and therefore may account as an early event in the etiology of Alzheimer's pathology. Ultimately, both events may constitute key components of hippocampal dysfunction and associated cognitive deficits occurring in Alzheimer's disease.

  17. A rapidly activating sustained K+ current modulates repolarization and excitation-contraction coupling in adult mouse ventricle.

    PubMed Central

    Fiset, C; Clark, R B; Larsen, T S; Giles, W R

    1997-01-01

    1. The K+ currents which control repolarization in adult mouse ventricle, and the effects of changes in action potential duration on excitation-contraction coupling in this tissue, have been studied with electrophysiological methods using single cell preparations and by recording mechanical parameters from an in vitro working heart preparation. 2. Under conditions where Ca(2+)-dependent currents were eliminated by buffering intracellular Ca2+ with EGTA, depolarizing voltage steps elicited two rapidly activating outward K+ currents: (i) a transient outward current, and (ii) a slowly inactivating or 'sustained' delayed rectifier. 3. These two currents were separated pharmacologically by the K+ channel blocker 4-amino-pyridine (4-AP). 4-AP at concentrations between 3 and 200 microM resulted in (i) a marked increase in action potential duration and a large decrease in the sustained K+ current at plateau potentials, as well as (ii) a significant increase in left ventricular systolic pressure in the working heart preparation. 4. The current-voltage (I-V) relation, kinetics, and block by low concentrations of 4-AP strongly suggest that the rapid delayed rectifier in adult mouse ventricles is the same K+ current (Kv1.5) that has been characterized in detail in human and canine atria. 5. These results show that the 4-AP-sensitive rapid delayed rectifier is a very important repolarizing current in mouse ventricle. The enhanced contractility produced by 4-AP (50 microM) in the working heart preparation demonstrates that modulation of the action potential duration, by blocking a K+ current, is a very significant inotropic variable. PMID:9401964

  18. Kv4.3 is not required for the generation of functional Ito,f channels in adult mouse ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Noriko; Wang, Wei; Sha, Qun; Marionneau, Céline; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that the heteromeric assembly of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 α subunits underlies the fast transient Kv current (Ito,f) in rodent ventricles. Recent studies, however, demonstrated that the targeted deletion of Kv4.2 results in the complete elimination of Ito,f in adult mouse ventricles, revealing an essential role for the Kv4.2 α subunit in the generation of mouse ventricular Ito,f channels. The present study was undertaken to investigate directly the functional role of Kv4.3 by examining the effects of the targeted disruption of the KCND3 (Kv4.3) locus. Mice lacking Kv4.3 (Kv4.3−/−) appear indistinguishable from wild type control animals, and no structural or functional abnormalities were evident in Kv4.3−/− hearts. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed that functional Ito,f channels are expressed in Kv4.3−/− ventricular myocytes, and that mean Ito,f densities are similar to those recorded from wild type cells. In addition, Ito,f properties (inactivation rates, voltage-dependences of inactivation and rates of recovery from inactivation) in Kv4.3−/− and wild type mouse ventricular myocytes were indistinguishable. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses did not reveal any measurable changes in the expression of Kv4.2 or the Kv channel interacting protein (KChIP2) in Kv4.3−/−ventricles. Taken together, the results presented here suggest that, in contrast with Kv4.2, Kv4.3 is not required for the generation of functional mouse ventricular Ito,f channels. PMID:18045613

  19. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for atrazine and its main metabolites in the adult male C57BL/6 mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2011-02-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a chlorotriazine herbicide that is widely used and relatively persistent in the environment. In laboratory rodents, excessive exposure to ATR is detrimental to the reproductive, immune, and nervous systems. To better understand the toxicokinetics of ATR and to fill the need for a mouse model, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for ATR and its main chlorotriazine metabolites (Cl-TRIs) desethyl atrazine (DE), desisopropyl atrazine (DIP), and didealkyl atrazine (DACT) was developed for the adult male C57BL/6 mouse. Taking advantage of all relevant and recently made available mouse-specific data, a flow-limited PBPK model was constructed. The ATR and DACT sub-models included blood, brain, liver, kidney, richly and slowly perfused tissue compartments, as well as plasma protein binding and red blood cell binding, whereas the DE and DIP sub-models were constructed as simple five-compartment models. The model adequately simulated plasma levels of ATR and Cl-TRIs and urinary dosimetry of Cl-TRIs at four single oral dose levels (250, 125, 25, and 5 mg/kg). Additionally, the model adequately described the dose dependency of brain and liver ATR and DACT concentrations. Cumulative urinary DACT amounts were accurately predicted across a wide dose range, suggesting the model's potential use for extrapolation to human exposures by performing reverse dosimetry. The model was validated using previously reported data for plasma ATR and DACT in mice and rats. Overall, besides being the first mouse PBPK model for ATR and its Cl-TRIs, this model, by analogy, provides insights into tissue dosimetry for rats. The model could be used in tissue dosimetry prediction and as an aid in the exposure assessment to this widely used herbicide.

  20. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  1. Neuron-Enriched Gene Expression Patterns are Regionally Anti-Correlated with Oligodendrocyte-Enriched Patterns in the Adult Mouse and Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Powell Patrick Cheng; French, Leon; Pavlidis, Paul

    2013-01-01

    An important goal in neuroscience is to understand gene expression patterns in the brain. The recent availability of comprehensive and detailed expression atlases for mouse and human creates opportunities to discover global patterns and perform cross-species comparisons. Recently we reported that the major source of variation in gene transcript expression in the adult normal mouse brain can be parsimoniously explained as reflecting regional variation in glia to neuron ratios, and is correlated with degree of connectivity and location in the brain along the anterior-posterior axis. Here we extend this investigation to two gene expression assays of adult normal human brains that consisted of over 300 brain region samples, and perform comparative analyses of brain-wide expression patterns to the mouse. We performed principal components analysis (PCA) on the regional gene expression of the adult human brain to identify the expression pattern that has the largest variance. As in the mouse, we observed that the first principal component is composed of two anti-correlated patterns enriched in oligodendrocyte and neuron markers respectively. However, we also observed interesting discordant patterns between the two species. For example, a few mouse neuron markers show expression patterns that are more correlated with the human oligodendrocyte-enriched pattern and vice-versa. In conclusion, our work provides insights into human brain function and evolution by probing global relationships between regional cell type marker expression patterns in the human and mouse brain. PMID:23440889

  2. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreas carcinoma occurring in the annular pancreas: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Maki, Akira; Amemiya, Hidetake; Matsuda, Masanori; Fujii, Hideki; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Takahashi, Ei; Sano, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    The annular pancreas is a rare congenital anomaly in which a ring of the pancreas parenchyma surrounds the second part of the duodenum. Malignant tumors are extremely rare in patients with an annular pancreas. A 64-year-old man presented with appetite loss and vomiting. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) indicated pancreas parenchyma surrounding the second part of the duodenum, and a hypovascular area occupying lesion in the annular pancreas. Subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histopathology showed pancreatic carcinoma occurring in the complete annular pancreas.

  3. An Adult Mouse Model of Vibrio cholerae-induced Diarrhea for Studying Pathogenesis and Potential Therapy of Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Sawasvirojwong, Sutthipong; Srimanote, Potjanee; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2013-01-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. This study aimed to establish an adult mouse model of Vibrio cholerae-induced diarrhea and to characterize its pathophysiology. Ligated ileal loops of adult mice were inoculated for 6, 9, 12 and 18 h with a classical O1 hypertoxigenic 569B strain of V. cholerae (107 CFU/loop). Time-course studies demonstrated that the optimal period for inducing diarrhea was 12 h post-inoculation, when peak intestinal fluid accumulation (loop/weight ratio of ∼0.2 g/cm) occurred with the highest diarrhea success rate (90%). In addition, pathogenic numbers of V. cholerae (∼109 CFU/g tissue) were recovered from ileal loops at all time points between 6–18 h post-inoculation with the diarrheagenic amount of cholera toxin being detected in the secreted intestinal fluid at 12 h post-inoculation. Interestingly, repeated intraperitoneal administration of CFTRinh-172 (20 µg every 6 h), an inhibitor of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), completely abolished the V. cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion without affecting V. cholerae growth in vivo. As analyzed by ex vivo measurement of intestinal electrical resistance and in vivo assay of fluorescein thiocyanate (FITC)-dextran trans-intestinal flux, V. cholerae infection had no effect on intestinal paracellular permeability. Measurements of albumin in the diarrheal fluid suggested that vascular leakage did not contribute to the pathogenesis of diarrhea in this model. Furthermore, histological examination of V. cholerae-infected intestinal tissues illustrated edematous submucosa, congestion of small vessels and enhanced mucus secretion from goblet cells. This study established a new adult mouse model of V. cholerae-induced diarrhea, which could be useful for studying the pathogenesis of cholera diarrhea and for evaluating future therapeutics/cholera vaccines. In addition, our study confirmed the major role of CFTR in V

  4. An Adult Mouse Model of Vibrio cholerae-induced Diarrhea for Studying Pathogenesis and Potential Therapy of Cholera.

    PubMed

    Sawasvirojwong, Sutthipong; Srimanote, Potjanee; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2013-06-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. This study aimed to establish an adult mouse model of Vibrio cholerae-induced diarrhea and to characterize its pathophysiology. Ligated ileal loops of adult mice were inoculated for 6, 9, 12 and 18 h with a classical O1 hypertoxigenic 569B strain of V. cholerae (10(7) CFU/loop). Time-course studies demonstrated that the optimal period for inducing diarrhea was 12 h post-inoculation, when peak intestinal fluid accumulation (loop/weight ratio of ∼0.2 g/cm) occurred with the highest diarrhea success rate (90%). In addition, pathogenic numbers of V. cholerae (∼10(9) CFU/g tissue) were recovered from ileal loops at all time points between 6-18 h post-inoculation with the diarrheagenic amount of cholera toxin being detected in the secreted intestinal fluid at 12 h post-inoculation. Interestingly, repeated intraperitoneal administration of CFTRinh-172 (20 µg every 6 h), an inhibitor of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), completely abolished the V. cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion without affecting V. cholerae growth in vivo. As analyzed by ex vivo measurement of intestinal electrical resistance and in vivo assay of fluorescein thiocyanate (FITC)-dextran trans-intestinal flux, V. cholerae infection had no effect on intestinal paracellular permeability. Measurements of albumin in the diarrheal fluid suggested that vascular leakage did not contribute to the pathogenesis of diarrhea in this model. Furthermore, histological examination of V. cholerae-infected intestinal tissues illustrated edematous submucosa, congestion of small vessels and enhanced mucus secretion from goblet cells. This study established a new adult mouse model of V. cholerae-induced diarrhea, which could be useful for studying the pathogenesis of cholera diarrhea and for evaluating future therapeutics/cholera vaccines. In addition, our study confirmed the major role of CFTR in V

  5. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  6. Analyses of pancreas development by generation of gfp transgenic zebrafish using an exocrine pancreas-specific elastaseA gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Haiyan; Korzh, Svitlana; Li Zhen; Mudumana, Sudha Puttur; Korzh, Vladimir; Jiang Yunjin; Lin Shuo; Gong Zhiyuan . E-mail: dbsgzy@nus.edu.sg

    2006-05-15

    In contrast to what we know on development of endocrine pancreas, the formation of exocrine pancreas remains poorly understood. To create an animal model that allows observation of exocrine cell differentiation, proliferation, and morphogenesis in living animals, we used the zebrafish elastaseA (elaA) regulatory sequence to develop transgenic zebrafish that display highly specific exocrine pancreas expression of GFP in both larvae and adult. By following GFP expression, we found that the pancreas in early development was a relatively compact organ and later extended posterior along the intestine. By transferring the elaA:gfp transgene into slow muscle omitted mutant that is deficient in receiving Hedgehog signals, we further showed that Hedgehog signaling is required for exocrine morphogenesis but not for cell differentiation. We also applied the morpholino knockdown and toxin-mediated cell ablation approaches to this transgenic line. We showed that the development of exocrine pancreas is Islet-1 dependent. Injection of the diphtheria toxin A (DTA) construct under the elastaseA promoter resulted in selective ablation of exocrine cells while the endocrine cells and other endodermal derivatives (liver and intestine) were not affected. Thus, our works demonstrated the new transgenic line provided a useful experimental tool in analyzing exocrine pancreas development.

  7. Toward a hybrid artificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E A

    1989-06-01

    Management of insulinopenic diabetic individuals centers on administration of insulin by means of multiple injections, a wearable or implantable insulin-infusion pump, or a whole-organ or segmental-pancreas transplant. Preliminary trials indicate that surgical implantation of a hybrid device containing living insulin-secreting tissue may function as a combined glucose sensor and insulin-infusion pump. By means of a chamber composed of a semipermeable membrane shaped into hollow fibers or a box surrounding endocrine tissue, pilot studies have shown that isolated islets of Langerhans, fragments of insulinoma, or a fetal pancreas retains function for days to weeks, as judged by the ability to sustain euglycemic conditions in chemically induced diabetic rats. Lacking clear proof that normalizing blood glucose levels will prevent vascular complications of diabetes in humans, the case for further development of a hybrid (tissue plus fabricated components) device rests mainly on optimistic extrapolation of results attained in the chemically induced diabetic rat and dog. For the minority of diabetic patients who have insulin-dependent diabetes, the benefit afforded by a bionic device establishing internal insulin release regulated by silently sensed blood glucose level is more than enough payoff for the discomfort and surgery involved in its implantation. Further trials of a hybrid artificial pancreas in the dog appear warranted as a logical extension of preliminary studies with this species.

  8. Wearable and implantable pancreas substitutes.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Assaf, Tareq; Dario, Paolo; Menciassi, Arianna

    2013-03-01

    A lifelong-implanted and completely automated artificial or bioartificial pancreas (BAP) is the holy grail for type 1 diabetes treatment, and could be a definitive solution even for other severe pathologies, such as pancreatitis and pancreas cancer. Technology has made several important steps forward in the last years, providing new hope for the realization of such devices, whose feasibility is strictly connected to advances in glucose sensor technology, subcutaneous and intraperitoneal insulin pump development, the design of closed-loop control algorithms for mechatronic pancreases, as well as cell and tissue engineering and cell encapsulation for biohybrid pancreases. Furthermore, smart integration of the mentioned components and biocompatibility issues must be addressed, bearing in mind that, for mechatronic pancreases, it is most important to consider how to recharge implanted batteries and refill implanted insulin reservoirs without requiring periodic surgical interventions. This review describes recent advancements in technologies and concepts related to artificial and bioartificial pancreases, and assesses how far we are from a lifelong-implanted and self-working pancreas substitute that can fully restore the quality of life of a diabetic (or other type of) patient.

  9. The Endocrine Pancreas: insights into development, differentiation and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the developing embryo, appropriate patterning of the endoderm fated to become pancreas requires the spatial and temporal coordination of soluble factors secreted by the surrounding tissues. Once pancreatic progenitor cells are specified in the developing gut tube epithelium, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, as well as a cascade of transcription factors, subsequently delineate three distinct lineages, including endocrine, exocrine and ductal cells. Simultaneous morphological changes, including branching, vascularization, and proximal organ development, also influence the process of specification and differentiation. Decades of research using mouse genetics have uncovered many of the key factors involved in pancreatic cell fate decisions. When pancreas development or islet cell functions go awry, due to mutation in genes important for proper organogenesis and development, the result can lead to a common pancreatic affliction, diabetes mellitus. Current treatments for diabetes are adequate but not curative. Therefore researchers are utilizing the current understanding of normal embryonic pancreas development in vivo, to direct embryonic stem cells toward a pancreatic fate with the goal of transplanting these in vitro generated “islets” into patients. Mimicking development in vitro has proven difficult; however, significant progress has been made and the current differentiation protocols are becoming more efficient. The continued partnership between developmental biologists and stem cell researchers will guarantee that the in vitro generation of insulin-producing beta cells is a possible therapeutic option for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22905335

  10. Quercetin Aglycone Is Bioavailable in Murine Pancreas and Pancreatic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifeng; Angst, Eliane; Park, Jenny L.; Moro, Aune; Dawson, David W.; Reber, Howard A.; Eibl, Guido; Hines, O. Joe; Go, Vay-Liang W.; Lu, Qing-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Quercetin is a potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic and other cancers. This study was to examine the distribution of quercetin in plasma, lung, liver, pancreas and pancreatic cancer xenografts in a murine in vivo model and the uptake of quercetin in pancreatic cancer MiaPaCa-2 cells in cellular in vitro model. Mice were randomly allocated to control diet, 0.2 and 1% quercetin diet groups utilizing the AIN93G-based diet (n=12 per group) for 6 weeks. In addition, 6 mice from each group were injected weekly with chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine (120 mg/kg mouse, i.p.). MiaPaCa cells were collected from culture medium after cells were exposed to 30 µM of quercetin for 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hrs. Levels of quercetin and 3-O’-methyl-quercetin in mice tissues and MiaPaCa-2 cells were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography following enzymatic hydrolysis and then extraction. Our study showed that quercetin is accumulated in pancreatic cancer cells, and is absorbed in the circulating system, tumors and tissues of pancreas, liver and lung in vivo. A higher proportion of total quercetin found in tumors and pancreas are aglycones. Gemcitabine co-treatment with quercetin reduced absorption of quercetin in mice circulatory system and liver. Results from the study provide important information on the interpretation of chemo-therapeutic efficacy of quercetin. PMID:20499918

  11. Daily rhythms of core temperature and locomotor activity indicate different adaptive strategies to cold exposure in adult and aged mouse lemurs acclimated to a summer-like photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Terrien, Jeremy; Zizzari, Philippe; Epelbaum, Jacques; Perret, Martine; Aujard, Fabienne

    2009-07-01

    Daily variations in core temperature (Tc) within the normothermic range imply thermoregulatory processes that are essential for optimal function and survival. Higher susceptibility towards cold exposure in older animals suggests that these processes are disturbed with age. In the mouse lemur, a long-day breeder, we tested whether aging affected circadian rhythmicity of Tc, locomotor activity (LA), and energy balance under long-day conditions when exposed to cold. Adult (N = 7) and aged (N = 5) mouse lemurs acclimated to LD14/10 were exposed to 10-day periods at 25 and 12 degrees C. Tc and LA rhythms were recorded by telemetry, and caloric intake (CI), body mass changes, and plasma IGF-1 were measured. During exposure to 25 degrees C, both adult and aged mouse lemurs exhibited strong daily variations in Tc. Aged animals exhibited lower levels of nocturnal LA and nocturnal and diurnal Tc levels in comparison to adults. Body mass and IGF-1 levels remained unchanged with aging. Under cold exposure, torpor bout occurrence was never observed whatever the age category. Adult and aged mouse lemurs maintained their Tc in the normothermic range and a positive energy balance. All animals exhibited increase in CI and decrease in IGF-1 in response to cold. The decrease in IGF-1 was delayed in aged mouse lemurs compared to adults. Moreover, both adult and aged animals responded to cold exposure by increasing their diurnal LA compared to those under Ta = 25 degrees C. However, aged animals exhibited a strong decrease in nocturnal LA and Tc, whereas cold effects were only slight in adults. The temporal organization and amplitude of the daily phase of low Tc were particularly well preserved under cold exposure in both age groups. Sexually active mouse lemurs exposed to cold thus seemed to prevent torpor exhibition and temporal disorganization of daily rhythms of Tc, even during aging. However, although energy balance was not impaired with age in mouse lemurs after cold exposure

  12. Stimulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by physical exercise and enriched environment is disturbed in a CADASIL mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Klein, C.; Schreyer, S.; Kohrs, F. E.; Elhamoury, P.; Pfeffer, A.; Munder, T.; Steiner, B.

    2017-01-01

    In the course of CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), a dysregulated adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been suggested as a potential mechanism for early cognitive decline. Previous work has shown that mice overexpressing wild type Notch3 and mice overexpressing Notch3 with a CADASIL mutation display impaired cell proliferation and survival of newly born hippocampal neurons prior to vascular abnormalities. Here, we aimed to elucidate how the long-term survival of these newly generated neurons is regulated by Notch3. Knowing that adult neurogenesis can be robustly stimulated by physical exercise and environmental enrichment, we also investigated the influence of such stimuli as potential therapeutic instruments for a dysregulated hippocampal neurogenesis in the CADASIL mouse model. Therefore, young-adult female mice were housed in standard (STD), environmentally enriched (ENR) or running wheel cages (RUN) for either 28 days or 6 months. Mice overexpressing mutated Notch3 and developing CADASIL (TgN3R169C), and mice overexpressing wild type Notch3 (TgN3WT) were used. We found that neurogenic stimulation by RUN and ENR is apparently impaired in both transgenic lines. The finding suggests that a disturbed neurogenic process due to Notch3-dependent micromilieu changes might be one vascular-independent mechanism contributing to cognitive decline observed in CADASIL. PMID:28345617

  13. Cloning and characterization of mouse brush border myosin-I in adult and embryonic intestine.

    PubMed

    Skowron, J F; Mooseker, M S

    1999-02-15

    Brush border myosin-I is a class I myosin with calmodulin light chains that has been identified in several vertebrate species. In chicken, it is exclusively expressed in intestinal epithelial cells where it forms spirally arrayed bridges that tether the microvillar actin bundle to the membrane. To facilitate future knockout strategies, we have isolated mouse brush border myosin-I cDNA and genomic clones. The deduced primary structure of mouse brush border myosin-I is homologous to other known brush border myosins-I. Northern blot, immunoblot, and immunolocalization studies indicate that the intestine-specific and subcellular localization profile of mouse brush border myosin-I are comparable to that determined for other brush border myosins-I. Northern analysis during embryogenesis revealed a 3.9-kb transcript first detected in 15-day embryos. This is in marked contrast to chicken, where brush border myosin-I expression begins early in embryogenesis. In situ localization in 17-day embryos indicated that RNA expression is restricted to the intestine. Protein expression is first detected in 16-day embryos with decreasing levels observed in a proximal to distal fashion. Immunolocalization in embryonic intestine revealed that brush border myosin-I is evenly distributed on both apical and basolateral membrane domains. There is also pronounced localization to a supranuclear region, presumably the Golgi apparatus. This suggests that brush border myosin-I may be targeted to the plasma membrane on Golgi-derived vesicles rather than by direct targeting to microvillar actin cores.

  14. Chronic Social Stress Affects Synaptic Maturation of Newly Generated Neurons in the Adult Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Huang, Chiung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic stress has been found to suppress adult neurogenesis, but it remains unclear whether it may affect the maturation process of adult-born neurons. Here, we examined the influence of chronic social defeat stress on the morphological and electrophysiological properties of adult-born dentate granule cells at different developmental stages. Methods: Adult C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 10 days of chronic social defeat stress followed by a social interaction test 24 hours after the last defeat. Defeated mice were segregated into susceptible and unsusceptible subpopulations based on a measure of social interaction test. Combining electrophysiology with retrovirus-mediated birth-dating and labeling, we examined the impact of chronic social defeat stress on temporal regulation of synaptic plasticity of adult-born dentate granule cells along their maturation. Results: Chronic social defeat stress decreases the survival and dendritic complexity of adult-born dentate granule cells. While chronic social defeat stress doesn’t alter the intrinsic electrophysiological properties and synaptic transmission of surviving adult-born dentate granule cells, it promotes the developmental switch in synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors from predominant GluN2B- to GluN2A-containing receptors, which transform the immature synapse of adult-born dentate granule cells from one that exhibits enhanced long-term potentiation to one that has normal levels of long-term potentiation. Furthermore, chronic social defeat stress increases the level of endogenous repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor mRNA in adult-born dentate granule cells, and knockdown of the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor in adult-born dentate granule cells rescues chronic social defeat stress-induced morphological deficits and accelerated developmental switch in synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit composition. Conclusions: These results uncover a previously

  15. Stromal reengineering to treat pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stromnes, Ingunn M.; DelGiorno, Kathleen E.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Hingorani, Sunil R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma co-opts multiple cellular and extracellular mechanisms to create a complex cancer organ with an unusual proclivity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. Cell-autonomous events are essential for the initiation and maintenance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but recent studies have implicated critical non-cell autonomous processes within the robust desmoplastic stroma that promote disease pathogenesis and resistance. Thus, non-malignant cells and associated factors are culprits in tumor growth, immunosuppression and invasion. However, even this increasing awareness of non-cell autonomous contributions to disease progression is tempered by the conflicting roles stromal elements can play. A greater understanding of stromal complexity and complicity has been aided in part by studies in highly faithful genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Insights gleaned from such studies are spurring the development of therapies designed to reengineer the pancreas cancer stroma and render it permissive to agents targeting cell-autonomous events or to reinstate immunosurveillance. Integrating conventional and immunological treatments in the context of stromal targeting may provide the key to a durable clinical impact on this formidable disease. PMID:24908682

  16. Pancreas Transplantation in the Modern Era.

    PubMed

    Redfield, Robert R; Rickels, Michael R; Naji, Ali; Odorico, Jon S

    2016-03-01

    The field of pancreas transplantation has evolved from an experimental procedure in the 1980s to become a routine transplant in the modern era. With short- and long-term outcomes continuing to improve and the significant mortality, quality-of-life, and end-organ disease benefits, pancreas transplantation should be offered to more patients. In this article, we review current indications, patient selection, surgical considerations, complications, and outcomes in the modern era of pancreas transplantation.

  17. Combined 3DISCO clearing method, retrograde tracer and ultramicroscopy to map corneal neurons in a whole adult mouse trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Launay, Pierre-Serge; Godefroy, David; Khabou, Hanen; Rostene, William; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Baudouin, Christophe; Melik Parsadaniantz, Stéphane; Reaux-Le Goazigo, Annabelle

    2015-10-01

    Tissue clearing and subsequent imaging of intact transparent tissues have provided an innovative way to analyze anatomical pathways in the nervous system. In this study, we combined a recent 3-dimensional imaging of solvent cleared organ (3DISCO) procedure, light-sheet microscopy, fluorescent retrograde tracer, and Imaris software to 3D map corneal sensory neurons within a whole adult mouse trigeminal ganglion (TG). We first established the optimized steps to easily and rapidly clear a fixed TG. We found that the 3DISCO procedure gave excellent results and took less than 3 h to clear the TG. In a second set of experiments, a retrograde tracer (cholera toxin B Alexa 594-conjugated) was applied to de-epithelialized cornea to retrograde-labeled corneal sensory neurons. Two days later, TGs were cleared by the 3DISCO method and serial imaging was performed using light-sheet ultramicroscopic technology. High-resolution images of labeled neurons can be easily and rapidly obtained from a 3D reconstructed whole mouse TG. We then provided a 3D reconstruction of corneal afferent neurons and analyzed their precise localization in the TG. Thus, we showed that neurons supplying corneal sensory innervation exhibit a highly specific limited dorsomedial localization within the TG. We report that our combined method offers the possibility to perform manual (on 20 μm sections) and automated (on 3D reconstructed TG) counting of labeled cells in a cleared mouse TG. To conclude, we illustrate that the combination of the 3DISCO clearing method with light-sheet microscopy, retrograde tracer, and automatic counting represents a rapid and reliable method to analyze a subpopulation of neurons within the peripheral and central nervous system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gravity in mammalian organ development: differentiation of cultured lung and pancreas rudiments during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Hardman, P.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Organ culture of embryonic mouse lung and pancreas rudiments has been used to investigate development and differentiation, and to assess the effects of microgravity on culture differentiation, during orbital spaceflight of the shuttle Endeavour (mission STS-54). Lung rudiments continue to grow and branch during spaceflight, an initial result that should allow future detailed study of lung morphogenesis in microgravity. Cultured embryonic pancreas undergoes characteristic exocrine acinar tissue and endocrine islet tissue differentiation during spaceflight, and in ground controls. The rudiments developing in the microgravity environment of spaceflight appear to grow larger than their ground counterparts, and they may have differentiated more rapidly than controls, as judged by exocrine zymogen granule presence.

  19. Gravity in mammalian organ development: differentiation of cultured lung and pancreas rudiments during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Hardman, P.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Organ culture of embryonic mouse lung and pancreas rudiments has been used to investigate development and differentiation, and to assess the effects of microgravity on culture differentiation, during orbital spaceflight of the shuttle Endeavour (mission STS-54). Lung rudiments continue to grow and branch during spaceflight, an initial result that should allow future detailed study of lung morphogenesis in microgravity. Cultured embryonic pancreas undergoes characteristic exocrine acinar tissue and endocrine islet tissue differentiation during spaceflight, and in ground controls. The rudiments developing in the microgravity environment of spaceflight appear to grow larger than their ground counterparts, and they may have differentiated more rapidly than controls, as judged by exocrine zymogen granule presence.

  20. A new model of experimental fibrosis in hindlimb skeletal muscle of adult mdx mouse mimicking muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Desguerre, Isabelle; Arnold, Ludovic; Vignaud, Alban; Cuvellier, Sylvain; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Gherardi, Romain K; Chelly, Jamel; Chretien, Fabrice; Mounier, Rémi; Ferry, Arnaud; Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2012-06-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by the lack of dystrophin that leads to severe myofiber degeneration. We have shown that endomysial fibrosis is correlated with age at ambulation loss in DMD patients. However, the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse does not have fibrotic lesions in adult limb muscles. Here, we describe a model of chronic mechanical muscle injury that triggers chronic lesions in mdx hindlimb muscle. Micromechanical injuries were performed daily in tibialis anterior muscles for 2 weeks. Endomysial fibrosis appeared beginning 1 week post-injury, remained stable for 3 months and was associated with loss of specific maximal force. Fibrosis was associated with an increased expression of factors involved in fibrogenesis including α-smooth muscle actin, connective tissue growth factor, and lysyl oxidase, which colocalized with collagen deposits. This induced fibrotic dystrophic model may be useful to study mechanisms of fibrosis in dystrophinopathies and to evaluate antifibrotic treatments. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. "The preadipocyte factor" DLK1 marks adult mouse adipose tissue residing vascular cells that lack in vitro adipogenic differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Jensen, Line; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Jensen, Charlotte Harken

    2009-09-03

    Delta-like 1 (Dlk1) is expressed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and has frequently been referred to as "the" preadipocyte marker, yet the phenotype of DLK1(+) cells in adipose tissue remains undetermined. Herein, we demonstrate that DLK1(+) cells encompass around 1-2% of the adult mouse adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF). Unexpectedly, the DLK1(+)SVF population was enriched for cells expressing genes generally ascribed to the vascular lineage and did not possess any adipogenic differentiation potential in vitro. Instead, DLK1(+) cells comprised an immediate ability for cobblestone formation, generation of tube-like structures on matrigel, and uptake of Acetylated Low Density-Lipoprotein, all characteristics of endothelial cells. We therefore suggest that DLK1(+)SVF cells are of a vascular origin and not them-selves committed preadipocytes as assumed hitherto.

  2. Different tumours induced by benzo(a)pyrene and its 7,8-dihydrodiol injected into adult mouse salivary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Wigley, C. B.; Amos, J.; Brookes, P.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison has been made between the carcinogenic activities of benzo(a)pyrene and the proposed proximate carcinogen, benzo(a)pyrene 7,8-dihydrodiol, in the adult C57BL mouse submandibular salivary gland. In preliminary studies using a range of doses, the dihydrodiol was slightly less active than the parent hydrocarbon in this system. There was a difference in the type of tumour induced by the 2 compounds. Benzo(a)pyrene induced tumours of the salivary glands at the site of injection, whereas the dihydrodiol induced malignant lymphosarcomas, particularly of the thymus, which were often metastatic to other orgnas. Possible reasons for the different sites of action of the 2 compounds are discussed. PMID:580763

  3. Mouse Models of Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type-1–Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, B.; Niewiesk, S.; Lairmore, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a number of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory conditions including HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Development of animal models to study the pathogenesis of HTLV-1–associated diseases has been problematic. Mechanisms of early infection and cell-to-cell transmission can be studied in rabbits and nonhuman primates, but lesion development and reagents are limited in these species. The mouse provides a cost-effective, highly reproducible model in which to study factors related to lymphoma development and the preclinical efficacy of potential therapies against ATL. The ability to manipulate transgenic mice has provided important insight into viral genes responsible for lymphocyte transformation. Expansion of various strains of immunodeficient mice has accelerated the testing of drugs and targeted therapy against ATL. This review compares various mouse models to illustrate recent advances in the understanding of HTLV-1–associated ATL development and how improvements in these models are critical to the future development of targeted therapies against this aggressive T-cell lymphoma. PMID:20442421

  4. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin V.; Yoon, Jin H.; Kang, Bo Ram; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Sejin; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kim, Joo Won; Cho, Yakdol; Woo, Jiwan; Kim, YoungSoo

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve cognitive deficits to be allowed to accelerate on to clinical trials. Our study focuses on taurine, an endogenous amino acid found in high concentrations in humans. It has demonstrated neuroprotective properties against many forms of dementia. In this study, we assessed cognitively enhancing property of taurine in transgenic mouse model of AD. We orally administered taurine via drinking water to adult APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model for 6 weeks. Taurine treatment rescued cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice up to the age-matching wild-type mice in Y-maze and passive avoidance tests without modifying the behaviours of cognitively normal mice. In the cortex of APP/PS1 mice, taurine slightly decreased insoluble fraction of Aβ. While the exact mechanism of taurine in AD has not yet been ascertained, our results suggest that taurine can aid cognitive impairment and may inhibit Aβ-related damages. PMID:25502280

  5. Small Fractions of Muscular Dystrophy Embryonic Stem Cells Yield Severe Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Defects in Adult Mouse Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J Patrick; Kyrychenko, Sergii; Kyrychenko, Viktoriia; Schneider, Joel S; Granier, Celine J; Himelman, Eric; Lahey, Kevin C; Zhao, Qingshi; Yehia, Ghassan; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Bhaumik, Mantu; Shirokova, Natalia; Fraidenraich, Diego

    2017-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by the loss of the protein dystrophin, leading to muscle fragility, progressive weakening, and susceptibility to mechanical stress. Although dystrophin-negative mdx mouse models have classically been used to study DMD, phenotypes appear mild compared to patients. As a result, characterization of muscle pathology, especially in the heart, has proven difficult. We report that injection of mdx embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into Wild Type blastocysts produces adult mouse chimeras with severe DMD phenotypes in the heart and skeletal muscle. Inflammation, regeneration and fibrosis are observed at the whole organ level, both in dystrophin-negative and dystrophin-positive portions of the chimeric tissues. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function are also decreased to mdx levels. In contrast to mdx heterozygous carriers, which show no significant phenotypes, these effects are even observed in chimeras with low levels of mdx ESC incorporation (10%-30%). Chimeric mice lack typical compensatory utrophin upregulation, and show pathological remodeling of Connexin-43. In addition, dystrophin-negative and dystrophin-positive isolated cardiomyocytes show augmented calcium response to mechanical stress, similar to mdx cells. These global effects highlight a novel role of mdx ESCs in triggering muscular dystrophy even when only low amounts are present. Stem Cells 2017;35:597-610.

  6. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood–brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  7. Genetic disruption of ankyrin-G in adult mouse forebrain causes cortical synapse alteration and behavior reminiscent of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shanshan; Cordner, Zachary A; Xiong, Jiali; Chiu, Chi-Tso; Artola, Arabiye; Zuo, Yanning; Nelson, Andrew D; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Zaika, Natalya; Woolums, Brian M; Hess, Evan J; Wang, Xiaofang; Chuang, De-Maw; Pletnikov, Mikhail M; Jenkins, Paul M; Tamashiro, Kellie L; Ross, Christopher A

    2017-09-11

    Genome-wide association studies have implicated the ANK3 locus in bipolar disorder, a major human psychotic illness. ANK3 encodes ankyrin-G, which organizes the neuronal axon initial segment (AIS). We generated a mouse model with conditional disruption of ANK3 in pyramidal neurons of the adult forebrain (Ank-G cKO). This resulted in the expected loss of pyramidal neuron AIS voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. There was also dramatic loss of markers of afferent GABAergic cartridge synapses, resembling the cortical microcircuitry changes in brains from psychotic patients, and suggesting disinhibition. Expression of c-fos was increased in cortical pyramidal neurons, consistent with increased neuronal activity due to disinhibition. The mice showed robust behavioral phenotypes reminiscent of aspects of human mania, ameliorated by antimania drugs lithium and valproate. Repeated social defeat stress resulted in repeated episodes of dramatic behavioral changes from hyperactivity to "depression-like" behavior, suggestive of some aspects of human bipolar disorder. Overall, we suggest that this Ank-G cKO mouse model recapitulates some of the core features of human bipolar disorder and indicates that cortical microcircuitry alterations during adulthood may be involved in pathogenesis. The model may be useful for studying disease pathophysiology and for developing experimental therapeutics.

  8. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin V; Yoon, Jin H; Kang, Bo Ram; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Sejin; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kim, Joo Won; Cho, Yakdol; Woo, Jiwan; Kim, YoungSoo

    2014-12-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve cognitive deficits to be allowed to accelerate on to clinical trials. Our study focuses on taurine, an endogenous amino acid found in high concentrations in humans. It has demonstrated neuroprotective properties against many forms of dementia. In this study, we assessed cognitively enhancing property of taurine in transgenic mouse model of AD. We orally administered taurine via drinking water to adult APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model for 6 weeks. Taurine treatment rescued cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice up to the age-matching wild-type mice in Y-maze and passive avoidance tests without modifying the behaviours of cognitively normal mice. In the cortex of APP/PS1 mice, taurine slightly decreased insoluble fraction of Aβ. While the exact mechanism of taurine in AD has not yet been ascertained, our results suggest that taurine can aid cognitive impairment and may inhibit Aβ-related damages.

  9. The Phospholipase D2 Knock Out Mouse Has Ectopic Purkinje Cells and Suffers from Early Adult-Onset Anosmia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qifeng; Smethurst, Elizabeth; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Schrewe, Heinrich; Wakelam, Michael J. O.

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase D2 (PLD2) is an enzyme that produces phosphatidic acid (PA), a lipid messenger molecule involved in a number of cellular events including, through its membrane curvature properties, endocytosis. The PLD2 knock out (PLD2KO) mouse has been previously reported to be protected from insult in a model of Alzheimer's disease. We have further analysed a PLD2KO mouse using mass spectrophotometry of its lipids and found significant differences in PA species throughout its brain. We have examined the expression pattern of PLD2 which allowed us to define which region of the brain to analyse for defect, notably PLD2 was not detected in glial-rich regions. The expression pattern lead us to specifically examine the mitral cells of olfactory bulbs, the Cornus Amonis (CA) regions of the hippocampus and the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We find that the change to longer PA species correlates with subtle architectural defect in the cerebellum, exemplified by ectopic Purkinje cells and an adult-onset deficit of olfaction. These observations draw parallels to defects in the reelin heterozygote as well as the effect of high fat diet on olfaction. PMID:27658289

  10. Genetic manipulation of adult-born hippocampal neurons rescues memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Richetin, Kevin; Leclerc, Clémence; Toni, Nicolas; Gallopin, Thierry; Pech, Stéphane; Roybon, Laurent; Rampon, Claire

    2015-02-01

    In adult mammals, neural progenitors located in the dentate gyrus retain their ability to generate neurons and glia throughout lifetime. In rodents, increased production of new granule neurons is associated with improved memory capacities, while decreased hippocampal neurogenesis results in impaired memory performance in several memory tasks. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, neurogenesis is impaired and the granule neurons that are generated fail to integrate existing networks. Thus, enhancing neurogenesis should improve functional plasticity in the hippocampus and restore cognitive deficits in these mice. Here, we performed a screen of transcription factors that could potentially enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We identified Neurod1 as a robust neuronal determinant with the capability to direct hippocampal progenitors towards an exclusive granule neuron fate. Importantly, Neurod1 also accelerated neuronal maturation and functional integration of new neurons during the period of their maturation when they contribute to memory processes. When tested in an APPxPS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, directed expression of Neurod1 in cycling hippocampal progenitors conspicuously reduced dendritic spine density deficits on new hippocampal neurons, to the same level as that observed in healthy age-matched control animals. Remarkably, this population of highly connected new neurons was sufficient to restore spatial memory in these diseased mice. Collectively our findings demonstrate that endogenous neural stem cells of the diseased brain can be manipulated to become new neurons that could allow cognitive improvement. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Cell Growth Dynamics in Embryonic and Adult Mouse Thyroid Revealed by a Novel Approach to Detect Thyroid Gland Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Gawade, Sanjay; Mayer, Carlos; Hafen, Katrin; Barthlott, Thomas; Krenger, Werner; Szinnai, Gabor

    2016-04-01

    The thyroid is composed of endocrine epithelial cells, blood vessels, and mesenchyme. However, no data exist thus far on absolute cell numbers, relative distribution, and proliferation of the different cell populations in the developing and mature thyroid. The aim of this study was therefore to establish a flow cytometry protocol that allows detection and quantification of discrete cell populations in embryonic and adult murine thyroid tissues. Cell-type anti-mouse specific antibodies were used for erythroid cells (Ter119), hematopoietic cells (CD45), epithelial cells (EpCam/CD326, E-cadherin/CD324), thyroid follicular cells and C-cells (Nkx2-1), endothelial cells (Pecam/CD31, Icam-1/CD54), and fibroblasts (PDGFRa/CD140a). Proliferating cells were detected after labeling with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). For flow cytometry analyses, micro-dissected embryonic (E) and adult thyroids were pooled (E13.5, n = 25; E15.5, n = 15; E17.5, n = 15; adult, n = 4) in one sample. The absolute parenchymal cell numbers per mouse thyroid (M ± SD), excluding the large number of CD45(+) and Ter119(+) cells, increased from 7425 ± 1338 at E13.5 to 271,561 ± 22,325 in adult tissues. As expected, Nkx2-1(+) cells represented the largest cell population in adult tissues (61.2 ± 1.1%). Surprisingly, at all three embryonic stages analyzed, thyroid follicular cells and C-cells accounted only for a small percentage of the total thyroid cell mass (between 4.7 ± 0.4% and 9.4 ± 1.6%). In contrast, the largest cell population at all three embryonic stages was identified as PDGFRa/CD140a(+) fibroblasts (61.4 ± 0.4% to 77.3 ± 1.1%). However, these cells represented the smallest population in adult tissues (5.2 ± 0.8%). Pecam/CD31(+) endothelial cells increased from E13.5 to E15.5 from 3.7 ± 0.8% to 8.5 ± 3.0%, then remained stable at E17.5 and adult tissues. Proliferation rates were sizable during the entire organogenesis but differed between cell populations, with distinct

  12. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis.

  13. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  14. Quiescent Oct4(+) Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) Repopulate Ablated Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein(+) NSCs in the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Rachel L; Yammine, Samantha Z; Morshead, Cindi M; van der Kooy, Derek

    2017-09-01

    Adult primitive neural stem cells (pNSCs) are a rare population of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)(-) Oct4(+) cells in the mouse forebrain subependymal zone bordering the lateral ventricles that give rise to clonal neurospheres in leukemia inhibitory factor in vitro. pNSC neurospheres can be passaged to self-renew or give rise to GFAP(+) NSCs that form neurospheres in epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2, which we collectively refer to as definitive NSCs (dNSCs). Label retention experiments using doxycycline-inducible histone-2B (H2B)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice and several chase periods of up to 1 year quantified the adult pNSC cell cycle time as 3-5 months. We hypothesized that while pNSCs are not very proliferative at baseline, they may exist as a reserve pool of NSCs in case of injury. To test this function of pNSCs, we obtained conditional Oct4 knockout mice, Oct4(fl/fl) ;Sox1(Cre) (Oct4(CKO) ), which do not yield adult pNSC-derived neurospheres. When we ablated the progeny of pNSCs, namely all GFAP(+) dNSCs, in these Oct4(CKO) mice, we found that dNSCs did not recover as they do in wild-type mice, suggesting that pNSCs are necessary for dNSC repopulation. Returning to the H2B-GFP mice, we observed that the cytosine β-d-arabinofuranoside ablation of proliferating cells including dNSCs-induced quiescent pNSCs to proliferate and significantly dilute their H2B-GFP label. In conclusion, we demonstrate that pNSCs are the most quiescent stem cells in the adult brain reported to date and that their lineage position upstream of GFAP(+) dNSCs allows them to repopulate a depleted neural lineage. Stem Cells 2017;35:2071-2082. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  15. An in vitro spinal cord slice preparation for recording from lumbar motoneurons of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pratip; Brownstone, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    The development of central nervous system slice preparations for electrophysiological studies has led to an explosion of knowledge of neuronal properties in health and disease. Studies of spinal motoneurons in these preparations, however, have been largely limited to the early postnatal period, as adult motoneurons are vulnerable to the insults sustained by the preparation. We therefore sought to develop an adult spinal cord slice preparation that permits recording from lumbar motoneurons. To accomplish this, we empirically optimized the composition of solutions used during preparation in order to limit energy failure, reduce harmful ionic fluxes, mitigate oxidative stress, and prevent excitotoxic cell death. In addition to other additives, this involved the use of ethyl pyruvate, which serves as an effective nutrient and antioxidant. We also optimized and incorporated a host of previously published modifications used for other in vitro preparations, such as the use of polyethylene glycol. We provide an in-depth description of the preparation protocol and discuss the rationale underlying each modification. By using this protocol, we obtained stable whole cell patch-clamp recordings from identified fluorescent protein-labeled motoneurons in adult slices; here, we describe the firing properties of these adult motoneurons. We propose that this preparation will allow further studies of how motoneurons integrate activity to produce adult motor behaviors and how pathological processes such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis affect these neurons.

  16. The pancreas from Aristotle to Galen.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Ryoichi; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The first description of the pancreas in literature is found in Aristotle's Historia Animalium, but it is modified by "so-called". Therefore, the origin is pursued more extensively. The Greek-English Lexicon recommends three treatises as a possible original source. These three and Galen's other papers are investigated. In 2005, Sachs et al. suggested an origin of the pancreas might have derived from the intestinal divination using the avian pancreas. This report is evaluated. The avian pancreas which is the intraperitoneal organ, might have been well known by the intestinal divination, and people have called the organ pankreas or kallikreas. Anatomical dissection on human body was not accepted before the Aristotle's time. "So-called pancreas" in Historia must have been interpolated by Theophrastus. He was the most faithful and reliable disciple of Aristotle and succeeded the Aristotle's school. He and Macedonian ruler of Egypt Ptolemy I had known each other and there had been a strong link between them. The contemporary Herophilus performed many public dissections on both human and animal bodies in Alexandria. He named the various parts of the human body and designated the beginning intestine as duodenum. Yet in his extant works, the pancreas is not found. It is surmised that Herophilus may be the first to recognize the human pancreas, which is fixed with retroperitoneal tissue, and he named it "so-called pancreas". Theophrastus might have interpolated Herophilus' designation in Historia Animalium. Galen also uses "so-called pancreas" to designate the human pancreas. Galen's descriptions, that is, "Nature created 'so-called pancreas 'and spread it beneath all vessels" are not generally acceptable but propose the very rare portal vein anomalies. Since the early years of the 20th century, cases with a preduodenal portal vein or a prepancreatic portal vein have been reported. Although the incidence is very rare, its surgical importance is emphasized. Copyright © 2014

  17. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Derek T.; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  18. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity.

  19. Myogenin Regulates Exercise Capacity and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fiorotto, Marta; Klein, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Although skeletal muscle metabolism is a well-studied physiological process, little is known about how it is regulated at the transcriptional level. The myogenic transcription factor myogenin is required for skeletal muscle development during embryonic and fetal life, but myogenin's role in adult skeletal muscle is unclear. We sought to determine myogenin's function in adult muscle metabolism. A Myog conditional allele and Cre-ER transgene were used to delete Myog in adult mice. Mice were analyzed for exercise capacity by involuntary treadmill running. To assess oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, we performed indirect calorimetry, monitored blood glucose and lactate levels, and performed histochemical analyses on muscle fibers. Surprisingly, we found that Myog-deleted mice performed significantly better than controls in high- and low-intensity treadmill running. This enhanced exercise capacity was due to more efficient oxidative metabolism during low- and high-intensity exercise and more efficient glycolytic metabolism during high-intensity exercise. Furthermore, Myog-deleted mice had an enhanced response to long-term voluntary exercise training on running wheels. We identified several candidate genes whose expression was altered in exercise-stressed muscle of mice lacking myogenin. The results suggest that myogenin plays a critical role as a high-level transcriptional regulator to control the energy balance between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in adult skeletal muscle. PMID:21042574

  20. Generation of a conditional mouse model to target Acvr1b disruption in adult tissues.

    PubMed

    Ripoche, Doriane; Gout, Johann; Pommier, Roxane M; Jaafar, Rami; Zhang, Chang X; Bartholin, Laurent; Bertolino, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Alk4 is a type I receptor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) family. It takes part in the signaling of TGF-β ligands such as Activins, Gdfs, and Nodal that had been demonstrated to participate in numerous mechanisms ranging from early embryonic development to adult-tissue homeostasis. Evidences indicate that Alk4 is a key regulator of many embryonic processes, but little is known about its signaling in adult tissues and in pathological conditions where Alk4 mutations had been reported. Conventional deletion of Alk4 gene (Acvr1b) results in early embryonic lethality prior gastrulation, which has precluded study of Alk4 functions in postnatal and adult mice. To circumvent this problem, we have generated a conditional Acvr1b floxed-allele by flanking the fifth and sixth exons of the Acvr1b gene with loxP sites. Cre-mediated deletion of the floxed allele generates a deleted allele, which behaves as an Acvr1b null allele leading to embryonic lethality in homozygous mutant animals. A tamoxifen-inducible approach to target disruption of Acvr1b specifically in adult tissues was used and proved to be efficient for studying Alk4 functions in various organs. We report, therefore, a novel conditional model allowing investigation of biological role played by Alk4 in a variety of tissue-specific contexts.

  1. MAPK Signaling Determines Anxiety in the Juvenile Mouse Brain but Depression-Like Behavior in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wefers, Benedikt; Hitz, Christiane; Hölter, Sabine M.; Trümbach, Dietrich; Hansen, Jens; Weber, Peter; Pütz, Benno; Deussing, Jan M.; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Roenneberg, Till; Zheng, Fang; Alzheimer, Christian; Silva, Alcino; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    MAP kinase signaling has been implicated in brain development, long-term memory, and the response to antidepressants. Inducible Braf knockout mice, which exhibit protein depletion in principle forebrain neurons, enabled us to unravel a new role of neuronal MAPK signaling for emotional behavior. Braf mice that were induced during adulthood showed normal anxiety but increased depression-like behavior, in accordance with pharmacological findings. In contrast, the inducible or constitutive inactivation of Braf in the juvenile brain leads to normal depression-like behavior but decreased anxiety in adults. In juvenile, constitutive mutants we found no alteration of GABAergic neurotransmission but reduced neuronal arborization in the dentate gyrus. Analysis of gene expression in the hippocampus revealed nine downregulated MAPK target genes that represent candidates to cause the mutant phenotype. Our results reveal the differential function of MAPK signaling in juvenile and adult life phases and emphasize the early postnatal period as critical for the determination of anxiety in adults. Moreover, these results validate inducible gene inactivation as a new valuable approach, allowing it to discriminate between gene function in the adult and the developing postnatal brain. PMID:22529971

  2. Expression of the Argonaute protein PiwiL2 and piRNAs in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qiuling; Ma, Qi; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Wilson, Amber; Xia, Linghui; Yu, Hong; Webster, Keith A.

    2010-06-11

    Piwi (P-element-induced wimpy testis) first discovered in Drosophila is a member of the Argonaute family of micro-RNA binding proteins with essential roles in germ-cell development. The murine homologue of PiwiL2, also known as Mili is selectively expressed in the testes, and mice bearing targeted mutations of the PiwiL2 gene are male-sterile. PiwiL2 proteins are thought to protect the germ line genome by suppressing retrotransposons, stabilizing heterochromatin structure, and regulating target genes during meiosis and mitosis. Here, we report that PiwiL2 and associated piRNAs (piRs) may play similar roles in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells. We found that PiwiL2 is expressed in the cytoplasm of metaphase mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow of adult and aged mice. Knockdown of PiwiL2 with a specific siRNA enhanced cell proliferation, significantly increased the number of cells in G1/S and G2/M cell cycle phases and was associated with increased expression of cell cycle genes CCND1, CDK8, microtubule regulation genes, and decreased expression of tumor suppressors Cables 1, LATS, and Cxxc4. The results suggest broader roles for Piwi in genome surveillance beyond the germ line and a possible role in regulating the cell cycle of mesenchymal stem cells.

  3. GC-MS metabolomic analysis reveals significant alterations in cerebellar metabolic physiology in a mouse model of adult onset hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Caterina; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis K; Margarity, Marigoula; Klapa, Maria I

    2011-02-04

    Although adult-onset hypothyroidism (AOH) has been connected to neural activity alterations, including movement, behavioral, and mental dysfunctions, the underlying changes in brain metabolic physiology have not been investigated in a systemic and systematic way. The current knowledge remains fragmented, referring to different experimental setups and recovered from various brain regions. In this study, we developed and applied a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics protocol to obtain a holistic view of the cerebellar metabolic physiology in a Balb/cJ mouse model of prolonged adult-onset hypothyroidism induced by a 64-day treatment with 1% potassium perchlorate in the drinking water of the animals. The high-throughput analysis enabled the correlation between multiple parallel-occurring metabolic phenomena; some have been previously related to AOH, while others implicated new pathways, designating new directions for further research. Specifically, an overall decline in the metabolic activity of the hypothyroid compared to the euthyroid cerebellum was observed, characteristically manifested in energy metabolism, glutamate/glutamine metabolism, osmolytic/antioxidant capacity, and protein/lipid synthesis. These alterations provide strong evidence that the mammalian cerebellum is metabolically responsive to AOH. In light of the cerebellum core functions and its increasingly recognized role in neurocognition, these findings further support the known phenotypic manifestations of AOH into movement and cognitive dysfunctions.

  4. HETEROTOPICALLY TRANSPLANTED CVO NEURAL STEM CELLS GENERATE NEURONS AND MIGRATE WITH SVZ CELLS IN THE ADULT MOUSE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Lori B.; Cai, Jingli; Enikolopov, Grigori; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Production of new neurons throughout adulthood has been well characterized in two brain regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. The neurons produced from these regions arise from neural stem cells (NSCs) found in highly regulated stem cell niches. We recently showed that midline structures called circumventricular organs (CVOs) also contain NSCs capable of neurogenesis and/or astrogliogenesis in vitro and in situ [3]. The present study demonstrates that NSCs derived from two astrogliogenic CVOs, the median eminence and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis of the Nestin-GFP mouse, possess the potential to integrate into the SVZ and differentiate into cells with a neuronal phenotype. These NSCs, following expansion and BrdU-labeling in culture and heterotopic transplantation into a region proximal to the SVZ in adult mice, migrate caudally to the SVZ and express early neuronal markers (TUC-4, PSA-NCAM) as they migrate along the rostral migratory stream. CVO-derived BrdU+ cells ultimately reach the olfactory bulb where they express early (PSA-NCAM) and mature (NeuN) neuronal markers. Collectively, these data suggest that although NSCs derived from the ME and OVLT CVOs are astrogliogenic in situ, they produce cells phenotypic of neurons in vivo when placed in a neurogenic environment. These findings may have implications for neural repair in the adult brain. PMID:20298755

  5. Comparative gene expression profiling of adult mouse ovary-derived oogonial stem cells supports a distinct cellular identity

    PubMed Central

    Imudia, Anthony N.; Wang, Ning; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; White, Yvonne A.R.; Woods, Dori C.; Tilly, Jonathan L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Perform gene expression profiling of adult mouse ovary-derived oogonial stem cells (OSCs). Design Experimental animal study. Setting Research laboratory. Animal(s) Adult C57BL/6 female mice. Intervention(s) None. Main outcome measure(s) Gene expression profiles were compared between freshly isolated and cultured OSCs, as well as between OSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs), fetal primordial germ cells (PGCs) and spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs); OSC yield from ovaries versus meiotic gene activation during the estrous cycle was determined. Result(s) Freshly isolated OSCs, PGCs and SSCs exhibited distinct gene expression profiles. Cultured OSCs maintained their germline gene expression pattern, but gained expression of pluripotency markers found in PGCs and ESCs. Cultured OSCs also expressed the meiotic marker, stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8). In vivo, OSC yield was higher from luteal versus follicular phase ovaries and this was inversely related to Stra8 expression. Conclusion(s) Freshly isolated OSCs exhibit a germline gene expression profile that overlaps with, but is distinct from, that of PGCs and SSCs. After in vitro expansion, OSCs activate expression of pluripotency genes found in freshly isolated PGCs. In vivo, OSC numbers in the ovaries fluctuate during the estrous cycle, with the highest numbers noted during the luteal phase. This is followed by activation of Stra8 expression during the follicular phase, which may signify a wave of neo-oogenesis to partially offset follicular loss through atresia and ovulation in the prior cycle. PMID:23876535

  6. Comparative gene expression profiling of adult mouse ovary-derived oogonial stem cells supports a distinct cellular identity.

    PubMed

    Imudia, Anthony N; Wang, Ning; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; White, Yvonne A R; Woods, Dori C; Tilly, Jonathan L

    2013-11-01

    Perform gene expression profiling of adult mouse ovary-derived oogonial stem cells (OSCs). Experimental animal study. Research laboratory. Adult C57BL/6 female mice. None. Gene expression profiles were compared between freshly isolated and cultured OSCs, as well as between OSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs), fetal primordial germ cells (PGCs), and spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs); OSC yield from ovaries versus meiotic gene activation during the estrous cycle was determined. Freshly isolated OSCs, PGCs, and SSCs exhibited distinct gene expression profiles. Cultured OSCs maintained their germline gene expression pattern but gained expression of pluripotency markers found in PGCs and ESCs. Cultured OSCs also expressed the meiotic marker, stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8). In vivo, OSC yield was higher from luteal versus follicular phase ovaries, and this was inversely related to Stra8 expression. Freshly isolated OSCs exhibit a germline gene expression profile that overlaps with, but is distinct from, that of PGCs and SSCs. After in vitro expansion, OSCs activate expression of pluripotency genes found in freshly isolated PGCs. In vivo, OSC numbers in the ovaries fluctuate during the estrous cycle, with the highest numbers noted during the luteal phase. This is followed by activation of Stra8 expression during the follicular phase, which may signify a wave of neo-oogenesis to partially offset follicular loss through atresia and ovulation in the prior cycle. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of notch activity promotes non-mitotic regeneration of hair cells in the adult mouse utricles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Vincent; Golub, Justin S.; Nguyen, Tot Bui; Hume, Clifford R.; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.; Stone, Jennifer S.

    2011-01-01

    The capacity of adult mammals to regenerate sensory hair cells is not well defined. To explore early steps in this process, we examined reactivation of a transiently expressed developmental gene, Atoh1, in adult mouse utricles after neomycin-induced hair cell death in culture. Using an adenoviral reporter for Atoh1 enhancer, we found that Atoh1 transcription is activated in some hair cell progenitors (supporting cells) three days after neomycin treatment. By 18 days post-neomycin, the number of cells with Atoh1 transcriptional activity increased significantly, but few cells acquired hair cell features (i.e., accumulated ATOH1 or myosin VIIa protein or developed stereocilia). Treatment with DAPT, an inhibitor of γ-secretase, reduced notch pathway activity, enhanced Atoh1 transcriptional activity, and dramatically increased the number of Atoh1-expressing cells with hair cell features, but only in the striolar/juxtastriolar region. Similar effects were seen with TAPI-1, an inhibitor of another enzyme required for notch activity (TACE). Division of supporting cells was rare in any control or DAPT-treated utricles. This study shows that mature mammals have a natural capacity to initiate vestibular hair cell regeneration and suggests that regional notch activity is a significant inhibitor of direct transdifferentiation of supporting cells into hair cells following damage. PMID:22031879

  8. Resection for secondary malignancy of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Hsia; Wang, Shin-E; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Chen, Tien-Hua; Wu, Chew-Wun

    2012-01-01

    This study tried to clarify the role of pancreatic resection in the treatment of secondary malignancy with metastasis or local invasion to the pancreas in terms of surgical risk and survival benefit. Data of secondary malignancy of the pancreas from our 19 patients and cases reported in the English literature were pooled together for analysis. There were 329 cases of resected secondary malignancy of the pancreas, including 241 cases of metastasis and 88 cases of local invasion. The most common primary tumor metastatic to the pancreas and amenable to resection was renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (73.9%). More than half (52.3%) of the primary cancers with local invasion to the pancreas were colon cancer, and nearly half (40.9%) were stomach cancer. The median metastatic interval was 84 months (7 years) for overall primary tumors and 108 months (9 years) for RCC. The 5-year survival for secondary malignancy of the pancreas after resection was 61.1% for metastasis and 58.9% for local invasion, with 72.8% for RCC metastasis, 69.0% for colon cancer, and 43.8% for stomach cancer with local invasion to the pancreas. Pancreatic resection should not be precluded for secondary malignancy of the pancreas because long-term survival could be achieved with acceptable surgical risk in selected patients.

  9. Minimally Invasive Management of Ectopic Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Gerardo A; Cavnar, Michael J; Hajdu, Cristina; Khaykis, Inessa; Newman, Elliot; Melis, Marcovalerio; Pachter, H Leon; Cohen, Steven M

    2017-03-01

    The management of ectopic pancreas is not well defined. This study aims to determine the prevalence of symptomatic ectopic pancreas and identify those who may benefit from treatment, with a particular focus on robotically assisted surgical management. Our institutional pathology database was queried to identify a cohort of ectopic pancreas specimens. Additional clinical data regarding clinical symptomatology, diagnostic studies, and treatment were obtained through chart review. Nineteen cases of ectopic pancreas were found incidentally during surgery for another condition or found incidentally in a pathologic specimen (65.5%). Eleven patients (37.9%) reported prior symptoms, notably abdominal pain and/or gastrointestinal bleeding. The most common locations for ectopic pancreas were the duodenum and small bowel (31% and 27.6%, respectively). Three out of 29 cases (10.3%) had no symptoms, but had evidence of preneoplastic changes on pathology, while one harbored pancreatic cancer. Over the years, treatment of ectopic pancreas has shifted from open to laparoscopic and more recently to robotic surgery. Our experience is in line with existing evidence supporting surgical treatment of symptomatic or complicated ectopic pancreas. In the current era, minimally invasive and robotic surgery can be used safely and successfully for treatment of ectopic pancreas.

  10. Regional and strain-specific gene expression mapping in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Rickard; Yasuda, Rie; Pankratz, Daniel G.; Carter, Todd A.; Del Rio, Jo A.; Wodicka, Lisa; Mayford, Mark; Lockhart, David J.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2000-01-01

    To determine the genetic causes and molecular mechanisms responsible for neurobehavioral differences in mice, we used highly parallel gene expression profiling to detect genes that are differentially expressed between the 129SvEv and C57BL/6 mouse strains at baseline and in response to seizure. In addition, we identified genes that are differentially expressed in specific brain regions. We found that approximately 1% of expressed genes are differentially expressed between strains in at least one region of the brain and that the gene expression response to seizure is significantly different between the two inbred strains. The results lead to the identification of differences in gene expression that may account for distinct phenotypes in inbred strains and the unique functions of specific brain regions. PMID:11005875

  11. Adult Mouse Venous Hypertension Model: Common Carotid Artery to External Jugular Vein Anastomosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shun-Tai; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Ana; Walker, Espen J.; Young, William L.; Su, Hua; Lawton, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the pathophysiology of brain arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas has improved thanks to animal models. A rat model creating an artificial fistula between the common carotid artery (CCA) and the external jugular vein (EJV) has been widely described and proved technically feasible. This construct provokes a consistent cerebral venous hypertension (CVH), and therefore has helped studying the contribution of venous hypertension to formation, clinical symptoms, and prognosis of brain AVMs and dural AVFs. Equivalent mice models have been only scarcely described and have shown trouble with stenosis of the fistula. An established murine model would allow the study of not only pathophysiology but also potential genetic therapies for these cerebrovascular diseases. We present a model of arteriovenous fistula that produces a durable intracranial venous hypertension in the mouse. Microsurgical anastomosis of the murine CCA and EJV can be difficult due to diminutive anatomy and frequently result in a non-patent fistula. In this step-by-step protocol we address all the important challenges encountered during this procedure. Avoiding excessive retraction of the vein during the exposure, using 11-0 sutures instead of 10-0, and making a carefully planned end-to-side anastomosis are some of the critical steps. Although this method requires advanced microsurgical skills and a longer learning curve that the equivalent in the rat, it can be consistently developed. This novel model has been designed to integrate transgenic mouse techniques with a previously well-established experimental system that has proved useful to study brain AVMs and dural AVFs. By opening the possibility of using transgenic mice, a broader spectrum of valid models can be achieved and genetic treatments can also be tested. The experimental construct could also be further adapted to the study of other cerebrovascular diseases related with venous hypertension such as migraine

  12. Genistein exposure inhibits growth and alters steroidogenesis in adult mouse antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-02-15

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36μM) for 18-96h. Every 24h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genistein Exposure Inhibits Growth and Alters Steroidogenesis in Adult Mouse Antral Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) for 18 – 96 hours (h). Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36 μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96 h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18 h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26792615

  14. Distinct enhancers of ptf1a mediate specification and expansion of ventral pancreas in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pashos, Evanthia; Park, Joon Tae; Leach, Steven; Fisher, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Development of the pancreas and cerebellum require Pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (Ptf1a), which encodes a subunit of the transcription factor complex PTF1. Ptf1a is required in succession for specification of the pancreas, proper allocation of pancreatic progenitors to endocrine and exocrine fates, and the production of digestive enzymes from the exocrine acini. In several neuronal structures, including the cerebellum, hindbrain, retina and spinal cord, Ptf1a is transiently expressed and promotes inhibitory neuron fates at the expense of excitatory fates. Transcription of Ptf1a in mouse is maintained in part by PTF1 acting on an upstream autoregulatory enhancer. However, the transcription factors and enhancers that initially activate Ptf1a expression in the pancreas and in certain structures of the nervous system have not yet been identified. Here we describe a zebrafish autoregulatory element, conserved among teleosts, with activity similar to that described in mouse. In addition, we performed a comprehensive survey of all non-coding sequences in a 67 kilobase interval encompassing zebrafish ptf1a, and identified several neuronal enhancers, and an enhancer active in the ventral pancreas prior to activation of the autoregulatory enhancer. To test the requirement for autoregulatory control during pancreatic development, we restored ptf1a function through BAC transgenesis in ptf1a morphants, either with an intact BAC or one lacking the autoregulatory enhancer. We find that ptf1a autoregulation is required for development of the exocrine pancreas and full rescue of the ptf1a morphant phenotype. Similarly, we demonstrate that a ptf1a locus lacking the early enhancer region is also capable of rescue, but only supports formation of a hypoplastic exocrine pancreas. Through our dissection of the complex regulatory control of ptf1a, we identified separate cis–regulatory elements that underlie different aspects of its expression and function, and further

  15. Skin cancer after pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Spanogle, Joshua P; Kudva, Yogish C; Dierkhising, Ross A; Kremers, Walter K; Roenigk, Randall K; Brewer, Jerry D; Prieto, Mikel; Otley, Clark C

    2012-10-01

    Skin cancer in patients who have undergone pancreas transplantation (PT) has not been extensively characterized. We sought to describe the incidence, tumor burden, and risk factors for skin cancer in PT recipients at Mayo Clinic from 1998 through 2006. A retrospective study was performed by analyzing outcomes among a cohort of pancreas allograft recipients at Mayo Clinic between 1998 and 2006. Among 216 allogeneic PT recipients at 2, 5, and 10 years posttransplantation, the cumulative incidence of any skin cancer was 4.7%, 12.7%, and 19.6%; the cumulative incidence of squamous cell carcinoma was 2.8%, 10.3%, and 16.7%; and the cumulative incidence of basal cell carcinoma was 2.4%, 7.8%, and 17.4%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of a second squamous cell carcinoma developing was 56% at 2 years; the cumulative incidence of a second basal cell carcinoma developing was 36% at 2 years. Of the risk factors examined, only age and having a skin cancer before transplantation were predictive of skin cancer development. This was a retrospective study. Results from a large tertiary center may not be generalizable. Nonmelanoma skin cancers commonly occur in recipients of PT, and those patients who have a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer have a very high likelihood of further skin cancer development. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pancreas transplantation after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Porubsky, Marian; Powelson, John A; Selzer, Don J; Mujtaba, Muhammad A; Taber, Tim; Carnes, Katerine L; Fridell, Jonathan A

    2012-01-01

    Obese transplant candidates are at increased risk for perioperative and postoperative complications. In many transplant programs, morbid obesity is considered to be an exclusion criterion for transplantation. The only potential option that would grant these patients access to transplant is weight loss. Non-operative weight loss strategies such as behavioral modifications, exercise, diet, or medication have only very limited success in achieving long-term weight loss. In contrast, bariatric surgery was shown to achieve not only more excessive weight loss, but more importantly, this weight loss can be sustained for longer periods of time. Therefore, bariatric surgery presents an attractive option for weight loss for morbidly obese transplant candidates. We report our experience with four patients who underwent bariatric surgery prior to successful pancreas transplantation. Even though gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable gastric band present as equivalent alternatives for weight reduction, we believe that in the population of morbidly obese diabetic patients who are possible candidates for pancreas transplantation, laparoscopic adjustable gastric band placement is the more suitable procedure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Chronic metabolic acidosis destroys pancreas.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Peter; Melamed, Felix

    2014-11-28

    One primary reason for the current epidemic of digestive disorders might be chronic metabolic acidosis, which is extremely common in the modern population. Chronic metabolic acidosis primarily affects two alkaline digestive glands, the liver, and the pancreas, which produce alkaline bile and pancreatic juice with a large amount of bicarbonate. Even small acidic alterations in the bile and pancreatic juice pH can lead to serious biochemical/biomechanical changes. The pancreatic digestive enzymes require an alkaline milieu for proper function, and lowering the pH disables their activity. It can be the primary cause of indigestion. Acidification of the pancreatic juice decreases its antimicrobial activity, which can lead to intestinal dysbiosis. Lowering the pH of the pancreatic juice can cause premature activation of the proteases inside the pancreas with the potential development of pancreatitis. The acidification of bile causes precipitation of the bile acids, which irritate the entire biliary system and create bile stone formation. Aggressive mixture of the acidic bile and the pancreatic juice can cause erratic contractions of the duodenum's walls and subsequent bile reflux into the stomach and the esophagus. Normal exocrine pancreatic function is the core of proper digestion. Currently, there is no effective and safe treatment for enhancing the exocrine pancreatic function. Restoring normal acid-base homeostasis can be a useful tool for pathophysiological therapeutic approaches for various gastrointestinal disorders. There is strong research and practical evidence that restoring the HCO3(-) capacity in the blood can improve digestion.

  18. Topographic differences in adult neurogenesis in the mouse hippocampus: a stereology-based study using endogenous markers.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Shozo

    2011-05-01

    The hippocampus plays a critical role in various cognitive and affective functions. Increasing evidence shows that these functions are topographically distributed along the dorsoventral (septotemporal) and transverse axes of the hippocampus. For instance, dorsal hippocampus is involved in spatial memory and learning whereas ventral hippocampus is related to emotion. Here, we examined the topographic differences (dorsal vs. ventral; suprapyramidal vs. infrapyramidal) in adult neurogenesis in the mouse hippocampus using endogenous markers. The optical disector was applied to estimate the numerical densities (NDs) of labeled cells in the granule cell layer. The NDs of radial glia-like progenitors labeled by brain lipid binding protein were significantly lower in the infrapyramidal blade of the ventral DG than in other subdivisions. The NDs of doublecortin-expressing cells presumed neural progenitors and immature granule cells were significantly higher in the suprapyramidal blade of the dorsal DG than in the other subdivisions. The NDs of calretinin-expressing cells presumed young granule cells at the postmitotic stage were significantly higher in the suprapyramidal blade than in the infrapyramidal blade in the dorsal DG. No significant regional differences were detected in the NDs of dividing cells identified by proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Taken together, these findings suggest that a larger pool of immature granule cells in dorsal hippocampus might be responsible for spatial learning and memory, whereas a smaller pool of radial glia-like progenitors in ventral hippocampus might be associated with the susceptibility to affective disorders. Cell number estimation using a 300-μm-thick hypothetical slice indicates that regional differences in immature cells might contribute to the formation of topographic gradients in mature granule cells in the adult hippocampus. Our data also emphasizes the importance of considering such differences when evaluating changes in

  19. The CD38-independent ADP-ribosyl cyclase from mouse brain synaptosomes: a comparative study of neonate and adult brain.

    PubMed

    Ceni, Claire; Pochon, Nathalie; Villaz, Michel; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Schuber, Francis; Baratier, Julie; De Waard, Michel; Ronjat, Michel; Moutin, Marie-Jo

    2006-04-15

    cADPR (cADP-ribose), a metabolite of NAD+, is known to modulate intracellular calcium levels and to be involved in calcium-dependent processes, including synaptic transmission, plasticity and neuronal excitability. However, the enzyme that is responsible for producing cADPR in the cytoplasm of neural cells, and particularly at the synaptic terminals of neurons, remains unknown. In the present study, we show that endogenous concentrations of cADPR are much higher in embryonic and neonate mouse brain compared with the adult tissue. We also demonstrate, by comparing wild-type and Cd38-/- tissues, that brain cADPR content is independent of the presence of CD38 (the best characterized mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase) not only in adult but also in developing tissues. We show that Cd38-/- synaptosome preparations contain high ADP-ribosyl cyclase activities, which are more important in neonates than in adults, in line with the levels of endogenous cyclic nucleotide. By using an HPLC method and adapting the cycling assay developed initially to study endogenous cADPR, we accurately examined the properties of the synaptosomal ADP-ribosyl cyclase. This intracellular enzyme has an estimated K(m) for NAD+ of 21 microM, a broad optimal pH at 6.0-7.0, and the concentration of free calcium has no major effect on its cADPR production. It binds NGD+ (nicotinamide-guanine dinucleotide), which inhibits its NAD+-metabolizing activities (K(i)=24 microM), despite its incapacity to cyclize this analogue. Interestingly, it is fully inhibited by low (micromolar) concentrations of zinc. We propose that this novel mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase regulates the production of cADPR and therefore calcium levels within brain synaptic terminals. In addition, this enzyme might be a potential target of neurotoxic Zn2+.

  20. Pharmacologically induced mouse model of adult spinal muscular atrophy to evaluate effectiveness of therapeutics after disease onset.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhihua; Ling, Karen K Y; Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Chunyi; Karp, Gary; Welch, Ellen M; Naryshkin, Nikolai; Ratni, Hasane; Chen, Karen S; Metzger, Friedrich; Paushkin, Sergey; Weetall, Marla; Ko, Chien-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease characterized by atrophy of muscle and loss of spinal motor neurons. SMA is caused by deletion or mutation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and the nearly identical SMN2 gene fails to generate adequate levels of functional SMN protein due to a splicing defect. Currently, several therapeutics targeted to increase SMN protein are in clinical trials. An outstanding issue in the field is whether initiating treatment in symptomatic older patients would confer a therapeutic benefit, an important consideration as the majority of patients with milder forms of SMA are diagnosed at an older age. An SMA mouse model that recapitulates the disease phenotype observed in adolescent and adult SMA patients is needed to address this important question. We demonstrate here that Δ7 mice, a model of severe SMA, treated with a suboptimal dose of an SMN2 splicing modifier show increased SMN protein, survive into adulthood and display SMA disease-relevant pathologies. Increasing the dose of the splicing modifier after the disease symptoms are apparent further mitigates SMA histopathological features in suboptimally dosed adult Δ7 mice. In addition, inhibiting myostatin using intramuscular injection of AAV1-follistatin ameliorates muscle atrophy in suboptimally dosed Δ7 mice. Taken together, we have developed a new murine model of symptomatic SMA in adolescents and adult mice that is induced pharmacologically from a more severe model and demonstrated efficacy of both SMN2 splicing modifiers and a myostatin inhibitor in mice at later disease stages. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. HOXA5 localization in postnatal and adult mouse brain is suggestive of regulatory roles in postmitotic neurons.

    PubMed

    Lizen, Benoit; Hutlet, Bertrand; Bissen, Diane; Sauvegarde, Deborah; Hermant, Maryse; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Gofflot, Françoise

    2017-04-01

    Hoxa5 is a member of the Hox gene family, which plays critical roles in successive steps of the central nervous system formation during embryonic and fetal development. Hoxa5 expression in the adult mouse brain has been reported, suggesting that this gene may be functionally required in the brain after birth. To provide further insight into the Hoxa5 expression pattern and potential functions in the brain, we have characterized its neuroanatomical profile from embryonic stages to adulthood. While most Hox mapping studies have been based solely on transcript analysis, we extended our analysis to HOXA5 protein localization in adulthood using specific antibodies. Our results show that Hoxa5 expression appears in the most caudal part of the hindbrain at fetal stages, where it is maintained until adulthood. In the medulla oblongata and pons, we detected Hoxa5 expression in many precerebellar neurons and in several nuclei implicated in the control of autonomic functions. In these territories, the HOXA5 protein is present solely in neurons, specifically in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic, glutamatergic, and catecholaminergic neurons. Finally, we also detected Hoxa5 transcripts, but not the HOXA5 protein, in the thalamus and the cortex, from postnatal stages to adult stages, and in the cerebellum at adulthood. We provide evidence that some larger variants of Hoxa5 transcripts are present in these territories. Our mapping analysis allowed us to build hypotheses regarding HOXA5 functions in the nervous system after birth, such as a potential role in the establishment and refinement/plasticity of precerebellar circuits during postnatal and adult life. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1155-1175, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Chronic coexistence of two troponin T isoforms in adult transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes decreased contractile kinetics and caused dilatative remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Bin; Wei, Hongguang; Jin, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Our previous in vivo and ex vivo studies suggested that coexistence of two or more troponin T (TnT) isoforms in adult cardiac muscle decreased cardiac function and efficiency (Huang QQ, Feng HZ, Liu J, Du J, Stull LB, Moravec CS, Huang X, Jin JP, Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 294: C213-C22, 2008; Feng HZ, Jin JP, Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 299: H97-H105, 2010). Here we characterized Ca(2+)-regulated contractility of isolated adult cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice coexpressing a fast skeletal muscle TnT together with the endogenous cardiac TnT. Without the influence of extracellular matrix, coexistence of the two TnT isoforms resulted in lower shortening amplitude, slower shortening and relengthening velocities, and longer relengthening time. The level of resting cytosolic Ca(2+) was unchanged, but the peak Ca(2+) transient was lowered and the durations of Ca(2+) rising and decaying were longer in the transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes vs. the wild-type controls. Isoproterenol treatment diminished the differences in shortening amplitude and shortening and relengthening velocities, whereas the prolonged durations of relengthening and Ca(2+) transient in the transgenic cardiomyocytes remained. At rigor state, a result from depletion of Ca(2+), resting sarcomere length of the transgenic cardiomyocytes became shorter than that in wild-type cells. Inhibition of myosin motor diminished this effect of TnT function on cross bridges. The length but not width of transgenic cardiomyocytes was significantly increased compared with the wild-type controls, corresponding to longitudinal addition of sarcomeres and dilatative remodeling at the cellular level. These dominantly negative effects of normal fast TnT demonstrated that chronic coexistence of functionally distinct variants of TnT in adult cardiomyocytes reduces contractile performance with pathological consequences.

  3. The familial dysautonomia disease gene IKBKAP is required in the developing and adult mouse central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Chaverra, Marta; George, Lynn; Thorne, Julian; Grindeland, Andrea; Ueki, Yumi; Eiger, Steven; Cusick, Cassie; Babcock, A. Michael; Carlson, George A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANs) are a genetically and clinically diverse group of disorders defined by peripheral nervous system (PNS) dysfunction. HSAN type III, known as familial dysautonomia (FD), results from a single base mutation in the gene IKBKAP that encodes a scaffolding unit (ELP1) for a multi-subunit complex known as Elongator. Since mutations in other Elongator subunits (ELP2 to ELP4) are associated with central nervous system (CNS) disorders, the goal of this study was to investigate a potential requirement for Ikbkap in the CNS of mice. The sensory and autonomic pathophysiology of FD is fatal, with the majority of patients dying by age 40. While signs and pathology of FD have been noted in the CNS, the clinical and research focus has been on the sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and no genetic model studies have investigated the requirement for Ikbkap in the CNS. Here, we report, using a novel mouse line in which Ikbkap is deleted solely in the nervous system, that not only is Ikbkap widely expressed in the embryonic and adult CNS, but its deletion perturbs both the development of cortical neurons and their survival in adulthood. Primary cilia in embryonic cortical apical progenitors and motile cilia in adult ependymal cells are reduced in number and disorganized. Furthermore, we report that, in the adult CNS, both autonomic and non-autonomic neuronal populations require Ikbkap for survival, including spinal motor and cortical neurons. In addition, the mice developed kyphoscoliosis, an FD hallmark, indicating its neuropathic etiology. Ultimately, these perturbations manifest in a developmental and progressive neurodegenerative condition that includes impairments in learning and memory. Collectively, these data reveal an essential function for Ikbkap that extends beyond the peripheral nervous system to CNS development and function. With the identification of discrete CNS cell types and structures that depend on Ikbkap

  4. Enlarged pancreas: not always a cancer.

    PubMed

    Calculli, Lucia; Festi, Davide; Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic fat accumulation has been described with various terms including pancreatic lipomatosis, pancreatic steatosis, fatty replacement, fatty infiltration, fatty pancreas, lipomatous pseudohypertrophy and nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease. It has been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, acute pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and the formation of pancreatic fistula. The real incidence of this condition is still unknown. We report a case of pancreatic steatosis in a non-obese female patient initially diagnosed with a mass in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out to define the characteristics of the pancreatic mass. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of fat pancreas. Enlarged pancreas is not always a cancer, but pancreatic steatosis is characterized by pancreatic enlargement. MRI could give a definite diagnosis of pancreatic steatosis or cancer.

  5. Cellular and molecular mechanisms coordinating pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Bastidas-Ponce, Aimée; Scheibner, Katharina; Lickert, Heiko; Bakhti, Mostafa

    2017-08-15

    The pancreas is an endoderm-derived glandular organ that participates in the regulation of systemic glucose metabolism and food digestion through the function of its endocrine and exocrine compartments, respectively. While intensive research has explored the signaling pathways and transcriptional programs that govern pancreas development, much remains to be discovered regarding the cellular processes that orchestrate pancreas morphogenesis. Here, we discuss the developmental mechanisms and principles that are known to underlie pancreas development, from induction and lineage formation to morphogenesis and organogenesis. Elucidating such principles will help to identify novel candidate disease genes and unravel the pathogenesis of pancreas-related diseases, such as diabetes, pancreatitis and cancer. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. MicroRNA (miRNA) cloning analysis reveals sex differences in miRNA expression profiles between adult mouse testis and ovary.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Takuya; Takizawa, Takami; Luo, Shan-Shun; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Tomoko; Mori, Miki; Kanda, Tomohiro; Goto, Tadashi; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2008-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding small RNAs that can regulate the expression of complementary mRNA targets. Identifying tissue-specific miRNAs is the first step toward understanding the biological functions of miRNAs, which include the regulation of tissue differentiation and the maintenance of tissue identity. In this study, we performed small RNA library sequencing in adult mouse testis and ovary to reveal their characteristic organ- and gender-specific profiles and to elucidate the characteristics of the miRNAs expressed in the reproductive system. We obtained 10,852 and 11 744 small RNA clones from mouse testis and ovary respectively (greater than 10,000 clones per organ), which included 6630 (159 genes) and 10,192 (154 genes) known miRNAs. A high level of efficiency of miRNA library sequencing was achieved: 61% (6630 miRNA clones/10,852 small RNA clones) and 87% (10,192/11,744) for adult mouse testis and ovary respectively. We obtained characteristic miRNA signatures in testis and ovary; 55 miRNAs were detected highly, exclusively, or predominantly in adult mouse testis and ovary, and discovered two novel miRNAs. Male-biased expression of miRNAs occurred on the X-chromosome. Our data provide important information on sex differences in miRNA expression that should facilitate studies of the reproductive organ-specific roles of miRNAs.

  7. Early exposure to ethanol differentially affects ethanol preference at adult age in two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Molet, Jenny; Bouaziz, Elodie; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2012-08-01

    Although the acute effects of ethanol exposure on brain development have been extensively studied, the long term consequences of juvenile ethanol intake on behavior at adult age, regarding especially ethanol consumption, are still poorly known. The aim of this study was to analyze the consequences of ethanol ingestion in juvenile C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice on ethanol intake and neurobiological regulations at adulthood. Mice were given intragastric ethanol at 4 weeks of age under different protocols and their spontaneous ethanol consumption was assessed in a free choice paradigm at adulthood. Both serotonin 5-HT(1A) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors were investigated using [(35)S]GTP-γ-S binding assay for the juvenile ethanol regimens which modified adult ethanol consumption. In DBA/2J mice, juvenile ethanol ingestion dose-dependently promoted adult spontaneous ethanol consumption. This early ethanol exposure enhanced 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor-mediated [(35)S]GTP-γ-S binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus and reduced CB1 receptor-mediated G protein coupling in both the striatum and the globus pallidus at adult age. In contrast, early ethanol ingestion by C57BL/6J mice transiently lowered spontaneous ethanol consumption and increased G protein coupling of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors in the hippocampus but had no effect on CB1 receptors at adulthood. These results show that a brief and early exposure to ethanol can induce strain-dependent long-lasting changes in both behavior toward ethanol and key receptors of central 5-HT and CB systems in mice.

  8. CD38-dependent ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity in developing and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ceni, Claire; Pochon, Nathalie; Brun, Virginie; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Andrieux, Annie; Grunwald, Didier; Schuber, Francis; De Waard, Michel; Lund, Frances; Villaz, Michel; Moutin, Marie-Jo

    2003-01-01

    CD38 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is expressed in many tissues throughout the body. In addition to its major NAD+-glycohydrolase activity, CD38 is also able to synthesize cyclic ADP-ribose, an endogenous calcium-regulating molecule, from NAD+. In the present study, we have compared ADP-ribosyl cyclase and NAD+-glycohydrolase activities in protein extracts of brains from developing and adult wild-type and Cd38 -/- mice. In extracts from wild-type brain, cyclase activity was detected spectrofluorimetrically, using nicotinamide-guanine dinucleotide as a substrate (GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity), as early as embryonic day 15. The level of cyclase activity was similar in the neonate brain (postnatal day 1) and then increased greatly in the adult brain. Using [14C]NAD+ as a substrate and HPLC analysis, we found that ADP-ribose is the major product formed in the brain at all developmental stages. Under the same experimental conditions, neither NAD+-glycohydrolase nor GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity could be detected in extracts of brains from developing or adult Cd38 -/- mice, demonstrating that CD38 is the predominant constitutive enzyme endowed with these activities in brain at all developmental stages. The activity measurements correlated with the level of CD38 transcripts present in the brains of developing and adult wild-type mice. Using confocal microscopy we showed, in primary cultures of hippocampal cells, that CD38 is expressed by both neurons and glial cells, and is enriched in neuronal perikarya. Intracellular NAD+-glycohydrolase activity was measured in hippocampal cell cultures, and CD38-dependent cyclase activity was higher in brain fractions enriched in intracellular membranes. Taken together, these results lead us to speculate that CD38 might have an intracellular location in neural cells in addition to its plasma membrane location, and may play an important role in intracellular cyclic ADP-ribose-mediated calcium signalling in brain tissue. PMID

  9. Changes in the neural representation of odorants after olfactory deprivation in the adult mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Kass, Marley D; Pottackal, Joseph; Turkel, Daniel J; McGann, John P

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory sensory deprivation during development has been shown to induce significant alterations in the neurophysiology of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), the primary sensory inputs to the brain's olfactory bulb. Deprivation has also been shown to alter the neurochemistry of the adult olfactory system, but the physiological consequences of these changes are poorly understood. Here we used in vivo synaptopHluorin (spH) imaging to visualize odorant-evoked neurotransmitter release from ORNs in adult transgenic mice that underwent 4 weeks of unilateral olfactory deprivation. Deprivation reduced odorant-evoked spH signals compared with sham-occluded mice. Unexpectedly, this reduction was equivalent between ORNs on the open and plugged sides. Changes in odorant selectivity of glomerular subpopulations of ORNs were also observed, but only in ORNs on the open side of deprived mice. These results suggest that naris occlusion in adult mice produces substantial changes in primary olfactory processing which may reflect not only the decrease in olfactory stimulation on the occluded side but also the alteration of response properties on the intact side. We also observed a modest effect of true sham occlusions that included noseplug insertion and removal, suggesting that conventional noseplug techniques may have physiological effects independent of deprivation per se and thus require more careful controls than has been previously appreciated.

  10. Electrical and chemical synapses among parvalbumin fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons in adult mouse neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Galarreta, Mario; Hestrin, Shaul

    2002-01-01

    Networks of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons connected via electrical and chemical synapses are thought to play an important role in detecting and promoting synchronous activity in the cerebral cortex. Although the properties of electrical and chemical synaptic interactions among inhibitory interneurons are critical for their function as a network, they have only been studied systematically in juvenile animals. Here, we have used transgenic mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein in cells containing parvalbumin (PV) to study the synaptic connectivity among fast-spiking (FS) cells in slices from adult animals (2–7 months old). We have recorded from pairs of PV-FS cells and found that the majority of them were electrically coupled (61%, 14 of 23 pairs). In addition, 78% of the pairs were connected via GABAergic chemical synapses, often reciprocally. The average coupling coefficient for step injections was 1.5% (n = 14), a smaller value than that reported in juvenile animals. GABA-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents and potentials decayed with exponential time constants of 2.6 and 5.9 ms, respectively, and exhibited paired-pulse depression (50-ms interval). The inhibitory synaptic responses in the adult were faster than those observed in young animals. Our results indicate that PV-FS cells are highly interconnected in the adult cerebral cortex by both electrical and chemical synapses, establishing networks that can have important implications for coordinating activity in cortical circuits. PMID:12213962

  11. Comparative analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from adult mouse adipose, muscle, and fetal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hulong; Yu, Bing; Huang, Zhiqing; Yang, Xuerong; Liu, Zehui; Mao, Xiangbing; Tian, Gang; He, Jun; Han, Guoquan; Chen, Hong; Mao, Qian; Chen, Daiwen

    2013-02-01

    Recently, increasing evidence supports that adult stem cells are the part of a natural system for tissue growth and repair. This study focused on the differences of mesenchymal stem cells from adult adipose (ADSCs), skeletal muscle (MDSCs) and fetal muscle (FMSCs) in biological characteristics, which is the key to cell therapy success. Stem cell antigen 1 (Sca-1) expression of MDSCs and FMSCs at passage 3 was two times more than that at passage 1 (P < 0.0001). After 28-day myogenic induction, higher expression levels of skeletal muscle-specific genes were observed in MDSCs than FMSCs (P < 0.01), and the lowest expression levels were demonstrated in ADSCs among three cells (P < 0.01). Besides, M-Cad and MyHC expressions in ADSCs were not detected by immunofluorescence or real-time quantitative PCR. Furthermore, after 14 days adipogenic induction, PPARγ2, LPL and aP2 mRNA expressions were higher in ADSCs vs. MDSCs (P < 0.01). Besides, MSCs from adult or fetal muscle expressed higher OCN and OPN than ADSCs after 28 days osteogenic induction (P < 0.01). Taken together, our results suggested that cell source and developmental stage had great impacts on biological properties of mesenchymal stem cells, and proper consideration of all the issues is necessary.

  12. Myelinated skin sensory neurons project extensively throughout adult mouse substantia gelatinosa.

    PubMed

    Boada, M Danilo; Woodbury, C Jeffery

    2008-02-27

    The substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord is a recipient zone for unmyelinated sensory neurons in adults. Recent studies of the central anatomy of physiologically identified skin sensory neurons in neonatal mice have shown that this region also receives substantial inputs from a variety of myelinated afferents. The present experiments were performed to determine whether these neonatal inputs represent a transient phenotype that retracts from the SG. Studies were conducted in an in vivo spinal cord preparation from adult mice; thoracic levels were targeted to facilitate comparisons with previous in vitro findings. We show that the SG continues to receive substantial projections from myelinated skin sensory neurons throughout life. A large population of myelinated nociceptors conducting in the upper A delta and low A beta range maintained extensive projections throughout all areas of the SG well into adulthood; the latter gave rise to dorsally recurving "flame"-shaped arbors extending into the marginal layer that were identical to afferents described in neonates and after nerve injury in adult rats. Furthermore, exquisitely sensitive down hair follicle afferents projected throughout the inner half of the SG (i.e., lamina IIi) and sent dense clusters of terminals well into the outer SG (IIo), where they intermingled with those of unmyelinated nociceptors. Arguments are presented that the SG likely plays a predominant role in tactile processing under normal conditions, but that this role switches rapidly to nociceptive-only during environmental exigencies imposed by temperature extremes.

  13. Voltage-dependent ionic channels in differentiating neural precursor cells collected from adult mouse brains six hours post-mortem.

    PubMed

    Bellardita, Carmelo; Bolzoni, Francesco; Sorosina, Melissa; Marfia, Giovanni; Carelli, Stephana; Gorio, Alfredo; Formenti, Alessandro

    2012-04-01

    A novel type of adult neural precursor cells (NPCs) has been isolated from the subventricular zone of the mouse 6 hr after animal death (T6-NPCs). This condition is supposed to select hypoxia-resistant cells of scientific and clinical interest. Ionic channels are ultimately the expression of the functional maturation of neurons, so the aim of this research was to characterize the pattern of the main voltage-dependent ionic channels in T6-NPCs differentiating to a neuronal phenotype, comparing it with NPCs isolated soon after death (T0-NPCs). T6- and T0-NPCs grow in medium containing epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Differentiation was performed in small wells without the addition of growth factors, in the presence of adhesion molecules, fetal bovine serum, and leukemia inhibitory factor. Ionic currents, recorded by means of whole-cell patch-clamp, namely, I(Ca2+) HVA, both L- and non-L-type, I(K+) delayed rectifying, I(K+) inward rectifier, transient I(K+A) , and TTX-sensitive I(Na+) have been found, although Na(+) currents were found in only a small percentage of cells and after the fifth week of differentiation. No significant differences in current types, density, orcell capacitance were observed between T6-NPCs and T0-NPCs. The sequence in which the markers appear in new neural cells is not necessarily a fixed program, but the discrepancies in morphological, biochemical, and electrophysiological maturation of mouse NPCs to neurons, possibly different in vivo, suggest that the various steps of the differentiation are independently regulated. Therefore, in addition to morphological and biochemical data, functional tests should be considered for characterizing the maturation of neurons.

  14. Gating behaviour of sodium currents in adult mouse muscle recorded with an improved two-electrode voltage clamp

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Markin, Vladislav; Cannon, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The availability of knock-in mutant mouse models for channelopathies of skeletal muscle has generated the need for improved methods to record ionic currents under voltage clamp in fully differentiated adult muscle fibres. A two-electrode voltage clamp has been optimized for recording Na+ currents in small fibres dissociated from the footpad. Clamp speed and spatial homogeneity were achieved by using short fibres (<600 μm) that were detubulated with hyperosmolar glycerol. Series resistance errors were reduced by limiting current amplitude with low [Na+]. The quality of the voltage clamp was explored with computer simulations of a finite cable model with active conductances. Simulations quantitatively defined the range of conditions for which clamp control can be maintained, and provided estimates for the errors in the determination of gating parameters from standard pulse protocols. Sodium currents recorded from short fast-twitch muscles revealed a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage dependence of activation (V1/2−52 mV) and fast inactivation (V1/2−88 mV) compared to expression studies of NaV1.4 in mammalian cell lines. Slow inactivation occurred at depolarized potentials (V1/2−69 mV) relative to fast inactivation. These data reveal a marked divergence in the voltage dependence of fast and slow inactivation and provide normative values of Na+ channel behaviour for mouse skeletal muscle that will serve as a reference for the investigation of muscle ion channelopathies using genetically engineered mice or computer simulation. PMID:21135045

  15. Characterization of muscle spindle afferents in the adult mouse using an in vitro muscle-nerve preparation.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Katherine A; Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Hochman, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    We utilized an in vitro adult mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) nerve-attached preparation to characterize the responses of muscle spindle afferents to ramp-and-hold stretch and sinusoidal vibratory stimuli. Responses were measured at both room (24°C) and muscle body temperature (34°C). Muscle spindle afferent static firing frequencies increased linearly in response to increasing stretch lengths to accurately encode the magnitude of muscle stretch (tested at 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% of resting length [Lo]). Peak firing frequency increased with ramp speeds (20% Lo/sec, 40% Lo/sec, and 60% Lo/sec). As a population, muscle spindle afferents could entrain 1:1 to sinusoidal vibrations throughout the frequency (10-100 Hz) and amplitude ranges tested (5-100 µm). Most units preferentially entrained to vibration frequencies close to their baseline steady-state firing frequencies. Cooling the muscle to 24°C decreased baseline firing frequency and units correspondingly entrained to slower frequency vibrations. The ramp component of stretch generated dynamic firing responses. These responses and related measures of dynamic sensitivity were not able to categorize units as primary (group Ia) or secondary (group II) even when tested with more extreme length changes (10% Lo). We conclude that the population of spindle afferents combines to encode stretch in a smoothly graded manner over the physiological range of lengths and speeds tested. Overall, spindle afferent response properties were comparable to those seen in other species, supporting subsequent use of the mouse genetic model system for studies on spindle function and dysfunction in an isolated muscle-nerve preparation.

  16. Characterization of Muscle Spindle Afferents in the Adult Mouse Using an In Vitro Muscle-Nerve Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Katherine A.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Hochman, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    We utilized an in vitro adult mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) nerve-attached preparation to characterize the responses of muscle spindle afferents to ramp-and-hold stretch and sinusoidal vibratory stimuli. Responses were measured at both room (24°C) and muscle body temperature (34°C). Muscle spindle afferent static firing frequencies increased linearly in response to increasing stretch lengths to accurately encode the magnitude of muscle stretch (tested at 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% of resting length [Lo]). Peak firing frequency increased with ramp speeds (20% Lo/sec, 40% Lo/sec, and 60% Lo/sec). As a population, muscle spindle afferents could entrain 1:1 to sinusoidal vibrations throughout the frequency (10–100 Hz) and amplitude ranges tested (5–100 µm). Most units preferentially entrained to vibration frequencies close to their baseline steady-state firing frequencies. Cooling the muscle to 24°C decreased baseline firing frequency and units correspondingly entrained to slower frequency vibrations. The ramp component of stretch generated dynamic firing responses. These responses and related measures of dynamic sensitivity were not able to categorize units as primary (group Ia) or secondary (group II) even when tested with more extreme length changes (10% Lo). We conclude that the population of spindle afferents combines to encode stretch in a smoothly graded manner over the physiological range of lengths and speeds tested. Overall, spindle afferent response properties were comparable to those seen in other species, supporting subsequent use of the mouse genetic model system for studies on spindle function and dysfunction in an isolated muscle-nerve preparation. PMID:22745708

  17. Mesenchymal Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Is Required for Normal Pancreas Development

    PubMed Central

    Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas; Ravassard, Philippe; Pardanaud-Glavieux, Corinne; Scharfmann, Raphaél; Serup, Palle

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pancreas organogenesis is orchestrated by interactions between the epithelium and the mesenchyme, but these interactions are not completely understood. Here we investigated a role for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling within the pancreas mesenchyme and found it to be required for the normal development of the mesenchyme as well as for the pancreatic epithelium. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed active BMP signaling by immunostaining for phospho-Smad1,5,8 and tested whether pancreas development was affected by BMP inhibition after expression of Noggin and dominant negative BMP receptors in chicken and mouse pancreas. RESULTS Endogenous BMP signaling is confined to the mesenchyme in the early pancreas and inhibition of BMP signaling results in severe pancreatic hypoplasia with reduced epithelial branching. Notably, we also observed an excessive endocrine differentiation when mesenchymal BMP signaling is blocked, presumably secondary to defective mesenchyme to epithelium signaling. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that BMP signaling plays a previously unsuspected role in the mesenchyme, required for normal development of the mesenchyme as well as for the epithelium. PMID:20522595

  18. Characterizing Newly Repopulated Microglia in the Adult Mouse: Impacts on Animal Behavior, Cell Morphology, and Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Monica R. P.; Lee, Rafael J.; West, Brian L.; Green, Kim N.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are the primary immune cell in the brain and are postulated to play important roles outside of immunity. Administration of the dual colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R)/c-Kit kinase inhibitor, PLX3397, to adult mice results in the elimination of ~99% of microglia, which remain eliminated for as long as treatment continues. Upon removal of the inhibitor, microglia rapidly repopulate the entire adult brain, stemming from a central nervous system (CNS) resident progenitor cell. Using this method of microglial elimination and repopulation, the role of microglia in both healthy and diseased states can be explored. Here, we examine the responsiveness of newly repopulated microglia to an inflammatory stimulus, as well as determine the impact of these cells on behavior, cognition, and neuroinflammation. Two month-old wild-type mice were placed on either control or PLX3397 diet for 21 d to eliminate microglia. PLX3397 diet was then removed in a subset of animals to allow microglia to repopulate and behavioral testing conducted beginning at 14 d repopulation. Finally, inflammatory profiling of the microglia-repopulated brain in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.25 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was determined 21 d after inhibitor removal using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), as well as detailed analyses of microglial morphologies. We find mice with repopulated microglia to perform similarly to controls by measures of behavior, cognition, and motor function. Compared to control/resident microglia, repopulated microglia had larger cell bodies and less complex branching in their processes, which resolved over time after inhibitor removal. Inflammatory profiling revealed that the mRNA gene expression of repopulated microglia was similar to normal resident microglia and that these new cells appear functional and responsive to LPS. Overall, these data demonstrate that newly repopulated microglia function similarly to the

  19. Neonatal tissue injury reduces the intrinsic excitability of adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Baccei, M L

    2014-01-03

    Tissue damage during the neonatal period evokes long-lasting changes in nociceptive processing within the adult spinal cord which contribute to persistent alterations in pain sensitivity. However, it remains unclear if the observed modifications in neuronal activity within the mature superficial dorsal horn (SDH) following early injury reflect shifts in the intrinsic membrane properties of these cells. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to identify the effects of neonatal surgical injury on the intrinsic excitability of both GABAergic and presumed glutamatergic neurons within lamina II of the adult SDH using in vitro patch clamp recordings from spinal cord slices prepared from glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein (Gad-GFP) mice. The results demonstrate that hindpaw surgical incision at postnatal day (P) 3 altered the passive membrane properties of both Gad-GFP and adjacent, non-GFP neurons in the mature SDH, as evidenced by decreased membrane resistance and more negative resting potentials in comparison to naïve littermate controls. This was accompanied by a reduction in the prevalence of spontaneous activity within the GABAergic population. Both Gad-GFP and non-GFP neurons displayed a significant elevation in rheobase and decreased instantaneous firing frequency after incision, suggesting that early tissue damage lowers the intrinsic membrane excitability of adult SDH neurons. Isolation of inward-rectifying K(+) (K(ir)) currents revealed that neonatal incision significantly increased K(ir) conductance near physiological membrane potentials in GABAergic, but not glutamatergic, lamina II neurons. Overall, these findings suggest that neonatal tissue injury causes a long-term dampening of intrinsic firing across the general population of lamina II interneurons, but the underlying ionic mechanisms may be cell-type specific. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mouse model of CADASIL reveals novel insights into Notch3 function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Fanny; Vogler, Steffen; Pojar, Sherin; Elliott, David A; Bradke, Frank; Steiner, Barbara; Kempermann, Gerd

    2015-03-01

    Could impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis be a relevant mechanism underlying CADASIL (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy)? Memory symptoms in CADASIL, the most common hereditary form of vascular dementia, are usually thought to be primarily due to vascular degeneration and white matter lacunes. Since adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a process essential for the integration of new spatial memory occurs in a highly vascularized niche, we considered dysregulation of adult neurogenesis as a potential mechanism for the manifestation of dementia in CADASIL. Analysis in aged mice overexpressing Notch3 with a CADASIL mutation, revealed vascular deficits in arteries of the hippocampal fissure but not in the niche of the dentate gyrus. At 12 months of age, cell proliferation and survival of newborn neurons were reduced not only in CADASIL mice but also in transgenic controls overexpressing wild type Notch3. At 6 months, hippocampal neurogenesis was altered in CADASIL mice independent of overt vascular abnormalities in the fissure. Further, we identified Notch3 expression in hippocampal precursor cells and maturing neurons in vivo as well as in cultured hippocampal precursor cells. Overexpression and knockdown experiments showed that Notch3 signaling negatively regulated precursor cell proliferation. Notch3 overexpression also led to deficits in KCl-induced precursor cell activation. This suggests a cell-autonomous effect of Notch3 signaling in the regulation of precursor proliferation and activation and a loss-of-function effect in CADASIL. Consequently, besides vascular damage, aberrant precursor cell proliferation and differentiation due to Notch3 dysfunction might be an additional independent mechanism for the development of hippocampal dysfunction in CADASIL.

  1. Odour enrichment increases adult-born dopaminergic neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Fasolo, Aldo; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is the first brain region involved in the processing of olfactory information. In adult mice, the OB is highly plastic, undergoing cellular/molecular dynamic changes that are modulated by sensory experience. Odour deprivation induces down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in OB dopaminergic interneurons located in the glomerular layer (GL), resulting in decreased dopamine in the OB. Although the effect of sensory deprivation is well established, little is known about the influence of odour enrichment on dopaminergic cells. Here we report that prolonged odour enrichment on C57BL/6J strain mice selectively increases TH-immunopositive cells in the GL by nearly 20%. Following odour enrichment on TH-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, in which GFP identified both mature TH-positive cells and putative immature dopaminergic cells expressing TH mRNA but not TH protein, we found a similar 20% increase in GFP-expressing cells, with no changes in the ratio between TH-positive and TH-negative cells. These data suggest that enriched conditions induce an expansion in the whole dopaminergic lineage. Accordingly, by using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine injections to label adult-generated cells in the GL of TH-GFP mice, we found an increase in the percentage of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive dopaminergic cells in enriched compared with control conditions, whereas no differences were found for calretinin- and calbindin-positive subtypes. Strikingly, the fraction of newborn cells among the dopaminergic population doubled in enriched conditions. On the whole, our results demonstrate that odour enrichment drives increased integration of adult-generated dopaminergic cells that could be critical to adapt the OB circuits to the environmental incoming information.

  2. Chronic Social Defeat Stress Modulates Dendritic Spines Structural Plasticity in Adult Mouse Frontal Association Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Chronic stress is associated with occurrence of many mental disorders. Previous studies have shown that dendrites and spines of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex undergo drastic reorganization following chronic stress experience. So the prefrontal cortex is believed to play a key role in response of neural system to chronic stress. However, how stress induces dynamic structural changes in neural circuit of prefrontal cortex remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of chronic social defeat stress on dendritic spine structural plasticity in the mouse frontal association (FrA) cortex in vivo using two-photon microscopy. We found that chronic stress altered spine dynamics in FrA and increased the connectivity in FrA neural circuits. We also found that the changes in spine dynamics in FrA are correlated with the deficit of sucrose preference in defeated mice. Our findings suggest that chronic stress experience leads to adaptive change in neural circuits that may be important for encoding stress experience related memory and anhedonia. PMID:28197343

  3. Reduced Glutamate Release in Adult BTBR Mouse Model of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongen; Ma, Yuehong; Ding, Caiyun; Jin, Guorong; Liu, Jianrong; Chang, Qiaoqiao; Hu, Fengyun; Yu, Li

    2016-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder characterized by impairments in social and communication abilities, as well as by restricted and repetitive behaviors. The BTBR T (+) Itpr3 (tf) (BTBR) mice have emerged as a well characterized and widely used mouse model of a range of ASD-like phenotype, showing deficiencies in social behaviors and unusual ultrasonic vocalizations as well as increased repetitive self-grooming. However, the inherited neurobiological changes that lead to ASD-like behaviors in these mice are incompletely known and still under active investigation. The aim of this study was to further evaluate the structure and neurotransmitter release of the glutamatergic synapse in BTBR mice. C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used as a control strain because of their high level of sociability. The important results showed that the evoked glutamate release in the cerebral cortex of BTBR mice was significantly lower than in B6 mice. And the level of vesicle docking-related protein Syntaxin-1A was reduced in BTBR mice. However, no significant changes were observed in the number of glutamatergic synapse, level of synaptic proteins, density of dendritic spine and postsynaptic density between BTBR mice and B6 mice. Overall, our results suggest that abnormal vesicular glutamate activity may underlie the ASD relevant pathology in the BTBR mice.

  4. Clinical implications of fatty pancreas: Correlations between fatty pancreas and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Seok; Kim, Sang Heum; Jun, Dae Won; Han, Jee Hye; Jang, Eun Chul; Park, Ji Young; Son, Byung Kwan; Kim, Seong Hwan; Jo, Yoon Ju; Park, Young Sook; Kim, Yong Soo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical implications of lipid deposition in the pancreas (fatty pancreas). METHODS: The subjects of this study were 293 patients who had undergone abdominal computed tomography (CT) and sonography. Fatty pancreas was diagnosed by sonographic findings and subdivided into mild, moderate, and severe fatty pancreas groups comparing to the retroperitoneal fat echogenicity. RESULTS: Fatty pancreas was associated with higher levels for visceral fat, waist circumference, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein, free fatty acid, γ-GTP, insulin, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) than the control group (P < 0.05). HOMA-IR, visceral fat, triglyceride, and ALT also tended to increase with the degree of fat deposition in the pancreas on sonography. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, HOMA-IR, visceral fat, and ALT level were independently related to fatty pancreas after adjustment for age, body mass index, and lipid profile. The incidence of metabolic syndrome in the fatty pancreas group was significantly higher than in the control group, and the numbers of metabolic syndrome parameters were significantly higher in the fatty pancreas group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Sonographic fatty pancrease showed higher insulin resistance, visceral fat area, triglyceride, and ALT levels than normal pancreases. Fatty pancreas also showed a strong correlation with metabolic syndrome. PMID:19370785

  5. Differential genomic imprinting regulates paracrine and autocrine roles of IGF2 in mouse adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrón, S. R.; Radford, E. J.; Domingo-Muelas, A.; Kleine, I.; Ramme, A.; Gray, D.; Sandovici, I.; Constancia, M.; Ward, A.; Menheniott, T. R.; Ferguson-Smith, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is implicated in the control of gene dosage in neurogenic niches. Here we address the importance of Igf2 imprinting for murine adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus in vivo. In the SVZ, paracrine IGF2 is a cerebrospinal fluid and endothelial-derived neurogenic factor requiring biallelic expression, with mutants having reduced activation of the stem cell pool and impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis. In contrast, Igf2 is imprinted in the hippocampus acting as an autocrine factor expressed in neural stem cells (NSCs) solely from the paternal allele. Conditional mutagenesis of Igf2 in blood vessels confirms that endothelial-derived IGF2 contributes to NSC maintenance in SVZ but not in the SGZ, and that this is regulated by the biallelic expression of IGF2 in the vascular compartment. Our findings indicate that a regulatory decision to imprint or not is a functionally important mechanism of transcriptional dosage control in adult neurogenesis. PMID:26369386

  6. Competition and Homeostasis of Excitatory and Inhibitory Connectivity in the Adult Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Saiepour, M Hadi; Chakravarthy, Sridhara; Min, Rogier; Levelt, Christiaan N

    2015-10-01

    During cortical development, synaptic competition regulates the formation and adjustment of neuronal connectivity. It is unknown whether synaptic competition remains active in the adult brain and how inhibitory neurons participate in this process. Using morphological and electrophysiological measurements, we show that expressing a dominant-negative form of the TrkB receptor (TrkB.T1) in the majority of pyramidal neurons in the adult visual cortex does not affect excitatory synapse densities. This is in stark contrast to the previously reported loss of excitatory input which occurs if the exact same transgene is expressed in sparse neurons at the same age. This indicates that synaptic competition remains active in adulthood. Additionally, we show that interneurons not expressing the TrkB.T1 transgene may have a competitive advantage and obtain more excitatory synapses when most neighboring pyramidal neurons do express the transgene. Finally, we demonstrate that inhibitory synapses onto pyramidal neurons are reduced when TrkB signaling is interfered with in most pyramidal neurons but not when few pyramidal neurons have this deficit. This adjustment of inhibitory innervation is therefore not a cell-autonomous consequence of decreased TrkB signaling but more likely a homeostatic mechanism compensating for activity changes at the population level.

  7. Transient hypothyroidism favors oligodendrocyte generation providing functional remyelination in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Remaud, Sylvie; Ortiz, Fernando C; Perret-Jeanneret, Marine; Aigrot, Marie-Stéphane; Gothié, Jean-David; Fekete, Csaba; Kvárta-Papp, Zsuzsanna; Gereben, Balázs; Langui, Dominique; Lubetzki, Catherine; Angulo, Maria Cecilia; Zalc, Bernard; Demeneix, Barbara

    2017-09-06

    In the adult brain, both neurons and oligodendrocytes can be generated from neural stem cells located within the Sub-Ventricular Zone (SVZ). Physiological signals regulating neuronal versus glial fate are largely unknown. Here we report that a thyroid hormone (T3)-free window, with or without a demyelinating insult, provides a favorable environment for SVZ-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor generation. After demyelination, oligodendrocytes derived from these newly-formed progenitors provide functional remyelination, restoring normal conduction. The cellular basis for neuronal versus glial determination in progenitors involves asymmetric partitioning of EGFR and TRα1, expression of which favor glio- and neuro-genesis, respectively. Moreover, EGFR(+) oligodendrocyte progenitors, but not neuroblasts, express high levels of a T3-inactivating deiodinase, Dio3. Thus, TRα absence with high levels of Dio3 provides double-pronged blockage of T3 action during glial lineage commitment. These findings not only transform our understanding of how T3 orchestrates adult brain lineage decisions, but also provide potential insight into demyelinating disorders.

  8. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Is Involved in Adult Mouse Hippocampal Neurogenesis After Stroke.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Minako; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Watanabe, Jun; Sugiyama, Koichi; Ohtaki, Hirokazu; Murai, Norimitsu; Sasaki, Shun; Xu, Zhifang; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Seki, Tamotsu; Miyazaki, Akira; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-06-01

    In the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus, neurogenesis persists throughout life and is upregulated following ischemia. Accumulating evidence suggests that enhanced neurogenesis stimulated by ischemic injury contributes to recovery after stroke. However, the mechanisms underlying the upregulation of neurogenesis are unclear. We have demonstrated that a neuropeptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), exerts a wide range of effects on neural stem cells (NSCs) during neural development. Here, we examined the effects of endogenous and exogenous PACAP in adult NSCs of the SGZ. Immunostaining showed expression of the PACAP receptor PAC1R in nestin-positive NSCs of adult naive mice. PACAP injection into the lateral ventricle increased bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive proliferative cells in the SGZ. These data suggest that PACAP promoted the proliferation of NSCs. In global ischemia model mice, the number of BrdU-positive cells was increased in wild-type mice but not in PACAP heterozygous knockout mice. The BrdU-positive cells that increased in number after ischemia were immunopositive for SOX2, a marker of NSCs, and differentiated into NeuN-positive mature neurons at 4 weeks after ischemia. These findings suggest that PACAP contributes to the proliferation of NSCs and may be associated with recovery after brain injury.

  9. Pancreas transplant imaging: how I do it.

    PubMed

    Tolat, Parag P; Foley, W Dennis; Johnson, Christopher; Hohenwalter, Mark D; Quiroz, Francisco A

    2015-04-01

    Pancreas transplantation aims to restore physiologic normoglycemia in diabetic patients with glomerulopathy and avoid or delay the onset of diabetic retinopathy and arteriopathy. Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is the most common approach, using a cadaveric pancreas donation in conjunction with either cadaveric or live donor renal transplant. Alternative techniques include pancreas after kidney transplant, in which the pancreas transplant is performed some years after renal transplant. Pancreas transplant alone is utilized rarely in diabetic patients with compensated renal function. Pancreas grafts have vascular and enteric connections that vary in their anatomic approach, and understanding of this is critical for imaging with ultrasonography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging techniques are directed to display the pancreatic transplant arterial and venous vasculature, parenchyma, and intestinal drainage pathway. Critical vascular information includes venous thrombosis (partial or complete), arterial occlusion, or aneurysm. Parenchymal abnormalities are nonspecific and occur in pancreatitis, graft rejection, and subsequent graft ischemia. Peripancreatic fluid collections include hematoma/seroma, pseudocyst, and abscess. The latter two are related to pancreatitis, duct disruption, or leak from the duodenojejunostomy. An understanding of transplant anatomy and complications will lead to appropriate use of imaging techniques to diagnose or exclude important complications.

  10. Immediate retransplantation for pancreas allograft thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, E F; Powelson, J A; Mangus, R S; Kazimi, M M; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Fridell, J A

    2009-04-01

    Early pancreas allograft failure most commonly results from thrombosis and requires immediate allograft pancreatectomy. Optimal timing for retransplantation remains undefined. Immediate retransplantation facilitates reuse of the same anatomic site before extensive adhesions have formed. Some studies suggest that early retransplantation is associated with a higher incidence of graft loss. This study is a retrospective review of immediate pancreas retransplants performed at a single center. All cases of pancreas allograft loss within 2 weeks were examined. Of 228 pancreas transplants, 12 grafts were lost within 2 weeks of surgery. Eleven of these underwent allograft pancreatectomy for thrombosis. One suffered anoxic brain injury and was not a retransplantation candidate, one was retransplanted at 3.5 months and nine patients underwent retransplantation 1-16 days following the original transplant. Of the nine early retransplants, one pancreas was lost to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, one recipient died with function at 2.9 years and the other grafts continue to function at 76-1137 days (mean 572 days). One-year graft survival for early retransplantation was 89% compared to 91% for all pancreas transplants at our center. Immediate retransplantation following pancreatic graft thrombosis restores durable allograft function with outcomes comparable to first-time pancreas transplantation.

  11. Morphometric Study of Pancreas in Human Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Dhende, Abhijeet S.; Joshi, Deepak S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The pancreas arises from the endoderm as a dorsal and a ventral bud which fuse together to form the single organ. It extends transversely across the posterior abdominal wall from the duodenum to the spleen. Functionally, it is endocrine and exocrine. Aim This study was undertaken to study the morphometry of human pancreas at different gestational age groups of normal, still born fetuses. Materials and Methods Forty aborted human fetuses (25 male and 15 female) of 12-40 weeks gestational age with no obvious congenital abnormality were obtained. The fetuses were dissected and pancreas was removed. The length and weight of the pancreas as well as height of its head were noted. Results It was observed that there was increase in body weight and crown rump length with increasing gestational age. The average length of pancreas was 1.80 cm in 12th week and 4.70 cm in 40th week of gestation. The average height of pancreas head was 0.80 cm in the 12th and 2.70 cm in 40th week of gestation. Conclusion The knowledge of development of pancreas helps in planning new therapeutic interventions in the treatment of various congenital and functional pancreatic anomalies. PMID:28050352

  12. [Aspiration biopsy of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Pérez Catzín, F; Gutiérrez Samperio, C; Valenzuela Tamariz, J

    1979-01-01

    Biopsy of the pancreas frequently is followed by complications, this is why the transoperative aspiration biopsy has been recomended. During the last 2 years we used this procedure in 46 patients; in each case, one or several aspirations were done in the more-representative area of the pancreatic pathology. With the aspirated material a smear was fixed and treated with H-E stain. Biopsy was negative for carcinoma in 30 patients (65.2%), positive in 12 (26.0%), insuficient material results in other 4 (8.6%) we consider that the procedure was useful in the 82.6% of the cases and help to elect more adecuate surgical tecnic. There were no complications and we concluded that this is not a harmful procedure. The correct interpretation of the citology depends on the experience of the pathologyst with this method, to increase the percentage of correct diagnosis.

  13. Glucagon in the Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of glucagon, in conjunction with insulin, in a dual chamber pump (artificial pancreas, AP) is a working goal for multiple companies and researchers. However, capital investment to create, operate, and maintain facilities with sufficient scale to produce enough glucagon to treat millions of patients, at a level of profit that makes it feasible, will be substantial. It can be assumed that the marketplace will expect the daily cost of glucagon (to the consumer) to be similar to the daily cost of insulin. After one subtracts wholesaler and pharmacy markup, there may be very few dollars remaining for the drug company to cover profit, capital expenditures, marketing, burden, and other costs. Without the potential for adequate margins, manufacturers may not be willing to take the risk. Assuming that the projections discussed in this article are in the right ballpark, advance planning for the supply for glucagon needs to start today and not wait for the AP to come to market. PMID:25139825

  14. Robotic surgery of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Daniel; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery is one of the most challenging and complex fields in general surgery. While minimally invasive surgery has become the standard of care for many intra-abdominal pathologies the overwhelming majority of pancreatic surgery is performed in an open fashion. This is attributed to the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas, its intimate relationship to major vasculature and the complexity of reconstruction in the case of pancreatoduodenectomy. Herein, we describe the application of robotic technology to minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. The unique capabilities of the robotic platform have made the minimally invasive approach feasible and safe with equivalent if not better outcomes (e.g., decreased length of stay, less surgical site infections) to conventional open surgery. However, it is unclear whether the robotic approach is truly superior to traditional laparoscopy; this is a key point given the substantial costs associated with procuring and maintaining robotic capabilities. PMID:25356035

  15. Robotic surgery of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Daniel; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-10-28

    Pancreatic surgery is one of the most challenging and complex fields in general surgery. While minimally invasive surgery has become the standard of care for many intra-abdominal pathologies the overwhelming majority of pancreatic surgery is performed in an open fashion. This is attributed to the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas, its intimate relationship to major vasculature and the complexity of reconstruction in the case of pancreatoduodenectomy. Herein, we describe the application of robotic technology to minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. The unique capabilities of the robotic platform have made the minimally invasive approach feasible and safe with equivalent if not better outcomes (e.g., decreased length of stay, less surgical site infections) to conventional open surgery. However, it is unclear whether the robotic approach is truly superior to traditional laparoscopy; this is a key point given the substantial costs associated with procuring and maintaining robotic capabilities.

  16. Decreasing maternal myostatin programs adult offspring bone strength in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Oestreich, Arin K.; Kamp, William M.; McCray, Marcus G.; Carleton, Stephanie M.; Karasseva, Natalia; Lenz, Kristin L.; Jeong, Youngjae; Daghlas, Salah A.; Yao, Xiaomei; Wang, Yong; Pfeiffer, Ferris M.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Schulz, Laura C.; Phillips, Charlotte L.

    2016-01-01

    During fetal development, the uterine environment can have effects on offspring bone architecture and integrity that persist into adulthood; however, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Myostatin is a negative regulator of muscle mass. Parental myostatin deficiency (Mstntm1Sjl/+) increases muscle mass in wild-type offspring, suggesting an intrauterine programming effect. Here, we hypothesized that Mstntm1Sjl/+ dams would also confer increased bone strength. In wild-type offspring, maternal myostatin deficiency altered fetal growth and calvarial collagen content of newborn mice and conferred a lasting impact on bone geometry and biomechanical integrity of offspring at 4 mo of age, the age of peak bone mass. Second, we sought to apply maternal myostatin deficiency to a mouse model with osteogenesis imperfecta (Col1a2oim), a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by abnormalities in the structure and/or synthesis of type I collagen. Femora of male Col1a2oim/+ offspring from natural mating of Mstntm1Sjl/+ dams to Col1a2oim/+sires had a 15% increase in torsional ultimate strength, a 29% increase in tensile strength, and a 24% increase in energy to failure compared with age, sex, and genotype-matched offspring from natural mating of Col1a2oim/+ dams to Col1a2oim/+ sires. Finally, increased bone biomechanical strength of Col1a2oim/+ offspring that had been transferred into Mstntm1Sjl/+ dams as blastocysts demonstrated that the effects of maternal myostatin deficiency were conferred by the postimplantation environment. Thus, targeting the gestational environment, and specifically prenatal myostatin pathways, provides a potential therapeutic window and an approach for treating osteogenesis imperfecta. PMID:27821779

  17. Lens injury stimulates adult mouse retinal ganglion cell axon regeneration via both macrophage- and lens-derived factors.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Barbara; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann

    2005-04-01

    In the present study the effects of lens injury on retinal ganglion cell axon/neurite re-growth were investigated in adult mice. In vivo, lens injury promoted successful regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons past the optic nerve lesion site, concomitant with the invasion of macrophages into the eye and the presence of activated retinal astrocytes/Muller cells. In vitro, retinal ganglion cells from lens-lesioned mice grew significantly longer neurites than those from intact mice, which correlated with the presence of enhanced numbers of activated retinal astrocytes/Muller cells. Co-culture of retinal ganglion cells from intact mice with macrophage-rich lesioned lens/vitreous body led to increased neurite lengths compared with co-culture with macrophage-free intact lens/vitreous body, pointing to a neurotrophic effect of macrophages. Furthermore, retinal ganglion cells from mice that had no lens injury but had received intravitreal Zymosan injections to stimulate macrophage invasion into the eye grew significantly longer neurites compared with controls, as did retinal ganglion cells from intact mice co-cultured with macrophage-rich vitreous body from Zymosan-treated mice. The intact lens, but not the intact vitreous body, exerted a neurotrophic effect on retinal ganglion cell neurite outgrowth, suggesting that lens-derived neurotrophic factor(s) conspire with those derived from macrophages in lens injury-stimulated axon regeneration. Together, these results show that lens injury promotes retinal ganglion cell axon regeneration/neurite outgrowth in adult mice, an observation with important implications for axon regeneration studies in transgenic mouse models.

  18. A new method for visualization of endothelial cells and extravascular leakage in adult mouse brain using fluorescein isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Seiji; Morita, Shoko

    2011-10-30

    We described a new method for the visualization of vasculature and endothelial cells and the assessment of extravascular leakage in adult mouse brain by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), or a reactive fluorescent dye. FITC is the fluorescein derivative that reacts covalently with amine groups at alkaline pH. In this method, strong fluorescence of FITC was seen at vasculature throughout the brain and spinal cord, when mice received intracardiac perfusion with FITC-containing saline at pH 7.0 followed by paraformaldehyde (PFA) fixative at pH 8.0. The fluorescence of FITC was faint when animals were fixed with PFA fixative at pH 7.0 after the perfusion of FITC-containing saline at pH 7.0. The fluorescence of FITC was not detected when mice was fixed with PFA fixative before the perfusion of FITC-containing saline. Double labeling immunohistochemistry using an endothelial cell marker CD31 or a pericyte marker desmin revealed that FITC was accumulated at nuclei of endothelial cells but not at those of pericytes. Extravascular leakage of FITC was prominent in the area postrema or a brain region of the circumventricular organs that lacks the blood-brain barrier. Moreover, strong extravascular leakage of FITC was detected at damaged sites of the cerebral cortex with cryoinjury. Thus, FITC method is useful technique for examining the architecture of brain vasculature and endothelial cells and the assessment of extravascular leakage in adult rodents. Moreover, FITC binds covalently to cellular components, so that makes it possible to perform double labeling immunohistochemistry and long-term storage of the preparation.

  19. Mouse maternal systemic inflammation at the zygote stage causes blunted cytokine responsiveness in lipopolysaccharide-challenged adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Williams, Charlotte L; Teeling, Jessica L; Perry, V Hugh; Fleming, Tom P

    2011-07-19

    The preimplantation embryo is sensitive to culture conditions in vitro and poor maternal diet in vivo. Such environmental perturbations can have long-lasting detrimental consequences for offspring health and physiology. However, early embryo susceptibility to other aspects of maternal health and their potential long-term influence into adulthood is relatively unexplored. In this study, we established an in vivo mouse model of maternal periconceptional systemic inflammation by intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration on the day of zygote formation and investigated the consequences into adulthood. In the short term, maternal LPS challenge induced a transient and typical maternal sickness response (elevated serum proinflammatory cytokines and hypoactive behaviour). Maternal LPS challenge altered preimplantation embryo morphogenesis and cell lineage allocation, resulting in reduced blastocyst inner cell mass (ICM) cell number and a reduced ICM:trophectoderm cell ratio. In the long term, diverse aspects of offspring physiology were affected by maternal LPS treatment. Whilst birthweight, growth and adult blood pressure were unaltered, reduced activity in an open-field behaviour test, increased fat pad:body weight ratio and increased body mass index were observed in male, but not female, offspring. Most importantly, the maternal LPS challenge caused corticosterone-independent blunting of the serum proinflammatory cytokine response to innate immune challenge in both male and female offspring. The suppressed state of innate immunity in challenged offspring was dose-dependent with respect to the maternal LPS concentration administered. These results demonstrate for the first time that the preimplantation embryo in vivo is sensitive to maternal systemic inflammation, with effects on blastocyst cell lineage allocation and consequences for behaviour, adiposity and innate immune response in adult offspring. Critically, we identify a novel mechanism mediated

  20. Cre recombinase-regulated Endothelin1 transgenic mouse lines: novel tools for analysis of embryonic and adult disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Andre L.P.; Clouthier, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (EDN1) influences both craniofacial and cardiovascular development and a number of adult physiological conditions by binding to one or both of the known endothelin receptors, thus initiating multiple signaling cascades. Animal models containing both conventional and conditional loss of the Edn1 gene have been used to dissect EDN1 function in both embryos and adults. However, while transgenic Edn1 over-expression or targeted genomic insertion of Edn1 has been performed to understand how elevated levels of Edn1 result in or exacerbate disease states, an animal model in which Edn1 over-expression can be achieved in a spatiotemporal-specific manner has not been reported. Here we describe the creation of Edn1 conditional over-expression transgenic mouse lines in which the chicken β-actin promoter and an Edn1 cDNA are separated by a strong stop sequence flanked by loxP sites. In the presence of Cre, the stop cassette is removed, leading to Edn1 expression. Using the Wnt1-Cre strain, in which Cre expression is targeted to the Wnt1-expressing domain of the central nervous system (CNS) from which neural crest cells (NCCs) arise, we show that stable CBA-Edn1 transgenic lines with varying EDN1 protein levels develop defects in NCC-derived tissues of the face, though the severity differs between lines. We also show that Edn1 expression can be achieved in other embryonic tissues utilizing other Cre strains, with this expression also resulting in developmental defects. CBA-Edn1 transgenic mice will be useful in investigating diverse aspects of EDN1-mediated-development and disease, including understanding how NCCs achieve and maintain a positional and functional identity and how aberrant EDN1 levels can lead to multiple physiological changes and diseases. PMID:25725491

  1. What You Need to Know about Cancer of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Need To Know About™ Cancer of the Pancreas This booklet is about cancer of the pancreas, also called pancreatic cancer. There are two main ... care. This booklet covers: The anatomy of the pancreas and basics about cancer of the pancreas Treatments ...

  2. Build a better mouse: directly-observed issues in computer use for adults with SMI.

    PubMed

    Black, Anne C; Serowik, Kristin L; Schensul, Jean J; Bowen, Anne M; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-03-01

    Integrating information technology into healthcare has the potential to bring treatment to hard-to-reach people. Individuals with serious mental illness (SMI), however, may derive limited benefit from these advances in care because of lack of computer ownership and experience. To date, conclusions about the computer skills and attitudes of adults with SMI have been based primarily on self-report. In the current study, 28 psychiatric outpatients with co-occurring cocaine use were interviewed about their computer use and opinions, and 25 were then directly observed using task analysis and think aloud methods as they navigated a multi-component health informational website. Participants reported low rates of computer ownership and use, and negative attitudes towards computers. Self-reported computer skills were higher than demonstrated in the task analysis. However, some participants spontaneously expressed more positive attitudes and greater computer self-efficacy after navigating the website. Implications for increasing access to computer-based health information are discussed.

  3. Hyper sensitive protein detection by Tandem-HTRF reveals Cyclin D1 dynamics in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Alexandre; Champagne, Julien; Auzemery, Baptiste; Fuentes, Ivanna; Maurel, Benjamin; Bienvenu, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We present here a novel method for the semi-quantitative detection of low abundance proteins in solution that is both fast and simple. It is based on Homogenous Time Resolved Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (HTRF), between a lanthanide labeled donor antibody and a d2 or XL665 labeled acceptor antibody that are both raised against different epitopes of the same target. This novel approach we termed “Tandem-HTRF”, can specifically reveal rare polypeptides from only a few microliters of cellular lysate within one hour in a 384-well plate format. Using this sensitive approach, we observed surprisingly that the core cell cycle regulator Cyclin D1 is sustained in fully developed adult organs and harbors an unexpected expression pattern affected by environmental challenge. Thus our method, Tandem-HTRF offers a promising way to investigate subtle variations in the dynamics of sparse proteins from limited biological material. PMID:26503526

  4. Multiple Retinal Axons Converge onto Relay Cells in the Adult Mouse Thalamus.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Sarah; Monavarfeshani, Aboozar; Lemon, Tyler; Su, Jianmin; Fox, Michael Andrew

    2015-09-08

    Activity-dependent refinement of neural circuits is a fundamental principle of neural development. This process has been well studied at retinogeniculate synapses-synapses that form between retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and relay cells within the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. Physiological studies suggest that shortly after birth, inputs from ∼20 RGCs converge onto relay cells. Subsequently, all but just one to two of these inputs are eliminated. Despite widespread acceptance, this notion is at odds with ultrastructural studies showing numerous retinal terminals clustering onto relay cell dendrites in the adult. Here, we explored this discrepancy using brainbow AAVs and serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM). Results with both approaches demonstrate that terminals from numerous RGCs cluster onto relay cell dendrites, challenging the notion that only one to two RGCs innervate each relay cell. These findings force us to re-evaluate our understanding of subcortical visual circuitry.

  5. Synaptic pathology and therapeutic repair in adult retinoschisis mouse by AAV-RS1 transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Jingxing; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Ziccardi, Lucia; Chen, Shan; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Pope, Jodie G.; Bush, Ronald A.; Wu, Zhijian; Li, Wei; Sieving, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Strategies aimed at invoking synaptic plasticity have therapeutic potential for several neurological conditions. The human retinal synaptic disease X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is characterized by impaired visual signal transmission through the retina and progressive visual acuity loss, and mice lacking retinoschisin (RS1) recapitulate human disease. Here, we demonstrate that restoration of RS1 via retina-specific delivery of adeno-associated virus type 8-RS1 (AAV8-RS1) vector rescues molecular pathology at the photoreceptor–depolarizing bipolar cell (photoreceptor-DBC) synapse and restores function in adult Rs1-KO animals. Initial development of the photoreceptor-DBC synapse was normal in the Rs1-KO retina; however, the metabotropic glutamate receptor 6/transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily M member 1–signaling (mGluR6/TRPM1-signaling) cascade was not properly maintained. Specifically, the TRPM1 channel and G proteins Gαo, Gβ5, and RGS11 were progressively lost from postsynaptic DBC dendritic tips, whereas the mGluR6 receptor and RGS7 maintained proper synaptic position. This postsynaptic disruption differed from other murine night-blindness models with an electronegative electroretinogram response, which is also characteristic of murine and human XLRS disease. Upon AAV8-RS1 gene transfer to the retina of adult XLRS mice, TRPM1 and the signaling molecules returned to their proper dendritic tip location, and the DBC resting membrane potential was restored. These findings provide insight into the molecular plasticity of a critical synapse in the visual system and demonstrate potential therapeutic avenues for some diseases involving synaptic pathology. PMID:26098217

  6. Gestational ketogenic diet programs brain structure and susceptibility to depression & anxiety in the adult mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Dafna; Germann, Jurgen; Henkelman, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) has seen an increase in popularity for clinical and non-clinical purposes, leading to rise in concern about the diet's impact on following generations. The KD is known to have a neurological effect, suggesting that exposure to it during prenatal brain development may alter neuro-anatomy. Studies have also indicated that the KD has an anti-depressant effect on the consumer. However, it is unclear whether any neuro-anatomical and/or behavioral changes would occur in the offspring and persist into adulthood. To fill this knowledge gap we assessed the brain morphology and behavior of 8-week-old young-adult CD-1 mice, who were exposed to the KD in utero, and were fed only a standard-diet (SD) in postnatal life. Standardized neuro-behavior tests included the Open-Field, Forced-Swim, and Exercise Wheel tests, and were followed by post-mortem Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to assess brain anatomy. The adult KD offspring exhibit reduced susceptibility to anxiety and depression, and elevated physical activity level when compared with controls exposed to the SD both in utero and postnatally. Many neuro-anatomical differences exist between the KD offspring and controls, including, for example, a cerebellar volumetric enlargement by 4.8%, a hypothalamic reduction by 1.39%, and a corpus callosum reduction by 4.77%, as computed relative to total brain volume. These results suggest that prenatal exposure to the KD programs the offspring neuro-anatomy and influences their behavior in adulthood.

  7. Gestational ketogenic diet programs brain structure and susceptibility to depression & anxiety in the adult mouse offspring

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Dafna; Germann, Jurgen; Henkelman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The ketogenic diet (KD) has seen an increase in popularity for clinical and non-clinical purposes, leading to rise in concern about the diet's impact on following generations. The KD is known to have a neurological effect, suggesting that exposure to it during prenatal brain development may alter neuro-anatomy. Studies have also indicated that the KD has an anti-depressant effect on the consumer. However, it is unclear whether any neuro-anatomical and/or behavioral changes would occur in the offspring and persist into adulthood. Methods To fill this knowledge gap we assessed the brain morphology and behavior of 8-week-old young-adult CD-1 mice, who were exposed to the KD in utero, and were fed only a standard-diet (SD) in postnatal life. Standardized neuro-behavior tests included the Open-Field, Forced-Swim, and Exercise Wheel tests, and were followed by post-mortem Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to assess brain anatomy. Results The adult KD offspring exhibit reduced susceptibility to anxiety and depression, and elevated physical activity level when compared with controls exposed to the SD both in utero and postnatally. Many neuro-anatomical differences exist between the KD offspring and controls, including, for example, a cerebellar volumetric enlargement by 4.8%, a hypothalamic reduction by 1.39%, and a corpus callosum reduction by 4.77%, as computed relative to total brain volume. Conclusions These results suggest that prenatal exposure to the KD programs the offspring neuro-anatomy and influences their behavior in adulthood. PMID:25642385

  8. Cyclohexane produces behavioral deficits associated with astrogliosis and microglial reactivity in the adult hippocampus mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Campos-Ordonez, Tania; Zarate-Lopez, David; Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y; Moy-Lopez, Norma; Guzman-Muniz, Jorge; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2015-05-01

    Cyclohexane is a volatile substance that has been utilized as a safe substitute of several organic solvents in diverse industrial processes, such as adhesives, paints, paint thinners, fingernail polish, lacquers, and rubber industry. A number of these commercial products are ordinarily used as inhaled drugs. However, it is not well known whether cyclohexane has noxious effects in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of cyclohexane inhalation on motor behavior, spatial memory, and reactive gliosis in the hippocampus of adult mice. We used a model that mimics recreational drug use in male Balb/C mice (P60), divided into two groups: controls and the cyclohexane group (exposed to 9,000 ppm of cyclohexane for 30 days). Both groups were then evaluated with a functional observational battery (FOB) and the Morris water maze (MWM). Furthermore, the relative expression of AP endonuclease 1 (APE1), and the number of astrocytes (GFAP+ cells) and microglia (Iba1+ cells) were quantified in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Our findings indicated that cyclohexane produced severe functional deficits during a recreational exposure as assessed by the FOB. The MWM did not show statistically significant changes in the acquisition and retention of spatial memory. Remarkably, a significant increase in the number of astrocytes and microglia cells, as well as in the cytoplasmic processes of these cells were observed in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas of cyclohexane-exposed mice. This cellular response was associated with an increase in the expression of APE1 in the same brain regions. In summary, cyclohexane exposure produces functional deficits that are associated with an important increase in the APE1 expression as well as the number of astrocytes and microglia cells and their cytoplasmic complexity in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the adult hippocampus.

  9. Santorinirrhage: hemosuccus pancreaticus in pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Iglesias, J L; Durana, J A; Yañez, J; Rodriguez, H; Garcia-Vallejo, L; Arnal, F

    1988-08-01

    We describe a previously unreported complication of pancreas divisum: severe and repeated episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding through the main pancreatic duct (hemosuccus pancreaticus) in a 34-yr-old woman over a period of 10 months. She had negative investigations, including a blank laparotomy, until an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a pancreas divisum with chronic pancreatitis and a small pseudocyst at the tail of the dorsal pancreas. During the procedure, bleeding through the papilla minor was observed coming from Santorini's duct. A corporocaudal pancreatectomy was done and the bleeding episodes have subsided.

  10. Adenosine 5' triphosphate evoked mobilization of intracellular calcium in central nervous system white matter of adult mouse optic nerve.

    PubMed

    James, G; Butt, A M

    1999-06-11

    Although it has been established that immature glial cells express functional purinergic receptors, the responsiveness of mature glial cells in vivo had not been elucidated. This question was addressed using fura-2 ratiometric measurements of [Ca2+]i in the adult mouse optic nerve, a central nervous system (CNS) white matter tract, taking advantage of the facts that (i), the optic nerve contains glial cells but not neurons and (ii), that fura-2 loads primarily astrocytes in isolated intact optic nerves. We show that adenosine 5' triphosphate (ATP) evoked an increase in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-maximal effect at 3 microm ATP, and with a rank order of agonist potency of ATP > ADP > alpha,beta-methyline-ATP > UDP > adenosine. The results indicate mainly P2Y and P2X components, consistent with the in vitro astroglial purinergic receptor profile. The in vivo response of mature glia to ATP may be important in their response to CNS damage.

  11. Biodegradation of the ZnO:Eu nanoparticles in the tissues of adult mouse after alimentary application.

    PubMed

    Kielbik, Paula; Kaszewski, Jaroslaw; Rosowska, Julita; Wolska, Ewelina; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S; Gralak, Mikolaj A; Gajewski, Zdzisław; Godlewski, Marek; Godlewski, Michal M

    2016-11-21

    Biodegradable zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are considered promising materials for future biomedical applications. To fulfil this potential, biodistribution and elimination patterns of ZnO NPs in the living organism need to be resolved. In order to investigate gastrointestinal absorption of ZnO NPs and their intra-organism distribution, water suspension of ZnO or fluorescent ZnO:Eu (Europium-doped zinc oxide) NPs (10mg/ml; 0.3ml/mouse) was alimentary-administered (IG: intra-gastric) to adult mice. Internal organs collected at key time-points after IG were evaluated by AAS for Zn concentration and analysed by cytometric techniques. We found that Zn-based NPs were readily absorbed and distributed (3 h post IG) in the nanoparticle form throughout the organism. Results suggest, that liver and kidneys were key organs responsible for NPs elimination, while accumulation was observed in the spleen and adipose tissues. We also showed that ZnO/ZnO:Eu NPs were able to cross majority of biological barriers in the organism (including blood-brain-barrier).

  12. Induced neural stem cells achieve long-term survival and functional integration in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hemmer, Kathrin; Zhang, Mingyue; van Wüllen, Thea; Sakalem, Marna; Tapia, Natalia; Baumuratov, Aidos; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Schöler, Hans R; Zhang, Weiqi; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2014-09-09

    Differentiated cells can be converted directly into multipotent neural stem cells (i.e., induced neural stem cells [iNSCs]). iNSCs offer an attractive alternative to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology with regard to regenerative therapies. Here, we show an in vivo long-term analysis of transplanted iNSCs in the adult mouse brain. iNSCs showed sound in vivo long-term survival rates without graft overgrowths. The cells displayed a neural multilineage potential with a clear bias toward astrocytes and a permanent downregulation of progenitor and cell-cycle markers, indicating that iNSCs are not predisposed to tumor formation. Furthermore, the formation of synaptic connections as well as neuronal and glial electrophysiological properties demonstrated that differentiated iNSCs migrated, functionally integrated, and interacted with the existing neuronal circuitry. We conclude that iNSC long-term transplantation is a safe procedure; moreover, it might represent an interesting tool for future personalized regenerative applications.

  13. Interneuron precursor transplants in adult hippocampus reverse psychosis-relevant features in a mouse model of hippocampal disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Ahmed I; Chohan, Muhammad O; Inan, Melis; Schobel, Scott A; Chaudhury, Nashid H; Paskewitz, Samuel; Chuhma, Nao; Glickstein, Sara; Merker, Robert J; Xu, Qing; Small, Scott A; Anderson, Stewart A; Ross, Margaret Elizabeth; Moore, Holly

    2014-05-20

    GABAergic interneuron hypofunction is hypothesized to underlie hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenia. Here, we use the cyclin D2 knockout (Ccnd2(-/-)) mouse model to test potential links between hippocampal interneuron deficits and psychosis-relevant neurobehavioral phenotypes. Ccnd2(-/-) mice show cortical PV(+) interneuron reductions, prominently in hippocampus, associated with deficits in synaptic inhibition, increased in vivo spike activity of projection neurons, and increased in vivo basal metabolic activity (assessed with fMRI) in hippocampus. Ccnd2(-/-) mice show several neurophysiological and behavioral phenotypes that would be predicted to be produced by hippocampal disinhibition, including increased ventral tegmental area dopamine neuron population activity, behavioral hyperresponsiveness to amphetamine, and impairments in hippocampus-dependent cognition. Remarkably, transplantation of cells from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (the major origin of cerebral cortical interneurons) into the adult Ccnd2(-/-) caudoventral hippocampus reverses these psychosis-relevant phenotypes. Surviving neurons from these transplants are 97% GABAergic and widely distributed within the hippocampus. Up to 6 mo after the transplants, in vivo hippocampal metabolic activity is lowered, context-dependent learning and memory is improved, and dopamine neuron activity and the behavioral response to amphetamine are normalized. These findings establish functional links between hippocampal GABA interneuron deficits and psychosis-relevant dopaminergic and cognitive phenotypes, and support a rationale for targeting limbic cortical interneuron function in the prevention and treatment of schizophrenia.

  14. Astrocytic adaptation during cerebral angiogenesis follows the new vessel formation induced through chronic hypoxia in adult mouse cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kanno, Iwao

    2014-03-01

    We examined longitudinal changes of the neuro-glia-vascular unit during cerebral angiogenesis induced through chronic hypoxia in the adult mouse cortex. Tie2-GFP mice in which the vascular endothelial cells expressed green fluorescent proteins (GFP) were exposed to chronic hypoxia, while the spatiotemporal developments of the cortical capillary sprouts and the neighboring astrocytic remodeling were characterized with repeated two-photon microscopy. The capillary sprouts appeared at early phases of the hypoxia adaptation (1-2 weeks), while the morphological changes of the astrocytic soma and processes were not detected in this phase. In the later phases of the hypoxia adaptation (> 2 weeks), the capillary sprouts created a new connection with existing capillaries, and its neighboring astrocytes extended their processes to the newly-formed vessels. The findings show that morphological adaptation of the astrocytes follow the capillary development during the hypoxia adaptation, which indicate that the newly-formed vessels provoke cellular interactions with the neighboring astrocytes to strengthen the functional blood-brain barrier.

  15. Morphological and behavioural changes occur following the X-ray irradiation of the adult mouse olfactory neuroepithelium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The olfactory neuroepithelium lines the upper nasal cavity and is in direct contact with the external environment and the olfactory bulbs. The ability to self-renew throughout life and the reproducible recovery after injury, make it a model tissue to study mechanisms underlying neurogenesis. In this study, X-rays were used to disrupt proliferating olfactory stem cell populations and to assess their role in the cellular and morphological changes involved in olfactory neurogenic processes. Results We have analysed the histological and functional effects of a sub-lethal dose of X-rays on the adult mouse olfactory neuroepithelium at 2 hours, 24 hours, 1 week, 2 weeks and 5 weeks. We have shown an immediate cessation of proliferating olfactory stem cells as shown by BrdU, Ki67 and pH3 expression. At 24 hours there was an increase in the neural transcription factors Mash1 and Pax6 expression, and a disruption of the basal lamina and increase in glandular cell marker expression at 1 week post-irradiation. Coincident with these changes was an impairment of the olfactory function in vivo. Conclusions We have shown significant changes in basal cell proliferation as well as morphological changes in the olfactory neuroepithelium following X-ray irradiation. There is involvement of the basal lamina as well as a clear role for glandular and sustentacular cells. PMID:23113950

  16. Short-Term Regulation of Excitation-Contraction Coupling by the β1a Subunit in Adult Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    García, María C.; Carrillo, Elba; Galindo, José M.; Hernández, Ascensión; Copello, Julio A.; Fill, Michael; Sánchez, Jorge A.

    2005-01-01

    The β1a subunit of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated Ca2+ channel plays a fundamental role in the targeting of the channel to the tubular system as well as in channel function. To determine whether this cytosolic auxiliary subunit is also a regulatory protein of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vivo, we pressure-injected the β1a subunit into intact adult mouse muscle fibers and recorded, with Fluo-3 AM, the intracellular Ca2+ signal induced by the action potential. We found that the β1a subunit significantly increased, within minutes, the amplitude of Ca2+ release without major changes in its time course. β1a subunits with the carboxy-terminus region deleted did not show an effect on Ca2+ release. The possibility that potentiation of Ca2+ release is due to a direct interaction between the β1a subunit and the ryanodine receptor was ruled out by bilayer experiments of RyR1 single-channel currents and also by Ca2+ flux experiments. Our data suggest that the β1a subunit is capable of regulating E-C coupling in the short term and that the integrity of the carboxy-terminus region is essential for its modulatory effect. PMID:16183888

  17. MODERATE PERINATAL ARSENIC EXPOSURE ALTERS NEUROENDOCRINE MARKERS ASSOCIATED WITH DEPRESSION AND INCREASES DEPRESSIVE-LIKE BEHAVIORS IN ADULT MOUSE OFFSPRING

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ebany J.; Kolb, Bethany L.; Bell, Angela; Savage, Daniel D.; Allan, Andrea M.

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic is one of the most common heavy metal contaminants found in the environment, particularly in water. We examined the impact of perinatal exposure to relatively low levels of arsenic (50 parts per billion) on neuroendocrine markers associated with depression and depressive-like behaviors in affected adult C57BL/6J mouse offspring. Whereas most biomedical research on arsenic has focused on its carcinogenic potential, a few studies suggest that arsenic can adversely affect brain development and neural function. Compared to controls, offspring exposed to 50 parts per billion arsenic during the perinatal period had significantly elevated serum corticosterone levels, reduced whole hippocampal CRFR1 protein level and elevated dorsal hippocampal serotonin 5HT1A receptor binding and receptor-effector coupling. 5HT1A receptor binding and receptor-effector coupling were not different in the ventral hippocampal formation, entorhinal or parietal cortices, or inferior colliculus. Perinatal arsenic exposure also significantly increased learned helplessness and measures of immobility in a forced swim task. Taken together, these results suggest that perinatal arsenic exposure may disrupt the regulatory interactions between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the serotonergic system in the dorsal hippocampal formation in a manner that predisposes affected offspring to depressive-like behavior. These results are the first to demonstrate that relatively low levels of arsenic exposure during development can have long-lasting adverse effects on behavior and neurobiological markers associated with these behavioral changes. PMID:18573533

  18. Morphometric analysis of axons myelinated during adult life in the mouse superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Little, G J; Heath, J W

    1994-01-01

    In experimental studies addressing the regulation of myelin formation and maintenance by Schwann cells, the sympathetic nervous system of young adult rodents has served a key role as an essentially nonmyelinated yet modifiable control tissue. Nevertheless there is clear evidence of substantial myelination in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) of normal mice and rats of more advanced age. Against this background, interpretation of experimental outcomes in particular sympathetic tissues will require detailed quantitative control data taking account of animal age. To provide a baseline for future investigations on myelin remodelling, an ultrastructural morphometric study of myelinated fibres in the SCG was undertaken in 4 strains (QS, Balb/C, C57 and CBA) of adult male mice aged 32-72 wk. Numbers of myelinated fibres in SCG cross-sections varied substantially between individual animals, and the mean numbers for QS (132), Balb/C (165) and CBA (254) were significantly higher than that for C57 (32). Both axonal and fibre diameter were distributed unimodally (means for the 4 strains ranged from 2.3-2.4 microns and 3.2-3.6 microns respectively). Myelin spiral length was distributed unimodally and skewed to the right (range of means = 227-357 microns) and was significantly greater in QS mice as compared with the other 3 strains. While the mean g ratio (axonal diameter/fibre diameter) was significantly lower in QS mice than in the other 3 strains, the range for mean g ratio was 0.64-0.73, indicating that myelination had proceeded appropriately even though late in onset in this tissue. The index of circularity was high in all strains, both for axons (range of means = 0.80-0.88) and fibres (range of means = 0.84-0.89). The small axonal and fibre diameter and unimodal distribution are consistent with the characteristics of autonomic myelinated fibres and it is probable that most are postganglionic sympathetic fibres arising within the SCG. In terms of providing a sufficient

  19. Build a Better Mouse: Directly-Observed Issues in Computer Use for Adults with SMI

    PubMed Central

    Black, Anne C.; Serowik, Kristin L.; Schensul, Jean J.; Bowen, Anne M.; Rosen, Marc I.

    2014-01-01

    Integrating information technology into healthcare has the potential to bring treatment to hard-to-reach people. Individuals with serious mental illness (SMI), however, may derive limited benefit from these advances in care because of lack of computer ownership and experience. To date, conclusions about the computer skills and attitudes of adults with SMI have been based primarily on self-report. In the current study, 28 psychiatric outpatients with co-occurring cocaine use were interviewed about their computer use and opinions, and 25 were then directly observed using task analysis and think aloud methods as they navigated a multi-component health informational website. Participants reported low rates of computer ownership and use, and negative attitudes towards computers. Self-reported computer skills were higher than demonstrated in the task analysis. However, some participants spontaneously expressed more positive attitudes and greater computer self-efficacy after navigating the website. Implications for increasing access to computer-based health information are discussed. PMID:22711454

  20. Plasticity of Astrocytic Coverage and Glutamate Transporter Expression in Adult Mouse Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Pascal; Hirling, Harald; Welker, Egbert; Knott, Graham W

    2006-01-01

    Astrocytes play a major role in the removal of glutamate from the extracellular compartment. This clearance limits the glutamate receptor activation and affects the synaptic response. This function of the astrocyte is dependent on its positioning around the synapse, as well as on the level of expression of its high-affinity glutamate transporters, GLT1 and GLAST. Using Western blot analysis and serial section electron microscopy, we studied how a change in sensory activity affected these parameters in the adult cortex. Using mice, we found that 24 h of whisker stimulation elicited a 2-fold increase in the expression of GLT1 and GLAST in the corresponding cortical column of the barrel cortex. This returns to basal levels 4 d after the stimulation was stopped, whereas the expression of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 remained unaltered throughout. Ultrastructural analysis from the same region showed that sensory stimulation also causes a significant increase in the astrocytic envelopment of excitatory synapses on dendritic spines. We conclude that a period of modified neuronal activity and synaptic release of glutamate leads to an increased astrocytic coverage of the bouton–spine interface and an increase in glutamate transporter expression in astrocytic processes. PMID:17048987

  1. Generation of hyaline cartilaginous tissue from mouse adult dermal fibroblast culture by defined factors

    PubMed Central

    Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Sasagawa, Satoru; Outani, Hidetatsu; Nakagawa, Kanako; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2011-01-01

    Repair of cartilage injury with hyaline cartilage continues to be a challenging clinical problem. Because of the limited number of chondrocytes in vivo, coupled with in vitro de-differentiation of chondrocytes into fibrochondrocytes, which secrete type I collagen and have an altered matrix architecture and mechanical function, there is a need for a novel cell source that produces hyaline cartilage. The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided a tool for reprogramming dermal fibroblasts to an undifferentiated state by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Here, we show that retroviral expression of two reprogramming factors (c-Myc and Klf4) and one chondrogenic factor (SOX9) induces polygonal chondrogenic cells directly from adult dermal fibroblast cultures. Induced cells expressed marker genes for chondrocytes but not fibroblasts, i.e., the promoters of type I collagen genes were extensively methylated. Although some induced cell lines formed tumors when subcutaneously injected into nude mice, other induced cell lines generated stable homogenous hyaline cartilage–like tissue. Further, the doxycycline-inducible induction system demonstrated that induced cells are able to respond to chondrogenic medium by expressing endogenous Sox9 and maintain chondrogenic potential after substantial reduction of transgene expression. Thus, this approach could lead to the preparation of hyaline cartilage directly from skin, without generating iPS cells. PMID:21293062

  2. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive ability in a mouse model of intrastriatal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Meikui; Kang, Xiaoni; Jiang, Chen; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Pei; Li, Jingjing

    2015-07-10

    Thrombin released by hematoma is an important mediator of the secondary injury of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), however, the effect of thrombin on adult neurogenesis and cognitive ability remains elusive. In this study, intrastriatal injection of 0.05 U thrombin didn't affect the neurogenesis at the subgranular zone (SGZ), which was distal to the injection site. 0.1 U thrombin increased the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine(+) (BrdU(+), S-phase proliferating cells)/doublecortin(+) (DCX(+), immature neurons) double labelled neurons, but decreased BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) double labelled mature neurons. Higher doses of thrombin (1 U, 2 U, and 5 U) significantly decreased the BrdU(+)/DCX(+) and BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) double labelled cells. After 1 U thrombin injection, cell apoptosis was found at the dentate gyrus of hippocampus at 3-24 h, but not 5 d post-injury. Thrombin infusion (1 U) induced spatial memory deficits in Morris water maze test; whereas, hirudin, the thrombin antagonist, significantly reversed both neurogenesis loss and spatial learning and memory impairment. In conclusion, at least at short term (5 days) after striatum ICH, the effect of high dose of thrombin on neurogenesis of SGZ, and the spatial learning and memory ability, is detrimental.

  3. Ectopic Atoh1 expression drives Merkel cell production in embryonic, postnatal and adult mouse epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Stephen M.; Wright, Margaret C.; Bolock, Alexa M.; Geng, Xuehui; Maricich, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cells are mechanosensitive skin cells whose production requires the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Atoh1. We induced ectopic Atoh1 expression in the skin of transgenic mice to determine whether Atoh1 was sufficient to create additional Merkel cells. In embryos, ectopic Atoh1 expression drove ectopic expression of the Merkel cell marker keratin 8 (K8) throughout the epidermis. Epidermal Atoh1 induction in adolescent mice similarly drove widespread K8 expression in glabrous skin of the paws, but in the whisker pads and body skin ectopic K8+ cells were confined to hair follicles and absent from interfollicular regions. Ectopic K8+ cells acquired several characteristics of mature Merkel cells in a time frame similar to that seen during postnatal development of normal Merkel cells. Although ectopic K8+ cell numbers decreased over time, small numbers of these cells remained in deep regions of body skin hair follicles at 3 months post-induction. In adult mice, greater numbers of ectopic K8+ cells were created by Atoh1 induction during anagen versus telogen and following disruption of Notch signaling by conditional deletion of Rbpj in the epidermis. Our data demonstrate that Atoh1 expression is sufficient to produce new Merkel cells in the epidermis, that epidermal cell competency to respond to Atoh1 varies by skin location, developmental age and hair cycle stage, and that the Notch pathway plays a key role in limiting epidermal cell competency to respond to Atoh1 expression. PMID:26138479

  4. Ectopic Atoh1 expression drives Merkel cell production in embryonic, postnatal and adult mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Stephen M; Wright, Margaret C; Bolock, Alexa M; Geng, Xuehui; Maricich, Stephen M

    2015-07-15

    Merkel cells are mechanosensitive skin cells whose production requires the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Atoh1. We induced ectopic Atoh1 expression in the skin of transgenic mice to determine whether Atoh1 was sufficient to create additional Merkel cells. In embryos, ectopic Atoh1 expression drove ectopic expression of the Merkel cell marker keratin 8 (K8) throughout the epidermis. Epidermal Atoh1 induction in adolescent mice similarly drove widespread K8 expression in glabrous skin of the paws, but in the whisker pads and body skin ectopic K8+ cells were confined to hair follicles and absent from interfollicular regions. Ectopic K8+ cells acquired several characteristics of mature Merkel cells in a time frame similar to that seen during postnatal development of normal Merkel cells. Although ectopic K8+ cell numbers decreased over time, small numbers of these cells remained in deep regions of body skin hair follicles at 3 months post-induction. In adult mice, greater numbers of ectopic K8+ cells were created by Atoh1 induction during anagen versus telogen and following disruption of Notch signaling by conditional deletion of Rbpj in the epidermis. Our data demonstrate that Atoh1 expression is sufficient to produce new Merkel cells in the epidermis, that epidermal cell competency to respond to Atoh1 varies by skin location, developmental age and hair cycle stage, and that the Notch pathway plays a key role in limiting epidermal cell competency to respond to Atoh1 expression.

  5. ENDOCRINE FUNCTION OF THE SURGICALLY REDUCED PANCREAS

    PubMed Central

    Houssay, B. A.; Foglia, V. G.; Smyth, F. S.

    1941-01-01

    The pancreas reduced to 4 or 10 gm. weeks or months previously by partial resection, is able to maintain a normal glycemic level in dogs of about 10 kilos in good condition. When the pancreas is reduced to 4 gm. the capacity for secreting insulin under certain conditions of strain is diminished whereas a pancreas reduced to 10 gm. may have a normal or decreased capacity. This decreased functional capacity is shown: (1) by a longer hyperglycemic curve after the intravenous injection of 1 gm. of glucose per kilo; (2) by the requirement of smaller doses of extract of anterior hypophysis to produce diabetes; and (3) by the longer time required to correct the diabetic hyperglycemia if reduced pancreas is grafted in the neck of pancreatectomized animals. The time to recover is in inverse ratio to the weight of the transplanted pancreatic tissue. PMID:19871135

  6. [Pancreas transplant in Spain: better late than...].

    PubMed

    Casanova, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Pancreas transplant is the only method that enables diabetic patients to have a normal carbohydrate metabolism in the long-term. Its application in selected patients has shown to have patient survival rates, at one year of the graft, similar to those transplanted with other solid organs, such as kidney, heart, liver, etc. The indications are currently well established, with combined pancreas-kidney transplant being the most common, followed by pancreas transplant after a functioning kidney transplant and isolated pancreas transplant in pre-uraemic patients. In 2005, in Spain, under the auspices of the National Transplant Organisation (ONT), a consensus meeting was held with the scientific societies involved in this type of transplant, to standardise its indications and highlight its benefits in order to optimise the results of this transplant in our country. The most important conclusions of this consensus meeting are discussed in this short article. Copyright 2008 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Malignant Nonfunctioning Neuroendocrine Neoplasm of the Pancreas in a 10-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Ahmed; Christein, John D

    2009-04-17

    Malignant neoplasms of the pancreas are extremely rare in children and only represent a small percentage of pediatric cancer-related deaths. The paucity of cases reported in the literature, in addition to the lack of understanding of biologic behavior, has led to a lack of consensus concerning optimal management strategy. Presentation differs compared to adult counterparts and generally prognosis is improved even when lymph node metastases occur. Here we review the literature and report the case of a 10-year-old autistic female with a malignant nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine neoplasm of the head of the pancreas successfully extirpated via pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  8. Response of olfactory axons to loss of synaptic targets in the adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ardiles, Yona; de la Puente, Rafael; Toledo, Rafael; Isgor, Ceylan; Guthrie, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Glomerular convergence has been proposed to rely on interactions between like olfactory axons, however topographic targeting is influenced by guidance molecules encountered in the olfactory bulb. Disruption of these cues during development misdirects sensory axons, however little is known about the role of bulb-derived signals in later life, as new axons arise during turnover of the olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) population. To evaluate the contribution of bulb neurons in maintaining topographic projections in adults, we ablated them with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in P2-IRES-tauLacZ mice and examined how sensory axons responded to loss of their postsynaptic partners. NMDA lesion eliminated bulb neurons without damage to sensory axons or olfactory ensheathing glia. P2 axons contained within glomeruli at the time of lesion maintained convergence at these locations; there was no evidence of compensatory growth into the remnant tissue. Delayed apoptosis of OSNs in the target-deprived epithelium led to declines in P2 neuron number as well as the gradual atrophy, and in some cases complete loss, of P2 glomeruli in lesioned bulbs by three weeks. Increased cell proliferation in the epithelium partially restored the OSN population, and by eight weeks, new P2 axons distributed within diverse locations in the bulb remnant and within the anterior olfactory nucleus. Prior studies have suggested that initial development of olfactory topography does not rely on synapse formation with target neurons, however the present data demonstrate that continued maintenance of the sensory map requires the presence of sufficient numbers and/or types of available bulbar synaptic targets. PMID:17674970

  9. Adult mouse subventricular zones stimulate glioblastoma stem cells specific invasion through CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Goffart, Nicolas; Kroonen, Jérôme; Di Valentin, Emmanuel; Dedobbeleer, Matthias; Denne, Alexandre; Martinive, Philippe; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) have an overall median survival of 15 months. This catastrophic survival rate is the consequence of systematic relapses that could arise from remaining glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) left behind after surgery. We previously demonstrated that GSCs are able to escape the tumor mass and specifically colonize the adult subventricular zones (SVZs) after transplantation. This specific localization, away from the initial injection site, therefore represents a high-quality model of a clinical obstacle to therapy and relapses because GSCs notably retain the ability to form secondary tumors. Method In this work, we questioned the role of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in the GSC-specific invasion of the SVZs. Results We demonstrated that both receptor and ligand are respectively expressed by different GBM cell populations and by the SVZ itself. In vitro migration bio-assays highlighted that human U87MG GSCs isolated from the SVZs (U87MG-SVZ) display stronger migratory abilities in response to recombinant CXCL12 and/or SVZ-conditioned medium (SVZ-CM) compared with cancer cells isolated from the tumor mass (U87MG-TM). Moreover, in vitro inhibition of the CXCR4 signaling significantly decreased the U87MG-SVZ cell migration in response to the SVZ-CM. Very interestingly, treating U87MG-xenografted mice with daily doses of AMD3100, a specific CXCR4 antagonist, prevented the specific invasion of the SVZ. Another in vivo experiment, using CXCR4-invalidated GBM cells, displayed similar results. Conclusion Taken together, these data demonstrate the significant role of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in this original model of brain cancer invasion. PMID:25085362

  10. GAP-43 overexpression in adult mouse Purkinje cells overrides myelin-derived inhibition of neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Gianola, Sara; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2004-02-01

    Up-regulation of growth-associated proteins in adult neurons promotes axon regeneration and neuritic elongation onto nonpermissive substrates. To investigate the interaction between these molecules and myelin-related inhibitory factors, we examined transgenic mice in which overexpression of the growth-associated protein GAP-43 is driven by the Purkinje cell-specific promoter L7. Contrary to their wild-type counterparts, which have extremely poor regenerative capabilities, axotomized transgenic Purkinje cells exhibit profuse sprouting along the intracortical neurite and at the severed stump [Buffo et al. (1997) J. Neurosci., 17, 8778-8791]. Here, we investigated the relationship between such sprouting axons and oligodendroglia to ask whether GAP-43 overexpression enables Purkinje neurites to overcome myelin-derived inhibition. Intact transgenic Purkinje axons display normal morphology and myelination. Following injury, however, many GAP-43-overexpressing neurite stumps are devoid of myelin cover and sprout into white matter regions containing densely packed myelin and Nogo-A- or MAG-immunopositive oligodendrocytes. The intracortical segments of these neurites show focal accumulations of GAP-43, which are associated with disrupted or retracted myelin sheaths. Numerous sprouts originate from such demyelinated segments and spread into the granular layer. Some myelin loss, though not axon sprouting, is also evident in wild-type mice, but this phenomenon is definitely more rapid and extensive in transgenic cerebella. Thus, GAP-43-overexpressing Purkinje axons are endowed with enhanced capabilities for growing into nonpermissive territories and show a pronounced tendency to lose myelin. Our observations suggest that accumulation of GAP-43 along precise axon segments disrupts the normal axon-glia interaction and enhances the retraction of oligodendrocytic processes to facilitate the outgrowth of neuritic sprouts.

  11. [Mucinous papillary cystadenoma of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Ledezma, G; Salloum, S; de Sulbarán, Y; de Armas, L

    1992-01-01

    The case of a 15-years-old female patient is presented, who referred pain and presence of a mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. Diagnostic imaging showed a 9 cm diameter cystic lesion in the tail of the pancreas which was removed surgically. Histology demonstrated a pancreatic mucinous cystadenoma with borderline biological behaviour. A review of the literature related to cystic neoplasms of the pancreas is realized.

  12. Who needs an artificial pancreas? (?).

    PubMed

    Winikoff, Janet; Drexler, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The development of a closed-loop "artificial pancreas" would be a welcome advance for both endocrinologists and diabetic patients struggling to attain near normal glycemic control. While great strides in automatically controlling blood sugar in the fasting, sedentary state have been made through complex mathematical modeling, management of blood sugar excursions due to food and exercise have been more problematic. An artificial pancreas is not feasible at this time because of limitations inherent in the currently available technology.

  13. Single- and Dual-Hormone Artificial Pancreas for Overnight Glucose Control in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Ahmad; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Legault, Laurent; Lovblom, Leif E; Rakheja, Rohan; Messier, Virginie; D'Aoust, Émilie; Falappa, C Marcelo; Justice, Tara; Orszag, Andrej; Tschirhart, Holly; Dallaire, Maryse; Ladouceur, Martin; Perkins, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    The added benefit of glucagon in artificial pancreas systems for overnight glucose control in type 1 diabetes has not been fully explored. The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of dual-hormone (insulin and glucagon) artificial pancreas, single-hormone (insulin alone) artificial pancreas, and conventional insulin pump therapy. This study was a three-center, three-arm, open-label, randomized, crossover controlled trial involving three interventions, each applied over a night after a high carbohydrate/high fat meal and a second after exercise to mimic real-life glycemic excursions. The study was conducted in a home setting. Twenty-eight type 1 diabetes participants (21 adults and seven adolescents) participated in the study. Dual-hormone artificial pancreas, single-hormone artificial pancreas, and conventional pump therapy was activated from 9:00 PM to 7:00 AM. The main outcome was a proportion of time in target (4-8 mmol/L) by continuous glucose monitoring from 11:00 PM to 7:00 AM. Analysis was by intention to treat. The median (interquartile range) percentage of time-in-target glucose range was 47% (36%-71%) for conventional therapy, higher on both single-hormone (76% [65%-91%], P < .001) and dual-hormone artificial pancreas (81 [68%-93%], P < .001). The median (interquartile range) time spent below 4 mmol/L was 14% (4%-28%) for conventional therapy, lower on both single-hormone (5% [0%-13%], P = .004) and dual-hormone artificial pancreas (1% [0%-8%], P < .001). There were 14 hypoglycemic events on conventional therapy compared with six incidences on the single-hormone artificial pancreas (P = .059) and three incidences on the dual-hormone artificial pancreas (P = .017). None of these outcomes differed significantly between single- and dual-hormone configurations. Single- and dual-hormone artificial pancreas systems both provided better glucose control than conventional therapy. Although the dual-hormone configuration did not increase overnight time

  14. Distinct phenotype and function of NK cells in the pancreas of nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Hanna; Elemans, Marjet; Lemos, Sara; Broberger, Christian; Holmberg, Dan; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Kärre, Klas; Höglund, Petter

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about target organ-infiltrating NK cells in type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified NK cells with a unique phenotype in the pancreas of NOD mice. Pancreatic NK cells, localized to the endocrine and exocrine parts, were present before T cells during disease development and did not require T cells for their infiltration. Furthermore, NK cells, or NK cell precursors, from the spleen could traffic to the pancreas, where they displayed the pancreatic phenotype. Pancreatic NK cells from other mouse strains shared phenotypic characteristics with pancreatic NK cells from NOD mice, but displayed less surface killer cell lectin-like receptor G1, a marker for mature NK cells that have undergone proliferation, and also did not proliferate to the same extent. A subset of NOD mouse pancreatic NK cells produced IFN-gamma spontaneously, suggesting ongoing effector responses. However, most NOD mouse pancreatic NK cells were hyporesponsive compared with spleen NK cells, as reflected by diminished cytokine secretion and a lower capacity to degranulate. Interestingly, such hyporesponsiveness was not seen in pancreatic NK cells from the nonautoimmune strain C57BL/6, suggesting that this feature is not a general property of pancreatic NK cells. Based on our data, we propose that NK cells are sentinel cells in a normal pancreas. We further speculate that during inflammation, pancreatic NK cells initially mediate proinflammatory effector functions, potentially contributing to organ-specific autoimmunity, but later become hyporesponsive because of exhaustion or regulation.

  15. Diabetic Foot Complications Despite Successful Pancreas Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Kyo; Lee, Ho Seong; Park, Jungu; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Han, Duck Jong; Seo, Sang Gyo

    2017-06-01

    It is known that successful pancreas transplantation enables patients with diabetes to maintain a normal glucose level without insulin and reduces diabetes-related complications. However, we have little information about the foot-specific morbidity in patients who have undergone successful pancreas transplantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and predisposing factors for foot complications after successful pancreas transplantation. This retrospective study included 218 patients (91 males, 127 females) who had undergone pancreas transplantation for diabetes. The mean age was 40.7 (range, 15-76) years. Diabetes type, transplantation type, body mass index, and diabetes duration before transplantation were confirmed. After pancreas transplantation, the occurrence and duration of foot and ankle complications were assessed. Twenty-two patients (10.1%) had diabetic foot complications. Fifteen patients (6.9%) had diabetic foot ulcer and 7 patients (3.2%) had Charcot arthropathy. Three patients had both diabetic foot ulcer and Charcot arthropathy. Three insufficiency fractures (1.4%) were included. Mean time of complications after transplantation was 18.5 (range, 2-77) months. Creatinine level 1 year after surgery was higher in the complication group rather than the noncomplication group ( P = .02). Complications of the foot and ankle still occurred following pancreas transplantation in patients with diabetes. Level III, comparative study.

  16. Aquaporins in salivary glands and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Delporte, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Salivary glands and pancreas are involved in saliva secretion, pancreatic fluid secretion and insulin secretion. These functions are essential for proper oral, pancreatic and glucose homeostasis. Aquaporins are water-permeable transmembrane protein involved in the physiology of these secretory gland functions. This review gives an overview of the morphology of salivary glands and pancreas, the expression and localization of aquaporins, the secretion roles and mechanisms, the physiological roles of aquaporins, and the role of aquaporins in pathophysiological conditions. Several aquaporins are expressed in salivary glands and pancreas, and some play important physiological roles. Modulation of aquaporin expression and/or trafficking may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases affecting salivary glands and pancreas glands such as xerostomic conditions, pancreatic insufficiencies and diabetes. Aquaporins are involved in physiological and pathophysiological processes in salivary glands and pancreas. They could represent therapeutic targets for the treatment of diseases affecting the salivary glands and pancreas. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Aquaporins. © 2013.

  17. Analysis of Adult Female Mouse (Mus musculus) Group Behavior on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomides, P.; Moyer, E. L.; Talyansky, Y.; Choi, S.; Gong, C.; Globus, R. K.; Ronca, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    As interest in long duration effects of space habitation increases, understanding the behavior of model organisms living within the habitats engineered to fly them is vital for designing, validating, and interpreting future spaceflight studies. A handful of papers have previously reported behavior of mice and rats in the weightless environment of space. The Rodent Research Hardware and Operations Validation (Rodent Research-1; RR1) utilized the Rodent Habitat (RH) developed at NASA Ames Research Center to fly mice on the ISS (International Space Station). Ten adult (16-week-old) female C57BL/6 mice were launched on September 21st, 2014 in an unmanned Dragon Capsule, and spent 37 days in microgravity. Here we report group behavioral phenotypes of the RR1 Flight (FLT) and environment-matched Ground Control (GC) mice in the Rodent Habitat (RH) during this long-duration flight. Video was recorded for 33 days on the ISS, permitting daily assessments of overall health and well-being of the mice, and providing a valuable repository for detailed behavioral analysis. We previously reported that, as compared to GC mice, RR1 FLT mice exhibited the same range of behaviors, including eating, drinking, exploration, self- and allo-grooming, and social interactions at similar or greater levels of occurrence. Overall activity was greater in FLT as compared to GC mice, with spontaneous ambulatory behavior, including organized 'circling' or 'race-tracking' behavior that emerged within the first few days of flight following a common developmental sequence, and comprised the primary dark cycle activity persisting throughout the remainder of the experiment. Participation by individual mice increased dramatically over the course of the flight. Here we present a detailed analysis of 'race-tracking' behavior in which we quantified: (1) Complete lap rotations by individual mice; (2) Numbers of collisions between circling mice; (3) Lap directionality; and (4) Recruitment of mice into a group

  18. Dose-dependent requirement of patched homologue 1 in mouse pancreatic beta cell mass.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, S; Arakawa, M; Uchida, T; Ogihara, T; Kanno, R; Ikeda, F; Azuma, K; Hirose, T; Kawamori, R; Fujitani, Y; Watada, H

    2008-10-01

    Ectopic activation of hedgehog (HH) signalling in pancreas induces various abnormal morphogenetic events in the pancreas. This study analysed the dose-dependent requirement of patched homologue 1 (PTCH1), a negative regulator of HH signalling on pancreatic development. We used a recessive spontaneous mutant mouse denoted as mes which carries a mutated Ptch1 resulting in deletion of the most carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the PTCH1 protein. In this study, we analysed pancreatic morphology in Ptch1 ( +/+ ), Ptch1 ( +/mes ), Ptch1 (+/-), Ptch1 ( mes/me ) (s) and Ptch1 (-/mes ) mouse embryos, as well as the islet mass in adult Ptch1 (+/+), Ptch1 (+/mes ) and Ptch1 (+/-) mice. Until embryonic day (E) 12.5, no obvious abnormality of pancreas was observed in any of the Ptch1 mutants. The levels of PDX1 and glucagon were also not evidently different among the mice genotypes studied. Thereafter, morphological abnormalities appeared in the Ptch1 mutant mice. The beta, alpha and exocrine cell masses decreased at E18.5 in parallel with increased HH signalling, with beta cell mass showing the highest sensitivity to HH signalling with a significant decrease even in Ptch1 (+/mes ) mice. Adult Ptch1 (+/-) mice also showed a significant decrease in beta cell mass compared with wild-type mice. Our findings indicate that the carboxy-terminal domain of Ptch1 is essential for pancreatic development. In addition, the loss of Ptch1 function decreases both the endocrine and exocrine cell mass in a dose-dependent manner, with beta cells particularly sensitive to changes in HH signalling.

  19. A rare case of choledochal cyst with pancreas divisum: case presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ransom-Rodríguez, Adrián; Blachman-Braun, Ruben; Sánchez-García Ramos, Emilio; Varela-Prieto, Jesús; Rosas-Lezama, Erick; Mercado, Miguel Ángel

    2017-02-01

    Choledochal cysts are rare congenital malformations of the bile duct characterized by dilatations of the intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic portion of the biliary tree, they are associated to an anomalous arrangement of the pancreaticobiliary duct. Pancreas divisum results from a fusion failure of the pancreatic buds. The coexistence of pancreas divisum and choledochal cyst in adults has been reported in less than 10 well documented cases. This article presents a case of a 42-year-old Peruvian man with intermittent episodes of abdominal pain, initially diagnosed with choledocholithiasis, who underwent open cholecystectomy. During surgery, a diagnosis of choledochal cyst and pancreas divisum was made, and therefore a hepaticoduodenostomy was performed. The patient was referred to our hospital due to persistence of abdominal pain. After admission, a papillectomy was achieved without further complications. A cyst resection and dismantling of hepaticoduodenostomy with Roux-en-Y was performed 8 years later. During the subsequent 18-month follow-up, the patient remains asymptomatic.

  20. Duplicate pancreas meets gastric duplication cyst: A tale of two anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Christians, Kathleen K.; Pappas, Sam; Pilgrim, Charles; Tsai, Susan; Quebbeman, Edward

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Congenital anomalies are a rare cause of pancreatitis in adults. Gastric duplications are the least common duplication of the gastrointestinal tract and are even more uncommon in the setting of a duplicate pancreas. PRESENTATION OF CASE This manuscript contains a case report and review of the literature of an adult who presented with recurrent pancreatitis and was found to have a gastric duplication cyst that communicated with a duplicate pancreas. The study aim is to alert practitioners to the duplicate anomaly and recommend appropriate therapy. DISCUSSION Combined gastric and pancreatic duplications usually occur in young females with nonspecific, recurrent abdominal pain. This combined duplication can result in pancreatitis when the gastric duplication is contiguous with the stomach. Heightened awareness of the condition, appropriate diagnostics with accurate interpretation and a minimalist approach to resection are warranted. CONCLUSION Recurrent abdominal pain and pancreatitis in young adults devoid of risk factors should lead to consideration of congenital anomalies. Not all cysts near the pancreas and stomach are pseudocysts. ECRP and abdominal CT/MRI provide critical diagnostic information. This dual anomaly is best treated by simple excision of the gastric duplication and heterotopic pancreas. PMID:23827696

  1. Cell transplantation therapy for diabetes mellitus: endocrine pancreas and adipocyte.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Junji; Hosoda, Kiminori; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2013-01-01

    Experimental transplantation of endocrine tissues has led to significant advances in our understanding of endocrinology and metabolism. Endocrine cell transplantation therapy is expected to be applied to the treatment of metabolic endocriopathies. Restoration of functional pancreatic beta-cell mass or of functional adipose mass are reasonable treatment approaches for patients with diabetes or lipodystrophy, respectively. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell research is having a great impact on life sciences. Doctors Takahashi and Yamanaka discovered that the forced expression of a set of genes can convert mouse and human somatic cells into a pluripotent state [1, 2]. These iPS cells can differentiate into a variety of cell types. Therefore, iPS cells from patients may be a potential cell source for autologous cell replacement therapy. This review briefly summarizes the current knowledge about transplantation therapy for diabetes mellitus, the development of the endocrine pancreas and adipocytes, and endocrine-metabolic disease-specific iPS cells.

  2. Artificial three-dimensional niches deconstruct pancreas development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Manuel; Gobaa, Samy; Ranga, Adrian; Semb, Henrik; Lutolf, Matthias; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2013-11-01

    In the context of a cellular therapy for diabetes, methods for pancreatic progenitor expansion and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing beta cells would be extremely valuable. Here we establish three-dimensional culture conditions in Matrigel that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the medium composition we generate either hollow spheres, which are mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors, or complex organoids that spontaneously undergo pancreatic morphogenesis and differentiation. The in vitro maintenance and expansion of pancreatic progenitors require active Notch and FGF signaling, thus recapitulating in vivo niche signaling interactions. Our experiments reveal new aspects of pancreas development, such as a community effect by which small groups of cells better maintain progenitor properties and expand more efficiently than isolated cells, as well as the requirement for three-dimensionality. Finally, growth conditions in chemically defined biomaterials pave the way for testing the biophysical and biochemical properties of the niche that sustains pancreatic progenitors.

  3. Giant serous microcystic pancreas adenoma.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, Kursat; Bostanci, Hasan; Yildirim, Ali Cihat; Sakrak, Omer; Kerem, Mustafa

    2012-10-10

    Serous cystadenomas are rare tumors comprising 1-2% of exocrine pancreas tumors. They are mostly known as benign conditions but malign transformation as serous cystadenocarcinoma is also reported. It is usually seen in females. Non-specific symptoms, such as abdominal pain or symptoms due to mass affect, are usually seen. A 64-year old female patient was investigated for abdominal pain. Physical and laboratory findings were normal. Abdomen ultrasonography confirmed an 11×9.5 cm solid cystic lesion and abdomen computed tomography scan confirmed a 12×11 cm lobulated cystic solid lesion which had central cystic necrotic areas extending from liver hilus inferiorly. Fine needle biopsy confirmed benign cytology and trucut biopsy of the pancreatic mass reported chronic inflamation. Nevertheless, this mass could have malignant contents and transformation potential. A laparatomy was decided due to patient's symptoms and mass effect. Due to vascular invasion of the tumor, Whipple procedure was performed. The pathology report confirmed serous microcystic adenoma. These rare tumors are usually benign but pre-operative malignity criterias are not identified. There are few differential diagnostic tools for excluding malignity. We suggest surgical resection as best treatment approach for selected cases.

  4. Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Tran Cao, Hop S.; Kellogg, Benjamin; Lowy, Andrew M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Whereas pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a well-studied (but still poorly understood) disease with a dismal prognosis, cystic neoplasms of the pancreas form a more recently recognized group of pancreatic tumors. They are diverse and variable in their pathologic characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes,1–3 although all portend a better overall prognosis than PDA. In recent years, with the improved sensitivity and increasing use of cross-sectional imaging in clinical practice, these lesions are more commonly identified,4 with many being discovered incidentally. Indeed, large radiological series using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have reported detection rates of pancreatic cystic lesions between 1.2% and almost 20%,5,6 approaching the 24.3% prevalence rate in an autopsy series by Kimura and colleagues.7 Although most of these lesions are pseudocysts, a significant portion consist of cystic neoplasms, which are estimated to represent 10% to 15% of all primary pancreatic cystic lesions.8 Given the growing clinical relevance of these tumors, a keen understanding of their natural history and pathophysiology is needed. This article reviews pancreatic cystic neoplasms, with a focus on the challenges encountered in their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20159515

  5. The Pancreas: Causes for Malabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Hackert, Thilo; Schütte, Kerstin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The pancreas has a central function in digestion and glucose homeostasis. With regard to the exocrine function, which is responsible for the digestion and absorption of nutrients and vitamins, the most important disturbances of these physiological processes are based on deficiencies in enzyme production and secretion, either due to impaired excretion caused by obstruction of the pancreatic duct or due to loss of pancreatic tissue. Both conditions result in maldigestion, malabsorption, and malnutrition. Methods Systematic literature review. Results Symptoms associated with pancreatic exocrine failure are gastrointestinal discomfort, steatorrhea, and weight loss. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency caused by ductal obstruction occurs in chronic pancreatitis or with neoplasia of the pancreatic head. Loss of functional parenchyma can be caused either by chronic pancreatitis resulting in fibrotic replacement of the destroyed parenchyma or by a postoperative state of pancreatic resection. Conclusion In patients with chronic pancreatitis, a stage-adapted and timely therapy including conservative as well as surgical measures is essential to prevent functional deterioration and to preserve residual function. In the case of pancreatic resection for chronic pancreatitis, this can be achieved with modern organ-sparing surgery such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection. In patients requiring more extended pancreatic resections and even total duodenopancreatectomy, regardless of the underlying indication, adequate enzyme replacement and monitoring of the nutritional status is critical to prevent impairment of quality of life as well as detrimental malnutrition in the long term. PMID:26288593

  6. Minimal homozygous endothelial deletion of Eng with VEGF stimulation is sufficient to cause cerebrovascular dysplasia in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Walker, Espen J; Shen, Fanxia; Oh, S Paul; Arthur, Helen M; Young, William L; Su, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) represent a high risk for hemorrhagic stroke, leading to significant neurological morbidity and mortality in young adults. The etiopathogenesis of bAVM remains unclear. Research progress has been hampered by the lack of animal models. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) patients with haploinsufficiency of endoglin (ENG, HHT1) or activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1, HHT2) have a higher incidence of bAVM than the general population. We previously induced cerebrovascular dysplasia in the adult mouse that resembles human bAVM through Alk1 deletion plus vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulation. We hypothesized that Eng deletion plus VEGF stimulation would induce a similar degree of cerebrovascular dysplasia as the Alk1-deleted brain. Ad-Cre (an adenoviral vector expressing Cre recombinase) and AAV-VEGF (an adeno-associated viral vector expressing VEGF) were co-injected into the basal ganglia of 8- to 10-week-old Eng(2f/2f) (exons 5 and 6 flanked by loxP sequences), Alk1(2f/2f) (exons 4-6 flanked by loxP sequences) and wild-type (WT) mice. Vascular density, dysplasia index, and gene deletion efficiency were analyzed 8 weeks later. AAV-VEGF induced a similar degree of angiogenesis in the brain with or without Alk1- or Eng-deletion. Abnormally patterned and dilated dysplastic vessels were found in the viral vector-injected region of Alk1(2f/2f) and Eng(2f/2f) brain sections, but not in WT. Alk1(2f/2f) mice had about 1.8-fold higher dysplasia index than Eng(2f/2f) mice (4.6 ± 1.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.1, p < 0.05). However, after normalization of the dysplasia index with the gene deletion efficiency (Alk1(2f/2f): 16% and Eng(2f/2f): 1%), we found that about 8-fold higher dysplasia was induced per copy of Eng deletion (2.5) than that of Alk1 deletion (0.3). ENG-negative endothelial cells were detected in the Ad-Cre-treated brain of Eng(2f/2f) mice, suggesting homozygous deletion of Eng in the cells. VEGF induced more

  7. LRH-1 and PTF1-L coregulate an exocrine pancreas-specific transcriptional network for digestive function.

    PubMed

    Holmstrom, Sam R; Deering, Tye; Swift, Galvin H; Poelwijk, Frank J; Mangelsdorf, David J; Kliewer, Steven A; MacDonald, Raymond J

    2011-08-15

    We have determined the cistrome and transcriptome for the nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) in exocrine pancreas. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq and RNA-seq analyses reveal that LRH-1 directly induces expression of genes encoding digestive enzymes and secretory and mitochondrial proteins. LRH-1 cooperates with the pancreas transcription factor 1-L complex (PTF1-L) in regulating exocrine pancreas-specific gene expression. Elimination of LRH-1 in adult mice reduced the concentration of several lipases and proteases in pancreatic fluid and impaired pancreatic fluid secretion in response to cholecystokinin. Thus, LRH-1 is a key regulator of the exocrine pancreas-specific transcriptional network required for the production and secretion of pancreatic fluid.

  8. Outcomes of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation in type 2 diabetic recipients.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Marcelo Santos; Kuo, Hung-Tien; Bunnapradist, Suphamai

    2011-05-01

    Type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease may receive a simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplant. However, outcomes are not well described. Risks for death and graft failure were examined in SPK type 2 diabetic recipients. Using the United Network for Organ Sharing database, outcomes of SPK transplants were compared between type 2 and type 1 diabetic recipients. All primary SPK adult recipients transplanted between 2000 and 2007 (n=6756) were stratified according to end-stage pancreas disease diagnosis (type 1: n=6141, type 2: n=582). Posttransplant complications and risks for death and kidney/pancreas graft failure were compared. Of the 6756 SPK transplants, 8.6% were performed in recipients with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Rates of delayed kidney graft function and primary kidney nonfunction were higher in the type 2 diabetics. Five-year overall and death-censored kidney graft survival were inferior in type 2 diabetics. After adjustment for other risk factors, including recipient (age, race, body weight, dialysis time, and cardiovascular comorbidities), donor, and transplant immune characteristics, type 2 diabetes was not associated with increased risk for death or kidney or pancreas failure when compared with type 1 diabetic recipients. After adjustment for other risk factors, SPK recipients with type 2 diabetes diagnosis were not at increased risk for death, kidney failure, or pancreas failure when compared with recipients with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Nephrology

  9. Deep-brain magnetic stimulation promotes adult hippocampal neurogenesis and alleviates stress-related behaviors in mouse models for neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)/ Deep-brain Magnetic Stimulation (DMS) is an effective therapy for various neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression disorder. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the impacts of rTMS/DMS on the brain are not yet fully understood. Results Here we studied the effects of deep-brain magnetic stimulation to brain on the molecular and cellular level. We examined the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal synaptic plasticity of rodent under stress conditions with deep-brain magnetic stimulation treatment. We found that DMS promotes adult hippocampal neurogenesis significantly and facilitates the development of adult new-born neurons. Remarkably, DMS exerts anti-depression effects in the learned helplessness mouse model and rescues hippocampal long-term plasticity impaired by restraint stress in rats. Moreover, DMS alleviates the stress response in a mouse model for Rett syndrome and prolongs the life span of these animals dramatically. Conclusions Deep-brain magnetic stimulation greatly facilitates adult hippocampal neurogenesis and maturation, also alleviates depression and stress-related responses in animal models. PMID:24512669

  10. The transformation of synaptic to system plasticity in motor output from the sacral cord of the adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Elbasiouny, Sherif M.; Collins, William F.; Heckman, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is fundamental in shaping the output of neural networks. The transformation of synaptic plasticity at the cellular level into plasticity at the system level involves multiple factors, including behavior of local networks of interneurons. Here we investigate the synaptic to system transformation for plasticity in motor output in an in vitro preparation of the adult mouse spinal cord. System plasticity was assessed from compound action potentials (APs) in spinal ventral roots, which were generated simultaneously by the axons of many motoneurons (MNs). Synaptic plasticity was assessed from intracellular recordings of MNs. A computer model of the MN pool was used to identify the middle steps in the transformation from synaptic to system behavior. Two input systems that converge on the same MN pool were studied: one sensory and one descending. The two synaptic input systems generated very different motor outputs, with sensory stimulation consistently evoking short-term depression (STD) whereas descending stimulation had bimodal plasticity: STD at low frequencies but short-term facilitation (STF) at high frequencies. Intracellular and pharmacological studies revealed contributions from monosynaptic excitation and stimulus time-locked inhibition but also considerable asynchronous excitation sustained from local network activity. The computer simulations showed that STD in the monosynaptic excitatory input was the primary driver of the system STD in the sensory input whereas network excitation underlies the bimodal plasticity in the descending system. These results provide insight on the roles of plasticity in the monosynaptic and polysynaptic inputs converging on the same MN pool to overall motor plasticity. PMID:26203107

  11. Characterization of thrombopoietin (TPO)-responsive progenitor cells in adult mouse bone marrow with in vivo megakaryocyte and erythroid potential.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ashley P; Kauppi, Maria; Metcalf, Donald; Di Rago, Ladina; Hyland, Craig D; Alexander, Warren S

    2012-02-14

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells are the progeny of hematopoietic stem cells that coordinate the production of precise numbers of mature blood cells of diverse functional lineages. Identification of cell-surface antigen expression associated with hematopoietic lineage restriction has allowed prospective isolation of progenitor cells with defined hematopoietic potential. To clarify further the cellular origins of megakaryocyte commitment, we assessed the in vitro and in vivo megakaryocyte and platelet potential of defined progenitor populations in the adult mouse bone marrow. We show that megakaryocytes arise from CD150(+) bipotential progenitors that display both platelet- and erythrocyte-producing potential in vivo and that can develop from the Flt3(-) fraction of the pregranulocyte-macrophage population. We define a bipotential erythroid-megakaryocyte progenitor population, the CD150(+)CD9(lo)endoglin(lo) fraction of Lin(-)cKit(+)IL7 receptor alpha(-)FcγRII/III(lo)Sca1(-) cells, which contains the bulk of the megakaryocyte colony-forming capacity of the bone marrow, including bipotential megakaryocyte-erythroid colony-forming capacity, and can generate both erythrocytes and platelets efficiently in vivo. This fraction is distinct from the CD150(+)CD9(hi)endoglin(lo) fraction, which contains bipotential precursors with characteristics of increased megakaryocytic maturation, and the CD150(+)CD9(lo)endoglin(hi) fraction, which contains erythroid lineage-committed cells. Finally, we demonstrate that bipotential erythroid-megakaryocyte progenitor and CD150(+)CD9(hi)endoglin(lo) cells are TPO-responsive and that the latter population specifically expands in the recovery from thrombocytopenia induced by anti-platelet serum.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent angiogenesis and dynamic vascular plasticity in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shoko; Furube, Eriko; Mannari, Tetsuya; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Wanaka, Akio; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    The sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), which comprise the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), the subfornical organ (SFO) and the area postrema (AP), lack a typical blood-brain barrier (BBB) and monitor directly blood-derived information to regulate body fluid homeostasis, inflammation, feeding and vomiting. Until now, almost nothing has been documented about vascular features of the sensory CVOs except fenestration of vascular endothelial cells. We therefore examine whether continuous angiogenesis occurs in the sensory CVOs of adult mouse. The angiogenesis-inducing factor vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and the VEGF-A-regulating transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α were highly expressed in neurons of the OVLT and SFO and in both neurons and astrocytes of the AP. Expression of the pericyte-regulating factor platelet-derived growth factor B was high in astrocytes of the sensory CVOs. Immunohistochemistry of bromodeoxyuridine and Ki-67, a nuclear protein that is associated with cellular proliferation, revealed active proliferation of endothelial cells. Moreover, immunohistochemistry of caspase-3 and the basement membrane marker laminin showed the presence of apoptosis and sprouting of endothelial cells, respectively. Treatment with the VEGF receptor-associated tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 significantly reduced proliferation and filopodia sprouting of endothelial cells, as well as the area and diameter of microvessels. The mitotic inhibitor cytosine-b-D-arabinofuranoside reduced proliferation of endothelial cells and the vascular permeability of blood-derived low-molecular-weight molecules without changing vascular area and microvessel diameter. Thus, our data indicate that continuous angiogenesis is dependent on VEGF signaling and responsible for the dynamic plasticity of vascular structure and permeability.

  13. Early Social Enrichment Rescues Adult Behavioral and Brain Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oddi, Diego; Subashi, Enejda; Middei, Silvia; Bellocchio, Luigi; Lemaire-Mayo, Valerie; Guzmán, Manuel; Crusio, Wim E; D'Amato, Francesca R; Pietropaolo, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Converging lines of evidence support the use of environmental stimulation to ameliorate the symptoms of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. Applying these interventions at very early ages is critical to achieve a marked reduction of the pathological phenotypes. Here we evaluated the impact of early social enrichment in Fmr1-KO mice, a genetic mouse model of fragile X syndrome (FXS), a major developmental disorder and the most frequent monogenic cause of autism. Enrichment was achieved by providing male KO pups and their WT littermates with enhanced social stimulation, housing them from birth until weaning with the mother and an additional nonlactating female. At adulthood they were tested for locomotor, social, and cognitive abilities; furthermore, dendritic alterations were assessed in the hippocampus and amygdala, two brain regions known to be involved in the control of the examined behaviors and affected by spine pathology in Fmr1-KOs. Enrichment rescued the behavioral FXS-like deficits displayed in adulthood by Fmr1-KO mice, that is, hyperactivity, reduced social interactions, and cognitive deficits. Early social enrichment also eliminated the abnormalities shown by adult KO mice in the morphology of hippocampal and amygdala dendritic spines, namely an enhanced density of immature vs mature types. Importantly, enrichment did not induce neurobehavioral changes in WT mice, thus supporting specific effects on FXS-like pathology. These findings show that early environmental stimulation has profound and long-term beneficial effects on the pathological FXS phenotype, thereby encouraging the use of nonpharmacological interventions for the treatment of this and perhaps other neurodevelopmental diseases. PMID:25348604

  14. Impairment of Mitochondria in Adult Mouse Brain Overexpressing Predominantly Full-Length, N-Terminally Acetylated Human α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Sarafian, Theodore A.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Souda, Puneet; Masliah, Eliezer; Kar, Upendra K.; Vinters, Harry V.; Mathern, Gary W.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Watson, Joseph B.

    2013-01-01

    While most forms of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) are sporadic in nature, a small percentage of PD have genetic causes as first described for dominant, single base pair changes as well as duplication and triplication in the α-synuclein gene. The α-synuclein gene encodes a 140 amino acid residue protein that interacts with a variety of organelles including synaptic vesicles, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi vesicles and, reported more recently, mitochondria. Here we examined the structural and functional interactions of human α-synuclein with brain mitochondria obtained from an early, pre-manifest mouse model for PD over-expressing human α-synuclein (ASOTg). The membrane potential in ASOTg brain mitochondria was decreased relative to wildtype (WT) mitochondria, while reactive oxygen species (ROS) were elevated in ASOTg brain mitochondria. No selective interaction of human α-synuclein with mitochondrial electron transport complexes cI-cV was detected. Monomeric human α-synuclein plus carboxyl terminally truncated forms were the predominant isoforms detected in ASOTg brain mitochondria by 2-dimensional PAGE (Native/SDS) and immunoblotting. Oligomers or fibrils were not detected with amyloid conformational antibodies. Mass spectrometry of human α-synuclein in both ASOTg brain mitochondria and homogenates from surgically resected human cortex demonstrated that the protein was full-length and postranslationally modified by N-terminal acetylation. Overall the study showed that accumulation of full-length, N-terminally acetylated human α-synuclein was sufficient to disrupt brain mitochondrial function in adult mice. PMID:23667637

  15. Comparative analysis of the frequency and distribution of stem and progenitor cells in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Golmohammadi, Mohammad G; Blackmore, Daniel G; Large, Beatrice; Azari, Hassan; Esfandiary, Ebrahim; Paxinos, George; Franklin, Keith B J; Reynolds, Brent A; Rietze, Rodney L

    2008-04-01

    The neurosphere assay can detect and expand neural stem cells (NSCs) and progenitor cells, but it cannot discriminate between these two populations. Given two assays have purported to overcome this shortfall, we performed a comparative analysis of the distribution and frequency of NSCs and progenitor cells detected in 400 mum coronal segments along the ventricular neuraxis of the adult mouse brain using the neurosphere assay, the neural colony forming cell assay (N-CFCA), and label-retaining cell (LRC) approach. We observed a large variation in the number of progenitor/stem cells detected in serial sections along the neuraxis, with the number of neurosphere-forming cells detected in individual 400 mum sections varying from a minimum of eight to a maximum of 891 depending upon the rostral-caudal coordinate assayed. Moreover, the greatest variability occurred in the rostral portion of the lateral ventricles, thereby explaining the large variation in neurosphere frequency previously reported. Whereas the overall number of neurospheres (3730 +/- 276) or colonies (4275 +/- 124) we detected along the neuraxis did not differ significantly, LRC numbers were significantly reduced (1186 +/- 188, 7 month chase) in comparison to both total colonies and neurospheres. Moreover, approximately two orders of magnitude fewer NSC-derived colonies (50 +/- 10) were detected using the N-CFCA as compared to LRCs. Given only 5% of the LRCs are cycling (BrdU+/Ki-67+) or competent to divide (BrdU+/Mcm-2+), and proliferate upon transfer to culture, it is unclear whether this technique selectively detects endogenous NSCs. Overall, caution should be taken with the interpretation and employment of all these techniques.

  16. Liver Progenitors Isolated from Adult Healthy Mouse Liver Efficiently Differentiate to Functional Hepatocytes In Vitro and Repopulate Liver Tissue.

    PubMed

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Ishii, Masayuki; Kino, Junichi; Mizuguchi, Toru; Hirata, Koichi; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2016-12-01

    It has been proposed that tissue stem cells supply multiple epithelial cells in mature tissues and organs. However, it is unclear whether tissue stem cells generally contribute to cellular turnover in normal healthy organs. Here, we show that liver progenitors distinct from bipotent liver stem/progenitor cells (LPCs) persistently exist in mouse livers and potentially contribute to tissue maintenance. We found that, in addition to LPCs isolated as EpCAM(+) cells, liver progenitors were enriched in CD45(-) TER119(-) CD31(-) EpCAM(-) ICAM-1(+) fraction isolated from late-fetal and postnatal livers. ICAM-1(+) liver progenitors were abundant by 4 weeks (4W) after birth. Although their number decreased with age, ICAM-1(+) liver progenitors existed in livers beyond that stage. We established liver progenitor clones derived from ICAM-1(+) cells between 1 and 20W and found that those clones efficiently differentiated into mature hepatocytes (MHs), which secreted albumin, eliminated ammonium ion, stored glycogen, and showed cytochrome P450 activity. Even after long-term culture, those clones kept potential to differentiate to MHs. When ICAM-1(+) clones were transplanted into nude mice after retrorsine treatment and 70% partial hepatectomy, donor cells were incorporated into liver plates and expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α, and carbamoylphosphate synthetase I. Moreover, after short-term treatment with oncostatin M, ICAM-1(+) clones could efficiently repopulate the recipient liver tissues. Our results indicate that liver progenitors that can efficiently differentiate to MHs exist in normal adult livers. Those liver progenitors could be an important source of new MHs for tissue maintenance and repair in vivo, and for regenerative medicine ex vivo. Stem Cells 2016;34:2889-2901.

  17. Early social enrichment rescues adult behavioral and brain abnormalities in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oddi, Diego; Subashi, Enejda; Middei, Silvia; Bellocchio, Luigi; Lemaire-Mayo, Valerie; Guzmán, Manuel; Crusio, Wim E; D'Amato, Francesca R; Pietropaolo, Susanna

    2015-03-13

    Converging lines of evidence support the use of environmental stimulation to ameliorate the symptoms of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. Applying these interventions at very early ages is critical to achieve a marked reduction of the pathological phenotypes. Here we evaluated the impact of early social enrichment in Fmr1-KO mice, a genetic mouse model of fragile X syndrome (FXS), a major developmental disorder and the most frequent monogenic cause of autism. Enrichment was achieved by providing male KO pups and their WT littermates with enhanced social stimulation, housing them from birth until weaning with the mother and an additional nonlactating female. At adulthood they were tested for locomotor, social, and cognitive abilities; furthermore, dendritic alterations were assessed in the hippocampus and amygdala, two brain regions known to be involved in the control of the examined behaviors and affected by spine pathology in Fmr1-KOs. Enrichment rescued the behavioral FXS-like deficits displayed in adulthood by Fmr1-KO mice, that is, hyperactivity, reduced social interactions, and cognitive deficits. Early social enrichment also eliminated the abnormalities shown by adult KO mice in the morphology of hippocampal and amygdala dendritic spines, namely an enhanced density of immature vs mature types. Importantly, enrichment did not induce neurobehavioral changes in WT mice, thus supporting specific effects on FXS-like pathology. These findings show that early environmental stimulation has profound and long-term beneficial effects on the pathological FXS phenotype, thereby encouraging the use of nonpharmacological interventions for the treatment of this and perhaps other neurodevelopmental diseases.

  18. Oral Immunization with Cholera Toxin Provides Protection against Campylobacter jejuni in an Adult Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model

    PubMed Central

    Albert, M. John; Mustafa, Abu Salim; Islam, Anjum; Haridas, Shilpa

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunity to Campylobacter jejuni, a major diarrheal pathogen, is largely Penner serotype specific. For broad protection, a vaccine should be based on a common antigen(s) present in all strains. In our previous study (M. J. Albert, S. Haridas, D. Steer, G. S. Dhaunsi, A. I. Smith, and B. Adler, Infect. Immun. 75:3070–3073, 2007), we demonstrated that antibody to cholera toxin (CT) cross-reacted with the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs) of all Campylobacter jejuni strains tested. In the current study, we investigated whether immunization with CT protects against intestinal colonization by C. jejuni in an adult mouse model and whether the nontoxic subunit of CT (CT-B) is the portion mediating cross-reaction. Mice were orally immunized with CT and later challenged with C. jejuni strains (48, 75, and 111) of different serotypes. Control animals were immunized with phosphate-buffered saline. Fecal shedding of challenge organisms was studied daily for 9 days. Serum and fecal antibody responses were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting. The cross-reactivity of rabbit CT-B antibody to MOMP was studied by immunoblotting. The reactivity of 21 overlapping 30-mer oligopeptides (based on MOMP’s sequence) against rabbit CT antibody was tested by ELISA. Test animals produced antibodies to CT and MMP in serum and feces and showed resistance to colonization, the vaccine efficacies being 49% (for strain 48), 37% (for strain 75), and 34% (for strain 111) (P, ≤0.05 to ≤0.001). One peptide corresponding to a variable region of MOMP showed significant reactivity. CT-B antibody cross-reacted with MOMP. Since CT-B is a component of oral cholera vaccines, it might be possible to control C. jejuni diarrhea with these vaccines. PMID:23653448

  19. Cdh1 Is Essential for Endometrial Differentiation, Gland Development, and Adult Function in the Mouse Uterus1

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Sarah N.; King, Mandy L.; MacLean, James A.; Mann, Jordan L.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.; Hayashi, Kanako

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT CDH1 is a cell-cell adhesion molecule expressed in the epithelium to coordinate key morphogenetic processes, establish cell polarity, and regulate epithelial differentiation and proliferation. To determine the role of CDH1 in the mouse uterus, Cdh1 was conditionally ablated by crossing Pgr-Cre and Cdh1-flox mice, and the phenotype was characterized. We found that loss of Cdh1 results in a disorganized cellular structure of the epithelium and ablation of endometrial glands in the neonatal uterus. Cdh1d/d mice lost adherens junctions (CTNNB1 and CTNNA1) and tight junctions (claudin, occludin, and ZO-1 proteins) in the neonatal uterus, leading to loss of epithelial cell-cell interaction. Ablation of Cdh1 induced abnormal epithelial proliferation and massive apoptosis, and disrupted Wnt and Hox gene expression in the neonatal uterus. Although the uteri of Cdh1d/d mice did not show any myometrial defects, ablation of Cdh1 inhibited expression of epithelial (cytokeratin 8) and stromal (CD10) markers. Cdh1d/d mice were infertile because of defects during implantation and decidualization. Furthermore, we showed in the model of conditional ablation of both Cdh1 and Trp53 in the uterus that interrupting cell cycle regulation through the loss of Cdh1 leads to abnormal uterine development. The uteri of Cdh1d/d Trp53d/d mice exhibited histological features of endometrial carcinomas with myometrial invasion. Collectively, these findings suggest that CDH1 has an important role in structural and functional development of the uterus as well as adult uterine function. CDH1 has a capacity to control cell fate by altering directional cell proliferation and apoptosis. PMID:22378759

  20. Outpatient Glycemic Control with a Bionic Pancreas in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Manasi; Magyar, Kendra L.; McKeon, Katherine; Goergen, Laura G.; Balliro, Courtney; Hillard, Mallory A.; Nathan, David M.; Damiano, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The safety and effectiveness of automated glycemic management have not been tested in multiday studies under unrestricted outpatient conditions. METHODS In two random-order, crossover studies with similar but distinct designs, we compared glycemic control with a wearable, bihormonal, automated, “bionic” pancreas (bionic-pancreas period) with glycemic control with an insulin pump (control period) for 5 days in 20 adults and 32 adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The automatically adaptive algorithm of the bionic pancreas received data from a continuous glucose monitor to control subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon. RESULTS Among the adults, the mean plasma glucose level over the 5-day bionic-pancreas period was 138 mg per deciliter (7.7 mmol per liter), and the mean percentage of time with a low glucose level (<70 mg per deciliter [3.9 mmol per liter]) was 4.8%. After 1 day of automatic adaptation by the bionic pancreas, the mean (±SD) glucose level on continuous monitoring was lower than the mean level during the control period (133±13 vs. 159±30 mg per deciliter [7.4±0.7 vs. 8.8±1.7 mmol per liter], P<0.001) and the percentage of time with a low glucose reading was lower (4.1% vs. 7.3%, P = 0.01). Among the adolescents, the mean plasma glucose level was also lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (138±18 vs. 157±27 mg per deciliter [7.7±1.0 vs. 8.7±1.5 mmol per liter], P = 0.004), but the percentage of time with a low plasma glucose reading was similar during the two periods (6.1% and 7.6%, respectively; P = 0.23). The mean frequency of interventions for hypoglycemia among the adolescents was lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (one per 1.6 days vs. one per 0.8 days, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS As compared with an insulin pump, a wearable, automated, bihormonal, bionic pancreas improved mean glycemic levels, with less frequent hypoglycemic episodes, among both

  1. Embryonic mouse STO cell-derived xenografts express hepatocytic functions in the livers of nonimmunosuppressed adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjun; Joseph, Brigid; Gupta, Sanjeev; Guest, I; Xu, Meng; Sell, Stewart; Son, Kyung-Hwa; Koch, Katherine S; Leffert, Hyam L

    2005-02-01

    Cells derived from embryonic mouse STO cell lines differentiate into hepatocytes when transplanted into the livers of nonimmunosuppressed dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPPIV)-negative F344 rats. Within 1 day after intrasplenic injection, donor cells moved rapidly into the liver and were found in intravascular and perivascular sites; by 1 month, they were intrasinusoidal and also integrated into hepatic plates with approximately 2% efficiency and formed conjoint bile canaliculi. Neither donor cell proliferation nor host inflammatory responses were observed during this time. Detection of intrahepatic mouse COX1 mitochondrial DNA and mouse albumin mRNA in recipient rats indicated survival and differentiation of donor cells for at least 3 months. Mouse COX1 targets were also detected intrahepatically 4-9 weeks after STO cell injection into nonimmunosuppressed wild-type rats. In contrast to STO-transplanted rats, mouse DNA or RNA was not detectable in untreated or mock-transplanted rats or in rats injected with donor cell DNA. In cultured STO donor cells, DPPIV and glucose-6-phosphatase activities were observed in small clusters; in contrast, mouse major histocompatibility complex class I H-2Kq, H-2Dq, and H-2Lq and class II I-Aq markers were undetectable in vitro before or after interferon gamma treatment. Together with H-2K allele typing, which confirmed the Swiss mouse origin of the donor cells, these observations indicate that mouse-derived STO cell lines can differentiate along hepatocytic lineage and engraft into rat liver across major histocompatibility barriers.

  2. A new genus and species of demodecid mites from the tongue of a house mouse Mus musculus: description of adult and immature stages with data on parasitism.

    PubMed

    Izdebska, J N; Rolbiecki, L

    2016-06-01

    The study of the parasitofauna of the house mouse Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae) Linnaeus is particularly important owing to its multiple relationships with humans - as a cosmopolitan, synanthropic rodent, bred for pets, food for other animals or laboratory animal. This article proposes and describes a new genus and species of the parasitic mite based on adult and immature stages from the house mouse. Glossicodex musculi gen. n., sp. n. is a medium-sized demodecid mite (adult stages on average 199 µm in length) found in mouse tissue of the tongue. It is characterized by two large, hooked claws on each tarsus of the legs; the legs are relatively massive, consisting of large, non-overlapping segments. The palps consist of three slender, clearly separated, relatively narrow segments, wherein their coxal segments are also quite narrow and spaced. Also, segments of the palps of larva and nymphs are clearly isolated, and on the terminal segment, trident claws that resemble legs' claws can be found. On the ventral side, in immature stages, triangular scuta, topped with sclerotized spur, can be also observed. Glossicodex musculi was noted in 10.8% of mice with a mean infection intensity of 2.2 parasites per host.

  3. Purification of oogonial stem cells from adult mouse and human ovaries: an assessment of the literature and a view toward the future.

    PubMed

    Woods, Dori C; White, Yvonne A R; Tilly, Jonathan L

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary claims that mitotically active female germ line or oogonial stem cells (OSCs) exist and support oogenesis during postnatal life in mammals have been debated in the field of reproductive biology since March 2004, when a mouse study posed the first serious challenge to the dogma of a fixed pool of oocytes being endowed at birth in more than 50 years. Other studies have since been put forth that further question the validity of this dogma, including the isolation of OSCs from neonatal and adult mouse ovaries by 4 independent groups using multiple strategies. Two of these groups also reported that isolated mouse OSCs, once transplanted back into ovaries of adult female mice, differentiate into fully functional eggs that ovulate, fertilize, and produce healthy embryos and offspring. Arguably, one of the most significant advances in this emerging field was provided by a new research study published this year, which reported the successful isolation and functional characterization of OSCs from ovaries of reproductive age women. Two commentaries on this latest work, one cautiously supportive and one highly skeptical, were published soon afterward. This article evaluates the current literature regarding postnatal oogenesis in mammals and discusses important next steps for future work on OSC biology and function.

  4. Purification of Oogonial Stem Cells From Adult Mouse and Human Ovaries: An Assessment of the Literature and a View Toward the Future

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Dori C.; White, Yvonne A. R.; Tilly, Jonathan L.

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary claims that mitotically active female germ line or oogonial stem cells (OSCs) exist and support oogenesis during postnatal life in mammals have been debated in the field of reproductive biology since March 2004, when a mouse study posed the first serious challenge to the dogma of a fixed pool of oocytes being endowed at birth in more than 50 years. Other studies have since been put forth that further question the validity of this dogma, including the isolation of OSCs from neonatal and adult mouse ovaries by 4 independent groups using multiple strategies. Two of these groups also reported that isolated mouse OSCs, once transplanted back into ovaries of adult female mice, differentiate into fully functional eggs that ovulate, fertilize, and produce healthy embryos and offspring. Arguably, one of the most significant advances in this emerging field was provided by a new research study published this year, which reported the successful isolation and functional characterization of OSCs from ovaries of reproductive age women. Two commentaries on this latest work, one cautiously supportive and one highly skeptical, were published soon afterward. This article evaluates the current literature regarding postnatal oogenesis in mammals and discusses important next steps for future work on OSC biology and function. PMID:23024060

  5. Melatonin, endocrine pancreas and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    Melatonin influences insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro. (i) The effects are MT(1)-and MT(2)-receptor-mediated. (ii) They are specific, high-affinity, pertussis-toxin-sensitive, G(i)-protein-coupled, leading to inhibition of the cAMP-pathway and decrease of insulin release. [Correction added after online publication 4 December 2007: in the preceding sentence, 'increase of insulin release' was changed to 'decrease of insulin release'.] Furthermore, melatonin inhibits the cGMP-pathway, possibly mediated by MT(2) receptors. In this way, melatonin likely inhibits insulin release. A third system, the IP(3)-pathway, is mediated by G(q)-proteins, phospholipase C and IP(3), which mobilize Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, with a resultant increase in insulin. (iii) Insulin secretion in vivo, as well as from isolated islets, exhibits a circadian rhythm. This rhythm, which is apparently generated within the islets, is influenced by melatonin, which induces a phase shift in insulin secretion. (iv) Observation of the circadian expression of clock genes in the pancreas could possibly be an indication of the generation of circadian rhythms in the pancreatic islets themselves. (v) Melatonin influences diabetes and associated metabolic disturbances. The diabetogens, alloxan and streptozotocin, lead to selective destruction of beta-cells through their accumulation in these cells, where they induce the generation of ROS. Beta-cells are very susceptible to oxidative stress because they possess only low-antioxidative capacity. Results suggest that melatonin in pharmacological doses provides protection against ROS. (vi) Finally, melatonin levels in plasma, as well as the arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activity, are lower in diabetic than in nondiabetic rats and humans. In contrast, in the pineal gland, the AANAT mRNA is increased and the insulin receptor mRNA is decreased, which indicates a close interrelationship between insulin and melatonin.

  6. Pancreas graft survival in simultaneous pancreas-kidney versus pancreas-after-kidney and pancreas alone transplantations: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Casado, M C; Pérez-Daga, J A; Aranda-Narváez, J M; Fernández-Burgos, I; Sánchez-Pérez, B; León-Díaz, F J; Cabello-Díaz, M; Rodríguez-Burgos, D; Hernández-Marrero, D; Santoyo-Santoyo, J

    2013-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation offers excellent outcomes today in patients who have type-1 diabetes mellitus (DM) with difficult control in terms of increasing patient and pancreatic graft survival. Different factors in donors, recipients, and the perioperative period have been associated with long-term graft survival. The aim of this study was to compare pancreatic graft survival in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) and the other two modalities, pancreas-alone and pancreas-after-kidney transplantation (non-SPK), at our institution. This retrospective cohort study included 63 pancreas transplantation patients from January 2007 to May 2012 at our institution. The patients were divided into two groups: SPK and non-SPK transplantations. We excluded those patients who had transplants with vascular graft loss. The primary endpoint was 1-year and overall graft survival with consideration of multiple relevant variables. Non-parametric tests were calculated with the statistical package SPSS 20 (SPSS INC, Chicago, IL). The 1-year and overall graft survival in this period was 87.3% and 82.5%, respectively. The median follow-up was 963 days. The causes of graft loss were vascular (64%) and immunologic (34%). Finally, we included 56 pancreas transplantations, 46 (82%) were SPK and 10 (18%) non-SPK. The donor and recipient characteristics were similar in both groups, except for the duration of DM (SPK 22 years vs. non-SPK 29 years) and recipient body mass index (SPK 23 vs. non-SPK 28); P = .042 and P = .003, respectively. The cold ischemia time was 563 minutes (standard deviation, 145). Bivariate analysis showed that long-term graft loss was only influenced by matching for gender (P = .023). Using the Kaplan-Meier method, the pancreas graft survival was better in SPK than in non-SPK transplants (log rank .038). Patients who receive pancreas-alone or pancreas-after-kidney grafts have shorter long-term graft survival. Multiple strategies should be applied to improve

  7. US Findings in Patients at Risk for Pancreas Transplant Failure.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Tara A; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Harbell, Jack; Kornak, John; Stock, Peter G; Feldstein, Vickie A

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine if ultrasonographic (US) findings, including Doppler US findings, are associated with subsequent pancreas transplant failure. Materials and Methods A cohort of adult patients who underwent pancreas transplantation at a tertiary institution over the course of 10 years (from 2003 to 2012) was retrospectively evaluated for failure, which was defined as return to insulin therapy or surgical graft removal. The institutional review board provided a waiver of informed consent. All US images obtained within the 1st postoperative year were reviewed for three findings: arterial flow (presence or absence of intraparenchymal forward diastole flow), splenic vein thrombus, and edema. These findings were correlated with pancreas graft failure within 1-year after surgery by using Cox proportional hazards models and hazard ratios. Results A total of 228 transplants were included (mean patient age, 41.6 years; range, 19-57 years; 122 men, 106 women). Absent or reversed arterial diastolic flow was identified in nine of 20 failed transplants (sensitivity, 45%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 23, 68) and in 15 of 208 transplants that survived (specificity, 93% [193 of 208]; 95% CI: 89, 96). The Cox proportional hazard ratio was 6.2 (95% CI: 3.1, 12.4). Splenic vein thrombus was identified in 10 of 20 failed transplants (sensitivity, 50%; 95% CI: 27, 73) and in 25 of 208 transplants that survived (specificity, 88% [183 of 208]; 95% CI: 83, 92). The Cox proportional hazard ratio was 4.2 (95% CI: 2.4, 7.4). Edema had the lowest specificity (Cox proportional hazard ratio, 2.0; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.9). In the multivariate analysis, only absent or reversed arterial diastolic flow remained significantly associated with transplant failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.6; 95% CI: 1.0, 12.8; P = .045). Conclusion Absent or reversed diastolic arterial Doppler flow has a stronger association with transplant failure than does splenic vein thrombus or edema. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  8. Progress and challenges of the bioartificial pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Patrick T. J.; Shah, Dishant K.; Garcia, Jacob A.; Bae, Chae Yun; Lim, Dong-Jin; Huiszoon, Ryan C.; Alexander, Grant C.; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation has been validated as a treatment for type 1 diabetes since it maintains consistent and sustained type 1 diabetes reversal. However, one of the major challenges in pancreatic islet transplantation is the body's natural immune response to the implanted islets. Immunosuppressive drug treatment is the most popular immunomodulatory approach for islet graft survival. However, administration of immunosuppressive drugs gives rise to negative side effects, and long-term effects are not clearly understood. A bioartificial pancreas is a therapeutic approach to enable pancreatic islet transplantation without or with minimal immune suppression. The bioartificial pancreas encapsulates the pancreatic islets in a semi-permeable environment which protects islets from the body's immune responses, while allowing the permeation of insulin, oxygen, nutrients, and waste. Many groups have developed various types of the bioartificial pancreas and tested their efficacy in animal models. However, the clinical application of the bioartificial pancreas still requires further investigation. In this review, we discuss several types of bioartificial pancreases and address their advantages and limitations. We also discuss recent advances in bioartificial pancreas applications with microfluidic or micropatterning technology.

  9. The case for pancreas after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fridell, Jonathan A; Mangus, Richard S; Hollinger, Edward F; Taber, Tim E; Goble, Michelle L; Mohler, Elaine; Milgrom, Martin L; Powelson, John A

    2009-01-01

    Pancreas after kidney (PAK) transplantation has historically demonstrated inferior pancreas allograft survival compared to simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplantation. Under our current immunosuppression protocol, we have noted excellent outcomes and rare immunological graft loss. The goal of this study was to compare pancreas allograft survival in PAK and SPK recipients using this regimen. This was a single center retrospective review of all SPK and PAK transplants performed between January 2003 and November 2007. All transplants were performed with systemic venous drainage and enteric exocrine drainage. Immunosuppression included induction with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (thymoglobulin), early steroid withdrawal, and maintenance with tacrolimus and sirolimus or mycophenolate mofetil. Study end points included graft and patient survival and immunosuppression related complications. Transp