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Sample records for adult murine bone

  1. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    PubMed

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  2. Bone marrow mononuclears from murine tibia after spaceflight on biosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Elena; Roe, Maria; Buravkova, Ludmila; Andrianova, Irina; Goncharova, Elena; Gornostaeva, Alexandra

    Elucidation of the space flight effects on the adult stem and progenitor cells is an important goal in space biology and medicine. A unique opportunity for this is provided by project "BION -M1". The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 30-day flight on biosatellite "BION - M1" and the subsequent 7-day recovery on the quantity, viability, immunophenotype of mononuclears from murine tibia bone marrow. Also the in vitro characterization of functional capacity of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) was scheduled. Under the project, the S57black/6 mice were divided into groups: spaceflight/vivarium control, recovery after spaceflight/ vivarium control to recovery. Bone marrow mononuclears were isolated from the tibia and immunophenotyped using antibodies against CD45, CD34, CD90 on a flow cytometer Epics XL (Beckman Coulter). A part of the each pool was frozen for subsequent estimation of hematopoietic colony-forming units (CFU), the rest was used for the evaluation of fibroblast CFU (CFUf) number, MSC proliferative activity and osteogenic potency. The cell number in the flight group was significantly lower than in the vivarium control group. There were no differences in this parameter between flight and control groups after 7 days of recovery. The mononuclears viability was more than 95 percent in all examined groups. Flow cytometric analysis showed no differences in the bone marrow cell immunophenotype (CD45, CD34, CD90.1 (Thy1)), but the flight animals had more large-sized CD45+mononuclears, than the control groups of mice. There was no difference in the CFUf number between groups. After 7 days in vitro the MSC number in flight group was twice higher than in vivarium group, after 10 days - 4 times higher. These data may indicate a higher proliferative activity of MSCs after spaceflight. MSCs showed the same and high alkaline phosphatase activity, both in flight and in the control groups, suggesting no effect of spaceflight factors on early

  3. The Effects of Obesity on Murine Cortical Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sophi

    This dissertation details the effects of obesity on the mechanical properties and structure of cortical bone. Obesity is associated with greater bone mineral content that might be expected to protect against fracture, which has been observed in adults. Paradoxically however, the incidence of bone fractures has been found to increase in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Femora from adolescent and adult mice fed a high-fat diet are investigated for changes in shape, tissue structure, as well as tissue-level and whole-bone mechanical properties. Results indicate increased bone size, reduced size-independent mechanical properties, but maintained size-dependent mechanical properties. Other changes in cortical bone response to obesity are observed with advancing age. This study indicates that bone quantity and bone quality play important compensatory roles in determining fracture risk, and that fracture risk may not be lessened for adults as previously thought.

  4. Bone Fracture Exacerbates Murine Ischemic Cerebral Injury

    PubMed Central

    Degos, Vincent; Maze, Mervyn; Vacas, Susana; Hirsch, Jan; Guo, Yi; Shen, Fanxia; Jun, Kristine; van Rooijen, Nico; Gressens, Pierre; Young, William L.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone fracture increases alarmins and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood, and provokes macrophage infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the hippocampus. We recently reported that stroke is an independent risk factor after bone surgery for adverse outcome, the impact of bone fracture on stroke outcome is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that bone fracture, shortly after ischemic stroke, enhances stroke-related injuries by augmenting the neuroinflammatory response. Methods Tibia fracture (bone fracture) was induced in mice one day after permanent occlusion of the distal middle cerebral artery (stroke). High-mobility-group box chromosomal protein-1 (HMGB1) was tested to mimic the bone fracture effects. HMGB1 neutralizing antibody and clodrolip (macrophage depletion) were tested to attenuate the bone fracture effects. Neurobehavioral function (n=10), infarct volume, neuronal death, and macrophages/microglia-infiltration (n=6–7) were analyzed three days after. Results We found that mice with both stroke and bone fracture had larger infarct volumes (mean percentage of ipsilateral hemisphere±SD: 30±7% vs. 12±3%, n=6, P<0.001) more severe neurobehavioral dysfunction, and more macrophages/microglia in the peri-infarct region than mice with stroke only. Intraperitoneal injection of HMGB1 mimicked, whereas neutralizing HMGB1 attenuated, the bone fracture effects and the macrophage/microglia infiltration. Depleting macrophages with clodrolip also attenuated the aggravating effects of bone fracture on stroke lesion and behavioral dysfunction. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that bone fracture shortly after stroke enhances stroke injury via augmented inflammation through HMGB1 and macrophage/microglia infiltration. Interventions to modulate early macrophage/microglia activation could be therapeutic goals to limit the adverse consequences of bone fracture after stroke. PMID:23438676

  5. Murine Hind Limb Long Bone Dissection and Bone Marrow Isolation.

    PubMed

    Amend, Sarah R; Valkenburg, Kenneth C; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the bone and the bone marrow is critical in many research fields including basic bone biology, immunology, hematology, cancer metastasis, biomechanics, and stem cell biology. Despite the importance of the bone in healthy and pathologic states, however, it is a largely under-researched organ due to lack of specialized knowledge of bone dissection and bone marrow isolation. Mice are a common model organism to study effects on bone and bone marrow, necessitating a standardized and efficient method for long bone dissection and bone marrow isolation for processing of large experimental cohorts. We describe a straightforward dissection procedure for the removal of the femur and tibia that is suitable for downstream applications, including but not limited to histomorphologic analysis and strength testing. In addition, we outline a rapid procedure for isolation of bone marrow from the long bones via centrifugation with limited handling time, ideal for cell sorting, primary cell culture, or DNA, RNA, and protein extraction. The protocol is streamlined for rapid processing of samples to limit experimental error, and is standardized to minimize user-to-user variability. PMID:27168390

  6. Murine Hind Limb Long Bone Dissection and Bone Marrow Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Amend, Sarah R.; Valkenburg, Kenneth C.; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the bone and the bone marrow is critical in many research fields including basic bone biology, immunology, hematology, cancer metastasis, biomechanics, and stem cell biology. Despite the importance of the bone in healthy and pathologic states, however, it is a largely under-researched organ due to lack of specialized knowledge of bone dissection and bone marrow isolation. Mice are a common model organism to study effects on bone and bone marrow, necessitating a standardized and efficient method for long bone dissection and bone marrow isolation for processing of large experimental cohorts. We describe a straightforward dissection procedure for the removal of the femur and tibia that is suitable for downstream applications, including but not limited to histomorphologic analysis and strength testing. In addition, we outline a rapid procedure for isolation of bone marrow from the long bones via centrifugation with limited handling time, ideal for cell sorting, primary cell culture, or DNA, RNA, and protein extraction. The protocol is streamlined for rapid processing of samples to limit experimental error, and is standardized to minimize user-to-user variability. PMID:27168390

  7. Quantitative image analysis of cell colocalization in murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Zeinab; Mech, Franziska; Zehentmeier, Sandra; Hauser, Anja E; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2015-06-01

    Long-term antibody production is a key property of humoral immunity and is accomplished by long-lived plasma cells. They mainly reside in the bone marrow, whose importance as an organ hosting immunological memory is becoming increasingly evident. Signals provided by stromal cells and eosinophils may play an important role for plasma cell maintenance, constituting a survival microenvironment. In this joint study of experiment and theory, we investigated the spatial colocalization of plasma cells, eosinophils and B cells by applying an image-based systems biology approach. To this end, we generated confocal fluorescence microscopy images of histological sections from murine bone marrow that were subsequently analyzed in an automated fashion. This quantitative analysis was combined with computer simulations of the experimental system for hypothesis testing. In particular, we tested the observed spatial colocalization of cells in the bone marrow against the hypothesis that cells are found within available areas at positions that were drawn from a uniform random number distribution. We find that B cells and plasma cells highly colocalize with stromal cells, to an extent larger than in the simulated random situation. While B cells are preferentially in contact with each other, i.e., form clusters among themselves, plasma cells seem to be solitary or organized in aggregates, i.e., loosely defined groups of cells that are not necessarily in direct contact. Our data suggest that the plasma cell bone marrow survival niche facilitates colocalization of plasma cells with stromal cells and eosinophils, respectively, promoting plasma cell longevity.

  8. [Kinetic study of splenocytes after allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Hua; Zhou, Fan; Dou, Li-Ping; Wang, Li-Li; Wang, Xin-Rong; Li, Li; Yu, Li

    2010-08-01

    The study was purposed to understand immunological reconstitution of peripheral immune organs after transplantation, through establishing allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation model and detecting the kinetic change of splenocytes after transplantation. C57BL/6 mice were donors, BALB/c mice were recipients. Recipient mice were divided into irradiation group (R), irradiation plus inoculating bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNC) group (B), and irradiation plus inoculating bone marrow mononuclear cells and spleno-MNC group (S). After transplantation, the mice were examined daily for the symptoms such as weight, hunched posture, activity, ruffled fur, diarrhea, and survival. Blood routine test was done once a week, splenocyte was counted and CD3, CD4, CD8, B220, CD11c positive cell relative count was detected by FACS on day 2, 7, 14, 27, 60 after transplantation, Liver, skin and intestine were biopsied for histopathological examination before dying. The results indicated that 89% mice in S group died of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) during day 6 to 78. The spleno-mononuclear cell count quickly decreased and reached to lowest level on day 2, then gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 14; CD8 and B220 positive cells decreased to lowest level on day 12, in which CD8(+) cells quickly recovered and reached to level of pretransplantation, but the B220(+) recovered most slowly and sustained to be with low level, then gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 60; CD3 and CD4 positive cells decreased relatively slowly, and reached to lowest level on day 14, then both gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 60; CD11c positive cell count changed unstrikingly except day 14. It is concluded that when C57BL/6 mice are donors, and BALB/c mice are recipients treated with irradiation of 7.5 Gy and inoculated with 1 x 10⁷ bone marrow MNC and 1 x 10⁷ spleno-MNC, allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation model

  9. Developmental and Genetic Origins of Murine Long Bone Length Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Thomas J.; Norgard, Elizabeth A.; Pletscher, L. Susan; Bevilacqua, Michael; Brooks, Victoria R.; Sandell, Linda M.; Cheverud, James M.

    2011-01-01

    If we wish to understand whether development influences the rate or direction of morphological evolution, we must first understand the developmental bases of morphological variation within species. However, quantitative variation in adult morphology is the product of molecular and cellular processes unfolding from embryonic development through juvenile growth to maturity. The Atchley-Hall model provides a useful framework for dissecting complex morphologies into their component parts as a way of determining which developmental processes contribute to variation in adult form. We have examined differences in postnatal allometry and the patterns of genetic correlation between age-specific traits for 10 recombinant inbred strains of mice generated from an intercross of LG/J and SM/J. Long bone length is closely tied to body size, but variation in adult morphology is more closely tied to differences in growth rate between 3 and 5 weeks of age. These analyses show that variation generated during early development is overridden by variation generated later in life. To more precisely determine the cellular processes generating this variation we then examined the cellular dynamics of long bone growth plates at the time of maximum elongation rate differences in the parent strains. Our analyses revealed that variation in long bone length is the result of faster elongation rates of the LG/J stain. The developmental bases for these differences in growth rate involve the rate of cell division and chondrocyte hypertrophy in the growth plate. PMID:21328530

  10. Saliva suppresses osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow cultures.

    PubMed

    Caballé-Serrano, J; Cvikl, B; Bosshardt, D D; Buser, D; Lussi, A; Gruber, R

    2015-01-01

    Saliva can reach mineralized surfaces in the oral cavity; however, the relationship between saliva and bone resorption is unclear. Herein, we examined whether saliva affects the process of osteoclastogenesis in vitro. We used murine bone marrow cultures to study osteoclast formation. The addition of fresh sterile saliva eliminated the formation of multinucleated cells that stained positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). In line with the histochemical staining, saliva substantially reduced gene expression of cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and TRAP. Addition of saliva led to considerably decreased gene expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) and, to a lesser extent, that of c-fms. The respective master regulators of osteoclastogenesis (c-fos and NFATc1) and the downstream cell fusion genes (DC-STAMP and Atp6v0d2) showed decreased expression after the addition of saliva. Among the costimulatory molecules for osteoclastogenesis, only OSCAR showed decreased expression. In contrast, CD40, CD80, and CD86-all costimulatory molecules of phagocytic cells-were increasingly expressed with saliva. The phagocytic capacity of the cells was confirmed by latex bead ingestion. Based on these in vitro results, it can be concluded that saliva suppresses osteoclastogenesis and leads to the development of a phagocytic cell phenotype.

  11. New bone formation by murine osteoprogenitor cells cultured on corticocancellous allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ehren R; Huang, Zhinong; Ma, Ting; Lindsey, Derek; Jacobs, Christopher; Smith, Robert L; Goodman, Stuart B

    2008-12-01

    The gold standard for bone grafting in orthopedics is autograft, however autograft has a limited supply and is associated with significant morbidity at the harvest site. One alternative, allograft bone, provides an osteoconductive scaffold, is in less limited supply, and it does not require a harvest from the patient. However, allograft lacks both osteogenic cells and osteoinductive proteins that make autograft bone so advantageous. This study provides a model to investigate strategies for augmentation of corticocancellous allograft bone discs with bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells (OPCs) plus exogenous growth factors in vitro. In this model, allograft bone discs were created by cutting 1-mm thick slices from the distal femur and proximal tibia of euthanized mice. The allografts were sterilized and scanned by micro-computed tomography (microCT) to provide the pre-culture graft volume and trabecular characteristics. The discs were then seeded with OPCs harvested from murine bone marrow. The seeded grafts were placed in organ culture until harvest, after which they were re-scanned by microCT and the data compared to the corresponding pre-culture data. In addition, bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7, also know as osteogenic protein-1 or OP-1), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and OP-1 combined with bFGF were added on a daily basis to the cultures. After final microCT scanning, all grafts were sectioned and evaluated histologically after hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. microCT scans of cultured allografts with cells at 3, 5, and 9 weeks showed a time-dependent, statistically significant increase in bone volume. The trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.) of grafts, from both groups that were augmented with OP-1, showed a statistically significant increase in trabecular thickness of allografts with OPCs. These data suggest that bone marrow-derived OPCs adhere to, and produce, new bone on corticocancellous allograft in vitro. When exogenous OP-1 is added to

  12. Engineering vascularized bone: osteogenic and proangiogenic potential of murine periosteal cells.

    PubMed

    van Gastel, Nick; Torrekens, Sophie; Roberts, Scott J; Moermans, Karen; Schrooten, Jan; Carmeliet, Peter; Luttun, Aernout; Luyten, Frank P; Carmeliet, Geert

    2012-11-01

    One of the key challenges in bone tissue engineering is the timely formation of blood vessels that promote the survival of the implanted cells in the construct. Fracture healing largely depends on the presence of an intact periosteum but it is still unknown whether periosteum-derived cells (PDC) are critical for bone repair only by promoting bone formation or also by inducing neovascularization. We first established a protocol to specifically isolate murine PDC (mPDC) from long bones of adult mice. Mesenchymal stem cells were abundantly present in this cell population as more than 50% of the mPDC expressed mesenchymal markers (CD73, CD90, CD105, and stem cell antigen-1) and the cells exhibited trilineage differentiation potential (chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic). When transplanted on a collagen-calcium phosphate scaffold in vivo, mPDC attracted numerous blood vessels and formed mature bone which comprises a hematopoiesis-supportive stroma. We explored the proangiogenic properties of mPDC using in vitro culture systems and showed that mPDC promote the survival and proliferation of endothelial cells through the production of vascular endothelial growth factor. Coimplantation with endothelial cells demonstrated that mPDC can enhance vasculogenesis by adapting a pericyte-like phenotype, in addition to their ability to stimulate blood vessel ingrowth from the host. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that periosteal cells contribute to fracture repair, not only through their strong osteogenic potential but also through their proangiogenic features and thus provide an ideal cell source for bone regeneration therapies.

  13. Partial Characterization of the Sox2+ Cell Population in an Adult Murine Model of Digit Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vineet; Siu, Bernard F.; Chao, Hsu; Hirschi, Karen K.; Raborn, Eric; Johnson, Scott A.; Tottey, Stephen; Hurley, Katherine B.; Medberry, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue regeneration in response to injury in adult mammals is generally limited to select tissues. Nonmammalian species such as newts and axolotls undergo regeneration of complex tissues such as limbs and digits via recruitment and accumulation of local and circulating multipotent progenitors preprogrammed to recapitulate the missing tissue. Directed recruitment and activation of progenitor cells at a site of injury in adult mammals may alter the default wound-healing response from scar tissue toward regeneration. Bioactive molecules derived from proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo to the site of injury. The present study further characterized the population of cells accumulating at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products in a well-established model of murine digit amputation. After a mid-second phalanx digit amputation in 6–8-week-old adult mice, treatment with ECM degradation products resulted in the accumulation of a heterogeneous population of cells, a subset of which expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a marker of pluripotent and adult progenitor cells. Sox2+ cells were localized lateral to the amputated P2 bone and coexpressed progenitor cell markers CD90 and Sca1. Transgenic Sox2 eGFP/+ and bone marrow chimeric mice showed that the bone marrow and blood circulation did not contribute to the Sox2+ cell population. The present study showed that, in addition to circulating progenitor cells, resident tissue-derived cells also populate at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products. Although future work is necessary to determine the contribution of Sox2+ cells to functional tissue at the site of injury, recruitment and/or activation of local tissue-derived cells may be a viable approach to tissue engineering of more complex tissues in adult mammals. PMID:22530556

  14. Denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to RANKL, inhibits bone resorption and increases BMD in knock-in mice that express chimeric (murine/human) RANKL.

    PubMed

    Kostenuik, Paul J; Nguyen, Hung Q; McCabe, James; Warmington, Kelly S; Kurahara, Carol; Sun, Ning; Chen, Ching; Li, Luke; Cattley, Russ C; Van, Gwyneth; Scully, Shelia; Elliott, Robin; Grisanti, Mario; Morony, Sean; Tan, Hong Lin; Asuncion, Frank; Li, Xiaodong; Ominsky, Michael S; Stolina, Marina; Dwyer, Denise; Dougall, William C; Hawkins, Nessa; Boyle, William J; Simonet, William S; Sullivan, John K

    2009-02-01

    RANKL is a TNF family member that mediates osteoclast formation, activation, and survival by activating RANK. The proresorptive effects of RANKL are prevented by binding to its soluble inhibitor osteoprotegerin (OPG). Recombinant human OPG-Fc recognizes RANKL from multiple species and reduced bone resorption and increased bone volume, density, and strength in a number of rodent models of bone disease. The clinical development of OPG-Fc was discontinued in favor of denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits primate RANKL. Direct binding assays showed that denosumab bound to human RANKL but not to murine RANKL, human TRAIL, or other human TNF family members. Denosumab did not suppress bone resorption in normal mice or rats but did prevent the resorptive response in mice challenged with a human RANKL fragment encoded primarily by the fifth exon of the RANKL gene. To create mice that were responsive to denosumab, knock-in technology was used to replace exon 5 from murine RANKL with its human ortholog. The resulting "huRANKL" mice exclusively express chimeric (human/murine) RANKL that was measurable with a human RANKL assay and that maintained bone resorption at slightly reduced levels versus wildtype controls. In young huRANKL mice, denosumab and OPG-Fc each reduced trabecular osteoclast surfaces by 95% and increased bone density and volume. In adult huRANKL mice, denosumab reduced bone resorption, increased cortical and cancellous bone mass, and improved trabecular microarchitecture. These huRANKL mice have potential utility for characterizing the activity of denosumab in a variety of murine bone disease models.

  15. Can the adult skeleton recover lost bone?

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, A; Schneider, V

    1991-01-01

    The loss of bone mineral with aging and subsequent development of osteoporosis is a common problem in elderly women, and as life expectancy increases, in elderly men as well. Space flight also causes bone loss and could be a limiting factor for long duration missions, such as, a Mars expedition or extended occupation of a space station. Before effective countermeasures can be devised, a thorough knowledge of the extent, location, and rate of bone loss during weightlessness is needed from actual space flight data or ground-based disuse models. In addition, the rate and extent that these losses are reversed after return from space flight are of primary importance. Although the mechanisms are not likely to be the same in aging and space flight, there are common elements. For example, strategies developed to prevent disuse bone loss or to enhance the rate of recovery following space flight might have direct applicability to clinical medicine. For various reasons, little attention has been given to recovery of bone mass following space flight. As a prelude to the design of strategies to enhance recovery of bone, this paper reviews published literature related to bone recovery in the adult. We conclude that recovery can be expected, but the rate and extent will be individual and bone site dependent. The development of strategies to encourage or enhance bone formation following space flight may be as important as implementing countermeasures during flight.

  16. Can the adult skeleton recover lost bone?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Adrian; Schneider, Victor

    1991-01-01

    The loss of bone mineral with aging and subsequent development of osteoporosis is a common problem in elderly women, and as life expectancy increases, in elderly men as well. Space flight also causes bone loss and could be a limiting factor for long duration missions, such as, a Mars expedition or extended occupation of a Space Station. Before effective countermeasures can be devised, a thorough knowledge of the extent, location, and rate of bone loss during weightlessness is needed from actual space flight data or ground-based disuse models. In addition, the rate and extent that these losses are reversed after return from space flight are of primary importance. Although the mechanisms are not likely to be the same in aging and space flight, there are common elements. For example, strategies developed to prevent disuse bone loss or to enhance the rate of recovery following space flight might have direct applicability to clinical medicine. For various reasons, little attention has been given to recovery of bone mass following space flight. As a prelude to the design of strategies to enhance recovery of bone, this paper reviews published literature related to bone recovery in the adult. We conclude that recovery can be expected, but the rate and extent will be individual and bone site dependent. The development of strategies to encourage or enhance bone formation following space flight may be as important as implementing countermeasures during flight.

  17. Assessment of murine bone ultrastructure using synchrotron light: towards nano-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Voide, Romain; Stauber, Martin; Stampanoni, Marco; Donahue, Leah Rae; Wyss, Peter; Sennhauser, Urs; Müller, Ralph

    2006-08-01

    To describe the different aspects of bone quality, we follow a hierarchical approach and assess bone tissue properties in different regimes of spatial resolution, beginning at the organ level and going down to cellular dimensions. For these purposes we developed different synchrotron radiation (SR) based computed-tomography (CT) methods to assess murine bone ultrastructure. In a first step, a tubular system and the osteocyte lacunar system within murine cortical bone have been established as novel ultrastructural quantitative traits. Results in two mouse strains showed that morphometry of these quantitative traits was dependent on strain and partially on gender, and that their scaling behavior with bone size was fundamentally different. In a second step, we explored bone competence on an ultrastructural level and related our findings to the two ultrastructural quantitative traits introduced before. We showed that SR CT imaging is a powerful tool to investigate the initiation and propagation of microcracks, which may alter bone quality and may lead to increased fracture risk by means of microdamage accumulation. In summary, investigation of ultrastructural bone tissue properties will eventually lead to a better understanding of bone quality and its relative contribution to bone competence.

  18. A Novel Population of Cells Expressing Both Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Markers Is Present in the Normal Adult Bone Marrow and Is Augmented in a Murine Model of Marrow Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohishi, Masanobu; Ono, Wanida; Ono, Noriaki; Khatri, Richa; Marzia, Marilena; Baker, Emma K.; Root, Sierra H.; Wilson, Tremika Le-Shan; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Aguila, Hector L.; Purton, Louise E.; Schipani, Ernestina

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) fibrosis is a feature of severe hyperparathyroidism. Consistent with this observation, mice expressing constitutively active parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptors (PPR) in osteoblasts (PPR*Tg) display BM fibrosis. To obtain insight into the nature of BM fibrosis in such a model, a double-mutant mouse expressing constitutively active PPR and green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the type I collagen promoter (PPR*Tg/GFP) was generated. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry revealed the presence of a cell population expressing GFP (GFP+) that was also positive for the hematopoietic marker CD45 in the BM of both PPR*Tg/GFP and control animals. This cell population was expanded in PPR*Tg/GFP. The existence of cells expressing both type I collagen and CD45 in the adult BM was confirmed by IHC and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. An analysis of total RNA extracted from sorted GFP+CD45+ cells showed that these cells produced type I collagen and PTH/PTH-related peptide receptor and receptor activator for NF-κB mRNAs, further supporting their features of being both mesenchymal and hematopoietic lineages. Similar cells, known as fibrocytes, are also present in pathological fibroses. Our findings, thus, indicate that the BM is a permissive microenvironment for the differentiation of fibrocyte-like cells and raise the possibility that these cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of BM fibrosis. PMID:22155108

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  20. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  1. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Murine Bone In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Kreider, Jaclynn M.; Esmonde-White, Francis; Dooley, Kathryn A.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy can provide valuable information about bone tissue composition in studies of bone development, biomechanics, and health. In order to study the Raman spectra of bone in vivo, instrumentation that enhances the recovery of subsurface spectra must be developed and validated. Five fiber-optic probe configurations were considered for transcutaneous bone Raman spectroscopy of small animals. Measurements were obtained from the tibia of sacrificed mice, and the bone Raman signal was recovered for each probe configuration. The configuration with the optimal combination of bone signal intensity, signal variance, and power distribution was then evaluated under in vivo conditions. Multiple in vivo transcutaneous measurements were obtained from the left tibia of 32 anesthetized mice. After collecting the transcutaneous Raman signal, exposed bone measurements were collected and used as a validation reference. Multivariate analysis was used to recover bone spectra from transcutaneous measurements. To assess the validity of the transcutaneous bone measurements cross-correlations were calculated between standardized spectra from the recovered bone signal and the exposed bone measurements. Additionally, the carbonate-to-phosphate height ratios of the recovered bone signals were compared to the reference exposed bone measurements. The mean cross-correlation coefficient between the recovered and exposed measurements was 0.96, and the carbonate-to-phosphate ratios did not differ significantly between the two sets of spectra (p > 0.05). During these first systematic in vivo Raman measurements, we discovered that probe alignment and animal coat color influenced the results and thus should be considered in future probe and study designs. Nevertheless, our noninvasive Raman spectroscopic probe accurately assessed bone tissue composition through the skin in live mice. PMID:19281644

  2. Peptide-induced de novo bone formation after tooth extraction prevents alveolar bone loss in a murine tooth extraction model.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Ono, Takashi; Murali, Ramachandran; Mise-Omata, Setsuko; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-07-01

    Tooth extraction causes bone resorption of the alveolar bone volume. Although recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) markedly promotes de novo bone formation after tooth extraction, the application of high-dose rhBMP-2 may induce side effects, such as swelling, seroma, and an increased cancer risk. Therefore, reduction of the necessary dose of rhBMP-2 which can still obtain sufficient bone mass is necessary by developing a new osteogenic reagent. Recently, we showed that the systemic administration of OP3-4 peptide, which was originally designed as a bone resorption inhibitor, had osteogenic ability both in vitro and in vivo. This study evaluated the ability of the local application of OP3-4 peptide to promote bone formation in a murine tooth extraction model with a very low-dose of BMP. The mandibular incisor was extracted from 10-week-old C57BL6/J male mice and a gelatin hydrogel containing rhBMP-2 with or without OP3-4 peptide (BMP/OP3-4) was applied to the socket of the incisor. Bone formation inside the socket was examined radiologically and histologically at 21 days after the extraction. The BMP/OP3-4-group showed significant bone formation inside the mandibular extraction socket compared to the gelatin-hydrogel-carrier-control group or rhBMP-2-applied group. The BMP/OP3-4-applied mice showed a lower reduction of alveolar bone and fewer osteoclast numbers, suggesting that the newly formed bone inside the socket may prevent resorption of the cortical bone around the extraction socket. Our data revealed that OP3-4 peptide promotes BMP-mediated bone formation inside the extraction socket of mandibular bone, resulting in preservation from the loss of alveolar bone. PMID:27118173

  3. The preparation of primary hematopoietic cell cultures from murine bone marrow for electroporation.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Kelly; Collins, Michelle; Ugozzoli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that electroporation is the most effective way to introduce plasmid DNA or siRNA into primary cells. The Gene Pulser MXcell electroporation system and Gene Pulser electroporation buffer were specifically developed to transfect nucleic acids into mammalian cells and difficult-to-transfect cells, such as primary and stem cells.This video demonstrates how to establish primary hematopoietic cell cultures from murine bone marrow, and then prepare them for electroporation in the MXcell system. We begin by isolating femur and tibia. Bone marrow from both femur and tibia are then harvested and cultures are established. Cultured bone marrow cells are then transfected and analyzed. PMID:19229174

  4. Exercise and bone mass in adults.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Fuentes, Teresa; Guerra, Borja; Calbet, Jose A L

    2009-01-01

    There is a substantial body of evidence indicating that exercise prior to the pubertal growth spurt stimulates bone growth and skeletal muscle hypertrophy to a greater degree than observed during growth in non-physically active children. Bone mass can be increased by some exercise programmes in adults and the elderly, and attenuate the losses in bone mass associated with aging. This review provides an overview of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies performed to date involving training and bone measurements. Cross-sectional studies show in general that exercise modalities requiring high forces and/or generating high impacts have the greatest osteogenic potential. Several training methods have been used to improve bone mineral density (BMD) and content in prospective studies. Not all exercise modalities have shown positive effects on bone mass. For example, unloaded exercise such as swimming has no impact on bone mass, while walking or running has limited positive effects. It is not clear which training method is superior for bone stimulation in adults, although scientific evidence points to a combination of high-impact (i.e. jumping) and weight-lifting exercises. Exercise involving high impacts, even a relatively small amount, appears to be the most efficient for enhancing bone mass, except in postmenopausal women. Several types of resistance exercise have been tested also with positive results, especially when the intensity of the exercise is high and the speed of movement elevated. A handful of other studies have reported little or no effect on bone density. However, these results may be partially attributable to the study design, intensity and duration of the exercise protocol, and the bone density measurement techniques used. Studies performed in older adults show only mild increases, maintenance or just attenuation of BMD losses in postmenopausal women, but net changes in BMD relative to control subjects who are losing bone mass are beneficial in

  5. Exercise and bone mass in adults.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Fuentes, Teresa; Guerra, Borja; Calbet, Jose A L

    2009-01-01

    There is a substantial body of evidence indicating that exercise prior to the pubertal growth spurt stimulates bone growth and skeletal muscle hypertrophy to a greater degree than observed during growth in non-physically active children. Bone mass can be increased by some exercise programmes in adults and the elderly, and attenuate the losses in bone mass associated with aging. This review provides an overview of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies performed to date involving training and bone measurements. Cross-sectional studies show in general that exercise modalities requiring high forces and/or generating high impacts have the greatest osteogenic potential. Several training methods have been used to improve bone mineral density (BMD) and content in prospective studies. Not all exercise modalities have shown positive effects on bone mass. For example, unloaded exercise such as swimming has no impact on bone mass, while walking or running has limited positive effects. It is not clear which training method is superior for bone stimulation in adults, although scientific evidence points to a combination of high-impact (i.e. jumping) and weight-lifting exercises. Exercise involving high impacts, even a relatively small amount, appears to be the most efficient for enhancing bone mass, except in postmenopausal women. Several types of resistance exercise have been tested also with positive results, especially when the intensity of the exercise is high and the speed of movement elevated. A handful of other studies have reported little or no effect on bone density. However, these results may be partially attributable to the study design, intensity and duration of the exercise protocol, and the bone density measurement techniques used. Studies performed in older adults show only mild increases, maintenance or just attenuation of BMD losses in postmenopausal women, but net changes in BMD relative to control subjects who are losing bone mass are beneficial in

  6. Histological and In Vivo Microscopic Analysis of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment in a Murine Model of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weissenberger, Eva S; Krause, Daniela S

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the leukemic bone marrow microenvironment, also called the leukemic bone marrow niche, is an essential method to determine and to evaluate the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other leukemias in murine models. In this chapter we introduce the murine model of CML primarily used in our laboratory by describing blood and bone marrow analysis as well as the method of histological sectioning and immunohistochemistry in combination with various stainings that can help to understand the complex interaction between leukemic cells, their normal hematopoietic counterparts, and the bone marrow microenvironment. We conclude with describing how to image the bone marrow niche using in vivo microscopy. PMID:27581139

  7. Loss of estrogen upregulates osteoblastogenesis in the murine bone marrow. Evidence for autonomy from factors released during bone resorption.

    PubMed Central

    Jilka, R L; Takahashi, K; Munshi, M; Williams, D C; Roberson, P K; Manolagas, S C

    1998-01-01

    Loss of sex steroids causes an increase in both the resorption and formation of bone, with the former exceeding the latter. Based on evidence that the increased bone resorption after estrogen loss is due to an increase in osteoclastogenesis, we hypothesized that estrogen loss also stimulates osteoblastogenesis. We report that the number of mesenchymal osteoblast progenitors in the murine bone marrow was increased two- to threefold between 2 and 8 wk after ovariectomy and returned to control levels by 16 wk. Circulating osteocalcin, as well as osteoclastogenesis and the rate of bone loss, followed a very similar temporal pattern. Inhibition of bone resorption by administration of the bisphosphonate alendronate led to a decrease of the absolute number of osteoblast progenitors; however, it did not influence the stimulating effect of ovariectomy on osteoblastogenesis or osteoclastogenesis. These observations indicate that the increased bone formation that follows loss of estrogen can be explained, at least in part, by an increase in osteoblastogenesis. Moreover, they strongly suggest that unlike normal bone remodeling, whereby osteoblast development is stimulated by factors released from the bone matrix during osteoclastic resorption, estrogen deficiency unleashes signals that can stimulate the differentiation of osteoblast progenitors in a fashion that is autonomous from the need created by bone resorption, and therefore, inappropriate. PMID:9576759

  8. Knee loading stimulates cortical bone formation in murine femurs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Su, Min; Tanaka, Shigeo M; Yokota, Hiroki

    2006-01-01

    Background Bone alters its architecture and mass in response to the mechanical environment, and thus varying loading modalities have been examined for studying load-driven bone formation. The current study aimed to evaluate the anabolic effects of knee loading on diaphyseal cortical bone in the femur. Methods Using a custom-made piezoelectric loader, 0.5-N loads were laterally applied to the left knee of C57/BL/6 mice at 5, 10, 15, and 20 Hz for 3 minutes per day for 3 consecutive days. Animals were sacrificed for examination 13 days after the last loading. The contralateral femur was used as a non-loading control, and the statistical significance of loading effects was evaluated with p < 0.05. Results Although diaphyseal strains were measured as small as 12 μstrains, bone histomorphometry clearly demonstrated frequency-dependent enhancement of bone formation. Compared to a non-loading control, bone formation on the periosteal surface was significantly enhanced. The loading at 15 Hz was most effective in elevating the mineralizing surface (1.7 x; p < 0.05), mineral apposition rate (1.4 x; p < 0.001), and bone formation rate (2.4 x; p < 0.01). The loading at 10 Hz elevated the mineralizing surface (1.4 x; p < 0.05), mineral apposition rate (1.3 x; p < 0.01), and bone formation rate (1.8 x; p < 0.05). The cross-sectional cortical area and the cortical thickness in the femoral diaphysis were significantly increased by loading at 10 Hz (both 9%) and 15 Hz (12% and 13%, respectively). Conclusion The results support the anabolic effects of knee loading on diaphyseal cortical bone in the femur with small in situ strain, and they extend our knowledge on the interplay between bone and joints. Strengthening the femur contributes to preventing femoral fractures, and the discovery about the described knee loading might provide a novel strategy to strengthen osteoporotic bones. Further analyses are required to understand the biophysical and molecular mechanism behind knee

  9. Femur Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Cell Tracking in the Murine Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghong; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; DaCosta, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow is a complex organ that contains various hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. These cells are involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, immune regulation and tumor regulation. Commonly used methods for understanding cellular actions in the bone marrow, such as histology and blood counts, provide static information rather than capturing the dynamic action of multiple cellular components in vivo. To complement the standard methods, a window chamber (WC)-based model was developed to enable serial in vivo imaging of cells and structures in the murine bone marrow. This protocol describes a surgical procedure for installing the WC in the femur, in order to facilitate long-term optical access to the femoral bone marrow. In particular, to demonstrate its experimental utility, this WC approach was used to image and track neutrophils within the vascular network of the femur, thereby providing a novel method to visualize and quantify immune cell trafficking and regulation in the bone marrow. This method can be applied to study various biological processes in the murine bone marrow, such as hematopoiesis, stem cell transplantation, and immune responses in pathological conditions, including cancer. PMID:27500928

  10. Single-Limb Irradiation Induces Local and Systemic Bone Loss in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wright, Laura E; Buijs, Jeroen T; Kim, Hun-Soo; Coats, Laura E; Scheidler, Anne M; John, Sutha K; She, Yun; Murthy, Sreemala; Ma, Ning; Chin-Sinex, Helen J; Bellido, Teresita M; Bateman, Ted A; Mendonca, Marc S; Mohammad, Khalid S; Guise, Theresa A

    2015-07-01

    Increased fracture risk is commonly reported in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy, particularly at sites within the field of treatment. The direct and systemic effects of ionizing radiation on bone at a therapeutic dose are not well-characterized in clinically relevant animal models. Using 20-week-old male C57Bl/6 mice, effects of irradiation (right hindlimb; 2 Gy) on bone volume and microarchitecture were evaluated prospectively by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry and compared to contralateral-shielded bone (left hindlimb) and non-irradiated control bone. One week postirradiation, trabecular bone volume declined in irradiated tibias (-22%; p < 0.0001) and femurs (-14%; p = 0.0586) and microarchitectural parameters were compromised. Trabecular bone volume declined in contralateral tibias (-17%; p = 0.003), and no loss was detected at the femur. Osteoclast number, apoptotic osteocyte number, and marrow adiposity were increased in irradiated bone relative to contralateral and non-irradiated bone, whereas osteoblast number was unchanged. Despite no change in osteoblast number 1 week postirradiation, dynamic bone formation indices revealed a reduction in mineralized bone surface and a concomitant increase in unmineralized osteoid surface area in irradiated bone relative to contralateral and non-irradiated control bone. Further, dose-dependent and time-dependent calvarial culture and in vitro assays confirmed that calvarial osteoblasts and osteoblast-like MC3T3 cells were relatively radioresistant, whereas calvarial osteocyte and osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cell apoptosis was induced as early as 48 hours postirradiation (4 Gy). In osteoclastogenesis assays, radiation exposure (8 Gy) stimulated murine macrophage RAW264.7 cell differentiation, and coculture of irradiated RAW264.7 cells with MLO-Y4 or murine bone marrow cells enhanced this effect. These studies highlight the multifaceted nature of radiation-induced bone loss by demonstrating direct

  11. Identification and enrichment of colony-forming cells from the adult murine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Lepore, D.A.; Roeszler, K.; Wagner, J.; Ross, S.A.; Bauer, K.; Thomas, P.Q. , E-Mail: paul.thomas@mcri.edu.au

    2005-08-01

    Stem and progenitor cells have been identified in many adult tissues including bone marrow, the central nervous system, and skin. While there is direct evidence to indicate the activity of a progenitor cell population in the pituitary gland, this putative subpopulation has not yet been identified. Herein we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel clonogenic cell type in the adult murine pituitary, which we have termed Pituitary Colony-Forming Cells (PCFCs). PCFCs constitute 0.2% of pituitary cells, and generate heterogeneous colonies from single cells. PCFCs exhibit variable proliferative potential, and may exceed 11 population doublings in 14 days. Enrichment of PCFCs to 61.5-fold with 100% recovery can be obtained through the active uptake of the fluorescent dipeptide, {beta}-Ala-Lys-N{epsilon}-AMCA. PCFCs are mostly contained within the large, agranular subpopulation of AMCA{sup +} cells, and constitute 28% of this fraction, corresponding to 140.5-fold enrichment. Interestingly, the AMCA{sup +} population contains rare cells that are GH{sup +} or PRL{sup +}. GH{sup +} cells were also identified in PCFC single cell colonies, suggesting that PCFCs have the potential to differentiate into GH{sup +} cells. Together, these data show that the pituitary contains a rare clonogenic population which may correspond to the somatotrope/lactotrope progenitors suggested by previous experiments.

  12. In-vitro circadian rhythm of murine bone marrow progenitor production.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Philippe; Ledain, Arnaud F; Beau, Jacques; Mille, Dominique; Lévi, Francis

    2002-01-01

    Hematopoietic processes display 24h rhythms both in rodents and in human beings. We hypothesized these rhythms to be in part generated by a circadian oscillator within the bone marrow. The ability of murine bone marrow granulo-monocytic (GM) precursors to form colonies following colony-stimulating factor (rm GM-CSF) exposure was investigated in liquid culture samples obtained every 3 h for a span of up to 198 h. The CFU-GM count varied rhythmically over the first 4 d of culture, with a reproducible maximum in the early morning hours, similar to that observed in vivo. These experiments provide the first evidence that bone marrow progenitors sustain in vitro circadian rhythmicity, and they demonstrate the presence of a circadian time-keeping system within these cells. The results support the potential usefulness of bone marrow cultures for investigating chronopharmacologic effects of anticancer drugs and cytokines on this target system.

  13. The effects of simulated hypogravity on murine bone marrow cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Desales

    1989-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells grown in complete medium at unit gravity were compared with a similar population cultured in conditions that mimic some aspects of microgravity. After the cells adjusted to the conditions that simulated microgravity, they proliferated as fetal or oncogenic populations; their numbers doubled in twelve hour periods. Differentiated subpopulations were depleted from the heterogeneous mixture with time and the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem cells increased in numbers. The cells in the control groups in unit gravity and those in the bioreactors in conditions of microgravity were monitored under a number of parameters. Each were phenotyped as to cell surface antigens using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. Other parameters compared included: pH, glucose uptake, oxygen consumption and carbon-dioxide production. Nuclear DNA was monitored by flow cytometry. Functional responses were studied by mitogenic stimulation by various lectins. The importance of these findings should have relevance to the space program. Cells should behave predictably in zero gravity; specific populations can be eliminated from diverse populations and other populations isolated. The availability of stem cell populations will enhance both bone marrow and gene transplant programs. Stem cells will permit developmental biologists study the paths of hematopoiesis.

  14. A murine model for bone loss from therapeutic and space-relevant sources of radiation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S A; Pecaut, M J; Gridley, D S; Travis, N D; Bandstra, E R; Willey, J S; Nelson, G A; Bateman, T A

    2006-09-01

    Cancer patients receiving radiation therapy are exposed to photon (gamma/X-ray), electron, and less commonly proton radiation. Similarly, astronauts on exploratory missions will be exposed to extended periods of lower-dose radiation from multiple sources and of multiple types, including heavy ions. Therapeutic doses of radiation have been shown to have deleterious consequences on bone health, occasionally causing osteoradionecrosis and spontaneous fractures. However, no animal model exists to study the cause of radiation-induced osteoporosis. Additionally, the effect of lower doses of ionizing radiation, including heavy ions, on general bone quality has not been investigated. This study presents data developing a murine model for radiation-induced bone loss. Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to gamma, proton, carbon, or iron radiation at 2-Gray doses, representing both a clinical treatment fraction and spaceflight exposure for an exploratory mission. Mice were euthanized 110 days after irradiation. The proximal tibiae and femur diaphyses were analyzed using microcomputed tomography. Results demonstrate profound changes in trabecular architecture. Significant losses in trabecular bone volume fraction were observed for all radiation species: gamma, (-29%), proton (-35%), carbon (-39%), and iron (-34%). Trabecular connectivity density, thickness, spacing, and number were also affected. These data have clear implications for clinical radiotherapy in that bone loss in an animal model has been demonstrated at low doses. Additionally, these data suggest that space radiation has the potential to exacerbate the bone loss caused by microgravity, although lower doses and dose rates need to be studied. PMID:16741258

  15. Adult hemolytic-uremic syndrome and bone marrow necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, C.B.; Redmond, J. III

    1984-11-01

    A case is reported of adult hemolytic-uremic syndrome in which massive bone marrow necrosis developed, a previously undescribed complication. Technetium-99m minicolloid scanning and indium-111 bone marrow scans were used to demonstrate lack of bone marrow activity in the patient. 11 references, 2 figures.

  16. Osteoblast function and bone histomorphometry in a murine model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blue, Mary E; Boskey, Adele L; Doty, Stephen B; Fedarko, Neal S; Hossain, Mir Ahamed; Shapiro, Jay R

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder due to mutations affecting the neural transcription factor MeCP2. Approximately 50% of affected females have decreased bone mass. We studied osteoblast function using a murine model of RTT. Female heterozygote (HET) and male Mecp2-null mice were compared to wild type (WT) mice. Micro-CT of tibia from 5 week-old Mecp2-null mice showed significant alterations in trabecular bone including reductions in bone volume fraction (-29%), number (-19%), thickness (-9%) and connectivity density (-32%), and increases in trabecular separation (+28%) compared to WT. We also found significant reductions in cortical bone thickness (-18%) and in polar moment of inertia (-45%). In contrast, cortical and trabecular bone from 8 week-old WT and HET female mice were not significantly different. However, mineral apposition rate, mineralizing surface and bone formation rate/bone surface were each decreased in HET and Mecp2-null mice compared to WT mice. Histomorphometric analysis of femurs showed decreased numbers of osteoblasts but similar numbers of osteoclasts compared to WT, altered osteoblast morphology and decreased tissue synthesis of alkaline phosphatase in Mecp2-null and HET mice. Osteoblasts cultured from Mecp2-null mice, which unlike WT osteoblasts did not express MeCP2, had increased growth rates, but reductions in mRNA expression of type I collagen, Runx2 and Osterix compared to WT osteoblasts. These results indicate that MeCP2 deficiency leads to altered bone growth. Osteoblast dysfunction was more marked in Mecp2-null male than in HET female mice, suggesting that expression of MeCP2 plays a critical role in bone development.

  17. Enhancement by dimethyl myleran of donor type chimerism in murine recipients of bone marrow allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidot, T.; Terenzi, A.; Singer, T.S.; Salomon, O.; Reisner, Y. )

    1989-05-15

    A major problem in using murine models for studies of bone marrow allograft rejection in leukemia patients is the narrow margin in which graft rejection can be analyzed. In mice irradiated with greater than 9 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) rejection is minimal, whereas after administration of 8 Gy TBI, which spares a significant number of clonable T cells, a substantial frequency of host stem cells can also be detected. In current murine models, unlike in humans, bone marrow allograft rejection is generally associated with full autologous hematopoietic reconstitution. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the myeloablative drug dimethyl myleran (DMM) on chimerism status following transplantation of T cell-depleted allogenic bone marrow (using C57BL/6 donors and C3H/HeJ recipients, conditioned with 8 Gy TBI). Donor type chimerism 1 to 2 months post-transplant of 1 to 3 x 10(6) bone marrow cells was markedly enhanced by using DMM one day after TBI and prior to transplantation. Conditioning with cyclophosphamide instead of DMM, in combination with 8 Gy TBI, did not enhance engraftment of donor type cells. Artificial reconstitution of T cells, after conditioning with TBI plus DMM, by adding mature thymocytes, or presensitization with irradiated donor type spleen cells 1 week before TBI and DMM, led to strong graft rejection and consequently to severe anemia. The anti-donor responses in these models were proportional to the number of added T cells and to the number of cells used for presensitization, and they could be neutralized by increasing the bone marrow inoculum.

  18. Circadian Mechanisms in Murine and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Following Dexamethasone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiying; Yu, Gang; Parks, Helen; Hebert, Teddi; Goh, Brian C.; Dietrich, Marilyn A.; Pelled, Gadi; Izadpanah, Reza; Gazit, Dan; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    A core group of transcriptional regulatory factors regulate circadian rhythms in mammalian cells. While the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the brain serves as the central core circadian oscillator, circadian clocks also exist within peripheral tissues and cells. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that >20% of expressed mRNAs in bone and adipose tissues oscillate in a circadian manner. The current manuscript reports evidence of the core circadian transcriptional apparatus within primary cultures of murine and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Exposure of confluent, quiescent BMSCs to dexamethasone synchronized the oscillating expression of the mRNAs encoding the albumin D binding protein (dbp), brain-muscle arnt-like 1 (bmal1), period 3 (per3), rev-erb α, and rev-erb β. The genes displayed a mean oscillatory period of 22.2 to 24.3 hours. The acrophase or peak expression of mRNAs encoding “positive” (bmal1) and “negative” (per3) transcriptional regulatory factors were out of phase with each other by ∼8-12 hours, consistent with in vivo observations. In vivo, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) mediated phosphorylation regulates the turnover of per3 and core circadian transcriptional apparatus. In vitro addition of lithium chloride, a GSK3β inhibitor, significantly shifted the acrophase of all genes by 4.2-4.7 hours oscillation in BMSCs; however, only the male murine BMSCs displayed a significant increase in the length of the period of oscillation. We conclude that human and murine BMSCs represent a valid in vitro model for the analysis of circadian mechanisms in bone metabolism and stem cell biology. PMID:18302991

  19. Rabies virus replication in primary murine bone marrow macrophages and in human and murine macrophage-like cell lines: implications for viral persistence.

    PubMed

    Ray, N B; Ewalt, L C; Lodmell, D L

    1995-02-01

    To determine whether rabies viruses replicate in macrophage or macrophage-like cells, several human and murine macrophage-like cell lines, as well as primary cultures of murine bone marrow macrophages, were incubated with the Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) virus and several different street rabies viruses (SRV). ERA rabies virus replicated well in human monocytic U937 and THP-1 cells and murine macrophage IC-21 cells, as well as primary cultures of murine macrophages. Minimal replication was detected in murine monocytic WEHI-3BD- and PU5-1R cells, and ERA virus did not replicate in murine monocytic P388D1 or J774A.1 cells. A tissue culture-adapted SRV of bat origin also replicated in IC-21 and U937 cells. Non-tissue culture-adapted SRV isolated from different animal species, particularly bats, replicated minimally in U937, THP-1, IC-21 cells and primary murine bone marrow macrophages. To determine whether rabies virus replication is dependent upon the state of differentiation of the macrophage-like cell, human promyelocytic HL-60 cells were differentiated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). ERA rabies virus replicated in the differentiated HL-60 cells but not in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Persistent infections were established in macrophage-like U937 cells with ERA rabies virus and SRV, and infectious SRV was isolated from adherent bone marrow cells of mice that had been infected 96 days previously. Virus harvested from persistently infected U937 cells and the adherent bone marrow cells had specifically adapted to each cell. This specificity was shown by the inability of the viruses to infect macrophages other than U937 cells and primary bone marrow macrophages, respectively. Virus titers of the persistently infected U937 cells fluctuated with extended cell passage. After 30 passages, virus released from the cells had lost virulence as shown by its inability to kill intracranially inoculated mice. However, the avirulent virus released from the

  20. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture. Grenzgänger: adult bone marrow cells populate the brain.

    PubMed

    Priller, Josef

    2003-08-01

    While the brain has traditionally been considered a rather secluded site, recent studies suggest that adult bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells can generate glia and neurons in rodents and humans. Macrophages and microglia are the first to appear in the murine brain after transplantation of genetically marked BM cells. Within weeks after transplantation, some authors have found astrocytes and cells expressing neuronal antigens. We detected cerebellar Purkinje neurons and interneurons, such as basket cells, expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) 10-15 months after transplantation of GFP-labeled BM cells. The results push the boundaries of our classic view of lineage restriction.

  1. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture. Grenzgänger: adult bone marrow cells populate the brain.

    PubMed

    Priller, Josef

    2003-08-01

    While the brain has traditionally been considered a rather secluded site, recent studies suggest that adult bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells can generate glia and neurons in rodents and humans. Macrophages and microglia are the first to appear in the murine brain after transplantation of genetically marked BM cells. Within weeks after transplantation, some authors have found astrocytes and cells expressing neuronal antigens. We detected cerebellar Purkinje neurons and interneurons, such as basket cells, expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) 10-15 months after transplantation of GFP-labeled BM cells. The results push the boundaries of our classic view of lineage restriction. PMID:12898276

  2. Ex vivo 3D osteocyte network construction with primary murine bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiaoling; Gu, Yexin; Zhang, Wenting; Dziopa, Leah; Zilberberg, Jenny; Lee, Woo

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes reside as three-dimensionally (3D) networked cells in the lacunocanalicular structure of bones and regulate bone and mineral homeostasis. Despite of their important regulatory roles, in vitro studies of osteocytes have been challenging because: (1) current cell lines do not sufficiently represent the phenotypic features of mature osteocytes and (2) primary cells rapidly differentiate to osteoblasts upon isolation. In this study, we used a 3D perfusion culture approach to: (1) construct the 3D cellular network of primary murine osteocytes by biomimetic assembly with microbeads and (2) reproduce ex vivo the phenotype of primary murine osteocytes, for the first time to our best knowledge. In order to enable 3D construction with a sufficient number of viable cells, we used a proliferated osteoblastic population of healthy cells outgrown from digested bone chips. The diameter of microbeads was controlled to: (1) distribute and entrap cells within the interstitial spaces between the microbeads and (2) maintain average cell-to-cell distance to be about 19 µm. The entrapped cells formed a 3D cellular network by extending and connecting their processes through openings between the microbeads. Also, with increasing culture time, the entrapped cells exhibited the characteristic gene expressions (SOST and FGF23) and nonproliferative behavior of mature osteocytes. In contrast, 2D-cultured cells continued their osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation. This 3D biomimetic approach is expected to provide a new means of: (1) studying flow-induced shear stress on the mechanotransduction function of primary osteocytes, (2) studying physiological functions of 3D-networked osteocytes with in vitro convenience, and (3) developing clinically relevant human bone disease models. PMID:26421212

  3. Wnt16 Is Associated with Age-Related Bone Loss and Estrogen Withdrawal in Murine Bone

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Henry; Galea, Gabriel L.; Meakin, Lee B.; Delisser, Peter J.; Lanyon, Lance E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome Wide Association Studies suggest that Wnt16 is an important contributor to the mechanisms controlling bone mineral density, cortical thickness, bone strength and ultimately fracture risk. Wnt16 acts on osteoblasts and osteoclasts and, in cortical bone, is predominantly derived from osteoblasts. This led us to hypothesize that low bone mass would be associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression and that Wnt16 expression would be increased by anabolic factors, including mechanical loading. We therefore investigated Wnt16 expression in the context of ageing, mechanical loading and unloading, estrogen deficiency and replacement, and estrogen receptor α (ERα) depletion. Quantitative real time PCR showed that Wnt16 mRNA expression was lower in cortical bone and marrow of aged compared to young female mice. Neither increased nor decreased (by disuse) mechanical loading altered Wnt16 expression in young female mice, although Wnt16 expression was decreased following ovariectomy. Both 17β-estradiol and the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen increased Wnt16 expression relative to ovariectomy. Wnt16 and ERβ expression were increased in female ERα-/- mice when compared to Wild Type. We also addressed potential effects of gender on Wnt16 expression and while the expression was lower in the cortical bone of aged males as in females, it was higher in male bone marrow of aged mice compared to young. In the kidney, which we used as a non-bone reference tissue, Wnt16 expression was unaffected by age in either males or females. In summary, age, and its associated bone loss, is associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression whereas bone loss associated with disuse has no effect on Wnt16 expression. In the artificially loaded mouse tibia we observed no loading-related up-regulation of Wnt16 expression but provide evidence that its expression is influenced by estrogen receptor signaling. These findings suggest that while Wnt16 is not an obligatory contributor to

  4. Wnt16 Is Associated with Age-Related Bone Loss and Estrogen Withdrawal in Murine Bone.

    PubMed

    Todd, Henry; Galea, Gabriel L; Meakin, Lee B; Delisser, Peter J; Lanyon, Lance E; Windahl, Sara H; Price, Joanna S

    2015-01-01

    Genome Wide Association Studies suggest that Wnt16 is an important contributor to the mechanisms controlling bone mineral density, cortical thickness, bone strength and ultimately fracture risk. Wnt16 acts on osteoblasts and osteoclasts and, in cortical bone, is predominantly derived from osteoblasts. This led us to hypothesize that low bone mass would be associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression and that Wnt16 expression would be increased by anabolic factors, including mechanical loading. We therefore investigated Wnt16 expression in the context of ageing, mechanical loading and unloading, estrogen deficiency and replacement, and estrogen receptor α (ERα) depletion. Quantitative real time PCR showed that Wnt16 mRNA expression was lower in cortical bone and marrow of aged compared to young female mice. Neither increased nor decreased (by disuse) mechanical loading altered Wnt16 expression in young female mice, although Wnt16 expression was decreased following ovariectomy. Both 17β-estradiol and the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen increased Wnt16 expression relative to ovariectomy. Wnt16 and ERβ expression were increased in female ERα-/- mice when compared to Wild Type. We also addressed potential effects of gender on Wnt16 expression and while the expression was lower in the cortical bone of aged males as in females, it was higher in male bone marrow of aged mice compared to young. In the kidney, which we used as a non-bone reference tissue, Wnt16 expression was unaffected by age in either males or females. In summary, age, and its associated bone loss, is associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression whereas bone loss associated with disuse has no effect on Wnt16 expression. In the artificially loaded mouse tibia we observed no loading-related up-regulation of Wnt16 expression but provide evidence that its expression is influenced by estrogen receptor signaling. These findings suggest that while Wnt16 is not an obligatory contributor to

  5. Murine hematopoietic reconstitution after tagging and selection of retrovirally transduced bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    García-Hernández, B.; Castellanos, A.; López, A.; Orfao, A.; Sánchez-García, I.

    1997-01-01

    A major problem facing the effective treatment of patients with cancer is how to get the specific antitumor agent into every tumor cell. In this report we describe the use of a strategy that, by using retroviral vectors encoding a truncated human CD5 cDNA, allows the selection of only the infected cells, and we show the ability to obtain, before bone marrow transplantation, a population of 5-fluouraci-treated murine bone marrow cells that are 100% marked. This marked population of bone marrow cells is able to reconstitute the hematopoietic system in lethally irradiated mice, indicating that the surface marker lacks deleterious effects on the functionality of bone marrow cells. No gross abnormalities in hematopoiesis were detected in mice repopulated with CD5-expressing cells. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of the hematopoietic cells no longer expresses the surface marker CD5 in the 9-month-old recipient mice. This transcriptional inactivity of the proviral long terminal repeat (LTR) was accompanied by de novo methylation of the proviral sequences. Our results show that the use of the CD5 as a retrovirally encoded marker enables the rapid, efficient, and nontoxic selection in vitro of infected primary cells, which can entirely reconstitute the hematopoietic system in mice. These results should now greatly enhance the power of studies aimed at addressing questions such as generation of cancer-negative hematopoiesis. PMID:9371830

  6. Recent advances in bone regeneration using adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zigdon-Giladi, Hadar; Rudich, Utai; Michaeli Geller, Gal; Evron, Ayelet

    2015-04-26

    Bone is a highly vascularized tissue reliant on the close spatial and temporal association between blood vessels and bone cells. Therefore, cells that participate in vasculogenesis and osteogenesis play a pivotal role in bone formation during prenatal and postnatal periods. Nevertheless, spontaneous healing of bone fracture is occasionally impaired due to insufficient blood and cellular supply to the site of injury. In these cases, bone regeneration process is interrupted, which might result in delayed union or even nonunion of the fracture. Nonunion fracture is difficult to treat and have a high financial impact. In the last decade, numerous technological advancements in bone tissue engineering and cell-therapy opened new horizon in the field of bone regeneration. This review starts with presentation of the biological processes involved in bone development, bone remodeling, fracture healing process and the microenvironment at bone healing sites. Then, we discuss the rationale for using adult stem cells and listed the characteristics of the available cells for bone regeneration. The mechanism of action and epigenetic regulations for osteogenic differentiation are also described. Finally, we review the literature for translational and clinical trials that investigated the use of adult stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and CD34(+) blood progenitors) for bone regeneration.

  7. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  8. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Back, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani; Hylarides, Mark; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-05-15

    Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy using an Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide 211At Combined with Bone Marrow Transplantation Prolongs Survival in a Disseminated Murine Leukemia Model ABSTRACT Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies (Ab) labeled primarily with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse.

  9. Tracking Circadian Rhythms of Bone Mineral Deposition in Murine Calvarial Organ Cultures

    PubMed Central

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhao, Guisheng; Khmaladze, Alexander; Wilson, Christopher G.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoblasts, which orchestrate the deposition of small apatite crystals through the expression of nucleating proteins, have been shown to also express clock genes associated with the circadian signaling pathway. We hypothesized that protein-mediated bone mineralization may be linked to circadian oscillator mechanisms functioning in peripheral bone tissue. In this study, Per1 expression in ex vivo neonatal murine calvaria organ cultures was monitored for 6 days using a Per1-luciferase transgene as a bioluminescent indicator of clock function. Fluctuations in Per1 expression had a period of 25±4 hours (n=14) with early expression at CT09:59±03:37 (circadian time). We also established the kinetics of mineral deposition in developing bone by using non-invasive Raman microscopy to track mineral accumulation in calvarial tissue. The content and quality of newly deposited mineral was continually examined at the interparietal bone/fontanel boundary for a period of 6 days with 1 hour temporal resolution. Using this approach, mineralization over time exhibited bursts of mineral deposition followed by little or no deposition, which was recurrent with a periodicity of 26.8±9.6 hours. As many as 6 near-daily mineralization events were observed in the calvaria before deposition ceased. Earliest mineralization events occurred at CT16:51±03:45, which is 6 hours behind Per1 expression. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that mineralization in developing bone tissue is regulated by a local circadian oscillator mechanism. PMID:23505073

  10. Toll-like receptor ligand activation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Dearman, Rebecca J; Cumberbatch, Marie; Maxwell, Gavin; Basketter, David A; Kimber, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the initiation of primary immune responses. The pattern of Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression on various subsets of these cells has been shown to differ, suggestive of distinct roles in influencing immune responses. We have examined here the responses of immature DCs derived from murine bone marrow (BMDCs) to a range of TLR ligands. BMDCs cultured for 6 days in the presence of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor were stimulated for 24 hr with ligands to TLR1-2 [Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 (PAM)], TLR2-6 (macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2); zymosan or peptidoglycan (PG)], TLR3 (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid), TLR4 [lipopolysaccharide R515 (LPS)], TLR5 (flagellin), TLR7 (polyuridylic acid) and TLR9 [CpG ODN2395 (CpG)]. DC activation was monitored using membrane marker expression and analysis of culture supernatants for cytokine/chemokine release. Ligands to TLR3 and TLR7 failed to activate BMDCs. All other TLR ligands caused elevated expression of membrane markers. PAM, MALP-2 and LPS induced high-level expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Treatment with CpG was associated with a preferential type 1 cytokine and chemokine profile. Zymosan and PG were proinflammatory but also skewed towards a type 2 pattern of cytokines and chemokines. In contrast, flagellin did not cause marked secretion by BMDCs of cytokines or chemokines. These data for BMDCs are largely consistent with the reported TLR repertoire of freshly isolated murine Langerhans cells. In addition, murine BMDCs show selective responses to TLR ligands with respect to general activation, with differentiated cytokine patterns suggestive of potential priming for divergent immune responses. PMID:18778283

  11. Interferon-gamma enhances megakaryocyte colony-stimulating activity in murine bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuji-Takayama, K; Tahata, H; Harashima, A; Nishida, Y; Izumi, N; Fukuda, S; Ohta, T; Kurimoto, M

    1996-09-01

    We have demonstrated previously that interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) accelerates platelet recovery in mice with 5-FU induced-marrow aplasia in vivo. However, the mechanism for the regulation of megakaryocyte development induced by IFN-gamma in bone marrow cells in vivo remains unknown. To further study the effects of IFN-gamma on megakaryocyte development, various steps during IFN-gamma-mediated accelerated differentiation of the megakaryocytes were investigated in serum-free cultures of murine bone marrow cells in vitro. IFN-gamma markedly induced acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity, a marker of murine megakaryocytic cells, accompanied by increased colony formation of the megakaryocyte lineage. A prominent increase in megakaryocyte number was observed after IFN-gamma treatment. All of these effects were dependent on the presence of IL-3, and, therefore, these results suggest that IFN-gamma acts as a megakaryocyte potentiator (Meg-POT). However, IFN-gamma did not enhance megakaryocyte maturation with respect to increase in cell size. The effects of IFN-gamma on megakaryocyte maturation were similar to those observed after treatment with higher doses of IL-3 alone. Meg-POT is defined as a factor that induces megakaryocyte maturation. Since IFN-gamma enhanced IL-3-dependent megakaryocyte colony formation and proliferation rather than megakaryocyte maturation, the effects on megakaryocyte development, which were induced by IFN-gamma treatment, seem to be different from the effects of a Meg-POT. We, therefore, propose a new function for IFN-gamma as an enhancer of megakaryocyte colony-stimulating factor activity. The effect of IFN-gamma in vitro appears to correlate well with the acceleration of platelet recovery in vivo.

  12. Age-specific profiles of tissue-level composition and mechanical properties in murine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Mekhala; Sahar, Nadder D; Kohn, David H; Morris, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    There is growing evidence that bone composition and tissue-level mechanical properties are significant determinants of skeletal integrity. In the current study, Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation testing were co-localized to analyze tissue-level compositional and mechanical properties in skeletally mature young (4 or 5 months) and old (19 months) murine femora at similar spatial scales. Standard multivariate linear regression analysis revealed age-dependent patterns in the relationships between mechanical and compositional properties at the tissue scale. However, changes in bone material properties with age are often complex and nonlinear, and can be missed with linear regression and correlation-based methods. A retrospective data mining approach was implemented using non-linear multidimensional visualization and classification to identify spectroscopic and nanoindentation metrics that best discriminated bone specimens of different age-classes. The ability to classify the specimens into the correct age group increased by using combinations of Raman and nanoindentation variables (86-96% accuracy) as compared to using individual measures (59-79% accuracy). Metrics that best classified 4 or 5 month and 19 month specimens (2-age classes) were mineral to matrix ratio, crystallinity, modulus and plasticity index. Metrics that best distinguished between 4, 5 and 19 month specimens (3-age classes) were mineral to matrix ratio, crystallinity, modulus, hardness, cross-linking, carbonate to phosphate ratio, creep displacement and creep viscosity. These findings attest to the complexity of mechanisms underlying bone tissue properties and draw attention to the importance of considering non-linear interactions between tissue-level composition and mechanics that may work together to influence material properties with age. The results demonstrate that a few non-linearly combined compositional and mechanical metrics provide better discriminatory information than a single metric

  13. Differential expression of murine adult hemoglobins in early ontogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzyniak, C.J.; Lewis, S.E.; Popp, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A hemoglobin mutation is described that permits study of the expression of the two adult ..beta..-globin genes throughout fetal and postnatal development. Mice with a mutation at the Hbb/sup s/, ..beta..-globin locus, were used to study the relative levels of ..beta..-s2major and ..beta..-sminor globins specified by the mutant Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype during development. At 11.5 days of gestation ..beta..-sminor comprised over 80% and ..beta..-s2major under 20% of the adult beta-globin. The relative level of ..beta..-sminor decreased through fetal development; at birth ..beta..-sminor represented 33.7% of the ..beta..-globin. The adult values of 71.0% ..beta..-s2major and 29.0% ..beta..-sminor globin are expressed in mice six days after birth. Because the two ..beta..-globin genes are expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup 2s/ haplotype, both the ..beta..-smajor and ..beta..-sminor genes must be expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype. Expression of the ..beta..-sminor gene is elevated to 35.6% in Hbb/sup s2/ mice that have been bled repeatedly. Thus, the 5' ..beta..-s2major and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype and, presumably the 5' ..beta..-smajor and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype, are regulated independently and are homologous to the 5' ..beta..-dmajor and 3' ..beta..-dminor genes of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotype. Mice of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype are better than mice of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotytpe for studying the mechanisms of hemoglobin switching because the Hbb/sup s2/ each of the three embryonic and two adult hemoglobins can be separated by electrophoresis. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Reproducible establishment of hemopoietic supportive stromal cell lines from murine bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, K.; Tezuka, H.; Sakoda, H.; Konno, M.; Nagata, K.; Uchiyama, T.; Uchino, H.; Mori, K.J.

    1989-02-01

    Stromal cell lines, designated MS-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, and -7 were established by irradiating the adherent cells in long-term bone marrow cultures with 900-rad x-rays. Two of the cell lines, MS-1 and MS-5, have the capacity to support the growth of hemopoietic stem cells (spleen colony-forming cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells) for greater than 2 months in vitro. These two cell lines were alkaline phosphatase-, peroxidase-, and factor VIII-negative and positive for periodic acid-Schiff and nonspecific esterase. Extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, laminin, and collagen type I were produced by these two cell lines. Neither MS-1 cell- nor MS-5 cell-conditioned medium supported the growth of hemopoietic stem cells, and hemopoietic stem cells were found preferentially to be under and on MS-1 and MS-5 layers rather than in suspension. Close contact with the MS-1 cell layer or the MS-5 cell layer appears to be essential in maintaining hemopoiesis in vitro. Conditioned media from MS-1 cells and MS-5 cells stimulated granulocyte colony formation from murine bone marrow cells in semisolid culture.

  15. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 and -4 expression during murine orofacial development.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J H; Hunt, P; Thorogood, P

    1995-09-01

    In the developing orofacial region, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions induce a differentiation cascade leading to bone and cartilage formation. Although the nature of this interaction is unknown, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP)-2 and -4 have been suggested as putative signalling molecules. Using 35S-labelled cDNA probes, the expression patterns of BMP-2 and -4 mRNA were examined in murine perioral tissues preceding, during and following the time of the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction leading to mandibular formation. At embryonic age (e) 9.5 days, a restricted pattern of BMP-4 mRNA was expressed in the epithelium of the developing facial processes. This decreased rapidly, with little or no signal on E10.5 or E11.5. By E13.5, BMP-4 signal was restricted to the dental lamina, follicle and papilla. BMP-2 expression was not prominent in the developing face until E13.5. At this stage, signal was widespread throughout mesenchyme of neural-crest, but not somatic origin. Different domains of expression were present in the developing epithelium: for example, there was strong signal in the floor of the mouth and the ventral tongue, in contrast to that of the dorsum of the tongue and primary palate, which were negative. These results support the role of BMP-2 and -4 as regulators of orofacial development and demonstrates different fields of BMP-2 expression in developing oral mucosal epithelium.

  16. Sequential univariate gating approach to study the effects of erythropoietin in murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Achuthanandam, Ram; Quinn, John; Capocasale, Renold J; Bugelski, Peter J; Hrebien, Leonid; Kam, Moshe

    2008-08-01

    Analysis of multicolor flow cytometric data is traditionally based on the judgment of an expert, generally time consuming, sometimes incomplete and often subjective in nature. In this article, we investigate another statistical method using a Sequential Univariate Gating (SUG) algorithm to identify regions of interest between two groups of multivariate flow cytometric data. The metric used to differentiate between the groups of univariate distributions in SUG is the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance (D) statistic. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated by applying it to a known three-color data set looking at activation of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes with anti-CD3 antibody treatment and comparing the results to the expert analysis. The algorithm is then applied to a four-color data set used to study the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) on several murine bone marrow populations. SUG was used to identify regions of interest in the data and results compared to expert analysis and the current state-of-the-art statistical method, Frequency Difference Gating (FDG). Cluster analysis was then performed to identify subpopulations responding differently to rHuEPO. Expert analysis, SUG and FDG identified regions in the data that showed activation of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes with anti-CD3 treatment. In the rHuEPO treated data sets, the expert and SUG identified a dose responsive expansion of only the erythroid precursor population. In contrast, FDG resulted in identification of regions of interest both in the erythroid precursors as well as in other bone marrow populations. Clustering within the regions of interest defined by SUG resulted in identification of four subpopulations of erythroid precursors that are morphologically distinct and show a differential response to rHuEPO treatment. Greatest expansion is seen in the basophilic and poly/orthochromic erythroblast populations with treatment. Identification of populations of interest can be performed

  17. Compressive behaviour of child and adult cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Caroline; Baleani, Massimiliano; Pani, Carla; Taddei, Fulvia; Alberghini, Marco; Viceconti, Marco; Manfrini, Marco

    2011-10-01

    In this study, cortical bone tissue from children was investigated. It is extremely difficult to obtain human child tissue. Therefore, the only possibility was to use bone tissue, free from any lesion, collected from young bone cancer patients. The compressive mechanical behaviour of child bone tissue was compared to the behaviour of adult tissue. Moreover, two hypotheses were tested: 1) that the mechanical behaviour of both groups is correlated to ash density; 2) that yield strain is an invariant. Small parts of the diaphysis of femora or tibiae from 12 children (4-15 years) and 12 adults (22-61 years) were collected. Cylindrical specimens were extracted from the cortical wall along the longitudinal axis of the diaphysis. A total of 107 specimens underwent compressive testing (strain rate: 0.1 s(-1)). Only the specimens showing a regular load-displacement curve (94) were considered valid and thereafter reduced to ash. It was found that the child bone tissue had significant lower compressive Young's modulus (-34%), yield stress (-38%), ultimate stress (-33%) and ash density (-17%) than the adult tissue. Conversely, higher compressive ultimate strain was found in the child group (+24%). Despite specimens extracted from both children and adults, ash density largely described the variation in tissue strength and stiffness (R(2)=in the range of 0.86-0.91). Furthermore, yield strain seemed to be roughly an invariant to subject age and tissue density. These results confirm that the mechanical properties of child cortical bone tissue are different from that of adult tissue. However, such differences are correlated to differences in tissue ash density. In fact, ash density was found to be a good predictor of strength and stiffness, also for cortical bone collected from children. Finally, the present findings support the hypothesis that compressive yield strain is an invariant.

  18. Bone-forming capacity of adult human nasal chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pippenger, Benjamin E; Ventura, Manuela; Pelttari, Karoliina; Feliciano, Sandra; Jaquiery, Claude; Scherberich, Arnaud; Walboomers, X Frank; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Nasal chondrocytes (NC) derive from the same multipotent embryological segment that gives rise to the majority of the maxillofacial bone and have been reported to differentiate into osteoblast-like cells in vitro. In this study, we assessed the capacity of adult human NC, appropriately primed towards hypertrophic or osteoblastic differentiation, to form bone tissue in vivo. Hypertrophic induction of NC-based micromass pellets formed mineralized cartilaginous tissues rich in type X collagen, but upon implantation into subcutaneous pockets of nude mice remained avascular and reverted to stable hyaline-cartilage. In the same ectopic environment, NC embedded into ceramic scaffolds and primed with osteogenic medium only sporadically formed intramembranous bone tissue. A clonal study could not demonstrate that the low bone formation efficiency was related to a possibly small proportion of cells competent to become fully functional osteoblasts. We next tested whether the cues present in an orthotopic environment could induce a more efficient direct osteoblastic transformation of NC. Using a nude rat calvarial defect model, we demonstrated that (i) NC directly participated in frank bone formation and (ii) the efficiency of survival and bone formation by NC was significantly higher than that of reference osteogenic cells, namely bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. This study provides a proof-of-principle that NC have the plasticity to convert into bone cells and thereby represent an easily available cell source to be further investigated for craniofacial bone regeneration. PMID:25689393

  19. Non-invasive diffuse correlation tomography reveals spatial and temporal blood flow differences in murine bone grafting approaches

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Proctor, Ashley R.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Choe, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal blood flow during murine bone graft healing was monitored non-invasively using diffuse correlation tomography. The system utilized spatially dense data from a scanning set-up, non-linear reconstruction, and micro-CT anatomical information. Weekly in vivo measurements were performed. Blood flow changes in autografts, which heal successfully, were localized to graft regions and consistent across mice. Poor healing allografts showed heterogeneous blood flow elevation and high inter-subject variabilities. Allografts with tissue-engineered periosteum showed responses intermediate to both autografts and allografts, consistent with healing observed. These findings suggest that spatiotemporal blood flow changes can be utilized to differentiate the degree of bone graft healing.

  20. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates Amifostine induced preservation of bone mineralization patterns in the irradiated murine mandible

    PubMed Central

    Poushanchi, Behdod; Donneys, Alexis; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Gallagher, K. Kelly; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Morris, Michael D.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Adjuvant radiotherapy in the management of head and neck cancer remains severely debilitating. Fortunately, newly developed agents aimed at decreasing radiation-induced damage have shown great promise. Amifostine (AMF) is a compound, which confers radio-protection to the exposed normal tissues, such as bone. Our intent is to utilize Raman spectroscopy to demonstrate how AMF preserves the mineral composition of the murine mandible following human equivalent radiation. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into 3 experimental groups: control (n=5), XRT (n=5), and AMF–XRT (n=5). Both XRT and AMF groups underwent bioequivalent radiation of 70 Gy in 5 fractions to the left hemimandible. AMF–XRT received Amifostine prior to radiation. Fifty-six days post-radiation, the hemimandibles were harvested, and Raman spectra were taken in the region of interest spanning 2 mm behind the last molar. Bone mineral and matrix-specific Raman bands were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, with statistical significance at p<0.05. Results The full-width at half-maximum of the primary phosphate band (FWHM) and the ratio of carbonate/phosphate intensities demonstrated significant differences between AMF–XRT versus XRT (p<0.01) and XRT versus control (p<0.01). There was no difference between AMF–XRT and control (p>0.05) in both Raman metrics. Computer-aided spectral subtraction further confirmed these results where AMF–XRT was spectrally similar to the control. Interestingly, the collagen cross-link ratio did not differ between XRT and AMF–XRT (p<0.01) but was significantly different from the control (p<0.01). Conclusion Our novel findings demonstrate that AMF prophylaxis maintains and protects bone mineral quality in the setting of radiation. Raman spectroscopy is an emerging and exceptionally attractive clinical translational technology to investigate and monitor both the destructive effects of radiation and the therapeutic remediation of AMF on the structural, physical

  1. The impact of the opioids fentanyl and morphine on nociception and bone destruction in a murine model of bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    El Mouedden, Mohammed; Meert, Theo Frans

    2007-05-01

    Chronic pain resulting from metastasis into skeleton of certain neoplastic diseases remains poorly understood and relatively resistant to analgesic treatment. Opioids are the principal axis in drug therapy for this type of pain, especially at the end stage of cancer. Our aim was to examine whether, fentanyl as well as morphine, two potent analgesic opioids commonly used to treat cancer pain, would inhibit pain and bone lesion-related responses in a murine model of bone cancer pain. Repeated administration of equianalgesic doses of fentanyl (0.16 mg/kg s.c. once a day) and morphine (20 mg/kg s.c. once a day) initiated at day 1 (prophylactic treatment) or at day 7 (curative treatment) after tumor cell inoculation in the femoral cavity consistently decreased bone pain symptoms and tumor growth-induced bone destruction (micro-CT bone structure parameters). Both fentanyl and morphine treatments resulted in clear antinociceptive properties as well as reductions in cancer cell-induced bone lesions. The present results demonstrate that fentanyl, and to some lesser degree morphine, has potential benefits in the treatment and development of bone cancer pain. As such, chronic administration of high doses of certain opioids like fentanyl may have clinical utility in the management of bone cancer pain.

  2. Genetic determinants of bone mass in adults. A twin study.

    PubMed Central

    Pocock, N A; Eisman, J A; Hopper, J L; Yeates, M G; Sambrook, P N; Eberl, S

    1987-01-01

    The relative importance of genetic factors in determining bone mass in different parts of the skeleton is poorly understood. Lumbar spine and proximal femur bone mineral density and forearm bone mineral content were measured by photon absorptiometry in 38 monozygotic and 27 dizygotic twin pairs. Bone mineral density was significantly more highly correlated in monozygotic than in dizygotic twins for the spine and proximal femur and in the forearm of premenopausal twin pairs, which is consistent with significant genetic contributions to bone mass at all these sites. The lesser genetic contribution to proximal femur and distal forearm bone mass compared with the spine suggests that environmental factors are of greater importance in the aetiology of osteopenia of the hip and wrist. This is the first demonstration of a genetic contribution to bone mass of the spine and proximal femur in adults and confirms similar findings of the forearm. Furthermore, bivariate analysis suggested that a single gene or set of genes determines bone mass at all sites. PMID:3624485

  3. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  4. Sustained Engraftment of Cryopreserved Human Bone Marrow CD34(+) Cells in Young Adult NSG Mice.

    PubMed

    Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Brugman, Martijn H; Salvatori, Daniela C F; Egeler, R Maarten; Bredius, Robbert G M; Fibbe, Willem E; Staal, Frank J T

    2014-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are defined by their ability to repopulate the bone marrow of myeloablative conditioned and/or (lethally) irradiated recipients. To study the repopulating potential of human HSCs, murine models have been developed that rely on the use of immunodeficient mice that allow engraftment of human cells. The NSG xenograft model has emerged as the current standard for this purpose allowing for engraftment and study of human T cells. Here, we describe adaptations to the original NSG xenograft model that can be readily implemented. These adaptations encompass use of adult mice instead of newborns and a short ex vivo culture. This protocol results in robust and reproducible high levels of lympho-myeloid engraftment. Immunization of recipient mice with relevant antigen resulted in specific antibody formation, showing that both T cells and B cells were functional. In addition, bone marrow cells from primary recipients exhibited repopulating ability following transplantation into secondary recipients. Similar results were obtained with cryopreserved human bone marrow samples, thus circumventing the need for fresh cells and allowing the use of patient derived bio-bank samples. Our findings have implications for use of this model in fundamental stem cell research, immunological studies in vivo and preclinical evaluations for HSC transplantation, expansion, and genetic modification.

  5. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    PubMed

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing.

  6. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    PubMed

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing. PMID:26203392

  7. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R.; Hoffman, Michael D.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-01-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing. PMID:26203392

  8. Antitumor effects of a xenogeneic survivin bone marrow derived dendritic cell vaccine against murine GL261 gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Michael J; Apfel, Lisa; Barone, Tara A; Castro, Carla A; Weiss, Tina C; Fenstermaker, Robert A

    2006-12-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family. Gliomas and many other tumors express survivin at high levels; whereas, normal fully differentiated cells generally do not. Therefore, survivin represents a tumor-specific target for cancer vaccine therapy. It has been shown that it is possible to produce a MHC-I-restricted cellular immunologic response to survivin vaccines. To study differences in immunogenicity between murine and human survivin proteins, we vaccinated C57BL/6 mice with bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC) transfected with expression vectors containing the murine and human survivin genes. Mice vaccinated with BMDCs expressing a truncated human survivin protein developed cytotoxic T lymphocyte to subcutaneous GL261 glioma cells and exhibited prolonged tumor-free survival compared to mice vaccinated with BMDCs transfected with vector alone (P<0.01). While mice challenged with intracerebral GL261 cells had increased survival, no cures were observed. In contrast, vaccinated mice that fully resisted subcutaneous tumor challenge were rendered resistant to intracerebral GL261 re-challenge. BMDCs transfected with the full-length human survivin molecule were significantly more effective at prolonging survival than BMDCs expressing the full-length murine survivin gene (P=0.0175). Therefore, xenogeneic differences between human and murine sequences might be exploited to develop more immunogenic tumor vaccines.

  9. Ablating hedgehog signaling in tenocytes during development impairs biomechanics and matrix organization of the adult murine patellar tendon enthesis.

    PubMed

    Breidenbach, Andrew P; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey; Lu, Yinhui; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Liu, Chia-Feng; Liu, Han; Wylie, Chris; Rao, Marepalli; Shearn, Jason T; Rowe, David W; Kadler, Karl E; Jiang, Rulang; Butler, David L

    2015-08-01

    Restoring the native structure of the tendon enthesis, where collagen fibers of the midsubstance are integrated within a fibrocartilaginous structure, is problematic following injury. As current surgical methods fail to restore this region adequately, engineers, biologists, and clinicians are working to understand how this structure forms as a prerequisite to improving repair outcomes. We recently reported on the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a novel enthesis marker, in regulating early postnatal enthesis formation. Here, we investigate how inactivating the Hh pathway in tendon cells affects adult (12-week) murine patellar tendon (PT) enthesis mechanics, fibrocartilage morphology, and collagen fiber organization. We show that ablating Hh signaling resulted in greater than 100% increased failure insertion strain (0.10 v. 0.05 mm/mm, p<0.01) as well as sub-failure biomechanical deficiencies. Although collagen fiber orientation appears overtly normal in the midsubstance, ablating Hh signaling reduces mineralized fibrocartilage by 32%, leading to less collagen embedded within mineralized tissue. Ablating Hh signaling also caused collagen fibers to coalesce at the insertion, which may explain in part the increased strains. These results indicate that Ihh signaling plays a critical role in the mineralization process of fibrocartilaginous entheses and may be a novel therapeutic to promote tendon-to-bone healing.

  10. Targeting of the bone marrow microenvironment improves outcome in a murine model of myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Balderman, Sophia R.; Li, Allison J.; Hoffman, Corey M.; Frisch, Benjamin J.; Goodman, Alexandra N.; LaMere, Mark W.; Georger, Mary A.; Evans, Andrew G.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Becker, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro evidence suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment (BMME) is altered in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs). Here, we study the BMME in MDS in vivo using a transgenic murine model of MDS with hematopoietic expression of the translocation product NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13). This model exhibits a prolonged period of cytopenias prior to transformation to leukemia and is therefore ideal to interrogate the role of the BMME in MDS. In this model, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) were decreased in NHD13 mice by flow cytometric analysis. The reduction in the total phenotypic HSPC pool in NHD13 mice was confirmed functionally with transplantation assays. Marrow microenvironmental cellular components of the NHD13 BMME were found to be abnormal, including increases in endothelial cells and in dysfunctional mesenchymal and osteoblastic populations, whereas megakaryocytes were decreased. Both CC chemokine ligand 3 and vascular endothelial growth factor, previously shown to be increased in human MDS, were increased in NHD13 mice. To assess whether the BMME contributes to disease progression in NHD13 mice, we performed transplantation of NHD13 marrow into NHD13 mice or their wild-type (WT) littermates. WT recipients as compared with NHD13 recipients of NHD13 marrow had a lower rate of the combined outcome of progression to leukemia and death. Moreover, hematopoietic function was superior in a WT BMME as compared with an NHD13 BMME. Our data therefore demonstrate a contributory role of the BMME to disease progression in MDS and support a therapeutic strategy whereby manipulation of the MDS microenvironment may improve hematopoietic function and overall survival. PMID:26637787

  11. [Long-term subculture and biological characterization of the murine bone marrow endothelial cell line].

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang; Zhu, Wen-Biao; Zhu, Hai-Ling; Wang, Bao-He; Wang, Qi-Ru

    2007-12-01

    The murine bone marrow endothelial cell line (mBMEC) has been maintained by means of subculture and cryopreservation for over 10 years since it was established in our laboratory. This study was aimed to newly identify biological characteristics of this cell line for further study. The cultured mBMEC cells were observed by inverted microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PECAM-1 (CD31) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were detected by immunofluorescent staining. The phagocytotic activity of the cells in culture was tested by using fluorescent acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Dil-Ac-LDL). The cell growth kinetics analysis and karyotype analysis were performed. The results showed that the adherent cells were mostly elliptical, rounded and spindle-shaped, and some of them connected to each other to form cord- and network-like arrangements in mBMEC cultures at subconfluence. The adherent cells grew up to confluence as a cobblestone-like monolayer. Several ultrastructural features of the endothelial cells could be observed in TEM sections of the cultured cells. More than 94% of mBMEC cells were positive for either CD31 or vWF. The phagocytotic ingestion of Dil-Ac-LDL occurred in 98.5% of cells. In normal culture conditions, the cells grew with a mean population doubling time of 54.6 hours and the maximal mitotic index was 38 per thousand in the rapid growth period. The colony yields were 4.33% to 7.40% depending on the plating density of cells. Karyotypes of all the cells were aneuploidy with a greater percentage of hyperdiploid. It is concluded that mBMEC cells retain the fundamental properties of endothelial cells, but the growth kinetics and biological behaviors are slightly different from those in the early days after the establishment of this cell line.

  12. Propagation and titration of murine cytomegalovirus in a continuous bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (M2-10B4).

    PubMed

    Lutarewych, M A; Quirk, M R; Kringstad, B A; Li, W; Verfaillie, C M; Jordan, M C

    1997-11-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) can only be propagated effectively in mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells. We demonstrate that MCMV replicates significantly better in M2-10B4 cells, a continuous line of murine bone marrow stromal cells. M2-10B4 cells were also comparable to MEF cells for detection of small amounts of MCMV reactivating from latently infected spleen explants. M2-10B4 cells will be very useful for studies of MCMV pathogenesis.

  13. Non-invasive diffuse correlation tomography reveals spatial and temporal blood flow differences in murine bone grafting approaches

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Proctor, Ashley R.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Choe, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal blood flow during murine bone graft healing was monitored non-invasively using diffuse correlation tomography. The system utilized spatially dense data from a scanning set-up, non-linear reconstruction, and micro-CT anatomical information. Weekly in vivo measurements were performed. Blood flow changes in autografts, which heal successfully, were localized to graft regions and consistent across mice. Poor healing allografts showed heterogeneous blood flow elevation and high inter-subject variabilities. Allografts with tissue-engineered periosteum showed responses intermediate to both autografts and allografts, consistent with healing observed. These findings suggest that spatiotemporal blood flow changes can be utilized to differentiate the degree of bone graft healing. PMID:27699097

  14. The effects of Phyllanthus niruri aqueous extract on the activation of murine lymphocytes and bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nworu, C S; Akah, P A; Okoye, F B C; Proksch, P; Esimone, C O

    2010-01-01

    Phyllanthus niruri L. (Euphorbiaceae) is acclaimed world-wide for its versatile ethnomedicinal uses. It features in recipes used by some herbalists to manage different diseases, including claims of efficacy against many life-threatening infections, such as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. In order to understand the mechanisms and the involvement of the immune system in mediating these activities, the effects of the aqueous extract of P. niruri on the activation of murine lymphocytes and macrophages were investigated. The study showed that the extract of P. niruri is a potent murine lymphocytes mitogen, inducing significant (p < 0.01) increases in the expression of surface activation maker (CD69) and proliferation of B and T lymphocytes. The production of interferon-gamma (IFN- gamma) and interleukine-4 (IL-4) by P. niruri extract-stimulated naïve splenocytes cultures was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Various indices of activation and functions murine bone marrow-derived macrophages were significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced by pre-treatment with the extract, including phagocytosis, lysosomal enzymes activity, and TNF-alpha release. Phyllanthus niruri extract was also shown to modulate nitric oxide release by macrophages. These activities suggest that stimulation of the immune system by the extracts of P. niruri could be partly responsible for the ethnomedicinal applications in the management of infectious diseases. PMID:20380522

  15. Assessment of DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells in the adult murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Florian Mehrkens, Dennis Starbatty, Jutta Nicol, Philipp Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Islet-1 was expressed in the adult heart. • Islet-1-positive cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. • Sinoatrial node cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. - Abstract: Rationale: Islet-1 positive (Islet-1{sup +}) cardiac progenitor cells give rise to the right ventricle, atria and outflow tract during murine cardiac development. In the adult heart Islet-1 expression is limited to parasympathetic neurons, few cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, within the proximal aorta and pulmonary artery and sinoatrial node cells. Its role in these cells is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that Islet-1{sup +} cells retain proliferative activity and may therefore play a role in regenerating specialized regions in the heart. Methods and results: DNA synthesis was analyzed by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine ({sup 3}H-thymidine) in Isl-1-nLacZ mice, a transgenic model with an insertion of a nuclear beta-galactosidase in the Islet-1 locus. Mice received daily injections of {sup 3}H-thymidine for 5 days. DNA synthesis was visualized throughout the heart by dipping autoradiography of cryosections. Colocalization of an nLacZ-signal and silver grains would indicate DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells. Whereas Islet{sup −} non-myocyte nuclei were regularly marked by accumulation of silver grains, colocalization with nLacZ-signals was not detected in >25,000 cells analyzed. Conclusions: Islet-1{sup +} cells are quiescent in the adult heart, suggesting that, under normal conditions, even pacemaking cells do not proliferate at higher rates than normal cardiac myocytes.

  16. Label-Retaining Cells in the Adult Murine Salivary Glands Possess Characteristics of Adult Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chibly, Alejandro M.; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction. PMID:25238060

  17. Label-retaining cells in the adult murine salivary glands possess characteristics of adult progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chibly, Alejandro M; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction.

  18. Gemstone spectral imaging for measuring adult bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wei-Guang; Liu, Dian-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to detect the bone Ca2+ content of L3 vertebrae in adults by gemstone spectral computed tomography. In total, 235 patients were selected and divided into age groups of 10 years each. The scanning data were used to detect the water-based and Ca2+-based substance levels on the L3 vertebral cancellous bone images. The results indicated that there were significant differences in vertebral Ca2+-water and water-Ca2+ densities determined by gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) between males and females in subjects aged 50–59 years, 60–69 years, 70–79 years and ≥80 years (P<0.05). The ages of male and female participants were negatively correlated with vertebral Ca2+-water density (P<0.01) and water-Ca2+ density (P<0.01). In conclusion, GSI may be used as a novel method of measuring the vertebral adult bone mineral density. PMID:27703518

  19. Bone Marrow Transplantation Transfers Age-Related Susceptibility to Neovascular Remodeling in Murine Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G.; Malek, Goldis; Mettu, Priyatham S.; Caicedo, Alejandro; Saloupis, Peter; Gach, Sarah; Dunnon, Askia K.; Hu, Peng; Spiga, Maria-Grazia; Cousins, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Neovascular remodeling (NVR), the progression of small capillaries into large-caliber arterioles with perivascular fibrosis, represents a major therapeutic challenge in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Neovascular remodeling occurs after laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in aged but not young mice. Additionally, bone marrow–derived cells, including macrophages, endothelial precursor cells, and mesenchymal precursor cells, contribute to CNV severity. In this study, we investigated the impact of aged bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on the degree of fibrosis, size, and vascular morphology of CNV lesions in a mouse model of laser-induced CNV. Methods. Young (2 months) and old (16 months) mice were transplanted with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled bone marrow isolated from either young or old donors. Laser CNV was induced 1 month following transplant, and eyes were analyzed via choroidal flat mounts and immunohistochemistry 1 month postlaser. The identity of cells infiltrating CNV lesions was determined using specific markers for the labeled transplanted cells (GFP+), macrophages (F4/80+), perivascular mesenchymal-derived cells (smooth muscle actin, SMA+), and endothelial cells (CD31+). Results. Bone marrow transplantation from aged mice transferred susceptibility to NVR into young recipients. Inversely, transplantation of young marrow into old mice prevented NVR, preserving small size and minimal fibrosis. Mice with NVR demonstrated a greater relative contribution of marrow-derived SMA+ perivascular mesenchymal cells as compared to other cells. Conclusions. Our findings indicate that the status of bone marrow is an important determining factor of neovascular severity. Furthermore, we find that perivascular mesenchymal cells, rather than endothelial cells, derived from aged bone marrow may contribute to increased CNV severity in this murine model of experimental neovascularization. PMID:24135751

  20. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  1. Serum Bicarbonate and Bone Mineral Density in US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Melamed, Michal L.; Abramowitz, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic metabolic acidosis leads to bone mineral loss and results in lower bone mineral density (BMD), which is a risk factor for osteoporosis-related fractures. The effect of low-level metabolic acidosis on bone density in the general population is unknown. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting & Participants 9,724 nationally representative adults aged 20 years or older in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. Factor Serum bicarbonate level. Outcomes Lumbar and total BMD as well as low lumbar and total bone mass defined as 1.0 SD below sex-specific mean of young adults. Measurements BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and serum bicarbonate levels were measured in all participants. Results Both men and women with lower serum bicarbonate levels were more likely to be current smokers and had higher body mass index and estimated net endogenous acid production. There was a significant linear trend across quartiles of serum bicarbonate with lumbar BMD among the total population as well as in sex-specific models (p=0.02 for all three models, p=0.1 for interaction). For total BMD, a significant association was seen with serum bicarbonate levels among women but not men (p=0.02 and p=0.1, respectively; p=0.8 for interaction); and a significant association was seen among post-menopausal women but not pre-menopausal women (p=0.02 and p=0.2, respectively; p=0.5 for interaction). Compared to women with serum bicarbonate level <24 mEq/L, those with serum bicarbonate ≥27 mEq/L had 0.018 g/cm2 higher total BMD (95% CI, 0.004-0.032; p=0.01) and had 31% lower odds of having low total bone mass (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.46-0.99; p=0.05). Limitations Cross-sectional study using a single measurement of serum bicarbonate level. The subgroup differences are not definitive. Conclusions Lower serum bicarbonate levels are associated with lower BMD in US adults. Further studies should examine whether serum bicarbonate levels should be

  2. Alternatively activated macrophages determine repair of the infarcted adult murine heart

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Shintani, Yasunori; Shintani, Yusuke; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Yashiro, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Alternatively activated (also known as M2) macrophages are involved in the repair of various types of organs. However, the contribution of M2 macrophages to cardiac repair after myocardial infarction (MI) remains to be fully characterized. Here, we identified CD206+F4/80+CD11b+ M2-like macrophages in the murine heart and demonstrated that this cell population predominantly increases in the infarct area and exhibits strengthened reparative abilities after MI. We evaluated mice lacking the kinase TRIB1 (Trib1–/–), which exhibit a selective depletion of M2 macrophages after MI. Compared with control animals, Trib1–/– mice had a catastrophic prognosis, with frequent cardiac rupture, as the result of markedly reduced collagen fibril formation in the infarct area due to impaired fibroblast activation. The decreased tissue repair observed in Trib1–/– mice was entirely rescued by an external supply of M2-like macrophages. Furthermore, IL-1α and osteopontin were suggested to be mediators of M2-like macrophage–induced fibroblast activation. In addition, IL-4 administration achieved a targeted increase in the number of M2-like macrophages and enhanced the post-MI prognosis of WT mice, corresponding with amplified fibroblast activation and formation of more supportive fibrous tissues in the infarcts. Together, these data demonstrate that M2-like macrophages critically determine the repair of infarcted adult murine heart by regulating fibroblast activation and suggest that IL-4 is a potential biological drug for treating MI. PMID:27140396

  3. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester abrogates bone resorption in a murine calvarial model of polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, M S F; Perilli, E; Stansborough, R L; Marino, V; Cantley, M D; Xu, J; Dharmapatni, A A S S K; Haynes, D R; Gibson, R J; Crotti, T N

    2015-06-01

    Particle-induced bone loss by osteoclasts is a common cause of aseptic loosening around implants. This study investigates whether caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a potent and specific inhibitor of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 and nuclear factor kappa B, at a low dose reduces bone resorption in a murine calvarial model of polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis. The effects of particles and CAPE treatment on gastrointestinal tract (GIT) histopathology were also evaluated. Mice were scanned using in vivo animal micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a baseline measurement. PE particles (2.82 × 10(9) particles/mL) were implanted over the calvariae on day 0. CAPE was administered subcutaneously (1 mg/kg/day) at days 0, 4, 7 and 10. Mice were killed at day 14 and serum was analysed for Type-1 carboxyterminal collagen crosslinks (CTX)-1 and osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) levels. Ex vivo μCT scans were conducted to assess bone volume (BV) change and percentage area of calvarial surface resorbed. Calvarial and GIT tissue was processed for histopathology. By day 14, PE particles significantly induced calvarial bone loss compared with control animals as evidenced by resorption areas adjacent to the implanted PE in three-dimensional μCT images, an increase in percentage of resorbed area (p = 0.0022), reduction in BV (p = 0.0012) and increased Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells. Serum CTX-1 (p = 0.0495) and OSCAR levels (p = 0.0006) significantly increased in the PE implant group. CAPE significantly inhibited PE particle-induced calvarial osteolysis, as evidenced by a significant reduction in surface bone resorption (p = 0.0012) and volumetric change (p = 0.0154) compared with PE only, but had no effect on systemic CTX-1. Neither particles nor CAPE had an effect on GIT histopathology. PMID:25804981

  4. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Demonstrates Similar Nanostructure in Cortical Bone from Young Adult Animals of Different Species.

    PubMed

    Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Turunen, Mikael Juhani; Mathavan, Neashan; Lages, Sebastian; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Olsson, Ulf; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Despite the vast amount of studies focusing on bone nanostructure that have been performed for several decades, doubts regarding the detailed structure of the constituting hydroxyapatite crystal still exist. Different experimental techniques report somewhat different sizes and locations, possibly due to different requirements for the sample preparation. In this study, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the nanostructure of femur samples from young adult ovine, bovine, porcine, and murine cortical bone, including three different orthogonal directions relative to the long axis of the bone. The radially averaged scattering from all samples reveals a remarkable similarity in the entire q range, which indicates that the nanostructure is essentially the same in all species. Small differences in the data from different directions confirm that the crystals are elongated in the [001] direction and that this direction is parallel to the long axis of the bone. A model consisting of thin plates is successfully employed to describe the scattering and extract the plate thicknesses, which are found to be in the range of 20-40 Å for most samples but 40-60 Å for the cow samples. It is demonstrated that the mineral plates have a large degree of polydispersity in plate thickness. Additionally, and equally importantly, the scattering data and the model are critically evaluated in terms of model uncertainties and overall information content.

  5. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Demonstrates Similar Nanostructure in Cortical Bone from Young Adult Animals of Different Species.

    PubMed

    Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Turunen, Mikael Juhani; Mathavan, Neashan; Lages, Sebastian; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Olsson, Ulf; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Despite the vast amount of studies focusing on bone nanostructure that have been performed for several decades, doubts regarding the detailed structure of the constituting hydroxyapatite crystal still exist. Different experimental techniques report somewhat different sizes and locations, possibly due to different requirements for the sample preparation. In this study, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the nanostructure of femur samples from young adult ovine, bovine, porcine, and murine cortical bone, including three different orthogonal directions relative to the long axis of the bone. The radially averaged scattering from all samples reveals a remarkable similarity in the entire q range, which indicates that the nanostructure is essentially the same in all species. Small differences in the data from different directions confirm that the crystals are elongated in the [001] direction and that this direction is parallel to the long axis of the bone. A model consisting of thin plates is successfully employed to describe the scattering and extract the plate thicknesses, which are found to be in the range of 20-40 Å for most samples but 40-60 Å for the cow samples. It is demonstrated that the mineral plates have a large degree of polydispersity in plate thickness. Additionally, and equally importantly, the scattering data and the model are critically evaluated in terms of model uncertainties and overall information content. PMID:26914607

  6. A cost-effective method to enhance adenoviral transduction of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Buo, Atum M; Williams, Mark S; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Stains, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    We report here a method for the use of poly-l-lysine (PLL) to markedly improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in culture and in situ, which are typically difficult to transduce. We show by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry that the addition of PLL to the viral-containing medium significantly increases the number of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive osteoblasts and BMSCs transduced with an enhanced GFP-expressing adenovirus. We also demonstrate that PLL can greatly enhance the adenoviral transduction of osteoblasts and osteocytes in situ in ex vivo tibia and calvaria, as well as in long bone fragments. In addition, we validate that PLL can improve routine adenoviral transduction studies by permitting the use of low multiplicities of infection to obtain the desired biologic effect. Ultimately, the use of PLL to facilitate adenoviral gene transfer in osteogenic cells can provide a cost-effective means of performing efficient gene transfer studies in the context of bone research. PMID:27547486

  7. Optical clearing in transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy of murine cortical bone tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Dooley, Kathryn A.; Kreider, Jaclynn M.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of optical clearing with glycerol on the Raman spectra of bone tissue acquired transcutaneously on right and left tibiae from four mice was studied. Multiple transcutaneous measurements were obtained from each limb; glycerol was then applied as an optical clearing agent, and additional transcutaneous measurements were taken. Glycerol reduces the noise in the raw spectra (p=0.0037) and significantly improves the cross-correlation between the recovered bone factor and the exposed bone measurement in a low signal-to-noise region of the bone spectra (p=0.0245). PMID:18465957

  8. Retrieval of Disseminated Tumor Cells Colonizing the Bone in Murine Breast Cancer Metastasis Models

    PubMed Central

    Welte, Thomas; Yu, Cuijuan

    2016-01-01

    In breast cancer, the most frequent site of metastasis is bone. Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) can be detected in the bone marrow of patients by their expression of epithelial or oncogenic markers [1], and the presence and frequency of these DTCs are associated with poor prognosis. However, many of the details behind this process remain elusive, including the biological properties and fates of these apparently indolent cancer cells. To provide pre-clinical models of DTCs, we have developed a procedure that allows for controlled and enhanced delivery of tumor cells to the bone in animal experiments via injection into the iliac artery of the hind limb [2]. To our surprise, we found that most cancer cells became integrated into the solid bone matrix shortly after arriving in the bone, and only a minority can be flushed out with the bone marrow. Here we describe a method that helps to retrieve DTCs homing to the bone in which we achieve an improved recovery of those tumor cells closely associated with the bone microenvironment. In our view it is especially important to analyze these tumor cell subpopulations, as they may take full advantage of growth-, survival- and immune-protective signals provided by neighbor cells. We also show a pilot study on how this approach may be applied to the analysis of cancer dormancy. Our study suggests that the detection and retrieval of DTCs in clinical studies are incomplete because they are conducted exclusively with bone marrow aspirates. PMID:26490041

  9. An Improved Harvest and in Vitro Expansion Protocol for Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Song; De Becker, Ann; Van Camp, Ben; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Riet, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Compared to bone marrow (BM) derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from human origin or from other species, the in vitro expansion and purification of murine MSCs (mMSCs) is much more difficult because of the low MSC yield and the unwanted growth of non-MSCs in the in vitro expansion cultures. We describe a modified protocol to isolate and expand murine BM derived MSCs based on the combination of mechanical crushing and collagenase digestion at the moment of harvest, followed by an immunodepletion step using microbeads coated with CD11b, CD45 and CD34 antibodies. The number of isolated mMSCs as estimated by colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay showed that this modified isolation method could yield 70.0% more primary colonies. After immunodepletion, a homogenous mMSC population could already be obtained after two passages. Immunodepleted mMSCs (ID-mMSCs) are uniformly positive for stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1), CD90, CD105 and CD73 cell surface markers, but negative for the hematopoietic surface markers CD14, CD34 and CD45. Moreover the immunodepleted cell population exhibits more differentiation potential into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. Our data illustrate the development of an efficient and reliable expansion protocol increasing the yield and purity of mMSCs and reducing the overall expansion time. PMID:21197440

  10. Long-term survival of murine allogeneic bone marrow chimeras: effect of anti-lymphocyte serum and bone marrow dose

    SciTech Connect

    Norin, A.J.; Emeson, E.E.; Veith, F.J.

    1981-02-01

    Graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) and failure of donor stem cells to engraft permanently are two major obstacles to successful bone marrow transplantation. The effect of a single large dose of anti-lymphocyte serum (ALS) on mice receiving various numbers of H-2 incompatible bone marrow cells was evaluated. Most animals receiving lethal total body irradiation (TBI) and allogeneic marrow died within 45 days due to GVHD. Mice that were given ALS 6 to 24 h before TBI and bone marrow 24 h after irradiation survived in good health for more than 200 days. These cell preparations caused lethal GVHD in third party mice indicating that the lack of alloreactivity was specific to the strain in which the unresponsiveness was originally induced.

  11. Induction of DNA-strand breaks after X-irradiation in murine bone cells of various differentiation capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine E.; Kirchner, Simone; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    During longterm space missions, astronauts suffer from the loss of minerals especially from weightbearing bones due to prolonged sojourn under microgravity. In addition to weightlessness, exposure to cosmic ionization radiation is another space related factor endangering health and productivity of astronauts. In order to elucidate changes in bone cell metabolism induced by ionizing radiation, ground-based bone cell models have been developed. The differentiation level of the bone cells may influence their radiation sensitivity. Therefore, our cell model comprises a collection of immortalized murine pre-osteoblast, osteoblast and osteocyte cell lines representing discrete stages of differentiation: the subclones 4 and 24 of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1, the osteoblast cell line OCT-1 and the osteocyte cell line MLO-Y4 display varying potential to produce mineralized bone matrix upon incubation with ascorbic acid and β-glycerophosphate (osteogenic medium). The MLO-Y4 cells showed the highest and subclone 24 the lowest proliferation rate. The most intense von Kossa reaction after culture in osteogenic medium was observed in subclone 4, indicating mineralized bone matrix. The bone cell markers alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were determined to further characterize the differentiation stage. All cell lines expressed osteocalcin, as determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The activity of alkaline phosphatase was highest in the cell line OCT-1 and very low in MLO-Y4 and S4. The peculiarity of the markers suggests a characterization of OCT-1 and S24 as preosteoblast, S4 as (mature) osteoblast, and MLO-Y4 as osteocyte. Survival after exposure to X-rays was determined using the colony forming ability test. The resulting dose-effect relationships revealed normal radiation sensitivity (compared to human fibroblasts). Cell clone specific variations (subclones 4 and 24) in the radiation sensitivity may be due to the differentiation level. The

  12. Delayed bone regeneration is linked to chronic inflammation in murine muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Khalil, Rana; Yang, Frank; Mortreux, Marie; Lieu, Shirley; Yu, Yan-Yiu; Wurmser, Maud; Pereira, Catia; Relaix, Frédéric; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Colnot, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients exhibit skeletal muscle weakness with continuous cycles of muscle fiber degeneration/regeneration, chronic inflammation, low bone mineral density and increased risks of fracture. Fragility fractures and associated complications are considered as a consequence of the osteoporotic condition in these patients. Here, we aimed to establish the relationship between muscular dystrophy and fracture healing by assessing bone regeneration in mdx mice, a model of DMD with absence of osteoporosis. Our results illustrate that muscle defects in mdx mice impact the process of bone regeneration at various levels. In mdx fracture calluses, both cartilage and bone deposition were delayed followed by a delay in cartilage and bone remodeling. Vascularization of mdx fracture calluses was also decreased during the early stages of repair. Dystrophic muscles are known to contain elevated numbers of macrophages contributing to muscle degeneration. Accordingly, we observed increased macrophage recruitment in the mdx fracture calluses and abnormal macrophage accumulation throughout the process of bone regeneration. These changes in the inflammatory environment subsequently had an impact on the recruitment of osteoclasts and the remodeling phase of repair. Further damage to the mdx muscles, using a novel model of muscle trauma, amplified both the chronic inflammatory response and the delay in bone regeneration. In addition, PLX3397 treatment of mdx mice, a cFMS inhibitor in monocytes, partially rescued the bone repair defect through increasing cartilage deposition and decreasing macrophage number. In conclusion, chronic inflammation in mdx mice contributes to the fracture healing delay and is associated with a decrease in angiogenesis and a transient delay in osteoclast recruitment. By revealing the role of dystrophic muscle in regulating the inflammatory response during bone repair, our results emphasize the implication of muscle in the normal bone

  13. Delayed bone regeneration is linked to chronic inflammation in murine muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Abou-Khalil, Rana; Yang, Frank; Mortreux, Marie; Lieu, Shirley; Yu, Yan-Yiu; Wurmser, Maud; Pereira, Catia; Relaix, Frédéric; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S; Colnot, Céline

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients exhibit skeletal muscle weakness with continuous cycles of muscle fiber degeneration/regeneration, chronic inflammation, low bone mineral density, and increased risks of fracture. Fragility fractures and associated complications are considered as a consequence of the osteoporotic condition in these patients. Here, we aimed to establish the relationship between muscular dystrophy and fracture healing by assessing bone regeneration in mdx mice, a model of DMD with absence of osteoporosis. Our results illustrate that muscle defects in mdx mice impact the process of bone regeneration at various levels. In mdx fracture calluses, both cartilage and bone deposition were delayed followed by a delay in cartilage and bone remodeling. Vascularization of mdx fracture calluses was also decreased during the early stages of repair. Dystrophic muscles are known to contain elevated numbers of macrophages contributing to muscle degeneration. Accordingly, we observed increased macrophage recruitment in the mdx fracture calluses and abnormal macrophage accumulation throughout the process of bone regeneration. These changes in the inflammatory environment subsequently had an impact on the recruitment of osteoclasts and the remodeling phase of repair. Further damage to the mdx muscles, using a novel model of muscle trauma, amplified both the chronic inflammatory response and the delay in bone regeneration. In addition, PLX3397 treatment of mdx mice, a cFMS (colony stimulating factor receptor 1) inhibitor in monocytes, partially rescued the bone repair defect through increasing cartilage deposition and decreasing the number of macrophages. In conclusion, chronic inflammation in mdx mice contributes to the fracture healing delay and is associated with a decrease in angiogenesis and a transient delay in osteoclast recruitment. By revealing the role of dystrophic muscle in regulating the inflammatory response during bone repair, our results

  14. The Effects of Androgens on Murine Cortical Bone Do Not Require AR or ERα Signaling in Osteoblasts and Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Ucer, Serra; Iyer, Srividhya; Bartell, Shoshana M; Martin-Millan, Marta; Han, Li; Kim, Ha-Neui; Weinstein, Robert S; Jilka, Robert L; O'Brien, Charles A; Almeida, Maria; Manolagas, Stavros C

    2015-07-01

    In men, androgens are critical for the acquisition and maintenance of bone mass in both the cortical and cancellous bone compartment. Male mice with targeted deletion of the androgen receptor (AR) in mature osteoblasts or osteocytes have lower cancellous bone mass, but no cortical bone phenotype. We have investigated the possibility that the effects of androgens on the cortical compartment result from AR signaling in osteoprogenitors or cells of the osteoclast lineage; or via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling in either or both of these two cell types upon conversion of testosterone to estradiol. To this end, we generated mice with targeted deletion of an AR or an ERα allele in the mesenchymal (AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre or ERα(f/f);Osx1-Cre) or myeloid cell lineage (AR(f/y);LysM-Cre or ERα(f/f);LysM-Cre) and their descendants. Male AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre mice exhibited decreased bone volume and trabecular number, and increased osteoclast number in the cancellous compartment. Moreover, they did not undergo the loss of cancellous bone volume and trabecular number caused by orchidectomy (ORX) in their littermate controls. In contrast, AR(f/y);LysM-Cre, ERα(f/f);Osx1-Cre, or ERα(f/f);LysM-Cre mice had no cancellous bone phenotype at baseline and lost the same amount of cancellous bone as their controls following ORX. Most unexpectedly, adult males of all four models had no discernible cortical bone phenotype at baseline, and lost the same amount of cortical bone as their littermate controls after ORX. Recapitulation of the effects of ORX by AR deletion only in the AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre mice indicates that the effects of androgens on cancellous bone result from AR signaling in osteoblasts-not on osteoclasts or via aromatization. The effects of androgens on cortical bone mass, on the other hand, do not require AR or ERα signaling in any cell type across the osteoblast or osteoclast differentiation lineage. Therefore, androgens must exert their effects indirectly by actions on

  15. Induction of DNA-strand breaks after X- irradiation in murine bone cells of various differentiation capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, P.; Hellweg, C. E.; Kirchner, S.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Horneck, G.

    Bone loss resulting from long-duration space flight is a well known medical risk for space travellers, as a weakened skeleton is more susceptible to bone fractures. In addition to weightlessness the astronaut is also exposed to cosmic ionizing radiation. In order to elucidate changes in bone cell metabolism by ionizing radiation, a ground-based bone cell model has been developed. This model consists of a bunch of immortalized murine osteocyte, osteoblast and pre-osteoblast cell lines representing discrete stages of differentiation: The osteocyte cell line MLO-Y4 (obtained from L. Bonewald, Kansas City, USA), the osteoblast cell line OCT-1 (obtained from D. Chen, San Antonio, USA), and the subclones 4 and 24 of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 (obtained from ATCC, Manassas, Virginia, USA). Regarding their growth properties, MLO-Y4 cells show the highest growth velocity with a doubling time of 15.8 h. The osteoblast cell line OCT-1 has a doubling time of 27.3 h. The respective values for MC3T3-E1 subclone 24 and S4 are 90.5 h and 51.6 h. To investigate the stage of differentiation, the expression of alkaline phosphatase, of osteocalcin and of E11 was examined. Survival after X-ray exposure was determined using the colony forming ability test. The resulting dose-effect relationships revealed significant differences. The parameter D0 of the survival curves ranges between 1.8 Gy for OCT-1, 1.9 Gy for MLO-Y4, 2.0 Gy for subclone 24 and 2,3 Gy for subclone 4. The quantitative acquisition of DNA-strand breaks was performed by Fluorescent Analysis of DNA-Unwinding (FADU). The results can be correlated with the corresponding survival curve. In conclusion, the cell lines with higher differentiation levels are less sensitive to radiation when compared to the lower differentiated osteoblast cell lines.

  16. Response of three murine macrophage populations to particulate debris: bone resorption in organ cultures.

    PubMed

    Glant, T T; Jacobs, J J

    1994-09-01

    Particulate wear debris from bone cement or prosthetic components can stimulate macrophages to cause bone resorption. We compared the effect of particle composition (titanium and polymethylmethacrylate as inherent components of prosthetic materials or bone cement and polystyrene as a reference material) on the secretion of interleukin-1 and prostaglandin E2 by peritoneal macrophages and monocyte/macrophage cell lines (P388D1 and IC-21) and on the bone-resorbing activity of conditioned medium harvested from these particle-challenged macrophages. Titanium particles (1-3 microns) in peritoneal macrophage cultures exhibited significantly enhanced bone-resorbing activity measured as 45Ca release, whereas polymethylmethacrylate and polystyrene exhibited this effect to a greater extent in the P388D1 and IC-21 monocyte/macrophage cultures. Although exogenous prostaglandin E2 and recombinant human interleukin-1 could significantly increase the 45Ca release and indomethacin significantly reduced both the spontaneous calcium efflux and active 45Ca release from calvarial bones labeled in vivo, the levels of interleukin-1 and prostaglandin E2, alone or together, did not always correlate with the bone-resorbing activity of conditioned media. Thus, the actual levels of potent bone-resorbing agents (prostaglandin E2 and interleukin-1) measured in conditioned tissue culture media did not necessarily reflect the bone-resorbing capability. An important result of this study is that different macrophage populations may respond differently to the same microenvironmental signal, which in our investigation was particulate wear debris of differing composition and size. PMID:7931789

  17. Tips and techniques for processing and sectioning undecalcified murine bone specimens.

    PubMed

    Bemenderfer, Thomas B; Harris, Jonathan S; Condon, Keith W; Kacena, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of mineralized tissue specimens for bone-specific staining encompasses a critical sequence of histological techniques that provides visualization of tissue and cellular morphology. Bone specimens are fixed in 10 % neutral-buffered formalin, dehydrated in graded ethanol (EtOH) solutions (and optionally cleared in xylene), infiltrated and embedded in polymethyl methacrylate (methyl methacrylate), classically sliced into 4-10 micrometer (μm) sections, and stained with bone-specific histological stains such as von Kossa (with either nuclear fast red solution counterstain or MacNeal's tetrachrome counterstain), modified Goldner's trichrome, and alizarin red S stain. Here, we describe the tissue processing of mineralized mouse bones from dissection to staining for histological analysis by light microscopy.

  18. Management of adult diaphyseal both-bone forearm fractures.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Leah M; Meals, Clifton G; Neviaser, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    Simultaneous diaphyseal fractures of the radius and ulna, often referred to as both-bone forearm fractures, are frequently encountered by orthopaedic surgeons. Adults with this injury are typically treated with open reduction and internal fixation because of the propensity for malunion of the radius and ulna and the resulting loss of forearm rotation. Large case series support the use of plate and screw fixation for simple fractures. More complex fractures are managed according to strain theory, with the intention of controlling rather than eliminating motion at the fracture site. This can be achieved with flexible plate and screw constructs or intramedullary nails. In general, results of surgical fixation have been good, with only modest losses of forearm strength and rotation. Notable complications include nonunion, malunion, and refracture after device removal. PMID:24966250

  19. Spaceflight-induced bone loss alters failure mode and reduces bending strength in murine spinal segments.

    PubMed

    Berg-Johansen, Britta; Liebenberg, Ellen C; Li, Alfred; Macias, Brandon R; Hargens, Alan R; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation rates are quadrupled in astronauts following spaceflight. While bending motions are main contributors to herniation, the effects of microgravity on the bending properties of spinal discs are unknown. Consequently, the goal of this study was to quantify the bending properties of tail discs from mice with or without microgravity exposure. Caudal motion segments from six mice returned from a 30-day Bion M1 mission and eight vivarium controls were loaded to failure in four-point bending. After testing, specimens were processed using histology to determine the location of failure, and adjacent motion segments were scanned with micro-computed tomography (μCT) to quantify bone properties. We observed that spaceflight significantly shortened the nonlinear toe region of the force-displacement curve by 32% and reduced the bending strength by 17%. Flight mouse spinal segments tended to fail within the growth plate and epiphyseal bone, while controls tended to fail at the disc-vertebra junction. Spaceflight significantly reduced vertebral bone volume fraction, bone mineral density, and trabecular thickness, which may explain the tendency of flight specimens to fail within the epiphyseal bone. Together, these results indicate that vertebral bone loss during spaceflight may degrade spine bending properties and contribute to increased disc herniation risk in astronauts. PMID:26285046

  20. Spaceflight-induced bone loss alters failure mode and reduces bending strength in murine spinal segments.

    PubMed

    Berg-Johansen, Britta; Liebenberg, Ellen C; Li, Alfred; Macias, Brandon R; Hargens, Alan R; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation rates are quadrupled in astronauts following spaceflight. While bending motions are main contributors to herniation, the effects of microgravity on the bending properties of spinal discs are unknown. Consequently, the goal of this study was to quantify the bending properties of tail discs from mice with or without microgravity exposure. Caudal motion segments from six mice returned from a 30-day Bion M1 mission and eight vivarium controls were loaded to failure in four-point bending. After testing, specimens were processed using histology to determine the location of failure, and adjacent motion segments were scanned with micro-computed tomography (μCT) to quantify bone properties. We observed that spaceflight significantly shortened the nonlinear toe region of the force-displacement curve by 32% and reduced the bending strength by 17%. Flight mouse spinal segments tended to fail within the growth plate and epiphyseal bone, while controls tended to fail at the disc-vertebra junction. Spaceflight significantly reduced vertebral bone volume fraction, bone mineral density, and trabecular thickness, which may explain the tendency of flight specimens to fail within the epiphyseal bone. Together, these results indicate that vertebral bone loss during spaceflight may degrade spine bending properties and contribute to increased disc herniation risk in astronauts.

  1. Leptin-receptor-expressing mesenchymal stromal cells represent the main source of bone formed by adult bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo O; Yue, Rui; Murphy, Malea M; Peyer, James G; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-08-01

    Studies of the identity and physiological function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been hampered by a lack of markers that permit both prospective identification and fate mapping in vivo. We found that Leptin Receptor (LepR) is a marker that highly enriches bone marrow MSCs. Approximately 0.3% of bone marrow cells were LepR(+), 10% of which were CFU-Fs, accounting for 94% of bone marrow CFU-Fs. LepR(+) cells formed bone, cartilage, and adipocytes in culture and upon transplantation in vivo. LepR(+) cells were Scf-GFP(+), Cxcl12-DsRed(high), and Nestin-GFP(low), markers which also highly enriched CFU-Fs, but negative for Nestin-CreER and NG2-CreER, markers which were unlikely to be found in CFU-Fs. Fate-mapping showed that LepR(+) cells arose postnatally and gave rise to most bone and adipocytes formed in adult bone marrow, including bone regenerated after irradiation or fracture. LepR(+) cells were quiescent, but they proliferated after injury. Therefore, LepR(+) cells are the major source of bone and adipocytes in adult bone marrow.

  2. Exchange of potassium and strontium in adult bone. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Maltby, B.; Lemon, G.J.; Bassingthwaighte, J.B.; Kelly, P.J.

    1982-04-01

    The kinetics of exchange of strontium (/sup 85/Sr) and potassium (/sup 42/K) were studied in the midtibial cortical bone of 37 adult dogs. After injection of these two tracer cations and tracer-labeled albumin into the tibial nutrient artery, two types of observations were made: 1) collection of sequential venous samples to provide the outflow indicator-dilution curves and to calculate the extraction and retention at early times; and 2) detection of energy-selected gamma emissions via a detector over the tibia to give the time course of content of /sup 42/K and /sup 85/Sr in the tibia. Extractions of K/sup +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ were 50 and 60% during a single transcapillary passage. More Sr/sup 2 +/ than K/sup +/ was retained in the first minutes. Their rates of washout over a 3-h period were similar. The interpretation is that the rate of uptake at extravascular sites is faster for Sr/sup 2 +/ than for K/sup +/, as is the rate of release, and that the extravascular volume of distribution for Sr/sup 2 +/ (adsorption sites in the interstitium or on bone) is much larger than that for K/sup +/ (intracellular).

  3. [Bone marrow mononuclear cells from murine tibia after the space flight on biosatellite "Bion-M1"].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, E R; Goncharova, E A; Gornostaeva, A N; Grigor'eva, O V; Buravkova, L B

    2014-01-01

    Cellularity, viability and immunophenotype of mononuclear cells derived from the tibial marrow of C57bL/6 mice were measured after the 30-day "Bion-M1" space flight and subsequent 7-day recovery. Cell number in the flight group was significantly less than in the group of vivarium control. There was no difference in the parameter between the flight and control groups after the recovery. Viability of mononuclear cells was more than 95% in all examined groups. Flow cytometric analysis failed to show differences in bone marrow cell immunophenotype (CD45, CD34, CD90.1 (Thy1); however, the flight animals had more large-sized CD45+ mononuclears than the control groups of mice. These results indicate that spaceflight factors did not have significant damaging effects on the number or immunophenotype of murine bone marrow mononuclears. These observations are consistent with the previously made assumption of a moderate and reversible stress reaction of mammals to space flight.

  4. Chemical changes in DMP1-null murine bone & silica based pecvd coatings for titanium implant osseoapplications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maginot, Megen

    In order to improve clinical outcomes in bone-implant systems, a thorough understanding of both local bone chemistry and implant surface chemistry is necessary. This study consists, therefore, of two main parts: one focused on determining the nature of the changes in bone chemistry in a DMP1-null transgenic disease model and the other on the development of amorphous silica-based coatings for potential use as titanium bone implant coatings. For the study of bone mineral in the DMP1 transgenic model, which is known to have low serum phosphate levels, transgenic DMP1-null and wild type mice were fed a high phosphate diet, sacrificed, and had their long bone harvested. This bone was characterized using SEM, FTIR, microCT and XANES and compared to DMP1-null and wild type control groups to assess the therapeutic effect of high Pi levels on the phenotype and the role of DMP1 in mineralization in vivo. Findings suggest that though the high phosphate diet results in restoring serum phosphate levels, it does not completely rescue the bone mineral phenotype at an ultrastructural level and implicates DMP1 in phosphate nucleation. Since plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silica like coatings have not previously been fabricated for use in oessoapplications, the second part of this study initially focused on the characterization of novel SiOx chemistries fabricated via a chemical vapor deposition process that were designed specifically to act as bioactive coatings with a loose, hydrogenated structure. These coatings were then investigated for their potential initial stage response to bone tissue through immersion in a simulated body fluid and through the culture of MC3T3 cells on the coating surfaces. Coating surfaces were characterized by SEM, FTIR, contact angle measurements, and XANES. Coating dissolution and ionic release were also investigated by ICP-OES. Findings suggest that some SiOx chemistries may form a bioactive coating while more highly substituted

  5. Erythropoietin treatment in murine multiple myeloma: immune gain and bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Deshet-Unger, Naamit; Hiram-Bab, Sahar; Haim-Ohana, Yasmin; Mittelman, Moshe; Gabet, Yankel; Neumann, Drorit

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy, characterized by osteolytic lesions and monoclonal immunoglobulins. The anemia, accompanying the disease is often treated with recombinant human EPO. Diverse non-erythropoietic effects of EPO have led us to question its combined action on the immune system and bone in the 5T33MM mouse model. EPO administration to MM mice attenuated disease progression as demonstrated by a decrease in serum MM IgG2b, splenic CD138 expressing cells, IL-6 and RORγτ transcripts in bone marrow (BM). IFN-γ transcript levels and macrophages (F4/80+CD11b+) in the BM both increased ~1.5 fold in the EPO-treated MM mice. In-vitro, EPO stimulated phagocytosis of 5T33MM cells (+30%) by BM-derived macrophages. In contrast, high-resolution microCT analysis of distal femurs revealed EPO-associated bone loss in both healthy and 5T33MM mice. EPO significantly increased expression of the osteoclastogenic nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) in healthy mice, but not in MM mice, likely due to antagonizing effects on MM progression. Thus, in MM, EPO may act as a double-edged-sword stimulating immune response, while accelerating bone resorption, possibly via direct action on BM macrophages. This study supports a prudent approach of treating anemia in MM patients, aiming to maintain EPO-associated anti-MM effects, while considering bone damage. PMID:27481313

  6. Murine bone cell lines as models for spaceflight induced effects on differentiation and gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, P.; Hellweg, C. E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Reitz, G.

    Critical health factors for space crews especially on long-term missions are radiation exposure and the absence of gravity DNA double strand breaks DSB are presumed to be the most deleterious DNA lesions after radiation as they disrupt both DNA strands in close proximity Besides radiation risk the absence of gravity influences the complex skeletal apparatus concerning muscle and especially bone remodelling which results from mechanical forces exerting on the body Bone is a dynamic tissue which is life-long remodelled by cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineage Any imbalance of this system leads to pathological conditions such as osteoporosis or osteopetrosis Osteoblastic cells play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis and differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes Premature terminal differentiation has been reported to be induced by a number of DNA damaging or cell stress inducing agents including ionising and ultraviolet radiation as well as treatment with mitomycin C In the present study we compare the effects of sequential differentiation by adding osteoinductive substances ss -glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid Radiation-induced premature differentiation was investigated regarding the biosynthesis of specific osteogenic marker molecules and the differentiation dependent expression of marker genes The bone cell model established in our laboratory consists of the osteocyte cell line MLO-Y4 the osteoblast cell line OCT-1 and the subclones 4 and 24 of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 expressing several

  7. Enrichment for CFU-C from murine and human bone marrow using soybean agglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Reisner, Y.; Kapoor, N.; Hodes, M.Z.; O'Reilly, R.J.; Good, R.A.

    1982-02-01

    Mouse bone marrow and spleen cells agglutinated by soybean agglutinin (SBA) or peanut agglutinin (PNA) were previously shown to be enriched for spleen colony-forming cells (CFU-S) and sufficiently depleted of graft-versus-host reaction producing cells to allow hematologic reconstitution of lethally irradiated allogeneic recipient mice. A similar enrichment for cells capable of forming colonies in soft agar culture (CFU-C) has now been found in the SBA-agglutinated fraction of mouse bone marrow cells, in contrast to the finding that in human bone marrow the majority of the CFU-C are in the fraction not agglutinated by SBA. Cytofluorometric studies with fluorescein-labeled SBA (FITC-SBA) revealed that the majority of both mouse and human bone marrow cells bind the lectin. Experiments mixing the human marrow fractions separated by SBA reveal that true enrichment for CFU-C is achieved in the unagglutinated fraction, as opposed to a possible depletion of a suppressor cell population. Granulocytic, monocytic, and mixed cell colonies were all enriched in the SBA-unagglutinated cell fraction from human bone marrow.

  8. Fibrillin-1 microfibrils influence adult bone marrow hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Silvia; Bigarella, Carolina L; Del Solar, Maria; Ghaffari, Saghi; Ramirez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that fibrillin-1 assemblies regulate the fate of skeletal stem cells (aka, mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs]) by modulating TGFβ activity within the microenvironment of adult bone marrow niches. Since MSCs can also influence hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activities, here we investigated adult hematopoiesis in mice with Cre-mediated inactivation of the fibrillin-1 (Fbn1) gene in the mesenchyme of the forming limbs (Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice). Analyses of 3-month-old Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice revealed a statistically significant increase of circulating red blood cells, which a differentiation assay correlated with augmented erythropoiesis. This finding, together with evidence of fibrillin-1 deposition in erythroblastic niches, supported the notion that this extracellular matrix protein normally restricts differentiation of erythroid progenitors. Whereas flow cytometry measurements identified a decreased HSC frequency in mutant relative to wild type mice, no appreciable differences were noted with regard to the relative abundance and differentiation potential of myeloid progenitor cells. Together these findings implied that fibrillin-1 normally promotes HSC expansion but does not influence cell lineage commitment. Since local TGFβ hyperactivity has been associated with abnormal osteogenesis in Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice, 1-month-old mutant and wild type animals were systemically treated for 8weeks with either a pan-TGF-β-neutralizing antibody or an antibody of the same IgG1 isotype. The distinct outcomes of these pharmacological interventions strongly suggest that fibrillin-1 differentially modulates TGFβ activity in HSC vs. erythroid niches.

  9. Effects of OK-432 on murine bone marrow and the production of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.B.; Rosse, C.

    1985-01-01

    The streptococcal preparation, OK-432, which augments anti-tumor responses in humans and mice, has been shown to be a potent immunomodulator. Among its effects is a pronounced augmentation of natural killer (NK) activity. The hypothesis that OK-432 alters the rates of production and maturation of NK cells in the bone marrow was tested. Studies to determine the kinetic parameters of NK cell production in normal C57BL/6J mice using tritiated thymidine, /sup 3/H-TdR, as a DNA marker are described. We are now extending those studies to determine the effect of OK-432 on the bone marrow and on the production of NK cells in the marrow. Initial observations are reported which indicate that OK-432 has profound effects on the cellularity and mitotic activity of the bone marrow, and in particular, on cells with the characteristics of natural killer cells within the marrow. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Adult bone marrow: which stem cells for cellular therapy protocols in neurodegenerative disorders?

    PubMed

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy.

  11. A Bone Anabolic Effect of RANKL in a Murine Model of Osteoporosis mediated through FoxP3+ CD8 T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Buchwald, Zachary S.; Yang, Chang; Nellore, Suman; Shashkova, Elena V.; Davis, Jennifer L.; Cline, Anna; Ko, Je; Novack, Deborah V.; DiPaolo, Richard; Aurora, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    TNFα and IL-17 secreted by proinflammatory T-cells (TEFF) promote bone erosion by activating osteoclasts. We previously demonstrated that in addition to bone resorption, osteoclasts act as antigen presenting cells to induce FoxP3 in CD8 T-cells (TcREG). The osteoclast-induced regulatory CD8 T-cells limit bone resorption in ovariectomized mice (a murine model of postmenopausal osteoporosis). Here we show that while low-dose RANKL maximally induces TcREG via Notch signaling pathway to limit bone resorption, high-dose RANKL promotes bone resorption. In vitro, both TNFα and IL-17, cytokines that are abundant in ovariectomized animals, suppress TcREG induction by osteoclasts by repressing Notch ligand expression in osteoclasts but this effect can be counteracted by addition of RANKL. Ovariectomized mice treated with low-dose RANKL induced TcREG that suppressed bone resorption, decreased TEFF levels and increased bone formation. High dose RANKL had the expected osteolytic effect. Low dose RANKL administration in ovariectomized mice lacking CD8 T-cells was also osteolytic, confirming that TcREG mediate this bone anabolic effect. Our results show that while RANKL directly stimulates osteoclasts to resorb bone, it also controls the osteoclasts’ ability to induce regulatory T-cells, engaging an important negative feedback loop. In addition to the conceivable clinical relevance to treatment of osteoporosis, these observations have potential relevance to induction of tolerance and autoimmune diseases. PMID:25656537

  12. The Proteome of Native Adult Müller Glial Cells From Murine Retina.

    PubMed

    Grosche, Antje; Hauser, Alexandra; Lepper, Marlen Franziska; Mayo, Rebecca; von Toerne, Christine; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Hauck, Stefanie M

    2016-02-01

    To date, the proteomic profiling of Müller cells, the dominant macroglia of the retina, has been hampered because of the absence of suitable enrichment methods. We established a novel protocol to isolate native, intact Müller cells from adult murine retinae at excellent purity which retain in situ morphology and are well suited for proteomic analyses. Two different strategies of sample preparation - an in StageTips (iST) and a subcellular fractionation approach including cell surface protein profiling were used for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) comparing Müller cell-enriched to depleted neuronal fractions. Pathway enrichment analyses on both data sets enabled us to identify Müller cell-specific functions which included focal adhesion kinase signaling, signal transduction mediated by calcium as second messenger, transmembrane neurotransmitter transport and antioxidant activity. Pathways associated with RNA processing, cellular respiration and phototransduction were enriched in the neuronal subpopulation. Proteomic results were validated for selected Müller cell genes by quantitative real time PCR, confirming the high expression levels of numerous members of the angiogenic and anti-inflammatory annexins and antioxidant enzymes (e.g. paraoxonase 2, peroxiredoxin 1, 4 and 6). Finally, the significant enrichment of antioxidant proteins in Müller cells was confirmed by measurements on vital retinal cells using the oxidative stress indicator CM-H2DCFDA. In contrast to photoreceptors or bipolar cells, Müller cells were most efficiently protected against H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species formation, which is in line with the protein repertoire identified in the proteomic profiling. Our novel approach to isolate intact glial cells from adult retina in combination with proteomic profiling enabled the identification of novel Müller glia specific proteins, which were validated as markers and for their functional impact in glial

  13. Physalis angulata induces in vitro differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The bone marrow is a hematopoietic tissue that, in the presence of cytokines and growth factors, generates all of the circulating blood cells. These cells are important for protecting the organism against pathogens and for establishing an effective immune response. Previous studies have shown immunomodulatory effects of different products isolated from plant extracts. This study aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory properties of aqueous Physalis angulata (AEPa) extract on the differentiation of bone marrow cells. Results Increased cellular area, higher spreading ability and several cytoplasmatic projections were observed in the treated cells, using optical microscopy, suggesting cell differentiation. Furthermore, AEPa did not promote the proliferation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, however promotes increased the number of macrophages in the culture. The ultrastructural analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy of treated cells showed spreading ability, high number of cytoplasmatic projections and increase of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, a high level of LC3b expression by treated cells was detected by flow cytometry, suggesting an autophagic process. Cell surface expression of F4/80 and CD11b also indicated that AEPa may stimulate differentiation of bone marrow cells mainly into macrophages. In addition, AEPa did not differentiate cells into dendritic cells, as assessed by CD11c analysis. Furthermore, no cytotoxic effects were observed in the cells treated with AEPa. Conclusion Results demonstrate that AEPa promotes the differentiation of bone marrow cells, particularly into macrophages and may hold promise as an immunomodulating agent. PMID:25281406

  14. Cure of murine thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation without eradication of endogenous stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemaker, G.; Visser, T.P.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1986-09-01

    alpha-Thalassemic heterozygous (Hbath/+) mice were used to investigate the possible selective advantage of transplanted normal (+/+) hemopoietic cells. Without conditioning by total-body irradiation (TBI), infusion of large numbers of normal bone marrow cells failed to correct the thalassemic peripheral blood phenotype. Since the recipients' stem cells are normal with respect to number and differentiation capacity, it was thought that the transplanted stem cells were not able to lodge, or that they were not stimulated to proliferate. Therefore, a nonlethal dose of TBI was given to temporarily reduce endogenous stem cell numbers and hemopoiesis. TBI doses of 2 or 3 Gy followed by infusion of normal bone marrow cells proved to be effective in replacing the thalassemic red cells by normal red cells, whereas a dose of 1 Gy was ineffective. It is concluded that cure of thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation does not necessarily require eradication of thalassemic stem cells. Consequently, the objectives of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation of thalassemic patients (and possibly other nonmalignant hemopoietic disorders) should be reconsidered.

  15. Long circulating enzyme replacement therapy rescues bone pathology in mucopolysaccharidosis VII murine model.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Daniel J; Tomatsu, Shunji; Grubb, Jeffrey H; Haupt, Bisong; Montaño, Adriana M; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Sosa, Angela C; Chen, Anping; Sly, William S

    2012-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VII is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS), leading to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) effectively clears GAG storage in the viscera. Recent studies showed that a chemically modified form of GUS (PerT-GUS), which escaped clearance by mannose 6-phosphate and mannose receptors and showed prolonged circulation, reduced CNS storage more effectively than native GUS. Clearance of storage in bone has been limited due to the avascularity of the growth plate. To evaluate the effectiveness of long-circulating PerT-GUS in reducing the skeletal pathology, we treated MPS VII mice for 12 weeks beginning at 5 weeks of age with PerT-GUS or native GUS and used micro-CT, radiographs, and quantitative histopathological analysis for assessment of bones. Micro-CT findings showed PerT-GUS treated mice had a significantly lower BMD. Histopathological analysis also showed reduced storage material and a more organized growth plate in PerT-GUS treated mice compared with native GUS treated mice. Long term treatment with PerT-GUS from birth up to 57 weeks also significantly improved bone lesions demonstrated by micro-CT, radiographs and quantitative histopathological assay. In conclusion, long-circulating PerT-GUS provides a significant impact to rescue of bone lesions and CNS involvement.

  16. Comparison of the relationship between bone marrow adipose tissue and volumetric bone mineral density in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Velasquez, Gilbert; Chen, Jun; Jin, Ye; Heymsfield, Steven B; Gallagher, Dympna; Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Several large-scale studies have reported the presence of an inverse relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) in adults. We aim to determine if there is an inverse relationship between pelvic volumetric BMD (vBMD) and pelvic BMAT in children and to compare this relationship in children and adults. Pelvic BMAT and bone volume (BV) was evaluated in 181 healthy children (5-17yr) and 495 healthy adults (≥18yr) with whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pelvic vBMD was calculated using whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to measure pelvic bone mineral content and MRI-measured BV. An inverse correlation was found between pelvic BMAT and pelvic vBMD in both children (r=-0.374, p<0.001) and adults (r=-0.650, p<0.001). In regression analysis with pelvic vBMD as the dependent variable and BMAT as the independent variable, being a child or adult neither significantly contribute to the pelvic BMD (p=0.995) nor did its interaction with pelvic BMAT (p=0.415). The inverse relationship observed between pelvic vBMD and pelvic BMAT in children extends previous findings that found the inverse relationship to exist in adults and provides further support for a reciprocal relationship between adipocytes and osteoblasts.

  17. Prophylactic Amifostine Preserves the Biomechanical Properties of Irradiated Bone in the Murine Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Felice, Peter A.; Ahsan, Salman; Perosky, Joseph E.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Nelson, Noah S.; Donneys, Alexis; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors have previously demonstrated that amifostine prophylaxis mitigates the pernicious effects of radiation in settings of fracture repair and distraction osteogenesis. Expanding on these studies, the authors examined the biomechanical properties of uninjured bone exposed to both radiation and amifostine. The authors hypothesize that radiation will degrade the biomechanical properties of native bone, and further hypothesize that prophylactic amifostine will preserve biomechanical properties to levels of normal bone and protect against radiation-induced morbidities. Methods Rats were randomized into control, irradiated, and amifostine pretreatment plus radiation (amifostine-pretreated) groups. Irradiated animals received a fractionated dosing schedule of 35 Gy, with amifostine-pretreated animals receiving amifostine before irradiation. Hemimandibles were harvested at 8 and 18 weeks for biomechanical testing and micro–computed tomographic analysis. Results At 8 weeks, irradiated specimens displayed elevations above controls for all biomechanical properties. At 18 weeks, the biomechanical properties of irradiated specimens degraded in comparison with controls; at both time points, amifostine-pretreated specimens were maintained at levels comparable to controls. There was a significant decrease in tissue mineral density from 8- to 18-week irradiated specimens, whereas no such change existed for control and amifostine-pretreated specimens. Conclusions The authors’ findings demonstrate paradoxical and transient elevations in the initial biomechanical properties of irradiated specimens that were not sustained through the later study time point. Amifostine pretreatment, however, provided uninterrupted preservation of the biomechanical properties of normal, native bone at both time points. This supports the contention that amifostine is capable of providing continuous protection to bone against the untoward effects of radiation therapy. PMID:24572876

  18. Fisetin antagonizes cell fusion, cytoskeletal organization and bone resorption in RANKL-differentiated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Sin-Hye; Han, Seon-Young; Kang, Soon Ah; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is comprised of several stage s including progenitor survival, differentiation to mononuclear preosteoclasts, cell fusion to multinuclear mature osteoclasts, and activation to osteoclasts with bone resorbing activity. Botanical antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects on bone. This study investigated that fisetin, a flavonol found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, suppressed osteoclastogenesis by disturbing receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated signaling pathway and demoting osteoclastogenic protein induction. Nontoxic fisetin at ≤10 μM inhibited the induction of RANK, tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and the activation of NF-κB in RANKL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In RANKL-differentiated osteoclasts cell fusion protein of E-cadherin was induced, which was dampened by fisetin. The formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclasts was suppressed by adding fisetin to RANKL-exposed macrophages. It was also found that fisetin reduced actin ring formation and gelsolin induction of osteclasts enhanced by RANKL through disturbing c-Src-proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 signaling. Fisetin deterred preosteoclasts from the cell-cell fusion and the organization of the cytoskeleton to seal the resorbing area and to secret protons for bone resorption. Consistently, the 5 day-treatment of fisetin diminished RANKL-induced cellular expression of carbonic anhydrase II and integrin β3 concurrently with a reduction of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. Therefore, fisetin was a natural therapeutic agent retarding osteoclast fusion and cytoskeletal organization such as actin rings and ruffled boarder, which is a property of mature osteoclasts and is required for osteoclasts to resorb bone.

  19. Differentiation of Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Is Regulated by PDGF-BB and Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Clifford; Yuan, Yifan; Courtman, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are key regulators of vascular disease and circulating smooth muscle progenitor cells may play important roles in vascular repair or remodelling. We developed enhanced protocols to derive smooth muscle progenitors from murine bone marrow and tested whether factors that are increased in atherosclerotic plaques, namely platelet-derived growth factor—BB (PDGF-BB) and monomeric collagen, can influence the smooth muscle specific differentiation, proliferation, and survival of mouse bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. During a 21 day period of culture, bone marrow cells underwent a marked increase in expression of the SMC markers α-SMA (1.93 ± 0.15 vs. 0.0008 ± 0.0003 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d), SM22-α (1.50 ± 0.27 vs. 0.005 ± 0.001 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d) and SM-MHC (0.017 ± 0.004 vs. 0.001 ± 0.001 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation experiments showed that in early culture, the smooth muscle progenitor subpopulation could be identified by high proliferative rates prior to the expression of smooth muscle specific markers. Culture of fresh bone marrow or smooth muscle progenitor cells with PDGF-BB suppressed the expression of α-SMA and SM22-α, in a rapidly reversible manner requiring PDGF receptor kinase activity. Progenitors cultured on polymerized collagen gels demonstrated expression of SMC markers, rates of proliferation and apoptosis similar to that of cells on tissue culture plastic; in contrast, cells grown on monomeric collagen gels displayed lower SMC marker expression, lower growth rates (319 ± 36 vs. 635 ± 97 cells/mm2), and increased apoptosis (5.3 ± 1.6% vs. 1.0 ± 0.5% (Annexin 5 staining)). Our data shows that the differentiation and survival of smooth muscle progenitors are critically affected by PDGF-BB and as well as the substrate collagen structure. PMID:27258003

  20. Differentiation of Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Is Regulated by PDGF-BB and Collagen.

    PubMed

    Lin, Clifford; Yuan, Yifan; Courtman, David W

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are key regulators of vascular disease and circulating smooth muscle progenitor cells may play important roles in vascular repair or remodelling. We developed enhanced protocols to derive smooth muscle progenitors from murine bone marrow and tested whether factors that are increased in atherosclerotic plaques, namely platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and monomeric collagen, can influence the smooth muscle specific differentiation, proliferation, and survival of mouse bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. During a 21 day period of culture, bone marrow cells underwent a marked increase in expression of the SMC markers α-SMA (1.93 ± 0.15 vs. 0.0008 ± 0.0003 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d), SM22-α (1.50 ± 0.27 vs. 0.005 ± 0.001 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d) and SM-MHC (0.017 ± 0.004 vs. 0.001 ± 0.001 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation experiments showed that in early culture, the smooth muscle progenitor subpopulation could be identified by high proliferative rates prior to the expression of smooth muscle specific markers. Culture of fresh bone marrow or smooth muscle progenitor cells with PDGF-BB suppressed the expression of α-SMA and SM22-α, in a rapidly reversible manner requiring PDGF receptor kinase activity. Progenitors cultured on polymerized collagen gels demonstrated expression of SMC markers, rates of proliferation and apoptosis similar to that of cells on tissue culture plastic; in contrast, cells grown on monomeric collagen gels displayed lower SMC marker expression, lower growth rates (319 ± 36 vs. 635 ± 97 cells/mm2), and increased apoptosis (5.3 ± 1.6% vs. 1.0 ± 0.5% (Annexin 5 staining)). Our data shows that the differentiation and survival of smooth muscle progenitors are critically affected by PDGF-BB and as well as the substrate collagen structure.

  1. Effects of sublethal irradiation on patterns of engraftment after murine bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Jacob; Ge, Shundi; Symbatyan, Goar; Rosol, Michael S; Olch, Arthur J; Crooks, Gay M

    2011-05-01

    Attempts to reduce the toxicity of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have led to the use of various immunosuppressive, yet nonmyeloablative preparative regimens that often include low-dose irradiation. To determine the effects of low-dose irradiation on the dynamics of donor cell engraftment after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), we coupled standard endpoint flow cytometric analysis with in vivo longitudinal bioluminescence imaging performed throughout the early (<10 days) and late (days 10-90) post-BMT periods. To exclude the contribution of irradiation on reducing immunologic rejection, severely immune-deficient mice were chosen as recipients of allogeneic bone marrow. Flow cytometric analysis showed that sublethal doses of total body irradiation (TBI) significantly increased long-term (14 weeks) donor chimerism in the bone marrow compared with nonirradiated recipients (P < .05). Bioluminescence imaging demonstrated that the effect of TBI (P < .001) on chimerism occurred only after the first 7 days post-BMT. Flow cytometric analysis on day 3 showed no increase in the number of donor cells in irradiated bone marrow, confirming that sublethal irradiation does not enhance marrow chimerism early after transplantation. Local irradiation also significantly increased late (but not early) donor chimerism in the irradiated limb. Intrafemoral injection of donor cells provided efficient early chimerism in the injected limb, but long-term systemic donor chimerism was highest with i.v. administration (P < .05). Overall, the combination of TBI and i.v. administration of donor cells provided the highest levels of long-term donor chimerism in the marrow space. These findings suggest that the major effect of sublethal irradiation is to enhance long-term donor chimerism by inducing proliferative signals after the initial phase of homing.

  2. Commercial Honeybush (Cyclopia spp.) Tea Extract Inhibits Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption in RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages-An in vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Visagie, Amcois; Kasonga, Abe; Deepak, Vishwa; Moosa, Shaakirah; Marais, Sumari; Kruger, Marlena C; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-10-28

    Honeybush tea, a sweet tasting caffeine-free tea that is indigenous to South Africa, is rich in bioactive compounds that may have beneficial health effects. Bone remodeling is a physiological process that involves the synthesis of bone matrix by osteoblasts and resorption of bone by osteoclasts. When resorption exceeds formation, bone remodeling can be disrupted resulting in bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors of monocytic lineage. These precursors fuse and differentiate into mature osteoclasts in the presence of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL), produced by osteoblasts. In this study, the in vitro effects of an aqueous extract of fermented honeybush tea were examined on osteoclast formation and bone resorption in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. We found that commercial honeybush tea extract inhibited osteoclast formation and TRAP activity which was accompanied by reduced bone resorption and disruption of characteristic cytoskeletal elements of mature osteoclasts without cytotoxicity. Furthermore, honeybush tea extract decreased expression of key osteoclast specific genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K. This study demonstrates for the first time that honeybush tea may have potential anti-osteoclastogenic effects and therefore should be further explored for its beneficial effects on bone.

  3. Commercial Honeybush (Cyclopia spp.) Tea Extract Inhibits Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption in RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages—An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, Amcois; Kasonga, Abe; Deepak, Vishwa; Moosa, Shaakirah; Marais, Sumari; Kruger, Marlena C.; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Honeybush tea, a sweet tasting caffeine-free tea that is indigenous to South Africa, is rich in bioactive compounds that may have beneficial health effects. Bone remodeling is a physiological process that involves the synthesis of bone matrix by osteoblasts and resorption of bone by osteoclasts. When resorption exceeds formation, bone remodeling can be disrupted resulting in bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors of monocytic lineage. These precursors fuse and differentiate into mature osteoclasts in the presence of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL), produced by osteoblasts. In this study, the in vitro effects of an aqueous extract of fermented honeybush tea were examined on osteoclast formation and bone resorption in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. We found that commercial honeybush tea extract inhibited osteoclast formation and TRAP activity which was accompanied by reduced bone resorption and disruption of characteristic cytoskeletal elements of mature osteoclasts without cytotoxicity. Furthermore, honeybush tea extract decreased expression of key osteoclast specific genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K. This study demonstrates for the first time that honeybush tea may have potential anti-osteoclastogenic effects and therefore should be further explored for its beneficial effects on bone. PMID:26516894

  4. Expansion of murine periosteal progenitor cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 reveals an intrinsic endochondral ossification program mediated by bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    van Gastel, Nick; Stegen, Steve; Stockmans, Ingrid; Moermans, Karen; Schrooten, Jan; Graf, Daniel; Luyten, Frank P; Carmeliet, Geert

    2014-09-01

    The preservation of the bone-forming potential of skeletal progenitor cells during their ex vivo expansion remains one of the major challenges for cell-based bone regeneration strategies. We report that expansion of murine periosteal cells in the presence of FGF2, a signal present during the early stages of fracture healing, is necessary and sufficient to maintain their ability to organize in vivo into a cartilage template which gives rise to mature bone. Implantation of FGF2-primed cells in a large bone defect in mice resulted in complete healing, demonstrating the feasibility of using this approach for bone tissue engineering purposes. Mechanistically, the enhanced endochondral ossification potential of FGF2-expanded periosteal cells is predominantly driven by an increased production of BMP2 and is additionally linked to an improved preservation of skeletal progenitor cells in the cultures. This characteristic is unique for periosteal cells, as FGF2-primed bone marrow stromal cells formed significantly less bone and progressed exclusively through the intramembranous pathway, revealing essential differences between both cell pools. Taken together, our findings provide insight in the molecular regulation of fracture repair by identifying a unique interaction between periosteal cells and FGF2. These insights may promote the development of cell-based therapeutic strategies for bone regeneration which are independent of the in vivo use of growth factors, thus limiting undesired side effects. PMID:24989687

  5. Lentivirus transduced interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene expression in murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Chi, Guanghao; Tian, Bo; Tang, Tingting; Dai, Kerong

    2015-09-01

    Genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells have been used in attempts to increase the expression of interleukin‑1 receptor antagonist (IL‑1Ra); however, the attempts thus far have been unsuccessful. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the lentivirus transduced IL‑1Ra gene was able to be stably expressed in murine bone marrow‑derived mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs) in vitro. In the present study, third generation lentiviral (Lv) vectors transducing the IL‑1Ra/green fluorescent protein (copGFP) gene were constructed and transfected into mBMSCs to establish the Lv.IL‑1Ra.copGFP/mBMSCs, which were evaluated using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, cell viability analysis using a cell counting kit‑8 kit, Trypan blue staining and an MTT growth kinetics assay. The expression of IL‑1Ra was analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The results demonstrated that the Lv.IL‑1Ra/copGFP vector was successfully constructed. The mBMSCs exhibited a short proliferation life, however they had good growth kinetics at an early stage and improved viability following efficient transduction of the IL‑1Ra gene. IL‑1Ra was overexpressed following transfection of mBMSCs. In conclusion, lentiviral vector transduced mBMSCs were able to efficiently express exogenous Il‑1Ra under certain conditions and had a marked capacity for proliferation. PMID:26130370

  6. Expression of TCR-Vβ peptides by murine bone marrow cells does not identify T-cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Janice L; Karsunky, Holger; Serwold, Thomas; Papathanasiou, Peter; Weissman, Irving L; O’Neill, Helen C

    2015-01-01

    Germline transcription has been described for both immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes, raising questions of their functional significance during haematopoiesis. Previously, an immature murine T-cell line was shown to bind antibody to TCR-Vβ8.2 in absence of anti-Cβ antibody binding, and an equivalent cell subset was also identified in the mesenteric lymph node. Here, we investigate whether germline transcription and cell surface Vβ8.2 expression could therefore represent a potential marker of T-cell progenitors. Cells with the TCR phenotype of Vβ8.2+Cβ− are found in several lymphoid sites, and among the lineage-negative (Lin−) fraction of hematopoietic progenitors in bone marrow (BM). Cell surface marker analysis of these cells identified subsets reflecting common lymphoid progenitors, common myeloid progenitors and multipotential progenitors. To assess whether the Lin−Vβ8.2+Cβ− BM subset contains hematopoietic progenitors, cells were sorted and adoptively transferred into sub-lethally irradiated recipients. No T-cell or myeloid progeny were detected following introduction of cells via the intrathymic or intravenous routes. However, B-cell development was detected in spleen. This pattern of restricted in vivo reconstitution disputes Lin−Vβ8.2+Cβ− BM cells as committed T-cell progenitors, but raises the possibility of progenitors with potential for B-cell development. PMID:25754612

  7. Matrine derivate MASM suppresses LPS-induced phenotypic and functional maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Qi, Yang; Xu, Wei-Heng; Liu, Ying; Qiu, Lie; Wang, Ke-Qi; Hu, Hong-Gang; He, Zhi-Gao; Zhang, Jun-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation process is a crucial step for the development of T cell immune responses and immune tolerance. In this study, we evaluated MASM, a novel derivative of the natural compound matrine that possesses a significant anti-inflammatory and immune-regulating property, for its efficacy to inhibit lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Here we show that MASM profoundly suppresses LPS-induced phenotypic and functional DC maturation. MASM inhibited LPS-induced expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in a concentration-dependent manner. MASM also attenuated LPS-induced IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-6 and NO release of DCs. The MASM-treated DCs were highly efficient at antigen capture via mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis but showed weak stimulatory capacity for allogeneic T cell proliferation. Furthermore, MASM inhibited LPS-induced PI3K/Akt, MAPK and NF-κB pathways. These novel findings provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of MASM in impacting on the DCs.

  8. Infusion of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Reduces Lung Fibrosis but Not Inflammation in the Late Stages of Murine Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Ventura, Túlio G.; de Oliveira, Helena D'Anunciação; Monção-Ribeiro, Leonardo C.; Gutfilen, Bianca; de Souza, Sergio A. L.; Rocco, Patrícia R. M.; Borojevic, Radovan; Morales, Marcelo M.; Takiya, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that infusion of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) in the late stages of silica-induced damage would reduce the remodelling process in a murine model of silicosis. C57BL/6 mice were assigned to 2 groups. In the SIL group, mice were instilled with a silica particle suspension intratracheally. Control (C) mice received saline under the same protocol. On the 40th day, some of the animals from both groups were killed. The others were treated with either saline or BMMCs (1×106cells) intravenously (C+BMMC and SIL+BMMC), and the mice were killed 70 days after the start of the protocol. In the mice in the SIL+BMMC group, collagen deposition, the presence of silica particles inside nodules, the presence of macrophages and cells reactive for inducible nitric oxide synthase were reduced. Lung parameters also improved. Beyond that, the total and differential cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, immunoexpression of transforming growth factor-β, the number of T regulatory cells and apoptosis were increased. However, the presence of male donor cells in lung tissue was not observed using GFP+ cells (40d) or Y chromosome DNA (70d). Therefore, BMMC therapy in the late stages of experimental silicosis improved lung function by diminishing fibrosis but inflammatory cells persisted, which could be related to expansion of T regulatory cells, responsible for the beneficial effects of cell therapy. PMID:25299237

  9. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process

    PubMed Central

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Houlihan, Alison; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix–only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in orthopedic applications

  10. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process.

    PubMed

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Houlihan, Alison; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix-only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in orthopedic applications. PMID

  11. CD34+ Cells Represent Highly Functional Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Murine Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junjie; Ii, Masaaki; Kamei, Naosuke; Alev, Cantas; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Masuda, Haruchika; Sawa, Yoshiki; Asahara, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were shown to have angiogenic potential contributing to neovascularization. However, a clear definition of mouse EPCs by cell surface markers still remains elusive. We hypothesized that CD34 could be used for identification and isolation of functional EPCs from mouse bone marrow. Methodology/Principal Findings CD34+ cells, c-Kit+/Sca-1+/Lin− (KSL) cells, c-Kit+/Lin− (KL) cells and Sca-1+/Lin− (SL) cells were isolated from mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) using fluorescent activated cell sorting. EPC colony forming capacity and differentiation capacity into endothelial lineage were examined in the cells. Although CD34+ cells showed the lowest EPC colony forming activity, CD34+ cells exhibited under endothelial culture conditions a more adherent phenotype compared with the others, demonstrating the highest mRNA expression levels of endothelial markers vWF, VE-cadherin, and Flk-1. Furthermore, a dramatic increase in immediate recruitment of cells to the myocardium following myocardial infarction and systemic cell injection was observed for CD34+ cells comparing with others, which could be explained by the highest mRNA expression levels of key homing-related molecules Integrin β2 and CXCR4 in CD34+ cells. Cell retention and incorporation into the vasculature of the ischemic myocardium was also markedly increased in the CD34+ cell-injected group, giving a possible explanation for significant reduction in fibrosis area, significant increase in neovascularization and the best cardiac functional recovery in this group in comparison with the others. Conclusion These findings suggest that mouse CD34+ cells may represent a functional EPC population in bone marrow, which could benefit the investigation of therapeutic EPC biology. PMID:21655289

  12. Expression of functional human EGF receptor on murine bone marrow cells.

    PubMed Central

    von Rüden, T; Wagner, E F

    1988-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R) was introduced into primary mouse bone marrow cells (BMC), utilizing retrovirus mediated gene transfer. Cultivation of infected BMC in the presence of interleukin-3 (IL-3) led to the outgrowth of IL-3 dependent myeloid cells, which efficiently expressed functional EGF-R, exhibiting its two characteristic affinity states. EGF acts on these cells synergistically with IL-3 in stimulating DNA synthesis and cell proliferation even under IL-3 saturation conditions. However, EGF was not sufficient to replace the requirement for IL-3. In contrast, EGF was able to maintain proliferation of a factor-dependent hemopoietic cell line (FDC-P1) infected with the EGF-R retrovirus in the absence of IL-3, but these cells did not respond to EGF in the presence of IL-3. No influence of EGF on IL-3 induced mast cell differentiation of BMC expressing the EGF-R could be observed by histological criteria. These data show that the expression of EGF-R alone is not sufficient to induce or maintain cell proliferation in IL-3 dependent bone marrow derived cells, although it can do so in established hemopoietic cell lines. Images PMID:3053164

  13. Molecular Imaging of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Survival and Homing in Murine Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Bogt, Koen E.A.; Hellingman, Alwine A.; Lijkwan, Maarten A.; Bos, Ernst-Jan; de Vries, Margreet R.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Quax, Paul H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Hamming, Jaap F.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) therapy is a promising treatment for peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study aims to provide insight into cellular kinetics using molecular imaging following different transplantation methods. Methods and Results MNCs were isolated from F6 transgenic mice (FVB background) that express firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Male FVB and C57Bl6 mice (n=50) underwent femoral artery ligation and were randomized into 4 groups receiving: (1) single intramuscular (i.m.) injection of 2×106 MNC; (2) four weekly i.m. injections of 5×105 MNC; (3) 2×106 MNCs intravenously (i.v.); and (4) PBS. Cellular kinetics, measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), revealed near-complete donor cell death 4 weeks after i.m. transplantation. Following i.v. transplantation, BLI monitored cells homed in on the injured area in the limb, as well as to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Ex vivo BLI showed presence of MNCs in the scar tissue and adductor muscle. However, no significant effects on neovascularisation were observed as monitored by Laser-Doppler-Perfusion-Imaging and histology. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to assess kinetics of transplanted MNCs in PAD using in vivo molecular imaging. MNC survival is short lived and MNCs do not significantly stimulate perfusion in this model. PMID:22239892

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their relation with bone and muscle health in adults.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Kelsey M; Sahni, Shivani; Kerstetter, Jane E; Kenny, Anne M; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-09-01

    Age-related bone and muscle loss are major public health problems. Investigational therapies to reduce these losses include anti-inflammatory dietary supplementations, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Surprisingly, this topic has received little attention in the osteoporosis community. Recent research highlights the role of PUFA in inflammatory regulation of bone remodeling via cellular pathways. Emerging research suggests significant roles for PUFA in reducing bone and muscle loss with aging; however, findings are conflicted for PUFA and fracture risk. Limited studies suggest a relation between higher omega-3 FA and better muscle/bone in older adults. This review highlights new research since 2008 and synthesizes our current understanding of PUFA in relation to bone and muscle. Across study designs, evidence indicates that PUFA has positive effects upon bone. As data are sparse, future clinical trials and prospective studies are important to determine the long term benefits of PUFA supplementation upon bone and muscle outcomes. PMID:23857286

  15. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their relation with bone and muscle health in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Kelsey M; Sahni, Shivani; Kerstetter, Jane E; Kenny, Anne M; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-01-01

    Age-related bone and muscle loss are major public health problems. Investigational therapies to reduce these losses include anti-inflammatory dietary supplementations, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Surprisingly, this topic has received little attention in the osteoporosis community. Recent research highlights the role of PUFA in inflammatory regulation of bone remodeling via cellular pathways. Emerging research suggests significant roles for PUFA in reducing bone and muscle loss with aging; however, findings are conflicted for PUFA and fracture risk. Limited studies suggest a relation between higher omega-3 FA and better muscle/bone in older adults. This review highlights new research since 2008 and synthesizes our current understanding of PUFA in relation to bone and muscle. Across study designs, evidence indicates that PUFA has positive effects upon bone. As data are sparse, future clinical trials and prospective studies are important to determine the long term benefits of PUFA supplementation upon bone and muscle outcomes. PMID:23857286

  16. Bone Marrow Transplantation Alters the Tremor Phenotype in the Murine Model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Adarsh S.; Wozniak, David F.; Farber, Nuri B.; Dearborn, Joshua T.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Sands, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Tremor is a prominent phenotype of the twitcher mouse, an authentic genetic model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe’s disease). In the current study, the tremor was quantified using a force-plate actometer designed to accommodate low-weight mice. The actometer records the force oscillations caused by a mouse’s movements, and the rhythmic structure of the force variations can be revealed. Results showed that twitcher mice had significantly increased power across a broad band of higher frequencies compared to wildtype mice. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT), the only available therapy for GLD, worsened the tremor in the twitcher mice and induced a measureable alteration of movement phenotype in the wildtype mice. These data highlight the damaging effects of conditioning radiation and BMT in the neonatal period. The behavioral methodology used herein provides a quantitative approach for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions for Krabbe’s disease. PMID:24013457

  17. Histochemical Phosphatases and Metachromasia in Murine Tumours Induced by Bone Seeking Radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Bland, M. R.; Loutit, J. F.; Sansom, Janet M.

    1974-01-01

    Tumours induced in mice, either CBA normal and chimaerical, or C3H, by 90Sr or 226Ra or plutonium have been examined histochemically with (1) diazotate fast red violet LB salt in naphthol AS-MX phosphate buffer at pH 8·6 and 5·2, (2) 1: 9 dimethyl methylene blue (Taylor). It is concluded: (a) The diagnosis of osteosarcoma is facilitated with Taylor's Blue which stains osteoid metachromatically. Cells of osteosarcoma, like normal osteoblasts, contain alkaline phosphatase but this may be lost by mutation either in the original tumour or subsequently on passage of the tumour serially to compatible hosts. (b) Osteosarcomata may contain giant-cells of two forms, bizarre tumour cells and osteoclasts; the latter contain acid phosphatase. Osteosarcomata which retain their osteoid on serial passage have few cells containing acid phosphatases. (c) Primitive mesenchymal cell tumours of angiomatous form may occur, if the bone marrow is irradiated, e.g. by 90Sr-90Y and Pu. These tumours lack osteoid and cells interpretable as osteoblasts or osteoclasts (though they destroy bone). (d) Tumours classifiable as fibrosarcomata occur rarely, and may be truly of fibroblastic origin or be mutated osteosarcomata. (e) Lymphomata also occur when the marrow is irradiated (90Sr-90Y and Pu). They may be generalized, when their cells may contain alkaline phosphatase or lack it. They may be localized to abdominal viscera, the reticulo-sarcomatous form, in which case the cells lack alkaline phosphatase. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 8Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 2Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 9Fig. 12 PMID:4133784

  18. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) mediates periarticular bone loss, but not joint destruction, in murine antigen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tomohiro; Takahata, Masahiko; Kameda, Yusuke; Endo, Tsutomu; Hamano, Hiroki; Hiratsuka, Shigeto; Ota, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclastogenesis requires immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling. Multiple immunoreceptors associated with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif adaptor proteins, including DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) and Fc receptor common γ (FcRγ), have been identified in osteoclast lineage cells, and some are involved in arthritis-induced bone destruction. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) is an immunoreceptor that regulates osteoclast development and bone resorption in association with DAP12. Whether Siglec-15 is involved in arthritis-induced bone lesions, however, remains unknown. Here we used a murine antigen-induced arthritis model to examine the role of Siglec-15 in the development of bone lesions induced by joint inflammation. Arthritis was unilaterally induced in the knee joints of 8-week-old female wild-type (WT) and Siglec-15(-/-) mice, and the contralateral knees were used as a control. The degree of joint inflammation, and cartilage and subchondral bone destruction in Siglec-15(-/-) mice was comparable to that in WT mice, indicating that Siglec-15 is not involved in the development of arthritis and concomitant cartilage and subchondral bone destruction. On the other hand, the degree of periarticular bone loss in the proximal tibia of the arthritic knee was significantly lower in Siglec-15(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Although osteoclast formation in the metaphysis was enhanced in both WT and Siglec-15(-/-) mice after arthritis induction, mature multinucleated osteoclast formation was impaired in Siglec-15(-/-) mice, indicating impaired osteoclast bone resorptive function in the periarticular regions of the arthritic joint in Siglec-15(-/-) mice. Confirming this result, Siglec-15(-/-) primary unfractionated bone marrow cells harvested from arthritic femurs and tibiae failed to develop into mature multinuclear osteoclasts. Our findings suggest that Siglec-15 is a therapeutic target for periarticular

  19. Particle-induced erythropoietin-independent effects of erythroid precursor cells in murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Ploemacher, R E; van Soest, P L; Wagemaker, G; van 't Hull, E

    1979-09-01

    A possible regulatory action of phagocytic cells on erythropoiesis was investigated by infusion of inert polystyrene latex particles (LAT). LAT appeared to induce changes in the femoral content of erythroid progenitor cells. These changes were most pronounced in primitive erythroid progenitor cells (BFUe) and appeared to be gradually damped in more differentiated populations (CFUe and erythroblasts). LAT did not influence granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFUc). The effects of LAT could not be attributed to changes in the systemic erythropoietin (EP) concentration. Administration of dexamethason nullified the effect of low doses of LAT, suggesting that phagocytosis of the particles is essential to the observed effects. Erythroid burst formation was previously found to be dependent on a bone marrow associated activity, termed BFA (burst feeder activity). BFA acts as an in vitro inducer of EP-responsiveness in BFUe. In this study it was found that LAT-induced changes in femoral erythroid progenitor cell content were characteristically preceded by corresponding changes in BFA. It was concluded that BFA-associated cells probably play a role in vivo in the early differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells. The present data are interpreted as direct in vivo evidence supporting a two-step regulatory model operating in erythropoiesis and provide evidence that phagocytic cells are a component of the erythroid haemopoietic inductive micro-environment. PMID:519701

  20. Altered Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Accessory Proteins in Murine and Human Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Noelle; Gaynor, Katherine U; Rowan, Simon C; Walsh, Sinead M; Fabre, Aurelie; Boylan, John; Keane, Michael P; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive fibrotic disease with a poor prognosis. The balance between transforming growth factor β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling plays an important role in tissue homeostasis, and alterations can result in pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that multiple BMP accessory proteins may be responsible for maintaining this balance in the lung. Using the bleomycin mouse model for fibrosis, we examined an array of BMP accessory proteins for changes in mRNA expression. We report significant increases in mRNA expression of gremlin 1, noggin, follistatin, and follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), and significant decreases in mRNA expression of chordin, kielin/chordin-like protein, nephroblastoma overexpressed gene, and BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI). Protein expression studies demonstrated increased levels of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice and in the lungs of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transforming growth factor β stimulation resulted in increased expression of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in human small airway epithelial cells. These results provide the first evidence that multiple BMP accessory proteins are altered in fibrosis and may play a role in promoting fibrotic injury.

  1. Macrophage function in murine allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras in the early phase after transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, J.; Baccarini, M.; Vogt, B.; Lohmann-Matthes, M.L. )

    1989-08-01

    We tested several of the functions of macrophages (M phi) in the early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer to get information about this important aspect of the nonspecific immune system in the T-cell-deficient recipient. On days 3-5 after transfer, the number of M phi was reduced in the spleen, liver, lungs, and peritoneal cavity (Pe). The phagocytosis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) by these M phi was normal or even enhanced, as in the case of Pe-M phi. Already on days 8-12 after transfer, the number of M phi in spleen and liver exceeded that of controls, whereas the number was still reduced in lungs and Pe. We examined their ability to kill P815 tumor cells, to produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), to phagocytose SRBC, to produce reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in vitro and to kill Listeria monocytogenes in vivo. Most functions were normal and often even enhanced, depending on the organ origin, but the ability of Pe-M phi to produce ROI was reduced. Proliferative response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and killing of YAC-1 tumor cells revealed a high frequency of macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and liver and a high natural killer (NK) activity in the liver. Altogether, enhanced nonspecific immune function, especially preactivated M phi, may enable chimeras to survive attacks by opportunistic pathogens.

  2. Association between sleep duration, insomnia symptoms and bone mineral density in older Puerto Rican adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To examine the association between sleep patterns (sleep duration and insomnia symptoms) and total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) among older Boston Puerto Rican adults. Materials/Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study including 750 Puerto Rican adults, aged 47–79 y livi...

  3. Effect of pimecrolimus vs. corticosteroids on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cell differentiation, maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Krummen, Mathias B W; Varga, Georg; Steinert, Meike; Stuetz, Anton; Luger, Thomas A; Grabbe, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    Pimecrolimus (SDZ ASM981) is a non-steroid member of calcineurin inhibitors recently developed for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. In this study, we compared the effect of pimecrolimus and corticosteroids on the differentiation, maturation and function of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DC). We added pimecrolimus at concentrations of 5-500 ng/ml or 0.5 ng/ml mometasone furoate at different timepoints to the BM-DC culture and checked (i) the number of matured cells, (ii) the expression of activation markers, (iii) the release of cytokines and (iv) the stimulatory capacity of the resulting BM-DC in vivo. Even at the highest concentration, pimecrolimus treatment resulted in only modest effects. In the pimecrolimus-treated culture, we observed a decrease in the numbers of matured cells but no significant effects on the expression of activation markers. The release of some inflammatory cytokines was reduced, but the stimulatory capacity in vivo was not affected. In contrast, mometasone furoate has pronounced effects on BM-DC at a concentration ten to 1000 times lower than those used with pimecrolimus. Furthermore, topical treatment of mice with clobetasole cream 0.05% resulted in almost complete depletion of splenic DC and a severe hyposplenia, while high-dose oral pimecrolimus treatment did not show any effects on the spleen or on splenic DC. These results support that pimecrolimus, unlike corticosteroids, has little effects on dendritic cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of this type with use of BM-DC.

  4. Differential response of C-type natriuretic peptide to estrogen and dexamethasone in adult bone.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Timothy C R; Wellby, Martin; Barrell, Graham K; Richards, A Mark; Espiner, Eric A

    2014-09-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is crucial in promoting endochondral bone growth in mammals including humans but whether this paracrine hormone participates in maintaining bone integrity in the mature skeleton is unknown. Accordingly we studied changes in plasma and bone tissue CNP in anoestrus adult ewes receiving short term anabolic (estrogen) or catabolic (dexamethasone) treatment for 7days. CNP and the aminoterminal fragment of the CNP prohormone (NTproCNP) were measured in plasma and extracts of cancellous bone excised from vertebral, iliac, tibial and marrow tissues. Concentrations of CNP peptides were much higher in vertebral and iliac extracts than those of tibial or marrow. Both plasma CNP and NTproCNP increased rapidly after estrogen followed by a later rise in bone alkaline phosphatase. Vertebral and iliac (but not tibial or marrow) CNP peptide content were significantly increased by estrogen. Consistent with a skeletal source, plasma NTproCNP was significantly associated with vertebral tissue CNP. In contrast, bone tissue CNP peptide content was unaffected by dexamethasone despite suppression of plasma CNP peptides and bone alkaline phosphatase. We postulate that increases in trabecular bone CNP reflect new endosteal bone formation in these estrogen responsive tissues whereas reduced plasma CNP peptides after dexamethasone, without change in cancellous bone content, reflects reductions in cortical bone turnover.

  5. Impaired function of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in murine liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Katsuya; Masuda, Haruchika; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Obi, Syotaro; Ito, Rie; Shizuno, Tomoko; Kurihara, Yusuke; Mine, Tetsuya; Asahara, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Liver fibrosis (LF) caused by chronic liver damage has been considered as an irreversible disease. As alternative therapy for liver transplantation, there are high expectations for regenerative medicine of the liver. Bone marrow (BM)- or peripheral blood-derived stem cells, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), have recently been used to treat liver cirrhosis. We investigated the biology of BM-derived EPC in a mouse model of LF. C57BL/6J mice were subcutaneously injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) every 3 days for 90 days. Sacrificed 2 days after final injection, whole blood (WB) was collected for isolation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) and biochemical examination. Assessments of EPC in the peripheral blood and BM were performed by flow cytometry and EPC colony-forming assay, respectively, using purified MNCs and BM c-KIT(+), Sca-1(+), and Lin(-) (KSL) cells. Liver tissues underwent histological analysis with hematoxylin/eosin/Azan staining, and spleens were excised and weighed. CCl(4)-treated mice exhibited histologically bridging fibrosis, pseudolobular formation, and splenomegaly, indicating successful induction of LF. The frequency of definitive EPC-colony-forming-units (CFU) as well as total EPC-CFU at the equivalent cell number of 500 BM-KSL cells decreased significantly (p < 0.0001) in LF mice compared with control mice; no significant changes in primitive EPC-CFU occurred in LF mice. The frequency of WB-MNCs of definitive EPC-CFU decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in LF mice compared with control mice. Together, these findings indicated the existence of impaired EPC function and differentiation in BM-derived EPCs in LF mice and might be related to clinical LF.

  6. Effects of myelotoxic agents on cytokine production in murine long-term bone marrow cultures.

    PubMed

    Hauser, S P; Allewelt, M C; Lipschitz, D A

    1998-01-01

    In long-term bone marrow cultures we studied the effect of the addition of the myelotoxic agents methotrexate (MTX) and ceftazidime (CEF) on the kinetics of cytokine production in the supernatant (SN) and on mRNA expression in the adherent stromal layer. In response to a medium change, a prompt and significant increase in colony-stimulating activity (CSA) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) concentrations in the SN occurred, peaking 12 h later. Two macrophage colony-stimulating factors (M-CSF) mRNA of 23 kb and 4 kb were identified. In response to the medium change, the 4.0-kb transcript increased significantly six h later. The 2.3-kb transcript expression was stronger than the 4-kb mRNA but did not cycle with medium change. At medium change, IL-6 mRNA was only minimally expressed; then a prompt increase occurred, which peaked six h later. The addition of 500 mg/ml (=915 microM) CEF to the culture caused a dose-dependent suppression of CSA and IL-6 supernatant concentrations and IL-6 and M-CSF mRNA expression. By contrast, 1 microM MTX had minimal effect on cytokine concentrations in the SN following medium change. mRNA expression was, however, suppressed. These results provide insights into the possible mechanisms whereby cytokines lead to increased myeloid cell proliferation following medium change. We also demonstrate that two myelotoxic agents have different effects on cytokine production. This information could be of value in developing rational approaches to the therapeutic use of cytokines in drug-induced neutropenia.

  7. Bone mineral mass in adult lacto-ovo-vegetarian and omnivorous males.

    PubMed

    Marsh, A G; Sanchez, T V; Chaffee, F L; Mayor, G H; Mickelsen, O

    1983-03-01

    Past studies indicate postmenopausal women who eat meat may experience greater bone mineral loss than lacto-ovo-vegetarian women. The present study extends those findings by comparing bone mineral in adult lacto-ovo-vegetarian and omnivorous males. Bone mineral mass was determined by direct photon absorptiometry in 320 lacto-ovo-vegetarian and 320 omnivorous males 20 to 79 yr old. Lacto-ovo-vegetarians were Seventh-day Adventists committed to their diet for at least 20 yr. Measurements were made at a cortical site along the radius. No statistical differences were identified between bone mineral mass in the lacto-ovo-vegetarian and omnivorous males in any decade examined. When contrasted against significant differences between bone mineral mass in postmenopausal omnivores and lacto-ovo-vegetarians, the data presented here may be interpreted as indicating that some factor associated with meat consumption is increasing bone mineral losses in postmenopausal females while having no observable effect in males.

  8. Proteolytic processing of osteopontin by PHEX and accumulation of osteopontin fragments in Hyp mouse bone, the murine model of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Barros, Nilana M T; Hoac, Betty; Neves, Raquel L; Addison, William N; Assis, Diego M; Murshed, Monzur; Carmona, Adriana K; McKee, Marc D

    2013-03-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH/HYP)-with renal phosphate wasting, hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and tooth abscesses-is caused by mutations in the zinc-metallopeptidase PHEX gene (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidase on the X chromosome). PHEX is highly expressed by mineralized tissue cells. Inactivating mutations in PHEX lead to distal renal effects (implying accumulation of a secreted, circulating phosphaturic factor) and accumulation in bone and teeth of mineralization-inhibiting, acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM)-containing peptides, which are proteolytically derived from the mineral-binding matrix proteins of the SIBLING family (small, integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins). Although the latter observation suggests a local, direct matrix effect for PHEX, its physiologically relevant substrate protein(s) have not been identified. Here, we investigated two SIBLING proteins containing the ASARM motif-osteopontin (OPN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP)-as potential substrates for PHEX. Using cleavage assays, gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry, we report that OPN is a full-length protein substrate for PHEX. Degradation of OPN was essentially complete, including hydrolysis of the ASARM motif, resulting in only very small residual fragments. Western blotting of Hyp (the murine homolog of human XLH) mouse bone extracts having no PHEX activity clearly showed accumulation of an ∼35 kDa OPN fragment that was not present in wild-type mouse bone. Immunohistochemistry and immunogold labeling (electron microscopy) for OPN in Hyp bone likewise showed an accumulation of OPN and/or its fragments compared with normal wild-type bone. Incubation of Hyp mouse bone extracts with PHEX resulted in the complete degradation of these fragments. In conclusion, these results identify full-length OPN and its fragments as novel, physiologically relevant substrates for PHEX, suggesting that accumulation of mineralization-inhibiting OPN

  9. Adaptations of young adult rat cortical bone to 14 days of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R., Jr.; Martinez, D. A.; Ashman, R. B.; Ulm, M. J.; Grindeland, R. E.; Durnova, G. N.; Kaplanskii, A.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether mature humeral cortical bone would be modified significantly by an acute exposure to weightlessness, adult rats (110 days old) were subjected to 14 days of microgravity on the COSMOS 2044 biosatellite. There were no significant changes in peak force, stiffness, energy to failure, and displacement at failure in the flight rats compared with ground-based controls. Concentrations and contents of hydroxyproline, calcium, and mature stable hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline collagen cross-links remained unchanged after spaceflight. Bone lengths, cortical and endosteal areas, and regionl thicknesses showed no significant differences between flight animals and ground controls. The findings suggest that responsiveness of cortical bone to microgravity is less pronounced in adult rats than in previous spaceflight experiments in which young growing animals were used. It is hypothesized that 14 days of spaceflight may not be sufficient to impact the biochemical and biomechanical properties of cortical bone in the mature rat skeleton.

  10. Bone Characteristics and Their Determinants in Adolescents and Young Adults with Early-Onset Severe Obesity.

    PubMed

    Viljakainen, H T; Valta, H; Lipsanen-Nyman, M; Saukkonen, T; Kajantie, E; Andersson, S; Mäkitie, O

    2015-10-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with compromised bone health. We studied bone characteristics and their determinants in obese young adults. The study included 68 subjects with early-onset severe obesity and 73 normal-weight controls. Data on physical activity (PA), diet and smoking were collected. Bone characteristics were measured using peripheral QCT. The obese and control subjects were similar in age (mean 19.6 ± 2.6 years) and height but BMIs differed (39.7 and 22.6 kg/m(2)). A clustering of unhealthy lifestyles was marked: Obese subjects reported less supervised PA in childhood, adolescence and currently (p < 0.03) and were more likely to smoke (p = 0.005), and had a lower healthy eating index (HEI) (p = 0.007) but similar alcohol consumption compared with controls. In obese women, all crude bone characteristics were higher than in controls; in men, the differences were smaller. Associations of lifestyle factors with bone characteristics were tested using partial correlations. Independently of BMI, supervised PA in adolescence and alcohol consumption were related positively to bone characteristics in both groups. HEI associated positively with bone characteristics only in controls, while smoking was a positive determinant of bone characteristics only in obese subjects. The multivariate model showed that the contribution of lifestyle factors to bone characteristics was minimal compared with BMI. Early-onset obesity is accompanied by poor dietary quality, sedentary lifestyle, and more frequent smoking, but the overall contribution of these lifestyle factors to bone strength is limited. Bone strength is more likely to be compromised in men and in unloaded bone sites in subjects with early-onset severe obesity. The impact of obesity-related endocrine changes on bone characteristics need to be evaluated in future studies.

  11. High‐throughput collagen fingerprinting of intact microfaunal remains; a low‐cost method for distinguishing between murine rodent bones

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Muxin; Shameer, Sanu; Patel, Soyab; Chamberlain, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Microfaunal skeletal remains can be sensitive indicators of the contemporary ecosystem in which they are sampled and are often recovered in owl pellets in large numbers. Species identification of these remains can be obtained using a range of morphological criteria established for particular skeletal elements, but typically dominated by a reliance on cranial characters. However, this can induce biases under different environmental and taphonomic conditions. The aim of this research was to develop a high‐throughput method of objectively identifying rodent remains from archaeological deposits using collagen fingerprinting, most notably the identification of rats from other myomorph rodents as a means to identify disturbances in the archaeofauna through the presence of invasive taxa not contemporary with the archaeological deposits. Methods Collagen was extracted from complete microfaunal skeletal remains in such a manner as to leave the bones morphologically intact (i.e., weaker concentration of acid than previously used over shorter length of time). Acid‐soluble collagen was then ultrafiltered into ammonium bicarbonate and digested with trypsin prior to dilution in the MALDI matrix and acquisition of peptide mass fingerprints using a matrix‐assisted laser desorption/ionisation time‐of‐flight (MALDI‐TOF) mass spectrometer. Results Collagen fingerprinting was able to distinguish between Rattus, Mus, Apodemus and Micromys at the genus level; at the species level, R. rattus and R. norvegicus could be separated whereas A. flavicollis and A. sylvaticus could not. A total of 12,317 archaeological microvertebrate samples were screened for myomorph signatures but none were found to be invasive rats (Rattus) or mice (Mus). Of the contemporary murine fauna, no harvest mice (Micromys) were identified and only 24 field mouse (Apodemus) discovered. Conclusions As a result, no evidence of recent bioturbation could be inferred from the faunal remains of these

  12. Physical activity and lifestyle effects on bone mineral density among young adults: sociodemographic and biochemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H.; Gabr, Sami A.; Al-Eisa, Einas

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the possible role of physical activities, calcium consumption and lifestyle factors in both bone mineral density and bone metabolism indices in 350 young adult volunteers. [Subjects and Methods] All volunteers were recruited for the assessment of lifestyle behaviors and physical activity traits using validated questioners, and bone mineral density (BMD), serum osteocalcin (s-OC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and calcium were estimated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis, and immunoassay techniques. [Results] Male participants showed a significant increase in BMD along with an increase in bone metabolism markers compared with females in all groups. However, younger subjects showed a significant increase in BMD, OC, BAP, and calcium compared with older subjects. Osteoporosis was more common in older subjects linked with abnormal body mass index and waist circumference. Bone metabolism markers correlated positively with BMD, physically activity and negatively with osteoporosis in all stages. Also, moderate to higher calcium and milk intake correlated positively with higher BMD. However, low calcium and milk intake along with higher caffeine, and carbonated beverage consumption, and heavy cigarette smoking showed a negative effect on the status of bone mineral density. Stepwise regression analysis showed that life style factors including physical activity and demographic parameters explained around 58–69.8% of the bone mineral density variation in young adults especially females. [Conclusion] body mass index, physical activity, low calcium consumption, and abnormal lifestyle have role in bone mineral density and prognosis of osteoporosis in young adults. PMID:26311965

  13. Physical activity and lifestyle effects on bone mineral density among young adults: sociodemographic and biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the possible role of physical activities, calcium consumption and lifestyle factors in both bone mineral density and bone metabolism indices in 350 young adult volunteers. [Subjects and Methods] All volunteers were recruited for the assessment of lifestyle behaviors and physical activity traits using validated questioners, and bone mineral density (BMD), serum osteocalcin (s-OC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and calcium were estimated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis, and immunoassay techniques. [Results] Male participants showed a significant increase in BMD along with an increase in bone metabolism markers compared with females in all groups. However, younger subjects showed a significant increase in BMD, OC, BAP, and calcium compared with older subjects. Osteoporosis was more common in older subjects linked with abnormal body mass index and waist circumference. Bone metabolism markers correlated positively with BMD, physically activity and negatively with osteoporosis in all stages. Also, moderate to higher calcium and milk intake correlated positively with higher BMD. However, low calcium and milk intake along with higher caffeine, and carbonated beverage consumption, and heavy cigarette smoking showed a negative effect on the status of bone mineral density. Stepwise regression analysis showed that life style factors including physical activity and demographic parameters explained around 58-69.8% of the bone mineral density variation in young adults especially females. [Conclusion] body mass index, physical activity, low calcium consumption, and abnormal lifestyle have role in bone mineral density and prognosis of osteoporosis in young adults. PMID:26311965

  14. Comparison of in vitro mineralization by murine embryonic and adult stem cells cultured in an osteogenic medium.

    PubMed

    Shimko, Daniel A; Burks, Chris A; Dee, Kay C; Nauman, Eric A

    2004-01-01

    Nearly half a million bone-grafting procedures occurred in the United States in the year 2000. Tissue-engineered bone substitutes may mitigate difficulties associated with current grafting options. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could be a potential cell source for bone substitutes; however, direct comparisons between ESCs and other cell sources are lacking. Here we provide a direct, long-term, in vitro comparison of mineralization processes in adult, marrow-derived, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and ESCs from the 129/Sv+c/+p mouse strain. MSCs were observed to grow at a slower rate than ESCs. MSCs expressed seven times more alkaline phosphatase (AP) per cell than did ESCs and immediately showed type I collagen and osteocalcin production. ESCs also produced type I collagen and osteocalcin, but production was delayed. Mineral deposition by ESCs was nearly 50 times higher than by MSCs. Spectroscopic analysis showed the calcium-to-phosphorus ratio (Ca:P) of the ESC mineral (1.26:1) to be significantly higher than that of the MSCs (0.29:1), but still 25% lower than hydroxyapatite (1.67:1). Addition of basic fibroblast growth factor significantly inhibited AP expression, mineral deposition, and Ca:P ratios in MSCs and had little effect on ESCs. These functional characteristics may assist with cell selection for purposes of bone tissue engineering.

  15. Relationship between dose of injected /sup 239/Pu and bone sarcoma mortality in young adult beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, A.V.; Prentice, R.L.; Marek, P.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of /sup 239/Pu on bone sarcoma mortality in young adult beagles is examined using data from a follow-up study conducted at the Radiobiology Laboratory at the University of Utah. A (proportional-hazards) model, which specifies that bone sarcoma mortality depends on both dose of injected plutonium and time since injection as the product of a dose factor and a time factor, is used both for describing the data and for performing inference about the relationship between dose of plutonium and bone sarcoma mortality. Relative bone sarcoma mortality rates are found to be approximately linear as a function of dose. There is evidence that relative bone sarcoma mortality decreases with time since injection.

  16. Increased presence of capillaries next to remodeling sites in adult human cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Helene Bjoerg; Andersen, Thomas Levin; Marcussen, Niels; Rolighed, Lars; Delaisse, Jean-Marie

    2013-03-01

    Vascularization is a prerequisite for osteogenesis in a number of situations, including bone development, fracture healing, and cortical bone remodeling. It is unknown whether a similar link exists between cancellous bone remodeling and vascularization. Here, we show an association between remodeling sites, capillaries, proliferative cells, and putative osteoblast progenitors. Iliac crest biopsies from normal human individuals were subjected to histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry to identify the respective positions of bone remodeling sites, CD34-positive capillaries, smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive putative osteoblast progenitors, including pericytes, Ki67-positive proliferative cells, and bone remodeling compartment (BRC) canopies. The BRC canopy is a recently described structure separating remodeling sites from the bone marrow, consisting of CD56-positive osteoblasts at an early differentiation stage. We found that bone remodeling sites were associated with a significantly increased presence of capillaries, putative osteoblast progenitors, and proliferative cells in a region within 50 µm of the bone or the canopy surface. The increases were the highest above eroded surfaces and at the level of the light-microscopically assessed contact of these three entities with the bone or canopy surfaces. Between 51 and 100 µm, their densities leveled to that found above quiescent surfaces. Electron microscopy asserted the close proximity between BRC canopies and capillaries lined by pericytes. Furthermore, the BRC canopy cells were found to express SMA. These ordered distributions support the existence of an osteogenic-vascular interface in adult human cancellous bone. The organization of this interface fits the current knowledge on the mode of action of vasculature on osteogenesis, and points to the BRC canopy as a central player in this mechanism. We propose a model where initiation of bone remodeling coincides with the induction of proximity of the

  17. Bone Mass in Young Adults with down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guijarro, M.; Valero, C.; Paule, B.; Gonzalez-Macias, J.; Riancho, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) is a frequent cause of intellectual disability. With the increasing life expectancy of these patients, concerns have been raised about the risk of osteoporosis. In fact, several investigators have reported a reduced bone mass in DS. However, the results may be confounded by comorbid diseases, and differences in…

  18. Project Healthy Bones: An Osteoporosis Prevention Program for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klotzbach-Shimomura, Kathleen

    2001-01-01

    Project Healthy Bones is a 24-week exercise and education program for older women and men at risk for or who have osteoporosis. The exercise component is designed to improve strength, balance, and flexibility. The education curriculum stresses the importance of exercise, nutrition, safety, drug therapy, and lifestyle factors. (SK)

  19. Genetic variants in adult bone mineral density and fracture risk genes are associated with the rate of bone mineral density acquisition in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Nicole M.; Kemp, John P.; Tilling, Kate; Tobias, Jonathan H.; Evans, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have identified 63 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with bone mineral density (BMD) in adults. These SNPs are thought to reflect variants that influence bone maintenance and/or loss in adults. It is unclear whether they affect the rate of bone acquisition during adolescence. Bone measurements and genetic data were available on 6397 individuals from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children at up to five follow-up clinics. Linear mixed effects models with smoothing splines were used for longitudinal modelling of BMD and its components bone mineral content (BMC) and bone area (BA), from 9 to 17 years. Genotype data from the 63 adult BMD associated SNPs were investigated individually and as a genetic risk score in the longitudinal model. Each additional BMD lowering allele of the genetic risk score was associated with lower BMD at age 13 [per allele effect size, 0.002 g/cm2 (SE = 0.0001, P = 1.24 × 10−38)] and decreased BMD acquisition from 9 to 17 years (P = 9.17 × 10−7). This association was driven by changes in BMC rather than BA. The genetic risk score explained ∼2% of the variation in BMD at 9 and 17 years, a third of that explained in adults (6%). Genetic variants that putatively affect bone maintenance and/or loss in adults appear to have a small influence on the rate of bone acquisition through adolescence. PMID:25941325

  20. Efficacy of delayed administration of post-chemotherapy granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: evidence from murine studies of bone marrow cell kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Yankelevich, Maxim; Goodell, Margaret A.; Kaplan, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The optimal schedule of post-chemotherapy G-CSF administration has not been determined. G-CSF is customarily started 24 hours after chemotherapy; however, clinical data demonstrated that delaying the G-CSF until 5 days after completion of chemotherapy has not resulted in a longer duration of neutropenia. Here, we examined the optimal timing of post-chemotherapy G-CSF administration in a mouse model, to show that delayed administration does not postpone the appearance of mature granulocytes in the peripheral blood. We also investigated the mechanism of decreased efficacy of the early G-CSF application after chemotherapy by characterizing the changes in bone marrow cellular composition. To our knowledge, we demonstrate for the first time, that early after chemotherapy, the bone marrow is predominantly composed of mature residual granulocytes and very few progenitors and precursors, on which G-CSF would act to generate granulocytes. The point when immature progenitors reappear does not occur in murine bone marrow until 48 hours after a single dose of cyclophosphamide. Our results indicate that the bone marrow cellular composition early after discontinuation of chemotherapy is not optimal for G-CSF action on acceleration of myeloid recovery. Given the high cost of G-CSF prophylaxis, its delayed administration may potentially result in substantial economic benefits. PMID:17949891

  1. Validation of K-XRF bone lead measurement in young adults.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppin, J A; Aro, A C; Williams, P L; Hu, H; Ryan, P B

    1995-01-01

    K-X-ray fluorescence (K-XRF) is a useful tool for assessing environmental exposure to lead in occupationally exposed individuals and older adults. This study explores the possibility of using this technique on young adults with low environmental lead exposure. Twenty-three college students, aged 18-21 years, were recruited for 2 hr of bone lead measurement. Bone lead measurements were taken from the mid-shaft tibia for periods of 30 or 60 min. In the analysis, 30-min measurements were combined so that each subject had the equivalent of two 60-min measurements. The average concentration of two bone lead measurements in this population ranged from -1.5 to 8.2 micrograms Pb/g bone mineral, with a mean of 3.0 micrograms Pb/g bone mineral. In a one sample t-test, this mean was significantly different from 0 (p < 0.0001). A linear trend with age was detected despite the small age range of our population. By doubling the sampling time, the reported measurement uncertainty decreased by a factor of 1.5, resulting in uncertainty estimates below the mean bone lead estimates. Power calculations using the observed variance estimates suggest that with 80% power, differences in bone lead concentration of 2-3 micrograms Pb/g bone mineral can be identified in groups of 100 or smaller. Due to the large within-person variation in young adults, K-XRF may not yet be a useful diagnostic tool for individual subjects, but it may be of great use to environmental scientists trying to characterize long-term lead exposure and dose in the general population or specific subpopulations. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7628429

  2. Mucosal Langerhans Cells Promote Differentiation of Th17 Cells in a Murine Model of Periodontitis but Are Not Required for Porphyromonas gingivalis–Driven Alveolar Bone Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Bittner-Eddy, Peter D.; Fischer, Lori A.; Kaplan, Daniel H.; Thieu, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic oral inflammatory disease affecting one in five individuals that can lead to tooth loss. CD4+ Th cells activated by a microbial biofilm are thought to contribute to the destruction of alveolar bone surrounding teeth by influencing osteoclastogenesis through IL-17A and receptor activator for NF-κB ligand effects. The relative roles of mucosal Ag presentation cells in directing Th cell immune responses against oral pathogens and their contribution to destruction of alveolar bone remain unknown. We tested the contribution of mucosal Langerhans cells (LCs) to alveolar bone homeostasis in mice following oral colonization with a well-characterized human periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis. We found that oral mucosal LCs did not protect from or exacerbate crestal alveolar bone destruction but were responsible for promoting differentiation of Th17 cells specific to P. gingivalis. In mice lacking LCs the Th17 response was suppressed and a Th1 response predominated. Bypassing LCs with systemic immunization of P. gingivalis resulted in a predominantly P. gingivalis–specific Th1 response regardless of whether LCs were present. Interestingly, we find that in vivo clonal expansion of P. gingivalis–specific Th cells and induced regulatory T cells does not depend on mucosal LCs. Furthermore, destruction of crestal alveolar bone induced by P. gingivalis colonization occurred regardless of the presence of mucosal LCs or P. gingivalis–specific Th17 cells. Our data indicate that both LCs and Th17 cells are redundant in contributing to alveolar bone destruction in a murine model of periodontitis. PMID:27402698

  3. Wnt5a is expressed in spondyloarthritis and exerts opposite effects on enthesis and bone in murine organ and cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Bougault, Carole; Briolay, Anne; Boutet, Marie-Astrid; Pilet, Paul; Delplace, Séverine; Le Goff, Benoît; Guicheux, Jérôme; Blanchard, Frédéric; Magne, David

    2015-12-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder that initiates at the enthesis, where tendons attach to bone through a fibrocartilage zone. At late stages, excessive bone apposition appears within the diseased enthesis. Because Wnt5a participates to normal bone formation and appears related to inflammatory processes, we investigated the role of this Wnt growth factor in inflammation-associated ossification in SpA. The concentration of Wnt5a assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in synovial fluids of patients with SpA (2.58 ± 0.98 ng/mL) was higher than in osteoarthritic patients (1.33 ± 0.71 ng/mL). In murine primary cultures of tendon cells, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts and in an organotypic model of mouse ankle, we showed that tumor necrosis factor α reversibly diminished Wnt5a expression and secretion, respectively. Wnt5a decreased gene expression of differentiation markers and mineralization in cultured chondrocytes and reduced alkaline phosphatase activity in Achilles tendon enthesis (-14%) and osteocalcin protein levels released by ankle explants (-36%). On the contrary, Wnt5a stimulated ossification markers' expression in cultured osteoblasts and increased the bone volume of the tibial plateau of the cultured explants (+19%). In conclusion, our results suggest that Wnt5a is expressed locally in the joints of patients with SpA. Wnt5a appears more associated with ossification than with inflammation and tends to inhibit mineralization in chondrocytes and enthesis, whereas it seems to favor the ossification process in osteoblasts and bone. Further studies are needed to decipher the opposing effects observed locally in enthesis and systemically in bone in SpA.

  4. Amelioration of murine sickle cell disease by nonablative conditioning and γ-globin gene-corrected bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Pestina, Tamara I; Hargrove, Phillip W; Zhao, Huifen; Mead, Paul E; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Weiss, Mitchell J; Wilber, Andrew; Persons, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with severe sickle cell disease (SCD) are candidates for gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but concomitant multi-organ disease may contraindicate pretransplant conditioning with full myeloablation. We tested whether nonmyeloablative conditioning, a regimen used successfully for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of adult SCD patients, allows engraftment of γ-globin gene-corrected cells to a therapeutic level in the Berkeley mouse model of SCD. Animals transplanted according to this regimen averaged 35% engraftment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells with an average vector copy < 2.0. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels ranged from 20 to 44% of total hemoglobin and approximately two-thirds of circulating red blood cells expressed HbF detected by immunofluorescence (F-cells). Gene therapy treatment of SCD mice ameliorated anemia, reduced hyperleukocytosis, improved renal function, and reduced iron accumulation in liver, spleen, and kidneys. Thus, modest levels of chimerism with donor cells expressing high levels of HbF from an insulated γ-globin lentiviral vector can improve the pathology of SCD in mice, thereby illustrating a potentially safe and effective strategy for gene therapy in humans. PMID:26665131

  5. Amelioration of murine sickle cell disease by nonablative conditioning and γ-globin gene-corrected bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    Pestina, Tamara I; Hargrove, Phillip W; Zhao, Huifen; Mead, Paul E; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Weiss, Mitchell J; Wilber, Andrew; Persons, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with severe sickle cell disease (SCD) are candidates for gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but concomitant multi-organ disease may contraindicate pretransplant conditioning with full myeloablation. We tested whether nonmyeloablative conditioning, a regimen used successfully for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of adult SCD patients, allows engraftment of γ-globin gene-corrected cells to a therapeutic level in the Berkeley mouse model of SCD. Animals transplanted according to this regimen averaged 35% engraftment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells with an average vector copy < 2.0. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels ranged from 20 to 44% of total hemoglobin and approximately two-thirds of circulating red blood cells expressed HbF detected by immunofluorescence (F-cells). Gene therapy treatment of SCD mice ameliorated anemia, reduced hyperleukocytosis, improved renal function, and reduced iron accumulation in liver, spleen, and kidneys. Thus, modest levels of chimerism with donor cells expressing high levels of HbF from an insulated γ-globin lentiviral vector can improve the pathology of SCD in mice, thereby illustrating a potentially safe and effective strategy for gene therapy in humans. PMID:26665131

  6. Amelioration of murine sickle cell disease by nonablative conditioning and γ-globin gene-corrected bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Pestina, Tamara I; Hargrove, Phillip W; Zhao, Huifen; Mead, Paul E; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Weiss, Mitchell J; Wilber, Andrew; Persons, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with severe sickle cell disease (SCD) are candidates for gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but concomitant multi-organ disease may contraindicate pretransplant conditioning with full myeloablation. We tested whether nonmyeloablative conditioning, a regimen used successfully for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of adult SCD patients, allows engraftment of γ-globin gene-corrected cells to a therapeutic level in the Berkeley mouse model of SCD. Animals transplanted according to this regimen averaged 35% engraftment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells with an average vector copy < 2.0. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels ranged from 20 to 44% of total hemoglobin and approximately two-thirds of circulating red blood cells expressed HbF detected by immunofluorescence (F-cells). Gene therapy treatment of SCD mice ameliorated anemia, reduced hyperleukocytosis, improved renal function, and reduced iron accumulation in liver, spleen, and kidneys. Thus, modest levels of chimerism with donor cells expressing high levels of HbF from an insulated γ-globin lentiviral vector can improve the pathology of SCD in mice, thereby illustrating a potentially safe and effective strategy for gene therapy in humans.

  7. Major depressive disorder and bone mass in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Calarge, Chadi A; Butcher, Brandon D; Burns, Trudy L; Coryell, William H; Schlechte, Janet A; Zemel, Babette S

    2014-10-01

    Depression has been associated with reduced bone mass in adults, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In addition, little is known about the association between depression and bone health during growth and development. To address this knowledge gap, we examined bone density and structure in 222 adolescents and young adults (69% females, mean ± SD age: 19.0 ± 1.5 years), enrolled within 1 month of starting a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or unmedicated. Psychiatric functioning was assessed with self-report and researcher-administered instruments, including the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation for Adolescents (A-LIFE). Anthropometric and laboratory measures included dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans. Linear multivariable regression analysis tested the association between depression and bone mass, after accounting for relevant confounders. The presence of current depression was associated with a significant reduction in age-sex-height-race-specific bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC) of total body less head and lumbar spine. The findings varied by assessment method with self-report scales, capturing symptom severity over the prior week or two, yielding the weakest associations. Depression was also associated with reduced cortical thickness and a trend for increased endosteal circumference. In contrast, generalized anxiety disorder was not associated with bone deficits. In sum, depressive illness is associated with significantly lower bone mass in youths. Future investigations must examine whether bone recovery is possible following depression remission or whether remedial interventions are warranted to optimize bone mass in order to minimize the long-term risk of osteoporosis.

  8. In Vitro Colony Assays for Characterizing Tri-potent Progenitor Cells Isolated from the Adult Murine Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Jacob R; LeBon, Jeanne M; Luo, Angela; Quijano, Janine C; Wedeken, Lena; Jou, Kevin; Riggs, Arthur D; Tirrell, David A; Ku, H Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells from the adult pancreas could be a potential source of therapeutic beta-like cells for treating patients with type 1 diabetes. However, it is still unknown whether stem and progenitor cells exist in the adult pancreas. Research strategies using cre-lox lineage-tracing in adult mice have yielded results that either support or refute the idea that beta cells can be generated from the ducts, the presumed location where adult pancreatic progenitors may reside. These in vivo cre-lox lineage-tracing methods, however, cannot answer the questions of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation-two criteria necessary to define a stem cell. To begin addressing this technical gap, we devised 3-dimensional colony assays for pancreatic progenitors. Soon after our initial publication, other laboratories independently developed a similar, but not identical, method called the organoid assay. Compared to the organoid assay, our method employs methylcellulose, which forms viscous solutions that allow the inclusion of extracellular matrix proteins at low concentrations. The methylcellulose-containing assays permit easier detection and analyses of progenitor cells at the single-cell level, which are critical when progenitors constitute a small sub-population, as is the case for many adult organ stem cells. Together, results from several laboratories demonstrate in vitro self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells from mice. The current protocols describe two methylcellulose-based colony assays to characterize mouse pancreatic progenitors; one contains a commercial preparation of murine extracellular matrix proteins and the other an artificial extracellular matrix protein known as a laminin hydrogel. The techniques shown here are 1) dissociation of the pancreas and sorting of CD133(+)Sox9/EGFP(+) ductal cells from adult mice, 2) single cell manipulation of the sorted cells, 3) single colony analyses using microfluidic q

  9. Infections of neonatal and adult mice with murine CMV HaNa1 strain upon oronasal inoculation: New insights in the pathogenesis of natural primary CMV infections.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Zhang, Shunchuan; Nauwynck, Hans

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, naturally acquired infections of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are generally asymptomatic. Animal models mimicking the natural primary HCMV infections in infants and adults are scarce. Here, neonatal and adult BALB/c mice were inoculated oronasally with a Belgian isolate HaNa1 of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). None of the mice showed clinical symptoms. In neonatal mice, a typical systemic infection occurred. In adult mice, viral replication was restricted to the nasal mucosa and submandibular glands. Infectious virus was not detected in trachea, oral mucosa, pharynx, esophagus, small intestines of both neonatal and adult mice at all time points. Nose was demonstrated to be the entry site. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that in nose infected cells were olfactory neurons and sustentacular cells in olfactory epithelium and were macrophages and dendritic cells in nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Neonatal and adult mice developed similar antibody response pattern, though former magnitude was lower. In summary, we have established intranasal (without anesthesia) infections of neonatal and adult mice with murine CMV HaNa1 strain, which mimic the range and extent of virus replication during natural primary HCMV infections in healthy infants and adults. These findings might bring new insights in the pathogenesis of natural primary CMV infections. PMID:26474525

  10. Adult allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: initial experience in the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Teh, A; Bosco, J J; Leong, K W; Saw, M H; Menaka, N; Devashanti, P

    1997-03-01

    Prior to 1993, bone marrow transplantation for adult patients was not available in Malaysia. Adult allogeneic bone marrow transplantation commenced in Malaysia when the first transplant was conducted at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur on 2 November 1993. Up till July 1995, 10 adult bone marrow transplants had been conducted at the University Hospital. Five patients had acute myeloid leukaemia in first remission, 4 had chronic myeloid leukaemia and 1 had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first partial remission. The age range of patients at the time of transplant is 16-40 years (mean 25.5 years). All patients engrafted successfully and the survival for the first 100 days post-transplant is 90%. One patient demonstrated haematological relapse post-transplant but achieved remission with donor buffy-coat infusion. The mean drug cost incurred was RM28,269 for the first 100 days. Locally available adult allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is safe, affordable and has comparable results with reputable overseas transplant centres.

  11. Brief Report: Bone Fractures in Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumeyer, Ann M.; O'Rourke, Julia A.; Massa, Alexandra; Lee, Hang; Lawson, Elizabeth A.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Misra, Madhusmita

    2015-01-01

    Peripubertal boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have lower bone mineral density (BMD) than typically developing controls. However, it is not clear whether lower BMD in ASD results in an increased fracture rate. This study examined the rate of fractures in children and adults with and without ASD using a national database of emergency room…

  12. A novel view of the adult bone marrow stem cell hierarchy and stem cell trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, M Z

    2015-04-01

    This review presents a novel view and working hypothesis about the hierarchy within the adult bone marrow stem cell compartment and the still-intriguing question of whether adult bone marrow contains primitive stem cells from early embryonic development, such as cells derived from the epiblast, migrating primordial germ cells or yolk sac-derived hemangioblasts. It also presents a novel view of the mechanisms that govern stem cell mobilization and homing, with special emphasis on the role of the complement cascade as a trigger for egress of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow into blood as well as the emerging role of novel homing factors and priming mechanisms that support stromal-derived factor 1-mediated homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells after transplantation.

  13. A novel view of the adult bone marrow stem cell hierarchy and stem cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, M Z

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a novel view and working hypothesis about the hierarchy within the adult bone marrow stem cell compartment and the still-intriguing question of whether adult bone marrow contains primitive stem cells from early embryonic development, such as cells derived from the epiblast, migrating primordial germ cells or yolk sac-derived hemangioblasts. It also presents a novel view of the mechanisms that govern stem cell mobilization and homing, with special emphasis on the role of the complement cascade as a trigger for egress of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow into blood as well as the emerging role of novel homing factors and priming mechanisms that support stromal-derived factor 1-mediated homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells after transplantation. PMID:25486871

  14. Intrusion of incisors in adult patients with marginal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Melsen, B; Agerbaek, N; Markenstam, G

    1989-09-01

    Elongated and spaced incisors are common problems in patients suffering from severe periodontal disease. Thirty patients characterized by marginal bone loss and deep overbite were treated by intrusion of incisors. Three different methods for intrusion were applied: (1) J hooks and extraoral high-pull headgear, (2) utility arches, (3) intrusion bent into a loop in a 0.17 x 0.25-inch wire, and (4) base arch as described by Burstone. The intrusion was evaluated from the displacement of the apex, incision, and the center of resistance of the most prominent or elongated central incisor. Change in the marginal bone level and the amount of root resorption were evaluated on standardized intraoral radiographs. The pockets were assessed by standardized probing and the clinical crown length was measured on study casts. The results showed that the true intrusion of the center of resistance varied from 0 to 3.5 mm and was most pronounced when intrusion was performed with a base arch. The clinical crown length was generally reduced by 0.5 to 1.0 mm. The marginal bone level approached the cementoenamel junction in all but six cases. All cases demonstrated root resorption varying from 1 to 3 mm. The total amount of alveolar support--that is, the calculated area of the alveolar wall--was unaltered or increased in 19 of the 30 cases. The dependency of the results on the oral hygiene, the force distribution, and the perioral function was evaluated in relation to the individual cases. It was obvious that intrusion was best performed when (1) forces were low (5 to 15 gm per tooth) with the line of action of the force passing through or close to the center of resistance, (2) the gingiva status was healthy, and (3) no interference with perioral function was present.

  15. Hypocellularity in the Murine Model for Down Syndrome Ts65Dn Is Not Affected by Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    López-Hidalgo, Rosa; Ballestín, Raul; Vega, Jessica; Blasco-Ibáñez, José M.; Crespo, Carlos; Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Nácher, Juan; Varea, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the presence of an extra copy of the chromosome 21 and it is the most common aneuploidy producing intellectual disability. Neural mechanisms underlying this alteration may include defects in the formation of neuronal networks, information processing and brain plasticity. The murine model for DS, Ts65Dn, presents reduced adult neurogenesis. This reduction has been suggested to underlie the hypocellularity of the hippocampus as well as the deficit in olfactory learning in the Ts65Dn mice. Similar alterations have also been observed in individuals with DS. To determine whether the impairment in adult neurogenesis is, in fact, responsible for the hypocellularity in the hippocampus and physiology of the olfactory bulb, we have analyzed cell proliferation and neuronal maturation in the two major adult neurogenic niches in the Ts656Dn mice: the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Additionally, we carried out a study to determine the survival rate and phenotypic fate of newly generated cells in both regions, injecting 5′BrdU and sacrificing the mice 21 days later, and analyzing the number and phenotype of the remaining 5′BrdU-positive cells. We observed a reduction in the number of proliferating (Ki67 positive) cells and immature (doublecortin positive) neurons in the subgranular and SVZ of Ts65Dn mice, but we did not observe changes in the number of surviving cells or in their phenotype. These data correlated with a lower number of apoptotic cells (cleaved caspase 3 positive) in Ts65Dn. We conclude that although adult Ts65Dn mice have a lower number of proliferating cells, it is compensated by a lower level of cell death. This higher survival rate in Ts65Dn produces a final number of mature cells similar to controls. Therefore, the reduction of adult neurogenesis cannot be held responsible for the neuronal hypocellularity in the hippocampus or for the olfactory learning deficit of Ts65Dn mice

  16. Bone structure and volumetric density in young adults born prematurely: a peripheral quantitative computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Backström, M C; Kuusela, A-L; Koivisto, A-M; Sievänen, H

    2005-04-01

    Prematurity is known to be associated with reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in childhood, but whether this condition has long-term detrimental consequences on adult bone structure is not known. In this study, we measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) the total bone cross-sectional area, cortical area and wall thickness, cortical and trabecular density, and a density-weighed polar section modulus as a bone strength index (BSI) at distal and shaft sites of right radius and tibia in a group of 40 prematurely born, otherwise normally developed and healthy young adults (17 women and 23 men, aged 18 to 27 years) and compared their data to corresponding data obtained from a group of 42 control subjects born term (20 women and 22 men, aged 18 to 28 years). Body height and weight were similar in both groups, but the preterm group had significantly lower BSI values at distal sites of tibia (approximately -16%) and radius (approximately -13%) and at tibial shaft (approximately -11%) as compared to control group. In the weight-bearing tibia, BMC was lower and the lower BSI values were mainly due to smaller total bone cross-sectional area. For unknown reason, this prematurity-associated detrimental effect seemed to concern more men than women. In contrast, prematurity was not associated with volumetric trabecular and cortical densities at any measured bone site while the typical sex differences in bone density were observed. We conclude that prematurity is associated with somewhat smaller cross-sectional bone dimensions in terms of body size in young adulthood. Due to the cross-sectional design, this study could not reveal specific reasons but they may pertain to nutrition during the neonatal period and living habits in general.

  17. Brief report: bone fractures in children and adults with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, Ann M; O'Rourke, Julia A; Massa, Alexandra; Lee, Hang; Lawson, Elizabeth A; McDougle, Christopher J; Misra, Madhusmita

    2015-03-01

    Peripubertal boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have lower bone mineral density (BMD) than typically developing controls. However, it is not clear whether lower BMD in ASD results in an increased fracture rate. This study examined the rate of fractures in children and adults with and without ASD using a national database of emergency room visits (Nationwide Emergency Department Sample). A higher odds ratio for hip fractures in children and young adults (3-22 years) as well as older adults (23-50 years) with ASD than those without ASD, and a higher odds ratio for forearm and spine fractures in women ages 23-50 with ASD were found. Further studies are necessary to better understand the decreased bone density in ASD and its implications for fracture development.

  18. Monte-Carlo approach to the microdosimetry of /sup 224/Ra in murine compact and cancellous bone

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, E.R.; Humm, J.L.

    1988-06-01

    A method is described which allows dose calculations to be made to individual target cells in different regions of mouse bone marrow exposed to alpha particles emitted from bone. The method takes into account the variable rate of transfer of energy along the tracks of alpha particles and was applied to experiment-based values calculated for the concentration of /sup 224/Ra on bone surfaces after an injection of a leukemogenic amount of the nuclide. These calculations show a minimum dose of 11 Gy in small (less than 50-micron) marrow spaces and 10 Gy close to bone surface in the shaft of the femur. The results suggest that leukemogenic doses are likely to occur at some distance from bone surfaces in wide marrow spaces and that osteosarcoma is not likely to be induced directly in cells immediately aligning bone surfaces.

  19. Osteoblast and osteocyte-specific loss of Connexin43 results in delayed bone formation and healing during murine fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Loiselle, Alayna E; Paul, Emmanuel M; Lewis, Gregory S; Donahue, Henry J

    2013-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) plays an important role in osteoblastic differentiation in vitro, and bone formation in vivo. Mice with osteoblast/osteocyte-specific loss of Cx43 display decreased gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), bone density, and cortical thickness. To determine the role of Cx43 in fracture healing, a closed femur fracture was induced in Osteocalcin-Cre+; Cx43(flox/flox) (Cx43cKO) and Cre-; Cx43(flox/flox) (WT) mice. We tested the hypothesis that loss of Cx43 results in decreased bone formation and impaired healing following fracture. Here, we show that osteoblast and osteocyte-specific deletion of Cx43 results in decreased bone formation, bone remodeling, and mechanical properties during fracture healing. Cx43cKO mice display decreased bone volume, total volume, and fewer TRAP+ osteoclasts. Furthermore, loss of Cx43 in mature osteoblasts and osteocytes results in a significant decrease in torsional rigidity between 21 and 35 days post-fracture, compared to WT mice. These studies identify a novel role for the gap junction protein Cx43 during fracture healing, suggesting that loss of Cx43 can result in both decreased bone formation and bone resorption. Therefore, enhancing Cx43 expression or GJIC may provide a novel means to enhance bone formation during fracture healing.

  20. Weight in infancy and adult calcium absorption as determinants of bone mineral density in adult men: the Hertfordshire cohort study.

    PubMed

    Patel, M B R; Makepeace, A E; Jameson, K A; Masterson, L M; Holt, R I G; Swaminathan, R; Javaid, M K; Cooper, C; Arden, N K

    2012-12-01

    Adult bone mass is modified by early life environmental influences, but the mechanism of this association is uncertain. Data support an inverse relationship between intestinal calcium absorption (αCa) and birth weight in women. However, little is known regarding determinants in men. This study examines the association between weight in infancy and adult αCa in healthy men and whether this could be a mechanism by which the early life environment may influence bone mass. Men were recruited from the MRC Hertfordshire Cohort Study, for whom detailed early life records were available. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) was measured using a Hologic QDR 4500 at the femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine. We randomly selected 123 men stratified by birth weight and assessed αCa using the stable strontium absorption test. The mean age was 63.6 (SD 2.5) years. αCa was not associated with birth weight or weight at 1 year. FN aBMD was associated with both weight at 1 year (r = 0.20, p = 0.03) and αCa (r = 0.20, p = 0.03). Both of these associations remained statistically significant in a mutually adjusted, multivariable model but would account for only ~4 % variance in BMD. We demonstrated a positive association between weight at 1 year and aBMD and between αCa and FN BMD, but no association was found between birth weight and αCa. This suggests that in men, although αCa is a contributing factor in FN bone density, it is not the main mechanism whereby the early environment modifies adult BMD. PMID:23010962

  1. Condylar subchondral formation of cortical bone in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jie; Liu, Mu-Qing; Yap, Adrian U Jin; Fu, Kai-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated subchondral formation of cortical bone in the condyles of adolescents and young adults, and looked for age-related and sex-related differences in bony formation with the aid of cone-beam computed tomography data in 1438 subjects aged between 10 and 30 years. The scans were part of the hospital's clinical protocol for patients seeking orthodontic or orthognathic treatment. No patient had signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. Central images of the coronal and sagittal planes of the condyle were acquired and scored. Subchondral formation of cortical bone was seen as a high-density compact linear image, and subjects were classified into complete, partial, and no formation. Subchondral formation of cortical bone was first seen at the ages of 13-14 in boys and 12-13 in girls. Complete cortical bony formation was seen after the age of 22 years for men and 21 for women. We conclude that cortical bone begins to form around the periphery of the condyles during adolescence (12-14 years). A continuous, homogeneous, and compact cortical bony layer is established in young adults by the age of 21-22, indicating full development of the mandibular condyle. The condylar bone developed gradually and was generally fully developed a year earlier in women than men.

  2. Alternate protein kinase A activity identifies a unique population of stromal cells in adult bone.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kit Man; Starost, Matthew F; Nesterova, Maria; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Watkins, Tonya; Almeida, Madson Q; Harran, Michelle; Li, Andrew; Collins, Michael T; Cheadle, Christopher; Mertz, Edward L; Leikin, Sergey; Kirschner, Lawrence S; Robey, Pamela; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-05-11

    A population of stromal cells that retains osteogenic capacity in adult bone (adult bone stromal cells or aBSCs) exists and is under intense investigation. Mice heterozygous for a null allele of prkar1a (Prkar1a(+/-)), the primary receptor for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and regulator of protein kinase A (PKA) activity, developed bone lesions that were derived from cAMP-responsive osteogenic cells and resembled fibrous dysplasia (FD). Prkar1a(+/-) mice were crossed with mice that were heterozygous for catalytic subunit Calpha (Prkaca(+/-)), the main PKA activity-mediating molecule, to generate a mouse model with double heterozygosity for prkar1a and prkaca (Prkar1a(+/-)Prkaca(+/-)). Unexpectedly, Prkar1a(+/-)Prkaca(+/-) mice developed a greater number of osseous lesions starting at 3 months of age that varied from the rare chondromas in the long bones and the ubiquitous osteochondrodysplasia of vertebral bodies to the occasional sarcoma in older animals. Cells from these lesions originated from an area proximal to the growth plate, expressed osteogenic cell markers, and showed higher PKA activity that was mostly type II (PKA-II) mediated by an alternate pattern of catalytic subunit expression. Gene expression profiling confirmed a preosteoblastic nature for these cells but also showed a signature that was indicative of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and increased Wnt signaling. These studies show that a specific subpopulation of aBSCs can be stimulated in adult bone by alternate PKA and catalytic subunit activity; abnormal proliferation of these cells leads to skeletal lesions that have similarities to human FD and bone tumors. PMID:20421483

  3. Measurement variability associated with KXRF bone lead measurement in young adults.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppin, J A; Aro, A; Hu, H; Ryan, P B

    2000-01-01

    In vivo bone lead measurement using K X-ray fluorescence (KXRF) has been used to estimate long-term lead exposure, especially in adults. Relatively few studies have been conducted on young subjects with this technique. To explore the measurement variability of KXRF bone lead measurements in young subjects, the tibiae of two male cadavers from Boston, Massachusetts, 17 and 20 years of age, were obtained for repeated bone lead measurements. Bone lead concentrations were measured using a grid of nine locations, 1 cm apart, centered at the midpoint of the tibia. Each location was sampled using five 60-min measurements. Measured concentrations ranged from < 0 to 11.8 microg Pb/g bone mineral across a tibia with mean concentrations for the midpoint locations of 0.8 microg Pb/g bone mineral SD = 2.5 and 2.0 microg Pb/g bone mineral (SD = 1.9) for the left and right legs of the younger subject and 3.6 microg Pb/g bone mineral (SD = 2.6) and 6.0 microg Pb/g bone mineral (SD = 3.3) for the left and right legs of the older subject. Although bone lead concentrations did not vary significantly by measurement location in an individual leg, reported measurement uncertainty increased significantly at locations that were 1 cm from the center of the tibia horizontally (p < 0.0001). Symmetry in bone lead concentration between legs was observed for the 17-year-old subject. Potential asymmetry between the left and right legs was suggested for the 20-year-old subject (p = 0.06). These data describe the degree of variability that may be associated with bone lead measurements of young subjects with low bone lead concentrations using a standard spot-source KXRF instrument. Because of the importance of conducting additional research on adolescent lead toxicity, further improvements to the precision of KXRF measurement are needed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10706530

  4. Decreased Bone Mineral Density in Adults Born with Very Low Birth Weight: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hovi, Petteri; Andersson, Sture; Järvenpää, Anna-Liisa; Eriksson, Johan G.; Strang-Karlsson, Sonja; Kajantie, Eero; Mäkitie, Outi

    2009-01-01

    Background Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW, <1,500 g) infants have compromised bone mass accrual during childhood, but it is unclear whether this results in subnormal peak bone mass and increased risk of impaired skeletal health in adulthood. We hypothesized that VLBW is associated with reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in adulthood. Methods and Findings The Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults is a multidisciplinary cohort study representative of all VLBW births within the larger Helsinki area from 1978 to 1985. This study evaluated skeletal health in 144 such participants (all born preterm, mean gestational age 29.3 wk, birth weight 1,127 g, birth weight Z score 1.3), and in 139 comparison participants born at term, matched for sex, age, and birth hospital. BMD was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at age 18.5 to 27.1 y. Adults born with VLBW had, in comparison to participants born at term, a 0.51-unit (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28–0.75) lower lumbar spine Z score and a 0.56-unit (95% CI 0.34–0.78) lower femoral neck Z score for areal BMD. These differences remained statistically significant after adjustment for the VLBW adults' shorter height and lower self-reported exercise intensity. Conclusions Young adults born with VLBW, when studied close to the age of peak bone mass, have significantly lower BMD than do their term-born peers. This suggests that compromised childhood bone mass accrual in preterm VLBW children translates into increased risk for osteoporosis in adulthood, warranting vigilance in osteoporosis prevention. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:19707270

  5. DECREASED OXIDATIVE STRESS AND GREATER BONE ANABOLISM IN THE AGED, AS COMPARED TO THE YOUNG, MURINE SKELETON BY PARATHYROID HORMONE

    PubMed Central

    Jilka, R.L.; Almeida, M.; Ambrogini, E.; Han, L.; Roberson, P. K.; Weinstein, R.S.; Manolagas, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Because of recent insights into the pathogenesis of age-related bone loss, we investigated whether intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) administration antagonizes the molecular mechanisms of the adverse effects of aging on bone. PTH produced a greater increase in vertebral trabecular bone mineral density and bone volume as well as a greater expansion of the endocortical bone surface in the femur of 26 as compared to 6 month old female C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, PTH increased trabecular connectivity in vertebrae and the toughness of both vertebrae and femora in old, but not young, mice. PTH also increased the rate of bone formation and reduced osteoblast apoptosis to a greater extent in the old mice. Most strikingly, PTH reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS), p66Shc phosphorylation and expression of the lipoxygenase Alox15; and it increased glutathione and stimulated Wnt signaling in bone of old mice. PTH also antagonized the effects of oxidative stress on p66Shc phosphorylation, FoxO transcriptional activity, osteoblast apoptosis, and Wnt signaling in vitro. In contrast, administration of the antioxidants N-acetyl cysteine or pegylated catalase reduced osteoblast progenitors, and attenuated proliferation and Wnt signaling. These results suggest that PTH has a greater bone anabolic efficacy in old age because in addition to its other positive actions on bone formation it antagonizes the age-associated increase in oxidative stress and its adverse effects on the birth and survival of osteoblasts. On the other hand, ordinary antioxidants cannot restore bone mass in old age because they slow remodeling and attenuate osteoblastogenesis by interfering with Wnt signaling. PMID:20698835

  6. Parietal Bone Thickness and Vascular Diameters in Adult Modern Humans: A Survey on Cranial Remains.

    PubMed

    Eisová, Stanislava; Rangel de Lázaro, Gizéh; Píšová, Hana; Pereira-Pedro, Sofia; Bruner, Emiliano

    2016-07-01

    Cranial bone thickness varies among modern humans, and many factors influencing this variability remain unclear. Growth hormones and physical activity are thought to influence the vault thickness. Considering that both systemic factors and energy supply influence the vascular system, and taking into account the structural and biomechanical interaction between endocranial vessels and vault bones, in this study we evaluate the correlation between vascular and bone diameters. In particular, we tested the relationship between the thickness of the parietal bone (which is characterized, in modern humans, by a complex vascular network) and the lumen size of the middle meningeal and diploic vessels, in adult modern humans. Our results show no patent correlation between the thickness of parietal bone and the size of the main vascular channels. Values and distributions of the branching patterns, as well as anatomical relationships between vessels and bones, are also described in order to provide information concerning the arrangement of the endocranial vascular morphology. This information is relevant in both evolutionary and medical contexts. Anat Rec, 299:888-896, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072555

  7. Effects of letrozole on breast cancer micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung in mice inoculated with murine 4T1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendan; Belosay, Aashvini; Yang, Xujuan; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Turner, Russell T; Churchwell, Mona I; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cancer in women worldwide. Metastasis occurs in stage IV BC with bone and lung being common metastatic sites. Here we evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole on BC micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung metastasis in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) mice with murine estrogen receptor negative (ER-) BC cells inoculated in tibia. Forty-eight BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: OVX, OVX + Letrozole, Intact, and Intact + Letrozole, and injected with 4T1 cells intra-tibially. Letrozole was subcutaneously injected daily for 23 days at a dose of 1.75 µg/g body weight. Tumor progression was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Following necropsy, inoculated tibiae were scanned via µCT and bone response to tumor was scored from 0 (no ectopic mineralization/osteolysis) to 5 (extensive ectopic mineralization/osteolysis). OVX mice had higher tibial pathology scores indicative of more extensive bone destruction than intact mice, irrespective of letrozole treatment. Letrozole decreased serum estradiol levels and reduced lung surface tumor numbers in intact animals. Furthermore, mice receiving letrozole had significantly fewer tumor colonies and fewer proliferative cells in the lung than OVX and intact controls based on H&E and Ki-67 staining, respectively. In conclusion, BC-inoculated OVX animals had higher tibia pathology scores than BC-inoculated intact animals and letrozole reduced BC metastases to lungs. These findings suggest that, by lowering systemic estrogen level and/or by interacting with the host organ, the aromatase inhibitor letrozole has the potential to reduce ER- BC metastasis to lung. PMID:27209469

  8. A model utilizing adult murine stem cells for creation of personalized islets for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Song, L J; Gerber, D A; Fair, J H; Rice, L; LaPaglia, M; Andreoni, K A

    2004-05-01

    Clinical islet cell transplantation has demonstrated great promise for diabetes treatment. Two major obstacles are the organ donor shortage and the immunoresponse. The purpose of this study was to create a model using the patient's own adult stem cell sources, possibly in combination with non-self cells, such as pancreatic, hepatic, or embryonic stem cells, to create "personalized" islets. We hypothesize that the reconstructed islets have the normal capability to produce insulin and glucagon with reduced immunoresponses after transplantation. Stem cells are a proliferating population of master cells that have the ability for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. The recently developed photolithograph-based, biologic, microelectromechanic system (BioMEMS) technique supplies a useful tool for biomedical applications. Our lab has developed a novel method that integrates the adult stem cell and BioMEMS to reconstruct personalized islets. We selected islet-derived progenitor cells (IPC) for repairing and reconstructing STZ-diabetic islets. A6(+)/PYY(+) or A6(+)/ngn3(+) cells were selected to manipulate the neoislets. After 3 to 4 weeks in culture, the reconstructed cells formed islet-like clusters containing insulin or glucagon producing cells. The pilot results showed the ability of these reconstructed islets to correct hyperglycemia when transplanted into a STZ-diabetic isograft mouse model. Although several technical problems remain with the mouse model, namely, the difficulty to collect enough islets from a single mouse because of animal size, the mouse isograft model is suitable for personalized islet development.

  9. PDGFRα demarcates the cardiogenic clonogenic Sca1+ stem/progenitor cell in adult murine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Michela; Harada, Mutsuo; McSweeney, Sara; Leja, Thomas; Belian, Elisa; Stuckey, Daniel J; Abreu Paiva, Marta S; Habib, Josef; Macaulay, Iain; de Smith, Adam J; al-Beidh, Farah; Sampson, Robert; Lumbers, R Thomas; Rao, Pulivarthi; Harding, Sian E; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Barahona, Mauricio; Schneider, Michael D

    2015-05-18

    Cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult hearts represent an attractive therapeutic target for heart regeneration, though (inter)-relationships among reported cells remain obscure. Using single-cell qRT-PCR and clonal analyses, here we define four subpopulations of cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult mouse myocardium all sharing stem cell antigen-1 (Sca1), based on side population (SP) phenotype, PECAM-1 (CD31) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) expression. SP status predicts clonogenicity and cardiogenic gene expression (Gata4/6, Hand2 and Tbx5/20), properties segregating more specifically to PDGFRα(+) cells. Clonal progeny of single Sca1(+) SP cells show cardiomyocyte, endothelial and smooth muscle lineage potential after cardiac grafting, augmenting cardiac function although durable engraftment is rare. PDGFRα(-) cells are characterized by Kdr/Flk1, Cdh5, CD31 and lack of clonogenicity. PDGFRα(+)/CD31(-) cells derive from cells formerly expressing Mesp1, Nkx2-5, Isl1, Gata5 and Wt1, distinct from PDGFRα(-)/CD31(+) cells (Gata5 low; Flk1 and Tie2 high). Thus, PDGFRα demarcates the clonogenic cardiogenic Sca1(+) stem/progenitor cell.

  10. PDGFRα demarcates the cardiogenic clonogenic Sca1+ stem/progenitor cell in adult murine myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Noseda, Michela; Harada, Mutsuo; McSweeney, Sara; Leja, Thomas; Belian, Elisa; Stuckey, Daniel J.; Abreu Paiva, Marta S.; Habib, Josef; Macaulay, Iain; de Smith, Adam J.; al-Beidh, Farah; Sampson, Robert; Lumbers, R. Thomas; Rao, Pulivarthi; Harding, Sian E.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Eirik Jacobsen, Sten; Barahona, Mauricio; Schneider, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult hearts represent an attractive therapeutic target for heart regeneration, though (inter)-relationships among reported cells remain obscure. Using single-cell qRT–PCR and clonal analyses, here we define four subpopulations of cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult mouse myocardium all sharing stem cell antigen-1 (Sca1), based on side population (SP) phenotype, PECAM-1 (CD31) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) expression. SP status predicts clonogenicity and cardiogenic gene expression (Gata4/6, Hand2 and Tbx5/20), properties segregating more specifically to PDGFRα+ cells. Clonal progeny of single Sca1+ SP cells show cardiomyocyte, endothelial and smooth muscle lineage potential after cardiac grafting, augmenting cardiac function although durable engraftment is rare. PDGFRα− cells are characterized by Kdr/Flk1, Cdh5, CD31 and lack of clonogenicity. PDGFRα+/CD31− cells derive from cells formerly expressing Mesp1, Nkx2-5, Isl1, Gata5 and Wt1, distinct from PDGFRα−/CD31+ cells (Gata5 low; Flk1 and Tie2 high). Thus, PDGFRα demarcates the clonogenic cardiogenic Sca1+ stem/progenitor cell. PMID:25980517

  11. Differential effects of two pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 gene family on murine bone quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Lisa Marie

    Bax and Hrk are pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 gene family. Both Bax and Hrk have been previously implicated in ovarian cell survival. Effects on bone cells have also been studied in several members of the Bcl-2 gene family; thus, the focus of this work was to characterize the bone quality of mice deficient in Bax or Hrk. Bone quality of various age groups (3, 6, 12, 6 and 22 months) of Bax-knockout (KO) and Hrk-KO female mice were compared to age-matched control female mice. Additional groups of 6-month mice were ovariectomized (OVX) to determine whether effects are dependent on ovarian function. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry was performed on all mice to determine bone mineral density (BMD). To evaluate bone mechanical properties, 3-point bending, torsion testing and femoral neck fracture were performed on femora, while compression was performed on individual vertebrae. Mechanical properties were rationalized through evaluation of structural (strut analysis, micro computed tomography), remodeling (histomorphometry, osteoclast staining) and material (back-scattered electron imaging, x-ray diffraction) properties. Aged Bax-KO mice do not experience the loss in BMD, bone mechanics and trabecular bone structural properties typically observed with age. Enhanced ovarian cell numbers in Bax-KO mice likely indirectly leads to this enhanced bone phenotype. Ovariectomy results in the loss of the enhanced trabecular bone phenotype, but does not affect the cortical bone phenotype. As such, cortical bone may be protected from typical OVX effects due to sustained osteoblast function in Bax-KO mice. By contrast, young Hrk-KO mice exhibit higher BMD and trabecular bone structural properties compared to control mice, coupled with a compromised mechanical integrity. This subtle transient osteopetrotic-like phenotype is likely influenced by a potentially augmented osteoblast survival, albeit with a compromised activity. This osteopetrotic-like phenotype, and the effect of Hrk

  12. 23(S),25(R)-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-26,23-lactone stimulates murine bone formation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, M.; Tanaka, H.; Norman, A.W.; Yamaoka, K.; Yoshikawa, H.; Takaoka, K.; Ishizuka, S.; Seino, Y. )

    1990-02-01

    23(S),25(R)-1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3-26,23-lactone (1,25-lactone) has been shown to have unique actions different from those of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3). In contrast to 1,25-(OH)2D3, 1,25-lactone causes a significant reduction in the serum Ca2+ level, stimulates collagen production in an osteoblastic cell line, and inhibits bone resorption induced by 1,25-(OH)2D3. A possible effect of 1,25-lactone on bone formation was examined in experiments on ectopic bone formation using a bone-inducing factor derived from Dunn osteosarcomas. 1,25-Lactone, a metabolite of 1,25-(OH)2D3, increased (3H)proline uptake at the stage of chondrogenesis and {sup 85}Sr uptake during bone formation. Significantly enlarged bone was also induced by this compound 3 weeks after implantation. These results suggest that the 1,25-lactone may be able to stimulate bone formation under in vivo conditions.

  13. Evaluating the relationship between muscle and bone modeling response in older adults.

    PubMed

    Reider, Lisa; Beck, Thomas; Alley, Dawn; Miller, Ram; Shardell, Michelle; Schumacher, John; Magaziner, Jay; Cawthon, Peggy M; Barbour, Kamil E; Cauley, Jane A; Harris, Tamara

    2016-09-01

    Bone modeling, the process that continually adjusts bone strength in response to prevalent muscle-loading forces throughout an individual's lifespan, may play an important role in bone fragility with age. Femoral stress, an index of bone modeling response, can be estimated using measurements of DXA derived bone geometry and loading information incorporated into an engineering model. Assuming that individuals have adapted to habitual muscle loading forces, greater stresses indicate a diminished response and a weaker bone. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the associations of lean mass and muscle strength with the femoral stress measure generated from the engineering model and to examine the extent to which lean mass and muscle strength account for variation in femoral stress among 2539 healthy older adults participating in the Health ABC study using linear regression. Mean femoral stress was higher in women (9.51, SD=1.85Mpa) than in men (8.02, SD=1.43Mpa). Percent lean mass explained more of the variation in femoral stress than did knee strength adjusted for body size (R(2)=0.187 vs. 0.055 in men; R(2)=0.237 vs. 0.095 in women). In models adjusted for potential confounders, for every percent increase in lean mass, mean femoral stress was 0.121Mpa lower (95% CI: -0.138, -0.104; p<0.001) in men and 0.139Mpa lower (95% CI: -0.158, -0.121; p<0.001) in women. The inverse association of femoral stress with lean mass and with knee strength did not differ by category of BMI. Results from this study provide insight into bone modeling differences as measured by femoral stress among older men and women and indicate that lean mass may capture elements of bone's response to load. PMID:27352990

  14. Evaluating the relationship between muscle and bone modeling response in older adults.

    PubMed

    Reider, Lisa; Beck, Thomas; Alley, Dawn; Miller, Ram; Shardell, Michelle; Schumacher, John; Magaziner, Jay; Cawthon, Peggy M; Barbour, Kamil E; Cauley, Jane A; Harris, Tamara

    2016-09-01

    Bone modeling, the process that continually adjusts bone strength in response to prevalent muscle-loading forces throughout an individual's lifespan, may play an important role in bone fragility with age. Femoral stress, an index of bone modeling response, can be estimated using measurements of DXA derived bone geometry and loading information incorporated into an engineering model. Assuming that individuals have adapted to habitual muscle loading forces, greater stresses indicate a diminished response and a weaker bone. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the associations of lean mass and muscle strength with the femoral stress measure generated from the engineering model and to examine the extent to which lean mass and muscle strength account for variation in femoral stress among 2539 healthy older adults participating in the Health ABC study using linear regression. Mean femoral stress was higher in women (9.51, SD=1.85Mpa) than in men (8.02, SD=1.43Mpa). Percent lean mass explained more of the variation in femoral stress than did knee strength adjusted for body size (R(2)=0.187 vs. 0.055 in men; R(2)=0.237 vs. 0.095 in women). In models adjusted for potential confounders, for every percent increase in lean mass, mean femoral stress was 0.121Mpa lower (95% CI: -0.138, -0.104; p<0.001) in men and 0.139Mpa lower (95% CI: -0.158, -0.121; p<0.001) in women. The inverse association of femoral stress with lean mass and with knee strength did not differ by category of BMI. Results from this study provide insight into bone modeling differences as measured by femoral stress among older men and women and indicate that lean mass may capture elements of bone's response to load.

  15. CD11b+ and Sca-1+ Cells Exert the Main Beneficial Effects of Systemically Administered Bone Marrow-Derived Mononuclear Cells in a Murine Model of Mixed Th2/Th17 Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fernanda F.; Borg, Zachary D.; Goodwin, Meagan; Coffey, Amy L.; Wagner, Darcy E.; Rocco, Patricia R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic administration of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMDMCs) or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) reduces inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in a murine model of Th2-mediated eosinophilic allergic airway inflammation. However, since BMDMCs are a heterogeneous population that includes MSCs, it is unclear whether the MSCs alone are responsible for the BMDMC effects. To determine which BMDMC population(s) is responsible for ameliorating AHR and lung inflammation in a model of mixed Th2-eosinophilic and Th17-neutrophilic allergic airway inflammation, reminiscent of severe clinical asthma, BMDMCs obtained from normal C57Bl/6 mice were serially depleted of CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD3, CD19, CD31, or Sca-1 positive cells. The different resulting cell populations were then assessed for ability to reduce lung inflammation and AHR in mixed Th2/Th17 allergic airway inflammation induced by mucosal sensitization to and challenge with Aspergillus hyphal extract (AHE) in syngeneic C56Bl/6 mice. BMDMCs depleted of either CD11b-positive (CD11b+) or Sca-1-positive (Sca-1+) cells were unable to ameliorate AHR or lung inflammation in this model. Depletion of the other cell types did not diminish the ameliorating effects of BMDMC administration. In conclusion, in the current model of allergic inflammation, CD11b+ cells (monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells) and Sca-1+ cells (MSCs) are responsible for the beneficial effects of BMDMCs. Significance This study shows that bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMDMCs) are as effective as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in ameliorating experimental asthma. It also demonstrates that not only MSCs present in the pool of BMDMCs are responsible for BMDMCs’ beneficial effects but also monocytes, which are the most important cell population to trigger these effects. All of this is in the setting of a clinically relevant model of severe allergic airways inflammation and thus

  16. Adult equine bone marrow stromal cells produce a cartilage-like ECM mechanically superior to animal-matched adult chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kopesky, P W; Lee, H-Y; Vanderploeg, E J; Kisiday, J D; Frisbie, D D; Plaas, A H K; Ortiz, C; Grodzinsky, A J

    2010-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the age-dependent mechanical phenotype of bone marrow stromal cell- (BMSC-) and chondrocyte-produced cartilage-like neo-tissue and to elucidate the matrix-associated mechanisms which generate this phenotype. Cells from both immature (2-4 month-old foals) and skeletally-mature (2-5 year-old adults) mixed-breed horses were isolated from animal-matched bone marrow and cartilage tissue, encapsulated in self-assembling-peptide hydrogels, and cultured with and without TGF-beta1 supplementation. BMSCs and chondrocytes from both donor ages were encapsulated with high viability. BMSCs from both ages produced neo-tissue with higher mechanical stiffness than that produced by either young or adult chondrocytes. Young, but not adult, chondrocytes proliferated in response to TGF-beta1 while BMSCs from both age groups proliferated with TGF-beta1. Young chondrocytes stimulated by TGF-beta1 accumulated ECM with 10-fold higher sulfated-glycosaminoglycan content than adult chondrocytes and 2-3-fold higher than BMSCs of either age. The opposite trend was observed for hydroxyproline content, with BMSCs accumulating 2-3-fold more than chondrocytes, independent of age. Size-exclusion chromatography of extracted proteoglycans showed that an aggrecan-like peak was the predominant sulfated proteoglycan for all cell types. Direct measurement of aggrecan core protein length and chondroitin sulfate chain length by single molecule atomic force microscopy imaging revealed that, independent of age, BMSCs produced longer core protein and longer chondroitin sulfate chains, and fewer short core protein molecules than chondrocytes, suggesting that the BMSC-produced aggrecan has a phenotype more characteristic of young tissue than chondrocyte-produced aggrecan. Aggrecan ultrastructure, ECM composition, and cellular proliferation combine to suggest a mechanism by which BMSCs produce a superior cartilage-like neo-tissue than either young or adult chondrocytes. PMID:20153827

  17. Pharmacological analysis of epithelial chloride secretion mechanisms in adult murine airways.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Ambra; Ferrera, Loretta; Philp, Amber R; Caci, Emanuela; Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Galietta, Luis J V; Flores, Carlos A

    2016-06-15

    Defective epithelial chloride secretion occurs in humans with cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic defect due to loss of function of CFTR, a cAMP-activated chloride channel. In the airways, absence of an active CFTR causes a severe lung disease. In mice, genetic ablation of CFTR function does not result in similar lung pathology. This may be due to the expression of an alternative chloride channel which is activated by calcium. The most probable protein performing this function is TMEM16A, a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). Our aim was to assess the relative contribution of CFTR and TMEM16A to chloride secretion in adult mouse trachea. For this purpose we tested pharmacological inhibitors of chloride channels in normal and CF mice. The amplitude of the cAMP-activated current was similar in both types of animals and was not affected by a selective CFTR inhibitor. In contrast, a CaCC inhibitor (CaCCinh-A01) strongly blocked the cAMP-activated current as well as the calcium-activated chloride secretion triggered by apical UTP. Although control experiments revealed that CaCCinh-A01 also shows inhibitory activity on CFTR, our results indicate that transepithelial chloride secretion in adult mouse trachea is independent of CFTR and that another channel, possibly TMEM16A, performs both cAMP- and calcium-activated chloride transport. The prevalent function of a non-CFTR channel may explain the absence of a defect in chloride transport in CF mice. PMID:27063443

  18. The effect of SDF-1α on low dose BMP-2 mediated bone regeneration by release from heparinized mineralized collagen type I matrix scaffolds in a murine critical size bone defect model.

    PubMed

    Zwingenberger, Stefan; Langanke, Robert; Vater, Corina; Lee, Geoffrey; Niederlohmann, Eik; Sensenschmidt, Markus; Jacobi, Angela; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Muders, Michael; Rammelt, Stefan; Knaack, Sven; Gelinsky, Michael; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Goodman, Stuart B; Stiehler, Maik

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of critical size bone defects represents a challenge. The growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) is clinically established but has potentially adverse effects when used at high doses. The aim of this study was to evaluate if stromal derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) and BMP-2 released from heparinized mineralized collagen type I matrix (MCM) scaffolds have a cumulative effect on bone regeneration. MCM scaffolds were functionalized with heparin, loaded with BMP-2 and/or SDF-1α and implanted into a murine critical size femoral bone defect (control group, low dose BMP-2 group, low dose BMP-2 + SDF-1α group, and high dose BMP-2 group). After 6 weeks, both the low dose BMP-2 + SDF-1α group (5.8 ± 0.6 mm³, p = 0.0479) and the high dose BMP-2 group (6.5 ± 0.7 mm³, p = 0.008) had a significantly increased regenerated bone volume compared to the control group (4.2 ± 0.5 mm³). There was a higher healing score in the low dose BMP-2 + SDF-1α group (median grade 8; Q1-Q3 7-9; p = 0.0357) than in the low dose BMP-2 group (7; Q1-Q3 5-9) histologically. This study showed that release of BMP-2 and SDF-1α from heparinized MCM scaffolds allows for the reduction of the applied BMP-2 concentration since SDF-1α seems to enhance the osteoinductive potential of BMP-2. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2126-2134, 2016.

  19. Site- and compartment-specific changes in bone with hindlimb unloading in mature adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, S. A.; Allen, M. R.; Hogan, H. A.; Delp, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine site- and compartment-specific changes in bone induced by hindlimb unloading (HU) in the mature adult male rat (6 months old). Tibiae, femora, and humeri were removed after 14, 21, and 28 days of HU for determination of bone mineral density (BMD) and geometry by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), mechanical properties, and bone formation rate (BFR), and compared with baseline (0 day) and aging (28 day) controls. HU resulted in 20%-21% declines in cancellous BMD at the proximal tibia and femoral neck after 28 day HU vs. 0 day controls (CON). Cortical shell BMD at these sites was greater (by 4%-6%) in both 28 day HU and 28 day CON vs. 0 day CON animals, and nearly identical to that gain seen in the weight-bearing humerus. Mechanical properties at the proximal tibia exhibited a nonsignificant decline after HU vs. those of 0 day CON rats. At the femoral neck, a 10% decrement was noted in ultimate load in 28 day HU rats vs. 28 day CON animals. Middiaphyseal tibial bone increased slightly in density and area during HU; no differences in structural and material properties between 28 day HU and 28 day CON rats were noted. BFR at the tibial midshaft was significantly lower (by 90%) after 21 day HU vs. 0 day CON; this decline was maintained throughout 28 day HU. These results suggest there are compartment-specific differences in the mature adult skeletal response to hindlimb unloading, and that the major impact over 28 days of unloading is on cancellous bone sites. Given the sharp decline in BFR for midshaft cortical bone, it appears likely that deficits in BMD, area, or mechanical properties would develop with longer duration unloading.

  20. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Lytic Bone Involvement in an Adult Smoker: Regression following Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Routy, B.; Hoang, J.; Gruber, J.

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare myeloid neoplasm characterized by the proliferation and dissemination of histiocytes. These in turn may cause symptoms ranging from isolated, infiltrative lesions to severe multisystem disease. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) presents as a localized polyclonal proliferation of Langerhans cells in the lungs causing bilateral cysts and fibrosis. In adults, this rare condition is considered a reactive process associated with cigarette smoking. Recently, clonal proliferation has been reported with the presence of BRAF V600E oncogenic mutation in a subset of PLCH patients. Spontaneous resolution was described; however, based on case series, smoking cessation remains the most effective way to achieve complete remission and prevent long term complications related to tobacco. Herein, we report the case of an adult woman with biopsy-proven PLCH presenting with thoracic (T8) vertebral bone destruction. Both the lung and the bone diseases regressed following smoking cessation, representing a rare case of synchronous disseminated PCLH with bone localization. This observation underscores the contribution of cigarette smoking as a systemic trigger of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary bone lesions. A review of similar cases in the literature is also presented. PMID:25789184

  1. Testosterone and Adult Male Bone: Actions Independent of 5α-Reductase and Aromatase.

    PubMed

    Yarrow, Joshua F; Wronski, Thomas J; Borst, Stephen E

    2015-10-01

    Androgens and estrogens influence skeletal development and maintenance in males. However, the relative contributions of the circulating sex steroid hormones that originate from testicular/adrenal secretion versus those produced locally in bone via intracrine action require further elucidation. Our novel hypothesis is that testosterone exerts direct protective effects on the adult male skeleton independently of the actions of 5α-reductase or aromatase.

  2. Autologous Transplantation of Bone Marrow Adult Stem Cells for the Treatment of Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Ricardo João; Bueno, Ronaldo Rocha Loures; Galvão, Paulo Bezerra de Araújo; Zanis Neto, José; Souza, Juliano Mendes; Guérios, Ênio Eduardo; Senegaglia, Alexandra Cristina; Brofman, Paulo Roberto; Pasquini, Ricardo; da Cunha, Claudio Leinig Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Background Morbimortality in patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy is high, even under optimal medical treatment. Autologous infusion of bone marrow adult stem cells has shown promising preliminary results in these patients. Objective Determine the effectiveness of autologous transplantation of bone marrow adult stem cells on systolic and diastolic left ventricular function, and on the degree of mitral regurgitation in patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy in functional classes NYHA II and III. Methods We administered 4,54 x 108 ± 0,89 x 108 bone marrow adult stem cells into the coronary arteries of 24 patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy in functional classes NYHA II and III. Changes in functional class, systolic and diastolic left ventricular function and degree of mitral regurgitation were assessed after 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Results During follow-up, six patients (25%) improved functional class and eight (33.3%) kept stable. Left ventricular ejection fraction improved 8.9%, 9.7% e 13.6%, after 3, 6 and 12 months (p = 0.024; 0.017 and 0.018), respectively. There were no significant changes neither in diastolic left ventricular function nor in mitral regurgitation degree. A combined cardiac resynchronization and implantable cardioversion defibrillation was implanted in two patients (8.3%). Four patients (16.6%) had sudden death and four patients died due to terminal cardiac failure. Average survival of these eight patients was 2.6 years. Conclusion Intracoronary infusion of bone marrow adult stem cells was associated with an improvement or stabilization of functional class and an improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction, suggesting the efficacy of this intervention. There were no significant changes neither in left ventricular diastolic function nor in the degree of mitral regurgitation. PMID:25590932

  3. Growth hormone expression in murine bone marrow cells is independent of the pituitary transcription factor Pit-1.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, R; Malur, A; Van Buul-Offers, S C; Hooghe-Peters, E L

    1997-09-01

    GH has been shown to promote the development and function of leukocytes. The expression of both GH and GH-receptors in lymphoid cells has led to the hypothesis that GH acts in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. The described effects of GH on hematopoiesis and B cell development, led us to investigate GH expression in bone marrow cells. By immunocytochemistry, we show that bone marrow-derived granulocytes and macrophages contain immunoreactive GH. We found that 65 +/- 24% of the granulocytes were stained with anti-GH, whereas 5.8 +/- 1.5% of the granulocytes contained detectable amounts of GH mRNA as assessed by in situ hybridization. To address a possible alternative regulation mechanism in bone marrow and to establish whether locally derived GH might still play a role in pituitary-deficient dwarf mice, we also addressed GH expression in bone marrow from hypopituitary Snell dwarf mice. These mice have a mutated gene for the pituitary transcription factor Pit-1 that is deficient in DNA binding. Our finding that GH expression (immunoreactive protein and mRNA) in bone marrow cells from dwarf mice is similar to that in normal mice points to a Pit-1 independent regulation of GH in mouse bone marrow.

  4. Attenuation of the self-renewal of transit-amplifying osteoblast progenitors in the murine bone marrow by 17β-estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Di Gregorio, Gina B.; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Ali, A. Afshan; Abe, Etsuko; Roberson, Paula; Manolagas, Stavros C.; Jilka, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    In agreement with evidence that estrogens slow the rate of bone remodeling by suppressing the production of both osteoclasts and osteoblasts, loss of estrogens leads to an increase in the number of osteoclast as well as early osteoblast progenitors (CFU-osteoblasts; CFU-OBs) in the murine bone marrow. Here we show that CFU-OBs are early transit-amplifying progenitors, i.e., dividing cells capable of limited self-renewal, and that 17β-estradiol acts in vivo and in vitro to attenuate their self-renewal by approximately 50%. Consistent with a direct receptor–mediated action of estrogens on early mesenchymal cell progenitors, anti–estrogen receptor-α (anti-ERα) Ab’s stain a small number of marrow cells that exhibit characteristics of primitive undifferentiated cells, including a high nucleus/cytoplasm ratio and lack of lineage-specific biochemical markers; the effect of 17β-estradiol on CFU-OB self-renewal is absent in mice lacking ERα. Because both osteoblasts and the stromal/osteoblastic cells that are required for osteoclast development are derived from CFU-OBs, suppression of the self-renewal of this common progenitor may represent a key mechanism of the anti-remodeling effects of estrogens. PMID:11285299

  5. Organotypical tissue cultures from adult murine colon as an in vitro model of intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bareiss, Petra M.; Metzger, Marco; Sohn, Kai; Rupp, Steffen; Frick, Julia S.; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Lang, Florian; Schwarz, Heinz; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Together with animal experiments, organotypical cell cultures are important models for analyzing cellular interactions of the mucosal epithelium and pathogenic mechanisms in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional culture model from the adult mouse colon for cell biological investigations in an in vivo-like environment. These explant cultures were cultured for up to 2 weeks and maintained typical characteristics of the intestinal mucosa, including a high-prismatic epithelium with specific epithelial cell-to-cell connections, a basal lamina and various connective tissue cell types, as analyzed with immunohistological and electron microscopic methods. The function of the epithelium was tested by treating the cultures with dexamethasone, which resulted in a strong upregulation of the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 similar to that found in vivo. The culture system was investigated in infection experiments with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Wildtype but not Δcph1/Δefg1-knockout Candida adhered to, penetrated and infiltrated the epithelial barrier. The results demonstrate the potential usefulness of this intestinal in vitro model for studying epithelial cell-cell interactions, cellular signaling and microbiological infections in a three-dimensional cell arrangement. PMID:18320204

  6. Glomerular parietal epithelial cells of adult murine kidney undergo EMT to generate cells with traits of renal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    G, Swetha; Chandra, Vikash; Phadnis, Smruti; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glomerular parietal epithelial cells (GPECs) are known to revert to embryonic phenotype in response to renal injury. However, the mechanism of de-differentiation in GPECs and the underlying cellular processes are not fully understood. In the present study, we show that cultured GPECs of adult murine kidney undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to generate cells, which express CD24, CD44 and CD29 surface antigens. Characterization by qRT-PCR and immunostaining of these clonogenic cells demonstrate that they exhibit metastable phenotype with co-expression of both epithelial (cytokeratin-18) and mesenchymal (vimentin) markers. Transcript analysis by qRT-PCR revealed high expression of metanephric mesenchymal (Pax-2, WT-1, Six-1, Eya-1, GDNF) and uteric bud (Hoxb-7, C-Ret) genes in these cells, indicating their bipotent progenitor status. Incubation of GPECs with EMT blocker Prostaglandin E2, resulted in low expression of renal progenitor markers reflecting the correlation between EMT and acquired stemness in these cells. Additional in vitro renal commitment assays confirmed their functional staminality. When injected into E13.5 kidney rudiments, the cells incorporated into the developing kidney primordia and co-culture with E13.5 spinal cord resulted in branching and tubulogenesis in these cells. When implanted under renal capsule of unilaterally nephrectomized mice, these cells differentiated into immature glomeruli and vascular ducts. Our study demonstrates that EMT plays a major role in imparting plasticity to terminally differentiated GPECs by producing metastable cells with traits of kidney progenitors. The present study would improve our understanding on epithelial cell plasticity, furthering our knowledge of its role in renal repair and regeneration. PMID:19840197

  7. Bone Mineral Density in Adults With Down Syndrome, Intellectual Disability, and Nondisabled Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geijer, Justin R.; Stanish, Heidi I.; Draheim, Christopher C.; Dengel, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) or Down syndrome (DS) may be at greater risk of osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to compare bone mineral density (BMD) of DS, ID, and non-intellectually disabled (NID) populations. In each group, 33 participants between the ages of 28 and 60 years were compared. BMD was measured with…

  8. Regulation of hemopoiesis: inhibitors and stimulators produced by a murine bone marrow stromal cell line (H-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.; Miller, M.E.; Garnett, H.; Harigaya, K.

    1982-01-01

    A murine cell line (H-1) probably derived from the adventitial reticular cell has been isolated and preserved. This line produces: (1) CSF; (2) a labile inhibitor of CFU-c proliferation with preferential action on granulopoiesis; (3) PGE; (4) proliferation inhibitors of BFU-E and GEMM; and (5) suppression of entry of CFU-S into DNA synthesis in vitro. It is postulated that the adventitial reticular cell (ARC) may play a major regulatory role in hemopoiesis through intramedullary production of the factors described. The nature of the signals that activate the genes in the ARC which are coded for the factors described is not known.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of cortical versus cancellous bone from mechanically-loaded murine tibiae reveals differential gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Natalie H; Schimenti, John C; Ross, F Patrick; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical loading is an anabolic stimulus that increases bone mass, and thus a promising method to counteract osteoporosis-related bone loss. The mechanism of this anabolism remains unclear, and needs to be established for both cortical and cancellous envelopes individually. We hypothesized that cortical and cancellous bone display different gene expression profiles at baseline and in response to mechanical loading. To test this hypothesis, the left tibiae of 10-week-old female C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to one session of axial tibial compression (9N, 1200cycles, 4Hz triangle waveform) and euthanized 3 and 24h following loading. The right limb served as the contralateral control. We performed RNA-seq on marrow-free metaphyseal samples from the cortical shell and the cancellous core to determine differential gene expression at baseline (control limb) and in response to load. Differential expression was verified with qPCR. Cortical and cancellous bone exhibited distinctly different transcriptional profiles basally and in response to mechanical loading. More genes were differentially expressed with loading at 24h with more genes downregulated at 24h than at 3h in both tissues. Enhanced Wnt signaling dominated the response in cortical bone at 3 and 24h, but in cancellous bone only at 3h. In cancellous bone at 24h many muscle-related genes were downregulated. These findings reveal key differences between cortical and cancellous genetic regulation in response to mechanical loading. Future studies at different time points and multiple loading sessions will add to our knowledge of cortical and cancellous mechanotransduction with the potential to identify new targets for mouse genetic knockout studies and drugs to treat osteoporosis. PMID:26876048

  10. Low intensity vibration mitigates tumor progression and protects bone quantity and quality in a murine model of myeloma.

    PubMed

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M; Chan, M Ete; Adler, Benjamin J; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Rubin, Janet; Bain, Steven D; Rubin, Clinton T

    2016-09-01

    Myeloma facilitates destruction of bone and marrow. Since physical activity encourages musculoskeletal preservation we evaluated whether low-intensity vibration (LIV), a means to deliver mechanical signals, could protect bone and marrow during myeloma progression. Immunocompromised-mice (n=25) were injected with human-myeloma cells, while 8 (AC) were saline-injected. Myeloma-injected mice (LIV; n=13) were subjected to daily-mechanical loading (15min/d; 0.3g @ 90Hz) while 12 (MM) were sham-handled. At 8w, femurs had 86% less trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) in MM than in AC, yet only a 21% decrease in LIV was observed in comparison to AC, reflecting a 76% increase versus MM. Cortical BV was 21% and 15% lower in MM and LIV, respectively, than in AC; LIV showing 30% improvement over MM. Similar outcomes were observed in the axial skeleton, showing a 35% loss in MM with a 27% improved retention of bone in the L5 of LIV-treated mice as compared to MM. Transcortical-perforations in the femur from myeloma-induced osteolysis were 9× higher in MM versus AC, reduced by 57% in LIV. Serum-TRACP5b, 61% greater in MM versus AC, rose by 33% in LIV compared to AC, a 45% reduction in activity when compared to MM. Histomorphometric analyses of femoral trabecular bone demonstrated a 70% elevation in eroded surfaces of MM versus AC, while measures in LIV were 58% below those in MM. 72% of marrow in the femur of MM mice contained tumor, contrasted by a 31% lower burden in LIV. MM mice (42%) presented advanced-stage necrosis of tibial marrow while present in just 8% of LIV. Myeloma infiltration inversely correlated to measures of bone quality, while LIV slowed the systemic, myeloma-associated decline in bone quality and inhibited tumor progression through the hindlimbs. PMID:27262776

  11. Bone mineral density in children and young adults with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B; Dagalakis, Urania; Sinaii, Ninet; Bornstein, Ethan; Kim, Aerang; Lokie, Kelsey B; Baldwin, Andrea M; Reynolds, James C; Dombi, Eva; Stratakis, Constantine A; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2012-12-01

    Concern for impaired bone health in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) has led to increased interest in bone densitometry in this population. Our study assessed bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) and whole-body bone mineral content (BMC)/height in pediatric patients with NF-1 with a high plexiform neurofibroma burden. Sixty-nine patients with NF-1 (age range 5.2-24.8; mean 13.7 ± 4.8 years) were studied. Hologic dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans (Hologic, Inc., Bedford, MA, USA) were performed on all patients. BMD was normalized to derive a reference volume by correcting for height through the use of the BMAD, as well as the BMC. BMAD of the lumbar spine (LS 2-4), femoral neck (FN), and total body BMC/height were measured and Z-scores were calculated. Impaired bone mineral density was defined as a Z-score ≤-2. Forty-seven percent of patients exhibited impaired bone mineral density at any bone site, with 36% at the LS, 18% at the FN, and 20% total BMC/height. BMAD Z-scores of the LS (-1.60 ± 1.26) were more impaired compared with both the FN (-0.54 ± 1.58; P=0.0003) and the whole-body BMC/height Z-scores (-1.16 ± 0.90; P=0.036). Plexiform neurofibroma burden was negatively correlated with LS BMAD (r(s)=-0.36, P=0.01). In pediatric and young adult patients with NF-1, LS BMAD was more severely affected than the FN BMAD or whole-body BMC/height.

  12. Bone disease in adult patients with β-thalassaemia major: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Marina; Forti, Stella; Orsatti, Alessandra; Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo; Airaghi, Lorena; Zanaboni, Laura; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2014-02-01

    Despite the extraordinary improvements carried out in diagnostic and therapeutic management of thalassaemia major over the past few decades, bone demineralization is still a common finding, even in optimally treated patients. The relationships between bone density and several clinical characteristics or hematological markers have been described, and many factors contributing to demineralization have been identified; among them endocrine complications seem to play an important role. Nevertheless, the complex etiological mechanisms of this heterogeneous osteopathy still remains incompletely clarified. While previous studies focused on the characteristics of thalassaemic patients affected from bone demineralization, we conducted a case-control study focused on thalassaemic patients free from bone disease, aimed to detect the distinctive characteristics and any possible protective feature. Among a large cohort of 150 adult patients with β-thalassaemia major, we enrolled 20 patients with normal bone mineralization and 20 patients with osteoporosis matched for gender, BMI, age at first transfusion, serum ferritin and pre-transfusional hemoglobin (Hb) levels. The differences in demographic, clinical and endocrinological profiles were investigated, correcting for physical and hematological features known as confounding variables. The comparison of the two groups for biochemical parameters and endocrine function showed a protective role of normal gonadic function and IGF-1 levels against osteoporosis, and a similar influence of hypoparathyroidism. Treatment-corrected hypothyroidism and diabetes seemed not to affect bone mineralization. In conclusion, from a different perspective our results corroborate the role of endocrinopathies in thalassaemic osteopathy, and once again underline the crucial importance of an early and multi-disciplinary intervention in preventing bone complications in thalassaemic patients. PMID:22179745

  13. The negative effect of prolonged somatotrophic/insulin signaling on an adult bone marrow-residing population of pluripotent very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs).

    PubMed

    Kucia, Magda; Masternak, Michal; Liu, Riu; Shin, Dong-Myung; Ratajczak, Janina; Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Spong, Adam; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that attenuated insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) has a positive effect on longevity in several animal species, including mice. Here, we demonstrate that a population of murine pluripotent very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) that reside in bone marrow (BM) is protected from premature depletion during aging by intrinsic parental gene imprinting mechanisms and the level of circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Accordingly, an increase in the circulating level of IGF-I, as seen in short-lived bovine growth hormone (bGH)-expressing transgenic mice, which age prematurely, as well as in wild-type animals injected for 2 months with bGH, leads to accelerated depletion of VSELs from bone marrow (BM). In contrast, long-living GHR-null or Ames dwarf mice, which have very low levels of circulating IGF-I, exhibit a significantly higher number of VSELs in BM than their littermates at the same age. However, the number of VSELs in these animals decreases after GH or IGF-I treatment. These changes in the level of plasma-circulating IGF-I corroborate with changes in the genomic imprinting status of crucial genes involved in IIS, such as Igf-2-H19, RasGRF1, and Ig2R. Thus, we propose that a chronic increase in IIS contributes to aging by premature depletion of pluripotent VSELs in adult tissues. PMID:22218782

  14. Teriparatide Increases Bone Formation and Bone Mineral Density in Adult Women With Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Irene S.; Miller, Karen K.; Herzog, David B.; Misra, Madhusmita; Lee, Hang; Finkelstein, Joel S.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Context: Anorexia nervosa (AN), a prevalent psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting women, is characterized by self-induced starvation and low body weight. Increased clinical fractures are common, and most women have low bone mineral density (BMD). Previously investigated treatments have led to no or modest increases in BMD in AN. Objective: Our objective was to investigate the effect of teriparatide (TPT; human PTH[1–34]), an anabolic agent, on low bone mass in women with AN. Design, Setting, and Patients: This randomized, placebo-controlled trial at a clinical research center included 21 women with AN: 10 (mean age ± SEM, 47 ± 2.7 years) treated with TPT and 11 (47.1 ± 2.3 years) treated with placebo. Interventions: TPT (20 μg SC) or placebo was administered for 6 months. Main Outcome Measures: Our primary outcome measure was change in BMD of the spine and hip by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Secondary outcome measures included changes in serum N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP), C-terminal collagen cross-links, sclerostin, and IGF-1 levels. Results: At 6 months, spine BMD increased significantly more with TPT (posteroanterior spine, 6.0% ± 1.4%; lateral spine, 10.5% ± 2.5%) compared with placebo (posteroanterior spine, 0.2% ± 0.7%, P < .01; lateral spine, −0.6% ± 1.0%; P < .01). The results remained significant after controlling for baseline body mass index, P1NP, and IGF-1. Changes in femoral neck (P = .4) and total hip (P = 0.8) BMD were comparable in both groups, as were changes in weight. Serum P1NP levels increased after 3 months of TPT treatment and remained at this higher level at 6 months, whereas P1NP levels were unchanged in the placebo group (P = .02). TPT was well-tolerated by all subjects. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that TPT administration increases spine BMD substantially after only 6 months of therapy in women with AN. PMID:24456286

  15. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using (211)At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Johnnie J; Bäck, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Frayo, Shani L; Hylarides, Mark D; Green, Damian J; Gopal, Ajay K; Press, Oliver W; Pagel, John M

    2013-05-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using monoclonal antibodies labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse. β emitters are limited by lower energies and nonspecific cytotoxicity from longer path lengths compared with α emitters such as (211)At, which has a higher energy profile and shorter path length. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT using (211)At in a disseminated murine AML model. Biodistribution studies in leukemic SJL/J mice showed excellent localization of (211)At-anti-murine CD45 mAb (30F11) to marrow and spleen within 24 hours (18% and 79% injected dose per gram of tissue [ID/g], respectively), with lower kidney and lung uptake (8.4% and 14% ID/g, respectively). In syngeneic HSCT studies, (211)At-B10-30F11 RIT improved the median survival of leukemic mice in a dose-dependent fashion (123, 101, 61, and 37 days given 24, 20, 12, and 0 µCi, respectively). This approach had minimal toxicity with nadir white blood cell counts >2.7 K/µL 2 weeks after HSCT and recovery by 4 weeks. These data suggest that (211)At-anti-CD45 RIT in conjunction with HSCT may be a promising therapeutic option for AML. PMID:23471305

  16. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Bäck, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani L.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using monoclonal antibodies labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse. β emitters are limited by lower energies and nonspecific cytotoxicity from longer path lengths compared with α emitters such as 211At, which has a higher energy profile and shorter path length. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT using 211At in a disseminated murine AML model. Biodistribution studies in leukemic SJL/J mice showed excellent localization of 211At-anti-murine CD45 mAb (30F11) to marrow and spleen within 24 hours (18% and 79% injected dose per gram of tissue [ID/g], respectively), with lower kidney and lung uptake (8.4% and 14% ID/g, respectively). In syngeneic HSCT studies, 211At-B10-30F11 RIT improved the median survival of leukemic mice in a dose-dependent fashion (123, 101, 61, and 37 days given 24, 20, 12, and 0 µCi, respectively). This approach had minimal toxicity with nadir white blood cell counts >2.7 K/µL 2 weeks after HSCT and recovery by 4 weeks. These data suggest that 211At-anti-CD45 RIT in conjunction with HSCT may be a promising therapeutic option for AML. PMID:23471305

  17. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using (211)At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Johnnie J; Bäck, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Frayo, Shani L; Hylarides, Mark D; Green, Damian J; Gopal, Ajay K; Press, Oliver W; Pagel, John M

    2013-05-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using monoclonal antibodies labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse. β emitters are limited by lower energies and nonspecific cytotoxicity from longer path lengths compared with α emitters such as (211)At, which has a higher energy profile and shorter path length. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT using (211)At in a disseminated murine AML model. Biodistribution studies in leukemic SJL/J mice showed excellent localization of (211)At-anti-murine CD45 mAb (30F11) to marrow and spleen within 24 hours (18% and 79% injected dose per gram of tissue [ID/g], respectively), with lower kidney and lung uptake (8.4% and 14% ID/g, respectively). In syngeneic HSCT studies, (211)At-B10-30F11 RIT improved the median survival of leukemic mice in a dose-dependent fashion (123, 101, 61, and 37 days given 24, 20, 12, and 0 µCi, respectively). This approach had minimal toxicity with nadir white blood cell counts >2.7 K/µL 2 weeks after HSCT and recovery by 4 weeks. These data suggest that (211)At-anti-CD45 RIT in conjunction with HSCT may be a promising therapeutic option for AML.

  18. Constrained tibial vibration does not produce an anabolic bone response in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Blaine A; Kotiya, Akhilesh A; Silva, Matthew J

    2009-10-01

    and exposure to anesthesia was associated with significant loss of trabecular and cortical bone. We conclude that direct vibrational loading of bone in anesthetized, adult mice is not anabolic.

  19. Constrained tibial vibration does not produce an anabolic bone response in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Blaine A; Kotiya, Akhilesh A; Silva, Matthew J

    2009-10-01

    and exposure to anesthesia was associated with significant loss of trabecular and cortical bone. We conclude that direct vibrational loading of bone in anesthetized, adult mice is not anabolic. PMID:19576309

  20. Conditional Knockout of Myocyte Focal Adhesion Kinase Abrogates Ischemic Preconditioning in Adult Murine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Perricone, Adam J.; Bivona, Benjamin J.; Jackson, Fannie R.; Vander Heide, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the importance of a cytoskeletal‐based survival signaling pathway using in vitro models of ischemia/reperfusion (IR). However, the importance of this pathway in mediating stress‐elicited survival signaling in vivo is unknown. Methods and Results The essential cytoskeletal signaling pathway member focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was selectively deleted in adult cardiac myocytes using a tamoxifen‐inducible Cre‐Lox system (α‐MHC‐MerCreMer). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot were performed to confirm FAK knockout (KO). All mice were subjected to a 40‐minute coronary occlusion followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Ischemic preconditioning (IP) was performed using a standard protocol. Control groups included wild‐type (WT) and tamoxifen‐treated α‐MHC‐MerCreMer+/−/FAKWT/WT (experimental control) mice. Infarct size was expressed as a percentage of the risk region. In WT mice IP significantly enhanced the expression of activated/phosphorylated FAK by 36.3% compared to WT mice subjected to a sham experimental protocol (P≤0.05; n=6 hearts [sham], n=4 hearts [IP]). IP significantly reduced infarct size in both WT and experimental control mice (43.7% versus 19.8%; P≤0.001; 44.7% versus 17.5%; P≤0.001, respectively). No difference in infarct size was observed between preconditioned FAK KO and nonpreconditioned controls (37.1% versus 43.7% versus 44.7%; FAK KO versus WT versus experimental control; P=NS). IP elicited a 67.2%/88.8% increase in activated phosphatidylinositol‐3‐kinase (PI3K) p85/activated Akt expression in WT mice, but failed to enhance the expression of either in preconditioned FAK KO mice. Conclusions Our results indicate that FAK is an essential mediator of IP‐elicited cardioprotection and provide further support for the hypothesis that cytoskeletal‐based signaling is an important component of stress‐elicited survival signaling. PMID:24080910

  1. Nanogel-crosslinked nanoparticles increase the inhibitory effects of W9 synthetic peptide on bone loss in a murine bone resorption model.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshimi; Alles, Neil; Khan, Masud; Nagano, Kenichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Tamura, Yukihiko; Shimoda, Asako; Ohya, Keiichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the biological activity of W9, a bone resorption inhibitor peptide, using NanoClik nanoparticles as an injectable carrier, where acryloyl group-modified cholesterol-bearing pullulan (CHPOA) nanogels were crosslinked by pentaerythritol tetra (mercaptoethyl) polyoxyethylene. Thirty 5-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low calcium diet and received once-daily subcutaneous injections of the carrier alone, W9 24 mg/kg/day alone, W9 24 mg/kg/day incorporated in cholesterol bearing pullulan (CHP) nanogels, or W9 (8 and 24 mg/kg/day) incorporated in NanoClik nanoparticles for 4 days (n=5). Mice that received a normal calcium diet with NanoClik nanoparticle injections without W9 were used as a control group. Radiological analyses showed that administration of W9 24 mg/kg/day significantly prevented low calcium-induced reduction of bone mineral density in the long bones and lumbar vertebrae, but only when the NanoClik nanoparticles were used as a carrier. Histomorphometric analyses of the proximal tibiae revealed that W9 24 mg/kg/day incorporated in NanoClik nanoparticles prevented the increase in bone resorption indices induced by a low calcium diet, which was confirmed by measurement of serum bone resorption markers. These data suggest that NanoClik nanoparticles could be a useful carrier for peptide therapeutics, and also demonstrate that daily subcutaneous injections of the W9 peptide with the nanoparticles were able to inhibit bone loss in vivo. An osteoclastogenesis inhibition assay performed in vitro confirmed a slower release profile of W9 from NanoClik nanoparticles compared with conventional CHP nanogels. PMID:25999711

  2. Nanogel-crosslinked nanoparticles increase the inhibitory effects of W9 synthetic peptide on bone loss in a murine bone resorption model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Toshimi; Alles, Neil; Khan, Masud; Nagano, Kenichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Tamura, Yukihiko; Shimoda, Asako; Ohya, Keiichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the biological activity of W9, a bone resorption inhibitor peptide, using NanoClik nanoparticles as an injectable carrier, where acryloyl group-modified cholesterol-bearing pullulan (CHPOA) nanogels were crosslinked by pentaerythritol tetra (mercaptoethyl) polyoxyethylene. Thirty 5-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low calcium diet and received once-daily subcutaneous injections of the carrier alone, W9 24 mg/kg/day alone, W9 24 mg/kg/day incorporated in cholesterol bearing pullulan (CHP) nanogels, or W9 (8 and 24 mg/kg/day) incorporated in NanoClik nanoparticles for 4 days (n=5). Mice that received a normal calcium diet with NanoClik nanoparticle injections without W9 were used as a control group. Radiological analyses showed that administration of W9 24 mg/kg/day significantly prevented low calcium-induced reduction of bone mineral density in the long bones and lumbar vertebrae, but only when the NanoClik nanoparticles were used as a carrier. Histomorphometric analyses of the proximal tibiae revealed that W9 24 mg/kg/day incorporated in NanoClik nanoparticles prevented the increase in bone resorption indices induced by a low calcium diet, which was confirmed by measurement of serum bone resorption markers. These data suggest that NanoClik nanoparticles could be a useful carrier for peptide therapeutics, and also demonstrate that daily subcutaneous injections of the W9 peptide with the nanoparticles were able to inhibit bone loss in vivo. An osteoclastogenesis inhibition assay performed in vitro confirmed a slower release profile of W9 from NanoClik nanoparticles compared with conventional CHP nanogels. PMID:25999711

  3. Nanogel-crosslinked nanoparticles increase the inhibitory effects of W9 synthetic peptide on bone loss in a murine bone resorption model.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshimi; Alles, Neil; Khan, Masud; Nagano, Kenichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Tamura, Yukihiko; Shimoda, Asako; Ohya, Keiichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the biological activity of W9, a bone resorption inhibitor peptide, using NanoClik nanoparticles as an injectable carrier, where acryloyl group-modified cholesterol-bearing pullulan (CHPOA) nanogels were crosslinked by pentaerythritol tetra (mercaptoethyl) polyoxyethylene. Thirty 5-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low calcium diet and received once-daily subcutaneous injections of the carrier alone, W9 24 mg/kg/day alone, W9 24 mg/kg/day incorporated in cholesterol bearing pullulan (CHP) nanogels, or W9 (8 and 24 mg/kg/day) incorporated in NanoClik nanoparticles for 4 days (n=5). Mice that received a normal calcium diet with NanoClik nanoparticle injections without W9 were used as a control group. Radiological analyses showed that administration of W9 24 mg/kg/day significantly prevented low calcium-induced reduction of bone mineral density in the long bones and lumbar vertebrae, but only when the NanoClik nanoparticles were used as a carrier. Histomorphometric analyses of the proximal tibiae revealed that W9 24 mg/kg/day incorporated in NanoClik nanoparticles prevented the increase in bone resorption indices induced by a low calcium diet, which was confirmed by measurement of serum bone resorption markers. These data suggest that NanoClik nanoparticles could be a useful carrier for peptide therapeutics, and also demonstrate that daily subcutaneous injections of the W9 peptide with the nanoparticles were able to inhibit bone loss in vivo. An osteoclastogenesis inhibition assay performed in vitro confirmed a slower release profile of W9 from NanoClik nanoparticles compared with conventional CHP nanogels.

  4. Borage and fish oils lifelong supplementation decreases inflammation and improves bone health in a murine model of senile osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Wauquier, Fabien; Barquissau, Valentin; Léotoing, Laurent; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Mercier, Sylvie; Philippe, Claire; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Morio, Béatrice; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique

    2012-02-01

    Fats are prevalent in western diets; they have known deleterious effects on muscle insulin resistance and may contribute to bone loss. However, relationships between fatty acids and locomotor system dysfunctions in elderly population remain controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of fatty acid quality on the age related evolution of the locomotor system and to understand which aging mechanisms are involved. In order to analyze age related complications, the SAMP8 mouse strain was chosen as a progeria model as compared to the SAMR1 control strain. Then, two months old mice were divided in different groups and subjected to the following diets : (1) standard "growth" diet - (2) "sunflower" diet (high ω6/ω3 ratio) - (3) "borage" diet (high γ-linolenic acid) - (4) "fish" diet (high in long chain ω3). Mice were fed ad libitum through the whole protocol. At 12 months old, the mice were sacrificed and tissues were harvested for bone studies, fat and muscle mass measures, inflammation parameters and bone cell marker expression. We demonstrated for the first time that borage and fish diets restored inflammation and bone parameters using an original model of senile osteoporosis that mimics clinical features of aging in humans. Therefore, our study strongly encourages nutritional approaches as relevant and promising strategies for preventing aged-related locomotor dysfunctions. PMID:21664309

  5. Borage and fish oils lifelong supplementation decreases inflammation and improves bone health in a murine model of senile osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Wauquier, Fabien; Barquissau, Valentin; Léotoing, Laurent; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Mercier, Sylvie; Philippe, Claire; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Morio, Béatrice; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique

    2012-02-01

    Fats are prevalent in western diets; they have known deleterious effects on muscle insulin resistance and may contribute to bone loss. However, relationships between fatty acids and locomotor system dysfunctions in elderly population remain controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of fatty acid quality on the age related evolution of the locomotor system and to understand which aging mechanisms are involved. In order to analyze age related complications, the SAMP8 mouse strain was chosen as a progeria model as compared to the SAMR1 control strain. Then, two months old mice were divided in different groups and subjected to the following diets : (1) standard "growth" diet - (2) "sunflower" diet (high ω6/ω3 ratio) - (3) "borage" diet (high γ-linolenic acid) - (4) "fish" diet (high in long chain ω3). Mice were fed ad libitum through the whole protocol. At 12 months old, the mice were sacrificed and tissues were harvested for bone studies, fat and muscle mass measures, inflammation parameters and bone cell marker expression. We demonstrated for the first time that borage and fish diets restored inflammation and bone parameters using an original model of senile osteoporosis that mimics clinical features of aging in humans. Therefore, our study strongly encourages nutritional approaches as relevant and promising strategies for preventing aged-related locomotor dysfunctions.

  6. Raman spectroscopy delineates radiation-induced injury and partial rescue by amifostine in bone: a murine mandibular model

    PubMed Central

    Felice, Peter A.; Gong, Bo; Ahsan, Salman; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Nelson, Noah S.; Donneys, Alexis; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine; Morris, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite its therapeutic role in head and neck cancer, radiation administration degrades the biomechanical properties of bone and can lead to pathologic fracture and osteoradionecrosis. Our laboratories have previously demonstrated that prophylactic amifostine administration preserves the biomechanical properties of irradiated bone and that Raman spectroscopy accurately evaluates bone composition ex vivo. As such, we hypothesize that Raman spectroscopy can offer insight into the temporal and mechanical effects of both irradiation and amifostine administration on bone to potentially predict and even prevent radiation-induced injury. Male Sprague–Dawley rats (350–400 g) were randomized into control, radiation exposure (XRT), and amifostine pre-treatment/radiation exposure groups (AMF-XRT). Irradiated animals received fractionated 70 Gy radiation to the left hemi-mandible, while AMF-XRT animals received amifostine just prior to radiation. Hemi-mandibles were harvested at 18 weeks after radiation, analyzed via Raman spectroscopy, and compared with specimens previously harvested at 8 weeks after radiation. Mineral (ρ958) and collagen (ρ1665) depolarization ratios were significantly lower in XRT specimens than in AMF-XRT and control specimens at both 8 and 18 weeks. amifostine administration resulted in a full return of mineral and collagen depolarization ratios to normal levels at 18 weeks. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates radiation-induced damage to the chemical composition and ultrastructure of bone while amifostine prophylaxis results in a recovery towards normal, native mineral and collagen composition and orientation. These findings have the potential to impact on clinical evaluations and interventions by preventing or detecting radiation-induced injury in patients requiring radiotherapy as part of a treatment regimen. PMID:25319554

  7. In vivo tungsten exposure alters B-cell development and increases DNA damage in murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Alexander D R; Lemaire, Maryse; Young, Yoon Kow; Eustache, Jules H; Guilbert, Cynthia; Molina, Manuel Flores; Mann, Koren K

    2013-02-01

    High environmental tungsten levels were identified near the site of a childhood pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cluster; however, a causal link between tungsten and leukemogenesis has not been established. The major site of tungsten deposition is bone, the site of B-cell development. In addition, our in vitro data suggest that developing B lymphocytes are susceptible to tungsten-induced DNA damage and growth inhibition. To extend these results, we assessed whether tungsten exposure altered B-cell development and induced DNA damage in vivo. Wild-type mice were exposed to tungsten in their drinking water for up to 16 weeks. Tungsten concentration in bone was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and correlated with B-cell development and DNA damage within the bone marrow. Tungsten exposure resulted in a rapid deposition within the bone following 1 week, and tungsten continued to accumulate thereafter albeit at a decreased rate. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a transient increase in mature IgD(+) B cells in the first 8 weeks of treatment, in animals of the highest and intermediate exposure groups. Following 16 weeks of exposure, all tungsten groups had a significantly greater percentage of cells in the late pro-/large pre-B developmental stages. DNA damage was increased in both whole marrow and isolated B cells, most notably at the lowest tungsten concentration tested. These findings confirm an immunological effect of tungsten exposure and suggest that tungsten could act as a tumor promoter, providing leukemic "hits" in multiple forms to developing B lymphocytes within the bone marrow.

  8. Prenatal and early postnatal stress exposure influences long bone length in adult rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Dancause, Kelsey Needham; Cao, Xiu Jing; Veru, Franz; Xu, Susan; Long, Hong; Yu, Chunbo; Laplante, David P.; Walker, Claire Dominique; King, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Stress during the prenatal and early postnatal periods (perinatal stress, PS) is known to impact offspring cognitive, behavioral, and physical development, but effects on skeletal growth are not clear. Our objective was to analyze effects of variable, mild, daily PS exposure on adult offspring long bone length. Twelve pregnant rat dams were randomly assigned to receive variable stress from gestational days 14-21 (Prenatal group), postpartum days 2-9 (Postnatal), both periods (Pre-Post), or no stress (Control). Differences in adult offspring tibia and femur length were analyzed among treatment groups. Mean tibia length differed among groups for males (p=0.016) and females (p=0.009), and differences for femur length approached significance for males (p=0.051). Long bone length was shorter among PS-exposed offspring, especially those exposed to postnatal stress (Postnatal and Pre-Post groups). Results persisted when controlling for nose-tail length. These differences might reflect early stunting that is maintained in adulthood, or delayed growth among PS-exposed offspring. This study suggests that PS results in shorter long bones in adulthood, independently of effects on overall body size. Stunting and growth retardation are major global health burdens. Our study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that PS is a risk factor for poor linear growth. PMID:22826037

  9. Identification and Characterization of Lineage(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) VSEL Phenotypic Cells Residing in Adult Mouse Bone Tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Ryusuke; Iwaki, Ryuji; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Sumide, Keisuke; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Yutaka; Uemura, Yasushi; Asano, Hiroaki; Kwon, A-Hon; Sonoda, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Murine bone marrow (BM)-derived very small embryonic-like stem cells (BM VSELs), defined by a lineage-negative (Lin(-)), CD45-negative (CD45(-)), Sca-1-positive (Sca-1(+)) immunophenotype, were previously reported as postnatal pluripotent stem cells (SCs). We developed a highly efficient method for isolating Lin(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) small cells using enzymatic treatment of murine bone. We designated these cells as bone-derived VSELs (BD VSELs). The incidences of BM VSELs in the BM-derived nucleated cells and that of BD VSELs in bone-derived nucleated cells were 0.002% and 0.15%, respectively. These BD VSELs expressed a variety of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), and endothelial cell markers. The gene expression profile of the BD VSELs was clearly distinct from those of HSCs, MSCs, and ES cells. In the steady state, the BD VSELs proliferated slowly, however, the number of BD VSELs significantly increased in the bone after acute liver injury. Moreover, green fluorescent protein-mouse derived BD VSELs transplanted via tail vein injection after acute liver injury were detected in the liver parenchyma of recipient mice. Immunohistological analyses suggested that these BD VSELs might transdifferentiate into hepatocytes. This study demonstrated that the majority of the Lin(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) VSEL phenotypic cells reside in the bone rather than the BM. However, the immunophenotype and the gene expression profile of BD VSELs were clearly different from those of other types of SCs, including BM VSELs, MSCs, HSCs, and ES cells. Further studies will therefore be required to elucidate their cellular and/or SC characteristics and the potential relationship between BD VSELs and BM VSELs.

  10. Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Kensi M.; Stuart, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults. Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 dB normal hearing level…

  11. Trends in Bone Mineral Density in Young Adults with Cystic Fibrosis over a 15 Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Putman, Melissa S.; Baker, Joshua F.; Uluer, Ahmet; Herlyn, Karen; Lapey, Allen; Sicilian, Leonard; Tillotson, Angela Pizzo; Gordon, Catherine M.; Merkel, Peter A.; Finkelstein, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Improvements in clinical care have led to increased life expectancy in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) over the past several decades. Whether these improvements have had significant effects on bone health in patients with CF is unclear. Methods This is a cross-sectional study comparing clinical characteristics and bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in adults with CF evaluated in 1995–1999 to age-, race-, and gender matched patients with CF evaluated in 2011–2013 at the same center on calibrated DXA machines. Results The cohorts were similar in terms of age, BMI, pancreatic insufficiency, presence of F508del mutation, and reproductive history. In the most recent cohort, pulmonary function was superior, and fewer patients had vitamin D deficiency or secondary hyperparathyroidism. Areal BMD measures of the PA spine, lateral spine, and distal radius were similarly low in the two cohorts. Conclusions Although pulmonary function and vitamin D status were better in patients in the present-day cohort, areal BMD of the spine was reduced in a significant number of patients and was no different in patients with CF today than in the late 1990s. Further attention to optimizing bone health may be necessary to prevent CF-related bone disease. PMID:25698451

  12. Prevention of Lethal Murine Hypophosphatasia by Neonatal Ex Vivo Gene Therapy Using Lentivirally Transduced Bone Marrow Cells.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Osamu; Miyake, Koichi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Miyake, Noriko; Igarashi, Tsutomu; Kanokoda, Chizu; Nakamura-Takahashi, Aki; Kinoshita, Hideaki; Noguchi, Taku; Abe, Shinichi; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Okada, Takashi; Shimada, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited skeletal and dental disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP). The major symptoms of severe forms of the disease are bone defects, respiratory insufficiency, and epileptic seizures. In 2015, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using recombinant bone-targeted TNALP with deca-aspartate (D10) motif was approved to treat pediatric HPP patients in Japan, Canada, and Europe. However, the ERT requires repeated subcutaneous administration of the enzyme because of the short half-life in serum. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of neonatal ex vivo gene therapy in TNALP knockout (Akp2(-/-)) HPP mice using lentivirally transduced bone marrow cells (BMC) expressing bone-targeted TNALP in which a D10 sequence was linked to the C-terminus of soluble TNALP (TNALP-D10). The Akp2(-/-) mice usually die within 20 days because of growth failure, epileptic seizures, and hypomineralization. However, an intravenous transplantation of BMC expressing TNALP-D10 (ALP-BMC) into neonatal Akp2(-/-) mice prolonged survival of the mice with improved bone mineralization compared with untransduced BMC-transplanted Akp2(-/-) mice. The treated Akp2(-/-) mice were normal in appearance and experienced no seizures during the experimental period. The lentivirally transduced BMC were efficiently engrafted in the recipient mice and supplied TNALP-D10 continuously at a therapeutic level for at least 3 months. Moreover, TNALP-D10 overexpression did not affect multilineage reconstitution in the recipient mice. The plasma ALP activity was sustained at high levels in the treated mice, and tissue ALP activity was selectively detected on bone surfaces, not in the kidneys or other organs. No ectopic calcification was observed in the ALP-BMC-treated mice. These results indicate that lentivirally transduced BMC can serve as a reservoir for stem cell-based ERT to rescue the Akp2

  13. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  14. Molecular changes in bone marrow, tumor and serum after conductive ablation of murine 4T1 breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Beata D; Shafirstein, Gal; Vishal, Sagar J; Dennis, Richard A; Griffin, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Thermal ablation of solid tumors using conductive interstitial thermal therapy (CITT) produces coagulative necrosis in the center of ablation. Local changes in homeostasis for surviving tumor and systemic changes in circulation and distant organs must be understood and monitored in order to prevent tumor re-growth and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to use a mouse carcinoma model to evaluate molecular changes in the bone marrow and surviving tumor after CITT treatment by quantification of transcripts associated with cancer progression and hyperthermia, serum cytokines, stress proteins and the marrow/tumor cross-talk regulator stromal-derived factor 1. Analysis of 27 genes and 22 proteins with quantitative PCR, ELISA, immunoblotting and multiplex antibody assays revealed that the gene and protein expression in tissue and serum was significantly different between ablated and control mice. The transcripts of four genes (Cxcl12, Sele, Fgf2, Lifr) were significantly higher in the bone marrow of treated mice. Tumors surviving ablation showed significantly lower levels of the Lifr and Sele transcripts. Similarly, the majority of transcripts measured in tumors decreased with treatment. Surviving tumors also contained lower levels of SDF-1α and HIF-1α proteins whereas HSP27 and HSP70 were higher. Of 16 serum chemokines, IFNγ and GM-CSF levels were lower with treatment. These results indicate that CITT ablation causes molecular changes which may slow cancer cell proliferation. However, inhibition of HSP27 may be necessary to control aggressiveness of surviving cancer stem cells. The changes in bone marrow are suggestive of possible increased recruitment of circulatory cancer cells. Therefore, the possibility of heightened bone metastasis after thermal ablation needs to be further investigated and inhibition strategies developed, if warranted.

  15. Provocation of skin graft rejection across murine class II differences by non--bone-marrow-derived cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, P.M.; Beck-Maier, B.; Melvold, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    We have evaluated the relative contribution of bone-marrow-derived cells to skin allograft immunogenicity in mice differing only at class II major histocompatibility genes by using bone marrow radiation chimeras as donors. The mouse strains used were C57BL/6Kh (B6) and B6.C-H-2bm12 (bm12), which differ only at at A beta gene of the I region of the mouse H-2 complex. Our results demonstrated that skin from (B6----bm12) chimeras was accepted by bm12 recipients and rejected by B6 mice in a manner indistinguishable from that of normal bm12 skin. Likewise, naive bm12 mice rejected (bm12----B6) chimeric skin and normal B6 skin equally well, and B6 animals accepted both types of skin grafts. Our data argues that the donor cell-type leading to graft rejection across limited I region differences is not of bone marrow origin, and that these cells must--at least under certain circumstances--express class II antigens.

  16. Role of regulatory T cells in transferable immunological tolerance to bone marrow donor in murine mixed chimerism model.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Il-Hee; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, You-sun; Shin, Jun-Seop; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2013-12-01

    Constructing a bone marrow chimera prior to graft transplantation can induce donor-specific immune tolerance. Mixed chimerism containing hematopoietic cells of both recipient- and donor-origin has advantages attributed from low dose of total body irradiation. In this study, we explored the mechanism of mixed chimerism supplemented with depletion of Natural Killer cells. Mixed chimerism with C57BL/6 bone marrow cells was induced in recipient BALB/c mice which were given 450 cGy of γ-ray irradiation (n = 16). As revealed by reduced proliferation and cytokine production in mixed leukocyte reaction and ELISpot assay (24.6 vs 265.5), the allo-immune response to bone marrow donor was reduced. Furthermore, the induction of transferable immunological tolerance was confirmed by adoptive transfer and subsequent acceptance of C57BL/6 skin graft (n = 4). CD4(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells were increased in the recipient compartment of the mixed chimera (19.2% → 33.8%). This suggests that regulatory T cells may be therapeutically used for the induction of graft-specific tolerance by mixed chimerism.

  17. Bone mineral density of vegetarian and non-vegetarian adults in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuh-Feng; Chiu, Jainn-Shiun; Chuang, Mei-Hua; Chiu, Jing-Er; Lin, Chin-Lon

    2008-01-01

    Diet is thought to be one of the leading causes of bone mineral loss in aging people. In this study, we explored the potential impact of a vegetarian diet on bone mineral density (BMD) in adult Taiwanese men and women. This was a cross-sectional study of the relationship between diet (vegetarian versus non-vegetarian) and BMD and the incidence of osteoporosis. Bone mineral density was determined in a cohort of 1865 adult male and female patients who underwent routine examination in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan between February 2003 and February 2004. Subjects with definite vertebral problems, known osteopathy, or poor posture were excluded. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was used to determine BMD, on the right hip in men and on lumbar vertebrae L2 to L4 in women. The subjects were grouped according to sex and diet, and were then stratified by age within each of the four groups. The outcome measures were the BMD value and the incidence of osteopenia or osteoporosis according to defined criteria. Bone mineral density gradually declined with increasing age in Taiwanese men, while Taiwanese women showed a precipitous decrease in BMD after the 5th decade. However, no statistical differences in BMD were observed between vegetarians and non-vegetarians of either sex. The proportion of subjects with osteopenia or osteoporosis also appeared comparable between vegetarians and non-vegetarians of either sex. BMD shows an age-related decline in Taiwanese men and women, and eating a vegetarian diet does not appear to affect this decline.

  18. IL-1 alpha beta blockade prevents cartilage and bone destruction in murine type II collagen-induced arthritis, whereas TNF-alpha blockade only ameliorates joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Joosten, L A; Helsen, M M; Saxne, T; van De Loo, F A; Heinegard, D; van Den Berg, W B

    1999-11-01

    Anti-TNF-alpha treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients markedly suppresses inflammatory disease activity, but so far no tissue-protective effects have been reported. In contrast, blockade of IL-1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients, by an IL-1 receptor antagonist, was only moderately effective in suppressing inflammatory symptoms but appeared to reduce the rate of progression of joint destruction. We therefore used an established collagen II murine arthritis model (collagen-induced arthritis(CIA)) to study effects on joint structures of neutralization of either TNF-alpha or IL-1. Both soluble TNF binding protein and anti-IL-1 treatment ameliorated disease activity when applied shortly after onset of CIA. Serum analysis revealed that early anti-TNF-alpha treatment of CIA did not decrease the process in the cartilage, as indicated by the elevated COMP levels. In contrast, anti-IL-1 treatment of established CIA normalized COMP levels, apparently alleviating the process in the tissue. Histology of knee and ankle joints corroborated the finding and showed that cartilage and joint destruction was significantly decreased after anti-IL-1 treatment but was hardly affected by anti-TNF-alpha treatment. Radiographic analysis of knee and ankle joints revealed that bone erosions were prevented by anti-IL-1 treatment, whereas the anti-TNF-alpha-treated animals exhibited changes comparable to the controls. In line with these findings, metalloproteinase activity, visualized by VDIPEN production, was almost absent throughout the cartilage layers in anti-IL-1-treated animals, whereas massive VDIPEN appearance was found in control and sTNFbp-treated mice. These results indicate that blocking of IL-1 is a cartilage- and bone-protective therapy in destructive arthritis, whereas the TNF-alpha antagonist has little effect on tissue destruction.

  19. Correlation of vitamin D, bone mineral density and parathyroid hormone levels in adults with low bone density

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil; Jammula, Sruti; Kota, Siva; Meher, Lalit; Modi, Kirtikumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bone mineral densiy (BMD) is known to be affected by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels. Indian data pertinent to above observation is scant. Our study aimed to investigate the relationships between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels and bone mineral density (BMD) in a cohort of Indian patients. Materials and Methods: Adults with or without fragility fractures with low BMD at the hip or lumbar spine were evaluated clinically along with laboratory investigations. T-scores of the hip and spine were derived from BMD-DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Multivariate regression models were used to investigate the relationships between serum 25(OH) D, iPTH and BMD. Results: Total of 102 patients (male:female = 38:64) with a mean age of 62.5 ± 6.4 years were included in the study. Forty-four patients had osteopenia. Osteoporosis was present in 58 patients. The mean values for serum 25(OH) D and iPTH levels were 21.3 ± 0.5 ng/ml and 53.1 ± 22.3 pg/ml, respectively. In 84.3% of patients, serum 25(OH) D levels were below 30 ng/ml (Normal = 30-74 ng/ml), confirming vitamin D deficiency. There was no association between 25(OH) D levels and BMD at the hip or lumbar spine (P = 0.473 and 0.353, respectively). Both at the hip and lumbar spine; iPTH levels, male gender, body mass index (BMI) and age were found to be significant predictors of BMD. Patients with higher BMI had significantly lower BMD and T-score. At levels <30 ng/ml, 25(OH) D was negatively associated with iPTH (P = 0.041). Conclusion: Among our cohort of patients with low BMD, no direct relationship between serum 25(OH) D levels and BMD was observed. However, a negative correlation between iPTH and 25(OH) D at serum 25(OH) D concentrations <30 ng/ml. Serum iPTH levels showed a significant negative association with BMD at the hip and lumbar spine. Our findings underscore the critical role of

  20. The triterpenoid CDDO-Me delays murine acute graft-versus-host disease with the preservation of graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghui; Sun, Kai; Redelman, Doug; Welniak, Lisbeth A.; Murphy, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and tumor relapse represent the two major obstacles impeding the efficacy of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in cancer. We have previously shown that the synthetic triterpenoid CDDO can inhibit murine early acute GVHD but anti-tumor effects were not assessed. In the current study, we found that a new derivative of CDDO, CDDO-Me, had an increased ability to inhibit allogeneic T cell responses and induce cell death of alloreactive T cells in vitro. Administration of CDDO-Me to mice following allogeneic BMT resulted in significant and increased protection from acute lethal GVHD compared to CDDO. This correlated with reduced TNF-α production, reduced donor T cell proliferation and decreased adhesion molecule (α4β7 integrin) expression on the donor T cells. CDDO-Me was also superior to CDDO in inhibiting leukemia growth in vitro. When CDDO-Me was administered following an allogeneic BMT to leukemia-bearing mice, significant increases in survival were observed. These findings suggest that CDDO-Me is superior to CDDO in delaying acute GVHD while preserving or possibly even augmenting GVT effects. PMID:20338256

  1. Glycyrrhizic Acid Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization in Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Associated with the Activation of JNK and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yulong; Wang, Baikui; Xu, Xin; Du, Wei; Li, Weifen; Wang, Youming

    2015-01-01

    The roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza species (licorice) have been widely used as natural sweeteners and herbal medicines. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) from licorice on macrophage polarization. Both phenotypic and functional activities of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) treated by GA were assessed. Our results showed that GA obviously increased the cell surface expression of CD80, CD86, and MHCII molecules. Meanwhile, GA upregulated the expression of CCR7 and the production of TNF-α, IL-12, IL-6, and NO (the markers of classically activated (M1) macrophages), whereas it downregulated the expression of MR, Ym1, and Arg1 (the markers of alternatively activated (M2) macrophage). The functional tests showed that GA dramatically enhanced the uptake of FITC-dextran and E. coli K88 by BMDMs and decreased the intracellular survival of E. coli K88 and S. typhimurium. Moreover, we demonstrated that JNK and NF-κB activation are required for GA-induced NO and M1-related cytokines production, while ERK1/2 pathway exhibits a regulatory effect via induction of IL-10. Together, these findings indicated that GA promoted polarization of M1 macrophages and enhanced its phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity. The results expanded our knowledge about the role of GA in macrophage polarization.

  2. Glycyrrhizic Acid Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization in Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Associated with the Activation of JNK and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yulong; Wang, Baikui; Xu, Xin; Du, Wei; Li, Weifen; Wang, Youming

    2015-01-01

    The roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza species (licorice) have been widely used as natural sweeteners and herbal medicines. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) from licorice on macrophage polarization. Both phenotypic and functional activities of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) treated by GA were assessed. Our results showed that GA obviously increased the cell surface expression of CD80, CD86, and MHCII molecules. Meanwhile, GA upregulated the expression of CCR7 and the production of TNF-α, IL-12, IL-6, and NO (the markers of classically activated (M1) macrophages), whereas it downregulated the expression of MR, Ym1, and Arg1 (the markers of alternatively activated (M2) macrophage). The functional tests showed that GA dramatically enhanced the uptake of FITC-dextran and E. coli K88 by BMDMs and decreased the intracellular survival of E. coli K88 and S. typhimurium. Moreover, we demonstrated that JNK and NF-κB activation are required for GA-induced NO and M1-related cytokines production, while ERK1/2 pathway exhibits a regulatory effect via induction of IL-10. Together, these findings indicated that GA promoted polarization of M1 macrophages and enhanced its phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity. The results expanded our knowledge about the role of GA in macrophage polarization. PMID:26664149

  3. Hospitalization for fractures and bone loss in adults. Why do we regard these phenomena as dull?

    PubMed

    Wylie, C M

    1977-01-01

    The epidemiology of serious fractures in adults relates less to the frequency of forceful accidents and more directly to the loss of bone in middle-aged and older people. To support this statement, hospital discharge rates for fractures in recent years are examined from different geographic areas. Rates for the United States rise with age, so that serious fractures form 10 percent of all hospital discharges at 85 years and older. Saskatchewan data suggest that rates for men remain low until 60 years; for women the figures began to rise at 45 years, before many had reached the menopause. Rates are lower among women than men in Saskatchewan until around 50 years, surpassing those of men at age 55 and older. Among Medicare enrollees in 1967 in the United States, women had higher discharge rates for fractures than men of the same age and race. Whites also had higher rates than blacks, so much so that white males had higher rates than black women of the same age. Such data confirm the past impression that blacks who survive into the older ages are a biological elite, more able to maintain bone strength than whites of either sex, although by no means being exempt from bone loss with age. A fractured femur was the most frequent diagnosis, forming a higher percentage of all fractures in women than men, and rising steeply with age in both sexes. The pattern of fractures by sex differs from the epidemiology of forceful accidents, which more often involve men than women. Bone loss with age, or osteoporosis, is perhaps the most powerful host factor to dominate the picture of fractures in the elderly. The existing possibilities for preventing or slowing this change are thus assessed; women may no longer accept as natural the widespread bone loss and accompanying fractures that lower the quality of life in later years. PMID:319479

  4. Thrombin binds to murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and enhances colony-stimulating factor-1-driven mitogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Clohisy, D.R.; Erdmann, J.M.; Wilner, G.D. )

    1990-05-15

    The binding and mitogenic properties of thrombin have been established in various transformed cell lines. In such systems, thrombin induces cell division in the absence of exogenous growth factors, and the enzyme is considered to act directly as a mitogen. This study explores thrombin's interaction with nontransformed, growth factor-dependent cells. Binding of 125I-alpha-thrombin to colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1-dependent bone marrow-derived macrophages is saturable, time-dependent, and displaceable by both unlabeled alpha-thrombin, and esterolytically inactive thrombin. Both dissociation studies of pre-bound radio-labeled thrombin and Scatchard analysis assisted by the program Ligand suggest adherence of thrombin-binding data to a multi-site model. There are an estimated 2 x 10(4) high affinity sites (Kd = 7 x 10(-9)M) and 2 x 10(6) low affinity sites (Kd = 9 x 10(-7)M) per cell. Quiescent bone marrow-derived macrophages were cultured with either 10(-8)M thrombin, 1000 units of CSF-1/ml, or both and (3H)thymidine incorporation was determined. Thrombin alone did not induce mitogenesis. CSF-1 induced mitogenesis with peak (3H) thymidine incorporation occurring 24 h after addition of the mitogen. This CSF-1-dependent mitogenic influence was enhanced greater than 2-fold by treatment with thrombin.

  5. Induction of donor-type chimerism in murine recipients of bone marrow allografts by different radiation regimens currently used in treatment of leukemia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, O.; Lapidot, T.; Terenzi, A.; Lubin, I.; Rabi, I.; Reisner, Y. )

    1990-11-01

    Three radiation protocols currently used in treatment of leukemia patients before bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were investigated in a murine model (C57BL/6----C3H/HeJ) for BM allograft rejection. These include (a) a single dose of total body irradiation (8.5 Gy TBI delivered at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min), (b) fractionated TBI 12 Gy administered in six fractions, 2 Gy twice a day in 3 days, delivered at a dose rate of 0.1 Gy/min, and (c) hyperfractionated TBI (14.4 Gy administered in 12 fractions, 1.2 Gy three times a day in 3 days, delivered at a dose rate of 0.1 Gy/min). Donor-type chimerism 6 to 8 weeks after BMT and hematologic reconstitution on day 12 after BMT found in these groups were compared with results obtained in mice conditioned with 8 Gy TBI delivered at a dose rate of 0.67 Gy/min, routinely used in this murine model. The results in both parameters showed a marked advantage for the single dose 8.5 Gy TBI over all the other treatments. This advantage was found to be equivalent to three- to fourfold increment in the BM inoculum when compared with hyperfractionated radiation, which afforded the least favorable conditions for development of donor-type chimerism. The fractionated radiation protocol was equivalent in its efficacy to results obtained in mice irradiated by single-dose 8 Gy TBI, both of which afforded a smaller but not significant advantage over the hyperfractionated protocol. This model was also used to test the effect of radiation dose rate on the development of donor-type chimerism. A significant enhancement was found after an increase in dose rate from 0.1 to 0.7 Gy/min. Further enhancement could be achieved when the dose rate was increased to 1.3 Gy/min, but survival at this high dose rate was reduced.

  6. A study of murine bone marrow cells cultured in bioreactors which create an environment which simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Brother Desales

    1990-01-01

    Previous research indicated that mouse bone marrow cells could be grown in conditions of simulated microgravity. This environment was created in rotating bioreactor vessels. On three attempts mouse cells were grown successfully in the vessels. The cells reached a stage where the concentrations were doubling daily. Phenotypic analysis using a panel of monoclonal antibodies indicated that the cell were hematopoietic pluripotent stem cells. One unsuccessful attempt was made to reestablish the immune system in immunocompromised mice using these cells. Since last summer, several unsuccessful attempts were made to duplicate these results. It was determined by electron microscopy that the cells successfully grown in 1989 contained virus particles. It was suggested that these virally parasitized cells had been immortalized. The work of this summer is a continuation of efforts to grow mouse bone marrow in these vessels. A number of variations of the protocol were introduced. Certified pathogen free mice were used in the repeat experiments. In some attempts the medium of last summer was used; in others Dexture Culture Medium containing Iscove's Medium supplemented with 20 percent horse serum and 10-6 M hydrocortisone. Efforts this summer were directed solely to repeating the work of last summer. Plans were made for investigations if stem cells were isolated. Immortalization of the undifferentiated stem cell would be attempted by transfection with an oncogenic vector. Selective differentiation would be induced in the stem cell line by growing it with known growth factors and immune response modulators. Interest is in identifying any surface antigens unique to stem cells that would help in their characterization. Another goal was to search for markers on stem cells that would distinguish them from stem cells committed to a particular lineage. If the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem cell was obtained, the pathways that would terminally convert it to myeloid, lyphoid

  7. In vivo expression of human growth hormone by genetically modified murine bone marrow stromal cells and its effect on the cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Oyama, M; Faulcon, L; Robbins, P D; Niyibizi, C

    2000-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is frequently used clinically for growth abnormalities in children and also in adults with growth hormone deficiency. The hormone is usually administered to the individuals by frequent injections. In the present study we investigated the potential of bone marrow stromal cells as vehicles to deliver the GH in vivo by infusion of cells transduced with hGH cDNA into mice femurs. The effect of the hormone on the transduced cells in vitro was also assessed. Bone marrow stromal cells established from a mouse model of human osteogenesis imperfecta mice (oim) were transduced with a retrovirus containing hGH and neomycin resistance genes. The hGH-expressing cells were selected in a medium containing G418 and were then assessed for the hGH expression in vitro. The selected cells synthesized 15 ng/10(6) cells of hGH per 24 h in vitro and exhibited alkaline phosphatase activity when they were treated with the human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2). The transduced cells also proliferated faster than the LacZ transduced cells but they did not exhibit a higher rate of matrix synthesis. When 2 x 10(6) hGH+ cells were injected into the femurs of mice, hGH was detected in the serum of the recipient mice up to 10 days after injection. The highest level of growth hormone expression, 750 pg/ml, was detected in the serum of the recipient mice I day after injection of the transduced cells. hGH was also detected in the medium conditioned by cells that were flushed from the femurs of the recipient mice at 1, 3, and 6 days after cell injection. These data indicate that bone marrow stromal cells could potentially be used therapeutically for the delivery of GH or any other therapeutic proteins targeted for bone. The data also suggest that GH may exert its effects on bone marrow stromal cells by increasing their rate of proliferation.

  8. Recapitulation of endochondral bone formation using human adult mesenchymal stem cells as a paradigm for developmental engineering.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Celeste; Tonnarelli, Beatrice; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Scherberich, Arnaud; Schaeren, Stefan; Schauerte, Alexandra; Lopez-Rios, Javier; Zeller, Rolf; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2010-04-20

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are typically used to generate bone tissue by a process resembling intramembranous ossification, i.e., by direct osteoblastic differentiation. However, most bones develop by endochondral ossification, i.e., via remodeling of hypertrophic cartilaginous templates. To date, endochondral bone formation has not been reproduced using human, clinically compliant cell sources. Here, we aimed at engineering tissues from bone marrow-derived, adult human MSC with an intrinsic capacity to undergo endochondral ossification. By analogy to embryonic limb development, we hypothesized that successful execution of the endochondral program depends on the initial formation of hypertrophic cartilaginous templates. Human MSC, subcutaneously implanted into nude mice at various stages of chondrogenic differentiation, formed bone trabeculae only when they had developed in vitro hypertrophic tissue structures. Advanced maturation in vitro resulted in accelerated formation of larger bony tissues. The underlying morphogenetic process was structurally and molecularly similar to the temporal and spatial progression of limb bone development in embryos. In particular, Indian hedgehog signaling was activated at early stages and required for the in vitro formation of hypertrophic cartilage. Subsequent development of a bony collar in vivo was followed by vascularization, osteoclastic resorption of the cartilage template, and appearance of hematopoietic foci. This study reveals the capacity of human MSC to generate bone tissue via an endochondral program and provides a valid model to study mechanisms governing bone development. Most importantly, this process could generate advanced grafts for bone regeneration by invoking a "developmental engineering" paradigm.

  9. Distribution of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Adult Cancer Patients Determined Using FLT-PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, James A.; Callahan, Jason W.; Herschtal, Alan; Everitt, Sarah; Binns, David S.; Hicks, Rod J.; Mac Manus, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Given that proliferating hematopoietic stem cells are especially radiosensitive, the bone marrow is a potential organ at risk, particularly with the use of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Existing data on bone marrow distribution have been determined from the weight and visual appearance of the marrow in cadavers. {sup 18}F-fluoro-L-deoxythymidine concentrates in bone marrow, and we used its intensity on positron emission tomography imaging to quantify the location of the proliferating bone marrow. Methods and Materials: The {sup 18}F-fluoro-L-deoxythymidine positron emission/computed tomography scans performed at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre between 2006 and 2009 on adult cancer patients were analyzed. At a minimum, the scans included the mid-skull through the proximal femurs. A software program developed at our institution was used to calculate the percentage of administered activity in 11 separately defined bony regions. Results: The study population consisted of 13 patients, 6 of whom were men. Their median age was 61 years. Of the 13 patients, 9 had lung cancer, 2 had colon cancer, and 1 each had melanoma and leiomyosarcoma; 6 had received previous, but not recent, chemotherapy. The mean percentage of proliferating bone marrow by anatomic site was 2.9% {+-} 2.1% at the skull, 1.9% {+-} 1.2% at the proximal humeri, 2.9% {+-} 1.3% at the sternum, 8.8% {+-} 4.7% at the ribs and clavicles, 3.8% {+-} 0.9% at the scapulas, 4.3% {+-} 1.6% at the cervical spine, 19.9% {+-} 2.6% at the thoracic spine, 16.6% {+-} 2.2% at the lumbar spine, 9.2% {+-} 2.3% at the sacrum, 25.3% {+-} 4.9% at the pelvis, and 4.5% {+-} 2.5% at the proximal femurs. Conclusion: Our modern estimates of bone marrow distribution in actual cancer patients using molecular imaging of the proliferating marrow provide updated data for optimizing normal tissue sparing during external beam radiotherapy planning.

  10. Rehabilitation of masticatory function improves the alveolar bone architecture of the mandible in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, Anestis; Odman, Anna; Ammann, Patrick; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2010-09-01

    hypofunctional group (p<0.05). Both alveolar height and width were significantly correlated with all micro-tomographic parameters under study. The rehabilitation of masticatory function led to a significant improvement of alveolar bone architecture in adult rats, although the negative effects of hypofunction were not totally reversed during the period under study. PMID:20601301

  11. Cone beam computed tomographic analyses of alveolar bone anatomy at the maxillary anterior region in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixuan; Chen, Wu; Shen, Ming; Sun, Chao; Li, Jun; Chen, Ning

    2014-11-01

    To provide an anatomical basis for clinical implant esthetics, we evaluated the morphology of the nasopalatine canal (NPC) and analyzed labial and interproximal bone anatomy at the maxillary anterior region. We sought to investigate the effect of maxillary protrusion and tooth labiolingual inclination on labial bone anatomy in Chinese adults. Three dimensional (3D) images were reconstructed using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from 80 Chinese subjects and by SimPlant 11.04. The dimensions of the NPC, the thickness and profile of the labial bone, the width and height of the interproximal bone, angle sella-nasion-subspinale (SNA) and angle upper central incisor-nasion,subspinale (U1-NA) were measured. The incisive foramen of the NPC was markedly wider than its nasal foramen. The dimension of its labial bone wall demonstrated an increasing width from the crestal to apical measurements. The labial bone at the maxillary anterior region was rather thin, especially at 3 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and the mid-root level; the profile of the labial bone was more curved at the central incisor, and the interproximal bone became wider and shorter posteriorly. There were significant relationships between maxillary protrusion and labial bone profile, tooth labiolingual inclination and labial bone thickness (P < 0.02). To achieve optimal esthetic outcome of implant, bone augmentation is necessary at the maxillary anterior region. For immediate or early placement at the maxillary anterior region, the implant should be located palatally to reduce labial bone resorption and marginal recession; its apex should be angulated palatally to avoid labial perforation at the apical region. To protect the NPC, implants at the central incisor region should be placed away from NPC. PMID:25469120

  12. Studies of allogeneic bone marrow and spleen cell transplantation in a murine model using ultraviolet-B light

    SciTech Connect

    Pamphilon, D.H.; Alnaqdy, A.A.; Godwin, V.; Preece, A.W.; Wallington, T.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation inhibits alloreactive and mitogen-induced responses and might reduce both graft-versus-host and host-versus-graft reactions after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We have studied proliferative responses to mitogens and reactivity in mixed lymphocyte culture after irradiation with ultraviolet (UV)-B light using splenocytes from Balb/c (H-2d) and CBA (H-2k) mice. Response to mitogens and in MLC was strongly inhibited by 20 J/m{sup 2} and abolished at 50 J/m{sup 2}. Clonogenic cell recovery (CFU-GM; CFU-S) after UV-B irradiation was also reduced. When bone marrow and spleen cells were transplanted from parent (Balb/c) animals into F1 hybrid (Balb/c X CBA) recipients, all animals died with features indicative of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in 34 days. If the grafts were first irradiated with 100 J/m{sup 2} of UV-B at a mean wavelength of 310 nm, then 76% survived to day 80 when they were killed and shown to have normal marrow cellularity. The remainder died in marrow aplasia or of GVHD. H-2 typing in a group of surviving recipients showed either donor hematopoiesis only (8 of 15), mixed allogeneic chimerism (5 of 15), or recipient type hematopoiesis (2 of 15). Higher doses (200 to 300 J/m{sup 2}) were detrimental to survival with 88% of recipients dying in marrow aplasia. Syngeneic BMT in Balb/c mice showed slower hematopoietic reconstitution when the grafts were first irradiated with 100 J/m{sup 2}. After BMT from Balb/c to CBA mice all recipients of unirradiated grafts died within 54 days. By contrast, after graft irradiation with 100 J/m{sup 2} survival of recipient animals to day 80 was 59%. If these grafts were treated with 50 J/m{sup 2} survival was only 26% with an increase in deaths due to GVHD. Hematopoiesis at day 80 in a group of survivors studied by Ig heavy chain allotyping indicated donor type hematopoiesis in 6 of 10 (50 J/m{sup 2}) and 2 of 9 (100 J/m{sup 2}).

  13. Effects of histamine and its antagonists on murine T-cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiufen; Zafar, Mohammad Ishraq; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of histamine and its antagonists on the surface marker expression of dendritic cells (DCs) and the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), histamine, and histamine receptor antagonists on DCs and T-cells. The bone marrow was extracted from the femurs and tibiae of 6- to 8-week-old female Balb/c mice and cultured in medium containing penicillin, streptomycin, L-glutamine, fetal calf serum, or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) alone or with interleukin (IL)-4. The cells received three different doses of LPS and histamine, plus three different doses of descarboethoxyloratadine (DCL). We assayed the supernatant for various cytokines. The spleen cells of DO11.10 mice were examined by flow cytometry, which included labeling and sorting CD4+ T-cells, as well as coculture of DCs and T-cells with ovalbumin (OVA)323-339 peptide. Histamine or histamine plus DCL did not affect the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II, CD11c, CD11b, CD86, and CD80. However, GM-CSF increased the expression of all markers except CD80. Histamine increased interferon-γ production in GM-CSF + IL-4-cultured cells; it also enhanced IL-10 production, but suppressed IL-12 production in LPS-stimulated DCs with no DCL. Cimetidine inhibited IL-10 production and restored IL-12 secretion in LPS-treated DCs. LPS increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 levels. GM-CSF + IL-4-generated DCs had a stronger stimulatory effect on DO11.10 T-cell proliferation than GM-CSF-generated DCs. Inducible costimulator ligand expression was higher in GM-CSF + IL-4- than in GM-CSF-generated DC groups after 2 days of coculture, but decreased 4 days later. IL-13 production was higher in bone marrow DCs generated with GM-CSF than in those generated with GM-CSF + IL-4. OVA-pulsed DCs and OVA-plus-DCL DCs showed increased IL-12 levels. OVA plus LPS increased both IL-10 and interferon-α. Although histamine or histamine receptor-1 antagonists did not influence DC LPS

  14. Bone Marrow MicroRNA-335 Level Predicts the Chemotherapy Response and Prognosis of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yingchun, Li; Rong, Zhang; Kun, Yao; Ying, Yang; Zhuogang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the role of microRNA-335 (miR-335) in determining the treatment response and prognosis in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients receiving the cytarabine (Ara-C)-based chemotherapy. A total of 204 adult AML patients were collected. The miR-335 levels in serum and bone marrow samples from these patients were determined. All patients received Ara-C-based standard induction chemotherapy regimens. The treatment response to Ara-C-based chemotherapy was evaluated. All patients were followed for prognostic analyses. The levels of miR-335 in bone marrow and serum samples from adult AML patients achieving complete response were significantly higher than those without. The serum miR-335 level was not associated with the chemotherapy response and prognosis in these AML patients. In contrast, high bone marrow miR-335 level was significantly associated with a poor treatment response and also predicted a worse prognosis indicated by the relapse-free survival and overall survival periods in adult AML patients receiving Ara-C-based chemotherapy. Our finding suggests that bone marrow miR-335 level may be used as a marker to predict the chemotherapy response and prognosis in adult AML patients. PMID:26287405

  15. IGF-1-mediated osteoblastic niche expansion enhances long-term hematopoietic stem cell engraftment after murine bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Anna; Olson, Timothy S; Otsuru, Satoru; Chen, Xiaohua; Hofmann, Ted J; Nah, Hyun-Duck; Grisendi, Giulia; Paolucci, Paolo; Dominici, Massimo; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2013-10-01

    The efficiency of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment after bone marrow (BM) transplantation depends largely on the capacity of the marrow microenvironment to accept the transplanted cells. While radioablation of BM damages osteoblastic stem cell niches, little is known about their restoration and mechanisms governing their receptivity to engraft transplanted HSCs. We previously reported rapid restoration and profound expansion of the marrow endosteal microenvironment in response to marrow radioablation. Here, we show that this reorganization represents proliferation of mature endosteal osteoblasts which seem to arise from a small subset of high-proliferative, relatively radio-resistant endosteal cells. Multiple layers of osteoblasts form along the endosteal surface within 48 hours after total body irradiation, concomitant with a peak in marrow cytokine expression. This niche reorganization fosters homing of the transplanted hematopoietic cells to the host marrow space and engraftment of long-term-HSC. Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1-receptor tyrosine kinase signaling abrogates endosteal osteoblast proliferation and donor HSC engraftment, suggesting that the cytokine IGF-1 is a crucial mediator of endosteal niche reorganization and consequently donor HSC engraftment. Further understanding of this novel mechanism of IGF-1-dependent osteoblastic niche expansion and HSC engraftment may yield clinical applications for improving engraftment efficiency after clinical HSC transplantation.

  16. Comparison of bone marrow tissue- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of sepsis in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hao; Zhao, Shangping; Peng, Yue; Xiao, Xuefei; Wang, Qianlu; Liu, Huaizeng; Xiao, Xianzhong; Yang, Mingshi

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to regulate the systemic inflammatory response and sepsis-induced immunologic injury pre-clinically. However, whether MSCs from different sources elicit identical effects remains to be elucidated. The present study compared the effect of bone marrow‑derived MSCs (BMSCs) and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ADMSCs) in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced sepsis. SPF BALB/c mice were induced with an injection of LPS (10 mg/kg; 1 mg/ml) via the tail vein. To compare the effect of MSCs on the septic mice, either saline, BMSCs or ADMSCs were injected via the tail vein 5 min following the administration of LPS. The survival rates and body temperatures of the mice were observed regularly up to 48 h. The serum levels of pro‑inflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor‑α, interleukin (IL)‑6 and IL‑8, anti‑inflammatory cytokines, including IL‑2, IL‑4 and IL‑10, and biochemical markers, including lactate, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase and aspertate aminotransferase, were analyzed at 6 h. The BMSCs and ADMSCs significantly reduced mortality rates, body‑temperature fluctuations, serum levels of biochemical markers and the majority of cytokines. However, the levels of IL‑8 in the BMSC and ADMSC groups were increased and decreased, respectively. These findings suggested that BMSCs and ADMSCs ameliorated sepsis-associated organ injury and mortality, and had a similar regulatory effect on pro‑ and anti‑inflammatory cytokines despite the different MSC sources. Therefore, BMSCs and ADMSCs may serve as novel treatment modalities for sepsis. PMID:27600821

  17. Natural Killer Cells-Produced IFN-γ Improves Bone Marrow-Derived Hepatocytes Regeneration in Murine Liver Failure Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu; Zeng, Zhutian; Qi, Ziping; Wang, Xin; Gao, Xiang; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Bone-marrow transplantation (BMT) can repopulate the liver through BM-derived hepatocyte (BMDH) generation, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Using fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase–deficient (Fah−/−) mice as a liver-failure model, we confirmed that BMDHs were generated by fusion of BM-derived CD11b+F4/80+myelomonocytes with resident Fah−/− hepatocytes. Hepatic NK cells became activated during BMDH generation and were the major IFN-γ producers. Indeed, both NK cells and IFN-γ were required for BMDH generation since WT, but not NK-, IFN-γ–, or IFN-γR1–deficient BM transplantation successfully generated BMDHs and rescued survival in Fah−/− hosts. BM-derived myelomonocytes were determined to be the IFN-γ–responding cells. The IFN-γ–IFN-γR interaction contributed to the myelomonocyte–hepatocyte fusion process, as most of the CD11b+ BMDHs in mixed BM chimeric Fah−/− hosts transplanted with a 1:1 ratio of CD45.1+ WT and CD45.2+ Ifngr1−/− BM cells were of CD45.1+ WT origin. Confirming these findings in vitro, IFN-γ dose-dependently promoted the fusion of GFP+ myelomonocytes with Fah−/− hepatocytes due to a direct effect on myelomonocytes; similar results were observed using activated NK cells. In conclusion, BMDH generation requires NK cells to facilitate myelomonocyte–hepatocyte fusion in an IFN-γ–dependent manner, providing new insights for treating severe liver failure. PMID:26345133

  18. Variation of bone layer thicknesses and trabecular volume fraction in the adult male human calvarium.

    PubMed

    Boruah, Sourabh; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S; Subit, Damien L; Salzar, Robert S; Crandall, Jeff R

    2015-08-01

    The human calvarium is a sandwich structure with two dense layers of cortical bone separated by porous cancellous bone. The variation of the three dimensional geometry, including the layer thicknesses and the volume fraction of the cancellous layer across the population, is unavailable in the current literature. This information is of particular importance to mathematical models of the human head used to simulate mechanical response. Although the target geometry for these models is the median geometry of the population, the best attempt so far has been the scaling of a unique geometry based on a few median anthropometric measurements of the head. However, this method does not represent the median geometry. This paper reports the average three dimensional geometry of the calvarium from X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging and layer thickness and trabecular volume fraction from micro CT (μCT) imaging of ten adult male post-mortem human surrogates (PMHS). Skull bone samples have been obtained and μCT imaging was done at a resolution of 30 μm. Monte Carlo simulation was done to estimate the variance in these measurements due to the uncertainty in image segmentation. The layer thickness data has been averaged over areas of 5mm(2). The outer cortical layer was found to be significantly (p < 0.01; Student's t test) thicker than the inner layer (median of thickness ratio 1.68). Although there was significant location to location difference in all the layer thicknesses and volume fraction measurements, there was no trend. Average distribution and the variance of these metrics on the calvarium have been shown. The findings have been reported as colormaps on a 2D projection of the cranial vault. PMID:25920690

  19. Physical activity benefits bone density and bone-related hormones in adult men with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Chain, Amina; Koury, Josely C; Bezerra, Flávia Fioruci

    2012-09-01

    Severe bone loss is a recognized complication of chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Physical exercise contributes to bone health; however, its influence on bone mass of cervical SCI individuals has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of physical activity on bone mass, bone metabolism, and vitamin D status in quadriplegics. Total, lumbar spine (L1-L4), femur and radius bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed in active (n = 15) and sedentary (n = 10) quadriplegic men by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], PTH, IGF1, osteocalcin and NTx were measured in serum. After adjustments for duration of injury, total body mass, and habitual calcium intake, bone indices were similar between groups, except for L1-L4 BMD Z score that was higher in the sedentary group (P < 0.05). Hours of physical exercise per week correlated positively with 25(OH)D (r = 0.59; P < 0.05) and negatively with PTH (r = -0.50; P < 0.05). Femur BMD was negatively associated with the number of months elapsed between the injury and the onset of physical activity (r = -0.60; P < 0.05). Moreover, in the active subjects, both L1-L4 BMD Z score (r = 0.72; P < 0.01) and radius BMD (r = 0.59; P < 0.05) were positively associated with calcium intake. In this cross-sectional study, both the onset of physical activity after injury and the number of hours dedicated to exercise were able to influence bone density and bone-related hormones in quadriplegic men. Our results also suggest a positive combined effect of exercise and calcium intake on bone health of quadriplegic individuals.

  20. ECM microenvironment unlocks brown adipogenic potential of adult human bone marrow-derived MSCs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle H.; Goralczyk, Anna G.; Kriszt, Rókus; Ang, Xiu Min; Badowski, Cedric; Li, Ying; Summers, Scott A.; Toh, Sue-Anne; Yassin, M. Shabeer; Shabbir, Asim; Sheppard, Allan; Raghunath, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Key to realizing the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of human brown/brite adipocytes is the identification of a renewable, easily accessible and safe tissue source of progenitor cells, and an efficacious in vitro differentiation protocol. We show that macromolecular crowding (MMC) facilitates brown adipocyte differentiation in adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs), as evidenced by substantially upregulating uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and uncoupled respiration. Moreover, MMC also induced ‘browning’ in bmMSC-derived white adipocytes. Mechanistically, MMC creates a 3D extracellular matrix architecture enshrouding maturing adipocytes in a collagen IV cocoon that is engaged by paxillin-positive focal adhesions also at the apical side of cells, without contact to the stiff support structure. This leads to an enhanced matrix-cell signaling, reflected by increased phosphorylation of ATF2, a key transcription factor in UCP1 regulation. Thus, tuning the dimensionality of the microenvironment in vitro can unlock a strong brown potential dormant in bone marrow. PMID:26883894

  1. Effects of exogenous, nonleukemogenic, ecotropic murine leukemia virus infections on the immune systems of adult C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J S; Giese, N A; Elkins, K L; Yetter, R A; Holmes, K L; Hartley, J W; Morse, H C

    1995-01-01

    Mouse AIDS (MAIDS) develops in mice infected with a mixture of replication-competent ecotropic and mink lung cell focus-inducing murine leukemia viruses and an etiologic replication-defective virus. Helper viruses are not required for induction of MAIDS, but the time course of disease is accelerated in their presence. To understand the possible contributions of ectropic murine leukemia viruses to MAIDS pathogenesis, we biologically cloned a series of viruses from the MAIDS-inducing LP-BM5 virus mixture. These viruses were examined for replication in tissues of infected mice and for effects on the immune system. All virus stocks replicated efficiently in mice. Infected animals showed slight lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly due primarily to B-cell proliferation associated with differentiation to immunoglobulin secretion resulting in twofold increases in serum immunoglobulin M levels; however, B-cell responses to helper T-cell-independent antigens were increased rather than decreased as in MAIDS. Analyses of CD8+ T-cell function showed that cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses to alloantigens were comparable in control and infected mice. Finally, we showed that infection resulted in enhanced expression of transcripts for interleukin-10, interleukin-4, and gamma interferon. These cytokines can all contribute to B-cell activation and may promote the expansion of a target cell population for the MAIDS defective virus. PMID:7769677

  2. Comparisons of bone mineral density and bone quality in adult rock climbers, resistance-trained men, and untrained men.

    PubMed

    Sherk, Vanessa D; Bemben, Michael G; Bemben, Debra A

    2010-09-01

    The nature of muscular contractions and episodes of impact loading during technical rock climbing are often varied and complex, and the resulting effects on bone health are unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare total body, lumbar spine, proximal femur, and forearm areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and tibia and forearm bone quality in male rock climbers (RC) (n = 15), resistance trained men (RT) (n = 16), and untrained male controls (CTR) (n = 16). Total body, anteroposterior (AP) lumbar spine, proximal femur, and forearm aBMD and body composition were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (Lunar Prodigy, v. 10.50.086; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin, U.S.A.). Volumetric BMD (vBMD), bone content, bone area, and muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) of the tibia and forearm were measured using pQCT (peripheral quantitative computed tomography; Stratec XCT 3000, Pforzheim, Germany). No significant group differences were seen in bone-free lean body mass. CTR had significantly (p < 0.05) greater body fat % than RC and RT and significantly (p < 0.05) greater fat mass than RC. Lumbar spine and femoral neck aBMD were significantly (p < 0.05) greater in RT compared to both RC and CTR. RC had significantly (p < 0.05) lower aBMD at the 33% radius site than CTR. Forearm MCSA was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in CTR than in the other groups. No significant differences were seen between groups for vBMD or bone area of the tibia and forearm. In conclusion, resistance-trained men had higher bone density at the central skeletal sites than rock climbers; however, bone quality variables of the peripheral limbs were similar in rock climber and resistance-trained groups.

  3. Multiple Wormian bones and their relation with definite pathological conditions in a case of an adult cranium.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Silviya Y; Toneva, Diana H; Yordanov, Yordan A; Lazarov, Nikolai E

    2014-01-01

    Wormian bones, also known as intrasutural bones, are present as an anatomical variation in healthy individuals. However, a higher than the usual incidence can be an important feature of some congenital pathological conditions. In this study we describe a case of an adult cranium with multiple Wormian bones. The cranium was a single sample obtained from an archaeological excavation in Vinitsa, Northeastern Bulgaria, and probably dated in the Chalcolithic. The Chalcolithic is a period of human history connected with discovering and using of copper. Actually, it is a transitional phase between the Neolithic and the Bronze Age. In this case the Wormian bones are mostly large in size and arranged in a mosaic pattern in several cranial regions. The cranium also shows features such as dolichocrany, a moderate platybasia, a notch in the posterior margin of the foramen magnum, hypoplastic and asymmetrical frontal sinuses, underdeveloped mastoid air cells, hyperostosis cranii interna, moderate frontal bossing, a complete metopic suture, a delayed sutural closure, relatively small facial bones, an early loss of teeth, dental caries and hypoplastic enamel defects on two preserved molars. Differential diagnosis indicates that the combination of all these features shows a link with pathological conditions involving dysplasias with prominent membranous bone involvement and an increased bone density such as cleidocranial dysplasia and pyknodysostosis.

  4. Multiple Wormian bones and their relation with definite pathological conditions in a case of an adult cranium.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Silviya Y; Toneva, Diana H; Yordanov, Yordan A; Lazarov, Nikolai E

    2014-01-01

    Wormian bones, also known as intrasutural bones, are present as an anatomical variation in healthy individuals. However, a higher than the usual incidence can be an important feature of some congenital pathological conditions. In this study we describe a case of an adult cranium with multiple Wormian bones. The cranium was a single sample obtained from an archaeological excavation in Vinitsa, Northeastern Bulgaria, and probably dated in the Chalcolithic. The Chalcolithic is a period of human history connected with discovering and using of copper. Actually, it is a transitional phase between the Neolithic and the Bronze Age. In this case the Wormian bones are mostly large in size and arranged in a mosaic pattern in several cranial regions. The cranium also shows features such as dolichocrany, a moderate platybasia, a notch in the posterior margin of the foramen magnum, hypoplastic and asymmetrical frontal sinuses, underdeveloped mastoid air cells, hyperostosis cranii interna, moderate frontal bossing, a complete metopic suture, a delayed sutural closure, relatively small facial bones, an early loss of teeth, dental caries and hypoplastic enamel defects on two preserved molars. Differential diagnosis indicates that the combination of all these features shows a link with pathological conditions involving dysplasias with prominent membranous bone involvement and an increased bone density such as cleidocranial dysplasia and pyknodysostosis. PMID:25065115

  5. Adult rat bone marrow stromal cells express genes associated with dopamine neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Brian C.; Woodbury, Dale . E-mail: WOODBURYDL@AOL.COM; Black, Ira B.

    2006-05-19

    An intensive search is underway to identify candidates to replace the cells that degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). To date, no suitable substitute has been found. We have recently found that adult rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced to assume a neuronal phenotype in vitro. These findings may have particular relevance to the treatment of PD. We now report that adult MSCs express multiple dopaminergic genes, suggesting that they are potential candidates for cell therapy. Using RT-PCR, we have examined families of genes that are associated with the development and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons. MSCs transcribe a variety of dopaminergic genes including patched and smoothened (components of the Shh receptor), Gli-1 (downstream mediator of Shh), and Otx-1, a gene associated with formation of the mesencephalon during development. Furthermore, Shh treatment elicits a 1.5-fold increase in DNA synthesis in cultured MSCs, suggesting the presence of a functional Shh receptor complex. We have also found that MSCs transcribe and translate Nurr-1, a nuclear receptor essential for the development of dopamine neurons. In addition, MSCs express a variety of growth factor receptors including the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand-binding subunit of the GDNF receptor, GFR{alpha}1, as well as fibroblast growth factor receptors one and four. The expression of genes that are associated with the development and survival of dopamine neurons suggests a potential role for these cells in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  6. The effects of delayed auditory feedback revealed by bone conduction microphone in adult zebra finches

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Makoto; Margoliash, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Vocal control and learning are critically dependent on auditory feedback in songbirds and humans. Continuous delayed auditory feedback (cDAF) robustly disrupts speech fluency in normal humans and has ameliorative effects in some stutterers; however, evaluations of the effects of cDAF on songbirds are rare. We exposed singing young (141–151 days old) adult zebra finch males to high-amplitude cDAF. cDAF exposure was achieved by the recording of bone-conducted sounds using a piezoelectric accelerometer, which resulted in high-quality song recordings that were relatively uncontaminated by airborne sounds. Under this condition of cDAF, birds rapidly (2–6 days) changed their song syllable timing. The one bird for which we were able to maintain the accelerometer recordings over a long period of time recovered slowly over more than a month after cDAF was discontinued. These results demonstrate that cDAF can cause substantial changes in the motor program for syllable timing generation over short intervals of time in adult zebra finches. PMID:25739659

  7. The effects of delayed auditory feedback revealed by bone conduction microphone in adult zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Makoto; Margoliash, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Vocal control and learning are critically dependent on auditory feedback in songbirds and humans. Continuous delayed auditory feedback (cDAF) robustly disrupts speech fluency in normal humans and has ameliorative effects in some stutterers; however, evaluations of the effects of cDAF on songbirds are rare. We exposed singing young (141-151 days old) adult zebra finch males to high-amplitude cDAF. cDAF exposure was achieved by the recording of bone-conducted sounds using a piezoelectric accelerometer, which resulted in high-quality song recordings that were relatively uncontaminated by airborne sounds. Under this condition of cDAF, birds rapidly (2-6 days) changed their song syllable timing. The one bird for which we were able to maintain the accelerometer recordings over a long period of time recovered slowly over more than a month after cDAF was discontinued. These results demonstrate that cDAF can cause substantial changes in the motor program for syllable timing generation over short intervals of time in adult zebra finches. PMID:25739659

  8. Pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 promote breast cancer cell growth in bone in a murine xenograft model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bones are the most common sites of breast cancer metastasis. Upon arrival within the bone microenvironment, breast cancer cells coordinate the activities of stromal cells, resulting in an increase in osteoclast activity and bone matrix degradation. In late stages of bone metastasis, breast cance...

  9. Association between Sleep Duration, Insomnia Symptoms and Bone Mineral Density in Older Boston Puerto Rican Adults

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jinya; Sahni, Shivani; Liao, Susu; Tucker, Katherine L.; Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Gao, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between sleep patterns (sleep duration and insomnia symptoms) and total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) among older Boston Puerto Rican adults. Materials/Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study including 750 Puerto Rican adults, aged 47–79 y living in Massachusetts. BMD at 3 hip sites and the lumbar spine were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Sleep duration (≤5 h, 6 h, 7 h, 8 h, or ≥9 h/d) and insomnia symptoms (difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early-morning awaking, and non-restorative sleep) were assessed by a questionnaire. Multivariable regression was used to examine sex-specific associations between sleep duration, insomnia symptoms and BMD adjusting for standard confounders and covariates. Results Men who slept ≥9h/d had significantly lower femoral neck BMD, relative to those reporting 8 h/d sleep, after adjusting for age, education level, smoking, physical activity, depressive symptomatology, comorbidity and serum vitamin D concentration. This association was attenuated and lost significance after further adjustment for urinary cortisol and serum inflammation biomarkers. In contrast, the association between sleep duration and BMD was not significant in women. Further, we did not find any significant associations between insomnia symptoms and BMD in men or women. Conclusions Our study does not support the hypothesis that shorter sleep duration and insomnia symptoms are associated with lower BMD levels in older adults. However, our results should be interpreted with caution. Future studies with larger sample size, objective assessment of sleep pattern, and prospective design are needed before a conclusion regarding sleep and BMD can be reached. PMID:26147647

  10. Parathyroid hormone secretory pattern, circulating activity, and effect on bone turnover in adult growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A M; Hopkins, M T; Fraser, W D; Ooi, C G; Durham, B H; Vora, J P

    2003-02-01

    Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is associated with osteoporosis. Reports have associated parathyroid hormone (PTH) circadian rhythm abnormalities with osteoporosis. Furthermore, there is evidence of relative PTH insensitivity in AGHD patients. Factors regulating PTH circadian rhythm are not fully understood. There is evidence that serum phosphate is a likely determinant of PTH rhythm. The aim of this study was to investigate PTH circadian rhythm and its circulating activity and association with bone turnover in untreated AGHD patients compared to healthy individuals. We sampled peripheral venous blood at 30-min and urine at 3-h intervals during the day over a 24-h period from 1400 h in 14 untreated AGHD patients (7 M, 7 W; mean age, 49.5 +/- 10.7 years) and 14 age (48.6 +/- 11.4 years; P = NS) and gender-matched controls. Cosinor analysis was performed to analyze rhythm parameters. Cross-correlational analysis was used to determine the relationship between variables. Serum PTH (1-84), phosphate, total calcium, urea, creatinine, albumin, type I collagen C-telopeptides (CT(x)), a bone resorption marker, and procollagen type I amino-terminal propeptide (PINP), a bone formation marker, were measured on all samples. Nephrogenous cyclic adenosine monophosphate (NcAMP), which reflects the renal activity of PTH, was calculated from plasma and urinary cAMP. Urinary calcium and phosphate were measured on all urine samples. Significant circadian rhythms were observed for serum PTH, phosphate, CT(x), and PINP in AGHD and healthy subjects (P < 0.001). No significant rhythm was observed for serum-adjusted calcium. PTH MESOR (rhythm-adjusted mean) was significantly higher (P < 0.05), whereas the MESOR values for phosphate, CT(x) (P < 0.05), and PINP (P < 0.001) were lower in AGHD patients than in controls. AGHD patients had significantly lower 24-h NcAMP (P < 0.001) and higher urinary calcium excretion (P < 0.05). Maximum cross-correlation between PTH and phosphate (r = 0

  11. Bone marrow–derived circulating progenitor cells fail to transdifferentiate into adipocytes in adult adipose tissues in mice

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Young Jun; Kang, Shinae; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Choi, Tae-Saeng; Lee, Ho Sub; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Koh, Gou Young

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about whether bone marrow–derived circulating progenitor cells (BMDCPCs) can transdifferentiate into adipocytes in adipose tissues or play a role in expanding adipocyte number during adipose tissue growth. Using a mouse bone marrow transplantation model, we addressed whether BMDCPCs can transdifferentiate into adipocytes under standard conditions as well as in the settings of diet-induced obesity, rosiglitazone treatment, and exposure to G-CSF. We also addressed the possibility of transdifferentiation to adipocytes in a murine parabiosis model. In each of these settings, our findings indicated that BMDCPCs did not transdifferentiate into either unilocular or multilocular adipocytes in adipose tissues. Most BMDCPCs became resident and phagocytic macrophages in adipose tissues — which resembled transdifferentiated multilocular adipocytes by appearance, but displayed cell surface markers characteristic for macrophages — in the absence of adipocyte marker expression. When exposed to adipogenic medium in vitro, bone marrow cells differentiated into multilocular, but not unilocular, adipocytes, but transdifferentiation was not observed in vivo, even in the contexts of adipose tissue regrowth or dermal wound healing. Our results suggest that BMDCPCs do not transdifferentiate into adipocytes in vivo and play little, if any, role in expanding the number of adipocytes during the growth of adipose tissues. PMID:18060029

  12. “Vitamin D supplementation and bone health in adults with diabetic nephropathy: the protocol for a randomized controlled trial”

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Suboptimal vitamin D status is highly prevalent in Northern communities, particularly in those patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes and chronic renal disease. Emerging literature suggests that adherence to daily vitamin D supplementation may be an important factor influencing vitamin D status and overall bone health, but compliance with therapies for bone health is a major challenge. It is unknown what level of vitamin D supplementation will ameliorate or improve suboptimal vitamin D status in patients with diabetic nephropathy or contribute to improved bone health, particularly for those living in northern climates. Methods/Design The study purpose was to examine two different strategies of vitamin D3 supplementation; daily dosing of 2000 IU per day verses monthly dosing of 40,000 IU per month on markers of vitamin D status, bone health and to examine whether adherence, quality of life and patient satisfaction with the supplementation strategy differs between the two vitamin D strategies in adults diagnosed with diabetic nephropathy. Discussion The need for RCTs assessing higher doses of vitamin D3 supplementation at varying frequencies of administration and its impact on bone health in adults with diabetes and chronic kidney disease are needed. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01476501. PMID:25115438

  13. Adult Bone Strength of Children from Single-Parent Families: The Midlife in the U.S. Study

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Carolyn J.; Karlamangla, Arun S.; Merkin, Sharon Stein; Binkley, Neil; Carr, Deborah; Greendale, Gail A.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Because peak bone mass is acquired during childhood, bone health may be negatively impacted by childhood socio-environmental disadvantage. The goal of this study was to determine whether being raised in a single-parent household is associated with lower bone strength in adulthood. Methods Using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry data from 708 participants (mean age 57 years) in the Midlife in the United States Biomarker Project, we examined the independent associations of composite indices of femoral neck bone strength relative to load (in three failure modes: compression, bending, and impact) in adulthood with the experience of single-parent childhood and parental death or divorce in childhood. Results After adjustment for gender, race, menopause transition stage, age, and body mass index, each additional year of single-parent childhood was associated with 0.02 to 0.03 SD lower indices of adult femoral neck strength. In those with 9-16 years of single-parent childhood, the compression strength index was 0.41 SD lower, bending strength index was 0.31 SD lower, and impact strength index was 0.25 SD lower (all p-values < 0.05). In contrast, parental death or divorce during childhood was not by itself independently associated with adult bone strength indices. The magnitudes of these associations were unaltered by additional adjustment for lifestyle factors and socioeconomic status in childhood and adulthood. Conclusions Independent of parental death or divorce, growing up in a single-parent household is associated with lower femoral neck bone strength in adulthood, and this association is not entirely explained by childhood or adult socioeconomic conditions or lifestyle choices. PMID:25510582

  14. MRI-measured pelvic bone marrow adipose tissue is inversely related to DXA-measured bone mineral in younger and older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei; Chen, Jun; Gantz, Madeleine; Punyanitya, Mark; Heymsfield, Steven B; Gallagher, Dympna; Albu, Jeanine; Engelson, Ellen; Kotler, Donald; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objective Recent research has shown an inverse relationship between bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) and bone mineral density (BMD). There is a lack of evidence at the macro-imaging level to establish whether increased BMAT is a cause or effect of bone loss. This cross-sectional study compared the BMAT and BMD relationship between a younger adult group at or approaching peak bone mass (PBM) (age 18.0-39.9 yrs) and an older group with potential bone loss (PoBL) (age 40.0-88 yrs). Subjects/Methods Pelvic BMAT was evaluated in 560 healthy men and women with T1-weighted whole body magnetic resonance imaging. BMD was measured using whole body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results An inverse correlation was observed between pelvic BMAT and pelvic, total, and spine BMD in the younger PBM group (r=-0.419 to -0.461, P<0.001) and in the older PoBL group (r=-0.405 to -0.500, P<0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, menopausal status, total body fat, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, neither subject group (younger PBM vs. older PoBL) nor its interaction with pelvic BMAT significantly contributed to the regression models with BMD as dependent variable and pelvic BMAT as independent variable (P=0.434 to 0.928). Conclusion Our findings indicate that an inverse relationship between pelvic BMAT and BMD is present both in younger subjects who have not yet experienced bone loss and also in older subjects. These results provide support at the macro-imaging level for the hypothesis that low BMD may be a result of preferential differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from osteoblasts to adipocytes. PMID:22491495

  15. Comparison in Adherence to Osteoporosis Guidelines according to Bone Health Status in Korean Adult

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hee-Sook; Kim, Soon-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Byun, Dong Won; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis one of the most serious disease to decrease the quality of life and cause economic loss. Thus, prevention of osteoporosis has become an important health concern. The study examined in adherence to osteoporosis guidelines and compared the levels of adherence to osteoporosis guidelines between bone health status in Korean adult. Methods This study used data from a nationally represented sample of Koreans (n=3,419) from 2008 to 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We were divided into three groups by T-score: normal, osteopenia and osteoporosis. Assessment of adherence level was based on 5 components of osteoporosis guidelines, considering intake of sodium, calcium and protein, smoking and regular exercise. Results The sex, body mass index, income and educational level did not significantly differ between three groups. Deficient intake of calcium was significantly associated with a threefold greater odds in osteoporosis group (OR 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.52-5.22). Excessive protein intake was significantly increased the risk only in osteoporosis group compared to the normal group (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.15-2.62). Smoking increased the risk in osteoporosis group compared to the normal group (OR 2.88; 95% CI 1.75-4.76), osteoporosis group compared to the osteopenia group (OR 2.69; 95% CI 1.61-4.55). Conclusions Nutritional factor (intake of calcium and protein) and lifestyle-related factor (smoking and exercise) must be accompanied the management for bone health. An adherence of guidelines is considered very important for the prevention of osteoporosis. PMID:27622178

  16. Consuming breakfast and exercising longer during high school increases bone mineral density in young adult men.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Yuyu; Yoshida, Munehito; Nagata, Keiji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Noriko

    2013-05-01

    We examined the bone mineral densities (BMDs) of young adult men and analyzed the factors associated with BMD differences. Between 1993 and 2002, all male freshmen in the Wakayama Medical University, Japan were recruited into the present study, which included a self-administrated questionnaire survey, anthropometric measurements, and BMD measurements of the spine and hip. Of a total of 387 freshmen, 382 (98.7 %; mean age, 20.3 years; age range, 18-29 years) completed the study. The mean BMDs of the spine (L2-4) and femoral neck (FN) were 1.21 (standard deviation, 0.13) g/cm(2) and 1.12 (0.14) g/cm(2), respectively. The L2-4 BMDs were not associated with age, while FN BMDs were significantly inversely associated with age. The BMDs at L2-4 and FN were significantly associated with body mass index (BMI). After adjustment for age and BMI, multivariate regression analysis indicated that BMDs at L2-4 and FN were associated with current longer exercise duration (L2-4, p = 0.024; FN, p = 0.001), those at L2-4 with milk intake (p = 0.024), and those at FN with consuming breakfast (p = 0.004). Similarly, habits of consuming breakfast and exercising longer (on a weekly basis) during high school were linked with significantly higher L2-4 and FN BMDs. High-impact activities during high school significantly influenced the later BMDs. In conclusion, to maximize peak bone mass, consuming breakfast and completing a longer duration of stronger exercise in the late high school years for at least 10 h per week is recommended.

  17. Comparison in Adherence to Osteoporosis Guidelines according to Bone Health Status in Korean Adult

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hee-Sook; Kim, Soon-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Byun, Dong Won; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis one of the most serious disease to decrease the quality of life and cause economic loss. Thus, prevention of osteoporosis has become an important health concern. The study examined in adherence to osteoporosis guidelines and compared the levels of adherence to osteoporosis guidelines between bone health status in Korean adult. Methods This study used data from a nationally represented sample of Koreans (n=3,419) from 2008 to 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We were divided into three groups by T-score: normal, osteopenia and osteoporosis. Assessment of adherence level was based on 5 components of osteoporosis guidelines, considering intake of sodium, calcium and protein, smoking and regular exercise. Results The sex, body mass index, income and educational level did not significantly differ between three groups. Deficient intake of calcium was significantly associated with a threefold greater odds in osteoporosis group (OR 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.52-5.22). Excessive protein intake was significantly increased the risk only in osteoporosis group compared to the normal group (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.15-2.62). Smoking increased the risk in osteoporosis group compared to the normal group (OR 2.88; 95% CI 1.75-4.76), osteoporosis group compared to the osteopenia group (OR 2.69; 95% CI 1.61-4.55). Conclusions Nutritional factor (intake of calcium and protein) and lifestyle-related factor (smoking and exercise) must be accompanied the management for bone health. An adherence of guidelines is considered very important for the prevention of osteoporosis.

  18. Different Balance of Wnt Signaling in Adult and Fetal Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Paciejewska, Maja M; Maijenburg, Marijke W; Gilissen, Christian; Kleijer, Marion; Vermeul, Kim; Weijer, Kees; Veltman, Joris A; von Lindern, Marieke; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Voermans, Carlijn

    2016-06-15

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are applied as novel therapeutics for their regenerative and immune-suppressive capacities. Clinical applications, however, require extensive expansion of MSCs. Fetal bone marrow-derived MSCs (FBMSCs) proliferate faster than adult bone marrow-derived MSC (ABMSCs). To optimize expansion and function of MSC in general, we explored the differences between ABMSC and FBMSC. Gene expression profiling implicated differential expression of genes encoding proteins in the Wnt signaling pathway, including excreted inhibitors of Wnt signaling, particularly by ABMSC. Both MSC types had a similar basal level of canonical Wnt signaling. Abrogation of autocrine Wnt production by inhibitor of Wnt production-2 (IWP2) reduced canonical Wnt signaling and cell proliferation of FBMSCs, but hardly affected ABMSC. Addition of exogenous Wnt3a, however, induced expression of the target genes lymphocyte enhancer-binding factor (LEF) and T-cell factor (TCF) faster and at lower Wnt3a levels in ABMSC compared to FBMSC. Medium replacement experiments indicated that ABMSC produce an inhibitor of Wnt signaling that is effective on ABMSC itself but not on FBMSC, whereas FBMSC excrete (Wnt) factors that stimulate proliferation of ABMSC. In contrast, FBMSC were not able to support hematopoiesis, whereas ABMSC displayed hematopoietic support sensitive to IWP2, the inhibitor of Wnt factor excretion. In conclusion, ABMSC and FBMSC differ in their Wnt signature. While FBMSC produced factors, including Wnt signals, that enhanced MSC proliferation, ABMSC produced Wnt factors in a setting that enhanced hematopoietic support. Thus, further unraveling the molecular basis of this phenomenon may lead to improvement of clinical expansion protocols of ABMSCs. PMID:27154244

  19. Effect of Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test on Bone Turnover Markers in Adults with Normal Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shou-Kui; Wan, Jing-Bo; Jiang, Xiao-Hong; Zhu, Yong-Hua; Ma, Jin-Hong; Hua, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background It is well known that enteral nutrients result in acute suppression of bone turnover markers (BTMs), and incretin hormones are believed to play a significant role in this physiological skeletal response. However, there is limited research exploring the impact of parenteral nutrients on BTMs. Our aim was to assess the influence of intravenous glucose on BTMs in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Material/Methods We conducted 1-h intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) in 24 subjects with NGT. Blood samples were collected before and 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60 min after administration of glucose, then serum levels of bone formation marker procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and resorption marker C-terminal cross-linking telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX) were measured. Results During IVGTT, the fasting CTX level fell gradually and reached a nadir of 80.4% of the basal value at 60 min. Conversely, the fasting P1NP level decreased mildly and reached a nadir of 90.6% of the basal value at 15 min, then gradually increased and reached 96.6% at 60 min. The CTX-to-P1NP ratio increased slightly and reached a peak of 104.3% of the basal value at 10 min, then fell gradually and reached a nadir of 83% at 60 min. Conclusions Our study indicates that intravenous glucose results in an acute suppression of BTMs in the absence of incretin hormones. The mechanism responsible for this needs further investigation. PMID:27447783

  20. The Association between Coffee Consumption and Bone Status in Young Adult Males according to Calcium Intake Level.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Kyeong; Kim, Mi-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between coffee consumption and bone status (bone mineral density and bone metabolism-related markers) according to calcium intake level in Korean young adult males. Healthy and nonsmoking males (19-26 years, n = 330) participated in this study. Anthropometric measurements, dietary habits, and nutrient intakes were surveyed. Bone status of the calcaneus was measured by using quantitative ultrasound (QUS). Bone metabolism-related markers including serum total alkaline phosphatase activity (TALP), N-mid osteocalcin (OC), and type 1 collagen C-terminal telopeptide (1CTP) were analyzed. The subjects were divided into two groups based on daily calcium intake level: a calcium-sufficient group (calcium intake ≥ 75% RI, n = 171) and a calcium-deficient group (calcium intake < 75% RI, n = 159). Each group was then further divided into three subgroups based on daily average coffee consumption: no-coffee, less than one serving of coffee per day, and one or more servings of coffee per day. There were no significant differences in height, body weight, body mass index, energy intake, or calcium intake among the three coffee consumption subgroups. QUS parameters and serum 1CTP, TALP, and OC were not significantly different among either the two calcium-intake groups or the three coffee consumption subgroups. Our results may show that current coffee consumption level in Korean young men is not significantly associated with their bone status and metabolism according to the calcium intake level. PMID:27482522

  1. The Association between Coffee Consumption and Bone Status in Young Adult Males according to Calcium Intake Level

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mi-Kyeong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between coffee consumption and bone status (bone mineral density and bone metabolism-related markers) according to calcium intake level in Korean young adult males. Healthy and nonsmoking males (19-26 years, n = 330) participated in this study. Anthropometric measurements, dietary habits, and nutrient intakes were surveyed. Bone status of the calcaneus was measured by using quantitative ultrasound (QUS). Bone metabolism-related markers including serum total alkaline phosphatase activity (TALP), N-mid osteocalcin (OC), and type 1 collagen C-terminal telopeptide (1CTP) were analyzed. The subjects were divided into two groups based on daily calcium intake level: a calcium-sufficient group (calcium intake ≥ 75% RI, n = 171) and a calcium-deficient group (calcium intake < 75% RI, n = 159). Each group was then further divided into three subgroups based on daily average coffee consumption: no-coffee, less than one serving of coffee per day, and one or more servings of coffee per day. There were no significant differences in height, body weight, body mass index, energy intake, or calcium intake among the three coffee consumption subgroups. QUS parameters and serum 1CTP, TALP, and OC were not significantly different among either the two calcium-intake groups or the three coffee consumption subgroups. Our results may show that current coffee consumption level in Korean young men is not significantly associated with their bone status and metabolism according to the calcium intake level. PMID:27482522

  2. A comparative study of the bone metabolic response to dried plum supplementation and PTH treatment in adult, osteopenic ovariectomized rat.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brenda J; Bu, So Young; Wang, Yan; Rendina, Elizabeth; Lim, Yin F; Marlow, Denver; Clarke, Stephen L; Cullen, Diane M; Lucas, Edralin A

    2014-01-01

    Dried plum has been reported to have potent effects on bone in osteopenic animal models, but the mechanisms through which bone metabolism is altered in vivo remain unclear. To address this issue, a study comparing the metabolic response of dried plum to the anabolic agent, parathyroid hormone (PTH), was undertaken. Six month-old female Sprague Dawley rats (n=84) were sham-operated (SHAM) or ovariectomized (OVX) and maintained on a control diet for 6wks until osteopenia was confirmed. Treatments were initiated consisting of a control diet (AIN-93M) supplemented with dried plum (0, 5, 15 or 25%; w/w) or a positive control group receiving PTH. At the end of 6wks of treatment, whole body and femoral bone mineral density (BMD) were restored by the two higher doses of dried plum to the level of the SHAM group. Trabecular bone volume and cortical thickness were also improved with these two doses of dried plum. Dried plum suppressed the OVX-induced increase in bone turnover as indicated by systemic biomarkers of bone metabolism, N-terminal procollagen type 1 (P1NP) and deoxypyridinoline (DPD). Dynamic bone histomorphometric analysis of the tibial metaphysis revealed that dried plum restored the OVX-induced increase in cancellous bone formation rate (BFR) and mineralizing surface (MS/BS) to the SHAM group, but some doses of dried plum increased endocortical mineral apposition rate (MAR). As expected, PTH significantly increased endocortical MAR and BFR, periosteal BFR, and trabecular MAR and BFR beyond that of the OVX and maintained the accelerated rate of bone resorption associated with OVX. Dried plum up-regulated bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) while down-regulating nuclear factor T cell activator 1 (Nfatc1). These findings demonstrate that in the adult osteopenic OVX animal, the effects of dried plum differ from that of PTH in that dried plum primarily suppressed bone turnover with the exception of the indices of bone

  3. Indoxyl sulfate exacerbates low bone turnover induced by parathyroidectomy in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Junya; Hirai, Kazuya; Asai, Hirobumi; Matsumoto, Chiho; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato; Yamato, Hideyuki; Watanabe-Akanuma, Mie

    2015-10-01

    Low-turnover bone disease is one of the bone abnormalities observed in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is recognized to be associated with low serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) level and skeletal resistance to PTH. Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a representative uremic toxin that accumulates in the blood as renal dysfunction progresses in CKD patients. A recent in vitro study using an osteoblastic cell culture system suggests that IS has an important role in the pathogenesis of low bone turnover through induction of skeletal resistance to PTH. However, the effects of IS on the progression of low bone turnover have not been elucidated. In the present study, we produced rats with low bone turnover by performing parathyroidectomy (PTX) and fed these rats a diet containing indole, a precursor of IS, to elevate blood IS level from indole metabolism. Bone metabolism was evaluated by measuring histomorphometric parameters of secondary spongiosa of the femur. Histomorphometric analyses revealed significant decreases in both bone formation-related parameters and bone resorption-related parameters in PTX rats. In indole-treated PTX rats, further decreases in bone formation-related parameters were observed. In addition, serum alkaline phosphatase activity, a bone formation marker, and bone mineral density of the tibia tended to decrease in indole-treated PTX rats. These findings strongly suggest that IS exacerbates low bone turnover through inhibition of bone formation by mechanisms unrelated to skeletal resistance to PTH. PMID:26112820

  4. An adult osteopetrosis model in medaka reveals the importance of osteoclast function for bone remodeling in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    To, Thuy Thanh; Witten, Paul Eckhard; Huysseune, Ann; Winkler, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Osteoclasts play important roles during bone growth and in maintaining bone health and bone homeostasis. Dysfunction or lack of osteoclasts leads to increased bone mass and osteopetrosis phenotypes in mouse and human. Here we report a severe osteopetrosis-like phenotype in transgenic medaka fish, in which membrane bound EGFP (mEGFP) was expressed in osteoclasts under control of the cathepsin K promoter (ctsk:mEGFP). In contrast to reporter lines with GFP expression in the cytoplasm of osteoclasts, adult fish of the mEGFP line developed bone defects indicative for an osteoclast dysfunction. Activity of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) was down-regulated and excess bone was observed in most parts of the skeleton. The osteopetrotic phenotype was particularly obvious at the neural and haemal arches that failed to increase their volume in growing fish. Excess bone caused severe constriction of the spinal cord and the ventral aorta. The continuation of tooth development and the failure to shed teeth resulted in severe hyperdontia. Interestingly, at the vertebral column vertebral body arches displayed a severe osteopetrosis, while vertebral centra had no or only a mild osteopetrotic phenotype. This confirms previous reports from cichlids that, different from the arches, allometric growth of fish vertebral centra initially does not depend on the action of osteoclasts. Independent developmental mechanism that shapes arches and vertebral centra can also lend support to the hypothesis that vertebral centra and arches function as independent developmental modules. Together, this medaka osteopetrosis model confirms the importance of proper osteoclast function during normal skeletal development in teleost fish that requires bone modeling and remodeling.

  5. Impact of Growth Hormone on Adult Bone Quality in Turner Syndrome: A HR-pQCT Study.

    PubMed

    Nour, Munier A; Burt, Lauren A; Perry, Rebecca J; Stephure, David K; Hanley, David A; Boyd, Steven K

    2016-01-01

    Women with Turner syndrome (TS) are known to be at risk of osteoporosis. While childhood growth hormone (GH) treatment is common in TS, the impact of this therapy on bone health has been poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of childhood GH treatment on adult bone quality in women with TS. 28 women aged 17-45 with confirmed TS (12 GH-treated) agreed to participate in this cross-sectional study. Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of lumbar spine, hip, and radius and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) scans of the radius and tibia were used to determine standard morphological and micro-architectural parameters of bone health. Finite element (FE) analysis and polar moment of inertia (pMOI) were used to estimate bone strength. GH-treated subjects were +7.4 cm taller (95% CI 2.5-12.3 cm, p = 0.005). DXA-determined areal BMD of hip, spine, and radius was similar between treatment groups. Both tibial and radial total bone areas were greater among GH-treated subjects (+20.4 and +21.2% respectively, p < 0.05), while other micro-architectural results were not different between groups. pMOI was significantly greater among GH-treated subjects (radius +35.0%, tibia +34.0%, p < 0.05). Childhood GH treatment compared to no treatment in TS was associated with an increased height, larger bones, and greater pMOI, while no significant difference in DXA-derived BMD, HR-pQCT micro-architectural parameters, or FE-estimated bone strength was detected. The higher pMOI and greater bone size may confer benefit for fracture reduction in these GH-treated patients.

  6. Contribution of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Adult Mouse Inner Ear: Mesenchymal Cells and Fibrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Schmiedt, Richard A.; Minamiguchi, Hitoshi; Zhou, Daohong; Smythe, Nancy; Liu, Liya; Ogawa, Makio; Schulte, Bradley A.

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells have shown plasticity with a capacity to differentiate into a variety of specialized cells. To test the hypothesis that some cells in the inner ear are derived from BM, we transplanted either isolated whole BM cells or clonally expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) prepared from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into irradiated adult mice. Isolated GFP+ BM cells also were transplanted into conditioned newborn mice derived from pregnant mice injected with busulfan (which ablates HSCs in the newborns). Quantification of GFP+ cells was performed 3-20 months after transplant. GFP+ cells were found in the inner ear with all transplant conditions. They were most abundant within the spiral ligament but were also found in other locations normally occupied by fibrocytes and mesenchymal cells. No GFP+ neurons or hair cells were observed in inner ears of transplanted mice. Dual immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that most of the GFP+ cells were negative for CD45, a macrophage and hematopoietic cell marker. A portion of the GFP+ cells in the spiral ligament expressed immunoreactive Na, K-ATPase or the Na-K-Cl transporter (NKCC), proteins used as markers for specialized ion transport fibrocytes. Phenotypic studies indicated that the GFP+ cells did not arise from fusion of donor cells with endogenous cells. This study provides the first evidence for the origin of inner ear cells from BM and more specifically from HSCs. The results suggest that mesenchymal cells, including fibrocytes in the adult inner ear, may be derived continuously from HSCs. PMID:16538683

  7. Antioxidant Impregnated Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Wear Debris Particles Display Increased Bone Remodeling and a Superior Osteogenic:Osteolytic Profile vs. Conventional UHMWPE Particles in a Murine Calvaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J.; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M.; Xie, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX™), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX™ containing UHMWPE (AOX™), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n=10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p<0.001). However, AOX also significantly induced 1.64-fold more new bone formation vs. AltrX (p<0.01). Moreover, while the osteolytic:osteogenic ratio of both particles was very close to 1.0, which is indicative of coupled remodeling, AOX was more osteogenic (Slope=1.13±0.10 vs. 0.97±0.10). Histomorphometry of the metabolically labeled undecalcified calvaria revealed a consistent trend of greater MAR in AOX vs. AltrX. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-oxidant impregnated UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. PMID:26495749

  8. Tungsten Promotes Sex-Specific Adipogenesis in the Bone by Altering Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Resident Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Grant, Michael P; Wu, Ting Hua; Flores Molina, Manuel; Plourde, Dany; Kelly, Alexander D R; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Lemaire, Maryse; Schlezinger, Jennifer J; Mwale, Fackson; Mann, Koren K

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring metal that increasingly is being incorporated into industrial goods and medical devices, and is recognized as an emerging contaminant. Tungsten preferentially and rapidly accumulates in murine bone in a concentration-dependent manner; however the effect of tungsten deposition on bone biology is unknown. Other metals alter bone homeostasis by targeting bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation, thus, we investigated the effects of tungsten on MSCsin vitroandin vivoIn vitro, tungsten shifted the balance of MSC differentiation by enhancing rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis, which correlated with an increase in adipocyte content in the bone of tungsten-exposed, young, male mice. Conversely, tungsten inhibited osteogenesis of MSCsin vitro; however, we found no evidence that tungsten inhibited osteogenesisin vivo Interestingly, two factors known to influence adipogenesis are sex and age of mice. Both female and older mice have enhanced adipogenesis. We extended our study and exposed young female and adult (9-month) male and female mice to tungsten for 4 weeks. Although tungsten accumulated to a similar extent in young female mice, it did not promote adipogenesis. Interestingly, tungsten did not accumulate in the bone of older mice; it was undetectable in adult male mice, and just above the limit of detect in adult female mice. Surprisingly, tungsten enhanced adipogenesis in adult female mice. In summary, we found that tungsten alters bone homeostasis by altering differentiation of MSCs, which could have significant implications for bone quality, but is highly dependent upon sex and age.

  9. CXC receptor knockout mice: characterization of skeletal features and membranous bone healing in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, David S; Sakamoto, Taylor; Ishida, Kenji; Makhijani, Nalini S; Gruber, Helen E; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2011-02-01

    The potential role of CXC chemokines bearing the glu-leu-arg (ELR) motif in bone repair was studied using a cranial defect (CD) model in mice lacking the CXC receptor (mCXCR(-/-) knockout mice), which is homologous to knockout of the human CXC receptor 2 (CXCR2) gene. During the inflammatory stage of bone repair, ELR CXC chemokines are released by inflammatory cells and serve as chemotactic and angiogenic factors. mCXCR(-/-) mice were smaller in weight and length from base of tail to nose tip, compared to WT littermates. DEXA analysis indicated that bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), total area (TA), bone area (BA), and total tissue mass (TTM) were decreased in the mCXCR(-/-) mice at 6, 12, and 18 weeks of age. Trabecular bone characteristics in mCXCR(-/-) (% bone, connectivity, number, and thickness) were reduced, and trabecular spacing was increased as evidenced by μCT. There was no difference in bone formation or resorption indices measured by bone histomorphometry. Trabecular BMD was not altered. Cortical bone volume, BMD, and thickness were reduced; whereas, bone marrow volume was increased in mCXCR(-/-). Decreased polar moment of inertia (J) in the tibias/femurs suggested that the mCXCR(-/-) long bones are weaker. This was confirmed by three-point bending testing of the femurs. CDs created in 6-week-old male mCXCR(-/-) and WT littermates were not completely healed at 12 weeks; WT animals, however, had significantly more bone in-growth than mCXCR(-/-). New bone sites were identified using polarized light and assessed for numbers of osteocyte (OCy) lacunae and blood vessels (BlV) around the original CD. In new bone, the number of BlV in WT was >2× that seen in mCXCR(-/-). Bone histomorphometry parameters in the cranial defect did not show any difference in bone formation or resorption markers. In summary, studies showed that mCXCR(-/-) mice have (1) reduced weight and size; (2) decreased BMD and BMC; (3) decreased amounts of trabecular

  10. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  11. Bone health in adults treated with endocrine therapy for early breast or prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Poznak, Catherine H

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a hormonally responsive organ. Sex hormones and calcium regulating hormones, including parathyroid hormone, 1-25 dihydroxy vitamin D, and calcitonin, have effects on bone resorption and bone deposition. These hormones affect both bone quality and bone quantity. The sex hormone estrogen inhibits bone resorption, and estrogen therapy has been developed to prevent and treat osteoporosis. Androgens are an important source of estrogen through the action of the enzyme aromatase and may themselves stimulate bone formation. Hence, the sex steroids play a role in bone metabolism. Breast cancer and prostate cancer are frequently hormonally responsive and may be treated with antiestrogens or antiandrogens respectfully. In addition, chemotherapy and supportive medications may alter the patient's endocrine system. In general, the suppression of sex hormones has a predictable affect on bone health, as seen by loss of bone mineral density and increased risk of fragility fractures. The bone toxicity of cancer-directed endocrine therapy can be mitigated through screening, counseling on optimization of calcium and vitamin D intake, exercise, and other lifestyle/behavioral actions, as well as the use of medications when the fracture risk is high. Maintaining bone health in patients who are treated with endocrine therapy for breast and prostate cancer is the focus of this review.

  12. Bone health in adults treated with endocrine therapy for early breast or prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Poznak, Catherine H

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a hormonally responsive organ. Sex hormones and calcium regulating hormones, including parathyroid hormone, 1-25 dihydroxy vitamin D, and calcitonin, have effects on bone resorption and bone deposition. These hormones affect both bone quality and bone quantity. The sex hormone estrogen inhibits bone resorption, and estrogen therapy has been developed to prevent and treat osteoporosis. Androgens are an important source of estrogen through the action of the enzyme aromatase and may themselves stimulate bone formation. Hence, the sex steroids play a role in bone metabolism. Breast cancer and prostate cancer are frequently hormonally responsive and may be treated with antiestrogens or antiandrogens respectfully. In addition, chemotherapy and supportive medications may alter the patient's endocrine system. In general, the suppression of sex hormones has a predictable affect on bone health, as seen by loss of bone mineral density and increased risk of fragility fractures. The bone toxicity of cancer-directed endocrine therapy can be mitigated through screening, counseling on optimization of calcium and vitamin D intake, exercise, and other lifestyle/behavioral actions, as well as the use of medications when the fracture risk is high. Maintaining bone health in patients who are treated with endocrine therapy for breast and prostate cancer is the focus of this review. PMID:25993224

  13. RT-PCR standardization and bone mineralization after low-level laser therapy on adult osteoblast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Bomfim, Fernando R. C.; Sella, Valéria R. G.; Zanaga, Jéssica Q.; Pereira, Nayara S.; Nouailhetas, Viviane L. A.; Plapler, Hélio

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Osteoblasts are capable to produce different compounds directly connected to bone mineralization process. This study aims to standardize the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for adult osteoblasts to observe the effect of low level laser therapy on bone mineralization. Methods: Five-millimeter long fragments obtained from the mead femoral region of male Wistar rats were assigned into group A (n=10, laser) and group B (n=10, no laser), submitted to mechanic and enzymatic digestion. After 7 days, cultures of group A were irradiated daily on a single spot with a GaInAs laser, λ=808nm, 200mW/cm2, 2J/cm2, bean diameter of 0,02mm, 5 seconds for 6 days. Group B was manipulated but received no laser irradiation. After 13 days the cells were trypsinized for 15 minute and stabilized with RNA later® for RNA extraction with Trizol®. cDNA synthesis used 10μg of RNA and M-MLV® enzyme. PCR was accomplished using the β-actin gene as a control. Another aliquot was fixed for Hematoxylin-Eosin and Von Kossa staining to visualize bone mineralization areas. Results: Under UV light we observed clearly the amplification of β-actin gene around 400bp. HE and Von Kossa staining showed osteoblast clusters, a higher number of bone cells and well defined mineralization areas in group A. Conclusion: The cell culture, RNA extraction and RT-PCR method for adult osteoblasts was effective, allowing to use these methods for bone mineralization studies. Laser improved bone mineralization and further studies are needed involving osteogenesis, calcium release mechanisms and calcium related channels.

  14. A comparison of osteoclast-rich and osteoclast-poor osteopetrosis in adult mice sheds light on the role of the osteoclast in coupling bone resorption and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Thudium, Christian S; Moscatelli, Ilana; Flores, Carmen; Thomsen, Jesper S; Brüel, Annemarie; Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Karsdal, Morten A; Richter, Johan; Henriksen, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Osteopetrosis due to lack of acid secretion by osteoclasts is characterized by abolished bone resorption, increased osteoclast numbers, but normal or even increased bone formation. In contrast, osteoclast-poor osteopetrosis appears to have less osteoblasts and reduced bone formation, indicating that osteoclasts are important for regulating osteoblast activity. To illuminate the role of the osteoclast in controlling bone remodeling, we transplanted irradiated skeletally mature 3-month old wild-type mice with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to generate either an osteoclast-rich or osteoclast-poor adult osteopetrosis model. We used fetal liver HSCs from (1) oc/oc mice, (2) RANK KO mice, and (3) compared these to wt control cells. TRAP5b activity, a marker of osteoclast number and size, was increased in the oc/oc recipients, while a significant reduction was seen in the RANK KO recipients. In contrast, the bone resorption marker CTX-I was similarly decreased in both groups. Both oc/oc and Rank KO recipients developed a mild osteopetrotic phenotype. However, the osteoclast-rich oc/oc recipients showed higher trabecular bone volume (40 %), increased bone strength (66 %), and increased bone formation rate (54 %) in trabecular bone, while RANK KO recipients showed only minor trends compared to control recipients. We here show that maintaining non-resorbing osteoclasts, as opposed to reducing the osteoclasts, leads to increased bone formation, bone volume, and ultimately higher bone strength in vivo, which indicates that osteoclasts are sources of anabolic molecules for the osteoblasts.

  15. Prolonged performance of a high repetition low force task induces bone adaptation in young adult rats, but loss in mature rats.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, Vicky S; Frara, Nagat; Harris, Michele Y; Amin, Mamta; Wade, Christine K; Popoff, Steven N; Barbe, Mary F

    2015-12-01

    We have shown that prolonged repetitive reaching and grasping tasks lead to exposure-dependent changes in bone microarchitecture and inflammatory cytokines in young adult rats. Since aging mammals show increased tissue inflammatory cytokines, we sought here to determine if aging, combined with prolonged performance of a repetitive upper extremity task, enhances bone loss. We examined the radius, forearm flexor muscles, and serum from 16 mature (14-18 months of age) and 14 young adult (2.5-6.5 months of age) female rats after performance of a high repetition low force (HRLF) reaching and grasping task for 12 weeks. Young adult HRLF rats showed enhanced radial bone growth (e.g., increased trabecular bone volume, osteoblast numbers, bone formation rate, and mid-diaphyseal periosteal perimeter), compared to age-matched controls. Mature HRLF rats showed several indices of radial bone loss (e.g., decreased trabecular bone volume, and increased cortical bone thinning, porosity, resorptive spaces and woven bone formation), increased osteoclast numbers and inflammatory cytokines, compared to age-matched controls and young adult HRLF rats. Mature rats weighed more yet had lower maximum reflexive grip strength, than young adult rats, although each age group was able to pull at the required reach rate (4 reaches/min) and required submaximal pulling force (30 force-grams) for a food reward. Serum estrogen levels and flexor digitorum muscle size were similar in each age group. Thus, mature rats had increased bone degradative changes than in young adult rats performing the same repetitive task for 12 weeks, with increased inflammatory cytokine responses and osteoclast activity as possible causes. PMID:26517953

  16. Prolonged performance of a high repetition low force task induces bone adaptation in young adult rats, but loss in mature rats.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, Vicky S; Frara, Nagat; Harris, Michele Y; Amin, Mamta; Wade, Christine K; Popoff, Steven N; Barbe, Mary F

    2015-12-01

    We have shown that prolonged repetitive reaching and grasping tasks lead to exposure-dependent changes in bone microarchitecture and inflammatory cytokines in young adult rats. Since aging mammals show increased tissue inflammatory cytokines, we sought here to determine if aging, combined with prolonged performance of a repetitive upper extremity task, enhances bone loss. We examined the radius, forearm flexor muscles, and serum from 16 mature (14-18 months of age) and 14 young adult (2.5-6.5 months of age) female rats after performance of a high repetition low force (HRLF) reaching and grasping task for 12 weeks. Young adult HRLF rats showed enhanced radial bone growth (e.g., increased trabecular bone volume, osteoblast numbers, bone formation rate, and mid-diaphyseal periosteal perimeter), compared to age-matched controls. Mature HRLF rats showed several indices of radial bone loss (e.g., decreased trabecular bone volume, and increased cortical bone thinning, porosity, resorptive spaces and woven bone formation), increased osteoclast numbers and inflammatory cytokines, compared to age-matched controls and young adult HRLF rats. Mature rats weighed more yet had lower maximum reflexive grip strength, than young adult rats, although each age group was able to pull at the required reach rate (4 reaches/min) and required submaximal pulling force (30 force-grams) for a food reward. Serum estrogen levels and flexor digitorum muscle size were similar in each age group. Thus, mature rats had increased bone degradative changes than in young adult rats performing the same repetitive task for 12 weeks, with increased inflammatory cytokine responses and osteoclast activity as possible causes.

  17. Augmented efficacy with the combination of blockade of the Notch-1 pathway, bortezomib and romidepsin in a murine MT-1 adult T-cell leukemia model.

    PubMed

    Yu, P; Petrus, M N; Ju, W; Zhang, M; Conlon, K C; Nakagawa, M; Maeda, M; Bamford, R N; Waldmann, T A

    2015-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive malignancy caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1. There is no accepted curative therapy for ATL. We have reported that certain ATL patients have increased Notch-1 signaling along with constitutive activation of the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Physical and functional interaction between these two pathways provides the rationale to combine the γ-secretase inhibitor compound E with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Moreover, romidepsin, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, has demonstrated major antitumor action in leukemia/lymphoma. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the single agents and the combination of these agents in a murine model of human ATL, the MT-1 model. Single and double agents inhibited tumor growth as monitored by tumor size (P<0.05), and prolonged survival of leukemia-bearing mice (P<0.05) compared with the control group. The combination of three agents significantly enhanced the antitumor efficacy as assessed by tumor size, tumor markers in the serum (human soluble interleukin-2 receptor-α and β2-microglobulin) and survival of the MT-1 tumor-bearing mice, compared with all other treatment groups (P<0.05). Improved therapeutic efficacy obtained by combining compound E, bortezomib and romidepsin supports a clinical trial of this combination in the treatment of ATL.

  18. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, V.; Kaila, R.; Wilson, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the safety and efficacy of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) compared with bone graft when used specifically for revision spinal fusion surgery secondary to pseudarthrosis. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were searched using defined search terms. The primary outcome measure was spinal fusion, assessed as success or failure in accordance with radiograph, MRI or CT scan review at 24-month follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was time to fusion. Results A total of six studies (three prospective and three retrospective) reporting on the use of BMP2 met the inclusion criteria (203 patients). Of these, four provided a comparison of BMP2 and bone graft whereas the other two solely investigated the use of BMP2. The primary outcome was seen in 92.3% (108/117) of patients following surgery with BMP2. Although none of the studies showed superiority of BMP2 to bone graft for fusion, its use was associated with a statistically quicker time to achieving fusion. BMP2 did not appear to increase the risk of complication. Conclusion The use of BMP2 is both safe and effective within the revision setting, ideally in cases where bone graft is unavailable or undesirable. Further research is required to define its optimum role. Cite this article: Mr P. Bodalia. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:145–152. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000418. PMID:27121215

  19. Immortalization and characterization of osteoblast cell lines generated from wild-type and Nmp4-null mouse bone marrow stromal cells using murine telomerase reverse transcriptase (mTERT).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Marta B; Childress, Paul; Philip, Binu K; Gerard-O'Riley, Rita; Hanlon, Michael; Herbert, Brittney-Shea; Robling, Alexander G; Pavalko, Fredrick M; Bidwell, Joseph P

    2012-05-01

    Intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) adds new bone to the osteoporotic skeleton; the transcription factor Nmp4/CIZ represses PTH-induced bone formation in mice and as a consequence is a potential drug target for improving hormone clinical efficacy. To explore the impact of Nmp4/CIZ on osteoblast phenotype, we immortalized bone marrow stromal cells from wildtype (WT) and Nmp4-knockout (KO) mice using murine telomerase reverse transcriptase. Clonal lines were initially chosen based on their positive staining for alkaline phosphatase and capacity for mineralization. Disabling Nmp4/CIZ had no gross impact on osteoblast phenotype development. WT and KO clones exhibited identical sustained growth, reduced population doubling times, extended maintenance of the mature osteoblast phenotype, and competency for differentiating toward the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages. Additional screening of the immortalized cells for PTH-responsiveness permitted further studies with single WT and KO clones. We recently demonstrated that PTH-induced c-fos femoral mRNA expression is enhanced in Nmp4-KO mice and in the present study we observed that hormone stimulated either an equivalent or modestly enhanced increase in c-fos mRNA expression in both primary null and KO clone cells depending on PTH concentration. The null primary osteoblasts and KO clone cells exhibited a transiently enhanced response to bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). The clones exhibited lower and higher expressions of the PTH receptor (Pthr1) and the BMP2 receptor (Bmpr1a, Alk3), respectively, as compared to primary cells. These immortalized cell lines will provide a valuable tool for disentangling the complex functional roles underlying Nmp4/CIZ regulation of bone anabolism.

  20. The GH secretagogues ipamorelin and GH-releasing peptide-6 increase bone mineral content in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Svensson, J; Lall, S; Dickson, S L; Bengtsson, B A; Rømer, J; Ahnfelt-Rønne, I; Ohlsson, C; Jansson, J O

    2000-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is of importance for normal bone remodelling. A recent clinical study demonstrated that MK-677, a member of a class of GH secretagogues (GHSs), increases serum concentrations of biochemical markers of bone formation and bone resorption. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the GHSs, ipamorelin (IPA) and GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6), increase bone mineral content (BMC) in young adult female rats. Thirteen-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were given IPA (0.5 mg/kg per day; n=7), GHRP-6 (0.5 mg/kg per day; n=8), GH (3.5 mg/kg per day; n=7), or vehicle administered continuously s.c. via osmotic minipumps for 12 weeks. The animals were followed in vivo by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements every 4th week. After the animals were killed, femurs were analysed in vitro by mid-diaphyseal peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) scans. After this, excised femurs and vertebrae L6 were analysed by the use of Archimedes' principle and by determinations of ash weights. All treatments increased body weight and total tibial and vertebral BMC measured by DXA in vivo compared with vehicle-treated controls. However, total BMC corrected for the increase in body weight (total BMC:body weight ratio) was unaffected. Tibial area bone mineral density (BMD, BMC/area) was increased, but total and vertebral area BMDs were unchanged. The pQCT measurements in vitro revealed that the increase in the cortical BMC was due to an increased cross-sectional bone area, whereas the cortical volumetric BMD was unchanged. Femur and vertebra L6 volumes were increased but no effect was seen on the volumetric BMDs as measured by Archimedes' principle. Ash weight was increased by all treatments, but the mineral concentration was unchanged. We conclude that treatment of adult female rats with the GHSs ipamorelin and GHRP-6 increases BMC as measured by DXA in vivo. The results of in vitro measurements using pQCT and Archimedes' principle, in

  1. High Expression of Human Homologue of Murine Double Minute 4 and the Short Splicing Variant, HDM4-S, in Bone Marrow in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Zhang, Yu Helen; You, M James; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E

    2016-08-01

    The human homologue of murine double minute 2 (HDM2) and HDM4 negatively regulate p53. HDM4 has not been assessed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We examined the expression of HDM4 and the short splicing variant, HDM4-S, in bone marrow samples obtained from 85 and 23 patients with AML and MDS, respectively, and 18 negative tumor staging bone marrow samples (used as the control). Immunohistochemical staining showed that HDM4 was overexpressed in 78 AML cases (92%) and 12 MDS cases (52%) compared with 1 stressed bone marrow sample (6%). Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of 8 AML and 11 low-grade (LG)-MDS cases confirmed that HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA expression were also elevated in all AML cases. HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA expression was elevated in 3 (27%) and 10 (91%) LG-MDS cases, respectively. HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA levels were higher in those with AML than in those with LG-MDS. In leukemia cell lines, HEL and U937 predominantly expressed HDM4-S. In contrast, NALM6 expressed HDM4 and HDM4-S. Downregulation of HDM4 expression by treatment with small interfering RNA in NALM6 and HEL cells induced p21 expression but not increased apoptotic activity. Our results indicate that HDM4 is a potential therapeutic target in patients with AML or MDS. PMID:27155969

  2. Selective cytotoxicity of murine monoclonal antibody LAM2 against human small-cell carcinoma in the presence of human complement: possible use for in vitro elimination of tumor cells from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Stahel, R A; Mabry, M; Sabbath, K; Speak, J A; Bernal, S D

    1985-05-15

    LAM2 is a murine IgM monoclonal antibody (MAb) which binds strongly to the cell membrane of human lung small-cell carcinoma (SCC) and squamous-cell carcinoma but not to normal bone-marrow cells. The cytotoxicity of this antibody in the presence of human complement was investigated in vitro by chromium release and clonogenic assays. The optimal treatment conditions included incubation with antibody for 30 min at 37 degrees C followed by 3 additions of human complement 30 min apart. Cell lysis ranged from 94 to 98% in 4 SCC cell lines at antibody dilutions of 1:100: a lower level of lysis (60%) occurred in a lung squamous-cell carcinoma cell line. The cytotoxic effect was strictly complement-dependent. No cytotoxic effect was seen with other human cell lines including lung adenocarcinoma, lung large-cell carcinoma, myeloid leukemia, and lymphoblastic leukemia. No lysis was seen with nucleated marrow cells from healthy volunteers. Normal marrow cells in excess did not inhibit SCC cell lysis. Incubation with antibody and complement resulted in a 100-fold reduction of colony formation of SCC cells, but did not reduce the number of colonies of marrow-cell precursors, including CFU-GEMM, BFU-E, and CFU-C. The selective cytotoxicity of LAM2 antibody to SCC, but not to normal bone-marrow cells, suggests that this antibody may be useful for the in vitro elimination of SCC cells from the bone marrow.

  3. Extracellular calcium (Ca2+(o))-sensing receptor in a murine bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2): potential mediator of the actions of Ca2+(o) on the function of ST2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+(o)) homeostasis by mediating the actions of Ca2+(o) on parathyroid gland and kidney. Bone marrow stromal cells support the formation of osteoclasts from their progenitors as well as the growth of hematopoietic stem cells by secreting humoral factors and through cell to cell contact. Stromal cells also have the capacity to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. Bone resorption by osteoclasts probably produces substantial local increases in Ca2+(o) that could provide a signal for stromal cells in the immediate vicinity, leading us to determine whether such stromal cells express the CaR. In this study, we used the murine bone marrow-derived, stromal cell line, ST2. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using an antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in ST2 cells. We also identified CaR transcripts in ST2 cells by Northern analysis using a CaR-specific probe and by RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products. Exposure of ST2 cells to high Ca2+(o) (4.8 mM) or to the polycationic CaR agonists, neomycin (300 microM) or gadolinium (100 microM), stimulated both chemotaxis and DNA synthesis in ST2 cells. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the bone marrow-derived stromal cell line, ST2, possesses both CaR protein and messenger RNA that are very similar if not identical to those in parathyroid and kidney. Furthermore, as ST2 cells have the potential to differentiate into osteoblasts, the CaR in stromal cells could participate in bone turnover by stimulating the proliferation and migration of such cells to sites of bone resorption as a result of local, osteoclast-mediated release of Ca2+(o) and, thereafter, initiating bone formation after their differentiation into osteoblasts.

  4. In vitro expanded bone marrow-derived murine (C57Bl/KaLwRij) mesenchymal stem cells can acquire CD34 expression and induce sarcoma formation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Song; De Becker, Ann; De Raeve, Hendrik; Van Camp, Ben; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Riet, Ivan

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Murine MSCs can undergo spontaneously malignant transformation and form sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acquisition of CD34 is a transformation type for MSCs into sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch/Hh/Wnt pathways are related to the malignant phenotype of transformed MSCs. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have currently generated numerous interests in pre-clinical and clinical applications due to their multiple lineages differentiation potential and immunomodulary effects. However, accumulating evidence indicates that MSCs, especially murine MSCs (mMSCs), can undergo spontaneous transformation after long-term in vitro culturing, which might reduce the therapeutic application possibilities of these stem cells. In the present study, we observed that in vitro expanded bone marrow (BM) derived mMSCs from the C57Bl/KaLwRij mouse strain can lose their specific stem cells markers (CD90 and CD105) and acquire CD34 expression, accompanied with an altered morphology and an impaired tri-lineages differentiation capacity. Compared to normal mMSCs, these transformed mMSCs exhibited an increased proliferation rate, an enhanced colony formation and migration ability as well as a higher sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs. Transformed mMSCs were highly tumorigenic in vivo, resulting in aggressive sarcoma formation when transplanted in non-immunocompromised mice. Furthermore, we found that Notch signaling downstream genes (hey1, hey2 and heyL) were significantly upregulated in transformed mMSCs, while Hedgehog signaling downstream genes Gli1 and Ptch1 and the Wnt signaling downstream gene beta-catenin were all decreased. Taken together, we observed that murine in vitro expanded BM-MSCs can transform into CD34 expressing cells that induce sarcoma formation in vivo. We assume that dysregulation of the Notch(+)/Hh(-)/Wnt(-) signaling pathway is associated with the malignant phenotype of the transformed mMSCs.

  5. Association between Homocysteine and Bone Mineral Density according to Age and Sex in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Il; Moon, Ji Hyun; Chung, Hye Won; Kong, Mi Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several studies about the relationship between serum homocysteine levels and bone mineral density (BMD), but the results are varied, and the studies are limited in Korea. In our study, the relationship between serum homocysteine levels and BMD by part according to age and sex is investigated. Methods From March 2012 to July 2015, the 3,337 healthy adults who took a medical examination were recruited. Subjects filled in the self-recording type questionnaire and physical examination, blood test, BMD of lumbar spine and femur were measured. After sorting by aging (≤49 year old, 50-59 year old, ≥60 year old) and sex, the results were adjusted with age and body mass index (BMI) and the relationship between serum homocysteine levels and BMD by lumbar spine and femur was analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results As results of analysis, with the adjustment with age and BMI, all age groups of men had no significant relationship between log-converted serum homocysteine levels and BMD. In women aged under 50, there were significantly negative relationships at lumbar spine (β=-0.028, P=0.038), femur neck (β=-0.062, P=0.001), and total hip (β=-0.076, P<0.001), but there was no significant relationship in other age groups (50-59 year old and ≥60 year old). Conclusions As the serum homocysteine levels increased in women aged under 50, BMD of the lumbar spine and femur decreased, and correlations between homocysteine and BMD were different by sex and age. PMID:27622176

  6. Association between Homocysteine and Bone Mineral Density according to Age and Sex in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Il; Moon, Ji Hyun; Chung, Hye Won; Kong, Mi Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several studies about the relationship between serum homocysteine levels and bone mineral density (BMD), but the results are varied, and the studies are limited in Korea. In our study, the relationship between serum homocysteine levels and BMD by part according to age and sex is investigated. Methods From March 2012 to July 2015, the 3,337 healthy adults who took a medical examination were recruited. Subjects filled in the self-recording type questionnaire and physical examination, blood test, BMD of lumbar spine and femur were measured. After sorting by aging (≤49 year old, 50-59 year old, ≥60 year old) and sex, the results were adjusted with age and body mass index (BMI) and the relationship between serum homocysteine levels and BMD by lumbar spine and femur was analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results As results of analysis, with the adjustment with age and BMI, all age groups of men had no significant relationship between log-converted serum homocysteine levels and BMD. In women aged under 50, there were significantly negative relationships at lumbar spine (β=-0.028, P=0.038), femur neck (β=-0.062, P=0.001), and total hip (β=-0.076, P<0.001), but there was no significant relationship in other age groups (50-59 year old and ≥60 year old). Conclusions As the serum homocysteine levels increased in women aged under 50, BMD of the lumbar spine and femur decreased, and correlations between homocysteine and BMD were different by sex and age.

  7. Diminished Bone Strength Is Observed in Adult Women and Men Who Sustained a Mild Trauma Distal Forearm Fracture During Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Achenbach, Sara J; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Kirmani, Salman; McCready, Louise K; Melton, L Joseph; Amin, Shreyasee

    2015-01-01

    Children and adolescents who sustain a distal forearm fracture (DFF) owing to mild, but not moderate, trauma have reduced bone strength and cortical thinning at the distal radius and tibia. Whether these skeletal deficits track into adulthood is unknown. Therefore, we studied 75 women and 75 men (age range, 20 to 40 years) with a childhood (age <18 years) DFF and 150 sex-matched controls with no history of fracture using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) to examine bone strength (ie, failure load) by micro–finite element (µFE) analysis, as well as cortical and trabecular bone parameters at the distal radius and tibia. Level of trauma (mild versus moderate) was assigned using a validated classification scheme, blind to imaging results. When compared to sex-matched, nonfracture controls, women and men with a mild trauma childhood DFF (eg, fall from standing height) had significant reductions in failure load (p < 0.05) of the distal radius, whereas women and men with a moderate trauma childhood DFF (eg, fall while riding a bicycle) had values similar to controls. Consistent findings were observed at the distal tibia. Furthermore, women and men with a mild trauma childhood DFF had significant deficits in distal radius cortical area (p < 0.05), and significantly lower dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived bone density at the radius, hip, and total body regions compared to controls (all p < 0.05). By contrast, women and men with a moderate trauma childhood DFF had bone density, structure, and strength that did not differ significantly from controls. These findings in young adults are consistent with our observations in children/adolescents with DFF, and they suggest that a mild trauma childhood DFF may presage suboptimal peak bone density, structure, and strength in young adulthood. Children and adolescents who suffer mild trauma DFFs may need to be targeted for lifestyle interventions to help achieve improved skeletal

  8. Anabolic Responses of an Adult Cancellous Bone Site to Prostaglandin E2 in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Ke, Hua Zhu; Jee, Webster S. S.; Sakou, Takashi

    1993-01-01

    The objects of this study were to determine: (1) the response of a non-growing cancellous bone site to daily prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) administration; and (2) the differences in the effects of daily PGE2, administration in growing (proximal tibial metaphysis, PTM) and non-growing cancellous bone sites (distal tibial metaphysis, DTM). Seven-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were given daily subcutaneous injections of 0, 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg per day for 60, 120 and 180 days. The static and dynamic histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent labeled undecalcified distal tibial metaphyses (DTM). No age-related changes were found in static and dynamic histomorphometry of DTM cancellous bone between 7 and 13 months of age. The DTM of 7-month-old (basal controls) rats consisted of a 24.5 +/- 7.61%-metaphyseal cancellous bone mass, and a thick trabeculae (92 +/- 12 micro-m). It also had a very low tissue-base bone formation rate (3.0 +/- 7.31%/year). Exogenous PGE2 administration produced the following transient changes in a dose-response manner between zero and 60 days: (1) increased trabecular bone mass and improved architecture (increased trabecular bone area, width and number, and decreased trabecular separation); (2) increased trabecular interconnections: (3) increased bone formation parameters; and (4) decreased eroded perimeter. A new steady state with more cancellous bone mass and higher bone turnover was observed from day 60 onward, The elevated bone mass induced by the first 60 days of PGE2 treatment was maintained by another 60 and 120 days with continuous daily PGE2 treatment. When these findings were compared to those previously reported for the PTM, we found that the DTM was much more responsive to PGE2 treatment than the PTM. Percent trabecular bone area and tissue based bone formation rate increased significantly more in DTM as compared to PTM after the 60 days of 6 mg PGE2 treatment. These observations indicate that a non

  9. Anti IL-17A therapy inhibits bone loss in TNF-α-mediated murine arthritis by modulation of the T-cell balance.

    PubMed

    Zwerina, Karin; Koenders, Marije; Hueber, Axel; Marijnissen, Renoud J; Baum, Wolfgang; Heiland, Gisela Ruiz; Zaiss, Mario; McLnnes, Iain; Joosten, Leo; van den Berg, Wim; Zwerina, Jochen; Schett, Georg

    2012-02-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a major inducer for inflammation and bone loss. Here, we investigated whether interleukin (IL)-17 plays a role in TNF-α-mediated inflammation and bone resorption. Human TNF-α transgenic (hTNFtg) mice were treated with a neutralizing anti-IL-17A antibody and assessed for inflammation, cartilage and bone damage. T-cell transcription factors and lymphokine patterns were measured in the LNs. IL-17A inhibition in the absence of IL-1 was also evaluated by treating hTNFtg/IL-1(-/-) mice with an IL-17A neutralizing antibody. IL-17A neutralization had only minor effects on TNF-α-induced inflammation but effectively reduced local and systemic bone loss by blocking osteoclast differentiation in vivo. Effects were based on a shift to bone-protective T-cell responses such as enhanced Th2 differentiation, IL-4 and IL-12 expression and Treg cell numbers. Whereas inflammation in hTNFtg/IL-1(-/-) mice was highly sensitive to IL-17A blockade, no shift in the T-cell lineages and no additional benefit on bone mass were observed in response to IL-17A neutralization. We thus conclude that IL-17A is a key mediator of TNF-α-induced bone loss by closely interacting with IL-1 in blocking bone protective T-cell responses.

  10. FDG-PET/CT Imaging Predicts Histopathologic Treatment Responses after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Adult Primary Bone Sarcomas

    DOE PAGES

    Benz, Matthias R.; Czernin, Johannes; Tap, William D.; Eckardt, Jeffrey J.; Seeger, Leanne L.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.; Dry, Sarah M.; Phelps, Michael E.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Eilber, Fritz C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose . Tmore » he aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether FDG-PET allows an accurate assessment of histopathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in adult patients with primary bone sarcomas. Methods . Twelve consecutive patients with resectable, primary high grade bone sarcomas were enrolled prospectively. FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed prior to the initiation and after completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic response. Results . Histopathologic responders showed significantly more pronounced decreases in tumor FDG-SUVmax from baseline to late follow up than non-responders ( 64 ± 19 % versus 29 ± 30 %, resp.; P = .03 ). Using a 60% decrease in tumor FDG-uptake as a threshold for metabolic response correctly classified 3 of 4 histopathologic responders and 7 of 8 histopathologic non-responders as metabolic responders and non-responders, respectively (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 88%). Conclusion . These results suggest that changes in FDG-SUVmax at the end of neoadjuvant treatment can identify histopathologic responders and non-responders in adult primary bone sarcoma patients.« less

  11. Migration of bone marrow progenitor cells in the adult brain of rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Dennie, Donnahue; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2016-04-26

    Neurogenesis takes place in the adult mammalian brain in three areas: Subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG); subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle; olfactory bulb. Different molecular markers can be used to characterize the cells involved in adult neurogenesis. It has been recently suggested that a population of bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells may migrate to the brain and differentiate into neuronal lineage. To explore this hypothesis, we injected recombinant SV40-derived vectors into the BM and followed the potential migration of the transduced cells. Long-term BM-directed gene transfer using recombinant SV40-derived vectors leads to expression of the genes delivered to the BM firstly in circulating cells, then after several months in mature neurons and microglial cells, and thus without central nervous system (CNS) lesion. Most of transgene-expressing cells expressed NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Thus, BM-derived cells may function as progenitors of CNS cells in adult animals. The mechanism by which the cells from the BM come to be neurons remains to be determined. Although the observed gradual increase in transgene-expressing neurons over 16 mo suggests that the pathway involved differentiation of BM-resident cells into neurons, cell fusion as the principal route cannot be totally ruled out. Additional studies using similar viral vectors showed that BM-derived progenitor cells migrating in the CNS express markers of neuronal precursors or immature neurons. Transgene-positive cells were found in the subgranular zone of the DG of the hippocampus 16 mo after intramarrow injection of the vector. In addition to cells expressing markers of mature neurons, transgene-positive cells were also positive for nestin and doublecortin, molecules expressed by developing neuronal cells. These cells were actively proliferating, as shown by short term BrdU incorporation studies. Inducing seizures by using kainic acid increased the number of BM progenitor cells

  12. Migration of bone marrow progenitor cells in the adult brain of rats and rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dennie, Donnahue; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis takes place in the adult mammalian brain in three areas: Subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG); subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle; olfactory bulb. Different molecular markers can be used to characterize the cells involved in adult neurogenesis. It has been recently suggested that a population of bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells may migrate to the brain and differentiate into neuronal lineage. To explore this hypothesis, we injected recombinant SV40-derived vectors into the BM and followed the potential migration of the transduced cells. Long-term BM-directed gene transfer using recombinant SV40-derived vectors leads to expression of the genes delivered to the BM firstly in circulating cells, then after several months in mature neurons and microglial cells, and thus without central nervous system (CNS) lesion. Most of transgene-expressing cells expressed NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Thus, BM-derived cells may function as progenitors of CNS cells in adult animals. The mechanism by which the cells from the BM come to be neurons remains to be determined. Although the observed gradual increase in transgene-expressing neurons over 16 mo suggests that the pathway involved differentiation of BM-resident cells into neurons, cell fusion as the principal route cannot be totally ruled out. Additional studies using similar viral vectors showed that BM-derived progenitor cells migrating in the CNS express markers of neuronal precursors or immature neurons. Transgene-positive cells were found in the subgranular zone of the DG of the hippocampus 16 mo after intramarrow injection of the vector. In addition to cells expressing markers of mature neurons, transgene-positive cells were also positive for nestin and doublecortin, molecules expressed by developing neuronal cells. These cells were actively proliferating, as shown by short term BrdU incorporation studies. Inducing seizures by using kainic acid increased the number of BM progenitor cells

  13. Structural and Ultrastructural Characteristics of Bone-Tendon Junction of the Calcaneal Tendon of Adult and Elderly Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Diego Pulzatto; Dias, Fernando José; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Watanabe, Ii-sei

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are transition tissues that transfer the contractile forces generated by the muscles to the bones, allowing movement. The region where the tendon attaches to the bone is called bone-tendon junction or enthesis and may be classified as fibrous or fibrocartilaginous. This study aims to analyze the collagen fibers and the cells present in the bone-tendon junction using light microscopy and ultrastructural techniques as scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Forty male Wistar rats were used in the experiment, being 20 adult rats at 4 months-old and 20 elderly rats at 20 months-old. The hind limbs of the rats were removed, dissected and prepared to light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The aging process showed changes in the collagen fibrils, with a predominance of type III fibers in the elderly group, in addition to a decrease in the amount of the fibrocartilage cells, fewer and shorter cytoplasmic processes and a decreased synthetic capacity due to degradation of the organelles involved in synthesis. PMID:27078690

  14. Structural and Ultrastructural Characteristics of Bone-Tendon Junction of the Calcaneal Tendon of Adult and Elderly Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Cury, Diego Pulzatto; Dias, Fernando José; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Watanabe, Ii-sei

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are transition tissues that transfer the contractile forces generated by the muscles to the bones, allowing movement. The region where the tendon attaches to the bone is called bone-tendon junction or enthesis and may be classified as fibrous or fibrocartilaginous. This study aims to analyze the collagen fibers and the cells present in the bone-tendon junction using light microscopy and ultrastructural techniques as scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Forty male Wistar rats were used in the experiment, being 20 adult rats at 4 months-old and 20 elderly rats at 20 months-old. The hind limbs of the rats were removed, dissected and prepared to light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The aging process showed changes in the collagen fibrils, with a predominance of type III fibers in the elderly group, in addition to a decrease in the amount of the fibrocartilage cells, fewer and shorter cytoplasmic processes and a decreased synthetic capacity due to degradation of the organelles involved in synthesis. PMID:27078690

  15. Enhanced habit-based learning and decreased neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus in a murine model of chronic social stress.

    PubMed

    Ferragud, A; Haro, A; Sylvain, A; Velázquez-Sánchez, C; Hernández-Rabaza, V; Canales, J J

    2010-06-26

    Stress can induce preferential engagement of habit learning mediated by the basal ganglia, relative to learning that involves complex spatial associations contributed by the hippocampal formation. We explored in mice the influence that chronic episodes of social stress exert on the selection of cognitive/spatial vs. habit-based learning strategies. Male mice were exposed to repeated episodes of social confrontation and were categorized as dominant, subordinate or undetermined according to quantitative ethologically relevant parameters of aggression. Mice were then trained in a conditional discrimination task in the T-maze in the presence of allocentric cues until five correct choices were made. The T-maze was then turned 180 degrees and mice were categorized as "cue-learners" or "place-learners" on the basis of their first response in the probe test. Mice showed a graded preference for place vs. cue learning strategies depending on their social categorization (control>undetermined>dominant>subordinate), which ranged from 55% in controls to only 10% in subordinate mice. The response of subordinate mice differed significantly from controls. Hippocampal neurogenesis was studied in the different groups of mice. In keeping with the tendency to engage habit learning, 2,5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation in the DG was reduced in mice that experienced agonistic encounters, and so was the expression of doublecortin, a marker for immature neurons. These observations suggest that chronic social stress impairs neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, weakens spatial learning and strengthens habit-like responses.

  16. Interferon-gamma but not TNF alpha promotes neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth of murine adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Galaxy; Goldshmit, Yona; Turnley, Ann M

    2004-05-01

    Neural trauma, such as traumatic brain injury or stroke, results in a vigorous inflammatory response at and near the site of injury, with cytokine production by endogenous glial cells and invading immune cells. Little is known of the effect that these cytokines have on neural stem cell function. Here we examine the effects of two inflammatory cytokines, interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), on adult neural stem cells. Neural stem cells grown in the presence of either cytokine failed to generate neurospheres. Cytotoxicity assays showed that TNF alpha but not IFN gamma was toxic to the neural stem cells under proliferative conditions. Under differentiating conditions, neither cytokine was toxic; however, IFN gamma enhanced neuronal differentiation, rapidly increasing beta III-tubulin positive cell numbers 3-4 fold and inhibiting astrocyte generation. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth and the number of neurites per neuron was enhanced in cells differentiated in the presence of IFN gamma. Therefore, both inflammatory cytokines examined have substantial, but different effects on neural stem cell function and suggests that regulation of the inflammatory environment following brain injury may influence the ability of neural stem cells to repair the damage. PMID:15081598

  17. Effects of Chronic Heavy Alcohol Consumption and Endurance Exercise on Cancellous and Cortical Bone Microarchitecture in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Teresa L.; Gaddini, Gino; Branscum, Adam J.; Olson, Dawn A.; Caroline-Westerlind, Kim; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone health is influenced by numerous lifestyle factors, including diet and exercise. Alcohol is a major non-essential constituent of diet and has dose and context-dependent effects on bone. Endurance exercise is associated with increased risk for stress fractures. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term independent and combined effects of chronic heavy alcohol consumption and endurance exercise (treadmill running) on bone mass and microarchitecture in young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Six-month-old male rats were randomized into 4 groups (9–13 rats/group): sedentary+control diet, sedentary+ethanol diet, exercise+control diet, or exercise+ethanol diet. Ethanol-fed rats consumed a liquid diet (ethanol comprised 35% of caloric intake) ad libitum. Control rats were pair-fed the same diet with isocaloric substitution of ethanol with maltose-dextran. Exercise was conducted on a motorized treadmill (15% grade for 30 min) 5 days/week for 16 weeks. Femur and 12th thoracic vertebra were analyzed for bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) using densitometry and cortical and cancellous bone architecture using microcomputed tomography. Results Ethanol consumption resulted in lower femur length, BMC, and BMD, and lower midshaft femur cortical volume, cortical thickness, and polar moment of inertia. In addition, trabecular thickness was lower in vertebra of ethanol-fed rats. Endurance exercise had no independent effect on any endpoints evaluated. A significant interaction between endurance exercise and ethanol was detected for several cancellous endpoints in the distal femur metaphysis. Ethanol-consuming rats that exercised had lower distal femur metaphysis bone volume/tissue volume, trabecular connectivity density, and trabecular thickness compared to exercising rats that consumed control diet. Conclusions The results obtained in this model suggest that chronic heavy alcohol consumption may reduce skeletal integrity by reducing

  18. Long-Term Neurotoxicity of Chemotherapy in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated for Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Sean; Latoufis, Christos; Eagle, Karen; Ash, Catherine M.; Fowler, Clare; Souhami, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To study the long-term neurotoxicity of chemotherapy in adolescents and young adults treated for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods. Thirty-six adolescents and young adults (median age 17 years) were examined following chemotherapy for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Twenty-nine (29/36) had received cisplatin (median 400 mg/m2), 15/36 ifosfamide (median 20 g/m2), and 12/36 vincristine (median 16 mg). Neurotoxicity was assessed at a median of 8 months (range, 1–54 months) after completion of chemotherapy by clinical examination, nerve conduction studies, audiograms and autonomic function tests. The same nerve conduction studies were carried out in 20 normal volunteers to define normal ranges in this age group. Results. Sixteen patients (44%) had a significant reduction in deep tendon reflexes, and this clinical parameter correlated well with abnormalities detected in nerve conduction studies. Vibration perception threshold (VPT) was raised in 20/36 patients (55%) and this was the most sensitive single test in the assessment of neuropathy. There was a significant correlation between VPT and cumulative cisplatin dose received in mg/m-2 (r=0.607, p<0.01). Ten of 29 patients (35%) had abnormal nerve conduction studies with a pattern characteristic of sensory axonal neuropathy. No patient complained of auditory symptoms, but minor high tone hearing loss was detected by audiograms in 5/28 patients who had received cisplatin. No patients had symptoms of autonomic neuropathy, but autonomic function tests showed minor abnormalities in 4/22 patients tested, and all had received cisplatin. Conclusions. This study demonstrates significant, although asymptomatic, long-term neurotoxicity of cisplatin in adolescents and young adults receiving chemotherapy for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Follow-up studies are planned to assess whether these neurological deficits improve with time. PMID:18521240

  19. Occurrence of osteoporosis & factors determining bone mineral loss in young adults with Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Dibakar; Dutta, Deep; Maisnam, Indira; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is a paucity of data with conflicting reports regarding the extent and pattern of bone mineral (BM) loss in Graves’ disease (GD), especially in young adults. Also, interpretation of BM data in Indians is limited by use of T-score cut-offs derived from Caucasians. This study was aimed to evaluate the occurrence of osteoporosis in active treatment naive patients with GD and determine the factors predicting BM loss, using standard T-scores from Caucasians and compare with the cut-offs proposed by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) for diagnosing osteoporosis in Indians. Methods: Patients with GD, >20 yr age without any history of use of anti-thyroid drugs, and normal controls without fracture history, drugs use or co-morbidities underwent BM density (BMD) assessment at lumbar spine, hip and forearm, thyroid function and calcium profile assessment. Women with menopause or premature ovarian insufficiency and men with androgen deficiency were excluded. Results: Patients with GD (n=31) had significantly lower BMD at spine (1.01±0.10 vs. 1.13±0.16 g/cm2), hip (0.88±0.10 vs. 1.04±0.19 g/cm2) and forearm (0.46±0.04 vs. 0.59±0.09 g/cm2) compared with controls (n=30) (P<0.001). Nine (29%) and six (19.3%) patients with GD had osteoporosis as per T-score and ICMR criteria, respectively. None of GD patients had osteoporosis at hip or spine as per ICMR criteria. Serum T3 had strongest inverse correlation with BMD at spine, hip and femur. Step-wise linear regression analysis after adjusting for age, BMI and vitamin D showed T3 to be the best predictor of reduced BMD at spine, hip and forearm, followed by phosphate at forearm and 48 h I131 uptake for spine BMD in GD. Interpretation & conclusions: Osteoporosis at hip or spine is not a major problem in GD and more commonly involves forearm. Diagnostic criterion developed from Caucasians tends to overdiagnose osteoporosis in Indians. T3 elevation and phosphate are important predictors

  20. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  1. Adult human bone marrow stromal spheres express neuronal traits in vitro and in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Suon, Sokreine; Yang, Ming; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2007-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) grown in suspension culture gave rise to spheres of neural progenitor (NP) cells, capable of expressing both dopaminergic (DA) and GABAergic (GABA) traits. After transplantation into the Parkinsonian rat, human NPs and neurons were present at 2 weeks. Although no DA neurons appeared to survive transplantation, there were abundant GABA neurons present in the graft. By 4 weeks, however, all cells had died. Finding ways to prolong survival and promote the appropriate neurotransmitter phenotype is essential if hMSCs are to be clinically useful. PMID:16828720

  2. Peripheral bone mass is not affected by winter vitamin D deficiency in children and young adults from Ushuaia.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, M B; Wittich, A; Mautalen, C; Chaperon, A; Kizlansky, A

    2000-09-01

    Low vitamin D levels in elderly people are associated with reduced bone mass, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and increased fracture risk. Its effect on the growing skeleton is not well known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible influence of chronic winter vitamin D deficiency and higher winter parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels on bone mass in prepubertal children and young adults. The study was carried out in male and female Caucasian subjects. A total of 163 prepubertal children (X age +/- 1 SD: 8.9 +/- 0.7 years) and 234 young adults (22.9 +/- 3.6 years) who had never received vitamin D supplementation were recruited from two areas in Argentina: (1)Ushuaia (55 degrees South latitude), where the population is known to have low winter 25OHD levels and higher levels of PTH in winter than in summer, and (2)Buenos Aires (34 degrees S), where ultraviolet (UV) radiation and vitamin D nutritional status in the population are adequate all year round. Bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) of the ultradistal and distal radius were measured in the young adults. Only distal radius measurements were taken in the children. Similar results were obtained in age-sex matched groups from both areas. The only results showing significant difference corresponded to comparison among the Ushuaian women: those whose calcium (Ca) intake was below 800 mg/day presented lower BMD and BMC values than those whose Ca intake was above that level (0.469 +/- 0.046 versus 0.498 +/- 0.041 g/cm(2), P < 0.02; 3.131 +/- 0.367 versus 3.339 +/- 0.386 g, P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, peripheral BMD and BMC were similar in children and young adults from Ushuaia and Buenos Aires in spite of the previously documented difference between both areas regarding UV radiation and winter vitamin D status. BMD of axial skeletal areas as well the concomitant effect of a low Ca diet and vitamin D deficiency on the growing skeleton should be studied further.

  3. Antioxidant impregnated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris particles display increased bone remodeling and a superior osteogenic:osteolytic profile vs. conventional UHMWPE particles in a murine calvaria model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX(™) ), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX(™) containing UHMWPE (AOX(™) ), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n = 10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p < 0.001). However, AOX also significantly induced 1.64-fold more new bone formation vs. AltrX (p < 0.01). Moreover, while the osteolytic:osteogenic ratio of both particles was very close to 1.0, which is indicative of coupled remodeling, AOX was more osteogenic (Slope = 1.13 ± 0.10 vs. 0.97 ± 0.10). Histomorphometry of the metabolically labeled undecalcified calvaria revealed a consistent trend of greater MAR in AOX vs. AltrX. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-oxidant impregnated UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:845-851, 2016. PMID:26495749

  4. Antioxidant impregnated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris particles display increased bone remodeling and a superior osteogenic:osteolytic profile vs. conventional UHMWPE particles in a murine calvaria model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX(™) ), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX(™) containing UHMWPE (AOX(™) ), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n = 10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p < 0.001). However, AOX also significantly induced 1.64-fold more new bone formation vs. AltrX (p < 0.01). Moreover, while the osteolytic:osteogenic ratio of both particles was very close to 1.0, which is indicative of coupled remodeling, AOX was more osteogenic (Slope = 1.13 ± 0.10 vs. 0.97 ± 0.10). Histomorphometry of the metabolically labeled undecalcified calvaria revealed a consistent trend of greater MAR in AOX vs. AltrX. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-oxidant impregnated UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:845-851, 2016.

  5. Lactase gene c/t(-13910) polymorphism, calcium intake, and pQCT bone traits in Finnish adults.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Sanna; Laaksonen, Marika; Mikkilä, Vera; Sievänen, Harri; Mononen, Nina; Räsänen, Leena; Viikari, Jorma; Raitakari, Olli T; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho J

    2011-02-01

    Genetic lactase nonpersistence may influence calcium intake and thereby bone health. We investigated in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finn Study whether young adults aged 31-46 years with the C/C(-13910) genotype are more susceptible to reduced bone phenotypes, low-energy fractures, and low calcium intake than subjects with other lactase genotypes. We also analyzed the gene-environment interactions on bone with calcium intake and physical activity. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography bone traits were measured from the distal and shaft sites of the radius and tibia. The total number of those subjects whose nondominant forearm was measured and the lactase genotype was defined was 1551. Information on diet, lifestyle factors, and fractures was collected with questionnaires. The mean intake of calcium was the lowest in men with the C/C(-13910) genotype (P = 0.001). Men with the T/T(-13910) genotype had ~3% higher trabecular density at the distal radius and distal tibia compared to other lactase genotypes (P = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). In women, we found no evidence of the gene effect at the radius and tibia. No major interactions of the C/T(-13910) polymorphism with calcium intake or physical activity on bone phenotypes were found in either sex. In conclusion, the C/T(-13910) polymorphism was associated with trabecular density at the distal radius and tibia in men. These differences may be due to the differences in calcium intake between the lactase genotypes.

  6. Does head posture have a significant effect on the hyoid bone position and sternocleidomastoid electromyographic activity in young adults?

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Saúl; Miralles, Rodolfo; Ravera, María José; Zúñiga, Claudia; Santander, Hugo; Ferrer, Marcelo; Nakouzi, Jorge

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between head posture (head extension, normal head posture, and head flexion) and anteroposterior head position, hyoid bone position, and the sternocleidomastoid integrated electromyographic (IEMG) activity in a sample of young adults. The study included 50 individuals with natural dentition and bilateral molar support. A lateral craniocervical radiograph was taken for each subject and a cephalometric analysis was performed. Head posture was measured by means of the craniovertebral angle formed by the MacGregor plane and the odontoid plane. According to the value of this angle, the sample was divided into the following three groups: head extension (less than 95 degrees); normal head posture (between 95 degrees and 106 degrees); and head flexion (more than 106 degrees). The following cephalometric measurements were taken to compare the three groups: anteroposterior head position (true vertical plane/pterygoid distance), anteroposterior hyoid bone position (true vertical plane-Ha distance), vertical hyoid bone position (H-H' distance in the hyoid triangle), and CO-C2 distance. In the three groups, IEMG recordings at rest and during swallowing of saliva and maximal voluntary clenching were performed by placing bipolar surface electrodes on the right and left sternocleidomastoid muscles. In addition, the condition with/without craniomandibular dysfunction (CMD) in each group was also assessed. Head posture showed no significant association with anteroposterior head position, anteroposterior hyoid bone position, vertical hyoid bone position, or sternocleidomastoid IEMG activity. There was no association to head posture with/without the condition of CMD. Clinical relevance of the results is discussed.

  7. Bone Mass and Mineral Metabolism Alterations in Adult Celiac Disease: Pathophysiology and Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Di Stefano, Michele; Mengoli, Caterina; Bergonzi, Manuela; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects many patients with celiac disease (CD), representing the consequence of calcium malabsorption and persistent activation of mucosal inflammation. A slight increase of fracture risk is evident in this condition, particularly in those with overt malabsorption and in postmenopausal state. The adoption of a correct gluten-free diet (GFD) improves bone derangement, but is not able to normalize bone mass in all the patients. Biomarkers effective in the prediction of bone response to gluten-free diet are not yet available and the indications of guidelines are still imperfect and debated. In this review, the pathophysiology of bone loss is correlated to clinical aspects, defining an alternative proposal of management for this condition. PMID:24284619

  8. Successful semiallogeneic and allogeneic bone marrow reconstitution of lethally irradiated adult mice mediated by neonatal spleen cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaFace, D.M.; Peck, A.B.

    1987-11-01

    Spleens of fetal/newborn mice less than 3-4 days of age contain a naturally occurring cell population capable of suppressing T-dependent and T-independent immune responses of third-party adult cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have utilized newborn spleen cells to prevent acute graft-versus-host (GVH) disease in lethally irradiated adult hosts reconstituted with semiallogeneic or even allogeneic bone marrow cells. Pretreatment of reconstituting cell populations with newborn spleen cells reduced the incidence of GVH disease from 100% to 20% in semiallogeneic and from 100% to 40% in allogeneic combinations. Long-term-surviving reconstituted hosts proved immunologically unresponsive to both donor and host histocompatibility antigens, yet possessed a fully chimeric lymphoid system responsive to T and B cell mitogens, as well as unrelated third-party alloantigens.

  9. Previous exposure to simulated microgravity does not exacerbate bone loss during subsequent exposure in the proximal tibia of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Anthony, Rachel A; Kwaczala, Andrea T; Judex, Stefan; Bloomfield, Susan A; Hogan, Harry A

    2013-10-01

    Extended periods of inactivity cause severe bone loss and concomitant deterioration of the musculoskeletal system. Considerable research has been aimed at better understanding the mechanisms and consequences of bone loss due to unloading and the associated effects on strength and fracture risk. One factor that has not been studied extensively but is of great interest, particularly for human spaceflight, is how multiple or repeated exposures to unloading and reloading affect the skeleton. Space agencies worldwide anticipate increased usage of repeat-flier crewmembers, and major thrust of research has focused on better understanding of microgravity effects on loss of bone density at weightbearing skeletal sites; however there is limited data available on repeat microgravity exposure. The adult hindlimb unloaded (HU) rat model was used to determine how an initial unloading cycle will affect a subsequent exposure to disuse and recovery thereafter. Animals underwent 28 days of HU starting at 6 months of age followed by 56 days of recovery, and then another 28 days of HU with 56 days of recovery. In vivo longitudinal pQCT was used to quantify bone morphological changes, and ex vivo μCT was used to quantify trabecular microarchitecture and cortical shell geometry at the proximal tibia metaphysis (PTM). The mechanical properties of trabecular bone were examined by the reduced platen compression mechanical test. The hypothesis that the initial HU exposure will mitigate decrements in bone mass and density for the second HU exposure was supported as pre- to post-HU declines in total BMC, total vBMD, and cortical area by in vivo pQCT at the proximal tibia metaphysis were milder for the second HU (and not significant) compared to an age-matched single HU (3% vs. 6%, 2% vs. 6%, and 2% vs. 6%, respectively). In contrast, the hypothesis was not supported at the microarchitectural level as losses in BV/TV and Tb.Th. were similar during 2nd HU exposure and age-matched single HU

  10. Interleukin-1β modulates endochondral ossification by human adult bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Marcus; Scotti, Celeste; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Todorov, Athanas; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Jakob, Marcel; Wendt, David; Martin, Ivan; Barbero, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines present in the milieu of the fracture site are important modulators of bone healing. Here we investigated the effects of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) on the main events of endochondral bone formation by human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC), namely cell proliferation, differentiation and maturation/remodelling of the resulting hypertrophic cartilage. Low doses of IL-1β (50 pg/mL) enhanced colony-forming units-fibroblastic (CFU-f) and -osteoblastic (CFU-o) number (up to 1.5-fold) and size (1.2-fold) in the absence of further supplements and glycosaminoglycan accumulation (1.4-fold) upon BM-MSC chondrogenic induction. In osteogenically cultured BM-MSC, IL-1β enhanced calcium deposition (62.2-fold) and BMP-2 mRNA expression by differential activation of NF-κB and ERK signalling. IL-1β-treatment of BM-MSC generated cartilage resulted in higher production of MMP-13 (14.0-fold) in vitro, mirrored by an increased accumulation of the cryptic cleaved fragment of aggrecan, and more efficient cartilage remodelling/resorption after 5 weeks in vivo (i.e., more TRAP positive cells and bone marrow, less cartilaginous areas), resulting in the formation of mature bone and bone marrow after 12 weeks. In conclusion, IL-1β finely modulates early and late events of the endochondral bone formation by BM-MSC. Controlling the inflammatory environment could enhance the success of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of fractures by resident MSC and as well as improve the engineering of implantable tissues. PMID:23007908

  11. Periostin deficiency increases bone damage and impairs injury response to fatigue loading in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Gineyts, Evelyne; Ammann, Patrick; Conway, Simon J; Garnero, Patrick; Ferrari, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Bone damage removal and callus formation in response to fatigue loading are essential to prevent fractures. Periostin (Postn) is a matricellular protein that mediates adaptive response of cortical bone to loading. Whether and how periostin influences damage and the injury response to fatigue remains unknown. We investigated the skeletal response of Postn(-/-) and Postn(+/+) mice after fatigue stimulus by axial compression of their tibia. In Postn(+/+) mice, cracks number and surface (CsNb, CsS) increased 1h after fatigue, with a decrease in strength compared to non-fatigued tibia. At 15 days, CsNb had started to decline, while CtTV and CtBV increased in fatigued vs non-fatigued tibia, reflecting a woven bone response that was present in 75% of the fatigued bones. Cortical porosity and remodelling also prominently increased in the fatigued tibia of Postn(+/+) mice. At 30 days, paralleling a continuous removal of cortical damage, strength of the fatigued tibia was similar to the non-fatigue tibia. In Postn(-/-) mice, cracks were detectable even in the absence of fatigue, while the amount of collagen crosslinks and tissue hardness was decreased compared to Postn(+/+). Fatigue significantly increased CsNb and CsS in Postn(-/-), but was not associated with changes in CtTV and CtBV, as only 16% of the fatigued bones formed some woven bone. Cortical porosity and remodelling did not increase either after fatigue in Postn(-/-), and the level of damage remained high even after 30 days. As a result, strength remained compromised in Postn(-/-) mice. Contrary to Postn(+/+), which osteocytic lacunae showed a change in the degree of anisotropy (DA) after fatigue, Postn(-/-) showed no DA change. Hence periostin appears to influence bone materials properties, damage accumulation and repair, including local modeling/remodeling processes in response to fatigue. These observations suggest that the level of periostin expression could influence the propensity to fatigue fractures. PMID

  12. Endoglin Deficiency in Bone Marrow Is Sufficient to Cause Cerebrovascular Dysplasia in the Adult Mouse after VEGF Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Walker, Espen J.; Degos, Vincent; Jun, Kristine; Kuo, Robert; Pile-Spellman, John; Su, Hua; Young, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) home to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced brain angiogenic foci, and VEGF induces cerebrovascular dysplasia in adult endoglin heterozygous (Eng+/−) mice. We hypothesized that Eng+/− BMDCs cause cerebrovascular dysplasia in the adult mouse after VEGF stimulation. Methods BM transplantation was performed using adult wild-type (WT) and Eng+/− mice as donors/recipients. An adeno-associated viral vector expressing VEGF (AAV-VEGF) was injected into the basal ganglia 4 weeks after transplantation. Vascular density, dysplasia index (vessels >15 μm/100 vessels), and BMDCs in the angiogenic foci were analyzed. Results The dysplasia index of WT/Eng+/− BM mice was higher than WT/WT BM mice (p<0.001) and was similar to Eng+/−/Eng+/− BM mice (p=0.2). Dysplasia in Eng+/− mice was partially rescued by WT BM (p<0.001). WT/WT BM and WT/Eng+/− BM mice had similar numbers of BMDCs in the angiogenic foci (p=0.4), most of which were CD68+. Eng+/− monocytes/macrophages expressed less matrix metalloproteinase-9 and Notch1. Conclusions ENG-deficient BMDCs are sufficient for VEGF to induce vascular dysplasia in the adult mouse brain. Our data support a previously unrecognized role of BM in the development of cerebrovascular malformations. PMID:23306322

  13. Frequency of Teriparatide Administration Affects the Histological Pattern of Bone Formation in Young Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomomaya; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Sasaki, Muneteru; Hongo, Hiromi; Tsuboi, Kanako; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Ota, Masahiro; Haraguchi, Mai; Takahata, Masahiko; Oda, Kimimitsu; Luiz de Freitas, Paulo Henrique; Takakura, Aya; Takao-Kawabata, Ryoko; Isogai, Yukihiro; Amizuka, Norio

    2016-07-01

    Evidence supports that daily and once-weekly administration of teriparatide, human (h)PTH(1-34), enhance bone mass in osteoporotic patients. However, it is uncertain whether different frequencies of hPTH(1-34) administration would induce bone formation similarly in terms of quantity and quality. To investigate that issue, mice were subjected to different frequencies of PTH administration, and their bones were histologically examined. Frequencies of administration were 1 time/2 days, 1 time a day, and 2 and 4 times a day. Mice were allocated to either to control or to 3 different dosing regimens: 80 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per injection (80 μg/kg per dose), 80 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per day (80 μg/kg · d), or 20 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per day (20 μg/kg · d). With the regimens of 80 μg/kg per dose and 80 μg/kg · d, high-frequency hPTH(1-34) administration increased metaphyseal trabecular number. However, 4 doses per day induced the formation of thin trabeculae, whereas the daily PTH regimen resulted in thicker trabeculae. A similar pattern was observed with the lower daily hPTH(1-34) dose (20 μg/kg · d): more frequent PTH administration led to the formation of thin trabeculae, showing a thick preosteoblastic cell layer, several osteoclasts, and scalloped cement lines that indicated accelerated bone remodeling. On the other hand, low-frequency PTH administration induced new bone with mature osteoblasts lying on mildly convex surfaces representative of arrest lines, which suggests minimodeling-based bone formation. Thus, high-frequency PTH administration seems to increase bone mass rapidly by forming thin trabeculae through accelerated bone remodeling. Alternatively, low-frequency PTH administration leads to the formation of thicker trabeculae through bone remodeling and minimodeling. PMID:27227535

  14. Effects of spaceflight on the murine mandible: Possible factors mediating skeletal changes in non-weight bearing bones of the head.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Payal; Stabley, John N; Behnke, Bradley J; Allen, Matthew R; Delp, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    Spaceflight-induced remodeling of the skull is characterized by greater bone volume, mineral density, and mineral content. To further investigate the effects of spaceflight on other non-weight bearing bones of the head, as well as to gain insight into potential factors mediating the remodeling of the skull, the purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of spaceflight on mandibular bone properties. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown 15d on the STS-131 Space Shuttle mission (n=8) and 13d on the STS-135 mission (n=5) or remained as ground controls (GC). Upon landing, mandibles were collected and analyzed via micro-computed tomography for tissue mineralization, bone volume (BV/TV), and distance from the cemento-enamel junction to the alveolar crest (CEJ-AC). Mandibular mineralization was not different between spaceflight (SF) and GC mice for either the STS-131 or STS-135 missions. Mandibular BV/TV (combined cortical and trabecular bone) was lower in mandibles from SF mice on the STS-131 mission (80.7±0.8%) relative to that of GC (n=8) animals (84.2±1.2%), whereas BV/TV from STS-135 mice was not different from GC animals (n=7). The CEJ-AC distance was shorter in mandibles from STS-131 mice (0.217±0.004mm) compared to GC animals (0.283±0.009mm), indicating an anabolic (or anti-catabolic) effect of spaceflight, while CEJ-AC distance was similar between STS-135 and GC mice. These findings demonstrate that mandibular bones undergo skeletal changes during spaceflight and are susceptible to the effects of weightlessness. However, adaptation of the mandible to spaceflight is dissimilar to that of the cranium, at least in terms of changes in BV/TV.

  15. Effects of spaceflight on the murine mandible: Possible factors mediating skeletal changes in non-weight bearing bones of the head.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Payal; Stabley, John N; Behnke, Bradley J; Allen, Matthew R; Delp, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    Spaceflight-induced remodeling of the skull is characterized by greater bone volume, mineral density, and mineral content. To further investigate the effects of spaceflight on other non-weight bearing bones of the head, as well as to gain insight into potential factors mediating the remodeling of the skull, the purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of spaceflight on mandibular bone properties. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown 15d on the STS-131 Space Shuttle mission (n=8) and 13d on the STS-135 mission (n=5) or remained as ground controls (GC). Upon landing, mandibles were collected and analyzed via micro-computed tomography for tissue mineralization, bone volume (BV/TV), and distance from the cemento-enamel junction to the alveolar crest (CEJ-AC). Mandibular mineralization was not different between spaceflight (SF) and GC mice for either the STS-131 or STS-135 missions. Mandibular BV/TV (combined cortical and trabecular bone) was lower in mandibles from SF mice on the STS-131 mission (80.7±0.8%) relative to that of GC (n=8) animals (84.2±1.2%), whereas BV/TV from STS-135 mice was not different from GC animals (n=7). The CEJ-AC distance was shorter in mandibles from STS-131 mice (0.217±0.004mm) compared to GC animals (0.283±0.009mm), indicating an anabolic (or anti-catabolic) effect of spaceflight, while CEJ-AC distance was similar between STS-135 and GC mice. These findings demonstrate that mandibular bones undergo skeletal changes during spaceflight and are susceptible to the effects of weightlessness. However, adaptation of the mandible to spaceflight is dissimilar to that of the cranium, at least in terms of changes in BV/TV. PMID:26545335

  16. A Novel Murine Model of Established Staphylococcal Bone Infection in the Presence of a Fracture Fixation Plate to Study Therapies Utilizing Antibiotic-laden Spacers after Revision Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Jason A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2014-01-01

    Mice are the small animal model of choice in biomedical research due to the low cost and availability of genetically engineered lines. However, the devices utilized in current mouse models of implant-associated bone infection have been limited to intramedullary or trans-cortical pins, which are not amenable to treatments involving extensive debridement of a full-thickness bone loss and placement of a segmental antibiotic spacer. To overcome these limitations, we developed a clinically faithful model that utilizes a locking fracture fixation plate to enable debridement of an infected segmental bone defect (full-thickness osteotomy) during a revision surgery, and investigated the therapeutic effects of placing an antibiotic-laden spacer in the segmental bone defect. To first determine the ideal time point for revision following infection, a 0.7 mm osteotomy in the femoral mid-shaft was stabilized with a radiolucent PEEK fixation plate. The defect was inoculated with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus, and the infection was monitored over 14 days by bioluminescent imaging (BLI). Osteolysis and reactive bone formation were assessed by X-ray and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). The active bacterial infection peaked by 5 days post-inoculation, however the stability of the implant fixation became compromised by 10–14 days post-inoculation due to osteolysis around the screws. Thus, day 7 was defined as the ideal time point to perform the revision surgery. During the revision surgery, the infected tissue was debrided and the osteotomy was widened to 3 mm to place a poly-methyl methacrylate spacer, with or without vancomycin. Half of the groups also received systemic vancomycin for the remaining 21 days of the study. The viable bacteria remaining at the end of the study were measured using colony forming unit assays. Volumetric bone changes (osteolysis and reactive bone formation) were directly measured using micro-CT image analysis. Mice that were treated with

  17. Occupational factors and risk of adult bone sarcomas: a multicentric case-control study in Europe.

    PubMed

    Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Bertoni, Franco; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Buemi, Antoine; Costa-Santos, Cristina; Eriksson, Mikael; Guénel, Pascal; Kaerlev, Linda; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Llopis-Gonzalez, Agustin; Merler, Enzo; Miranda, Ana; Morales-Suárez-Varela, Maria M; Olsson, Håkan; Fletcher, Tony; Olsen, Jorn

    2006-02-01

    We investigated the association between occupational factors and risk of bone sarcoma, a rare tumor with a largely unknown aetiology. A multicentric case-control study was conducted in 7 European countries in 1995-97. Ninety-six cases aged 35-69 years with a centrally reviewed diagnosis of bone sarcoma (68 chondrosarcomas and 28 osteosarcomas) were compared to 2,632 population (68%) or colon cancer (32%) controls. Subjects were interviewed to obtain information on occupational, medical and reproductive history, smoking and alcohol consumption and selected exposures including use of pesticides. Response proportions were 90% among cases and 66% among controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated for selected categories of job titles and branches of industry and for use of pesticides. We found an increased OR for bone sarcoma among blacksmiths, toolmakers, machine-tool operators (OR = 2.14, 95% CI 1.08-4.26), woodworkers (OR = 2.68, 95% CI 1.36-5.29) and construction workers (OR = 1.62, 95% CI 0.92-2.87). Ever users of pesticide had an OR of 2.33 (95% CI 1.31-4.13), with similar risks for exposure to insecticides and exposure to herbicides. Neither duration of employment in any of the analyzed occupational categories nor duration of use of pesticides showed an increasing trend in the risk of bone sarcoma. ORs of bone sarcoma were 1.03 (95% CI 0.23-4.57), 3.13 (95% CI 1.26-7.76) and 1.44 (95% CI 0.43-4.85) for the first, second and third tertile of days of use of pesticides. Our study suggests that novel and previously reported (woodworking) occupational factors play a role in the aetiology of bone sarcomas.

  18. The influence of bone and blood lead on plasma lead levels in environmentally exposed adults.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Avila, M; Smith, D; Meneses, F; Sanin, L H; Hu, H

    1998-01-01

    There is concern that previously accumulated bone lead stores may constitute an internal source of exposure, particularly during periods of increased bone mineral loss (e.g., pregnancy, lactation, and menopause). Furthermore, the contribution of lead mobilized from bone to plasma may not be adequately reflected by whole-blood lead levels. This possibility is especially alarming because plasma is the main circulatory compartment of lead that is available to cross cell membranes and deposit in soft tissues. We studied 26 residents of Mexico City who had no history of occupational lead exposure. Two samples of venous blood were collected from each individual. One sample was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-magnetic sector mass spectrometry for whole-blood lead levels. The other sample was centrifuged to separate plasma, which was then isolated and analyzed for lead content by the same analytical technique. Bone lead levels in the tibia and patella were determined with a spot-source 109Cd K-X-ray fluorescence instrument. Mean lead concentrations were 0.54 microg/l in plasma, 119 microg/l in whole blood, and 23.27 and 11.71 microg/g bone mineral in the patella and tibia, respectively. The plasma-to-whole-blood lead concentration ratios ranged from 0.27% to 0.70%. Whole-blood lead level was highly correlated with plasma lead level and accounted for 95% of the variability of plasma lead concentrations. Patella and tibia lead levels were also highly correlated with plasma lead levels. The bivariate regression coefficients of patella and tibia on plasma lead were 0.034 (p<0. 001) and 0.053 (p<0.001), respectively. In a multivariate regression model of plasma lead levels that included whole-blood lead, patella lead level remained an independent predictor of plasma lead level (ss = 0.007, p<0.001). Our data suggest that although whole-blood lead levels are highly correlated with plasma lead levels, lead levels in bone (particularly trabecular bone) exert an additional

  19. Botulinum toxin in masticatory muscles of the adult rat induces bone loss at the condyle and alveolar regions of the mandible associated with a bone proliferation at a muscle enthesis.

    PubMed

    Kün-Darbois, Jean-Daniel; Libouban, Hélène; Chappard, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    In man, botulinum toxin type A (BTX) is injected in masticatory muscles for several indications such as trismus, bruxism, or masseter hypertrophy. Bone changes in the mandible following BTX injections in adult animal have therefore became a subject of interest. The aim of this study was to analyze condylar and alveolar bone changes following BTX unilateral injections in masseter and temporal muscles in adult rats. Mature male rats (n = 15) were randomized into 2 groups: control (CTRL; n = 6) and BTX group (n= 9). Rats of the BTX group received a single injection of BTX into right masseter and temporal muscles. Rats of the CTRL group were similarly injected with saline solution. Rats were sacrificed 4 weeks after injections. Masticatory muscles examination and microcomputed tomography (microCT) were performed. A significant difference of weight was found between the 2 groups at weeks 2, 3 and 4 (p < 0.05). Atrophy of the right masseter and temporal muscles was observed in all BTX rats. MicroCT analysis showed significant bone loss in the right alveolar and condylar areas in BTX rats. Decrease in bone volume reached -20% for right alveolar bone and -35% for right condylar bone. A hypertrophic bone metaplasia at the digastric muscle enthesis was found on every right hemimandible in the BTX group and none in the CTRL group. BTX injection in masticatory muscles leads to a significant and major mandible bone loss. These alterations can represent a risk factor for fractures in human. The occurrence of a hypertrophic bone metaplasia at the Mus Digastricus enthesis may constitute an etiological factor for tori.

  20. EphB2 and EphB3 play an important role in the lymphoid seeding of murine adult thymus.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, David; García-Ceca, Javier; Farias-de-Oliveira, Desio A; Terra-Granado, Eugenia; Montero-Herradón, Sara; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Savino, Wilson; Zapata, Agustín

    2015-12-01

    Adult thymuses lacking either ephrin type B receptor 2 (EphB2) or EphB3, or expressing a truncated form of EphB2, the forward signal-deficient EphB2LacZ, have low numbers of early thymic progenitors (ETPs) and are colonized in vivo by reduced numbers of injected bone marrow (BM) lineage-negative (Lin(-)) cells. Hematopoietic progenitors from these EphB mutants showed decreased capacities to colonize wild type (WT) thymuses compared with WT precursors, with EphB2(-/-) cells exhibiting the greatest reduction. WT BM Lin(-) cells also showed decreased colonizing capacity into mutant thymuses. The reduction was also more severe in EphB2(-/-) host thymuses, with a less severe phenotype in the EphB2LacZ thymus. These results suggest a major function for forward signaling through EphB2 and, to a lesser extent, EphB3, in either colonizing progenitor cells or thymic stromal cells, for in vivo adult thymus recruitment. Furthermore, the altered expression of the molecules involved in thymic colonization that occurs in the mutant thymus correlates with the observed colonizing capacities of different mutant mice. Reduced production of CCL21 and CCL25 occurred in the thymus of the 3 EphB-deficient mice, but their expression, similar to that of P-selectin, on blood vessels, the method of entry of progenitor cells into the vascular thymus, only showed a significant reduction in EphB2(-/-) and EphB3(-/-) thymuses. Decreased migration into the EphB2(-/-) thymuses correlated also with reduced expression of both ephrinB1 and ephrinB2, without changes in the EphB2LacZ thymuses. In the EphB3(-/-) thymuses, only ephrinB1 expression appeared significantly diminished, confirming the relevance of forward signals mediated by the EphB2-ephrinB1 pair in cell recruitment into the adult thymus.

  1. Dietary intake of vitamin K in relation to bone mineral density in Korea adults: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2011).

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Sung; Kim, Eun-Soo; Sohn, Cheong-Min

    2015-11-01

    Low vitamin K nutritional status has been associated with increased risk of fracture, however inconsistent results exist to support the role of vitamin K on bone mineral density depending on ethnic difference and gender. Our objective was to determine vitamin K intake in Korean adults, examine correlation between vitamin K intake and bone mineral density. This study analyzed raw data from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for adults (2,785 men, 4,307 women) aged over 19 years. Cross-sectional analyses showed only positive association between vitamin K intake and femur bone mineral density in men after adjusting bone-related factors. However, women in high tertiles of vitamin K intake had a significantly higher bone mineral density both in femur and lumber as compared to women in lowest tertiles (p<0.05). The risk for osteoporosis was decreased as vitamin K intake increased in women, but this effect was not persisted after adjusting factors. The findings of this study indicate that low dietary vitamin K intake was associated with low bone mineral density in subjects. From these results we may suggest an increase in dietary vitamin K intakes for maintaining bone mineral density. (2010-02CON-21-C, 2011-02CON-06-C).

  2. Mechanical loads and cortical bone geometry in healthy children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Wetzsteon, Rachel J; Zemel, Babette S; Shults, Justine; Howard, Krista M; Kibe, Lucy W; Leonard, Mary B

    2011-05-01

    Muscle and bone form a functional unit. While muscle size is a useful surrogate of mechanical load on bone, the independent contributions to bone strength of muscle force, muscle size, gravitational load (body weight), and physical activity have not been assessed. Three hundred twenty-one healthy participants (32% black, 47% male), aged 5-35 years were assessed. Peak dorsiflexion muscle torque (ft-lbs) of the ankle was assessed using isometric dynamometry. Tibia peripheral quantitative computed tomography measures included polar section modulus (Zp; mm(3)), periosteal and endosteal circumference (mm), cortical area (mm(2)), and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD; mg/cm(3)) at the 38% site, and muscle cross-sectional area (CSA; mm(2)), at the 66% site. Physical activity (average hours per week) was assessed by questionnaire. Log linear regression was used to assess determinants of muscle specific force (MSF; torque relative to muscle CSA) and Zp adjusted for age and tibia length. MSF was greater in blacks than whites (p<0.05) and lower in females than males (p<0.001). Zp was greater in blacks than whites (p=0.002) in Tanner stages 1-4, but the difference was attenuated in Tanner 5 (interaction, p=0.02); R(2)=0.87. Muscle CSA, muscle torque, body weight, and physical activity were added to the model and each load covariate was independently and significantly (all, p<0.02) associated with Zp (R(2)=0.92), periosteal circumference, and cortical area. Inclusion of these measures attenuated but did not eliminate the significant race differences. Only muscle CSA was positively associated with endosteal circumference, while none of the load covariates were associated with vBMD. In conclusion, bone geometry is associated with several factors that define the mechanical load on bone, independent of age, tibia length, maturation, race, and sex. Race differences in Zp were not explained by these measures of mechanical load. Given that inclusion of muscle torque, body weight

  3. Site-specific, adult bone benefits attributed to loading during youth: A preliminary longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Scerpella, Tamara A; Bernardoni, Brittney; Wang, Sijian; Rathouz, Paul J; Li, Quefeng; Dowthwaite, Jodi N

    2016-04-01

    We examined site-specific bone development in relation to childhood and adolescent artistic gymnastics exposure, comparing up to 10years of prospectively acquired longitudinal data in 44 subjects, including 31 non-gymnasts (NON) and 13 gymnasts (GYM) who participated in gymnastics from pre-menarche to ≥1.9years post-menarche. Subjects underwent annual regional and whole-body DXA scans; indices of bone geometry and strength were calculated. Anthropometrics, physical activity, and maturity were assessed annually, coincident with DXA scans. Non-linear mixed effect models centered growth in bone outcomes at menarche and adjusted for menarcheal age, height, and non-bone fat-free mass to evaluate GYM-NON differences. A POST-QUIT variable assessed the withdrawal effect of quitting gymnastics. Curves for bone area, mass (BMC), and strength indices were higher in GYM than NON at both distal radius metaphysis and diaphysis (p<0.0001). At the femoral neck, greater GYM BMC (p<0.01), narrower GYM endosteal diameter (p<0.02), and similar periosteal width (p=0.09) yielded GYM advantages in narrow neck cortical thickness and buckling ratio (both p<0.001; lower BR indicates lower fracture risk). Lumbar spine and sub-head BMC were greater in GYM than NON (p<0.036). Following gymnastics cessation, GYM slopes increased for distal radius diaphysis parameters (p≤0.01) and for narrow neck BR (p=0.02). At the distal radius metaphysis, GYM BMC and compressive strength slopes decreased, as did slopes for lumbar spine BMC, femoral neck BMC, and narrow neck cortical thickness (p<0.02). In conclusion, advantages in bone mass, geometry, and strength at multiple skeletal sites were noted across growth and into young adulthood in girls who participated in gymnastics loading to at least 1.9years post-menarche. Following gymnastics cessation, advantages at cortical bone sites improved or stabilized, while advantages at corticocancellous sites stabilized or diminished. Additional longitudinal

  4. Two different pathways for the maintenance of trabecular bone in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Marie K; Movérare, Sofia; Skrtic, Stanko; Alatalo, Sari; Halleen, Jussi; Mohan, Subburaman; Gustafsson, J A; Ohlsson, Claes

    2002-04-01

    Androgens may regulate the male skeleton either directly via activation of the androgen receptor (AR) or indirectly via aromatization of androgens into estrogen and, thereafter, via activation of estrogen receptors (ERs). There are two known estrogen receptors, ER-alpha and ER-beta. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative roles of ER-alpha, ER-beta, and AR in the maintenance of trabecular bone in male mice. Seven-month-old male mice, lacking ER-alpha (ERKO), ER-beta (BERKO), or both receptors (DERKO), were orchidectomized (orx) and treated for 3 weeks with 0.7 microg/mouse per day of 17beta-estradiol or vehicle. No reduction in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) was seen in ERKO, BERKO, or DERKO mice before orx, showing that neither ER-a nor ER-beta is required for the maintenance of a normal trabecular BMD in male mice. After orx, there was a pronounced decrease in trabecular BMD, similar for all groups, resulting in equal levels of trabecular BMD in all genotypes. This reduction was reversed completely in wild-type (WT) and BERKO mice treated with estrogen, and no significant effect of estrogen was found in ERKO or DERKO mice. In summary, the trabecular bone is preserved both by a testicular factor, presumably testosterone acting via AR and by an estrogen-induced activation of ER-alpha. These results indicate that AR and ER-alpha are redundant in the maintenance of the trabecular bone in male mice. In contrast, ER-beta is of no importance for the regulation of trabecular bone in male mice.

  5. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  6. IL-4/CCL22/CCR4 Axis Controls Regulatory T-Cell Migration That Suppresses Inflammatory Bone Loss in Murine Experimental Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Araujo-Pires, Ana Claudia; Vieira, Andreia Espindola; Francisconi, Carolina Favaro; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Glowacki, Andrew; Yoshizawa, Sayuri; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro; Sfeir, Charles S.; Little, Steven R.; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bone resorption is a hallmark of periodontitis, and Tregs and Th2 cells are independently associated with disease progression attenuation. In this study, we employed an infection-triggered inflammatory osteolysis model to investigate the mechanisms underlying Treg and Th2 cell migration and the impact on disease outcome. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans–infected C57Bl/6 (wild-type [WT]) mice develop an intense inflammatory reaction and alveolar bone resorption, and Treg and Th2 cell migration is temporally associated with disease progression attenuation. Tregs extracted from the lesions preferentially express CCR4 and CCR8, whereas Th2 cells express CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8. The absence of CCR5 and CCR8 did not significantly impact the migration of Tregs and Th2 cells or affect the disease outcome. CCR4KO mice presented a minor reduction in Th2 cells in parallel with major impairment of Treg migration, which was associated with increased inflammatory bone loss and higher proinflammatory and osteoclastogenic cytokine levels. The blockade of the CCR4 ligand CCL22 in WT mice resulted in an increased inflammatory bone loss phenotype similar to that in the CCR4KO strain. Adoptive transfer of CCR4+ Tregs to the CCR4KO strain revert the increased disease phenotype to WT mice–like levels; also, the in situ production of CCL22 in the lesions is mandatory for Tregs migration and the consequent bone loss arrest. The local release of exogenous CCL22 provided by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles promotes migration of Tregs and disease arrest in the absence of endogenous CCL22 in the IL-4KO strain, characterized by the lack of endogenous CCL22 production, defective migration of Tregs, and exacerbated bone loss. In summary, our results show that the IL-4/CCL22/CCR4 axis is involved in the migration of Tregs to osteolytic lesion sites, and attenuates development of lesions by inhibiting inflammatory migration and the production of

  7. Extracellular matrix mineralization in murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cultures: an ultrastructural, compositional and comparative analysis with mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Addison, W N; Nelea, V; Chicatun, F; Chien, Y-C; Tran-Khanh, N; Buschmann, M D; Nazhat, S N; Kaartinen, M T; Vali, H; Tecklenburg, M M; Franceschi, R T; McKee, M D

    2015-02-01

    Bone cell culture systems are essential tools for the study of the molecular mechanisms regulating extracellular matrix mineralization. MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cell cultures are the most commonly used in vitro model of bone matrix mineralization. Despite the widespread use of this cell line to study biomineralization, there is as yet no systematic characterization of the mineral phase produced in these cultures. Here we provide a comprehensive, multi-technique biophysical characterization of this cell culture mineral and extracellular matrix, and compare it to mouse bone and synthetic apatite mineral standards, to determine the suitability of MC3T3-E1 cultures for biomineralization studies. Elemental compositional analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed calcium and phosphorus, and trace amounts of sodium and magnesium, in both biological samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) on resin-embedded intact cultures demonstrated that similar to 1-month-old mouse bone, apatite crystals grew with preferential orientations along the (100), (101) and (111) mineral planes indicative of guided biogenic growth as opposed to dystrophic calcification. XRD of crystals isolated from the cultures revealed that the mineral phase was poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite with 10 to 20nm-sized nanocrystallites. Consistent with the XRD observations, electron diffraction patterns indicated that culture mineral had low crystallinity typical of biological apatites. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed apatitic carbonate and phosphate within the biological samples. With all techniques utilized, cell culture mineral and mouse bone mineral were remarkably similar. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy showed that the cultures had a dense fibrillar collagen matrix with small, 100nm-sized, collagen fibril-associated mineralization foci which coalesced to form larger mineral aggregates, and where mineralized sites showed the accumulation of the

  8. Chronic low back pain is associated with reduced vertebral bone mineral measures in community-dwelling adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain (CLBP) experienced in middle-age may have important implications for vertebral bone health, although this issue has not been investigated as a primary aim previously. This study investigated the associations between CLBP and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived vertebral bone mineral measures acquired from postero-anterior and lateral-projections, among community-dwelling, middle-aged adults. Methods Twenty-nine adults with CLBP (11 male, 18 female) and 42 adults with no history of LBP in the preceding year (17 male, 25 female) were evaluated. Self-reported demographic and clinical data were collected via questionnaires. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) was measured in the lumbar spine by DXA. Apparent volumetric (ap.v) BMD in the lumbar spine was also calculated. Multiple linear regression models were used to examine associations between study group (CLBP and control) and vertebral DXA variables by gender, adjusting for height, mass and age. Results There was no difference between groups by gender in anthropometrics or clinical characteristics. In the CLBP group, the mean (SD) duration of CLBP was 13.3 (10.4) years in males and 11.6 (9.9) years in females, with Oswestry Disability Index scores of 16.2 (8.7)% and 15.4 (9.1)%, respectively. Males with CLBP had significantly lower adjusted lateral-projection aBMD and lateral-projection ap.vBMD than controls at L3 with mean differences (standard error) of 0.09 (0.04) g/cm2 (p = 0.03) and 0.02 (0.01) g/cm3 (p = 0.04). These multivariate models accounted for 55% and 53% of the variance in lateral-projection L3 aBMD and lateral-projection L3 ap.vBMD. Conclusions CLBP in males is associated with some lumbar vertebral BMD measures, raising important questions about the mechanism and potential clinical impact of this association. PMID:22458361

  9. Osteoclast precursors in murine bone marrow express CD27 and are impeded in osteoclast development by CD70 on activated immune cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanling; Song, Ji-Ying; de Vries, Teun J; Fatmawati, Christien; Parreira, Diana B; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Babala, Nikolina; Nolte, Martijn A; Everts, Vincent; Borst, Jannie

    2013-07-23

    Osteoclasts (OCs) are bone-resorbing cells that are formed from hematopoietic precursors. OCs ordinarily maintain bone homeostasis, but they can also cause major pathology in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Under homeostatic conditions, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) ligand on osteoblasts drives OC differentiation by interaction with its receptor RANK on OC precursors. During chronic immune activation, RANK ligand on activated immune cells likewise drives pathogenic OC differentiation. We here report that the related TNF family member CD70 and its receptor CD27 can also mediate cross-talk between immune cells and OC precursors. We identified CD27 on a rare population (0.3%) of B220(-)c-Kit(+)CD115(+)CD11b(low) cells in the mouse bone marrow (BM) that are highly enriched for osteoclastogenic potential. We dissected this population into CD27(high) common precursors of OC, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and CD27(low/neg) downstream precursors that could differentiate into OC and macrophages, but not DC. In a recombinant mouse model of chronic immune activation, sustained CD27/CD70 interactions caused an accumulation of OC precursors and a reduction in OC activity. These events were due to a CD27/CD70-dependent inhibition of OC differentiation from the OC precursors by BM-infiltrating, CD70(+)-activated immune cells. DC numbers in BM and spleen were increased, suggesting a skewing of the OC precursors toward DC differentiation. The impediment in OC differentiation culminated in a high trabecular bone mass pathology. Mice additionally presented anemia, leukopenia, and splenomegaly. Thus, under conditions of constitutive CD70 expression reflecting chronic immune activation, the CD27/CD70 system inhibits OC differentiation and favors DC differentiation.

  10. Maturational timing does not predict HSA estimated adult bone geometry at the proximal femur.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, Stefan A; Kontulainen, Saija A; Cooper, David M L; Lanovaz, Joel L; Baxter-Jones, Adam D G

    2011-12-01

    Late maturational timing is documented to be detrimental to bone strength primarily at the distal radius. Studies at the proximal femur have focused on bone mass and the results remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to examine the long term relationship between the onset of maturation and the development of estimated cross sectional area (CSA) and section modulus (Z) at the proximal femur. Two hundred and twenty six individuals (108 males and 118 females) from the Saskatchewan Pediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study (PBMAS) were classified into maturity groups based on age of attainment of peak height velocity. CSA and Z were serially assessed at the narrow neck (NN), intertrochanter (IT) and proximal shaft (S) sites using hip structural analysis (HSA). Multilevel models were constructed to examine the development of CSA and Z by maturity group. Cross sectional observations indicated that during adolescence, early maturing males had significantly greater CSA and Z than late maturing males at all sites of the proximal femur, while early maturing females had greater Z at the NN and S, and greater CSA at the NN, IT and S sites compared to late maturing females. When age, body size, body composition, physical activity and dietary intake were controlled no significant effects of maturational timing were found at the NN, IT or S regions (p>0.05) in either males or females. In this population of healthy individuals there appears to be no effect of the onset of maturation on estimated CSA and Z development at the proximal femur in both males and females. This may be a result of the proximal femur's loading environment. Future research is required to determine the role of loading on the relationship between maturational timing and bone structure and strength development at the proximal femur.

  11. Pathological sprouting of adult nociceptors in chronic prostate cancer-induced bone pain.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M; Bloom, Aaron P; Stake, James I; Mantyh, William G; Taylor, Reid N; Freeman, Katie T; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Kuskowski, Michael A; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2010-11-01

    Pain frequently accompanies cancer. What remains unclear is why this pain frequently becomes more severe and difficult to control with disease progression. Here we test the hypothesis that with disease progression, sensory nerve fibers that innervate the tumor-bearing tissue undergo a pathological sprouting and reorganization, which in other nonmalignant pathologies has been shown to generate and maintain chronic pain. Injection of canine prostate cancer cells into mouse bone induces a remarkable sprouting of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP(+)) and neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200(+)) sensory nerve fibers. Nearly all sensory nerve fibers that undergo sprouting also coexpress tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA(+)). This ectopic sprouting occurs in sensory nerve fibers that are in close proximity to colonies of prostate cancer cells, tumor-associated stromal cells and newly formed woven bone, which together form sclerotic lesions that closely mirror the osteoblastic bone lesions induced by metastatic prostate tumors in humans. Preventive treatment with an antibody that sequesters nerve growth factor (NGF), administered when the pain and bone remodeling were first observed, blocks this ectopic sprouting and attenuates cancer pain. Interestingly, reverse transcription PCR analysis indicated that the prostate cancer cells themselves do not express detectable levels of mRNA coding for NGF. This suggests that the tumor-associated stromal cells express and release NGF, which drives the pathological reorganization of nearby TrkA(+) sensory nerve fibers. Therapies that prevent this reorganization of sensory nerve fibers may provide insight into the evolving mechanisms that drive cancer pain and lead to more effective control of this chronic pain state.

  12. Vitamin D Deficiency and Low Bone Mineral Density in Pediatric and Young Adult Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ubesie, Agozie C; Heubi, James E; Kocoshis, Samuel A; Henderson, Carol J; Mezoff, Adam G; Rao, Marepalli B; Cole, Conrad R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence and predisposing factors for vitamin D deficiency and low bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with intestinal failure (IF). Methods A retrospective review of patients with IF managed at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. IF was defined as history of parenteral nutrition (PN) >30 days. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as serum 25-OH vitamin D [25(OH) D] < 20ng/dL. Reduced bone mineral density (BMD) was defined using dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) Z-score ≤− 2. A binary logistic regression model was used to test for association of significant risk factors and the outcome variables after univariate analyses. Results One hundred and twenty three patients with median age of 4 years (range 3–22 years) were evaluated. Forty-nine (39.8%) patients had at least a documented serum 25 (OH) D deficiency during the study interval while 10 out of 80 patients (12.5%) with DXA scans done had a low BMD Z-score. Age at study entry was associated with both 25 (OH) D deficiency (P= 0. 01) and low BMD Z-score (P = 0. 03). Exclusive PN at study entry was associated with reduced bone mass (P=0.03). There was no significant association between vitamin D deficiency and low BMD Z-score (P=0.31). Conclusion The risk of 25 (OH) D deficiency and low BMD Z-score increases with age among patients with IF. Strategies for monitoring and preventing abnormal bone health in older children receiving exclusive PN need to be developed and evaluated. PMID:23698025

  13. Facial Asymmetry in Young Adults with Condylar Hyperplasia-Unusual Changes in the Facial Bones

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha Lakhanpal; JK, Dayashankar Rao; Goel, Sumit; Srivastava, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Facial asymmetry can be caused by various pathological conditions, condylar hyperplasia (CH) is one of such condition, characterized by unilateral or bilateral mandibular condylar overgrowth, causing facial asymmetry, mandibular deviation, malocclusion and functional impairment. Advanced imaging and scintigraphic methods, helps the clinicians in diagnosing and monitoring its macroscopic aspects. Here we report three interesting and illustrative cases of facial asymmetry with unilateral CH discussing the unusual changes in the facial bones. PMID:25738093

  14. Facial asymmetry in young adults with condylar hyperplasia-unusual changes in the facial bones.

    PubMed

    Gn, Suma; Sharma, Manisha Lakhanpal; Jk, Dayashankar Rao; Goel, Sumit; Srivastava, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Facial asymmetry can be caused by various pathological conditions, condylar hyperplasia (CH) is one of such condition, characterized by unilateral or bilateral mandibular condylar overgrowth, causing facial asymmetry, mandibular deviation, malocclusion and functional impairment. Advanced imaging and scintigraphic methods, helps the clinicians in diagnosing and monitoring its macroscopic aspects. Here we report three interesting and illustrative cases of facial asymmetry with unilateral CH discussing the unusual changes in the facial bones. PMID:25738093

  15. Epihyoid bone fracture associated with tongue deviation in an adult dog.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Marcelo; Kani, Yukitaka; Mieres, Marcelo; Mansilla, Miguel

    2016-09-01

    An 8-month-old male Rhodesian ridgeback dog was evaluated for right lingual deviation, mild dysphagia, and inability to retract the tongue. Transverse and three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction images revealed a transverse fracture of the left epihyoid bone. After 4 months of conservative management, that included assisted feeding of a semi-liquid diet or small volumes of food and analgesics, the dog recovered. PMID:27587884

  16. Expression of migration-related genes is progressively upregulated in murine Lineage-Sca-1+c-Kit+ population from the fetal to adult stages of development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) follow a genetically programmed pattern of migration during development. Extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules, as well as chemokines and their receptors, are important in adult HSC migration. However, little is known about the role these molecules play at earlier developmental stages. Methods We have analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) array the expression pattern of extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules as well as chemokines and chemokine receptors in Lineage-Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK) cells at different stages of development, in order to characterize the role played by these molecules in LSK. Data were represented by volcano plots to show the differences in expression pattern at the time points studied. Results Our results show marked changes in the expression pattern of extracellular matrix, adhesion molecules, chemokines and their receptors with developmental age, particularly in later stages of development. Ten molecules were significantly increased among the LSK populations studied. Our screen identified the upregulation of Col4a1, as well as molecules involved in its degradation (Mmp2, Timp2), with development. Other genes identified were Sell, Tgfbi, and Entpd1. Furthermore, we show that the expression of the chemokines Ccl4, Ccl9, Il18 and the chemokine receptor Cxcr4 increases in LSK cells during development. Conclusions Several genes are upregulated in the LSK population in their transition to the bone marrow microenvironment, increasing at later stages of development. This gene pattern should be emulated by embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic progenitors in order to improve their properties for clinical applications such as engraftment. PMID:20637061

  17. IL-22 promoted CD3+ T cell infiltration by IL-22R induced STAT3 phosphorylation in murine acute graft versus host disease target organs after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Ruan, Suhong; Tian, Yu; Zhao, Dongmei; Chen, Chong; Pan, Bin; Yan, Zhiling; Yin, Lingling; Zhu, Shengyun; Xu, Kailin

    2016-10-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a life threatening complication of bone marrow stem cell transplantation, in which considerable numbers of proinflammatory cytokines secreted by allo-reactive donor T cells are involved. We and other previous studies have found that interleukin-22 (IL-22) was able to aggravate the target organs damage of GVHD. However, the mechanism and the signal pathway of IL-22 in murine acute GVHD was not clear. Here, we observed that compared with GVHD group, more serious pathological damage and more CD3(+) T cells infiltrated in GVHD target organs were detected in the mice injected with IL-22. Meanwhile, transcription factor T-bet, RORγt and AhR respectively associated with Th1, Th17 and Th22 cells changed in varying degrees in different GVHD target organs. Furthermore, the increased expression of IL-22R and its downstream protein P-STAT3 were detected in GVHD mice with IL-22 treated. These results suggested that the pathological role of IL-22 in GVHD target organs contribute to exogenous injected IL-22 as well as secreted IL-22 from the infiltrated allo-reactive effector T cells. In addition, the IL-22R-STAT3 pathway may play important role in GVHD tissue injury and target this way may yield new approaches for reduction of GVHD. PMID:27551984

  18. Effect of phylloquinone (vitamin K1) supplementation for 12 months on the indices of vitamin K status and bone health in adult patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Eibhlís M; Grealy, Geraldine; McCarthy, Jane; Desmond, Alan; Craig, Orla; Shanahan, Fergus; Cashman, Kevin D

    2014-10-14

    Although epidemiological findings support a role for vitamin K status in the improvement of bone indices in adult patients with Crohn's disease (CD), this needs to be confirmed in double-blind, randomised controlled trials (RCT) with phylloquinone (vitamin K1). By conducting two RCT, the present study aimed to first establish whether supplementation with 1000 μg of phylloquinone daily near-maximally suppresses the percentage of undercarboxylated osteocalcin in serum (%ucOC; marker of vitamin K status) in adult patients with CD currently in remission as it does in healthy adults and second determine the effect of supplementation with phylloquinone at this dose for 12 months on the indices of bone turnover and bone mass. The initial dose-ranging RCT was conducted in adult patients with CD (n 10 per group) using 0 (placebo), 1000 or 2000 μg of phylloquinone daily for 2 weeks. In the main RCT, the effect of placebo v. 1000 μg vitamin K/d (both co-administered with Ca (500 mg/d) and vitamin D3 (10 μg/d)) for 12 months (n 43 per group) on the biochemical indices of bone turnover (determined by enzyme immunoassay) and bone mass (determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) were investigated. At baseline, the mean %ucOC was 47 %, and this was suppressed upon supplementation with 1000 μg of phylloquinone daily ( - 81 %; P< 0·01) and not suppressed further by 2000 μg of phylloquinone daily. Compared with the placebo, supplementation with 1000 μg of phylloquinone daily for 12 months had no significant effect (P>0·1) on bone turnover markers or on the bone mass of the lumbar spine or femur, but modestly increased (P< 0·05) the bone mass of the total radius. Despite near maximal suppression of serum %ucOC, supplementation with 1000 μg of phylloquinone daily (with Ca and vitamin D3) had no effect on the indices of bone health in adult CD patients with likely vitamin K insufficiency.

  19. New TiAg composite coating for bone prosthesis engineering shows promising microvascular compatibility in the murine dorsal skinfold chamber model.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Ann-Kathrin; Beythien, Maximilian; Huber, Jakob; Zufraß, Thorsten; Butschkau, Antje; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of antimicrobial substances like silver into implant surface coatings is one promising concept against primary infections of endoprosthesis, especially for immunocompromised patients as well as against reinfection after revision operations. However, besides good antimicrobial and mechanical properties it is equally important that the implant material does not disturb the local microvascular perfusion of muscle tissue to enable microbial host defense and tissue repair processes. In this study the biocompatibility of a newly developed TiAg-composite coating applied on conventional titanium via physical vapor deposition was analysed. To evaluate the local microvascular and inflammatory response of striated muscle tissue upon implantation of TiAg-coated plates the murine dorsal skinfold chamber model was used. We repetitively examined local capillary and venular perfusion, endothelial integrity as well as leucocyte activation by intravital fluorescence microscopy at 1 h, 24 h as well as 3 and 7 days after implantation. TiAg-implants were well tolerated by the vascular system as indicated by intact functional capillary density and endothelial integrity compared to pure titanium plates and controls without a metal implant. Furthermore, quantification of rolling and adherent leucocytes did not reveal signs of inflammation upon TiAg-implantation.

  20. Does physical activity in adolescence have site-specific and sex-specific benefits on young adult bone size, content, and estimated strength?

    PubMed

    Duckham, Rachel L; Baxter-Jones, Adam D G; Johnston, James D; Vatanparast, Hassanali; Cooper, David; Kontulainen, Saija

    2014-02-01

    The long-term benefits of habitual physical activity during adolescence on adult bone structure and strength are poorly understood. We investigated whether physically active adolescents had greater bone size, density, content, and estimated bone strength in young adulthood when compared to their peers who were inactive during adolescence. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to measure the tibia and radius of 122 (73 females) participants (age mean ± SD, 29.3 ± 2.3 years) of the Saskatchewan Pediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study (PBMAS). Total bone area (ToA), cortical density (CoD), cortical area (CoA), cortical content (CoC), and estimated bone strength in torsion (SSIp ) and muscle area (MuA) were measured at the diaphyses (66% tibia and 65% radius). Total density (ToD), trabecular density (TrD), trabecular content (TrC), and estimated bone strength in compression (BSIc ) were measured at the distal ends (4%). Participants were grouped by their adolescent physical activity (PA) levels (inactive, average, and active) based on mean PA Z-scores obtained from serial questionnaire assessments completed during adolescence. We compared adult bone outcomes across adolescent PA groups in each sex using analysis of covariance followed by post hoc pairwise comparisons with Bonferroni adjustments. When adjusted for adult height, MuA, and PA, adult males who were more physically active than their peers in adolescence had 13% greater adjusted torsional bone strength (SSIp , p < 0.05) and 10% greater adjusted ToA (p < 0.05) at the tibia diaphysis. Females who were more active in adolescence had 10% larger adjusted CoA (p < 0.05), 12% greater adjusted CoC (p < 0.05) at the tibia diaphysis, and 3% greater adjusted TrC (p < 0.05) at the distal tibia when compared to their inactive peers. Benefits to tibia bone size, content, and strength in those who were more active during adolescence seemed to persist into young adulthood

  1. Effect of perinatal synthetic steroid hormone (allylestrenol, diethylstilbestrol) treatment (hormonal imprinting) on the bone mineralization of the adult male and female rat.

    PubMed

    Karabélyos, C; Horváth, C; Holló, I; Csaba, G

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal treatment with allylestrenol or diethylstilbestrol (DES) reduced the bone mineral content (BMC/bw) of the adult (four months old) female rats, without influencing bone mineral density (BMD/bw). In males these neonatal treatments elevated BMC and BMD alike. Ovariectomy alone decreased BMC and BMD alike; however the neonatal hormone treatments did not influence this reduced value. Ovariectomy of two months old animals increased body weight without the influence of neonatal hormone treatments. In adult males, the body weight was reduced significantly by neonatal DES and non-significantly by neonatal allylestrenol treatment. The experiments call attention to the possible human bone-effects of allylestrenol, which was used in the last decades as medication protecting endangered pregnancies. PMID:10075115

  2. Bone lead levels are associated with measures of memory impairment in older adults

    PubMed Central

    van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Campbell, James R.; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A.

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a link between lead exposure and memory impairment but assessments based on predictive and validated measures are lacking. We conducted a pilot study of 47 healthy subjects 55-67 years of age to examine associations between bone lead levels and 4 tests sensitive to the natural history of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). These include 3 subtests of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (delayed match-to-sample, paired associates learning and spatial recognition memory) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Test. Bone lead concentrations were measured at the mid-shaft of the tibia and the calcaneus with K X-ray fluorescence. Higher tibial and calcaneal bone lead values were significantly (p<0.05) associated with lower performance levels on delayed match-to-sample and paired associates learning in unadjusted analyses with Spearman rank correlation coefficients of about 0.4. Multiple linear regression analyses (i.e., least-squares means of cognitive test scores across tertiles of lead exposure) adjusted for age, education and smoking status continued to show an association of higher calcaneal lead levels with increasing memory impairments on delayed match-to-sample (p=0.07). As might be expected, additional adjustment for history of hypertension reduced the strength of this association (p=0.19). Given the demonstrated impact of lead exposure on hypertension and the vascular etiology of certain dementias, we speculate that hypertension could play a mediating role in the association between lead exposure and memory impairment. PMID:19477197

  3. Follicle-stimulating hormone, interleukin-1, and bone density in adult women.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Joseph G; Cortez-Cooper, Miriam; Meaders, Eric; Stallings, Judith; Haddow, Sara; Kraj, Barbara; Sloan, Gloria; Mulloy, Anthony

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies have indicated that follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) promotes bone loss. The present study tested the hypothesis that FSH enhances the activity of bone-resorbing cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and IL-6], either by inducing their secretion or by altering their receptor expression. Thirty-six women between the ages of 20 and 50 were assessed for bone mineral density (BMD), reproductive hormone, cytokine ligand and soluble receptor concentrations, and surface expression of cytokine receptors on monocytes. In addition, isolated mononuclear cells were incubated in vitro with exogenous FSH. Univariate regression analyses indicated that BMD was inversely related to serum FSH (r = -0.29 to -0.51, P = 0.03-0.001, depending upon the skeletal site). Physical activity and body composition were also identified as significant factors by multiple regressions. Exogenous FSH induced isolated cells to secrete IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 in proportion to the surface expression of FSH receptors on the monocytes. Endogenous (serum) FSH concentrations correlated with the circulating concentrations of these cytokines. None of these individual cytokines was related to BMD, but the IL-1beta to IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) ratio was inversely related to BMD (r = -0.53, P = 0.002) in all but the most physically active women, who had significantly lower expression of IL-1 type I receptors relative to type II (decoy receptors, P = 0.01). Physical activity also correlated positively with secretion of inhibitory soluble IL-1 receptors (r = 0.53, P = 0.003). Moreover, IL-1Ra correlated strongly with percent body fat (r = 0.66, P < 0.0001). These results indicate that BMD is related to FSH concentration, physical activity, and body composition. Although each of these factors likely has direct effects on bone, the present study suggests that each may also influence BMD by modulating the activity of the osteoresorptive cytokine IL-1beta.

  4. The recruitment of two consecutive and different waves of host stem/progenitor cells during the development of tissue-engineered bone in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Tasso, Roberta; Fais, Franco; Reverberi, Daniele; Tortelli, Federico; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2010-03-01

    Angiogenesis plays a central role in bone regeneration, not only for the transport of nutrients, but also for locally directing skeletal stem/progenitor cells. Following ectopic implantation of porous ceramic cubes seeded with mouse GFP-labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into syngenic mice, we investigated the cascade of events leading to bone formation. Implants harvested at different times were enzymatically digested to generate single-cell suspensions. Recovered cells were sorted to separate GFP+implanted MSC and host recruited GFP- cells. We isolated and characterized two different waves of cells, migrating from the host to the MSC-seeded ceramic. The first migrated cell population, recovered 7 days after implantation, was enriched in CD31+endothelial progenitors, while the second one, recruited at day 11, was enriched in CD146+pericyte-like cells. Both populations were not recruited into the scaffold following implantation of a non-MSC seeded ceramic. Pericyte-like cell mobilization was dependent on the first migrated endothelial cell population. Pericyte-like cells retained properties distinctive of stem cells, such as capacity of performing a high number of in vitro cell divisions and showed an osteogenic potential. Studies on the cross talk between implanted exogenous MSC and resident stem/progenitor cells could open new perspectives for future clinical applications.

  5. Effect of donor chimerism to reduce the level of glycosaminoglycans following bone marrow transplantation in a murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type II.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Kazumasa; Kaneshiro, Eiko; Higuchi, Takashi; Shimada, Yohta; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Masaharu; Otsu, Makoto; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Ohashi, Toya; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient activity of the iduronate-2-sulfatase. This leads to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the lysosomes of various cells. Although it has been proposed that bone marrow transplantation (BMT) may have a beneficial effect for patients with MPS II, the requirement for donor-cell chimerism to reduce GAG levels is unknown. To address this issue, we transplanted various ratios of normal and MPS II bone marrow cells in a mouse model of MPS II and analyzed GAG accumulation in various tissues. Chimerism of whole leukocytes and each lineage of BMT recipients' peripheral blood was similar to infusion ratios. GAGs were significantly reduced in the liver, spleen, and heart of recipients. The level of GAG reduction in these tissues depends on the percentage of normal-cell chimerism. In contrast to these tissues, a reduction in GAGs was not observed in the kidney and brain, even if 100 % donor chimerism was achieved. These observations suggest that a high degree of chimerism is necessary to achieve the maximum effect of BMT, and donor lymphocyte infusion or enzyme replacement therapy might be considered options in cases of low-level chimerism in MPS II patients.

  6. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 expression and activity in the human adult normal kidney is predominantly localized to the distal nephron.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, P; Haag, J; Câmpean, V; Goldschmeding, R; Atalla, A; Amann, K; Aigner, T

    2006-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP)-7 plays an important role during fetal kidney development. In the adult, BMP-7 is most strongly expressed in the kidney compared to other organs, but the exact expression pattern as well as the function of BMP-7 is unclear. The major aim of the present study was to define which parts of the human kidney do physiologically express BMP-7 and which cells appear to be targets of BMP activity by showing phosphorylated BMP-receptor-associated Smads 1, 5, or 8 and inhibitor of differentiation factor 1 (ID1) expression. BMP-7 expression was localized by immunohistology to the epithelia of the distal tubule as well as the collecting ducts (CDs). Phospho-Smads 1/5/8 and ID1 expression largely colocalized with BMP-7 and was also localized in the epithelia of the distal tubule and the CDs. This was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction-based mRNA expression analysis. In vitro, proximal tubular cells (PTCs) expressed BMP receptors and BMP-receptor-associated Smads and were reactive to BMP-7. Our data indicate that BMP-7 expression in the adult human kidney appears to be more restricted than in the fetal situation and predominantly found in the distal nephron. Also, evidence of in vivo BMP signalling (i.e. phospho-Smads and ID1 expression) was found there. These findings suggest that BMP-7 plays a physiological role mostly in this part of the kidney. Still, as reported previously, PTCs are responsive to BMP-7, but presumably not in an autocrine or paracrine mode in normal adult kidneys. PMID:16807538

  7. Improved graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival associated with bone marrow as the stem cell source in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; de Latour, Regis Peffault; DeFor, Todd E; Robin, Marie; Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Xhaard, Aliénor; Bejanyan, Nelli; de Fontbrune, Flore Sicre; Arora, Mukta; Brunstein, Claudio G.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Socie, Gerard; Holtan, Shernan G.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that bone marrow grafts from matched sibling donors resulted in best graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival at 1-year post allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. However, pediatric patients comprised the majority of bone marrow graft recipients in that study. To better define this outcome in adults and pediatric patients at 1- and 2-years post- allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, we pooled data from the University of Minnesota and the Hôpital Saint-Louis in Paris, France (n=1901). Graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival was defined as the absence of grade III–IV acute graft-versus-host disease, chronic graft-versus-host disease (requiring systemic therapy or extensive stage), relapse and death. In adults, bone marrow from matched sibling donors (n=123) had best graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival at 1- and 2-years, compared with peripheral blood stem cell from matched sibling donors (n=540) or other graft/donor types. In multivariate analysis, peripheral blood stem cells from matched sibling donors resulted in a 50% increased risk of events contributing to graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival at 1- and 2-years than bone marrow from matched sibling donors. With limited numbers of peripheral blood stem cell grafts in pediatric patients (n=12), graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival did not differ between bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell graft from any donor. While not all patients have a matched sibling donor, graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival may be improved by the preferential use of bone marrow for adults with malignant diseases. Alternatively, novel graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis regimens are needed to substantially impact graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival with the use of peripheral blood stem cell. PMID:27036159

  8. Stem cell niches and other factors that influence the sensitivity of bone marrow to radiation-induced bone cancer and leukaemia in children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Richard B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reviews and reassesses the internationally accepted niches or ‘targets’ in bone marrow that are sensitive to the induction of leukaemia and primary bone cancer by radiation. Conclusions: The hypoxic conditions of the 10 μm thick endosteal/osteoblastic niche where preleukemic stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) reside provides a radioprotective microenvironment that is 2-to 3-fold less radiosensitive than vascular niches. This supports partitioning the whole marrow target between the low haematological cancer risk of irradiating HSC in the endosteum and the vascular niches within central marrow. There is a greater risk of induced bone cancer when irradiating a 50 μm thick peripheral marrow adjacent to the remodelling/reforming portion of the trabecular bone surface, rather than marrow next to the quiescent bone surface. This choice of partitioned bone cancer target is substantiated by the greater radiosensitivity of: (i) Bone with high remodelling rates, (ii) the young, (iii) individuals with hypermetabolic benign diseases of bone, and (iv) the epidemiology of alpha-emitting exposures. Evidence is given to show that the absence of excess bone-cancer in atomic-bomb survivors may be partially related to the extremely low prevalence among Japanese of Paget's disease of bone. Radiation-induced fibrosis and the wound healing response may be implicated in not only radiogenic bone cancers but also leukaemia. A novel biological mechanism for adaptive response, and possibility of dynamic targets, is advocated whereby stem cells migrate from vascular niches to stress-mitigated, hypoxic niches. PMID:21204614

  9. Genetic expression and functional characterization of the RUNX2 gene in human adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J Y; Li, L C

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have revealed the critical role of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) in the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This study therefore aimed to investigate the expression profile of the RUNX2 gene in human bone marrow MSCs and its biological characteristics. Bone marrow MSCs were separated from 12 patients who had received hip joint replacement surgery. After purification and culture, the MSCs were subjected to the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry, the alkaline phosphatase assay, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and RUNX2 protein quantification. The cell growth curve, staining images, and information on the membrane antigens and the levels of RUNX2 mRNA and protein were obtained based on the results. The growth curve showed, after a 2-day lag period, cultured MSCs entered into the log phase between d3 (Day 3) and d6, when they reached a plateau. Flow cytometry data suggested 94.38% of MSCs were CD90-positive, while only 3.99 and 1.71% of total cells were positive for CD35 and CD45, respectively. With the elongated induction period, cultured MSCs were polygonal in shape. After a 14-day induction, cell fusion occurred in the center of the cell nodule accompanied by the disappearance of cellular structure to form the calcium nodule, which was stained red. There was also a statistically significant increase in the level of RUNX2 protein at d7 and d14. An osteogenic medium is required for the differentiation of adult MSCs, which is also under RUNX2 regulation. These findings are potentially valuable for clinical practice. PMID:26782468

  10. Impaired Autophagy in Adult Bone Marrow CD34+ Cells of Patients with Aplastic Anemia: Possible Pathogenic Significance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinbo; Ge, Meili; Lu, Shihong; Shi, Jun; Yu, Wei; Li, Xingxin; Wang, Min; Zhang, Jizhou; Feng, Sizhou; Dong, Shuxu; Cheng, Xuelian; Zheng, Yizhou

    2016-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is a bone marrow failure syndrome that is caused largely by profound quantitative and qualitative defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these defects remain unclear. Under conditions of stress, autophagy acts as a protective mechanism for cells. We therefore postulated that autophagy in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) from AA patients might be impaired and play a role in the pathogenesis of AA. To test this hypothesis, we tested autophagy in CD34+ cells from AA samples and healthy controls and investigated the effect of autophagy on the survival of adult human bone marrow CD34+ cells. We found that the level of autophagy in CD34+ cells from AA patients was significantly lower than in age/sex-matched healthy controls, and lower in cases of severe AA than in those with non-severe AA. Autophagy in CD34+ cells improved upon amelioration of AA but, compared to healthy controls, was still significantly reduced even in AA patients who had achieved a complete, long-term response. We also showed that although the basal autophagy in CD34+ cells was low, the autophagic response of CD34+ cells to "adversity" was rapid. Finally, impaired autophagy resulted in reduced differentiation and proliferation of CD34+ cells and sensitized them to death and apoptosis. Thus, our results confirm that autophagy in CD34+ cells from AA patients is impaired, that autophagy is required for the survival of CD34+ cells, and that impaired autophagy in CD34+ HPCs may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AA. PMID:26930650

  11. Evaluation of stem cell reserve using serial bone marrow transplantation and competitive repopulation in a murine model of chronic hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Maggio-Price, L.; Wolf, N.S.; Priestley, G.V.; Pietrzyk, M.E.; Bernstein, S.E.

    1988-09-01

    Serial transplantation and competitive repopulation were used to evaluate any loss of self-replicative capacity of bone marrow stem cells in a mouse model with increased and persistent hemopoietic demands. Congenic marrows from old control and from young and old mice with hereditary spherocytic anemia (sphha/sphha) were serially transplanted at 35-day intervals into normal irradiated recipients. Old anemic marrow failed or reverted to recipient karyotype at a mean of 3.5 transplants, and young anemic marrow reverted at a mean of 4.0 transplants, whereas controls did so at a mean of 5.0 transplants. In a competitive assay in which a mixture of anemic and control marrow was transplanted, the anemic marrow persisted to 10 months following transplantation; anemic marrow repopulation was greater if anemic marrow sex matched with the host. It is possible that lifelong stress of severe anemia decreases stem cell reserve in the anemic sphha/sphha mouse marrow. However, marginal differences in serial transplantation number and the maintenance of anemic marrow in a competition assay would suggest that marrow stem cells, under prolonged stress, are capable of exhibiting good repopulating and self-replicating abilities.

  12. Bone marrow-derived macrophages distinct from tissue-resident macrophages play a pivotal role in Concanavalin A-induced murine liver injury via CCR9 axis

    PubMed Central

    Amiya, Takeru; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Chu, Po-sung; Teratani, Toshiaki; Nakajima, Hideaki; Fukuchi, Yumi; Taniki, Nobuhito; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Shiba, Shunsuke; Miyake, Rei; Katayama, Tadashi; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism how heterogeneous hepatic macrophage (Mφ) subsets fulfill diverse functions in health and disease has not been elucidated. We recently reported that CCR9+ inflammatory Mφs play a critical role in the course of acute liver injury. To clarify the origin and differentiation of CCR9+Mφs, we used a unique partial bone marrow (BM) chimera model with liver shielding for maintaining hepatic resident Mφs. First, irradiated mice developed less liver injury with less Mφs accumulation by Concanavalin A (Con A) regardless of liver shielding. In mice receiving further BM transplantation, CD11blowF4/80high hepatic-resident Mφs were not replaced by transplanted donors under steady state, while under inflammatory state by Con A, CCR9+Mφs were firmly replaced by donors, indicating that CCR9+Mφs originate from BM, but not from hepatic-resident cells. Regarding the mechanism of differentiation and proliferation, EdU+CCR9+Mφs with a proliferative potential were detected specifically in the inflamed liver, and in vitro study revealed that BM-derived CD11b+ cells co-cultured with hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) or stimulated with retinoic acids could acquire CCR9 with antigen-presenting ability. Collectively, our study demonstrates that inflammatory Mφs originate from BM and became locally differentiated and proliferated by interaction with HSCs via CCR9 axis during acute liver injury. PMID:27725760

  13. Effectiveness of community intervention in improving bone health behaviors in older adults.

    PubMed

    Plawecki, Karen; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen

    2013-01-01

    An 8-week, bone-health community program addressed risks/lifestyle changes within the Health Belief Model and Theory of Reasoned Action frameworks in a randomized format (treatment group n = 35; control group n = 34). Median week 1 values for calcium (control, 963 mg; treatment, 1023 mg) and vitamin D (81 IU both groups) were below recommendations, increasing throughout the program for both control (1023 mg calcium, 128 IU vitamin D) and treatment (1005 mg calcium, 122 IU vitamin D) groups. There was limited response to the exercise outcome variables, with many not participating in that section of the program. Psychosocial variables were positive for both control and treatment groups at week 1, with no significant difference at postintervention. Regression analysis indicated that those with a positive attitude about calcium intake and belief that they could choose calcium-fortified foods were more likely to have higher calcium intake. Intention to exercise was modified by peer and family support. Community-based programs can translate and use clinical trial key topics and outcomes, but participation bias makes impact results difficult to interpret the effectiveness of the program.

  14. Effectiveness of community intervention in improving bone health behaviors in older adults.

    PubMed

    Plawecki, Karen; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen

    2013-01-01

    An 8-week, bone-health community program addressed risks/lifestyle changes within the Health Belief Model and Theory of Reasoned Action frameworks in a randomized format (treatment group n = 35; control group n = 34). Median week 1 values for calcium (control, 963 mg; treatment, 1023 mg) and vitamin D (81 IU both groups) were below recommendations, increasing throughout the program for both control (1023 mg calcium, 128 IU vitamin D) and treatment (1005 mg calcium, 122 IU vitamin D) groups. There was limited response to the exercise outcome variables, with many not participating in that section of the program. Psychosocial variables were positive for both control and treatment groups at week 1, with no significant difference at postintervention. Regression analysis indicated that those with a positive attitude about calcium intake and belief that they could choose calcium-fortified foods were more likely to have higher calcium intake. Intention to exercise was modified by peer and family support. Community-based programs can translate and use clinical trial key topics and outcomes, but participation bias makes impact results difficult to interpret the effectiveness of the program. PMID:23663213

  15. Low Bone Turnover and Low BMD in Down Syndrome: Effect of Intermittent PTH Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Akel, Nisreen S.; Vander Schilden, Jaclyn; Bacon, Anthony W.; Bracey, John W.; Sowder, Timothy; Skinner, Robert A.; Swain, Frances L.; Hogue, William R.; Leblanc, Donna B.; Gaddy, Dana; Wenger, Galen R.; Suva, Larry J.

    2012-01-01

    Trisomy 21 affects virtually every organ system and results in the complex clinical presentation of Down syndrome (DS). Patterns of differences are now being recognized as patients’ age and these patterns bring about new opportunities for disease prevention and treatment. Low bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported in many studies of males and females with DS yet the specific effects of trisomy 21 on the skeleton remain poorly defined. Therefore we determined the bone phenotype and measured bone turnover markers in the murine DS model Ts65Dn. Male Ts65Dn DS mice are infertile and display a profound low bone mass phenotype that deteriorates with age. The low bone mass was correlated with significantly decreased osteoblast and osteoclast development, decreased bone biochemical markers, a diminished bone formation rate and reduced mechanical strength. The low bone mass observed in 3 month old Ts65Dn mice was significantly increased after 4 weeks of intermittent PTH treatment. These studies provide novel insight into the cause of the profound bone fragility in DS and identify PTH as a potential anabolic agent in the adult low bone mass DS population. PMID:22916188

  16. Antigen-pulsed bone marrow derived and pulmonary dendritic cells promote Th2 cell responses and immunopathology in lungs during the pathogenesis of murine mycoplasma pneumonia1

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, Nicole A.; Zhou, Xia; Pulse, Mark; Hodge, Lisa M.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Simecka, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are a common cause of pneumonia in humans and animals, and attempts to create vaccines have not only failed to generate protective host responses, but exacerbated the disease. Mycoplasma pulmonis causes a chronic inflammatory lung disease resulting from a persistent infection, similar to other mycoplasma respiratory diseases. Using this model, Th1 subsets promote resistance to mycoplasma disease and infection, while Th2 responses contribute to immunopathology. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the capacity of cytokine differentiated dendritic cells (DC) populations to influence the generation of protective and/or pathologic immune responses during M. pulmonis respiratory disease in BALB/c mice. We hypothesized that intratracheal inoculation of mycoplasma antigen-pulsed bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) could result in the generation of protective T cell responses during mycoplasma infection. However, intratracheal inoculation (priming) of mice with antigen-pulsed DCs resulted enhanced pathology in the recipient mice when challenged with mycoplasma. Inoculation of immunodeficient SCID mice with antigen-pulsed DCs demonstrated that this effect was dependent on lymphocyte responses. Similar results were observed when mice were primed with antigen-pulsed pulmonary, but not splenic, DCs. Lymphocytes generated in uninfected mice after the transfer of either antigen-pulsed BMDCs or pulmonary DCs were shown to be IL13+ Th2 cells, known to be associated with immunopathology. Thus, resident pulmonary DC most likely promote the development of immunopathology in mycoplasma disease through the generation of mycoplasma-specific Th2 responses. Vaccination strategies that disrupt or bypass this process could potentially result in a more effective vaccination. PMID:24973442

  17. Sequential expression of adhesion and costimulatory molecules in graft-versus-host disease target organs after murine bone marrow transplantation across minor histocompatibility antigen barriers.

    PubMed

    Eyrich, Matthias; Burger, Gudrun; Marquardt, Katja; Budach, Wilfried; Schilbach, Karin; Niethammer, Dietrich; Schlegel, Paul G

    2005-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a potentially fatal complication after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. However, few data exist thus far on the molecular signals governing leukocyte trafficking during the disease. We therefore investigated the sequential pattern of distinct adhesion, costimulatory, and apoptosis-related molecules in GVHD organs (ileum, colon, skin, and liver) after transplantation across minor histocompatibility barriers (B10.D2 --> BALB/c, both H-2d). To distinguish changes induced by the conditioning regimen from effects achieved by allogeneic cell transfer, syngeneic transplant recipients (BALB/c --> BALB/c) and irradiated nontransplanted mice were added as controls. Irradiation upregulated the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-l, and B7-2 in ileum, as well as VCAM-1 and B7-2 in colon, on day 3 in all animals. Whereas in syngeneic mice these effects were reversed from day 9 on, allogeneic recipients showed further upregulation of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, B7-1, and B7-2 in these organs on day 22, when GVHD became clinically evident. Infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ donor T cells was noted on day 9 in skin and liver and on day 22 in ileum and colon. Surprisingly, the expression of several other adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-2, platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1, E-selectin, and mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1, did not change. Proapoptotic and antiapoptotic markers were balanced in GVHD organs with the exception of spleen, in which a preferential expression of the proapoptotic Bax could be noted. Our results indicate that irradiation-induced upregulation of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and B7-2 provides early costimulatory signals to incoming donor T cells in the intestine, followed by a cascade of proinflammatory signals in other organs once the alloresponse is established.

  18. Current data with inulin-type fructans and calcium, targeting bone health in adults.

    PubMed

    Coxam, Véronique

    2007-11-01

    In humans, there is increasing evidence that the colon can absorb nutritionally significant amounts of calcium, and this process may be susceptible to dietary manipulation by fermentable substrates, especially inulin-type fructans. Inulin-type fructans can modulate calcium absorption because they are resistant to hydrolysis by mammalian enzymes and are fermented in the large intestine to produce short-chain fatty acids, which in turn reduce luminal pH and modify calcium speciation, and hence solubility, or exert a direct effect on the mucosal transport pathway. Quite a few intervention studies showed an improvement of calcium absorption in adolescents or young adults by inulin-type fructans. In the same way, a positive effect has been reported in older women.

  19. Neonatal CD71+ erythroid cells do not modify murine sepsis mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Stocks, Blair T.; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Alrifai, Mhd Wael; Liu, Jin-Hua; Kim, Annette S.; Alford, Catherine E.; Matta, Pranathi; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Moore, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. A recent report suggested murine neonatal host defense against infection could be compromised by immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid splenocytes. We examined the impact of CD71+ erythroid splenocytes on murine neonatal mortality to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis and characterized circulating CD71+ erythroid (CD235a+) cells in human neonates. Adoptive transfer or antibody-mediated reduction of neonatal CD71+ erythroid splenocytes did not alter murine neonatal survival to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis challenge. Ex vivo immunosuppression of stimulated adult CD11b+ cells was not limited to neonatal splenocytes as it also occurred with adult and neonatal bone marrow. Animals treated with anti-CD71 antibody showed reduced splenic bacterial load following bacterial challenge compared to isotype-treated mice. However, adoptive transfer of enriched CD71+ erythroid splenocytes to CD71+-reduced animals did not reduce bacterial clearance. Human CD71+CD235a+ cells were common among cord blood mononuclear cells and were shown to be reticulocytes. In summary, a lack of effect on murine survival to polymicrobial sepsis following adoptive transfer or diminution of CD71+ erythroid splenocytes under these experimental conditions suggests the impact of these cells on neonatal infection risk and progression may be limited. An unanticipated immune priming effect of anti-CD71 antibody treatment was likely responsible for the reported enhanced bacterial clearance, rather than a reduction of immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid splenocytes. In humans, the well-described rapid decrease in circulating reticulocytes after birth suggests they may have a limited role in reducing inflammation secondary to microbial colonization. PMID:26101326

  20. Immunomodulatory effect of human adipose tissue-derived adult stem cells: comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Puissant, Bénédicte; Barreau, Corinne; Bourin, Philippe; Clavel, Cyril; Corre, Jill; Bousquet, Christine; Taureau, Christine; Cousin, Béatrice; Abbal, Michel; Laharrague, Patrick; Penicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis; Blancher, Antoine

    2005-04-01

    Like mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived adult stem cells (ADAS cells) can differentiate into several lineages and present therapeutical potential for repairing damaged tissues. The use of allogenic stem cells can enlarge their therapeutical interest, provided that the grafted cells could be tolerated. We investigate here, for the first time, the immunosuppressive properties of ADAS cells compared with the well-characterized immunosuppressive properties of BM-MSCs. ADAS cells did not provoke in vitro alloreactivity of incompatible lymphocytes and, moreover, suppressed mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogens. The impairment of inhibition when ADAS cells and BM-MSCs were separated from lymphocytes by a permeable membrane suggests that cell contact is required for a full inhibitory effect. Hepatocyte growth factor is secreted by both stem cells but, similar to interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), the levels of which were undetectable in supernatants of MLR inhibited by ADAS cells or BM-MSCs, it did not seem implicated in the stem cell suppressive effect. These findings support that ADAS cells share immunosuppressive properties with BM-MSCs. Therefore, ADAS cell-based reconstructive therapy could employ allogenic cells and because of their immunosuppressive properties, ADAS cells could be an alternative source to BM-MSCs to treat allogenic conflicts.

  1. Decision-making in adult thalassemia patients undergoing unrelated bone marrow transplantation: quality of life, communication and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Caocci, G; Pisu, S; Argiolu, F; Giardini, C; Locatelli, F; Vacca, A; Orofino, M G; Piras, E; De Stefano, P; Addari, M C; Ledda, A; La Nasa, G

    2006-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) represents a potentially curative treatment of thalassemia. For patients without an HLA-identical sibling donor, recourse to an unrelated donor is a practicable option but the candidates and their families are faced with a difficult decision. They can either choose to continue the supportive therapy, with no chance of definitive cure, or they accept the mortality risk of BMT in the hope of obtaining a definitive resolution of the disease. We investigated the communication strategies and the post transplantation quality of life (QoL) in 19 adult thalassemia patients surviving after an unrelated donor BMT. The patients were given two questionnaires: a questionnaire to evaluate pre-transplantation communication factors and the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire to assess global QoL. All patients were satisfied with the communication modalities employed by the physicians. The global post transplantation QoL in our patient cohort was found to be good. The approach used in this study may offer a contribution to understanding the decision-making process leading to the choice of a treatment with a high mortality risk for a chronic, non-malignant disease. Finally, some ethical issues of this therapeutic approach are briefly addressed. PMID:16299541

  2. Osteoporosis and Prevalent Fractures among Adult Filipino Men Screened for Bone Mineral Density in a Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Amy A.; Valdez, Valerie Ann U.; Mercado-Asis, Leilani B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis in men is markedly underdiagnosed and undertreated despite higher morbidity and mortality associated with fractures. This study aimed to characterize adult Filipino men with osteopenia, osteoporosis and prevalent fractures. Methods A cross-sectional study of 184 Filipino men ≥50 years screened for bone mineral density was performed. Age, weight, body mass index (BMI), Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) score, smoking status, family history of fracture, diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, and T-score were considered. Results Of the 184 patients, 40.2% and 29.9% have osteopenia and osteoporosis. Sixteen (21.6%) and 18 (32.1%) osteopenic and osteoporotic men have fragility hip, spine, or forearm fractures. Men aged 50 to 69 years have the same risk of osteoporosis and fractures as those ≥70 years. While hip fractures are higher in osteoporotic men, vertebral fractures are increased in both osteopenic and osteoporotic men. Mere osteopenia predicts the presence of prevalent fractures. A high risk OSTA score can predict fracture. A BMI <21 kg/m2 (P<0.05) and current smoking are associated with osteoporosis. Conclusion A significant fraction of Filipino men with osteopenia and osteoporosis have prevalent fractures. Our data suggest that fractures occur in men <70 years even before osteoporosis sets in. Low BMI, high OSTA score, and smoking are significant risk factors of osteoporosis. PMID:27546872

  3. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection-induced tissue and bone transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Meka, Archana; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Sathishkumar, Sabapathi; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Verma, Raj K.; Wallet, Shannon M.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Boyce, Brendan F.; Handfield, Martin; Lamont, Richard J.; Baker, Henry V.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Lakshmyya, Kesavalu N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Porphyromonas gingivalis has been associated with subgingival biofilms in adult periodontitis. However, the molecular mechanisms of its contribution to chronic gingival inflammation and loss of periodontal structural integrity remain unclear. The objectives of this investigation were to examine changes in the host transcriptional profiles during a P. gingivalis infection using a murine calvarial model of inflammation and bone resorption. Methods P. gingivalis FDC 381 was injected into the subcutaneous soft tissue over the calvaria of BALB/c mice for 3 days, after which the soft tissues and calvarial bones were excised. RNA was isolated from infected soft tissues and calvarial bones and analyzed for transcript profiles using Murine GeneChip® arrays to provide a molecular profile of the events that occur following infection of these tissues. Results After P. gingivalis infection, 5517 and 1900 probe sets in the infected soft tissues and calvarial bone, respectively, were differentially expressed (P ≤ 0.05) and up-regulated. Biological pathways significantly impacted by P. gingivalis infection in tissues and calvarial bone included cell adhesion (immune system) molecules, Toll-like receptors, B cell receptor signaling, TGF-β cytokine family receptor signaling, and MHC class II antigen processing pathways resulting in proinflammatory, chemotactic effects, T cell stimulation, and down regulation of antiviral and T cell chemotactic effects. P. gingivalis-induced inflammation activated osteoclasts, leading to local bone resorption. Conclusion This is the first in vivo evidence that localized P. gingivalis infection differentially induces transcription of a broad array of host genes that differed between inflamed soft tissues and calvarial bone. PMID:20331794

  4. Elutriated stem cells derived from the adult bone marrow differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vivo and reverse chemical diabetes.

    PubMed

    Iskovich, Svetlana; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Fabian, Ina; Askenasy, Nadir

    2012-01-01

    An ongoing debate surrounds the existence of stem cells in the adult endowed with capacity to differentiate into multiple lineages. We examined the possibility that adult bone marrow cells participate in recovery from chemical diabetes through neogenesis of insulin-producing cells. Small-sized cells negative for lineage markers derived by counterflow centrifugal elutriation from the bone marrow were transplanted into mice made diabetic with streptozotocin and sublethal irradiation. These cells homed efficiently to the injured islets and contributed to tissue revascularization. Islet-homed CD45-negative donor cells identified by sex chromosomes downregulated GFP, expressed PDX-1 and proinsulin, and converted the hormone precursor to insulin. An estimated 7.6% contribution of newly formed insulin-producing cells to islet cellularity increased serum insulin and stabilized glycemic control starting at 5 weeks post-transplant and persisting for 20 weeks. Newly differentiated cells displayed normal diploid genotype and there was no evidence of fusion between the grafted stem cells or their myeloid progeny and injured β-cells. Considering the extensive functional incorporation of insulin-producing donor cells in the injured islets, we conclude that the adult bone marrow contains a subset of small cells endowed with plastic developmental capacity.

  5. [Bone quality and strength relating with bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Mori, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The bone has the functions of mineral reservoir and mechanical support as skeleton. Bone remodeling is the adult mode of bone metabolism, replacing old bone tissue to new one. Bone strength is determined by bone volume, structure and quality such as micro damage, degree of mineralization and collagen cross linkage, which are all controlled by bone remodeling. Bone strength decreases under high turn-over condition by decreasing bone volume and deterioration of bone structure, which also decreases under low turn-over condition by increased micro damage, increasing mineralization and AGE collagen cross linkage.

  6. Natural ECM as biomaterial for scaffold based cardiac regeneration using adult bone marrow derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sreejit, P; Verma, R S

    2013-04-01

    Cellular therapy using stem cells for cardiac diseases has recently gained much interest in the scientific community due to its potential in regenerating damaged and even dead tissue and thereby restoring the organ function. Stem cells from various sources and origin are being currently used for regeneration studies directly or along with differentiation inducing agents. Long term survival and minimal side effects can be attained by using autologous cells and reduced use of inducing agents. Cardiomyogenic differentiation of adult derived stem cells has been previously reported using various inducing agents but the use of a potentially harmful DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-azaC) has been found to be critical in almost all studies. Alternate inducing factors and conditions/stimulant like physical condition including electrical stimulation, chemical inducers and biological agents have been attempted by numerous groups to induce cardiac differentiation. Biomaterials were initially used as artificial scaffold in in vitro studies and later as a delivery vehicle. Natural ECM is the ideal biological scaffold since it contains all the components of the tissue from which it was derived except for the living cells. Constructive remodeling can be performed using such natural ECM scaffolds and stem cells since, the cells can be delivered to the site of infraction and once delivered the cells adhere and are not "lost". Due to the niche like conditions of ECM, stem cells tend to differentiate into tissue specific cells and attain several characteristics similar to that of functional cells even in absence of any directed differentiation using external inducers. The development of niche mimicking biomaterials and hybrid biomaterial can further advance directed differentiation without specific induction. The mechanical and electrical integration of these materials to the functional tissue is a problem to be addressed. The search for the perfect extracellular matrix for

  7. Loss of c-Kit and bone marrow failure upon conditional removal of the GATA-2 C-terminal zinc finger domain in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan S; Jin, Jin; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Matatall, Katie A; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Huiyuan; Ullrich, Stephen E; King, Katherine Y; Sun, Shao-Cong; Watowich, Stephanie S

    2016-09-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the transcriptional regulator GATA-2 associate with multilineage immunodeficiency, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The majority of these mutations localize in the zinc finger (ZnF) domains, which mediate GATA-2 DNA binding. Deregulated hematopoiesis with GATA-2 mutation frequently develops in adulthood, yet GATA-2 function in the bone marrow remains unresolved. To investigate this, we conditionally deleted the GATA-2 C-terminal ZnF (C-ZnF) coding sequences in adult mice. Upon Gata2 C-ZnF deletion, we observed rapid peripheral cytopenia, bone marrow failure, and decreased c-Kit expression on hematopoietic progenitors. Transplant studies indicated GATA-2 has a cell-autonomous role in bone marrow hematopoiesis. Moreover, myeloid lineage populations were particularly sensitive to Gata2 hemizygosity, while molecular assays indicated GATA-2 regulates c-Kit expression in multilineage progenitor cells. Enforced c-Kit expression in Gata2 C-ZnF-deficient hematopoietic progenitors enhanced myeloid colony activity, suggesting GATA-2 sustains myelopoiesis via a cell intrinsic role involving maintenance of c-Kit expression. Our results provide insight into mechanisms regulating hematopoiesis in bone marrow and may contribute to a better understanding of immunodeficiency and bone marrow failure associated with GATA-2 mutation.

  8. Insulin-Producing Cells From Adult Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Control Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes In Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gabr, Mahmoud M.; Zakaria, Mahmoud M.; Refaie, Ayman F.; Ismail, Amani M.; Abou-El-Mahasen, Mona A.; Ashamallah, Sylvia A.; Khater, Sherry M.; El-Halawani, Sawsan M.; Ibrahim, Rana Y.; Uin, Gan Shu; Kloc, Malgorzata; Calne, Roy Y.; Ghoneim, Mohamed A.

    2013-01-01

    Harvesting, expansion and directed differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) could provide an autologous source of surrogate β-cells that would alleviate the limitations of availability and/or allogenic rejection following pancreatic or islet transplantation. Bone marrow cells were obtained from three adult type 2 diabetic volunteers and 3 non-diabetic donors. After 3 days in culture, adherent MSCs were expanded for 2 passages. At passage 3, differentiation was carried out in a 3-staged procedure. Cells were cultured in a glucose-rich medium containing several activation and growth factors. Cells were evaluated in-vitro by flow cytometry, immunolabelling, Rt-PCR and human insulin and c-peptide release in responses to increasing glucose concentrations. One thousand cell-clusters were inserted under the renal capsule of diabetic nude mice followed by monitoring of their diabetic status. At the end of differentiation, ~5–10% of cells were immunofluorescent for insulin, c-peptide or glucagon; insulin and c-peptide were co-expressed. Nanogold immunolabelling for electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of c-peptide in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Insulin-producing cells (IPCs) expressed transcription factors and genes of pancreatic hormones similar to those expressed by pancreatic islets. There was a stepwise increase in human insulin and c-peptide release by IPCs in response to increasing glucose concentrations. Transplantation of IPCs into nude diabetic mice resulted in control of their diabetic status for 3 months. The sera of IPC-transplanted mice contained human insulin and c-peptide but negligible levels of mouse insulin. When the IPCs-bearing kidneys were removed, rapid return of diabetic state was noted. BM-MSCs from diabetic and non-diabetic human subjects could be differentiated without genetic manipulation to form IPCs which, when transplanted, could maintain euglycaemia in diabetic mice for 3 months

  9. Is Bone Loss Linked to Chronic Inflammation in Antiretroviral-Naïve HIV-Infected Adults? A 48 Week Matched Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    HILEMAN, Corrilynn O; LABBATO, Danielle E; STORER, Norma J; TANGPRICHA, Vin; MCCOMSEY, Grace A

    2015-01-01

    Objective Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been implicated in bone loss in HIV. The role of inflammation and vitamin D is unclear and better investigated in ART-naïve individuals. Design and Methods This is a 48-week, prospective, cohort study to compare baseline and change in hip and spine bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual energy Xray absorptiometry (DXA) in HIV-infected, ART-naïve adults and healthy controls matched by age, sex, and race. We also studied associations between bone loss and inflammation markers and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) using logistic regression. Results 47 HIV-infected adults and 41 controls were included. Baseline 25(OH)D, BMD at total hip, trochanter, and spine, and prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis were similar between groups. In the HIV-infected group, total hip and trochanter, but not spine, BMD decreased over 48 weeks (hip −0.005 (−0.026-0.008)g/cm2, p=0.02 within-group; trochanter −0.013 (−0.03-0.003), p<0.01). BMD did not change at any site within controls. The HIV-infected group was more likely to have bone loss at the trochanter (p=0.03). This risk persisted after adjustment for age, sex, race, BMI, smoking, and hepatitis C (OR 4 (95% CI 1.2-15.8)). In the HIV-infected group, higher IL-6 concentrations (p=0.04) and Caucasian race (p<0.01) were independently associated with progression to osteopenia or osteoporosis, but not 25(OH)D levels. Conclusion BMD at the total hip and trochanter sites decreased in the HIV-infected, ART-naïve adults, but not controls, over this 48-week study. Higher serum IL-6 concentrations were associated with progression to osteopenia or osteoporosis status in the HIV-infected group. PMID:24871454

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates proliferation maintaining the multipotency of human adult bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoli; H'ng, Shiau-Chen; Leong, David T; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Melendez, Alirio J

    2010-08-01

    High renewal and maintenance of multipotency of human adult stem cells (hSCs), are a prerequisite for experimental analysis as well as for potential clinical usages. The most widely used strategy for hSC culture and proliferation is using serum. However, serum is poorly defined and has a considerable degree of inter-batch variation, which makes it difficult for large-scale mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expansion in homogeneous culture conditions. Moreover, it is often observed that cells grown in serum-containing media spontaneously differentiate into unknown and/or undesired phenotypes. Another way of maintaining hSC development is using cytokines and/or tissue-specific growth factors; this is a very expensive approach and can lead to early unwanted differentiation. In order to circumvent these issues, we investigated the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), in the growth and multipotency maintenance of human bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSCs. We show that S1P induces growth, and in combination with reduced serum, or with the growth factors FGF and platelet-derived growth factor-AB, S1P has an enhancing effect on growth. We also show that the MSCs cultured in S1P-supplemented media are able to maintain their differentiation potential for at least as long as that for cells grown in the usual serum-containing media. This is shown by the ability of cells grown in S1P-containing media to be able to undergo osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation. This is of interest, since S1P is a relatively inexpensive natural product, which can be obtained in homogeneous high-purity batches: this will minimize costs and potentially reduce the unwanted side effects observed with serum. Taken together, S1P is able to induce proliferation while maintaining the multipotency of different human stem cells, suggesting a potential for S1P in developing serum-free or serum-reduced defined medium for adult stem cell cultures.

  11. Energy Availability and Dietary Patterns of Adult Male and Female Competitive Cyclists With Lower Than Expected Bone Mineral Density.

    PubMed

    Viner, Rebecca T; Harris, Margaret; Berning, Jackie R; Meyer, Nanna L

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess energy availability (EA) and dietary patterns of 10 adult (29-49 years) male (n = 6) and female (n = 4) competitive (USA Cycling Category: Pro, n = 2; 1-4, n = 8) endurance cyclists (5 road, 5 off-road), with lower than expected bone mineral density (BMD; Z score < 0) across a season. Energy intake (EI) and exercise energy expenditure during preseason (PS), competition (C), and off-season (OS) were estimated from 3-day dietary records, completed once per month, across a cycling season. BMD was measured by DXA at 0 months/5 months/10 months. The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) was used to assess cognitive dietary restraint. Seventy percent of participants had low EA [(LEA); < 30 kcal · kg fat-free mass (FFM) (-1) · day(-1)] during PS, 90% during C, and 80% during OS (range: 3-37 kcal · kg FFM(-1) · day(-1)). Ninety percent of cyclists had LEA during ≥ 1 training period, and 70% had LEA across the season. Seventy percent of cyclists were identified as restrained eaters who consciously restrict EI as a means of weight control. Mean daily carbohydrate intake was below sport nutrition recommendations during each training period (PS: 3.9 ± 1.1 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p < .001; C: 4.3 ± 1.4 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p = .005; OS: 3.7 ± 1.4 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p = .01). There were no differences in EA and EI · kg(-1) between male and female cyclists and road and off-road cyclists. Low EI, and specifically low carbohydrate intake, appears to be the main contributor to chronic LEA in these cyclists. Adult male and female competitive road and off-road cyclists in the United States may be at risk for long-term LEA. Further studies are needed to explore strategies to prevent and monitor long-term LEA in these athletes.

  12. A Comparison of Outcomes for Cord Blood Transplantation and Unrelated Bone Marrow Transplantation in Adult Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Kanda, Junya; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Mori, Takehiko; Miyamura, Koichi; Kako, Shinichi; Uchida, Naoyuki; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Chiaki; Iwato, Koji; Ishiyama, Ken; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Eto, Tetsuya; Kahata, Kaoru; Kato, Jun; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Kato, Koji; Mori, Shinicihro; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Kimura, Fumihiko; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2016-10-01

    Earlier reports suggested that umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) for aplastic anemia (AA) was feasible in alternative transplantation. To identify differences in outcomes of UCBT and HLA-matched or mismatched unrelated bone marrow transplantation (UBMT) in adults with AA, we analyzed registry data of the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation and compared results of UCBT (n = 69) to 8/8-matched (n = 101), 7/8-matched (n = 65), or 6/8-matched (n = 37) UBMT. The transplantation period was from 2002 to 2012, and patients 16 years or older with AA were eligible. Median ages were 49, 35, 28, and 30 years for UCBT, 8/8-matched, 7/8-matched, and 6/8-matched UBMT, respectively. In multivariate analysis, risk of mortality was lower for 8/8-matched UBMT compared with that of UCBT (hazard ratio [HR], .55; 95% confidence interval [CI], .32 to .94; P = .029), adjusted for age and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, which were other associated factors. Mortality risks of 7/8-matched UBMT (HR, .55; 95% CI, .29 to 1.02) or 6/8-matched UBMT (HR, .67; 95% CI, .32 to 1.39) were not significantly different from those of UCBT. Risks of grade 3 or 4 acute and chronic GVHD were not different among the 4 groups. The most prevalent cause of death was graft failure in UCBT and 6/8-matched UBMT and infection in 8/8-matched and 7/8-matched UBMT. Under 40 years old,survival of UCBT was similar to that of UBMT (76%, 79%, 83%, and 83% for UCBT and 8/8-matched, 7/8-matched, and 6/8-matched UBMT, respectively, at 3 years), adjusted for transplantation period, which was another associated factor; however, for ages over 40 years, that of UCBT tended to be lower (47%, 64%, 64%, and 75% for UCBT, 8/8-matched, 7/8-matched, and 6/8-matched UBMT, respectively, at 3 years). To conclude, these data suggest that UCBT could be an alternative treatment option for younger adults when matched sibling or adequate UBMT donors are not available. PMID:27401034

  13. Energy Availability and Dietary Patterns of Adult Male and Female Competitive Cyclists With Lower Than Expected Bone Mineral Density.

    PubMed

    Viner, Rebecca T; Harris, Margaret; Berning, Jackie R; Meyer, Nanna L

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess energy availability (EA) and dietary patterns of 10 adult (29-49 years) male (n = 6) and female (n = 4) competitive (USA Cycling Category: Pro, n = 2; 1-4, n = 8) endurance cyclists (5 road, 5 off-road), with lower than expected bone mineral density (BMD; Z score < 0) across a season. Energy intake (EI) and exercise energy expenditure during preseason (PS), competition (C), and off-season (OS) were estimated from 3-day dietary records, completed once per month, across a cycling season. BMD was measured by DXA at 0 months/5 months/10 months. The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) was used to assess cognitive dietary restraint. Seventy percent of participants had low EA [(LEA); < 30 kcal · kg fat-free mass (FFM) (-1) · day(-1)] during PS, 90% during C, and 80% during OS (range: 3-37 kcal · kg FFM(-1) · day(-1)). Ninety percent of cyclists had LEA during ≥ 1 training period, and 70% had LEA across the season. Seventy percent of cyclists were identified as restrained eaters who consciously restrict EI as a means of weight control. Mean daily carbohydrate intake was below sport nutrition recommendations during each training period (PS: 3.9 ± 1.1 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p < .001; C: 4.3 ± 1.4 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p = .005; OS: 3.7 ± 1.4 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p = .01). There were no differences in EA and EI · kg(-1) between male and female cyclists and road and off-road cyclists. Low EI, and specifically low carbohydrate intake, appears to be the main contributor to chronic LEA in these cyclists. Adult male and female competitive road and off-road cyclists in the United States may be at risk for long-term LEA. Further studies are needed to explore strategies to prevent and monitor long-term LEA in these athletes. PMID:26131616

  14. Matrix-mediated retention of osteogenic differentiation potential by human adult bone marrow stromal cells during ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Mauney, Joshua R; Kaplan, David L; Volloch, Vladimir

    2004-07-01

    During prolonged cultivation ex vivo, adult bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) undergo two probably interdependent processes, replicative aging and a decline in differentiation potential. Recently, our results with primary human fibroblasts indicated that growth on denatured collagen (DC) matrix results in the reduction of the rate of cellular aging. The present study has been undertaken to test whether the growth of human BMSCs under the same conditions would translate into preservation of cellular aging-attenuated functions, such as the ability to express HSP70 in response to stress as well as of osteogenic differentiation potential. We report here that growth of BMSCs on a DC matrix versus tissue culture polystyrene significantly reduced one of the main manifestations of cellular aging, the attenuation of the ability to express a major protective stress response component, HSP70, increased the proliferation capacity of ex vivo expanded BMSCs, reduced the rate of morphological changes, and resulted in a dramatic increase in the retention of the potential to express osteogenic-specific functions and markers upon treatment with osteogenic stimulants. BMSCs are a promising and increasingly important cell source for tissue engineering as well as cell and gene therapeutic strategies. For use of BMSCs in these applications, ex vivo expansion is necessary to obtain a sufficient, therapeutically useful, number of cells; however, this results in the loss of differentiation potential. This problem is especially acute in older patients where more extensive in vitro expansion of smaller number of stem/progenitor cells is needed. The finding that growth on certain biomaterials preserves aging-attenuated functions, enhances proliferation capacity, and maintains differentiation potential of BMSCs indicates a promising approach to address this problem.

  15. Hematopoietic bone marrow cells participate in endothelial, but not epithelial or mesenchymal cell renewal in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Odörfer, Kathrin I; Egerbacher, Monika; Unger, Nina J; Weber, Karin; Jamnig, Angelika; Lepperdinger, Günter; Kleiter, Miriam; Sandgren, Eric P; Erben, Reinhold G

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which bone marrow (BM) contributes to physiological cell renewal is still controversial. Using the marker human placental alkaline phosphatase (ALPP) which can readily be detected in paraffin and plastic sections by histochemistry or immunohistochemistry, and in ultrathin sections by electron microscopy after pre-embedding staining, we examined the role of endogenous BM in physiological cell renewal by analysing tissues from lethally irradiated wild-type inbred Fischer 344 (F344) rats transplanted (BMT) with unfractionated BM from ALPP-transgenic F344 rats ubiquitously expressing the marker. Histochemical, immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic analysis showed that the proportion of ALPP+ capillary endothelial cells (EC) profoundly increased from 1 until 6 months after BMT in all organs except brain and adrenal medulla. In contrast, pericytes and EC in large blood vessels were ALPP–. Epithelial cells in kidney, liver, pancreas, intestine and brain were recipient-derived at all time-points. Similarly, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, striated muscle and smooth muscle cells were exclusively of recipient origin. The lack of mesenchymal BM-derived cells in peripheral tissues prompted us to examine whether BMT resulted in engraftment of mesenchymal precursors. Four weeks after BMT, all haematopoietic BM cells were of donor origin by flow cytometric analysis, whereas isolation of BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) failed to show engraftment of donor MSC. In conclusion, our data show that BM is an important source of physiological renewal of EC in adult rats, but raise doubt whether reconstituted irradiated rats are an apt model for BM-derived regeneration of mesenchymal cells in peripheral tissues. PMID:21091631

  16. Comparative analysis of paracrine factor expression in human adult mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, adipose, and dermal tissue.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sarah Tzu-Feng; Asgari, Azar; Lokmic, Zerina; Sinclair, Rodney; Dusting, Gregory James; Lim, Shiang Yong; Dilley, Rodney James

    2012-08-10

    Human adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) support the engineering of functional tissue constructs by secreting angiogenic and cytoprotective factors, which act in a paracrine fashion to influence cell survival and vascularization. MSCs have been isolated from many different tissue sources, but little is known about how paracrine factor secretion varies between different MSC populations. We evaluated paracrine factor expression patterns in MSCs isolated from adipose tissue (ASCs), bone marrow (BMSCs), and dermal tissues [dermal sheath cells (DSCs) and dermal papilla cells (DPCs)]. Specifically, mRNA expression analysis identified insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor-D (VEGF-D), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) to be expressed at higher levels in ASCs compared with other MSC populations whereas VEGF-A, angiogenin, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) were expressed at comparable levels among the MSC populations examined. Analysis of conditioned media (CM) protein confirmed the comparable level of angiogenin and VEGF-A secretion in all MSC populations and showed that DSCs and DPCs produced significantly higher concentrations of leptin. Functional assays examining in vitro angiogenic paracrine activity showed that incubation of endothelial cells in ASC(CM) resulted in increased tubulogenic efficiency compared with that observed in DPC(CM). Using neutralizing antibodies we concluded that VEGF-A and VEGF-D were 2 of the major growth factors secreted by ASCs that supported endothelial tubulogenesis. The variation in paracrine factors of different MSC populations contributes to different levels of angiogenic activity and ASCs maybe preferred over other MSC populations for augmenting therapeutic approaches dependent upon angiogenesis.

  17. Human adult bone marrow-derived somatic cell therapy results in functional recovery and axonal plasticity following stroke in the rat.

    PubMed

    Andrews, E M; Tsai, S-Y; Johnson, S C; Farrer, J R; Wagner, J P; Kopen, G C; Kartje, G L

    2008-06-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in the United States. To date there is no satisfactory treatment for stroke once neuronal damage has occurred. Human adult bone marrow-derived somatic cells (hABM-SC) represent a homogenous population of CD49c/CD90 co-positive, non-hematopoietic cells that have been shown to secrete therapeutically relevant trophic factors and to support axonal growth in a rodent model of spinal cord injury. Here we demonstrate that treatment with hABM-SC after ischemic stroke in adult rats results in recovery of forelimb function on a skilled motor test, and that this recovery is positively correlated with increased axonal outgrowth of the intact, uninjured corticorubral tract. While the complete mechanism of repair is still unclear, we conclude that enhancement of structural neuroplasticity from uninjured brain areas is one mechanism by which hABM-SC treatment after stroke leads to functional recovery. PMID:18440506

  18. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  19. Seven years of follow up of trabecular bone score, bone mineral density, body composition and quality of life in adults with growth hormone deficiency treated with rhGH replacement in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Allo Miguel, Gonzalo; Serraclara Plá, Alicia; Partida Muñoz, Myriam Lorena; Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo; Hawkins, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is characterized by impaired physical activity, diminished quality of life (QoL), weight and fat mass gain, decreased muscle mass and decreased bone mineral density (BMD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term treatment (7 years) with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on metabolic parameters, body composition (BC), BMD, bone microarchitecture and QoL. Patients and Methods: In this prospective study, BMD and BC were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Bone microarchitecture was assessed with the trabecular bone score (TBS). The QoL-AGHDA test was used to assess QoL. Results: A total of 18 AGHD patients (mean age, 37.39 ± 12.42) were included. Body weight and body mass index (BMI) showed a significant increase after 7 years (p = 0.03 and p = 0.001, respectively). There was a significant tendency of body fat mass (BFM) (p = 0.028) and lean body mass (LBM) (p = 0.005) to increase during the 7 years of rhGH treatment. There was a significant increase in lumbar spine (LS) BMD (p = 0.01). TBS showed a nonsignificant decrease after 7 years of treatment, with a change of -0.86% ± 1.95. QoL showed a large and significant improvement (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Long-term rhGH treatment in AGHD patients induces a large and sustained improvement in QoL. Metabolic effects are variable with an increase in LBM as well as in BMI and BFM. There is a positive effect on BMD based on the increase in LS BMD, which stabilizes during long-term therapy and is not associated with a similar increase in bone microarchitecture. PMID:27293538

  20. Lack of Association of Carotenoid Intake with Bone Mineral Density (BMD) in Older Adults: the Framingham Osteoporosis Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that carotenoids may inhibit bone resorption and stimulate bone formation. One study of BMD showed positive and negative associations for specific carotenoids, and a fracture study showed interaction by smoking. Thus, we evaluated intakes of total and individual ...

  1. Osteoporosis and low bone mass at the femur neck or lumbar spine in older adults: United States, 2005-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many current clinical guidelines recommend that assessment of osteoporosis or low bone mass, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) (1), be based on bone mineral density at either the femur neck region of the proximal femur (hip) or the lumbar spine (2,3). This data brief presents the mos...

  2. Effects of whole-body vibration training on physical function, bone and muscle mass in adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Gusso, Silmara; Munns, Craig F; Colle, Patrícia; Derraik, José G B; Biggs, Janene B; Cutfield, Wayne S; Hofman, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    We performed a clinical trial on the effects of whole-body vibration training (WBVT) on muscle function and bone health of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy. Forty participants (11.3–20.8 years) with mild to moderate cerebral palsy (GMFCS II–III) underwent 20-week WBVT on a vibration plate for 9 minutes/day 4 times/week at 20 Hz (without controls). Assessments included 6-minute walk test, whole-body DXA, lower leg pQCT scans, and muscle function (force plate). Twenty weeks of WBVT were associated with increased lean mass in the total body (+770 g; p = 0.0003), trunk (+410 g; p = 0.004), and lower limbs (+240 g; p = 0.012). Bone mineral content increased in total body (+48 g; p = 0.0001), lumbar spine (+2.7 g; p = 0.0003), and lower limbs (+13 g; p < 0.0001). Similarly, bone mineral density increased in total body (+0.008 g/cm2; p = 0.013), lumbar spine (+0.014 g/cm2; p = 0.003), and lower limbs (+0.023 g/cm2; p < 0.0001). Participants reduced the time taken to perform the chair test, and improved the distance walked in the 6-minute walk test by 11% and 35% for those with GMFCS II and III, respectively. WBVT was associated with increases in muscle mass and bone mass and density, and improved mobility of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy. PMID:26936535

  3. Human variation: delta/sup 13/C in adult bone collagen and the relation to diet in an isochronous C/sub 4/ (maize) archaeological population

    SciTech Connect

    Bumsted, M.P.

    1984-10-01

    Analysis of the stable isotopes of carbon (/sup 13/C and /sup 12/C in the standard ratio delta/sup 13/C) can distinguish the relative contributions of meat, cereals, and other plant foods to the diets of prehistoric people. This dissertation has examined an isochronous (non-cemetery) population of prehistoric Americans to ascertain the natural variation in isotopic composition amongst a group of maize-eaters. The seventeen adult females and fifteen adult males represent the largest human data set of prehistoric or contemporary samples for study of natural isotopic enrichment in which genetic, economic, disease, and temporal variables were controlled. Procedures for purifying remnant bone protein from archaeological samples were developed or modified specifically to determine isotopic measurement. Cryogenic milling, cold acid demineralizing, gelatinizing, and an XAD-2 resin column were used to remove soil contaminants while preserving the chemical integrity of the bone protein. Measurements of total elemental carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen of the unprocessed bone; amino acid analysis of selected gelatin samples; and stable carbon isotopic analysis were used to assess sample quality. Isotope values were lognormally distributed in this population (anti X = -1.15%) with the distribution and the means amongst males (anti X = -1.18%) significantly different from that of females (anti X = -1.13%). The isotopic diet model can be graphed with equilateral triangular coordinates to represent the relative contributions of meat, maize, and other plant foods. The graph can predict the maximum food contributions to the delta/sup 13/C of the prehistoric individuals measured. Isotopic variation in human bone protein is only partly due to the variable amount of enriched foods in the diet. Tissue enrichment which occurs at various metabolic levels must also be considered. 316 references, 20 figures, 10 tables.

  4. A Cross-Sectional Association Between Bone Mineral Density and Parathyroid Hormone and Other Biomarkers in Community-Dwelling Young Adults: The CARDIA Study

    PubMed Central

    Polgreen, Lynda E.; Hurley, Daniel L.; Gross, Myron D.; Sidney, Stephen; Jacobs, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Most association studies of bone-related biomarkers (BBMs) with bone mineral density (BMD) have been conducted in postmenopausal women. Objective: We tested whether the following BBMs were cross-sectionally associated with BMD among young adults: serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), PTH, osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and urinary pyridinoline/urinary creatinine. Setting and Participants: We studied 319 individuals (134 women, 149 black, 24–36 years) recruited during 1992 through 1993 in Oakland, California. BMD was assessed with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Linear regression models estimated the association between BMD and each BBM. Results: 1,25(OH)2D was inversely associated with all BMDs. 25OHD was positively, and PTH inversely, associated with lumbar spine, total hip, and whole-body BMD. BAP was inversely associated with left arm, right arm, and whole-body BMD but not with spine or hip BMD. Neither osteocalcin nor urinary pyridinoline/urinary creatinine was associated with BMD. When we placed all BBMs (including 1,25(OH)2D) in one model, the pattern and magnitude of association was similar except for PTH, which was attenuated. The association of BMD and BBMs did not differ significantly by race or sex. Conclusions: In this cross-sectional study of healthy young men and women who had PTH levels considered normal in clinical practice, higher PTH was associated with lower BMD, particularly in weight-bearing sites (ie, spine and hip). The inverse association of 1,25(OH)2D, together with the attenuation of PTH, suggests that the observed association of PTH is mediated by 1,25(OH)2D. BAP was inversely associated with arm BMD. BBMs can be important markers of skeletal activity in young adults, but their clinical role on bone health among this population is yet to be fully determined. PMID:23966240

  5. Long-term effects of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on pituitary, gonad, thyroid and adrenal function in adults.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, M; Koskinen, P; Irjala, K; Remes, K; Viikari, J

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the late-effects of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on endocrine function 20 adults (10 females, 10 males) with hematological malignancies were studied after a mean of 3.2 years (range 1.0-10.0) following BMT. The mean age of patients at the time of BMT was 39 years. Dynamic tests of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis included growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) stimulations with measurements of serum growth hormone (GH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), thyrotropin (TSH) and prolactin (PRL) responses. Adrenal function was assessed with the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) test. Five patients (25%) had a subnormal GH response to GHRH stimulation, but all had a normal serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) value. There was an inverse nonlinear relationship between the body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) and GH response but no relation between the GH response and total body irradiation (TBI), intrathecal treatment or occurrence of graft-versus-host disease. In females, serum FSH and LH basal levels and responses to GnRH, in spite of oestrogen substitution therapy in 9/10 patients, indicated ovarian failure and early menopause. Most responses to GnRH were delayed. All males had elevated serum basal FSH levels indicating damage in seminiferous tubulus and infertility. Serum basal LH was elevated only in four males but testosterone values were all within normal limits. However, the mean free androgen index (FAI) was in the low normal range, and two subjects had abnormally low FAI. Serum free thyroxine (fT4) levels were normal in all but one, but an exaggerated TSH response to TRH occurred in seven patients (35%). Four of them had received TBI and one total nodal irradiation suggesting radiation-induced damage to the thyroid gland. In 19 of the 20 patients, adrenal function judged with ACTH test was normal. We conclude that functional impairments

  6. [Adult].

    PubMed

    Milke-García, María Del Pilar

    2016-09-01

    Adulthood starts after youth and is characterized by the completion of growth and the achievement of organic and psychological maturity. Obesity and other preventable diseases related to lifestyle are common at this age. A complete, balanced and sufficient diet, together with exercise are important in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Several studies have brought about the mechanisms by which the incorporation of milk and dairy products to diet is beneficial in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Milk also contributes to the improvement of dental, bone and intestinal health, theoretically helps in body weight control, has a definite role on the muscular and bone mass maintenance and is an option for hydration during exercise, this being as important as diet for overweight, obesity, diabetes, dislipidemias and hypertension control.

  7. [Adult].

    PubMed

    Milke-García, María Del Pilar

    2016-09-01

    Adulthood starts after youth and is characterized by the completion of growth and the achievement of organic and psychological maturity. Obesity and other preventable diseases related to lifestyle are common at this age. A complete, balanced and sufficient diet, together with exercise are important in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Several studies have brought about the mechanisms by which the incorporation of milk and dairy products to diet is beneficial in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Milk also contributes to the improvement of dental, bone and intestinal health, theoretically helps in body weight control, has a definite role on the muscular and bone mass maintenance and is an option for hydration during exercise, this being as important as diet for overweight, obesity, diabetes, dislipidemias and hypertension control. PMID:27603885

  8. Engineering Small-Scale and Scaffold-Based Bone Organs via Endochondral Ossification Using Adult Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Celeste; Tonnarelli, Beatrice; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Piccinini, Elia; Todorov, Atanas; Centola, Matteo; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Bone development, growth, and repair predominantly occur through the process of endochondral ossification, characterized by remodelling of cartilaginous templates. The same route efficiently supports engineering of bone marrow as a niche for hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Here we describe a combined in vitro/in vivo system based on bone marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSC) that duplicates the hallmark cellular and molecular events of endochondral ossification during development. The model requires MSC culture with instructive molecules to generate hypertrophic cartilage tissues. The resulting constructs complete the endochondral route upon in vivo implantation, in the timeframe of up to 12 weeks. The described protocol is clearly distinct from the direct ossification approach typically used to drive MSC towards osteogenesis. Recapitulation of endochondral ossification allows modelling of stromal-HSC interactions in physiology and pathology and allows engineering processes underlying bone regeneration. PMID:27236686

  9. Evaluation of bone formation guided by DNA/protamine complex with FGF-2 in an adult rat calvarial defect model.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Yosuke; Toda, Masako; Ohno, Jun; Kawaguchi, Minoru; Kido, Hirofumi; Fukushima, Tadao

    2014-11-01

    DNA/protamine complex paste (D/P) and D/P complex paste with Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF-2) (D/P-FGF) were prepared to investigate their new bone formation abilities using an ∼40-week-old rat calvarial defect model. It was found that D/P could release FGF-2 proportionally in an in vitro experiment with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was also found that aging adversely affected self-bone healing of rats by comparison with the results in a previous study using 10-week-old rats. Microcomputed tomography and histopathological examinations showed that new bone formation abilities of D/P and D/P-FGF were superior to that of the control (sham operation). Control, D/P and D/P-FGF showed newly formed bone areas of 6.7, 58.3, and 67.0%, respectively, 3 months after the operation. Moreover, it was found that FGF-2 could support the osteoanagenesis ability of D/P. It was considered that FGF-2 could play an important role in new bone formation at early stages because it induced the genes such as collagen I, CBFA, OSX, and OPN, which are initiated first in the process of osteogenesis. Therefore, D/P-FGF will be a useful injectable biomaterial with biodegradable properties for the repair of bone defects in the elderly.

  10. Red bone marrow dose calculations in radiotherapy of prostate cancer based on the updated VCH adult male phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jinqin; Xie, Tianwu; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Qian

    2014-04-01

    Red bone marrow (RBM) is an important dose-limiting tissue that has high radiosensitivity but is difficult to identify on clinical medical images. In this study, we investigated dose distribution in RBM for prostate cancer radiotherapy. Four suborgans were identified in the skeleton of the visible Chinese human phantom: cortical bone (CB), trabecular bone (TB), RBM, and yellow bone marrow (YBM). Dose distributions in the phantom were evaluated by the Monte Carlo method. When the left os coxae was taken as the organ-at-risk (OAR), the difference in absorbed dose between RBM and each CB and TB was up to 20%, but was much less (≤3.1%) between RBM and YBM. When the left os coxae and entire bone were both taken as OARs, RBM dose also increased with increasing planning target volume size. The results indicate the validity of using dose to homogeneous bone marrow mixture for estimating dose to RBM when RBM is not available in computational phantoms. In addition, the human skeletal system developed in this study provides a model for considering RBM dose in radiotherapy planning.

  11. Elk3 deficiency causes transient impairment in post-natal retinal vascular development and formation of tortuous arteries in adult murine retinae.

    PubMed

    Weinl, Christine; Wasylyk, Christine; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Beck, Susanne C; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Roux, Michel J; Seeliger, Mathias W; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Nordheim, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Serum Response Factor (SRF) fulfills essential roles in post-natal retinal angiogenesis and adult neovascularization. These functions have been attributed to the recruitment by SRF of the cofactors Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors MRTF-A and -B, but not the Ternary Complex Factors (TCFs) Elk1 and Elk4. The role of the third TCF, Elk3, remained unknown. We generated a new Elk3 knockout mouse line and showed that Elk3 had specific, non-redundant functions in the retinal vasculature. In Elk3(-/-) mice, post-natal retinal angiogenesis was transiently delayed until P8, after which it proceeded normally. Interestingly, tortuous arteries developed in Elk3(-/-) mice from the age of four weeks, and persisted into late adulthood. Tortuous vessels have been observed in human pathologies, e.g. in ROP and FEVR. These human disorders were linked to altered activities of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the affected eyes. However, in Elk3(-/-) mice, we did not observe any changes in VEGF or several other potential confounding factors, including mural cell coverage and blood pressure. Instead, concurrent with the post-natal transient delay of radial outgrowth and the formation of adult tortuous arteries, Elk3-dependent effects on the expression of Angiopoietin/Tie-signalling components were observed. Moreover, in vitro microvessel sprouting and microtube formation from P10 and adult aortic ring explants were reduced. Collectively, these results indicate that Elk3 has distinct roles in maintaining retinal artery integrity. The Elk3 knockout mouse is presented as a new animal model to study retinal artery tortuousity in mice and human patients.

  12. Elk3 Deficiency Causes Transient Impairment in Post-Natal Retinal Vascular Development and Formation of Tortuous Arteries in Adult Murine Retinae

    PubMed Central

    Weinl, Christine; Wasylyk, Christine; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Beck, Susanne C.; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Roux, Michel J.; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Nordheim, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Serum Response Factor (SRF) fulfills essential roles in post-natal retinal angiogenesis and adult neovascularization. These functions have been attributed to the recruitment by SRF of the cofactors Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors MRTF-A and -B, but not the Ternary Complex Factors (TCFs) Elk1 and Elk4. The role of the third TCF, Elk3, remained unknown. We generated a new Elk3 knockout mouse line and showed that Elk3 had specific, non-redundant functions in the retinal vasculature. In Elk3(−/−) mice, post-natal retinal angiogenesis was transiently delayed until P8, after which it proceeded normally. Interestingly, tortuous arteries developed in Elk3(−/−) mice from the age of four weeks, and persisted into late adulthood. Tortuous vessels have been observed in human pathologies, e.g. in ROP and FEVR. These human disorders were linked to altered activities of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the affected eyes. However, in Elk3(−/−) mice, we did not observe any changes in VEGF or several other potential confounding factors, including mural cell coverage and blood pressure. Instead, concurrent with the post-natal transient delay of radial outgrowth and the formation of adult tortuous arteries, Elk3-dependent effects on the expression of Angiopoietin/Tie-signalling components were observed. Moreover, in vitro microvessel sprouting and microtube formation from P10 and adult aortic ring explants were reduced. Collectively, these results indicate that Elk3 has distinct roles in maintaining retinal artery integrity. The Elk3 knockout mouse is presented as a new animal model to study retinal artery tortuousity in mice and human patients. PMID:25203538

  13. Single episode of mild murine malaria induces neuroinflammation, alters microglial profile, impairs adult neurogenesis, and causes deficits in social and anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Guha, Suman K; Tillu, Rucha; Sood, Ankit; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Nanavaty, Ishira N; Sengupta, Arjun; Sharma, Shobhona; Vaidya, Vidita A; Pathak, Sulabha

    2014-11-01

    Cerebral malaria is associated with cerebrovascular damage and neurological sequelae. However, the neurological consequences of uncomplicated malaria, the most prevalent form of the disease, remain uninvestigated. Here, using a mild malaria model, we show that a single Plasmodium chabaudi adami infection in adult mice induces neuroinflammation, neurogenic, and behavioral changes in the absence of a blood-brain barrier breach. Using cytokine arrays we show that the infection induces differential serum and brain cytokine profiles, both at peak parasitemia and 15days post-parasite clearance. At the peak of infection, along with the serum, the brain also exhibited a definitive pro-inflammatory cytokine profile, and gene expression analysis revealed that pro-inflammatory cytokines were also produced locally in the hippocampus, an adult neurogenic niche. Hippocampal microglia numbers were enhanced, and we noted a shift to an activated profile at this time point, accompanied by a striking redistribution of the microglia to the subgranular zone adjacent to hippocampal neuronal progenitors. In the hippocampus, a distinct decline in progenitor turnover and survival was observed at peak parasitemia, accompanied by a shift from neuronal to glial fate specification. Studies in transgenic Nestin-GFP reporter mice demonstrated a decline in the Nestin-GFP(+)/GFAP(+) quiescent neural stem cell pool at peak parasitemia. Although these cellular changes reverted to normal 15days post-parasite clearance, specific brain cytokines continued to exhibit dysregulation. Behavioral analysis revealed selective deficits in social and anxiety-like behaviors, with no change observed in locomotor, cognitive, and depression-like behaviors, with a return to baseline at recovery. Collectively, these findings indicate that even a single episode of mild malaria results in alterations of the brain cytokine profile, causes specific behavioral dysfunction, is accompanied by hippocampal microglial

  14. Correlation between bone mineral density and serum trace elements in response to supervised aerobic training in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas S; Alghadir, Muaz H

    2016-01-01

    Background Life style and physical activity play a pivotal role in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The mechanism for better bone metabolism and improvement of physical disorders is not clear yet. Trace minerals such as Ca, Mn, Cu, and Zn are essential precursors for most vital biological process, especially those of bone health. Objective The main target of this study was evaluating the effective role of supervised aerobic exercise for 1 hour/day, 3 days/week for 12 weeks in the functions of trace elements in bone health through measuring bone mineral density (BMD), osteoporosis (T-score), bone markers, and trace element concentrations in healthy subjects aged 30–60 years with age average of 41.2±4.9. Methods A total of 100 healthy subjects (47 males, 53 females; age range 30–60 years) were recruited for this study. Based on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan analysis, the participants were classified into three groups: normal (n=30), osteopenic (n=40), and osteoporotic (n=30). Following, 12 weeks of moderate aerobic exercise, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), BMD, T-score, and trace elements such as Ca, Mn, Cu, and Zn were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Results Significant improvement in serum BAP level, T-score, and BMD were observed in all participants following 12 weeks of moderate exercise. Participants with osteopenia and osteoporosis showed significant increase in serum Ca and Mn, along with decrease in serum Cu and Zn levels following 12 weeks of aerobic training. In control group, the improvements in serum trace elements and body mass index were significantly linked with the enhancement in the levels of BAP, BMD hip, and BMD spine. These results supported the preventive effects of moderate exercise in healthy subjects against osteoporosis. In both sexes, the changes in serum trace elements significantly correlated (P<0.05) with the improvement in BAP, BMD hip, BMD spine, and body mass index in all groups

  15. Measuring ATP Concentration in a Small Number of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Zukowska, Monika; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of quiescent adult stem cells differs from the metabolism of differentiated cells. The metabolic processes are tightly regulated and their alterations disturb function of stem cells. One of the indicators of metabolic status of cells is the ATP level. While the method of measuring the ATP levels has been known for many years, estimating ATP levels in small population of defined stem cells isolated directly from the tissue has remained challenging. Here, we show our method of measuring the ATP levels in hematopoietic stem cells sorted from murine bone marrow. We used magnetic sorting as well as cell sorter and adopted the commonly used bioluminescence-based detection kits in described protocol. Our strategy allows to measure ATP levels in 1000 highly purified HSC.

  16. Measuring ATP Concentration in a Small Number of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Zukowska, Monika; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of quiescent adult stem cells differs from the metabolism of differentiated cells. The metabolic processes are tightly regulated and their alterations disturb function of stem cells. One of the indicators of metabolic status of cells is the ATP level. While the method of measuring the ATP levels has been known for many years, estimating ATP levels in small population of defined stem cells isolated directly from the tissue has remained challenging. Here, we show our method of measuring the ATP levels in hematopoietic stem cells sorted from murine bone marrow. We used magnetic sorting as well as cell sorter and adopted the commonly used bioluminescence-based detection kits in described protocol. Our strategy allows to measure ATP levels in 1000 highly purified HSC. PMID:27138010

  17. Adult murine prostate basal and luminal cells are self-sustained lineages that can both serve as targets for prostate cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nahyun; Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Li; Ittmann, Michael; Xin, Li

    2012-01-01

    Summary The prostate epithelial lineage hierarchy and the cellular origin for prostate cancer remain inadequately defined. Using a lineage tracing approach, we show that adult rodent prostate basal and luminal cells are independently self-sustained in vivo. Disrupting the tumor suppressor Pten in either lineage led to prostate cancer initiation. However, the cellular composition and onset dynamics of the resulting tumors are distinctive. Prostate luminal cells are more responsive to Pten null-induced mitogenic signaling. In contrast, basal cells are resistant to direct transformation. Instead, loss of Pten activity induces the capability of basal cells to differentiate into transformation-competent luminal cells. Our study suggests that deregulation of epithelial differentiation is a critical step for the initiation of prostate cancers of basal cell origin. PMID:22340597

  18. Vaccination of adult and newborn mice of a resistant strain (C57BL/6J) against challenge with leukemias induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Adult or newborn C57BL/6J mice were immunized with isogenic Moloney strain MuLV-induced leukemia cells irradiated with 10,000 rads or treated with low concentrations of formalin. Groups of immunized and control mice were challenged with a range of doses of viable leukemia cells, and tumor deaths were recorded for 90 days after challenge. Then, the doses of challenge cells which produced 50% tumor deaths were calculated for immunized and control mice. The logarithm of their ratio quantified the degree of protection provided by immunization. For adult C57BL/6J mice, a single immunization with MuLV-induced leukemia cells was not effective; either cells plus Bacillus Calmette-Guerin or Corynebacterium parvum, or else two immunizations with irradiated leukemia cells were needed to produce statistically significant increases in the values of the doses of challenge cells which produced 50% tumor deaths. Cross-protection was obtained by immunization with other isogenic MuLV-induced leukemias, but not by immunization with isogenic carcinogen-induced tumors or with an isogenic spontaneous leukemia. For newborn mice, a single injection of irradiated leukemia cells provided 1.3 to 1.5 logs of protection, and admixture of B. Calmette-Guerin or C. parvum increased this protection to 2.4 to 2.7 logs. Since irradiated and frozen-thawed MuLV-induced leukemia cells contained viable MuLV, leukemia cells treated with 0.5 or 1.0% formalin were tested as an alternative. A single injection of formalin-treated isogenic leukemia cells admixed with C. parvum provided between 1.7 and 2.8 logs of protection. These results demonstrate that a single vaccination of newborn animals against a highly antigenic virally induced leukemia produces strong protection against a subsequent challenge with viable leukemia cells.

  19. Distribution of the lipolysis stimulated receptor in adult and embryonic murine tissues and lethality of LSR-/- embryos at 12.5 to 14.5 days of gestation.

    PubMed

    Mesli, Samir; Javorschi, Sandrine; Bérard, Annie M; Landry, Marc; Priddle, Helen; Kivlichan, David; Smith, Andrew J H; Yen, Frances T; Bihain, Bernard E; Darmon, Michel

    2004-08-01

    The lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR) recognizes apolipoprotein B/E-containing lipoproteins in the presence of free fatty acids, and is thought to be involved in the clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). The distribution of LSR in mice was studied by Northern blots, quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. In the adult, LSR mRNA was detectable in all tissues tested except muscle and heart, and was abundant in liver, lung, intestine, kidney, ovaries and testes. During embryogenesis, LSR mRNA was detectable at 7.5 days post-coitum (E7) and increased up to E17 in parallel to prothrombin, a liver marker. In adult liver, immunofluorescence experiments showed a staining at the periphery of hepatocytes as well as in fetal liver at E12 and E15. These results are in agreement with the assumption that LSR is a plasma membrane receptor involved in the clearance of lipoproteins by liver, and suggest a possible role in steroidogenic organs, lung, intestine and kidney). To explore the role of LSR in vivo, the LSR gene was inactivated in 129/Ola ES cells by removing a gene segment containing exons 2-5, and 129/Ola-C57BL/6 mice bearing the deletion were produced. Although heterozygotes appeared normal, LSR homozygotes were not viable, with the exception of three males, while the total progeny of genotyped wild-type and heterozygote pups was 345. Mortality of the homozygote embryos was observed between days 12.5 and 15.5 of gestation, a time at which their liver was much smaller than that of their littermates, indicating that the expression of LSR is critical for liver and embryonic development.

  20. Association of dietary and serum vitamin E with bone mineral density in middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-qi; Liu, Jun; Cao, Yi; Zhu, Ying-ying; Guan, Ke; Chen, Yu-ming

    2016-01-14

    Previous studies have suggested that vitamin E (VE) may affect bone health, but the findings have been inconclusive. We examined the relationship between VE status (in both diet and serum) and bone mineral density (BMD) among Chinese adults. This community-based study included 3203 adults (2178 women and 1025 men) aged 40-75 years from Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. General and dietary intake information were collected using structured questionnaire interviews. The serum α-tocopherol (TF) level was quantified by reversed-phase HPLC. The BMD of the whole body, the lumbar spine and left hip sites (total, neck, trochanter, intertrochanter and Ward's triangle) were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. In women, the dietary intake of VE was significantly and positively associated with BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip, intertrochanter and femur neck sites after adjusting for covariates (P(trend): 0·001-0·017). Women in quartile 3 of VE intake typically had the highest BMD; the covariate-adjusted mean BMD were 2·5, 3·06, 3·41 and 3·54% higher, respectively, in quartile 3 (v. 1) at the four above-mentioned sites. Similar positive associations were observed between cholesterol-adjusted serum α-TF levels and BMD at each of the studied bone sites (P(trend): 0·001-0·022). The covariate-adjusted mean BMD were 1·24-4·83% greater in quartile 4 (v. 1) in women. However, no significant associations were seen between the VE levels (dietary or serum) and the BMD at any site in men. In conclusion, greater consumption and higher serum levels of VE are associated with greater BMD in Chinese women but not in Chinese men.

  1. Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy Improves the Prognosis of Unresectable Adult Bone and Soft-Tissue Sarcoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Jingu, Keiichi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Hasegawa, Azusa; Bessho, Hiroki; Takagi, Ryo; Morikawa, Takamichi; Tonogi, Morio; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Yamada, Shogo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) with 70.4 GyE for unresectable bone and soft-tissue sarcoma of the adult head and neck. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients (mean age, 46.2 years) were enrolled in this prospective study on C-ion RT with 70.4 GyE/16 fractions (fr) between April 2001 and February 2008. The primary end points were acute and late reactions of normal tissues, local control rate, and overall survival rate. The secondary end point was efficacy of the treatment in comparison to historical results with 57.6 or 64.0 GyE/16 fr. Results: The 3-year local control rate and overall survival rate for all patients were 91.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 81.0-100%) and 74.1% (95% CI = 57.5-90.6%), respectively. Acute reaction of Grade 3 or more was observed in only 1 patient. With regard to late reactions, visual loss was observed in 1 patient and a Grade 3 reaction of the maxillary bone was observed in 4 patients. A comparison with historical results revealed that the local control rate with 70.4 GyE was significantly higher than that with 57.6 or 64.0 GyE (3-year, 91.8% vs. 23.6%, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the overall survival with 70.4 GyE tended to be higher than that with 57.6 or 64.0 GyE (3-year, 74.1% vs. 42.9%, p = 0.09). Conclusion: C-ion RT with 70.4 GyE/16 fr for bone and soft-tissue sarcoma of the adult head and neck appears to be effective with acceptable toxicities in comparison to conventional RT and C-ion RT with lower doses.

  2. Relationships between in vivo microdamage and the remarkable regional material and strain heterogeneity of cortical bone of adult deer, elk, sheep and horse calcanei.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Sybrowsky, Christian L; Anderson, Wm Erick; Chow, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Natural loading of the calcanei of deer, elk, sheep and horses produces marked regional differences in prevalent/predominant strain modes: compression in the dorsal cortex, shear in medial-lateral cortices, and tension/shear in the plantar cortex. This consistent non-uniform strain distribution is useful for investigating mechanisms that mediate the development of the remarkable regional material variations of these bones (e.g. collagen orientation, mineralization, remodeling rates and secondary osteon morphotypes, size and population density). Regional differences in strain-mode-specific microdamage prevalence and/or morphology might evoke and sustain the remodeling that produces this material heterogeneity in accordance with local strain characteristics. Adult calcanei from 11 animals of each species (deer, elk, sheep and horses) were transversely sectioned and examined using light and confocal microscopy. With light microscopy, 20 linear microcracks were identified (deer: 10; elk: six; horse: four; sheep: none), and with confocal microscopy substantially more microdamage with typically non-linear morphology was identified (deer: 45; elk: 24; horse: 15; sheep: none). No clear regional patterns of strain-mode-specific microdamage were found in the three species with microdamage. In these species, the highest overall concentrations occurred in the plantar cortex. This might reflect increased susceptibility of microdamage in habitual tension/shear. Absence of detectable microdamage in sheep calcanei may represent the (presumably) relatively greater physical activity of deer, elk and horses. Absence of differences in microdamage prevalence/morphology between dorsal, medial and lateral cortices of these bones, and the general absence of spatial patterns of strain-mode-specific microdamage, might reflect the prior emergence of non-uniform osteon-mediated adaptations that reduce deleterious concentrations of microdamage by the adult stage of bone development.

  3. A randomized trial of hypnosis for relief of pain and anxiety in adult cancer patients undergoing bone marrow procedures.

    PubMed

    Snow, Alison; Dorfman, David; Warbet, Rachel; Cammarata, Meredith; Eisenman, Stephanie; Zilberfein, Felice; Isola, Luis; Navada, Shyamala

    2012-01-01

    Pain and anxiety are closely associated with bone marrow aspirates and biopsies. To determine whether hypnosis administered concurrently with the procedure can ameliorate these morbidities, the authors randomly assigned 80 cancer patients undergoing bone marrow aspirates and biopsies to either hypnosis or standard of care. The hypnosis intervention reduced the anxiety associated with procedure, but the difference in pain scores between the two groups was not statistically significant. The authors conclude that brief hypnosis concurrently administered reduces patient anxiety during bone marrow aspirates and biopsies but may not adequately control pain. The authors explain this latter finding as indicating that the sensory component of a patient's pain experience may be of lesser importance than the affective component. The authors describe future studies to clarify their results and address the limitations of this study. PMID:22571244

  4. The generation of C-3α epimer of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and its biological effects on bone mineral density in adult rodents.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Christina; Lavery, Paula; Agellon, Sherry; Weiler, Hope A

    2015-05-01

    The source and function of C-3α epimer of 25(OH)D (C-3 epimer) is unknown. The objectives were to (1) establish if increasing doses of vitamin D (VD) results in a proportionate dose-response in C-3 epimer; and (2) determine the biological response of bone to C-3 epimer treatment. Sprague Dawley rats (12 weeks, n = 36 female, n = 36 male) were randomized to control AIN93-M diet (1 IU VD3/g diet) or an experimental diet for 8 weeks containing VD3 at 2 or 4 IU/g diet, C-3 epimer at 0.5 or 1 IU/g diet or 25(OH)D (0.5 IU/g diet). BW and food consumption were measured weekly. Blood was sampled at week 0, 4, and 8 for assessment of VD metabolites and bone metabolism biomarkers. DXA (week 0, 4, and 8) and in vivo micro CT (μCT) (week 0 and 8) were performed in vivo plus ex vivo μCT imaging and bone biomechanics. Dietary intake and anthropometry did not differ among diet groups. The dose-response of VD generated significantly elevated C-3 epimer only in females with concentrations of 4 IU VD diet group [mean 84.6 (62.5) nmol/L] exceeding control [mean 21.4 (18.5) nmol/L, p = 0.005]. Both sexes in the 25(OH)D group did not show significant increases in C-3 epimer, whereas 0.5 and 1 IU epimer groups exceeded 100 nmol/L of C-3 epimer by 8 weeks. These data suggest C-3 epimer is endogenously generated with higher intakes of VD. Endogenous and exogenous C-3 epimer accumulates in serum without impact upon bone health outcomes in a healthy young adult model over 8 weeks.

  5. Moderate Exercise during Pregnancy in Wistar Rats Alters Bone and Body Composition of the Adult Offspring in a Sex-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Brielle V.; Blair, Hugh T.; Vickers, Mark H.; Dittmer, Keren E.; Morel, Patrick C. H.; Knight, Cameron G.; Firth, Elwyn C.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise during pregnancy may have long-lasting effects on offspring health. Musculoskeletal growth and development, metabolism, and later-life disease risk can all be impacted by the maternal environment during pregnancy. The skeleton influences glucose handling through the actions of the bone-derived hormone osteocalcin. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of moderate maternal exercise during pregnancy on the bone and body composition of the offspring in adult life, and to investigate the role of osteocalcin in these effects. Groups of pregnant Wistar rats either performed bipedal standing exercise to obtain food/water throughout gestation but not lactation, or were fed conventionally. Litters were reduced to 8/dam and pups were raised to maturity under control conditions. Whole body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and ex vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans of the right tibia were performed. At study termination blood and tissue samples were collected. Serum concentrations of fully and undercarboxylated osteocalcin were measured, and the relative expression levels of osteocalcin, insulin receptor, Forkhead box transcription factor O1, and osteotesticular protein tyrosine phosphatase mRNA were quantified. Body mass did not differ between the offspring of exercised and control dams, but the male offspring of exercised dams had a greater % fat and lower % lean than controls (p=0.001 and p=0.0008, respectively). At the mid-tibial diaphysis, offspring of exercised dams had a lower volumetric bone mineral density than controls (p=0.01) and in the male offspring of exercised dams the bone: muscle relationship was fundamentally altered. Serum concentrations of undercarboxylated osteocalcin were significantly greater in the male offspring of exercised dams than in controls (p=0.02); however, the relative expression of the measured genes did not differ between groups. These results suggest that moderate exercise during pregnancy can

  6. Moderate exercise during pregnancy in Wistar rats alters bone and body composition of the adult offspring in a sex-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Brielle V; Blair, Hugh T; Vickers, Mark H; Dittmer, Keren E; Morel, Patrick C H; Knight, Cameron G; Firth, Elwyn C

    2013-01-01

    Exercise during pregnancy may have long-lasting effects on offspring health. Musculoskeletal growth and development, metabolism, and later-life disease risk can all be impacted by the maternal environment during pregnancy. The skeleton influences glucose handling through the actions of the bone-derived hormone osteocalcin. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of moderate maternal exercise during pregnancy on the bone and body composition of the offspring in adult life, and to investigate the role of osteocalcin in these effects. Groups of pregnant Wistar rats either performed bipedal standing exercise to obtain food/water throughout gestation but not lactation, or were fed conventionally. Litters were reduced to 8/dam and pups were raised to maturity under control conditions. Whole body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and ex vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans of the right tibia were performed. At study termination blood and tissue samples were collected. Serum concentrations of fully and undercarboxylated osteocalcin were measured, and the relative expression levels of osteocalcin, insulin receptor, Forkhead box transcription factor O1, and osteotesticular protein tyrosine phosphatase mRNA were quantified. Body mass did not differ between the offspring of exercised and control dams, but the male offspring of exercised dams had a greater % fat and lower % lean than controls (p=0.001 and p=0.0008, respectively). At the mid-tibial diaphysis, offspring of exercised dams had a lower volumetric bone mineral density than controls (p=0.01) and in the male offspring of exercised dams the bone: muscle relationship was fundamentally altered. Serum concentrations of undercarboxylated osteocalcin were significantly greater in the male offspring of exercised dams than in controls (p=0.02); however, the relative expression of the measured genes did not differ between groups. These results suggest that moderate exercise during pregnancy can

  7. Lower fibroblast growth factor 23 levels in young adults with Crohn disease as a possible secondary compensatory effect on the disturbance of bone and mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Konstantinos A; Orfanidou, Timoklia I; Vlychou, Marianna K; Kapsoritakis, Andreas N; Tsezou, Aspasia; Malizos, Konstantinos N; Potamianos, Spyros P

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) is a bone-derived circulating phosphaturic factor that decreases serum concentration of phosphate and vitamin D, suggested to actively participate in a complex renal-gastrointestinal-skeletal axis. Serum FGF-23 concentrations, as well as various other laboratory parameters involved in bone homeostasis, were measured and analyzed with regard to various diseases and patients' characteristics in 44 patients with Crohn disease (CD) and 20 healthy controls (HCs) included in this cross-sectional study. Serum FGF-23 levels were significantly lower in patients with CD (900.42 ± 815.85pg/mL) compared with HC (1410.94 ± 1000.53pg/mL), p = 0.037. Further analyses suggested FGF-23 as a factor independent from various parameters including age (r = -0.218), body mass index (r = -0.115), 25-hydroxy vitamin D (r = 0.126), parathyroid hormone (r = 0.084), and bone mineral density (BMD) of hip and lumbar (r = 0.205 and r = 0.149, respectively). This observation remained even after multivariate analyses, exhibiting that BMD was not affected by FGF-23, although parameters such as age (p = 0.026), cumulative prednisolone dose (p < 0.0001), and smoking status (p = 0.024) were strong determinants of BMD regarding hip. Lower FGF-23 levels in patients with bowel inflammation are accompanied but not directly correlated with lower vitamin D levels, showing no impact on BMD determination of young adults with CD. The downregulation of serum FGF-23 levels in CD appears as a secondary compensatory effect on the bone and mineral metabolism induced by chronic intestinal inflammation.

  8. Distinct Relationships of Intramuscular and Subcutaneous Fat With Cortical Bone: Findings From a Cross-Sectional Study of Young Adult Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    Deere, K.; Sayers, A.; Viljakainen, H. T.; Lawlor, D. A.; Sattar, N.; Kemp, J. P.; Fraser, W. D.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intracellular fat within muscle and visceral tissue has been suggested to adversely influence bone development. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate associations between im fat, as reflected by muscle density as measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and cortical bone parameters in young adults. Design/Setting/Participants: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1703 males and 2243 females aged 17.8 years from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Outcome Measures: We measured cortical bone parameters from midtibial peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans. Results: Muscle density (inversely related to im fat) was inversely associated with periosteal circumference (PC) (beta = −0.07 [95% confidence interval (CI), −0.1, −0.04]), cortical bone mineral density (BMDC) (beta = −0.21 [95% CI, −0.26, −0.17]), and cortical thickness (CT) (beta = −0.37 [95% CI, −0.42, −0.33]) (males and females combined, adjusted for age, height, gender, and muscle cross-sectional area). In contrast, sc fat area was positively associated with PC (beta = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.07, 0.12]), but no association was seen with BMDC or CT. To examine the role of candidate intermediary metabolic pathways, analyses were repeated after adjustment for insulin, C-reactive protein, and β-C-telopeptides of type I collagen. Whereas similar associations were observed after adjustment for insulin and C-reactive protein, the association between muscle density and BMDC was partially attenuated by adjustment for β-C-telopeptides of type I collagen (beta = −0.14 [95% CI, −0.20, −0.08]). Conclusion: Although im and sc fat were both positively associated with cortical bone mass, the nature of these relationships differed in that im fat was predominantly associated with CT and BMDC, whereas sc fat was mainly associated with PC. These relationships were largely independent of candidate metabolic pathways, such as altered bone

  9. Does Diet-Induced Weight Loss Lead to Bone Loss in Overweight or Obese Adults? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Zibellini, Jessica; Seimon, Radhika V; Lee, Crystal M Y; Gibson, Alice A; Hsu, Michelle S H; Shapses, Sue A; Nguyen, Tuan V; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2015-12-01

    Diet-induced weight loss has been suggested to be harmful to bone health. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis (using a random-effects model) to quantify the effect of diet-induced weight loss on bone. We included 41 publications involving overweight or obese but otherwise healthy adults who followed a dietary weight-loss intervention. The primary outcomes examined were changes from baseline in total hip, lumbar spine, and total body bone mineral density (BMD), as assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Secondary outcomes were markers of bone turnover. Diet-induced weight loss was associated with significant decreases of 0.010 to 0.015 g/cm(2) in total hip BMD for interventions of 6, 12, or 24 (but not 3) months' duration (95% confidence intervals [CIs], -0.014 to -0.005, -0.021 to -0.008, and -0.024 to -0.000 g/cm(2), at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively). There was, however, no statistically significant effect of diet-induced weight loss on lumbar spine or whole-body BMD for interventions of 3 to 24 months' duration, except for a significant decrease in total body BMD (-0.011 g/cm(2); 95% CI, -0.018 to -0.003 g/cm(2)) after 6 months. Although no statistically significant changes occurred in serum concentrations of N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP), interventions of 2 or 3 months in duration (but not of 6, 12, or 24 months' duration) induced significant increases in serum concentrations of osteocalcin (0.26 nmol/L; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.39 nmol/L), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) (4.72 nmol/L; 95% CI, 2.12 to 7.30 nmol/L) or N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX) (3.70 nmol/L; 95% CI, 0.90 to 6.50 nmol/L bone collagen equivalents [BCEs]), indicating an early effect of diet-induced weight loss to promote bone breakdown. These data show that in overweight and obese individuals, a single diet-induced weight-loss intervention induces a small decrease in total hip BMD, but not lumbar spine

  10. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  11. Effective treatment of a murine model of adult T-cell leukemia using 211At-7G7/B6 and its combination with unmodified anti-Tac (daclizumab) directed toward CD25.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Meili; Garmestani, Kayhan; Talanov, Vladimir S; Plascjak, Paul S; Beck, Barbara; Goldman, Carolyn; Brechbiel, Martin W; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2006-08-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) consists of an overabundance of T cells, which express CD25. Therapeutic efficacy of astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled murine monoclonal antibody 7G7/B6 alone and in combination with daclizumab was evaluated in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice given injections of MET-1 human T-cell leukemia cells. Daclizumab and 7G7/B6 are directed toward different epitopes of CD25. Either a single dose of 12 microCi (0.444 MBq) (211)At-7G7/B6 per mouse given intravenously or receptor-saturating doses of daclizumab given at 100 microg weekly for 4 weeks intravenously inhibited tumor growth as monitored by serum levels of human beta-2 microglobulin (beta(2)mu) and by prolonged survival of leukemia-bearing mice compared with the control groups (P < .001). The combination of 2 agents enhanced the antitumor effect when compared with groups treated with 12 microCi (0.444 MBq) of (211)At-7G7/B6 (P < .05) or daclizumab alone (P < .05). The median survival duration of the PBS group was 62.6 days and 61.5 days in the radiolabeled nonspecific antibody (211)At-11F11-treated group. In contrast, 91% of mice in the combination group survived through day 94. These results that demonstrate a significantly improved therapeutic efficacy by combining (211)At-7G7/B6 with daclizumab support a clinical trial of this regimen in patients with ATL. PMID:16569769